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State of Real Estate 2020

will reeve He lost his parents at a young age, but today the ABC News reporter has nothing but optimism & gratitude

THE FIGHT OF HER LIFE

one-on-one with gretchen carlson Meet Will and Gretchen when they are honored at this year’s Greenwich International Film Festival

Key indicators, new tax laws, latest trends— what’s happening to your investment?

APRIL 2020 | $5.95

clear focus

Sally and Mike Harris travel the world photographing the people and moments that tell timeless cultural tales


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GREENWICH

contents APRIL 2020 vol. 73 | issue 4

features

departments 20 EDITOR’S LETTER

60

26 FROM THE FOUNDERS Of Siblings and Stunts

Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes with Will Reeve just after his team’s dramatic 2020 win

31 STATUS REPORT BUZZ Eugenia Zukerman on advocating for Alzheimer’s research while battling the disease; In the kitchen with Tracy Yort SHOP Fashionforward finds at Aritzia; Aesop: way more than just soap HOME Interior designer Sandra Morgan introduces her stunning new gallery. DO Slow and steady wins the race at Countdown Fitness.

47 PEOPLE & PLACES

60

73

GREENWICH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2020

STATE OF REAL ESTATE

As GIFF gears up to take Greenwich by storm for the sixth year, we caught up with two VIPs who will be in the spotlight at this year’s festival.

Our annual look at key indicators in the market—the highs, the lows, the trends and the taboos. Find out what’s impacting your investment. by chri s hodenf i eld

WILL POWER

FINDING HER VOICE

Greenwich native son Will Reeve suffered the loss of both parents at a young age. Yet instead of focusing on what was taken from him, the twenty-eight-year-old ABC News reporter has nothing but gratitude for all that he has been given—and all that he is able to give.

Gretchen Carlson’s sexual harassment story made it to both the big and small screens. We sit down with the former Fox host to talk about the movement that is changing the world for women in all industries.

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57 VOWS Rogers–Baker; Kramer–Turkle 93 HAPPENINGS Granoff Architects thirtieth anniversary; ASHA and Sally Krawcheck; Graff celebrates Romona Norton 97 CALENDAR 111 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 112 POSTSCRIPT Farewell to an old friend

DOUBLE EXPOSURE Sally and Mike Harris capture simple moments that speak volumes about the culture and lives of their subjects. We chat with them about their love of travel, people and photography.

on the c over: will reeve at his alma mater, brunswick

by ja m i e m a rsha ll

photo gr aph by kyle norton

GREENWICH MAGAZINE APRIL 2020, VOL. 73, NO. 4. GREENWICH MAGAZINE (USPS 961-500/ISSN 1072-2432) is published monthly by Moffly Media, Inc 205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to GREENWICH MAGAZINE PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607. greenwichmag.com

4

COURTESY OF ABC NEWS

b y rian n smith

Children of Fallen Patriots; Friends of Nathaniel Witherell; Bruce Museum; Impact Fairfield County; Junior League of Greenwich


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CO N FI D E NT A L LU R E . U N A S S U M I N G E L EG A N C E . 131 MEADOW ROAD, RIVERSIDE

DORON SABAG & JIM HOFFMAN l M 917.488.7186 l $26,750,000


24 ROCK RIDGE AVENUE GREENWICH

65 CL APBOARD RIDGE ROAD GREENWICH

DORON SABAG & JIM HOFFMAN l M 917.488.7186 l $14,750,000

ELLEN MOSHER l M 203.705.9680 l $6,995,000

4 OLD ROUND HILL L ANE GREENWICH

70 GURLEY ROAD STAMFORD

AMANDA MILLER l M 203.912.9233 l $9,995,000

JULIE CHURCH l M 203.561.9373 l $4,495,000

11 HIDDEN BROOK ROAD RIVERSIDE

36 BUTTERNUT HOLLOW ROAD GREENWICH

ELLEN MOSHER l M 203.705.9680 l $3,495,000

BK BATES l M 203.536.4997 l $3,395,000

FO R FI V E Y E A R S R U N N I N G , T H E # 1 R E A L E S TAT E B RO K E R AG E I N G R E E N W I C H G R E E N W I C H B R O K E R AG E

2 0 3. 8 69.070 0

R I V E R S I D E B R O K E R AG E

2 0 3.69 8 .1 2 3 4

Source: GMLS, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, total dollar volume of residential homes sold by company, Greenwich, Cos Cob, Riverside and Old Greenwich


Source: GMLS, 1/1/19-12/31/19, total units sold and total dollar volume sold by company, residential, Greenwich, Riverside, Cos Cob and Old Greenwich.

FO R FI V E Y E A R S R U N N I N G , TH E # 1 R E A L E S TATE B RO K E R AG E IN GREENWICH

23 SMITH ROAD, GREENWICH SALLY MALONEY | M 203.962.2100 | $39,500,000


The #1 Agent at the # 1 Brokerage in Greenwich

For information regarding the listings pictured please visit www.ellemosher.com

ELLEN MOSHER M 203.705.9680 EllenMosher.com emosher@houlihanlawrence.com

2 SOUND VIEW DRIVE

|

GREENWICH, CT 06830

Source: GMLS, 1.1.2019 - 12.31.2019, Total Volume of Homes Sold, Greenwich Brokerage by agent.


JOIN US ONLINE! april 2020

GREENWICHMAG.com CELEBRATING THE SCENE STEALERS OF OUR TOWN

WHAT’S ON OUR EDITORIAL DECK?

MAY

SOCIAL MEDIA SUMMIT

OUT & ABOUT

Visit our

galleries for WE CAUGHT THE LITTLE ONES HAVING A GREAT TIME OUT ON all the fun THE TOWN. CHECK OUT THIS AND ALL OF THE HAPPENINGS THAT OUR BIG PICTURE PHOTOGRAPHERS ARE CAPTURING.

We get up-close and personal with some of the hottest local social media influencers.

JUNE

INTERIOR DESIGN

Decor ideas that help turn your home into a beautiful retreat to relax, restore and reconnect.

JULY

BEST OF THE GOLD COAST & BEST OF GREENWICH Time to celebrate the best of the best on the Gold Coast and right here in Greenwich!

FOLLOW US ON:

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EVENT PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE /MELANI LUST; INSET 1: ©THASPOL - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 2: ©ARCHIVIZ - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 3: ©RAWPIXEL.COM - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

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Halstead Connecticut, LLC. Licensed in Connecticut. All information is from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal without notice. Customer should consult with its counsel regarding all closing costs, including transfer taxes. No representation is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate and all information should be confirmed by customer. All rights to content, photographs and graphics reserved to Broker.


2 Huntzinger Drive

1

Greenwich | $4,375,000 | Web#170273976 Christopher Finlay 203.969.5511

6 Raymond Street

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Old Greenwich | $3,399,000 | Web#170263936 Rob Johnson 203.979.2360

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95 Valley Road B

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Cos Cob | $2,950,000 | Web#170238347 Joann Erb 203.253.1800

1

2 233 Milbank Avenue #9 Greenwich | $1,875,000 | Web#170273977

3

4

5

6

5

Christopher Finlay 203.969.5511

41 Sundance Drive Cos Cob | $1,149,000 | Web#170271554

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Cora Lynch O’Meara 203.561.3306

27 Vineyard Lane Greenwich | $3,250,000 | Web#170276743

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Christopher Finlay 203.969.5511

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Christopher Finlay 203.969.5511

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 4 | april 2020 creative director

Amy Vischio

editorial editor

Cristin Marandino social editor

Alison Nichols Gray market editor

Megan Gagnon

Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning

International Estate and Tax Planning

founding editor 

Philanthropic Giving

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Commercial and Residential Real Estate

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Terry Christofferson, Kathryn Satterfield senior writers

Timothy Dumas, Chris Hodenfield, Jane Kendall, Bill Slocum, Riann Smith contributing writers

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Susan Bevan, Susan Moretti Bodson, Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo, Bobbi Eggers, Kim-Marie Evans, Muffy Fox, Lisa Lori, Jessica Mindich,

art senior art director

Venera Alexandrova senior art director, status report

Garvin Burke contributing art directors

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Bob Capazzo

digital media digital media manager

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renew, or change your address, please email us at subscribe@greenwichmag.com, call 1-877-467-1735, or write to GREENWICH magazine, 111 Corporate Drive, Big Sandy, TX 75755. U.S. subscription rates: $35/1 year, $57/2 years, $77/3 years; Canada and Foreign, U.S. $69/year. Prices are subject to change without notice. TO SUBSCRIBE,

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“First Republic understands our legacy and our bold aspirations. We define the goal, and they help us get there.” A M E R I C A N B A L L ET T H E AT R E

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 4 | april 2020

HOUSEHOLD | PERSONAL | DOMESTIC | BUSINESS

publisher

Trish Kirsch

PROVIDING THE BEST IN HIGHLY SKILLED PRIVATE, PERSONAL, BUSINESS AND HOUSEHOLD STAFF

publisher-at-large

Jonathan W. Moffly

sales & marketing sales management

• Personal and Executive Assistant • Estate and House Managers • Private Chefs, Chauffeurs, Butlers and Family Assistants • Housekeepers and Housemen

Karen Kelly-Micka–karen.kelly@moffly.com publisher stamford TRAVEL

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ARCHITECTS / INTERIOR DESIGN / HOME FURNISHING / ART & COLLECTIBLES

sales directors Jennifer Frank–jennifer.frank@moffly.com DOCTORS / DENTISTS / FINANCE / INSURANCE / BUSINESS CONSULTING

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CONTACT STEPHEN IN THE GREENWICH OFFICE

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business president

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Elena Moffly cofounders

John W. Moffly IV & Donna C. Moffly PUBLISHERS OF GREENWICH, FAIRFIELD LIVING, NEW CANAAN • DARIEN • ROWAYTON, WESTPORT, STAMFORD and athome magazines 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880 phone: 203-222-0600 mail@moffly.com

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ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: Lemuel Bandala 203-571-1610 or email advertise@moffly.com


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editor’s letter

APRIL 2020 / CRISTIN MARANDINO

t’s hard to believe that this month marks the sixth year that the Greenwich International Film Festival (GIFF) has taken our town by storm. I remember when it was just a concept in the very entrepreneurial minds of its founders—Wendy Stapleton, Colleen deVeer, Carina Crain and Ginger Stickel. We met over a glass of wine at l’escale, and they eagerly outlined their plans to create a festival that would bridge the gap between film and philanthropy. Just listening to them exhausted me. But to know these ladies is to know that they are not afraid of a little hard work. Their efforts paid off. In addition to celebrating talented filmmakers and nurturing the visual arts community, they also honor those who use their celebrity to call attention to matters of the human condition. This year the festival has tapped yet another group of impassioned personalities to help raise our collective awareness of a variety of causes. Our writer Riann Smith had the pleasure of sitting down with two of them. At the age of twelve, Will Reeve lost his father, Christopher, nine years after an equestrian accident rendered the Superman star quadriplegic. Then at the age of thirteen, he lost his mother, Dana, to cancer. Will’s resilience in the face of such unimaginable adversity is awe-inspiring. With an amazing support network of friends and family, Will flourished and went on to graduate from Brunswick and

greenwichmag.com

20

Middlebury College. Today the ABC News correspondent serves on the board of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation and is a vocal advocate for those with paralysis and spinal cord injuries. Meet the charming, indomitable Will Reeve in “Will Power,” page 60. In 2016, after eleven years with the Fox Network, Gretchen Carlson filed a sexual harassment lawsuit that would open the floodgates and take down Fox’s formidable leader, Roger Ailes. A movement was afoot. Bill Cosby, Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer and so many others would eventually be held accountable for their predatory behavior. And tales of the rampant misogyny at Fox would make their way to the big and small screens in Lionsgate’s Bombshell and Showtime’s The Loudest Voice. In “Finding her Voice” (page 68) Gretchen talks about life after her settlement and about continuing the battle through Lift Our Voices, an organization she cofounded to advocate for all women in every workplace and change the legislation that silences victims. We hope you enjoy GIFF’s five days of screenings, panels and parties (greenwichfilm .org for information and tickets). You’ll walk away entertained, engaged and inspired, and we know the founders would have it no other way.

WILLIAM TAUFIC

CAUSES TO CARE ABOUT I


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KING MERRITT ASSOCIATION | GREENWICH Fabulous one-floor living with a comfortable, open flow. This 4-bedroom home has a spectacular, private back yard on a level, park-like property. Features include a salt water pool, spa, gazebo and outdoor kitchen. $1,795,000 | MLS# 108836 | Listed by Stacy Young

SERENE PRIVACY | GREENWICH Set at the end of a cul-de-sac, this lovely home has a first-floor master suite, a private guest suite with separate entrance, an unfinished basement with lots of storage options, and an outdoor pool to enjoy. $2,450,000 | MLS# 108927 | Listed by The Magyar Team

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founder’s letter

APRIL 2020 / DONNA MOFFLY

“You know, I sort of feel sorry for only children. . . . They miss all this action.”

e all know that April 1 is April Fool’s Day and what comes with it. But you probably didn’t know that April 10 is National Sibling Day. What? Pretty unique to the USA since 1997, it’s a day to celebrate brothers and sisters. To celebrate? You’ve got to be … uh, fooling! From time immemorial, sisters and brothers have been entertaining themselves by deviling each other. Not bullying, mind you. Teasing. That’s different. And a rite of passage. Here are some examples: When our editor Ali Gray (nee Nichols) was seven, she awoke one morning to find that her eleven-year-old brother, Geoffrey, had drawn a design on her face with bright red lipstick. “Do you know how hard it is to get that stuff off when it’s been sitting on your skin for hours?” she recalls. “And I had to get to Old Greenwich School that morning. I think I’m still mad.” But probably not as mad as Brian Feidt was about what his sister did to him when he was a little boy: She took a picture of him going to the bathroom and taped it on their mailbox. Macie Evans created an imaginary monster named “HootieBoo” that she used to torment her little brothers, even making up a cell phone number for him. “She had her youngest brother so convinced HootieBoo was real and coming greenwichmag.com

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for him,” recalls their mother Kim-Marie, “that we have stick figure drawings he made of the terrifying HootieBoo, and she’ll likely end up paying for her brother’s future therapy.” Steve Westerberg used to point the shower head down and out, so when his brother reached in to turn on the hot and cold faucets, he’d get it right in the chops. Good clean fun, what? Muffy King Fox’s sister, Boo, had a different approach: She just quietly cut the hair off all Muffy’s Barbie dolls. And Susan Bevan recalls family vacations riding along in an eight-foot camper that sat on the back of her dad’s pickup truck. The four kids would lie on their stomachs in the area over the truck’s cab (fuhgeddaboud seatbelts!); and when they came to a tunnel or drove under a bridge, the oldest would say to the youngest, ‘Uh-oh, only twelve feet six inches, Stacey! Duck!’ “Stacey would dive her head under her pillow until we said, ‘It’s okay now, we made it!’ ” says Susan. She eventually caught on but sometimes still fell for it and popped up saying, “You guuuuuyyyz!” My two brothers were particularly creative. One of my earliest memories was of Lee, four years older, turning the sprinkler on me in Lakeview Cemetery in Cleveland while we were visiting our grandfather’s grave. Coming from church, I was in my Sunday best—from straw

VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY, GREENWICH, CT

OF SIBLINGS AND STUNTS W


239 GREENWICH AVENUE I GREENWICH I 203. 869.0124


founder’s letter hat and smocked green dress down to my Mary Janes. I was soaked but had the satisfaction of seeing him get into big trouble. Then on vacation at the Gatineau Fish and Game Club in Canada, Lee and some pals took me for a boat ride, tied me to a tree on an island, announced they were leaving me for the bears and rowed away. But Barry Merrill, the older brother of one of the gang, came to rescue me. I had a crush on him for years. Fast-forward to my teens when Mike-theyounger swung into action. Just before my boyfriend arrived, he and a friend poured a whole bottle of baby oil into my bathwater. Unwittingly, I got into the tub, and trust me, there was no way out without getting coated with the slimy stuff. I could’ve killed him. Another Mike trick, but this one was ongoing: If he didn’t like somebody I was dating, he’d wait until we came home from a movie and were having a Coke in the kitchen; then he’d show up in his pajamas and make

hash brown potatoes—deliberately chopping onions into tiny little smelly pieces and generally hanging around until the guy left. Of course, I did my share of teasing, too, and on occasion lived to regret it—twice for sure. Once when we were younger, Lee was sitting on the throne reading a comic book. To devil him, I stood at the door of the bathroom flicking the light switch on and off so he couldn’t read. He picked up the chain holding back the shower curtain and threw it at me just as I happened to click off the light. I didn’t see it coming and it shattered a lens of my glasses. My parents were out, but the au pair was smart enough to pour baby oil in my eye (what’s with this baby oil in my life?) to float the shards of glass until Dr. Thomas arrived to pick them out. A close call. Then came the evening that Mike wanted to listen to his favorite radio show—the “Lone Ranger”—and I kept turning it to Marshall’s News Ace “Zooms into Your Home.” This time

the projectile was a Sweet Potato Ocarina (like a harmonica) that he threw across the room and nailed me right in the head. About ten stitches worth. We were leaving the next day for New York to visit my maternal grandparents, and I boarded the train with a turban of gauze compliments of University Hospital. You know, I feel sort of sorry for only children—though my mother was one and turned out just fine. They miss all this action. It’s a fact that two thirds of Americans have at least one sibling, and I’m glad I have mine. Last year, I flew to Cleveland for Mike’s eightieth birthday party. It was a surprise including fifteen white-tied Spizzwinks from Yale, the new generation of his old singing group. And when I reached up to tap him on the shoulder (that’s way up, at 6’5”) and he saw me, he burst into tears, threw his arms around me and said sotto voce: “You’re always there when I need you.” Now, what could top that? G

Archi tec tur e: Ma r k P. Fi nl a y Ar chi t e c t s , A I A Ph otogr a phy: Wa r r en J a gger

HOBBS, INC.

hobbsinc.com

D I STI N CTI VE H OM E S , A D D I TI ON S & R E N OVATI ON S

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buzz STATUS REPORT

by beth c o oney fitzpatrick

FROM THE FRONTLINES FIGHTING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE WHILE BATTLING FOR A CURE

GREENWICH MAGAZINE: What were the first signs that something might be wrong. Were you forgetting things? EUGENIA ZUKERMAN: (Laughs) Well, I didn’t think I was forgetting things! But I have two fabulous daughters who kept saying to me, “I think something’s wrong. You don’t speak the same. You’re not yourself.” I found it annoying. It became clear they were angry and frustrated that I wasn’t doing anything. So I went with my younger daughter, Natalia, and I was tested and still didn’t think much of it. I didn’t mind the CAT scan, and we went for a club sandwich after. But when I got home, I just stared at the wall for a long time. I took out a pencil and paper and started to write. The writing made everything less frightening. And that’s how the [journey] began.

GM: How has music and creativity continued to play a role in your life? EZ: I just feel so lucky that music continues to give me strength and joy and inspiration. There’s a quote from Plato that I love: “Music is a moral law. It gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, gaiety and life to everything. It is the essence of order, and leads to all that is good and just and beautiful.”

GM: Is there a right thing to say if you are worried about a loved one who seems to be experiencing a cognitive decline?

I

CONTRIBUTED

EZ: I feel strongly there’s never enough attention being paid to the work the Alzheimer’s Association is doing. Its mission to help others suffering from the disease, to do research and find a cure is really important and deserving of positive media attention.

n 2017, acclaimed classical flutist EUGENIA ZUKERMAN was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, the progressive terminal illness that impairs the memory. The day of her diagnosis, the former arts correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning began to write her lyrical memoir Like Falling Through a Cloud. On April 25, Zukerman will be the guest speaker and performer at Celebrating Hope, the annual Greenwich gala that benefits the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter. We spoke with Zukerman, who lives on a small farm in upstate New York, in anticipation of her Celebrating Hope appearance. She was joined in the conversation by her husband, broadcaster Richard Novik, who helped fill in the blanks when she occasionally paused to find a word.

EZ: I think it’s really important for caregivers to understand there will be a lot of denial because there’s no cure. A diagnosis is a death sentence. But I think it’s important to find out, because there are things you can do. But it’s also really important to understand there’s going to be a tremendous amount of denial on both sides. GM: You appreciate the media’s power to inform. Is there any part of the Alzheimer’s story you feel isn’t being told?

APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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Eugenia’s memoir offers a touching, emotional and inspirational message about Alzheimer’s.


buzz Music has given me so much. I still play every day. I play at my book signings. I’m the musical director at Clarion Concerts in Columbia County [New York], and I’m still very engaged in that. GM: Is there a particular message you hope the Celebrating Hope audience will take away from spending time with you? EZ: My intention is to share my belief that even given a frightening diagnosis, there is still time to be productive and to enjoy life one day at a time. My book makes it clear that it’s possible to do these things even with this difficult diagnosis. Also, I grew up in West Hartford and went to school there. I really want to say it’s so great to be honored in Connecticut, which I still consider home. GM: You seem to be defying a stereotype that Alzheimer’s patients withdraw from life. EZ: You know, some people do find the diagnosis devastating and allow the darkness in. But here’s my intention: I want to do the best I can, while I can, to help people understand the disease. There’s no cure yet, but there’s great hope, and there are many people working on this. All I can say is that every day I wake up feeling positive. We know the Alzheimer’s Association will find a cure. We just don’t know when. It’s wonderful to go to places like this gala where I can share my positivity. EDITOR’S NOTE: Some questions

and answers were edited for brevity and clarity.

CELEBRATING HOPE

Apr.25

SAT

6:30PM

Belle Haven Club 100 Harbor Drive Greenwich

For tickets go to celebratinghope .givesmart.com or call 203-807-5845

BEHIND THE EFFORT Greenwich residents Jim and Kate Clark have been personally impacted by Alzheimer’s, which currently affects 5.8 million Americans living with the disease and millions more of their caregivers. Together, they have teamed up to serve as this year’s Celebrating Hope 2020 cochairs. We asked the Greenwich couple to reflect on why they’re involved.

“My mom died about ten years ago from Alzheimer’s and I am honored to cochair this event with my wife, not only to honor my mother but also to help raise funds for the research and eventual cure for this terrible disease, as well as for the care of those afflicted by it.” —JIM CLARK

Baking News

“When my aunt was diagnosed three years ago, I called the Alzheimer’s Association. I didn’t want to be part of this club, but it’s comforting to know there are people to talk to. It’s hard for my dad to see his mirror image—his sister—deal with this disease. It’s also a huge financial stress that takes a toll on everyone. We don’t want our children or grandchildren to go through this. The more research there is, the closer we are to ending this disease.”

Now that she’s perfected the artistry and expertise required of a master baker, TRACY YORT is going nuts by mary k ate ho gan

A

n accomplished home cook and baker with Martha Stewart-level finesse, Tracy Yort has always celebrated special occasions by creating treats for family and friends. Then her grateful friends urged her to go pro. “My love for sugar, details, flowers and friends led to the birth of Buttercream Blossoms,” she says. What sets apart her baked goods? They’re topped with buttercream, more difficult to work with than fondant but also more delicious. Each is a work of art. “I’m crazy about the details,” Tracy admits. Caterers and party planners took notice, and soon she was being hired for large events. Though she has access to a commercial kitchen, she prefers working from her Belle Haven home. One culinary endeavor led to another when this entrepreneurial mom of three got requests for another foodie obsession, her addictive spiced nuts. So she partnered with a friend to bring Pure Happinuts to market. We sat down with Tracy to get the 411 on her food biz adventures.

—KATE CLARK greenwichmag.com

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AMY AIDINIS HIRSCH INTERIOR DESIGN

amyhirsch.com

n

203 661 1266


buzz

Earliest food memory? Learning to cook and bake with my mom. She went from serving TV dinners in front of the Sonny and Cher show to becoming a true gourmet, having the good fortune of taking cooking classes in San Francisco from the best: Marcella Hazan, Jacques Pepin and James Beard. Soon we had fresh pasta drying on the backs of chairs and amazing cinnamon rolls scenting the house. My dad had become president of a Silicon Valley startup, and my mom’s initial motivation for learning to cook was to entertain at home. The timing was perfect. My mom and I cooked and baked as a team, a special bonding time with me as her sous chef. My parents winedand-dined execs at Bank of America and persuaded them to back his new venture. Favorite dessert? Key lime pie. I am a Southerner at heart. I love their warm nature, hospitality and kindness. How did you get started? Four years ago I took a leap of faith and flew to England to learn techniques from one of my Pinterest favorites, Maha Mohammed of Arty Cakes. After twenty-four hours of instruction, I returned with skills to make realistic, delicious buttercream flowers. For a friend’s birthday, I baked an angel food cake covered in buttercream hydrangeas and roses,

and she loved it so much she asked me to take on her daughter’s wedding cake. I had four months. Having no experience with stacked cakes, I took a class with wedding cake pro Erica O’ Brien to master the essentials. The nerve-wracking delivery of the three-tiered, buttercream-frosted wedding cake in peak summer heat to a Rye beach club was a test of courage. Thankfully, it was a success, and the father of the bride is still my biggest fan. From this first job, my business spread by word of mouth, and my cupcakes, cookies and cakes have become popular at parties. Most memorable project(s)… Three years ago a close friend was battling kidney cancer, and for a charity benefit in his honor, Rock Out for The Cure, I made unique rock ‘n’ roll electric guitar cookies for each guest. Other projects I’ve loved working on include cookies made to look like dogs that were wedding ring bearers as well as hand-painted tree cookies symbolic of a couple’s coming together after the passing of their first spouses. Biggest challenge… My first and only wedding cake! Another challenging but fun project was a birthday cake incorporating a friend’s favorite foods: lemon cake, French fries and potato chips. It was a big hit when guests tasted the pound-cake “fries” with red buttercream “ketchup”.

I keep these roasted nuts on my kitchen counter and send my kids off to college with them. Everyone asks for more. To keep myself from going nuts, I launched the nut line by partnering with Nicky Clifford, a friend who loves them and has the strengths I lack. The small-batch, artisanal blend contains organic rosemary from my garden that seasons the cashews, pistachios and almonds in Simply Nuts, Classic (with added dried cherries) and Cocoa Nuts (with added dark chocolate chunks). We’re working on additional flavors, but right now these are sold in The Perfect Provenance and Grayson De Vere in Greenwich and Back 40 in Old Greenwich. buttercreamblossoms .com and purehappinuts .com

How did you branch out into the nuts business? Years ago I received a roasted nuts recipe that I refined many times until it was the perfect mix of salty, sweet and savory. greenwichmag.com

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shop by megan gagnon

Beyond Basics

IN GOOD HANDS

S

Looking in at the new Aesop Greenwich (above) and from the brass basin stationed inside (below)

C

hances are you’ve already sampled Aesop, the unofficial handwash of your favorite boutique hotel, cool new restaurant or interior designer’s own guest bathroom. And while fans have responded so strongly to that luxurious formula and fragrance packaged in its signature brown apothecary-style bottle, this is more than just status soap. Like the rest of the products in the Australian skincare line, the focus for Aesop has been quality above all else, sourcing the finest ingredients to address the needs of your hair, body and face. Perfumes

top: Mandarin rind, rosemary leaf and cedar Atlas are key ingredients in the hand balm. above: the newly launched Sublime Replenishing Night Masque

are also available for those who can’t get enough of the intoxicating aromatic blends. The best way to experience Aesop is in one of its stores, and the newest Greenwich location proves that the brand considers its spaces as carefully as it does its product formulations. Inspired by Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi’s aesthetic, the shop features red marble, reclaimed timber shelves and a tea station to enhance each guest’s visit. Stop by for a cup and a demonstration, and we’re guessing you’ll leave with some Aesop for yourself. 346 Greenwich Ave.; aesop.com greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BRANDS

AESOP BRINGS ITS

AUSTRALIAN AESTHETIC TO THE AVENUE

hoppers hoping to replicate Kendall Jenner’s model off-duty look will be excited to see Aritzia has opened on Greenwich Avenue. Even if you’re not in the market for The Super Puff coat Jenner made famous on Instagram (a fashion crowd favorite for freezing weather), there are plenty of other options in store that’ll have you excited about new season staples. With a roster of twelve in-house brands, the Canadian-based boutique business that began in 1984 now has more than ninety-five locations, including five in New York alone. Its successful formula consists of a mix of on-trend pieces (outerwear has always been a standout), work-wear separates, lounge-ready essentials and easy accessories, all executed with thoughtful construction. An immersive shopping experience in modern-appointed spaces has kept customers coming back and invited newbies to discover their favorite new store. 165 Greenwich Ave.; aritzia.com


The most advanced orthopedics. The most personalized touch. At Long Ridge Medical Center in Stamford, we know what it takes to help you rebound from the aches, pains and injuries of an active lifestyle. Our team, led by Yale Medicine specialists, works together to personalize treatment plans using today’s most advanced procedures. And, as part of Greenwich Hospital, Long Ridge Medical Center reflects the care and compassion of one of the best community hospitals, with a singular focus on getting you back to the life you love. Services: Foot and Ankle Surgery; Hand and Wrist Surgery; Joint Replacement Surgery; Orthopedic Spine Surgery; Physiatry; Sports Medicine Long Ridge Medical Center 260 Long Ridge Road Stamford, CT 877-YALE-MDS Monday - Friday: 8 am - 8 pm Saturday: 8 am - noon No appointment needed after 5 pm and Saturday greenwichhospital.org/longridge

Craig Tifford, MD


home by mary k ate ho gan

THE ART OF IT ALL A MULTIFACETED APPROACH TO CREATING BEAUTIFUL SPACES FOR EVERY LIFESTYLE

S

ome say that art is the soul of decorating, and designer SANDRA MORGAN has a gallery’s worth in her arsenal. With decades of experience and close connections with many artists, Sandra recently moved uptown and opened a new studio above Simon Pearce and Greenwich Land Trust that also houses a gallery called Art Privé. “I think it’s very important and enriching to have original art as part of the setting for your life. It gives life and energy to a room in a way that furniture, rugs and lamps alone can’t,” says Sandra, who features established and emerging artists with most works priced under $10,000. Her space also houses the firm’s offices and a design workshop filled with beautiful fabrics and wallcovering samples. “There’s always a surprise whenever a new painting comes in that can inspire a color palette for a room or even a whole house.” Working closely with Sandra is senior designer Laird Morgan Tolan, her daughter who has a background in fashion. The mother-and-daughter team collaborate on projects and also work with clients individually. Recent projects include a classic colonial in Larchmont for a young family, a new Greenwich waterfront home for empty nesters, a refresh of a Manhattan townhouse, and a historic home and guest house on Nantucket. Sandra also opened an office in 2018 in Vero Beach, Florida, where she’s helped some of her Greenwich-area clients with their winter homes while also meeting new clients from other parts of the country. “It’s very relaxed down there in the way that we decorate homes. The color palette is more reflective of nature and the flora and fauna, lots of blues and greens.” 135 East Putnam Avenue, second floor, 203-629-8121; sandramorganinteriors.com

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hiltonarchitects.com

203.489.3800 

ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS


home

Decor Ideas

When we asked Sandra to share a few decorating tips, she explained that lighting, color, scale and integration are elements that top her list for a beautiful, comfortable room LAYERS OF LIGHT

HUES AND VIEWS

SIZE MATTERS

VINTAGE MEETS MODERN

Start with the right balance of recessed lights, wall sconces, and tabletop lamps to create options for the mood you want, depending on time of day or night. Remember to highlight artwork with adequate lighting to make the most of your investment. Sleek, minimal picture lights and wall washers do the trick. Circa Lighting is one of our favorite sources for a range of styles and pricing.

Color is the biggest game changer. Paint and wallpaper are transformative. Designs by Thibaut are a “go-to” for us for style and value, especially their printed sisals. Decide which colors make you happy, inspire you or soothe you. Installing a striking painting can trigger the color palette of an entire house and will give character to a room. We are happy to give in-home art consultations.

Scale is tricky for most, when decorating a large room with high ceilings or a small one with no focal point. Sectionals are the answer for generous, casual seating and are enjoying a comeback. The positive effect of an oversized painting or mirror in a small room will surprise you.

Whatever your style, try to weave in something antique to give a timeless quality to a modern room. Check out 1stdibs or Sotheby’s Home for special finds. Put a personal stamp on your home by blending modern and traditional for a “motra” look.

greenwichmag.com

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Riverside | 51 Willowmere Circle

$8,490,000

Greenwich | 65 Hunting Ridge Rd

$5,695,000

Impeccably maintained custom built home that features beautiful details & finishes throughout. Water views from every window.

Set on 6.18 private acres, ‘’Orchard Hill’’ offers an extraordinary lifestyle, less than an hour from NYC. Pool, tennis & guest cottage.

Ann Simpson | 203.940.0779

Julianne C. Ward | 203.231.1064

Greenwich | 4 Doverton Dr

$4,450,000

Old Greenwich | 23 Meadowbank Rd

$2,750,000

A private haven in Sabine Farm off Round Hill Road, this sophisticated 4 BR home is set on 2 exquisitely landscaped acres.

Sun filled & friendly steps away from the Long Island sound this updated 5 BR residence on .34 acres enjoys waterside living at its best

Jill Marchak | 203.554.6775

Alison Farn Leigh | 203.667.7832

GREENWICH | 136 East Putnam Ave.| 203-869-0500

OLD GREENWICH | 200 Sound Beach Ave. | 203-637-1713

Search all homes for sale at bhhsNEproperties.com © 2020 An independently operated member of BHH Affiliates. Equal Housing Opportunity.


do by mary k ate ho gan

HOW SLOW CAN YOU GO? H

ow often do you need to work out each week to achieve and maintain a slim, toned body? The owner of Countdown Fitness, ANEL DZAFIC, has an answer so surprising it seems too good to be true: thirty minutes. Not thirty minutes a day, but simply a half an hour once a week. In his studio above Greenwich Avenue, he takes clients through a super-efficient routine that involves high-intensity movements and weightlifting at a very slow speed for maximum effort. The

idea is to fatigue the muscles completely. “We have to create stimulus for your body to change. Challenge happens beyond your comfort zone. That’s where you’ll see results,” says Anel, who has trained professional NBA and NFL athletes and also appeared on the Today show. When clients are lifting, the average speed is ten seconds in one direction and ten seconds back; these slow-paced moves require greater effort. And just when you think you can’t handle one more rep,

greenwichmag.com

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JULIA DAGS

AT COUNTDOWN FITNESS, THE SLOWER THE BETTER


Turn What You Love Into Where You Live

Red Door House on Round Hill Road | Greenwich $14,500,000 | 7-BR, 7.2-BA | Web# CT108854

Conyers Farm Estate | Greenwich $8,595,000 | 8-BR, 7.2-BA | Web# CT108806

Spectacular New Construction | Greenwich $8,484,000 | 5-BR, 6.2-BA | Web# CT108801

Jennifer Leahy: O 203.622.4900 M 917.699.2783

Jennifer Leahy: O 203.622.4900 M 917.699.2783

Beverley Toepke: O 203.622.4900 M 203.253.1715 Alexander Glazer: O 203.622.4900 M 203.561.5898

Modern Farmhouse | Greenwich $6,250,000 | 6-BR, 6.2-BA | Web# CT108584

Beautiful Georgian Close to Town | Greenwich $3,875,000 | 6-BR, 6.2-BA | Web# CT108910

Classic Elegance | Westport $1,975,000 | 6-BR, 7.2-BA | Web# CT170267797

Mary Ann Heaven: O 203.622.4900 M 203.561.6915

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Clare Guest: O 203.622.4900 M 203.343.1071 Jennifer Ho O 203.622.4900 M 203.536.2628

Modern Elegance In-Town | Cos Cob $1,899,000 | 5-BR, 4.1-BA | Web# CT108895

Rare Opportunity in Backcountry | Greenwich $1,600,000 | 5-BR, 4.2-BA | Web# CT108906

Serenity and Convenience | Cos Cob $1,295,000 | 4-BR, 3-BA | Web# CT108449

Linda Michonski: O 203.622.4900 M 203.561.0694

Jennifer Leahy: O 203.622.4900 M 917.699.2783

Monica Webster: O 203.622.4900 M 203.952.5226

Rendering Shown

elliman.com 88 FIELD POINT ROAD, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.622.4900 © 2020 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL

PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


Anel puts you into “countdown” mode. You lift a weight or do a movement and he creates resistance, pushing against you in a counter-movement as he counts down from ten, drawing out the maximum effort at the end of each set. These personal training sessions are conducted in a sleek space above Greenwich Avenue that’s as unusual as the workout. Designed by Robert Passal, the studio features dim lighting and dark gray walls with vintage medicine balls and catcher’s masks as wall art. Each machine is custom made with black metal and leather upholstery. “I knew I wanted different, a wow when people walk in. I told him, I want it to look like the inside of a Mercedes,” he says of the design. Anel has a background in nutrition, too, and works closely with clients to develop a plan for healthy eating and recovery on their days off. He says, “You can’t outrun a bad diet.” 409 Greenwich Avenue, 203-594-6684; countdownfit.com

A LITTLE MORE ABOUT THE SPACE Good lighting matters—even at the gym. Dim lighting and black accents set a dramatic tone.

No gym smell here. Custom scents fill the air.

Sleek design. Machines are customized with matte black hardware and saddleleather seats.

Flower power. Arrangements from Winston Flowers accent the space.

BENEFITS OF THE WORKOUT • Slow lifting reduces stress on your joints, thereby decreasing the risk of injury. • Literally anyone can find thirty minutes a week to work out.

JULIA DAGS

• Muscles work harder during slow lifting, producing stronger leaner muscles. • The customized workouts fit your specific lifestyle and fitness goals. greenwichmag.com

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ARCHITECT: MARK P. FINLAY ARCHITECTS, AIA, PHOTO BY WARREN JAGGER

TISCHLER WINDOWS AND DOORS. UNCOMMON. UNCOMPROMISING.

Tischler und Sohn (USA) Ltd. Six Suburban Avenue, Stamford, CT 06901 Telephone 203/674/0600 • Telefax 203/674/0601


BE AUT IFUL BLOOMS, BE AU TI FUL LI FE

At Winston Flowers, we’re dedicated to making your home—and the lives of those that matter to you most—more beautiful. We offer award-winning floral arrangements to add special details to your everyday moments, provided by a team renowned for world-class design and unparalleled client care. • Concierge Services • In-Home Entertaining • Holiday Décor

• Weekly Floral Rotations • Green & Flowering Plant Design • Distinctive Containers

(800) 622-0722 | winstonflowers.com


people&PLACES by alison nichols gr ay

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHICHI AND ELAINE UBIÑA 1

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CHILDREN OF FALLEN PATRIOTS / Riverside Yacht Club

Education Liberation

T

8

he Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation recently hosted its eleventh annual gala at Riverside Yacht Club, raising $3 million to help military families navigate paying for college. The Distinguished Service Award was presented to Nancy and Tim Armstrong and Ellen and Rob Sweeney for their support of the organization. Mary and Dick Pace and Angela and Vincent Tortorella cochaired the event. Fallen Patriots honors the sacrifices of our fallen military heroes by ensuring the success of their children through college education. Since 2002, the organization has provided over $34 million in assistance. fallenpatriots.org »

1 Cynthia Kim, Ellen and Rob Sweeney, Nancy Armstrong, David Kim, Tim Armstrong 2 Dick Pace, Jim and Anna Farrell 3 Angie Tortorella, Lieutenant General Laura Richardson, Vincent Tortorella 4 Hillary and Ben Carter 5 Andrew and Ashley Smith 6 Caryn and RJ Jacoby 7 A Fallen Patriot recipient Cassidy LaBouff 8 Nancy and Ken Duffy APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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people CHILDREN OF FALLEN PATRIOTS Riverside Yacht Club 2

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1 Matt and Josie Amodeo, Cathy and Ross Goldstein, Wyatt and Laura Flores, Col. Jack Jacobs, John and Tracy Tien, Peter Mugno 2 Let the bidding begin 3 John Chadwick, Lieutenant General Laura Richardson, Patricia Chadwick 4 Guests with Lieutenant General Laura Richardson 5 Kim Augustine, Shep Murray, Neil Augustine 6 Brooke Dabrowski, Jim and Patty Read, Muffy and Andy Fox, Michael Dabrowski 7 Davis, Mark, Cara, MyLinh and Nora Shattan » greenwichmag.com

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35 elm street . westport serenaandlily.com


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Contact us! Breast Cancer Alliance 48 Maple Avenue Greenwich, CT 06830 P 203.861.0014 F 203.861.1940 Executive Director

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FRIENDS OF NATHANIEL WITHERELL / Greenwich Country Club 1 Larry and Rachel Simon, Jane Brody, Jed Simon 2 Wendy Day, Bea Crumbine, Christine Pascarella 3 Roberta Denning, Lindsay Ormsby, Sue Mandel 4 Margo Tusa, Carol Crapple, Leah Marmon 5 Nisha Hurst, Natalie Stein, Melissa Levin 6 David Ormsby, Jane Brody, Robert McDonald

Health Is Wealth

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he Friends of Nathaniel Witherell recently welcomed New York Times columnist Jane Brody to its annual fundraising luncheon at Greenwich Country Club. Brody delighted the crowd with her alternately witty and serious take on how to maintain a healthy, youthful brain. Proceeds from the event provide essential quality-of-life programs for residents of The Nathaniel Witherell, the short-term rehabilitation facility owned and operated by the Town of Greenwich. It is also home to 156 long-term residents and is considered one of the finest skilled nursing facilities in the region. thenathanielwitherell.org Âť

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF FRIENDS OF NATHANIEL WITHERELL

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he Bruce Museum brought Sunday Funday to a whole new level when it invited families to take over the campus one day before construction began on the New Bruce. Guests learned about the expansion plans and were encouraged to draw on the empty gallery walls and even climb into the construction trucks. The event was intended for the kids, but the parents were also seen grinning ear to ear. brucemuseum.org »

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/MARILYN ROOS

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essica and Grey met at Columbia Business School, yet they didn’t begin dating until after school ended and they reconnected at a reunion happy hour. They quickly became best friends and began a relationship. The pair dated for a little over two years before getting engaged. Jessica and Grey loved to ski and often spent time at Jessica’s family condo in Stratton. One morning after a fresh snowfall, Grey sprang out of bed at 6 a.m. and recommended a morning hike. They took the gondola to the top of the mountain, where Grey proposed. Reverend Bill Peterson and Cantor Melody Funk officiated at the ceremony on the dock at the bride’s family lake house in New Hampshire. Jessica and her father arrived via a beautiful wooden boa; and to honor both families’ Scottish roots, a bagpiper played while the wedding party walked down the aisle. A reception followed at The Barn at the Pickering House Inn. The bride, daughter of Charles and Evelyn Rogers of Greenwich, graduated from Rye Country Day School, Northwestern University and Columbia Business School. Jessica works for Mastercard in Greenwich. The groom, son of Geoffrey Baker and Kathryn Donaldson of Washington, D.C., graduated from St. Albans School, Stanford University and Columbia Business School. Grey also works for Mastercard in Greenwich. The newlyweds honeymooned in Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Italy. They call Greenwich home. »

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1 Charles and Evelyn Rogers, Grey and Jessica, Kathryn Donaldson and Geoffrey Baker with flower girls Fleur and Britton Baker 2 The ceremony 3 The wedding party 4 The wedding cake 5 Jessica dancing with her father, Charles 6 Cousins Skyler Foley, Ellory Lovering, Fleur Baker, Blake and Devlyn Upchurch, Brittin Baker, Jaylin Lovering, Camden Foley 7 The newlyweds leaving the ceremony APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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ALEXANDRA ROSE KRAMER & ADAM CRAIG TURKLE

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1 Adam and Alex 2 Exchanging vows 3 Another vision in white 4 Cammie Meade, Lindsey Yingst, Abbie Kramer, Alex, Adam, Matthew Turkle, Samantha Weisman, Jake Meiner 5 Abbie, Andy and Debbie Kramer, the bride and groom, Marcia Nackenson, Bruce and Matthew Turkle 6 Cornell University alumni greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY VICKI + ERIK PHOTOGRAPHERS

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ive from New York, it’s Alex and Adam!” (We’ll get to that later.) The pair first met through a mutual friend while studying at Cornell University. They hit it off and took their relationship through college and into the real world. But when it came time to propose four-and-a-half years later, Adam brought it back to where it all began. He proposed to Alex at their favorite spot, Sunset Park, just off of Cornell’s campus. It was a snowy March weekend, and Alex was on campus for a recruiting trip. Adam, coordinating with Alex’s sister Abbie (a current student) and work colleagues, surprised Alex with a beautiful proposal as the sun set. Rabbi Micah Greenstein, a college friend of the bride’s parents who officiated at their wedding thirty-three years earlier, officiated at the ceremony at Alex’s childhood home in Riverside. A reception followed at Riverside Yacht Club. The bride, daughter of Andy and Debbie Kramer, graduated from Greenwich High School, Cornell University and Johns Hopkins University. Alex is a digital product manager for Johnson & Johnson in Manhattan. The groom, son of Adam and Marcia Turkle of New Rochelle, graduated from New Rochelle High School and Cornell University. Adam is a page at Saturday Night Live. The Turkles honeymooned in Kruger National Park, in South Africa, and Barcelona, Spain. They live in Hoboken, New Jersey. G


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he may have called superman “dad,” but will reeve is a crusader in his own right. get to know THE RECIPIENT OF THE GREENWICH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL’S #MAKEANIMPACT AWARD, who

with grit and gratitude has propelled himself on a path that would make his parents proud

Meet Will at GIFF’s Adversity as a Catalyst for Change panel on Sunday, May 3.


It’s a rare thing when you encounter someone who effortlessly embodies their name, research and support for those with spinal cord injuries and paralysis. On Sunday, May 3, GIFF will honor Will’s work with the Reeve Foundation with its #MakeanImpact Award at the Adversity as a Catalyst for Change panel taking place at Greenwich Academy. This recognition is an outgrowth of Will’s philanthropic roots, planted deep and early in the form of community service. “Every major influence in my life—my family, Brunswick, Middlebury, Disney—has emphasized community service as part of a full and fulfilling life,” Will says. “As my mom always said, you have to give more than you take. I have been so outrageously fortunate in every facet of my life; it is only right that I try to give back where and when I can be useful.” We chatted with Will about his charitable work, his inner circle and the advice he has for young people wanting to follow in his formidable footsteps. »

COURTESY OF ABC NEWS

to the point where lines blur between word and person. It makes you wonder whether Dana and Christopher Reeve knew long before their son, Will, entered the world on June 7, 1992 what a force he would become … and what a force he would continue to be long after they left it. Losing your parents within seventeen months of each other—your father at age twelve and mother at age thirteen—is a tragedy that could break even the strongest of young people. For Will, it was an obstacle he faced with forward momentum and purpose. After attending Brunswick School and Middlebury College, Will forged a career in television journalism (you’ve probably seen his friendly face on ESPN and more recently ABC’s Good Morning America) while continuing his parents’ legacy as a board member of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. Created in 1999, four years after the equestrian accident that left Christopher quadriplegic, it funds

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this page: The Brunswick alum takes in the view from the Upper School opposite page: With GMA colleagues Michael Strahan, Robin Roberts and George Stephanopoulos


GM: Your parents, Dana and Christopher Reeve, were known not only as celebrities but as “activist leaders” in the sphere of spinal cord injuries and paralysis. What made them leaders in your eyes?

GM: You have spoken fondly about learning to ride a bike from your father, just by trusting in the directions he gave you from his wheelchair such as, “Don’t wobble the handlebars, Will! Look straight ahead!” How do you apply what he taught you to navigate life as an adult?

I try to live my life according to the values my parents instilled in me. In that way, I’m no different from anyone else. I wish I could call or visit my mom and dad to bounce ideas off of them, get advice, and everything else, but of course I can’t, so I settle for

Reporting on the Kincade Fire in Northern California last October

knowing that my parents gave me the very best head start—and foundation—that anyone could hope for, and it’s up to me to build on that. Luckily for me, I am my parents’ son, so I know that if I do nothing more than live up to their standard, I’ll be okay. Of course, I often fail at this, but we as humans fail all the time, whether our parents are around or not.

attributes that your dad did. GM: Your mother Dana received the “Mother of the Year” award from the American Cancer Society in 2005, a year before she passed away from lung cancer. What is your favorite memory of her? She loved to sing, and video footage reveals you inherited her gift in your knack for musicals.

“Knack for musicals” meaning I was in school plays in middle and high school. That’s about where it ends, unfortunately. I left my singing voice behind in adolescence. And I never had the acting ability to begin with. I can’t pick just one memory— that’s unfair to all the other memories. I remember my mom completely—the kind, compassionate, intelligent, decisive, radiant, silly, determined, courageous, bold, stunning person that she was and will always be to me.

GM: The world recently lost a hero in Kobe Bryant, not unlike the hero your father represented as Superman. If you could give one piece of advice to Kobe Bryant’s daughters as they grow up, what would it be?

Remember everything you can about the time you shared. Write down the memories, share them with others, replay them in your mind at every opportunity. Keep your father alive in yourself and in others, and seek to spend time with those who embody the same

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Make no mistake: Matthew and Al are my brother and sister. We always say, “there’s no ‘half.’” We may not have the same mother, but we were raised with the same values and have had many of the same life experiences, and we’ve had them together. They have always been integral supporters and confidants and are among the first people I turn to in any time of need—or triumph. The Puccis saved my life. Before I moved in with them after my mom died, they were already my second family. Their son Michael was already my best friend, their daughter Nicole was already my watchful extra older sister. My mom left me in their care because she knew that they—more than anyone else—would raise me in the way that she and my dad would have raised me. The Puccis are the very best and most fortunate thing to have happened to me in my life, and they are my family in every conceivable way. GM: You were Brunswick School class of ’10. What was your favorite class? Teacher? Your hardest, pull-my-hair-out class?

My favorite class was anything in the English department. In Mr. Burdett’s English class—and advisory, and hockey team, and chats in the cafeteria or in the halls—we talked a lot about “Education with a capital E,” meaning what you learn about life that isn’t found in any book or course. Brunswick gave me my Education. I learned how to be a better friend, citizen and student at Brunswick, and I’ll never be able to fully repay the debt I owe that special place for all it did for me. As for my favorite teacher, there are too many to name, but I had special bonds with Doug Burdett, Brendan Gilsenan and headmaster Tom Philip. The hardest class? Math. Any kind.

COURTESY OF ABC NEWS

I’ve had the great honor and privilege of seeing my parents through two lenses, which overlap in certain ways. I see them primarily as Mom and Dad, the people who loved me unconditionally and charted the path for my life through encouragement and by example. They taught me that giving oneself to a greater cause is a calling and a responsibility to be taken seriously. Of course, the most central cause in our lives was—and remains—spinal cord injury and paralysis. They helped establish the Reeve Foundation, the mission of which is to find cures for spinal cord injury while providing care for individuals and families impacted by paralysis. I, along with my brother, Matthew, sister, Alexandra, and a whole bunch of full-time staff and board members, have gladly tried to uphold their legacy in that arena. That’s where the lenses overlap: the world at large has seen my parents as larger than life figures representative of many of the best human qualities, and that’s a legacy I try to maintain as well. Everything I am, I am because of the way my parents raised me.

GM: How was your character shaped by your half-siblings Alexandra and Matthew and your adoptive family, the Puccis, who were your neighbors growing up in Bedford?


GM: Rumor has it you’re always the butt of the joke with your buddies. Care to share a few of them from Brunswick or Middlebury?

I definitely am the butt of the joke with my friends, which is exactly how I like it. My friends from Brunswick and Middlebury are some of the most important people in my life; and many of them have become friends with each other without my input, which makes me happier than just about anything. I keep my inner circle relatively small on purpose—so you’re not getting to hear any inside jokes, sorry!—and I cherish those relationships. I’m never happier than I am when surrounded by my closest family and friends. I try to make that happen as much as possible; if the whole group is making fun of me the whole time, bring it.

COURTESY OF THE CHRISTOPHER AND DANA REEVE FOUNDATION

GM: Let’s talk about “The Ride for Paralysis” with Brunswick alum Janne Kouri ’93 that you

pivoted to dreaming about the next best thing to playing sports professionally: talking about them. I watched ESPN constantly as a kid and decided that I wanted to be one of the anchors I idolized. Then, my parents died, and so much of my life became a day-to-day, one foot in front of the other experience that I didn’t really bother to think long term about what I wanted to be when I grew up. But, I always loved writing and storytelling, so when the opportunity came in college to intern at ABC News, I jumped at it—that’s where I fell in love with TV and fully committed myself to making a living out of doing it.

were part of and reported on for Good Morning America.

Robin Roberts and GMA have chronicled Janne’s journey for years now, since right after the accident that left him paralyzed years ago. I was honored when Robin asked me to pick up the baton, as it were, and cover the final leg of Janne’s powerwheelchair ride from California to Washington, D.C. I joined him for the final forty-ish miles—him in his power chair, me on a road bike—and my incomparable producer Brian O’Keefe helped me turn that day into a powerful story that helped celebrate Janne’s spirit of resilience and indomitability.

GM: What did you do as an intern that helped you land the job?

GM: How did you translate your love of sports and journalism into a four-year commentator gig at ESPN?

I made sure to learn as much as I possibly could during my two summers at ABC; I obsessively researched the organizational structure at the company, so I could pinpoint

Growing up, I wanted to be a professional athlete of some kind. After realizing that I didn’t have the requisite abilities, I

Surrounded by the Reeve Foundation community, Will rang the NASDAQ closing bell on November 16, 2017. APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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who exactly would be best able to guide me to where I wanted to go. It was quickly apparent that a woman named Barbara Fedida, then and now the head of ABC News’ talent department, was the person who made on-air careers. So I made sure to meet her, just to let her know I existed, and we stayed in touch. In addition to Barbara, I tried to make meaningful relationships with everyone I could at ABC; one of those relationships led to me getting a meeting with some ESPN executives. The first ESPN meeting went well enough to get me a second meeting, which led to a third, which led to complete radio silence on their end and sheer panic and despair on mine, which then turned into an on-air job offer. I didn’t have any real on-air experience, but ESPN was willing to take a chance because I had sent them every piece of writing of mine that I could find, and made sure they saw the reel I had put together while interning


Photograph by Kyle Norton

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“Look at the camera, Will!” The future TV personality (front, center) in more bashful days with brother Matthew, mother Dana, father Christopher and sister Alexandra in Williamstown, Massachusetts in 1994

at ABC. ESPN took a massive chance on me, and I’ll forever be grateful for that.

COURTESY OF WILL REEVE

GM: What advice would you give to people trying to break into TV?

Meet everyone you can. Help them in any way possible, big or small; they will help you later, but you help them first. Say “yes” to everything; it will at times be hard and frustrating and demoralizing and everything else, but grinding through the not-fun stuff is a rite of passage and it will quickly endear you to the decision makers and establish your reputation as reliable, which is probably the best trait to have in this business. Above all, be kind—there is a difference between nice and kind—be kind, be pleasant to work with and don’t engage in the inevitable office/industry gossip. If a group is talking about someone in front of you, they’re

unexpected moments than there might seem. Some that come to mind are the teleprompter going black midsentence, my earpiece cutting out right as an anchor has been cueing me up to speak, and satellite connections going out mid-interview. It’s all live, so you just have to roll with it and hope you can make a good moment out of it. At the end of the day, it’s just TV…it’s not that serious.

talking about you when you’re not there—so make sure nobody has any reason to have negative ammo against you. GM: What was your first big “get,” where you were pinching yourself thinking, “Yes, I did it!”

There was a moment early in my time at ESPN where I was guest anchoring SportsCenter and I had a second during a commercial break to look around the studio and realize, “Wow. I am living inside of my childhood dream, and I get to decide what happens next.” I was really living out the thing that I had always wanted to do, and it felt right. It was special, and I’ll never forget it.

GM: What sports figure or celebrity has blown you away during an interview?

Maybe I’m succumbing to recency bias, but I spent the day at Disney World with Patrick Mahomes the day after he won Super Bowl MVP, and I was shocked at how calm and accommodating he was. The guy was operating on basically no sleep, all adrenaline after winning the Super Bowl, being pulled in a million different directions, and he just cruised

GM: Ever had any on-air Ron Burgundy moments?

I thankfully haven’t suffered anything too embarrassing—yet— but there are more unplanned and

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through everything like it was just another day, gave us everything we needed for our GMA shoot and was exceedingly enjoyable to be around. GM: In honor of GIFF, what is your favorite movie?

I envy anybody who has one favorite movie. There are so many; it’s impossible for me to choose. But if I absolutely had to pick, I’d go with The Shawshank Redemption. The movie I’ve probably seen the most times is The Lion King; I always loved it as a kid, and now as an uncle I love getting to pass that and others down to my nieces and nephews. I’m also always quoting movie lines—usually Will Ferrell comedies—with my friends. My favorite movie in the past year has to be Little Women. To get a glimpse into Will’s dayto-day life in the news world, visit greenwichmag.com


GREENWICH I N T E R N AT I O N A L F I L M F E S T I VA L’ S 2020 COMMUNIT Y C HA NG E M A K E R

FINDING

Imagine having your mouth taped shut by a toxic patriarchy built on shaming its underlings into silence. It’s a dark reality that GRETCHEN CARLSON, GIFF’s Community Changemaker knows intimately, and one she is fighting to change

G

retchen Carlson is a winner, and not the kind of winner who lands in first place by accident. With Midwestern, grit-your-teeth dedication, Carlson was a violin prodigy who performed as a soloist with the Minnesota Orchestra at age thirteen, was high school valedictorian, graduated with honors from Stanford, studied at Oxford and was the first classical violinist to be crowned Miss America in 1989. “I feel so blessed that I had this idyllic upbringing in a small town in Minnesota where I learned all of these Protestant work ethic values, sort of put-your-nose-to-the-grindstone, and I also had wonderful examples in my family,” says the journalist, author and empowerment advocate from the Greenwich home she shares with her sports-agent husband Casey Close and two teenage children. “I had a mother who told me every single day that you can be whatever you want to be. I saw mountains in front of me and was like, ‘Well, I can get to the top of those because my mom says I can.’” At twenty-three, Carlson launched her television career as a political reporter and went on to become an award-winning correspondent at CBS before landing at the No. 1 rated cable morning news show in 2005 as cohost of Fox and Friends, where she spent seven years before hosting her own show, The Real Story. It was the kind of brand-building opportunity most television journalists only dream of. But behind

closed doors, it was a nightmare that anyone who has seen Bombshell or The Loudest Voice, both based on Carlson’s story, can only imagine. Both give a glimpse inside the Fox News machine, its sexual harassment victims and the allpowerful perpetrator it conspired to protect. In this toxic environment, Carlson had a choice: she could walk away quietly or seek justice. She did both. Putting her journalist skills to use, greenwichmag.com

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she collected taped evidence for a year prior to her dismissal, which she used to sue Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes for sexual harassment on July 6, 2016. Within two weeks, after an outside investigation was conducted and more employees came forward with stories of assault, Fox fired Ailes. On September 6, Carlson settled her case to the tune of a reported $20 million and a rare public apology. Ironically, because of the nondisclosure agreement she signed with Fox, the tallest mountain Gretchen climbed and conquered is one she is barred from discussing. “If I ever get out of my NDA, I’ll have a really big story to tell; but in the meantime I’m doing all of this work so every other woman doesn’t have to be silenced,” she says. Her work certainly hasn’t gone unnoticed. Named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World,” Carlson has become a globally recognized advocate for female empowerment, with her TED Talk on the subject garnering almost 2 million views. Her books, Getting Real and Be Fierce, are New York Times best-sellers, with proceeds from the latter going to Carlson’s Gift of Courage Fund, which supports organizations empowering women and young girls. As host and executive producer of A+E and Lifetime Network documentaries such as Breaking The Silence and an upcoming interview series with Blumhouse Television discussing topical, provocative subject matter, including #MeToo and the movement’s evolution, she is on a mission to tell the everywoman’s story. »


HER VOICE by riann smith

BRIGITTE LACOMBE

Meet Gretchen at GIFF’s Changemaker Gala at the Delamar on Thursday, April 30.

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“I’m really appreciative that GIFF is honoring me for my work, mainly on behalf of women, but men are a part of this equation as well. It shouldn’t just fall on the shoulders of women to solve these issues. We have a lot of great men in our community who are on board, so that means a lot.” “This is not just happening to Hollywood actresses. It’s the McDonald’s worker, it’s the nursing home attendant, the firefighter,” she says. “Listen, nobody was doing these projects three-and-a-half years ago. Nobody in the media, nobody in the movie world. As a journalist I can say they would’ve laughed at me if I’d pitched stories on sexual harassment. Now, look at the progress. That, in and of itself, is a victory.” Gretchen isn’t just making change on screen—she’s fighting to change legislation. In December 2019, she founded the organization Lift Our Voices with two former Fox News colleagues to end the practice of nondisclosure agreements, confidentiality provisions and forced arbitration clauses in employee contracts for issues of sexual harassment and gender discrimination. “The way the system has continued to protect predators is to silence women, handcuff and muzzle them,” she says. “No one expects to get in a work dispute, but when you do, it’s a dark day when you find out you signed an arbitration clause, which means you can’t go to court. Had my lawyers not found a way to be strategic and make my case public, we

wouldn’t be having this conversation today and there would be no movement, ostensibly.” Arbitration clauses and NDAs, Carlson says, are why so many harassment cases have been kept quiet, why women who report harassment to HR are often given a black mark and booted out with no references and no power to disclose the truth, and why 99 percent of the women who’ve reached out to her can’t work in their chosen profession ever again. “I had friends tell me after my case that the reason they left Wall Street was not because they wanted to spend more time with their kids, but because they were harassed and went into arbitration. Even I didn’t know it. The world doesn’t find out, and in many cases, the perpetrator gets to stay on the job so the system perpetuates itself in secret,” she says. “I have a bipartisan bill called the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Harassment Act in in the House and the Senate and am optimistic about that. If I can pass this, it will be a huge, huge success in this fight.” For her commitment to women’s empowerment, Carlson is being honored at the Greenwich International Film Festival Changemaker Gala on April 30 at l’escale. “I love the title of the award, Changemaker, greenwichmag.com

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because it’s pretty much what I’ve been doing for the last three-and-a-half years,” says Carlson, who looks forward to including her family in the festivities. “I travel a lot and have been receiving awards in all different places, but usually my kids can’t come. That’s important for me, for them to see not only the femaleinspired films, but to see their mom in that particular position,” she says. “I’m really appreciative that GIFF is honoring me for my work, mainly on behalf of women, but men are a part of this equation as well. It shouldn’t just fall on the shoulders of women to solve these issues. We have a lot of great men in our community who are on board, so that means a lot.” When asked to reflect on the remarkable ground-shift that has taken place since filing her case in 2016, she has to pinch herself. “I had no way of knowing how this was all going to unfold. The idea that it helped to ignite a cultural revolution is surreal, and at the same time, I have so much gratitude toward all the other women who’ve reached out to me and had to go through this and be silent,” she says. “That’s what I’m trying to fix by breaking through the barriers. I want to give a voice to G the voiceless.”

MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/BOB CAPAZZO

Gretchen speaking at the 2017 United Way Sole Sister’s luncheon at Greenwich Country Club


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by chris hodenfield

State of Real Estate

COURTESY OF TAMAR LURIE GROUP AT COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY; STEVE ROSSI/SOTHEBY’S; BRENNAN WESLEY & STEVE ROSSI/SOTHEBY’S

OUR ANNUAL LOOK AT WHO’S BUYING, WHAT’S SELLING AND HOW IT’S ALL GOING

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very year in America, about 6 million people buy a house. Of that, according to a Harvard study, 1.8 million are first-time buyers. These innocents (not so young, really, with a median age of thirty-

four) face a sometimes bewildering world of choices, not to mention the collective willpower of millions of sellers with very high hopes. Figuring out the rules in this game of four-dimensional chess is not for the unprepared. So we did what anyone dipping his or her toe in the market would do: We consulted the brokers, lawyers, swamis and soothsayers to

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»


First, after a year of often unpredictable market dynamics, there have been recent positive notes. “This January has been unseasonably busy so far,” says Alex Glazer of Douglas Elliman: “The buyers are out there and have been patient. A mostly mild [winter] has led to a willingness of people to get out and look. The one to four million dollar range has been busy, and so has the three million-plus.” “We’ve been very busy,” says Pam Pagnani of Sotheby’s International Realty. “We had fifty million dollars in contracts just in January. That’s a good January. Why? Buyers are seeing the values of a lot of homes. And last year was a fickle market—there was a lot of uncertainty. The biggest was the threat of a trade war with China and Mexico. Once that went away, corporations felt better.” Why the new pickup in the marketplace? “The mortgage rates are good” says Jen Danzi of the Tamar Lurie Group at Coldwell Banker Global Luxury. “And there’s a pent-up demand from buyers who have been waiting.” “Sellers are willing to understand the new value structure,” notes Eric Bjork of Berkshire Hathaway. “I don’t want to say capitulating, but accepting the new reality. My agents are describing it as a different level of engagement. Buyers seem more reluctant to commit, but when they see a good deal they jump on it.”

The Greenwich market covers, shall we say, a lot of bandwidth. And while housesellers still put out the welcome mat for the three groups who’ve always boosted our market—migrants from Manhattan, the international buyers and Wall Street folks flush with bonus checks—it is with the knowledge that various changes have happened. “You don’t have as many hedge fund people in the market,” notes Janet Milligan of Raveis. “There are some. Once you looked for Wall Street people to get their bonuses at the end of January and then they’d be out looking for houses, but that’s gone.”

Explanation? More firms have turned to forms of deferred compensation. Among the transitions is the desire by both downsizing Boomers and younger buyers to live close to town. “Several cultural changes have affected the market,” says Michael Cacase, a lawyer specializing in real estate. “Younger people are less inclined to buy houses. This is the first generation that saw property values come down. And when they buy, they want smaller houses. Partly it’s the maintenance issue. But smaller parcels with low maintenance tend to be closer to urban areas, which is the new preference.”

The trend of luxury condominiums offering in-town convenience and top-of-theline amenities continues due to both ends of the buying spectrum— Boomers who are downsizing as well as the younger set looking for a more urban lifestyle. greenwichmag.com

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THE MODERN COURTESY OF TAMAR LURIE GROUP AT COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY

WINDS OF CHANGE


Beautiful outdoor living spaces are essential to buyers looking for weekend retreats.

GARDINER & LARSON HOMES/HOULIHAN LAWRENCE

BIGGEST OF THE BIG The dramatic price reductions seen around town have gained some notoriety. But there were sales where the owner managed a giant profit. This happened with the sale of a fouracre waterfront mansion. The $48 million deal, brokered by Halstead, was for a heavily remodeled house that went for $17.5 million only a decade ago. The sale created enough excitement to put a number of houses in the Belle Haven enclave up for sale. “For years there was nothing on the market,” reports Tamar Lurie of Coldwell Banker Global Luxury, “and now four are for sale. Three are on the waterfront. One property across the street came on the market and it sold in fifteen minutes. The buyer was smart to pull the trigger right away.” The price was $11.25 million. “Even at that price, these are people who are clever on spending money. They’re moving money from all over the world, so they are smart. They’re still looking for a fair deal.” Up in the backcountry, there was cause for clinking champagne glasses. Four of

the town’s “big ten” sales occurred up there among the grand spreads. “The backcountry saw an increase of 40 percent in unit sales,” notes David Haffenreffer of Houlihan Lawrence, “but it was all on the back of price reductions.” “One nice trend is that the backcountry is coming back into vogue,” says Robin Kencel of Compass. “I think it’s a reflection of two things. People have discovered us as a weekend retreat. Having a little acreage and the birds singing, that’s nice. Part two, that old kneejerk phrase, ‘It’s too far from town’, is now seen differently. There’s been a change of perception. If it’s twelve minutes further out, then that’s twelve more minutes to talk with your child in the car.” Her partner at Compass, Shelly Tretter Lynch, also noted the arrival of buyers looking for a weekend escape (perhaps now deserting the frantic Hamptons traffic). She calls them “family and friends” compounds, naturally equipped with pool, tennis court, a larger home and lots of land to accommodate family and guests. » APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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“One nice trend is that the backcountry is coming back into vogue,” says Robin Kencel of Compass. “I think it’s a reflection of two things. People have discovered us as a weekend retreat. Having a little acreage and the birds singing, that’s nice. Part two, that old kneejerk phrase, ‘It’s too far from town’, is now seen differently.


late Paul Newman’s position in Westport— for half a century it was just understood in the community that you never, ever bothered Paul. It may well be that Brady would also enjoy such safety here…that is, if he has moved here.

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER With three years of inventory in some neighborhoods, it is a buyer’s market. So what’s a seller to do these days? Today’s sellers not only have to prepare the house for sale, they have to brace themselves for today’s buyer, an increasingly sophisticated form of house-hunter. For a seller who has been sitting pretty in greenwichmag.com

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their house for decades, there will be some surprises. “Today’s prospective buyer knows just as much about your house as you do,” says Jen Danzi. “They know the history of the house, they know if the mortgage has been released, if you owe back taxes. And they want all the information, the service records, who services the pool, when was the last time the flue was cleaned.” She adds: “And they’re demanding a lot more after inspection. In the past, buyers knew what they were buying and went with it, but now they want every little thing fixed and replaced. Today’s buyers are so discriminating.”

©EFETOVA - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Not every compound is going for top dollar. Perhaps the showpiece of the bargains was the seventy-five-acre estate that will always be known as “the Mel Gibson house” (even though he lammed out in 2010). “The house he sold for twenty-six million just sold for thirteen million,” notes David Haffenreffer, acknowledging that such price reductions “are helping pull value-oriented buyers into transactions.” Alas, one unfortunate side-effect of this market change is the snarky schadenfreude taken in some news reports about the price declines. (The giveaway is the word “tony.” A reference to our “tony neighborhood” means the writer is sure to take a certain, ahem, tone.) “I shake my head every time I see one of these articles,” says Jen Danzi, laughing. “It gives buyers more fuel for their fight. Even buyers from the UK have seen these articles. There was one the other day on Bloomberg, and the headline was, ‘No one buying a home in Greenwich pays sticker price.’ The annoying part of it is that almost nobody pays sticker price anywhere.” Still, the big sales happen. “The negative press has been a plus, actually,” adds Lesley McElwreath of Sotheby’s International. “The stories about pricing have piqued people’s interest. They thought Greenwich was out of their reach, and when they hear that prices have adjusted, they want to see. And as you know, we have prices that cover a very wide range.” David Haffenreffer has also seen the sarcastic articles. “Those stories never get that the size of our town is fifty-four square miles,” he says. “They never understand the diversity of our town. The outward reputation of Greenwich is a total disconnect to the experience of living here as a resident.” Speaking of residents, the other excitement in the air involves the swirling reports that quarterback Tom Brady and Gisele Bündchen have set up home here. Only none of the brokers we spoke with know for sure, or at least would not go on record confirming the rumor. It’s a situation reminiscent of the


TOP: BRENNAN WESLEY & STEVE ROSSI/SOTHEBY’S; BOTTOM: DEVIN GROODY/ COMPASS, STAGING BY GREY STONE STAGING & DESIGN

“They’re smarter and more data-driven,” amends David Haffenreffer. “And they very much value their own time.” “Everyone’s afraid of paying too much,” says Joann Erb of Halstead. “They know people who lost money. So the buyer might accept an offer, but if something scares them in the inspection process, they’ll walk. They might come back later to say they want an allowance, but sometimes the seller won’t do it. Buyers need to lose a few before they realize this might be the bottom of the market.” Into this situation has stepped a new firm called Prevu that only deals with the buyers’ side of the transaction. Figuring that a lot of consumers today prefer to shop online, they present customers the data, then step in to negotiate for them. According to Case Smith, this technology platform could save 2 percent on the realtor commissions. For sellers these days, the offerings of free advice are plentiful. The first order of business is to paint everything some variation of white, even those lovely cabinets. “It’s TV!” says Janet Milligan of Raveis. “Now everyone is renovating before going to market. I had a stager come to a house I was selling, and then I got an eighteenpage report on what I needed to do.” “You’ve got to update all the furniture and do everything to help buyers imagine themselves in that home,” says David Haffenreffer. “You’re unlocking their imagination.” Only a few years ago, sellers were replacing their tired sofas with new but admittedly budget-line furniture. Not anymore. Those substitute furnishings better be top quality. So staging is not cheap, with some people paying upwards of $30,000 for an epic job. But it does lead to quicker home sales. “And a lot of buyers want to buy furniture directly from the stager,” notes Jen.

Bright and open floor plans are a big selling point for today’s buyers. And whether sellers showcase their own furnishings or hire a home stager, the decor should be top-of-the-line but not over-the-top.

THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER What to do with the house, besides paint it white? “There’s a little more interest in contemporary, but not the stark contemporary,” APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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The modern farmhouse aesthetic is a popular architectural trend, explains Shelly Tretter Lynch. Inside, a minimalist approach featuring light wood floors and white cabinetry make a home much easier to sell.

TOP: RENDERING BY CORMAC BYRNE/ HOULIHAN LAWRENCE; BOTTOM: CASA LOMA STUDIOS/COMPASS

says Joann Erb. “People like it when you take a traditional home and give it a contemporary twist. People love open rooms with a lot of detail; they don’t like fussiness, knickknacks. Hopefully, antiques are coming back—a few pieces here and there, so the house doesn’t feel like it just came out of a catalog. They add warmth.” Observes Shelly Tretter Lynch: “Architecturally, the new builds are embracing modern farmhouse aesthetics. The main exterior elements of this style are a bright white ‘board and batten’ or shiplap siding; black exterior window trim and standing seam metal roofs. This light, minimalist style is carried into the interior with light-colored wood floors and ceiling beams, white cabinetry and a mix of white marble or lightstained wood countertops. “What is turning people off are older, heavier-feeling homes; stone, dark woods, overly ornate homes do not appeal to new buyers.” “Everyone wants black window trim,” adds Janet Milligan. “It’s OK with Tudor houses where it’s stone. But in new construction now they all have it. Everybody wants simple and flat; they don’t want extra stuff. If your kitchen is not all white it takes so much longer to sell a house. We’re photoshopping now to show what a house might look like if it were changed. We’re changing green walls to beige.” “People like an open floor plan—they like flow in a house,” amends Alex Glazer of Douglas Elliman. “In new construction, people are scaling down on formal living space. The living room, the dining room, the once-traditional large areas are now smaller, and builders are allocating that space to large family rooms.” Because buyers now do massive amounts of online research before ever showing up in town, it stands to reason that a house’s web presence be beautiful. “We’re selling luxury assets,” says Robin Kencel at Compass. “We have designers in our marketing department who come from Vogue.” Video clips have been de rigueur for

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big houses for a while but now are made for nearly everything. “We only use professionally made videos,” adds Joann Erb. “You can’t go in and shoot it with an iPhone. Because people are buying it [based]on the Internet.” Soaring drone videos are taken, not just to show landscaping but the house’s proximity to the beach and town. Many agents have noted the diminishing popularity of vast land holdings. Partly it’s a maintenance issue. “And the kids aren’t playing in the backyard,” maintains Joann Erb. “They’re going off to soccer and lacrosse, so they don’t need four acres at home to run around in.” While swimming pools are still mandatory in the upper strata of homes, it has been observed that younger buyers might be wary of pools. Robin Kencel also notes the rising trend toward saltwater pools. So what is an absolute must? “Wine cellars are extremely important,” says David Wilk of Raveis. But even bigger is the office. “Everybody’s working at home these days,” says Janet Milligan. “And a lot of people have their own companies now, I’ve noticed. So everyone looking at a house has to have two home offices.” This would serve as a hint for a seller whose house might have an extra rec room: Consider turning it into double offices.

TOP: CHRIS MEECH & DAN MILLSTEIN/SOTHEBY’S; BOTTOM: COURTESY HOULIHAN LAWRENCE

Gone are the days of a few interior photos to attract buyers. Marketing a home now requires high-quality video and photography.

ADD A DASH OF SALT

After the massive national tax cuts enacted in 2017, one tactic for recovering some of the missing revenue was what is now referred to simply as SALT (for state and local taxes). It reduces the tax deductions normally given for property taxes and state income taxes by capping deductions at $10,000. It also reduced mortgage-interest reductions. Added to this are fears of coming so-called “mansion taxes” and increased conveyance fees. A widely shared opinion is that the SALT thing has not spiced up the market. “It’s hard to quantify,” suggests Eric Bjork, “but it seems definite that it has dampened the APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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A picturesque day in Binney Park

idea of buying over renting. We still have an active rental market, by the way, but partly it’s a function of people not being able to sell their houses. “My other question about SALT is, how much money does it actually make? What does it add to the coffers?” Attorney Michael Cacase does not think it’s worrisome: “The cap on deductions on real estate taxes and interest paid on mortgages certainly had an impact, but the marketplace has adjusted. There is the question, of course, of whether this law mostly affects blue states, and was that the intention? We’ll have to see what comes out of the sausage makers from Hartford and Washington.” Mark Pruner of Berkshire Hathaway thinks that SALT probably has the deepest

“The stories about pricing have piqued people’s interest. They thought Greenwich was out of their reach, and when they hear that prices have adjusted, they want to see. And as you know, we have prices that cover a wide range.” —Lesley McElwreath greenwichmag.com

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effects on the lower end of the market. Anyway, the entire tristate region is similarly affected, says Shelly Tretter Lynch. “What differentiates Connecticut is that overall our taxes are lower than New Jersey or Westchester.”

CITY MOUSE, COUNTRY HOUSE As many as 20 percent of Greenwich buyers come from New York City. It has long been a familiar drama for refugees from Manhattan: The arrival of children suddenly makes the expense of living in New York untenable. Ivy League prices on the kindergartens will do that. For a while it seemed that Brooklyn was pulling people away. But the combination of


young people moving into town. ‘Let’s live close to town; let’s not have a big house and big yard to take care of.’” David Haffenreffer agrees, having watched the success of the new Beacon Hill II townhouses close to Town Hall. “The attractiveness of being in walking distance to Greenwich Avenue is still a constant.”

STILL THE CHOICE

JULIE BIDWELL

Strolling Sound Beach Avenue

Brooklyn’s rising prices and a rocky market all over New York City made people start eyeing Connecticut again. The one difference is that people seem to be starting families later. “What we’ve learned is that the New York buyer is staying there longer,” says David Haffenreffer, “and then coming out here with a larger family. So they’re not just looking for a three-bedroom, now it’s a four-or-five bedroom.” When they do arrive, notes Jen Danzi, they like Greenwich’s ready supply of urban amenities. “Younger buyers are looking to live closer to downtown,” she says. “They don’t even want to be in midcountry—they want to walk to downtown. That’s what has made Old Greenwich so

popular, too. It’s the closeness of a downtown and the ability to walk to a beach.” Thus the popularity of “the Golden Triangle”—that area south of the Post Road, flanked by Round Hill and North Street. Condos saw a slight drop in unit sales last year, but some believe that is owed to inventory. Certainly the rising popularity of highend condos has the city on notice. “The new condos are one of the biggest successes we’ve had this past year,” says Tamar Lurie, who backed the highluxe Modern on Field Point development. “The reason is so obvious. The same people who are selling in backcountry are looking to be closer to town in a space that is flat. We sold half of the twelve units before it was even built. This is also the direction of APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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The perceived migration to Florida is worth the attention it’s getting, says Michael Cacase. “But by the same token,” he says, “a number of industries have chosen to locate in lower Fairfield County: Vineyard Vines, Indeed, Frontier Communications, Charter Communications. We have a very educated population, and that remains attractive to employers. We also have a great school system here.” And it is still a prestigious address. When executives go to NBC’s new studios in Stamford, they may not want to hike back to the city at night. They want Greenwich. Just as Connecticut’s property taxes are the lowest in the tristate region, Greenwich’s taxes are among the lowest in the state. Its tax mill rate of 11.68 is somewhat better than, say, New Canaan’s (18.24), and noticeably better than Hartford’s (74.29). So, yes. People do leave this state for tax-free environs to the south. But one thing noted over and over is the number of “bounce backs.” Sometimes it’s for medical reasons, says Michael Cacase. “They relocate to Florida, have health issues and then they return for the caretakers. Their family is up here.” Equally important in the minds of many who have “bounced back” is the strength of enduring friendships made here. You can’t quantify friendships. But there is something about the Connecticut way of living that makes for good fellowship. Realtors hear this all the time from people desiring a weekend place, a downtown condo or maybe that sprawling compound. They want once more to be among that good G community.


Mike and Sally in required protective jumpsuits while exploring the glaciers and icebergs of Fjallsรกrlรณn Lake in Iceland


MIKE AND SALLY

are not just photographers. They are cultural archaeologists who capture the essence and soul of people and places that may otherwise go unseen. We join them on their colorful journey HARRIS

by jamie marshall

DOUBLE EXPOSURE


One of the only residents of a deserted Montana town, this four-legged friend was at first leery of the camera; but thanks to Mike’s patience, Sally was able to photograph the pair enjoying one another’s company.

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ike a lot of kids raised in the 50s, Mike Harris loved to fool around with his Kodak Brownie, a gift from his parents when he was ten. At the time, his primary model was the family’s collie mix, Donnie. He continued to take pictures throughout high school, graduating to a more sophisticated camera, a gift from his father. Eventually, college, law school, marriage, two children and a busy career as a partner in the Greenwich law firm of Ivey, Barnum and O’Mara intervened. Even though he had a darkroom in his first home, most of his pictures centered around family vacations and holidays. That all changed eleven years ago. “My brother let me use his digital camera,” Mike says. “That opened up a whole new world.” greenwichmag.com

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Mike captured Sally in a sunflower field in McHenry, Maryland.

Holding the camera in his hands stirred something in his soul. Mike heard about the Santa Fe Photography Workshops and signed up for a weeklong program in San Miguel de Allende with nature photographer Eddie Soloway. With his wife Sally’s blessing, Mike headed west. At the time, she remembers thinking, “I couldn’t imagine spending a week just doing photography. No sightseeing? No shopping? No thank you.” Nor could she have imagined what would come next. The experience exceeded his expectations. “It was the first time I got to spend all day, every day photographing and processing and sharing my work. All of sudden I was taking pride in what I was doing and getting a positive reaction,” Mike says. “I called Sally at the end of the week in tears and said, ‘This has changed my life.’” On the flight home, he promised him-

self he would devote his time and energy to pursuing his newfound passion, and, as Eddie suggested, sharing it with others. Mike told his law partners he was determined to take ten to twelve weeks a year to travel and photograph as he headed for retirement. That was in 2007. Since then Mike has made good on that promise. He has traveled throughout the world, photographing the exotic and the mundane, from the coal mines of West Virginia and gas pumps along Route 66, to the souks of Morocco and the rice paddies of Vietnam. (In 2019, he retired from the firm after fifty years.) The best part? Along the way, Sally discovered her passion for photography when she joined Mike at a workshop in Venice in the spring of 2008. She was no stranger to the photographic arts (part of her job in the alumni relations office at Ohio Wesleyan had involved APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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taking pictures of alumni events). “I had always had an Instamatic in hand growing up, taking snapshots at school and summer camp; and when I had the opportunity to go to Norway on a summer exchange program in high school, my dad offered me his Pentax, which meant learning how to use a light meter, so I took a photography class,” she recalls. “I still have those pictures from Norway. They’re not great photographs, but I loved them.” For Sally, the impetus to get serious about photography came from a desire to spend more time with her husband. At the time, she was happily employed as the assistant director of development at Greenwich Country Day School. But her job didn’t give her the flexibility she craved once Mike started roaming the globe. The Venice workshop was the first time they had traveled together as


photographers. The teacher, Eddie Soloway— with whom Mike had studied in San Miguel— took Sally under his wing. It soon became clear she was a natural. “I had to make a choice,” she says. “He had all this time to travel, and it was hard for me to take time off. I retired so I could be with him.” She never looked back. These days the two are virtually inseparable. They plan trips together, travel together and organize shows, exhibits and presentations together. They are active members in the Stamford Photography Club and are on the local speakers circuit, giving talks to the residents of Edgehill, Rotary clubs, the New Canaan Library, First Friday and various other social entities. “We both appreciate the fact we really enjoy this together. It’s a great way to spend our retirement years,” says Sally. They have studied with some of the best photographers in the business, including Santa Fe-based Nevada Wier who introduced them t o the idea of cultural photography, a concept they have embraced. “It’s less about the scenic sights and more about the people and the way they live,” says Mike. Sally recalls the first time they traveled with Wier. “We were in a tiny village in Vietnam. It had one dirt road. This woman was walking toward us and we all started to back away. Nevada said, ‘Why are you backing away? She is coming up to us to see what we want. We need to welcome her.’” It was a valuable lesson about humanity, the desire for connection and, most important, that a friendly expression and simple hand gestures can overcome almost any language barrier. “We once spent a month in Oaxaca and took Spanish lessons the whole time,” says Sally. “We forgot everything on the plane home. “We never try to sneak a photo,” Sally adds. “We approach people openly. If you are confident and respectful, you are more likely to have success.” Mike describes a recent trip to Ireland where they photographed the Irish Travelers, an ethnic minority with more than 30,000 people. The Harrises first learned about the Travellers through the Facebook page of Joseph-Philippe Bevillard, a photographer who lives in Killaloe and has been chronicling their lives since 2010. Bevillard acts as a liaison between the gypsies

Mike’s world: The juxtaposition of a broken down bus set amidst the beautiful landscape of Lone Pine, Montana • Just as he was about to end a long, hot day in search of an iconic New York City photo, Mike captured this young boy cooling off. • As Mike wandered the streets in Trinidad, Cuba, he saw an artist’s door open and caught this moment—he calls it a coincidence of turquoise. • When in Cuba, U.S. citizens are not permitted to stay in government owned hotels. Mike shot this scene one night outside his B&B in the center of Remedios, Cuba.

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Not until she and Mike bonded over politics would this Native American woman in New Mexico allow Mike to take her photograph. • Life imitating art in Cartagena, Colombia: Mike asked a waiter to recreate the mural scene.

When the skies opened up in Hoi An, Vietnam, Mike and Sally grabbed a seat under a bar’s awning, ordered beers and photographed the colorful scene.

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Every March in India there are multiple Holi festivals, a celebration where participants throw colored water or paint pigment on anyone and everyone. Sally captured these children celebrating in Kawant, India.

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Sally’s world: This young Irish Traveller posed at the door of the painted wagon that the Travellers use to roam the country. Her mother asked her to put her hands on her hips for the finishing touch. • Three siblings from the Yoder family, an Amish family in Indiana that Sally and Mike have become close with over the years • While visiting an island off the coast of Cartagena, Colombia, Sally and Mike arrived as the sun was rising and photographed the town waking up—roosters and all.

and the outside world. Recalls Mike, “We show up at this roadside trailer and this little boy runs up to us screaming, ‘Joseph!’” The boy’s father invited them inside. “It was their living room and bedroom and there were seven kids and two adults, and it was hard to see how we were going to photograph the individuals in this single room,” he says. Once they moved outside, though, the atmosphere lightened. They took pictures of the kids playing—even a young girl running from the top of one trailer to the next. They were invited to attend and photograph a mass of celebration for a child who had died the previous year. Mike felt a bit uncomfortable as he photographed the priest giving mass, but then he heard, “Hey, Mike, take our picture!” He turned around and saw a group of the dads who wanted to be included. “That is a moment that really tells a story,” Mike says. The Harris’s Irish Travellers exhibit at the YWCA last spring has been their most popular yet, with more than 150 people in attendance on opening night. It isn’t always that easy to get the shot. During a 2018 trip to Gallup, New Mexico, the couple was walking down the street with their large cameras when they came upon two women, one wearing an Obama T-shirt. “Don’t take my picture,” she said. After a few minutes of chatting, Mike pointed to her shirt and said, “You must miss him. ‘I miss him a lot,’ she replied. I said, ‘I really miss him.’ She embraced me for a couple of seconds, then backed away, punched her fist in the air and said, ‘Now you can take my picture.’” Sally pipes in. “Tell your barbershop story. It’s one of my favorites.” “We were in Clarksdale, Mississippi, and we went into a barber shop and I asked the barber if he minded if we took some photos and he said, yes, he did mind,” Mike says. “I said, ‘I’m out of here,’” adds Sally. “I wasn’t willing to sit there.” Mike meanwhile sat down and waited. After about ten minutes, the owner disappeared and came back out with a barber shirt on. “Now you can take my picture,” he said. “It’s such a great photo and I’m so jealous,” says Sally. “I just don’t have the patience that Mike has.” »


IT WAS A VALUABLE LESSON ABOUT HUMANITY, THE DESIRE FOR CONNECTION AND, MOST IMPORTANT, THAT A FRIENDLY EXPRESSION AND SIMPLE HAND GESTURES CAN OVERCOME ALMOST ANY LANGUAGE BARRIER. The Harrises do have an extremely compatible, but competitive, work ethic. Before they get to a destination, they will research it thoroughly and know what they want to do. When they arrive, they go in separate directions and rendezvous at a specific time and place. “She’ll come back and say, ‘Look what I got. Mine is better than yours,’” Mike says. “And I’ll say, ‘No, it’s not.’” And then in an aside, he adds, “It probably really is.” “Sometimes we’ll take the exact same thing and it will be different,” says Sally. “I’ll do wide angle and Mike will zoom in.” He corrects her. “It’s not that I use a zoom lens.” “Right,” adds Sally. “Mike will walk up closer to the subject.” “I always say the best zoom lens is your feet.” Patience pays off in other ways, too. The Harrises had just finished lunch at a diner in the remote town of Flaxville, Montana, when Mike spied a handsome spaniel sauntering down the street. He pointed his camera at the dog, who spooked and ran away. “He was scared,” says Mike. “So I sat down and waited.” After a few minutes, the dog started to approach, one careful step at a time. “I held the camera low and clicked, clicked, clicked, hoping he was in the frame. He then came and sat with me, facing in the same direction. He leaned against me, and I put my arm around him.” Sally took a picture of the two of them and says it’s one of her favorites. “We are both dog people. Mike likes to get down with them on the ground and play with them.” “The problem is I can’t get up,” he jokes.

Though it’s no joke. At seventy-nine he recognizes that the window for travel is precious. Post-retirement, there is a lot of ground to cover, and the lens is narrowing. “Mobility becomes important to do things now. We joke about me not being able to get up after playing with the dogs. It’s important to do the travel while we can.” The couple has already visited Cuba twice this year: in January on their own with a guide and a driver and again in March with a group led by their friend and mentor, Nevada Wier. They plan to go back to Ireland this summer to revisit the gypsies and “fill in the holes.” Sally is going to Japan to photograph during cherry blossom season (“It’s more about the people than the cherry blossoms, but it will be a beautiful time!” she says), while Mike works on the outline of their first coffee table book. When they were starting out, they relied on the professionals to help them with their itineraries, but now they do a lot of the trip planning themselves. An idea may be sparked by an event—the desire to photograph a rodeo led to a five-week road trip through the Pacific Northwest. Or a place—while traveling through Iowa, they got an unexpected opportunity to go out onto the field and photograph a Friday night football game. When planning a visit to photograph coal country in West Virginia, one of Mike’s clients arranged for them to go into a mine. “Turns out he was the chairman of the board of the largest coal manufacturer in the East.” Such serendipitous moments have played a huge role in their lives, starting as far back as greenwichmag.com

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1998. That was the year Sally and Mike, who was divorced from his first wife, met at a dinner party at a mutual friend’s house in Greenwich. Sally had lived in town after college but moved back to Ohio to take the job at Ohio Wesleyan. “I loved my job,” she says. “But eventually I dreamed about moving back to Connecticut. I stayed in touch with my friend, and I invited myself to a dinner party she was having. I knew it would be fun.” That was in February. The couple married in November. “Serendipity is out there,” says Mike. “If your eyes are open and you are observant, things are happening.” Like the time in April of 2016 when they happened to be driving on a back road in Pennsylvania Amish country near their house in western Maryland. They spotted a group of children clustered around Yoder’s Farm Stand, with its photogenic array of fresh vegetables, baked goods and flowers. The girls were wearing long dresses and traditional bonnets, the boys were in suspenders and straw hats. The couple asked if they might take a few pictures, to which the oldest boy consented. A few months later, the Harrises stopped by the farm stand again with several 8-by-10 prints in hand. So began a relationship with the Yoder family that continues to this day. The family even called Mike and Sally after the birth of their tenth, and then eleventh, child. “We were so honored to be on their call list,” Mike says. The Harrises have photographed the family on six different visits—including at their new home in Indiana. “The kids call us the G people with the big cameras.”


PHOTOGRAPHY BY: BOB CAPAZZO, KRISTIN HYNES, MELANI LUST & MARSIN MOGIELSKI

PHOTOGRAPHY

VIDEOGRAPHY

SOCIAL MEDIA

Moffly Media is one of the leading providers of professional event photography and marketing services in Fairfield County. We capture compelling, high-quality images of individuals and groups at meaningful events. With our wide range of capabilities from video to social media, Moffly will customize a marketing program that’s just right for you.

LEARN MORE! CONTACT KATHLEEN GODBOLD AT KATHLEEN.GODBOLD@MOFFLY.COM OR 203.571.1654


happenings by alison nichols gr ay

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ranoff Architects recently celebrated thirty years of award-winning design with a “block party” at the firm’s new headquarters on Railroad Avenue. Two hundred guests enjoyed cocktails, music and food trucks offering gourmet pizzas and burgers. Cheers to thirty more years! granoffarchitects.com » 1 Beth Peelle, Eric Bilhuber 2 Joe Lockridge, Jill Granoff, Tina Pray, Richard Granoff, Greg Silver 3 Bob Stepanian, Lora Mazurak 4 Nancy Coughlin, Pam Kelly 5 Seth Miller, Michelle Tesei, Amanda Miller 6 Jim Cabrera, Cristin Marandino, Jen Danzi, Richard Granoff 7 Nick Fletcher, Tommy Haendler, Gus Pappajohn 8 Paul and Amy Sethi 9 Chris Pollack, Mark Verrastro 10 Maria and Bryan Stepanian APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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ASHA / Asha by Ashley McCormick Penthouse

Life Tools & Jewels 1 Bree Hart, Kristin Stephens 2 Alex Perlin, Radhika Jones 3 Ashley McCormick with her daughter Annabel, Mayling and Katy McCormick 4 Molly King, Sallie Krawcheck 5 Becca O’Callaghan, Sophie Dick, Allie Keigher 6 Sara Mendell, Marion Holmes 7 Eliza Niblock, Nicki Rose 8 Oh so charming 9 Molly Young, Ashley McCormick, Sally King McBride 10 Amanda Wilson, Heather Kay Terry, Leila Lisiewski, Brooke Russ

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t was standing room only at the Asha by Ashley McCormick Penthouse for a very informative talk with powerhouse Sallie Krawcheck, former CFO of Citigroup and founder of Ellevest. Ellevest is a company designed by women, to help women navigate financial investments wisely. A lovely dinner party followed at Ashley’s home. ashabyadm.com and ellevest.com »

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he Graff jewelry boutique tucked within The Vault at Saks Fifth Avenue hosted an über fabulous birthday party for their friend and our December cover girl, Romona Norton. Guests were encouraged to try on jewels and sip champagne. Now this is our kind of party. graff.com G APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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1 Yuko Uchibori, Monica Nero, Yasuko Luzzi 2 Amanda Segura 3 Layla Lisiewski, Stanley Luongo 4 Alice Siess 5 Cake with diamond butterflies 6 Laura Tobias, Jocelyn Dimsey 7 Mira Muhtadie, Katie Stockton, Renuka Khera, Raquel Hudson 8 Jennifer Gerstel-Ringelstein 9 Heidi Siebens, Amy Lewis, Tiffany Costanzo 10 Jeff, Lile, Romona and Kala Norton


2020

GINGE CABRERA JAIME EISENBERG ELENI HENKEL CRISTIN MARANDINO COURTNEY MONTGOMERY MARY JO RIDDLE JEN ROSENBERG AMY ZOLIN

2020 Sponsors

Emcee

MARK TEIXEIRA FORMER MAJOR LEAGUE FIRST BASEMAN A N D C U R R E N T E S P N M L B A N A LY S T

Special Guest

PREMIER SPONSORS of Hope K AT E A N D J I M C L A R K

EUGENIA ZUKERMAN

LEADERS of Hope

R E N O W N E D F LU T I S T, A U T H O R A N D CBS MORNING NEWS CORRESPONDENT

AT R I A S E N I O R L I V I N G COURTNEY AND BRENT MONTGOMERY T H E C A B R E R A F A M I LY KIMBERLEY AND KENNY HABUL ELENI AND PETER HENKEL MERRICK KLEEMAN MARY JO AND BILL RIDDLE T H E S T A P L E T O N F A M I LY F O U N D A T I O N LEIGH AND MARK TEIXEIRA

CHAMPIONS of Hope T H E G R E E N S AT C A N N O N D A L E , T H E G R E E N S AT G R E E N W I C H A N D W I LT O N M E A D O W S

Courage and HopeAward DICK HELSTEIN DEVOTED HUSBAND AND CAREGIVER FO R H I S L AT E W I F E, S U S A N

S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 25, 2020 6 : 3 0 – 1 1 : 0 0 P. M .

SUPPORTERS of Hope E A G L E L E A S I N G CO M PA N Y LIVERAMP P OTO O S O LU T I O N S JEN AND CRAIG ROSENBERG W AT E R M A R K A T 3 0 3 0 P A R K

BELLE HAVEN CLUB 100 HARBOR DRIVE, GREENWICH S e a t e d D i n n e r, D a n c i n g t o D J A p r i l L a r k e n , Silent and Live Auctions

MEDIA SPONSOR G R E E N W I C H M A G A Z I N E , M O F F LY M E D I A

T EC H N O LO GY S P O N S O R

CO C K TA I L AT T I R E

(

The perfect time for PURPLE

)

G R E E N W I C H H O S P I TA L

NEWSPAPER SPONSOR GREENWICH SENTINEL

S I G N AT U R E C O C K TA I L S P O N S O R TITO’S HANDMADE VODKA

HELP THOSE IN NEED

Celebrating Hope

funding local programs, services and research

Fo r i n fo r m a t i o n a n d t i c ke t s celebratinghope.givesmar t .com o r 203.807.5845

HOPE FOR A WORLD WITHOUT ALZHEIMER’S

Leadership Committee

K AT E A N D J I M C L A R K

P L E A S E J O I N U S F O R T H E Eighth A N N U A L

BELIEVE IN A CURE

Event Chairs


calendar ART & ANTIQUES ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m.; Fri., until 8 p.m. AMY SIMON FINE ART, 1869 Post Rd. East, Westport, 259-1500. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.5:30 p.m., or by appointment. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free for members, $10 general admission. CANFIN GALLERY, 39 Main St., Tarrytown, NY, 914-332-4554. Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appt. Fine paintings and sculptures by established and emerging contemporary artists from all over the world.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE GREENWICH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

CAVALIER GALLERIES, 405 Greenwich Ave., 8693664. Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.6 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m., or by appt. A showcase of a select group of established and emerging artists who represent the finest in modern painting, sculpture and photography. CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING, 299 West Ave., Norwalk, 899-7999. Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m.

Greenwich International Film Festival

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt.

The sixth annual Greenwich International Film Festival (GIFF) is rolling out the red carpet. Festivities will take place Wednesday, April 29 through Sunday, May, 3. GIFF attracts an audience of celebrities, filmmakers, journalists and movie lovers. The mission of the festival is to provide filmmakers with an effective platform to showcase their work with the goal of finding financing opportunities for future projects. Additionally, GIFF harnesses the power of film to serve the greater good by highlighting important issues that relate to basic human rights, education, the environment and healthcare. Visit greenwichfilm.org to learn about all that the festival has to offer, from screenings to parties to panels and more.

DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m. -5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. The Discovery Museum’s 20,000-square-foot facility includes changing and permanent interactive exhibit galleries, a planetarium, Challenger Learning Center, an auditorium and five

( for more events visit greenwichmag.com )

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multipurpose classrooms where hands-on science classes are conducted for schools, groups and the general public. FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. FLINN GALLERY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7947. Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.5 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. GERTRUDE G. WHITE GALLERY, YWCA, 259 E. Putnam Ave., 869-6501. Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. GREENWICH ARTS COUNCIL, 299 Greenwich Ave., 862-6750. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. The Bendheim Gallery hosts major exhibitions every six weeks; visit greenwicharts .org to learn about upcoming exhibits. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 47 Strickland Rd., 869-6899. Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. J. RUSSELL JINISHIAN GALLERY, 1657 Post Rd., Fairfield, 259-8753. Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Large selection of original marine and sporting art by Christopher Blossom, Frederick Cozzens, Donald Demers, William Duffy, Carl Evers, Flick Ford, James Griffiths, Russ Kramer and many others. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun., 1-5 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. KENISE BARNES FINE ART, 1947 Palmer Ave.,


calendar appointment, Michaelflorio .com. NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-251-6100. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, Bronx River Pkwy. and Fordham Rd., 718-817-8616. Tues.-Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Wed. 1-19, The Orchid Show: Jeff Leatham’s Kaleidoscope. PELHAM ART CENTER, 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham, NY, 914-738-2525 ext. 113. Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. noon-4 p.m.

Stamford, 977-6521. Mon.Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. THOMAS J. WALSH GALLERY, Fairfield University, 1073 N. Benson Rd., Fairfield, 254-4000, ext. 2969. Tues.Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-4 p.m. UCONN STAMFORD ART GALLERY, One University Pl., Stamford, 251-8400. Mon.-Thurs. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport,

226-7070. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-2800. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Permanent collection on view. YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-0611. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs., until 8 p.m.; Sun., 1-6 p.m. Permanent collection includes African art, American decorative art, American paintings and sculpture, ancient art, Asian art, coins and medals, and modern and contemporary art.

ROWAYTON ARTS CENTER, 145 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 866-2744. Tues.-Sat., noon5 p.m.; Sun., 1-4 p.m. Girl in the Red Dress by Ammi Phillips

Greenwich Decorative Arts Society Join the Greenwich Decorative Arts Society on Monday, April 6, at 1:15 p.m. at the Bruce Museum, for a lecture by Jason Busch, Director of the American Folk Art Museum in New York City. Admission for non-members is $25. Space is limited. For reservations visit greenwichdecorativearts.com.

Larchmont, NY, 914-8348077. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.5:30 p.m., or by appt. Visit kbfa.com for show information. LOCKWOOD-MATHEWS MANSION MUSEUM, 295 West Ave., Norwalk, 838-9799. Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. Visit lockwoodmathewsmansion .com for program information. LOFT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION, 575 Pacific St., Stamford, 247-2027 or loftartists.com. Gallery open Saturdays and Sundays 1-4:30 p.m.

MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Daily, 10 a.m.5 p.m. The Maritime Aquarium inspires visitors to appreciate and protect the Long Island Sound ecosystem and the global environment through living exhibits, marine science and environmental education. MICHAEL FLORIO GALLERY, 135 Mason Street, 858-5743. Specializing in established and emerging contemporary artists, marine art and curiosities. Open most days by chance or by

SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY, 382 Greenwich Ave., 4226500 or 325-1924. Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The gallery is committed to exhibiting the work of emerging to mid-career artists, as well as a variety of strong secondary market works. SILVERMINE ARTS CENTER, 1037 Silvermine Rd., New Canaan, 966-9700. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. SM HOME GALLERY, 135 E. Putnam Ave., 2nd flr Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m. -5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m. -5 p.m. or by appointment. Featuring award-winning regional and national contemporary artists. Visit sandramorganinteriors.com for exhibit information. STAMFORD ART ASSOCIATION, 39 Franklin St., Stamford, 325-1139. Thurs.-Fri., 11 a.m.3 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-3 p.m. 21st Annual Vivian & Stanley Reed Marine Show coming in June. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd.,

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Alzheimer’s Association On Saturday, April 25 the Alzheimer’s Association CT Chapter will host its eighth annual Celebrating Hope benefit at the Belle Haven Club from 6:30 to 11 p.m. Mark Teixeira, former major league first baseman and current MLB analyst, will serve as the event’s emcee. The evening will honor Eugenia Zukerman, renowned flutist, author and CBS Morning News correspondent, who is battling Alzheimer’s Disease. Dick Helstein of Darien will be presented with the Courage & Hope Award. The event will also feature silent and live auctions, a seated dinner and dancing to DJ April Larken. Guests are encouraged to wear a touch of purple—the Alzheimer’s Association’s signature color. Tickets and information are available online at celebratinghope.givesmart.com or by phone 860-807-5845. »


Follow the yellow brick road to... Central Middle School

April 25th Two shows: 11am & 2pm

Purchase Tickets at:

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calendar RIDGEFIELD THEATER BARN, 37 Halpin Ln., Ridgefield, 431-9850. Fri. 17 and 18, Piano Bar… N, 8 p.m. SHUBERT THEATER, 247 College St., New Haven, 562-5666. Visit shubert.com for dates and show times.

STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. Visit stamfordcenterforthearts .org for more shows, dates and times. WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. Tues. 14May 2, Next to Normal.

American Red Cross Enjoy a high-flying evening, while raising money for a great cause and dancing the night away in a glammed up airplane hangar. The annual Red Cross Red & White Ball will be held on Saturday, April 25 at 6 p.m. in the NetJets Hangar at Westchester County Airport. For more information visit redcross.org

CONCERTS, FILM & THEATER ARENA AT HARBOR YARD, 600 Main St., Bridgeport, 345-2300. Visit websterbankarena.com for shows and times. AVON THEATRE FILM CENTER, 272 Bedford St., Stamford, 661-0321. Visit avontheatre.org for special events and guests speakers. THE CHAMBER PLAYERS OF THE GREENWICH SYMPHONY, Sun. 26, Round Hill Community Church, 395 Round Hill Rd., 4 p.m.; Mon. 27, Greenwich Arts Council, 299 Greenwich Ave., 7:30 p.m., 622-6611. Adult tickets $40; student tickets $10. Visit

greenwichsymphony.org for special performances. CURTAIN CALL, The Sterling Farms Theatre Complex, 1349 Newfield Ave., Stamford, 329-8207. Thurs. 2-25, Nunsense. Visit curtaincallinc .com for more information. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Fri. 24-May 17, Matilda. Visit dtcab.com for show times. EDGERTON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, Sacred Heart University, 5151 Park Ave., Fairfield, 371-7908. FAIRFIELD THEATRE COMPANY, on StageOne, 70 Sanford St., Fairfield, 2591036. Visit fairfieldtheatre.org for dates, shows and times. GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 6 Main St.,

East Haddam, 860-8738668. Fri. 17-June 28, South Pacific. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. Friends Friday Films: No Friends Friday Films until after the renovation is complete. JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 64 Manville Rd., Pleasantville, NY, 914-7737663. Visit burnsfilmcenter .org. for titles and times. LONG WHARF THEATRE, 222 Sargent Dr., New Haven, 787-4282. For show information on the 2020 season or to purchase tickets visit longwharf.com. RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-9269. For shows and times visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org.

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Greenwich United Way Join the Greenwich United Way for the fifteenth annual Sole Sisters luncheon on Tuesday, April 21 at Greenwich Country Club. The fundraising event will feature shopping and a conversation with best-selling author Candace Bushnell led by Lifetime Sole Sister and founder of The Perfect Provenance, Lisa Lori. Boutique opens at 9:30 a.m., luncheon begins at noon. For tickets visit greenwichunitedway.org. »


Support Open Doors Thursday, April 30, 2020 6:00pm – 9:00pm Hosted by Scott Pelley, Correspondent, 60 Minutes

Woodway Country Club 540 Hoyt Street Darien, CT 06820 Fabulous Live and Silent Auction Cocktails and Dinner

&

Au ct i o n

Seating is limited; kindly RSVP events@opendoorshelter.org by April 12, 2020 Participate in our auction at www.opendoorsct.givesmart.com

2020

Honoring Al Carey,

Recently retired CEO of PepsiCo North America Current Chairman of the Board of Unifi, Inc.

opendoorshelter.org • 203-866-1057 4 Merritt Street, Norwalk, CT 06854

A family-friendly classic with a spectacular cast! presents

Introducing

COPPÉLIA A charming peasant love story set against the magic of Dr. Coppelius’ toy shop. “An enjoyable and down-to-earth version of the classic.” – The New York Times

Carla Hernandez as Swanhilda

Meet the principal dancers in the lobby following the performance

Jose Carlos Losada as Franz

Saturday, May 23 - 2:00pm The Palace – 61 Atlantic Street, Stamford

Tickets on sale now! Visit www.palacestamford.org APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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Raeman Kilfoil as Dr. Coppelius


calendar AUX DÉLICES, 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540, ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods.com for menu listings and class dates; all classes 7-9:30 p.m. BOWMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC NIGHT, NE of Milbank/East Elm St. rotary on the grounds of Julian Curtiss School, 869-6786, ext. 338. Wed. 1 and 15, Observatory open to the public free of charge, 8-10 p.m., weather permitting. Sponsored by the Astronomical Society of Greenwich. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. The museum offers docentled tours, family gallery tours and toddler tours; visit brucemuseum.org for details.

Blood Pressure Screenings, Drop-In Computer Lab, Chess Club, Volunteer Tax Assistance, Foreign Affairs Book Discussion Group; for dates and times visit greenwichlibrary.org.

OTHER EVENTS & BENEFITS

KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, 26 Bedford Rd., Chappaqua, NY, 914-2329555. Guided tours are Tuesday through Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

BREAST CANCER ALLIANCE, GlenArbor Golf Club, 234 Bedford Center Road, Thurs. 2, Charity Poker Tournament, enjoy cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and spectacular prizes, 6 p.m.

STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday night Observatory Visitors’ Night, 8:30 p.m.

CONNECTICUT AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE LUNCHEON, Greenwich Hyatt, Tues. 28, Fundraising luncheon to benefit (CAGV), 11:30 a.m. For more information visit cagv.org.

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Clay Art Center’s mission is to offer a stimulating space for studio practice, exhibition and educational opportunities to better serve the community.

Focus on French Cinema Focus on French Cinema 2020, the annual festival of newly released French films from around the world will celebrate its sixteenth annual festival on Friday, April 24 through Tuesday, April 28. Presented by the Alliance Française of Greenwich, FFC2020 will welcome world famous French actor, Guillaume Canet. An opening night party will be held on Friday, April 24 at the Delamar Hotel followed by a U.S. premiere film. focusonfrenchcinema.com

LECTURES, TOURS & WORKSHOPS ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. noon-5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m.

Fri. 3, First Fridays: A Contemporary Cocktail Party with live music, 7-9 p.m.; visit aldrichart.org for more information. AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 5, First Sunday Bird Walk at Greenwich Point, 9-11 a.m.

CONNECTICUT CERAMICS STUDY CIRCLE, The Bruce Museum, Mon. 13, Prodigious Fine Old Japan: The Macdonald Collection of Japanese and JapaneseInspired Porcelain at the Gardiner Museum, Toronto, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. For reservations and information visit ctcsc.org. FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat.Sun., noon-4 p.m. Visit fairfieldhistory.org for tours. GARDEN EDUCATION CENTER, 130 Bible St., 869-9242 or gecgreenwich .org. Pruning class, plant doctor series, fruit tree grafting and more. Visit website for classes, dates and times. Preregistration required online. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. The library offers a variety of programs:

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Rotary Club On Thursday, May 7, Moffly Media president, Jonathan Moffly will be recognized as the Rotary Citizen of the Year at the Round Hill Club. For twenty-four years the Rotary Club and Foundation of Greenwich has been celebrating individuals and organizations for their dedication and volunteer commitment to the community. For more information visit greenwichrotary.org »


Spring clean your closet and help save a life

Thursday, May 7 • Belle Haven Club • 11:00 am Donate a new or gently used designer bag to the Old Bags Auction and help raise funds for YWCA Greenwich Domestic Abuse Services.

Join the fight against domestic violence. For luncheon tickets or to donate a bag, call Jackie Stam at 203-869-6501 ext 102 or go to ywcagrn.org/bags Old Bags Luncheon is a trademark of Little Blackbird, Inc.

259 East Putnam Avenue Greenwich, CT 06830


Save Lives.

Build Healthier Futures. Americares saves lives and improves health for people affected by poverty or disaster so they can reach their full potential. Learn more about our work at americares.org @americares

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6TH ANNUAL

RESTAURANT WEEK

Special Thanks

to all of our Restaurants and Corporate & Media Sponsors for making this year’s 6th Annual Greenwich Restaurant Week Opening Night Party a tremendous success!

PHOTOGRAPHS BY: BOB CAPAZZO & KRISTIN BURKE HYNES


calendar

This year’s Landmarks Recognition Program honors the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment and the brave women who made it possible. Four Greenwich structures owned by, designed for or dedicated to trailblazing women will receive plaques in recognition of their design excellence and value in preserving Greenwich’s unique architectural heritage. This stately fieldstone home, in which the late Mary Tyler Moore lived with her husband, Dr. S. Robert Levine, up until her death in 2017, is among the four structures to be recognized. A reception will be held on Sunday, April 26 at 4 p.m. at Greenwich Country Club. For more information visit greenwichhistory.org.»

Mary Tyler Moore’s home, designed by Stephen Wang

For more than 25 years, CT Against Gun Violence has led the way to keep Connecticut safe from gun violence.

© 2019 Jonathan Perloe

It’s working. Connecticut has the fifth lowest rate of gun deaths in the nation. For the seventh year running, Connecticut has been graded "A-" by the Giffords Law Center, placing us third among all 50 states on the strength of our gun laws. #StrongGunLawsSaveLives

Learn how you can support our mission at cagv.org/savelives

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DION PHOTOGRAPHY PTY LTD

Greenwich Historical Society


Friday, May 1, 2020 - 6:30 PM - RIVER HOUSE HONORARY CHAIRS LESLIE & JOHN COOPER COCKTAILS - SEATED DINNER - LIVE AUCTION MENTALIST - MUSIC - CARICATURIST Space is limited

All proceeds will directly support River House families. THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

Rosé on the River Committee KATHLEEN BURGWEGER * KAREN GRUND * LEAH MARMON * JOANN MCCARTHY JANICE RICHARDS * KAREN ROYCE * KYLE SILVER * NANCY THODE * ALLISON WOLOWITZ

125 River Road Extension - Cos Cob, CT - 203.622.0079 - theRiverHouse.org events@theriverhouse.org


calendar K I D S ’ S T U F F / APRIL ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-4519. Tues.-Sun. noon-5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. Sat. 18, Family Art Experiences, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 5, bundle up for the first Sunday bird walk, Tod’s Point, 9 a.m.

2020

Challenger Learning Center, an auditorium and five multipurpose classrooms where hands-on science classes are conducted for schools, groups and the general public. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Sat. 11-May 17, Wizard of Oz.

Danny Miller

Greenwich Symphony Orchestra On Saturday, April 18 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 19 at 4 p.m., Greenwich Symphony Orchestra will present the final concert of the 2019-20 season with Greenwich native Danny Miller as principal soloist. The concerts will be held at the Performing Arts Center at Greenwich High School. A free preconcert lecture will take place one hour before each performance. Adult tickets are $40, students $10. Call 203-869-2664 or visit greenwichsymphony.org for more information.

GREENWICH BOAT SHOW, Sat. 4 and 5, The show will be held on the Mianus River in Cos Cob. Boaters are invited to walk the docks and go out on the open waters of Long Island Sound. The show features boats by Chris Craft, Tiara, Hinckley, Back Cove, Southport Boats and Hunt Yachts, Edgewater, Scout, Grady White, Pursuit, Boston Whaler, Regulator, World Cat, Sea Fox, Sea Ray, Monterey, Carolina Cat, Chaparral, Regal and pontoon brands. greenwichboatshow.com, rain or shine. PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND, As of now, PPSNE will hold its annual benefit luncheon at the Stamford Marriott (234 Tresser Blvd.)

on Tuesday 7, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. But as we go to press, there is discussion that this event may be postponed until September because of the Coronavirus. So do check the website. Keynote speaker will be Brittany Packnett Cunningham, whom Obama singled out as a voice that’s “going to be making a difference for years to come.” The Community Impact Award will go to Kay Maxwell, PPSNE past board chair. Cochairing the event are Danielle Eason, Katey Goldberg, Anne Goodnow, Donna Moffly, Sheila Mossman and Brice Russian. To register or make a contribution online go to ppsne.org/springluncheon or contact Laurie Diorio at laurie.diorio@ppsne.org or 203-752-2813.

AUX DÉLICES, 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540 ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods.com for menu listings and class dates. BEARDSLEY ZOO, 1875 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 394-6565. open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. One of Connecticut’s top family attractions. See more than 300 animals representing North and South American species and learn about their endangered and threatened species, which include the Amur (Siberian) tiger, Andean condor, Ocelot, Red wolf, Maned wolf, Giant Anteater and Golden lion tamarin. Then grab a bite at the Peacock Café and take a ride on the carousel. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF GREENWICH, 4 Horseneck Lane, 869-3224. Visit bgcg.org for upcoming events and programs at the club. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Visit brucemueum.org for updated classes and exhibits and for after-school vacation workshops. Sun. 5, First Sunday Science at the Seaside Center, 1:30-4 p.m. DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m. -5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. The museum’s 20,000-square-foot facility includes changing and permanent interactive exhibit galleries, a planetarium,

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EARTHPLACE, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, 227-7253. The mission of Earthplace is to build a passion within the community for nature and the environment through education, experience and action, earthplace.org. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland St., 869-6899. April vacation workshops, visit hstg.org for more details. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. The library offers many programs for children: Wee Ones, Tales for Tots, Baby Lapsit, Mother Goose Story Time, call or visit greenwichlibrary.org for dates and times. IMAX THEATER AT MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. For special documentaries and Hollywood films on IMAX, check website for films and times, maritimeaquarium.org. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun. 1-5 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays for Tots, 1 p.m; Picture This! Saturday Story Time, select Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Daily 10 a.m.5 p.m. The Maritime Aquarium inspires visitors to appreciate and protect the Long Island Sound ecosystem and the global

environment through living exhibits, marine science, and environmental education. NEW CANAAN NATURE CENTER, 144 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 966-9577. Visit newcanaannature.org to learn about monthly Friday Family Fun Night. RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-5795. Splash’n Boots coming in May, 1 p.m. Visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org for more show information. STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. Sun. 5, The Tanglewood Marionettes, 3 p.m. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521 or stamfordmuseum.org. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 13, 14, 20, Forest Easter Egg Adventures, 11:30 a.m.- 4 p.m.; for ongoing programs visit stamfordmuseum.org STEPPING STONES MUSEUM FOR CHILDREN, 303 West Ave., Mathews Park, Norwalk, 899-0606. Daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Ongoing exhibits: Energy Lab, Tot Town, build it!, stateof-the-art Multimedia Gallery and Light Gallery; Ongoing events: science lab, community gardens; Rainforest Adventures and Color Coaster; visit steppingstonesmuseum.org for daily classes and times. WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 222-7070. Visit westportartscenter.org to sign up for workshops and summer camps. WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. No kids shows as of press time. G


advertisers index ART & ANTIQUES

Drew Klotz Kinetic Sculpture . . . . . . . 16

BUILDING & HOME IMPROVEMENT

Austin Patterson Disston Architects . . . . . . . . . . . 55 California Closets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Davenport Contracting . . . . . . . . . . 51 Grand Entrance Gates . . . . . . . . . . 54 Granoff Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Hilton Architecture & Interiors . . . . . 39 Hobbs, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Private Staff Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SBP Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3 Tischler und Sohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

BUSINESS & FINANCE

Citibank/Perry Gaa & Joseph Potvin . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Cummings & Lockwood LLC . . . . . . . 14 First Republic Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

DECORATING & HOME FURNISHINGS

Amy Aidinis Hirsch . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Serena & Lily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

ENTERTAINMENT

Connecticut Ballet Presents Coppélia . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Junior League of Greenwich/ The Wizard of Oz . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Stamford Tent & Event Services . . . . 29

EVENTS

6th Annual Greenwich International Film Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 6th Annual Greenwich Restaurant Week Thank You . . . . . 107 A-list Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 The Alzheimer's Association Connecticut Chapter /Eighth Annual Celebrating Hope 2020 . . . 96 End Allergies Together . . . . . . . . . . 106 The Greenwich Hospital Benefit . . . . . . . . . 102, 103 Greenwich Town Party . . . . . . . . . . 92 Open Doors Gala & Auction 2020 . . . 101 River House Adult Day Center Rosé on the River . . . . . . . . . . . 109 SoundWaters/Flotilla . . . . . . . . . . . 54 SoundWaters/Harborfest . . . . . . . . 54 SoundWaters/Tall Ships Ball . . . . . . 54 Spring for Abilis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Women in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 YWCA of Greenwich Old Bags Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . 105

FASHION

Roundabout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Tina Dragone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

FOOD, CATERING & LODGING

Marcia Selden Catering . . . . . . . . . . 11 Naked Fig Catering . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Tony's at the J House . . . . . . . . . . . 56

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Gray Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 The Nathaniel Witherell . . . . . . . . . . 24 Park Avenue Vein Laser Center/ H. Majlessi, M.D., FACS, FICS & Vida Yasmin, M.D. . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Rye Vein Laser Center/H. Majlessi, M.D., FACS, FICS & Vida Yasmin, M.D. . . . 14 Yale New Haven Health/ Greenwich Hospital . . . . . . . . . . 37

JEWELRY Betteridge/Chanel . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4 Betteridge/Davidor . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

LANDSCAPING, NURSERY & FLORISTS Sam Bridge Nursery & Greenhouses, LLC . . . . . . . . . . 51 Winston Flowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

NONPROFIT AmeriCares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Breast Cancer Alliance . . . . . . . . . . 50 CT Against Gun Violence . . . . . . . . 108

REAL ESTATE Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices . . 41 Coldwell Banker/Tamar Lurie Group . . . . . . . . . . Between 72 & 73 Douglas Elliman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Halstead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 13 Houlihan Lawrence . . . . . . . . . 6, 7, 8, 9 Sotheby's International Realty . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2, 1, 18, 19 William Raveis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 3, 21

SEE YOUR WEDDING Featured in

REAL ESTATE/DESTINATION Business Development Board of Palm Beach County . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Douglas Elliman/Gary Pohrer & John Reynolds . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Premier Estate Properties . . . . . . . . 22

MISCELLANEOUS Big Picture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Connecticut Collective . . . . . . . . . . 59 Westy Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 APRIL 2020 GREENWICH

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Download a wedding submission form at greenwichmag.com or email our weddings editor Ali Gray at alig@mofflymedia.com


postscript David and daughter Field

… for leaving us with such wonderful memories. You were a star in the Greenwich firmament— the champion of critical causes, the dean of real estate, the consummate gentleman, the most popular guy on the block. Thank you for being such a friend of this magazine and the Moffly family. When Jack and I merged our Greenwich Review with the Nutmegger back in 1988, you called from an airplane to make sure your ad would still be on Cover 2. Thank you for serving on our editorial advisory board and your enthusiastic support of our new initiatives. When 1,000 people showed up at our first Best of the Gold Coast event at the Hyatt in 2004, you commented: “I’ve never seen so many people I didn’t know having such a good time!” Thank you for being such an expert writer, including copy for your own ads. You

contributed pieces such as a 2008 cover story “Is Greenwich Becoming a Walled Town?” and others on ugly For Sale signs and the tragic loss of our historic houses. When you were young and sent letters to your famous father—British advertising tycoon David Ogilvy—he’d return them corrected in red ink. Maybe that made you a good writer but thank you for being your own man. As the Reverend Zabriskie of Christ Church commented, you could have been anything—from architect to minister. But you struck out for real estate, conservation and service to Greenwich, the only place you ever wanted to live. You also chose the lovely Anne to be your wife after, of course, thoughtfully clearing it with her two young daughters, ages eight and six, at dinner one night in Rye. Wanting to discuss it in private, Charlotte and Wells greenwichmag.com

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ducked under the table for a conference and came up granting permission, a wise decision. You and Anne would have a little girl named Field; and all of your four ladies with the long blond hair adored you. The feeling was mutual. As you lay in bed at the end of your life and Wells flew in at 6 a.m. from UVA to be at your side, you welcomed her as usual with: “How did you sleep, Beautiful Girl?” And Field, now fifteen, would tell you, “You’re perfect.” After the memorial service, the reception was packed. It was at the Belle Haven Club, where you were once commodore and sailed your C&C 40 aptly named Good Humor. Everybody in town was there. To paraphrase your own words: We never saw so many people having such a good time celebrating their friendship with you. Thank you, David, for showing us how to live. —D onna Moff ly

CHI CHI UBINA

THANK YOU, DAVID OGILVY


* AVAIL ABLE IN PRIME MID-COUNTRY GREENWICH LOCATION,

IN COLL ABORATION WITH SHOPE RENO WHARTON ARCHITECTURE


©2020 CHANEL®, Inc. *White gold with a thin layer of Rhodium plating for color.

KEIRA KNIGHTLEY WEARS A COCO CRUSH RING AND BRACELETS IN 18K WHITE GOLD* WITH DIAMONDS AND 18K BEIGE GOLD.

Profile for Moffly Media

Greenwich Magazine, April 2020  

Greenwich Magazine, April 2020