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MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

VOL. 38 | ISSUE 12 | DECEMBER 2017

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY FOR OVER

100 Years HEADED FOR A WATERY GRAVE 3 FINANCIAL TIPS FOR THE YEAR END STATE OF THE CHAMBER


Still in the Holiday Spirit

There’s no better time than the holidays to extend cheer to our loyal customers and friends. As the temperatures dip, the leaves drop, and snow dusts the mountaintops, families and friends gather to celebrate traditions. Good cheer and a sense of wonder is in the air. During this season we are especially grateful for the relationships we enjoy in the communities we have the pleasure of serving. From the entire Bank of Stockton family, we wish you the Happiest Holidays.

IN MODESTO 1302 J St. & 4204 Dale Rd. bankofstockton.com


DECEMBER 2017 | CONTENTS MISSION STATEMENT

The Modesto Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to serving the greater Modesto Area, regional businesses and community prosperity through advocacy, collaboration, access to leaders, economic development, connectivity and business education.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Chairman

Eric Tobias, F&M Bank

Chairman-Elect

Steven Rank, Rank Investigations and Protection, Inc.

Past Chairman

A Wealth of Opportunity

David Gianelli, Gianelli & Associates

Vice Chairman, External Operations Stephen Madison, STANCO

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Vice Chairman, Internal Operations

Patricia Gillum, Patricia A. Gillum,CPA

DIRECTORS

Elliot Begoun, The Intertwine Group Brad Blakeley, Edward Jones Investments Ryan Fitzpatrick, Valley BMW/Lexus David Gingerich, TD Gingerich Insurance Solutions, Inc. Paul Holshouser, Flowers Baking Co. of Modesto Michael Howell, Blom & Associates Warren Kirk, Doctors Medical Center Naomi Layland, Huff Construction Co, Inc. Craig Lewis, Lewis Capital Advisors DeSha McLeod, Community Hospice Inc. Tom Nielsen, Individual Member Peggy O’Donnell, Mid-Valley Promotion Dillon Olvera, Beard Land & Investment Co. Thomas Reeves, Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Lucy Virgen, Bank of the West Pete Zahos, Sysco Central California, Inc.

Headed for a Watery Grave

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3 Financial Tips for the Year End

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209.577.5757 • Progress@ModChamber.org www.ModChamber.org

Graphic Design: Never Boring

209.526.9136 • www.neverboring.com

Printer: The Parks Group

Never Boring 209.526.9136 • progress@neverboring.com

A Wealth of Opportunity

ADVOCACY

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Headed for a Watery Grave

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3 Financial Tips for the Year End Business Before Hours & Business After Hours Announcements Ribbon Cuttings & People On the Move

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Anniversaries

EDUCATION

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SPIE Annual Recognition Luncheon

SERVICE

209.576.2568 • mike@theparksgroup.com

Advertising Sales:

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Publisher: Modesto Chamber of Commerce

209.576.2568

Chamber Calendar

RELATIONSHIPS

Keith Boggs, Stanislaus County Chief Executive Office George Boodrookas, Modesto Junior College David Boring, Never Boring Tim Harms, Leadership Modesto David White, Opportunity Stanislaus Melissa Williams, Modesto Irrigation District

Distribution: The Parks Group

Message from the CEO

COMMUNITY

ADVISORS

Cecil Russell, President/CEO Modesto Chamber of Commerce CRussell@ModChamber.org

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SPIE Annual Recognition Luncheon

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© Copyright 2017 Modesto Chamber of Commerce. Some parts of this magazine may be reproduced or reprinted, however, we require that permission be obtained in writing. 209.577.5757, Progress@ModChamber.org

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State of the Chamber Work In Progress

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in

this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Modesto Chamber of Commerce.

State of the Chamber

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PROGRESS MAGAZINE 1114 J Street • Modesto, CA 95354 209. 577.5757 • Fax 209. 577.2673 www.ModChamber.org • Progress@ModChamber.org


MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

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Chamber President and CEO

HOSTED DISNEY INSTITUTE TRAINING

RIBBON CUTTINGS & GRAND OPENINGS

ATTENDED MODESTO CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS

By Cecil Russell,

MESSAGE FROM THE CEO / CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

We have some great articles this month as we wrap up 2017. I hope you find my article interesting as I discuss the Chamber’s purpose and some of the accomplishments that we have achieved this decade. In this fast-paced culture of information overload, I think the good work being done by the Chamber is often overlooked. So, I wanted to set the record straight as to the need for the Chamber in our community. I often say to our Board members—if not the Chamber then who?

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Disney’s Approach to Business Excellence (Day 1) & Disney’s Approach to Quality Service (Day 2 – Stan State Only)

STANISLAUS GREEN TEAM PRESENTATION BY PG&E

ATTENDED AN EVENING OF APPRECIATION CELEBRATION FOR DOCTORS MEDICAL CENTER

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE PRESENTATION

by CEO Jody Hayes on the County’s Vision for Economic Development and by StanCOG on Stanislaus ValleyVision

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COUNCIL PRESENTATION

We have already started planning to host another Disney Institute module next Autumn. As we move toward that date, we will strive to compile and publish stories of local businesses who have put this training into practice. So if you have a story, let us know.

by Supervisor Terry Withrow and District Attorney Birgit Fladager

SAINTS & CENTURIONS BELL-RINGING TEAM LEADER AT SALVATION ARMY’S KETTLE KICK-OFF

Our 104th Annual Gala & Members’ Choice Awards are coming to the Gallo Center of the Arts on Jan. 27, 2018. Save the date on your calendar. Tickets are on sale now, call the Chamber or visit our website to reserve your seats today! It is not too late for submissions for nominations for the awards. We would ask for you to contemplate who deserves to be nominated, and complete the form by mid-December. You can find the form on our website, www.ModChamber.org.

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

ON BUSINESS TOOLS & DOING BUSINESS WITH PG&E

MJC PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE

One of the accomplishments I was proud of this year was our hosting of the Disney Institute’s professional training course at Stanislaus State last month. We hosted "Disney’s Approach to Business Excellence", and it was a resounding success. Approximately 200 people attended, and we have been receiving great feedback. I have attended numerous training seminars during my career, and this is one of the best I have been to. There were many “takeaways” but I will tease you with just one: “Disney’s consistent business results are driven by overmanaging certain things that most companies undermanage or ignore….”

Finally, the Board of Directors, the Staff, and I want to wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, and much success into 2018. | P

DISNEY ’S APPRO ACH TO

BUSINESS EXCELLENCE

SERVED AT MODESTO GOSPEL MISSION’S GREAT THANKSGIVING BANQUET & BUNDLE-UP

Meetings with City Council Members Comprehensive Fees Task Force Meeting • Community Organization Meetings • Chamber committees and special events planning meetings • •

DOWNTOWN SECURITY MEETINGS


Real People. Real Solutions. Gardener #1 Grandpa Fútbol Fanatic

SF Giants Fan

Bean Counter

Camping Buff

Knitter Backpacker Proud Pappa

Scrapbooker

Meet the “real” people behind the numbers. At Grimbleby Coleman, our people are unique just like your business needs. Our growing team of advisors is here to help you find solutions!

it’s the people behind the numbers. Contact us today at 209-527-4220 or gccpas.net

OUR GEARS ARE ALWAYS SPINNING

The Parks Group has many “gears” to help power your projects. We provide everything in-house — printing & bindery, wide format, creative services support, branded merchandise, mailing, fulfillment & warehousing. Multiple solutions from a single source!

The

PARKS GROUP 209.576.2568 theparksgroup.com Modesto: 209.576.2568 1515 Tenth Street, Modesto, CA 95354 Stockton: 209.466.9026 445 W. Weber Ave, Suite 124A, Stockton, CA 95203

DECEMBER 2017

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CHAMBER CALENDAR DECEMBER ONLINE MARKETING 05 CHAMBER TOOLS CLASS

JANUARY DEVELOPMENT 10 ECONOMIC COMMITTEE MEETING Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 7:30 a.m.

Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 12 p.m.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE MEETING Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 7:30 a.m.

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BUSINESS BEFORE HOURS Carolyn Huff Photography Studio and Gallery 1224 K St., Modesto 7:30 a.m.

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NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 3 p.m.

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STANISLAUS GREEN TEAM Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 9 a.m.

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GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COUNCIL MEETING Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 12 p.m.

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AMBASSADOR & WELCOME TEAM MEETING Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 8 a.m.

CHAMBER CALENDAR MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

**The Modesto Chamber of Commerce is located at 1114 J St., Modesto

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BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Dale Commons 3900 Dale Rd., Modesto 5:30 p.m.

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GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COUNCIL MEETING Modesto Chamber of Commerce** 12 p.m.

Chamber will be CLOSED from December 22 - January 1, 2018

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

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CHAMBER U SalesForce.com Training Annual Gala Members 2929 Floyd Ave. #374, Modesto 11:45 a.m. Choice Awards

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Galo Center for the Arts 6 p.m.


The Modesto Chamber of Commerce is excited to announce a collabrative partnership with AgSafe. AgSafe, a Modesto based nonprofit has been providing training and resources for employers in California for over 26 years serving nearly 75,000 individuals. They have been widely known for their commitment to infusing practitioner based training solutions for the industries’ most pressing needs, assisting businesses to remain compliant, safe, and competitive.

Upcoming Webinars Food Safety Webinars

Join the AgSafe Education Team for these informative webinars to discuss compliance strategies and best practices for your operations food safety protocol.

December 4 Environmental Program

December 11 Preventative Maintenance

• How to identify zones • What is your pathogen of concern • Corrective actions

• Facility inspections • Associated risks • Reporting procedures

December 18 Food Defense

December 21 Document Control

• How to develop a plan • Developing a standard template • How to train your employees • Revisions and records Time: 9:00am – 10:00am Cost: Members: $50 Each | Members: Package of 4: $180 for Members

City of Modesto Utility Users Tax The City of Modesto’s Utility Users Tax is collected on water, gas and electric services at a rate of 6%, cable television services at 3%, and telecommunication services at 5.8%. The maximum tax utility users have to pay for each service is $1500. The Modesto Municipal Code currently provides for refunds of overpayments made within 12 months from the receipt of the refund request. To request a refund, please provide the city with a written request and copies of your utility bills which verify you overpaid. Requests for refunds should be mailed to: City of Modesto Finance Department Attn: Utility Tax Desk PO Box 642; Modesto CA 95353 You may elect to prepay the utility users tax maximum if you believe you will exceed the cap. If you have any questions, please contact the Utility Tax personnel at (209)577-5206.

To register for classes, please go to www.agsafe.org/calendar For more information, please contact AgSafe 209.526.4400 | safeinfo@agsafe.org

Happy Holidays FROM YOUR MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

DECEMBER 2017

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A WEALTH OF OPPORTUNITY:

The Coming Transfer of Wealth in Stanislaus County By Marian Kaanon, CEO, Stanislaus Community Foundation Amber Flores, President, Association of Fundraising Professionals – Yosemite Chapter

We all know that smart business leaders plan for succession in their companies to sustain growth with minimum disruption over time. In the same way, our region can and should plan for the unprecedented succession of wealth that is about to occur in Stanislaus. Transfer of wealth occurs when one generation leaves their assets to the next generation in their family. Given that 10,000 baby boomers retire every day, and are actively formulating their estate plans, the real opportunity lies in capturing a percentage of the wealth the generation leaves behind to support the future development of our region.

…WEALTH RETENTION EQUALS HIGHER PROPERTY VALUES, A MORE DYNAMIC

In short, wealth retention equals higher property values, a more dynamic workforce, more opportunities, and an overall improved quality of life. Local business leader Norm Porges, Owner of Prime Shine Car Wash, explained his corporate and family philosophy: “As we do in our business, we’ve implemented a long-term strategic vision to our family’s philanthropy. It’s important to us to be able to leave, at our choosing, legacy gifts that will impact our community for future generations.” What can business leaders do to make this dream a reality? Consider leaving a legacy gift or making a donation to the endowment of a local nonprofit, or initiating a Donor Advised Fund through Stanislaus Community Foundation. Let’s join together across all sectors to capitalize on this wealth potential and build a better future for Stanislaus County.

WORKFORCE, MORE OPPORTUNITIES, AND AN OVERALL IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE.

To read the full Stanislaus County Transfer of Wealth analysis, please visit stanislauscf.org. | P

What if Stanislaus County’s nonprofit organizations could capture just five percent of the wealth transferred between generations over the next 10 years to support our region? The Stanislaus Community Foundation, in partnership with the Association of Fundraising Professionals-Yosemite Chapter and the Stanislaus County Estate Planning Council, commissioned the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship to conduct a transfer of wealth analysis for Stanislaus County. The results illustrate the powerful role philanthropy can play in our community.

COMMUNITY

Currently, Stanislaus County residents have an estimated net worth of $74.1 billion. In the next 10 years, more than $8.4 billion will transfer generations. If just five percent of this figure were designated to local philanthropy, more than $421 million would be retained in our community. This $421 million–once invested–would generate more than $21 million in annual grantmaking.

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How does this wealth transfer affect local business? If local nonprofit organizations had funds to serve their mission and population, more investments could be made in projects that benefit the entire community such as education and infrastructure. These essential improvements would help make our community a more attractive place to live, work, and thrive.

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

Stanislaus Community Foundation Board Directors Melanie Chiesa (left) and Chris Tyler (right) join CEO Marian Kaanon (center) for the unveiling of the Transfer of Wealth Study commissioned by Stanislaus Community Foundation and its partners.


Life happens at the tabLe

MEETINGS

EVENTS

GROUPS

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I N - H O U S E AV

AVA I L A B L E D A I LY

| (209) 529-5898| Camp4Wine.com

COMING SOON! A new and improved BMW dealership! Our state-of-the-art new dealership will make it easier than ever to enter the world of BMW and for us to better serve you. See you in the showroom! DECEMBER 2017

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HEADED FOR A WATERY GRAVE By Mike Dunbar Reprinted with permission by the Modesto Bee

At the climax of most horror movies, the mask gets ripped away and we see the face of the villain: Jason, Leatherface, Freddy Krueger, Jerry Brown. We're living our own slow-motion horror movie, in which the state has been plotting for years to steal the water that sustains our lives and a third of the Northern San Joaquin Valley's economy. The plot is really boiling now, so let's pull off some masks. Governor Puppetmaster Gov. Brown waited until 11:48 p.m. last Sunday night to veto Adam Gray's Assembly Bill 313—which would have inserted some fairness into resolving water disputes. As it is, the State Water Resources Control Board staff writes the rules, brings the charges, then decides the cases. Disagree with their decision? Then the dispute moves to the board's governor-appointed commissioners. No wonder it never loses. The agency is cop, prosecutor, judge, and appellate court. That's fair in North Korea, not so much in Northern California. Gray's bill would have put appeals before a neutral third party before sending the decision back to the board. The board could still overrule it, but that might look, well, fishy. Brown's veto message conceded that the process doesn't appear fair, but he worried about costs, finding water experts, blah, blah.

ADVOCACY

What he's really worried about is that an impartial arbiter might put obstacles in the way of the Water Board's grab of vast amounts of our region's water; and that might trip up his legacy-fulfilling California WaterFix.

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Do state bureaucrats care? No, because it's not really about fish. The governor's 40-foot-wide twin tunnels will send most of the much-colder and four-times larger Sacramento River under the Delta. With reduced "inflows" from the Sacramento, more of the far smaller, much-warmer San Joaquin River will be needed to keep the Delta from becoming pickle brine. And the only way to assure those "inflows" are cold is to take what's deep behind our dams. What's Left? The Phase II fact sheet mentions reaching "voluntary" agreements. It confuses victims with volunteers. Our irrigation districts are developing their own plans—which we hope will include higher flows and restoration of riverbeds and floodplains to help trout thrive. Trout? Many scientists say salmon are already functionally extinct in our rivers. With Sierra runoff warming, is devoting higher flows to save salmon just whistling in the graveyard? Mean Greens The Tuolumne Trust's Peter Drekmeier has written several times for The Modesto Bee. But just before the state released its Phase II report, he targeted The Sacramento Bee's audience to complain that our water districts have resisted giving up even a "modest" amount more water. When environmentalists write about the water they want, it's always a modest amount. When they write about water someone else uses to grow food, then "big ag" is "consuming" 80 percent of "our water." Not exactly a lie, but certainly not the truth.

Plundering Bureaucrats The Water Board recently released its Phase II fact sheet, which was supposed to be about the California WaterFix's impacts on the Sacramento River. By Page 4, its real subject was clear.

Half the state's freshwater flows into the ocean every year - far more during wet years. Of what's left, farming uses 80 percent. From that 80 percent, many districts provide water for wildlife and fish.

The report described salmon as being "deprived" of "cold water" they "need for survival" followed by dire warnings that this "sometimes fatal" issue will be exacerbated by climate change. To save the salmon, the state wants strong pulse flows, colder water, constant and vastly higher "inflows" to the Delta. Where are these "inflows" flowing from? The Stanislaus, Merced, and Tuolumne rivers.

Over a year of quiet negotiations, our water districts offered to give up 100 percent more water. What did the state and environmentalists say? Nothing; they ghosted. Getting twice as much water wasn't enough. What they really want—it's in the Phase II fact sheet—is 75 percent of all flows (350 percent more). Plus the cold water behind the dams.

But peer-reviewed studies done here show that to be effective, "pulse" flows should be smaller; that fish take migration cues from factors scientists don't fully comprehend (like rain and turbidity). Sometimes scientists don't know what they're doing, killing more fish than they save.

What we want is an admission that the people of Modesto, Turlock, Oakdale, Merced and San Francisco have invested billions in dams, canals, tunnels, pipelines, pumps, treatment plants and, yes, environmental restoration. Without water, those investments are worthless.

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG


Mean Greens disdain farmers, but weep for salmon fishers. Drekmeier said commercial fishers lost $255 million when salmon fishing was banned in 2008-09. Seriously? California's entire commercial salmon catch was worth $8.1 million in 2015. (About what local beekeepers got for their honey.) And if they're not catching salmon, they're catching other fish. Why ridiculously insist losses hit $255 million? To justify crippling a $9 billion regional industry for the sake of a few San Francisco fishing boats. Cannibal Farmers Farmers like to think other farmers wouldn't betray them. When Kern County's water agency voted to back the governor's WaterFix, they did it unanimously while dreaming of filling their tomato fields with lucrative tree crops now grown best here. Westlands Water District rejected the tunnels, but as others line up at our spigots, expect Westlands to take a second bite of this apple. And out of us. Meanwhile, water districts in Castaic, Coachella Valley, Contra Costa and, of course, goliath Metropolitan Water District are all in. Santa Clara's water district voted only to fund one tunnel. We'll see if the governor is willing to split his baby. Regardless, the impact will be the same here—less water.

But what about the saintly salmon? With so much water bypassing the Delta, how will they ever find their way up the Sacramento to spawn? What about people living in the Delta? What about the thousands of families in Stanislaus, Merced and south San Joaquin counties who will lose their jobs as the fields are fallowed? "Stop waffling over the delta tunnels and dig," thundered the Times. They'll be digging our graves. | P

Innovation: Not just insurancerisk management.

Simple. Strategic. Secure.

www.capax.com

ADVOCACY

Bottomless Pit of Thirst Last year, the Los Angeles Times editorial board chastised farmers here for being unwilling to give up more water to help the noble salmon. But when Westlands refused (for now) to pay its portion of Uncle Jerry's tunnels, the outraged Times bellowed: "It comes down to this: We need the tunnels."

1.800.94CAPAX • 209.526.3110 MIKE DUNBAR IS THE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR OF THE MODESTO BEE. PHONE: 209-578-2325; EMAIL: MDUNBAR@MODBEE.COM.

Group Health • Workers Comp Home Owners & Auto • Business Insurance Giddings, Corby, Hynes Lic.# 0144783

DECEMBER 2017

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3 FINANCIAL TIPS FOR THE YEAR END By Michael Howell, MBA LPL Financial Advisor Blom & Associates The end of the year is fast approaching and now is the perfect time to review items you might want to consider as we enter 2018. Here are three quick financial tips. 1. Review Your Retirement Progress. A successful financial life does not happen by chance, it happens by choice. Retirement planning is at the core of your financial planning because most aspire to a work optional lifestyle, where you can someday work because you want to, not because you have to. To reach that stage, it's healthy to periodically examine where you stand. If you're young, check to see if you're on pace and putting enough away for the long-term. If you're within five years of retiring, it may be time to closely examine what your income will look like in the years beyond work. Now is a great time to make any necessary adjustments. 2. Check Your Lifestyle Against Your Finances. Sometimes we make finances more complicated than it needs to be. At the end of the day, the formula is simple but can be difficult to implement: Spend less than you earn, then save and invest the difference over a long period of time. So how does your current spending stack up against the net income you bring in? Check your expenses like those extra trips to Starbucks each month. You might just find that little adjustments in your lifestyle can mean hundreds of extra dollars per month going towards savings instead.

RELATIONSHIPS

3. Consider Automation. Speaking of savings, one great way to discipline yourself is to automate the process. Speaking personally, I know if I don't save immediately after receiving a paycheck, I likely won't do it. If this is true of you as well, consider automating your strategy. When you think about it, it makes a lot of sense—money that might otherwise be spent ends up in savings instead. In the long run, most people find they save far more this way and it helps keep their finances in check.

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Michael Howell is a Financial Advisor with, and securities offered through, LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. | P MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

BUSINESS BEFORE HOURS

CAROLYN HUFF PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY AND STUDIO 1224 K St., Modesto Dec. 7 | 7:30 a.m.

Carolyn Huff is a Modesto photographer, portrait artist, and gallery owner. We work with you to create heirloom portrait art and wall décor that you will treasure for years to come. We offer studio or on-location sessions. Our heirloom photography portrait art includes framed canvas, watercolor, and fine art media. We also create portraits for business and corporate use on your website, social media page, or print media, as well as wall décor for your business. Also, Carolyn Huff Photography Gallery and Studio supports the Modesto Art Walk. Each month, we partner with a local artist displaying work in many media types: acrylic, oils, pastels, watercolor, pen and ink, metal sculpture, textile art, etc. Guest artist works are on display in the Carolyn Huff Gallery, Tuesday through Friday. All are invited to join us for the artist reception during the Modesto Art Walk, held the third Thursday of each month from 5 - 9 p.m. | P

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS

DALE COMMONS 3900 Dale Rd., Modesto Dec. 14 | 5:30 p.m.

Dale Commons is more than just a place to call home. It’s a connected community where our residents experience the meaning of Inspired Aging. An environment that nurtures, physically, mentally, and socially—and promotes a true sense of belonging. We’re here to support that by providing a caring, supportive environment that encourages our residents to explore new dimensions of life and to be actively engaged in the community. Every day is a new opportunity to find purpose, meaning and validation. A chance to experience Inspired Aging to the fullest. | P


ANNOUNCEMENTS Carolyn Huff Photography Studio and Gallery is hosting several well-known local artists Dec. 2017 –Jan. 2018. These talented women include: Chella, Janet Hardie, Carol David, Betty Jean Reynolds, Barbara Gill, and Henrietta Sparkman.

But if accidents happen, when traffic is tight;

Join us for the artist reception on Thursday, Dec. 21, from 5 - 9 p.m. The gallery is located at 1224 K St. on the corner of 13th and K, in downtown Modesto. For more information, contact carolyn@carolynhuff.org or call 209.918.6617. | P

Tickets are $25.00 per person, but attendees must be 21 or older. There will be local vineyards and breweries featured, as well as local caterers featuring appetizers and desserts. View the Classic Cars of the Reed Family Collection and listen to the smooth sounding acoustics of Doug Robinett and Company. To purchase tickets, visit drailwinebeerbites.eventbrite.com. | P

@neverboring.com

Wine, Beer & Bites Jan. 20 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. Reed Carseum 220A Empire Ave., Modesto

Come on down to Burnside and get it fixed right.

WE WORK WITH ANY AND ALL INSURANCE PROVIDERS YOUR COMMUNITY | OUR COMMUNITY | SINCE 1990 209.521.6570 | BURNSIDEBODYSHOP.COM | LIKE US ON:

Get Ready For The Holidays! Customized Gifts as Unique as You and Your Customers! Provide us with your special promotional items and Stewart & Jasper employees will combine them with our Gourmet California Almond products to put together the perfect gift for your employees, customers and partners. Options include: • company logos on bows and ribbons • add branded items like hats, shirts, gift cards, etc.

You Can Put Your Logo Here!

VISIT OUR MODESTO COMPANY STORE IN McHENRY VILLAGE 1700 McHenry Avenue • Suite 58

(209) 577-NUTS Pantone 374 C

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HOURS: Monday-Wednesday 10am-7pm Thursday-Saturday 10am-8pm • Sunday 1pm-6pm

www.StewartandJasper.com

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To place an order, please call one of our associates at 1-877-ALMOND-8 DECEMBER 2017

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RIBBON CUTTINGS

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE

Juan Marquez

ASPIRE HOME REAL ESTATE, INC. 3425 Coffee Rd., Ste. 1A, Modesto, CA 95355

Valley First Credit Union is pleased to announce Juan Marquez has taken on a new role as Senior Business Relationship Consultant. In his new position, Juan will focus on strengthening and building relationships with local businesses to offer Valley First membership as an employee benefit.

Juan has over 22 years of experience in the financial industry and brings a wealth of knowledge to his new role. He strongly supports the credit union’s vision of providing superior service and looks forward to working with businesses in our community. For more information about Valley First, visit valleyfirstcu.org | P

EL RIO MEMORY CARE 2828 Healthcare Wy., Modesto, CA 95356

Express Employment Professionals is pleased to announce that Karrie Mitten has partnered with the company as Director of Talent Acquisition. Mrs. Mitten will be managing the expansion of the Executive, Accounting, and Administrative lines of the business. Karrie has a diverse background and holds deep roots in the Karrie Mitten community. Most recently, Karrie was instrumental working with the Modesto Bee/Bee Media Services team to grow their digital platform for McClatchy’s national digital agency, excelerate Digital. Many of her accomplishments include co-chairing the Central Valley Business Summit, actively participating in the Modesto Rotary Foundation Board, and chairing the Cog Committee. Express Employment Professionals is owned by Shannon Gilbert-Weaver and assists local businesses with staffing of full time and temporary employees. | P

RELATIONSHIPS

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS HOTEL & SUITES 4300 Bangs Ave., Modesto, CA 95356

BECOME A MEMBER STANISLAUS FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER 1418 J St., Modesto, CA 95354

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MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

visit us at modchamber.org or call our membership Director, John Villines 209.577.5757


ALMOND SNACKS AND GIFTS FOR ANY OCCASION

4800 Sisk Road, Modesto • 209-545-3222

RELATIONSHIPS

Open Monday - Friday 9:30 am to 5 pm • Saturdays open 10 am to 4 pm

DECEMBER 2017

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Congratulations

TO THIS MONTH'S MILESTONE MEMBERSHIPS

50 years ALLIED CONCRETE & SUPPLY CO., INC.

NIRVANA DRUG & ALCOHOL INSTITUTE

MODESTO LIONS ''500'' CLUB

AMERICAN RECYCLING, LLC

PARKVIEW CHRISTIAN ESTATES INC.

CURTIS LEGAL GROUP

STANISLAUS COUNTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICE

25 years +

STONE BROS. MANAGEMENT, INC. TRI COUNTIES BANK TURLOCK IRRIGATION DISTRICT

CLENDENIN BIRD & COMPANY, PC

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, MERCED

COVANTA STANISLAUS, INC.

VALLEY FIRST CREDIT UNION (DALE BRANCH)

HENNINGS BROS. DRILLING CO., INC.

10 + years

IT SOLUTIONS|CURRIE J.M. EQUIPMENT CO., INC. MODESTO JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMUNITY EDUCATION STANISLAUS COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION

15 years +

1ST SECURITY & SOUND CENTERRA CAPITAL METROPCS CALIFORNIA, LLC MODESTO MOBILITY CENTER, INC. MRAZ, AMERINE & ASSOCIATES

BORTON PETRINI, LLP

SECURITY PUBLIC STORAGE

BRANDMAN UNIVERSITY

STRUCK INSURANCE SERVICES, INC.

CHILDREN'S CRISIS CENTER EXPO DECOR & AUDIO VISUAL RENTAL

RELATIONSHIPS

FIRE2WIRE

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HERUM\CRABTREE LOVE'S SAFE DRIVING & TRAFFIC VIOLATOR SCHOOL, LLC

+

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG


STANISLAUS PARTNERS IN EDUCATION’S (SPIE) ANNUAL RECOGNITION LUNCHEON By Judie Piscitello, Executive Director

I love the Annual SPIE Recognition Luncheon! It is a chance to watch a parade of successful partnerships between businesses and educators, and celebrate the benefits these partnerships bring to students of Stanislaus County. This year, your Modesto Chamber honored Cindy Young, Director of Career Technical Education (CTE) for Stanislaus County of Education, with its Excellence In Education Award. Most recently, Cindy planned and executed the Chamber’s State of Education event and is an integral part of the team, transforming the Modesto Bee building into a learning and training center. Stanislaus County Office of Education recognized Shoob Photography as a county-wide partner. Because of his passion for education, Alex Shoob has been a steadfast partner to schools, districts, and the county office for a very long time. Most notably, at this luncheon every year, Alex Shoob is recognized by many school administrators for what he has done on their school campuses. SPIE’s Peter Johansen Award was presented to Prime Shine Car Wash. Prime Shine Car Wash has always been passionate about being involved in the communities it serves, whether through the direct efforts of its employees, support of charity events, or specific grants from the Prime Shine Porges Family Foundation. The company and its owners continually seek to provide leadership toward the common good and improving the counties in which they operate.

Gateway Rotary, Modesto Irrigation District, Modesto Police Dept., Modesto Sunset Lions, Monte Vista Chapel, Orchard Supply Hardware, Pioneer Market, Power Up Ceres, Ruiz Produce, Safe Kids Coalition, Second Harvest Food Bank, ShadowChase Running Club, Shoob Photography, Sierra Vista, Stanislaus County Library, Sunrise Bakery, Sunshine Community Church, Taqueria El Moguey, Tree House Club - Turlock, Trinity Baptist Church, Trinity United Presbyterian, Tuolumne River Trust, Twisted 3, UC Cal Fresh Nutrition Program, VR Printing, Wilkey Industries and Youth for Christ. SPIE could not provide this event without the major sponsorship of Memorial Medical Center and support of Mocse Credit Union. | P

Are you interested in hosting a BUSINESS BEFORE HOURS or BUSINESS AFTER HOURS in 2018? Contact Communications Assistant, Sandra Montez today! 209.577.5757 or smontez@modchamber.org

EDUCATION

Business partners recognized by their partner school this year were: Acme Construction, Associated Students CSUS, Assyrian American Civic Club, Blessings in a Back Pack, Boys & Girls Club of Stanislaus County, Centenary Methodist Church, Center for Human Services, Cere Pipe & Metal, Ceres Karate, Character Coach Turlock, Community Hospice, Container Graphics, Costless Foods, CSU, Stanislaus, CSUS Math Masters, Diamond Bar Arena, Duarte Nursery, E & J Gallo Winery, Embroidery Plus, Farmers Insurance, FoodMaxx, G3 Enterprises, Inc., Gallo Glass, Glory Industries, Grainger, Horace Mann Insurance, Juline Foundation for Children, Kazas Insurance, Kohl’s, Letters to Santa Charity, Lifetouch, Maria’s Taco Shop, McDonaldsCeres, Memorial Medical Center, Mill Creek Church, Modesto

DECEMBER 2017

17


COVER STORY

STATE OF THE CHAMBER By Cecil Russell, Chamber President and CEO

It is year-end for 2017 and I want to reflect on the number of years that I have been the President and CEO of the Modesto Chamber of Commerce. When I became the President in 2011, I realized we would be celebrating our 100-year anniversary in 2012. We moved our annual dinner to the Gallo Center for the Arts and turned the event to a Gala celebration. We took note that the Modesto Chamber had built the iconic Modesto Arch with the slogan “Water, Wealth, Contentment, Health” the same year we incorporated in 1912. We undertook the task and financial responsibility of repairing and restoring the Arch with new lighting and powder coating, bringing back the structure to its original color, complete with new flag poles and monument telling the story of the Arch.

We are dedicated to our mission statement: “The Modesto Chamber is dedicated to serving the greater Modesto area regional businesses and community prosperity through advocacy, collaboration, access to leaders, economic development, connectivity and business education.” To execute our adopted mission, we developed an acronym. The acronym is C.A.R.E.S.: Community, Advocacy, Relationships, Education, and Service. With this in mind, we have restated the purpose of the Modesto Chamber. That renewed purpose helps create an environment that is conducive for business to succeed. For our community to prosper, we collectively must partner with others, including government, to advocate and collaborate, while maintaining access to elected officials to expand economic growth.

COMMUNITY

Many of our Board Members and Staff serve on other boards that include the following: Craig Lewis, Stanislaus Community Foundation; Steve Madison, Salvation Army; Dave Gianelli and I, Stanislaus Boys and Girls Club; Steve Rank, Downtown Improvement District; Eric Tobias, Community Hospice; Dave Gianelli, Downtown Modesto Partnership; Cecil Russel, Stanislaus Partners in Education and Opportunity Stanislaus. The crossover of these organizations are very helpful in determining when and where we can create synergy while working on common goals for the vitality of our community. Dave Gianelli brought the Boys and Girls Club to Modesto, and I have had the pleasure of serving with that organization to help finance the start of the club. Today it serves over 1,000 kids with the assistance of the Sylvan School District

ADVOCACY

The Chamber’s Economic Development Committee and Government Relations Council meets with City, County and other Agencies on a regular basis to learn and provide input on policy, rules, and regulations that affect business and economic development growth. The Economic Development Committee, under the leadership of Craig Lewis, developed the Chamber’s “Pathway to Prosperity” strategy, which became a blueprint for Modesto to update its Comprehensive General Plan (includes

1912

SERVICE

Modesto Arch was Founded and christened with a bottle of canal water

18

1930s

1961

1982

Started our Annual Harvest Luncheon- raising money for the MJC Ag Scholarship Program

Leadership Modesto Program was created.

Chamber helped transform 9th Street into a main highway through town.

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

2012

Arch Restoration Project took place to celebrate the 100year anniversary of the Chamber


direction on land use and transportation). The positive outcome from this advocacy moved the City of Modesto to create a new Comprehension General Plan.

As the “Voice of Business” in the business community, the Chamber has supported “business-friendly” candidates for Modesto City Council, and Mayor, Stanislaus Board of Supervisors, State Senate, State Assembly, and other local races, whom we believe will encourage businesses to locate and thrive in Modesto. We proactively work to relieve the regulatory burdens businesses endure due to local and State Agencies. We led the charge to defeat an anti-growth measure, that if passed, would have stemmed economic growth and jobs for Modesto. When our new Mayor was elected, he formed a 100-day committee to study the effectiveness and efficiency of City government, and look for ways to cut costs. The Chamber had three board members that served on his committee; one result of this committee was to identify funding to allow for the City to hire 22 additional, muchneeded police officers. Your Chamber also formed a Public Safety Committee headed by former Mayor Jim Ridenour to search for answers in sustainable financing for public safety services. After the city was unable over two campaign cycles to convince voters to tax themselves for more city funding, the Chamber empaneled a committee to address the issues. In collaboration with city officials, elected officials, and the

CECIL RUSSELL 100 Day Review Committee, the committee made observations andrecommendations to the city on how to streamline services, improve collaboration and delivery of services and additional opportunities for revenue enhancements. We have developed a strong relationship with MID and TID, working to support the relicensing of Don Pedro Dam to secure our steady and reliable source of water. We have joined MID, TID, and our local legislators in Sacramento, in the fight to maintain our water rights and to help stop the state water agency from grabbing our water—water that is not only the lifeblood for our agricultural businesses but for all of the other businesses and households in our community. Assembly member Adam Gray has been a strong advocate for our water rights. We have also supported candidates that have run for board seats on MID that will support local business and all other ratepayers on a fair and reasonable for price electricity. Our focus is to advocate and support current and future businesses that will create more jobs and economic growth for all. A good example is the growth of our health industry, now a major part of our growing economy. With Kaiser Permanente, Doctors Medical Center, and Memorial Medical Center, we have some of the best medical care in Northern California. Doctors Medical Center has expanded into Valley Heart Institute and Darroch Brain & Spine Institute. Along with Care One Home Health/ Hospice, Central Valley Medical Group, Central Valley Specialty Hospital, English Oaks Nursing & Rehabilitation Hospital, First Choice Physician Partners, Stanislaus Surgical Hospital, and many others, we have worked and partnered with new businesses that have located in Modesto. Last year, we welcomed HealthSouth Rehabilitation to Modesto with their new multi-million-dollar facility. We also supported the Koelsch family to build the El Rio Memory Care Community and The Park at Modesto Independent Senior Living Community.

2013

2017

“Pathway to Job Growth and Prosperity” – The Chamber’s plan served as a foundation for updating the city’s general plan.

Worth Your Fight

SERVICE

Last year we collaborated with the the local cities and the County, StanCOG, Farm Bureau, Police Organization, and many other groups, to pass a self-help transportation measure that will raise the necessary funds to improve our transportation infrastructure throughout the County. Craig Lewis has been the driving force for the Chamber for many years to help educate the voters of the need and economic impact in our region this transportation measure with have for decades. Paul Van Konynenburg was the chairman of the Committee that unified these entities to come together to pass this measure. Since the election, he has been selected by the Governor to serve on the California Transportation Commission. He is only the second individual from the Central Valley to serve on this Commission, with the Chamber advocating and obtaining written letters in support of his appointment. Going forward, we will continue to advocate and encourage the ACE Train to be expanded to Modesto.

“IF NOT THE CHAMBER, THEN WHO?”

2016

Stanislaus voters approve Measure L (Transportation Tax) DECEMBER 2017

19


COVER STORY (CONTINUED)

STATE OF THE CHAMBER These two facilities are also multi-million-dollar investments, bringing with them state of the art care and hundreds of new jobs. We emceed the groundbreaking of Valley Children Specialty Care Center on Pelandale, another multi-million-dollar facility that will provide exceptional care for our children. The health care industry and these investments in Modesto bring with them hundreds of new jobs and have developed vacant land within the city limits using smart land use principles. We have worked with the leaders of Stanislaus County Courts to bring a new modern courthouse to Modesto. Although it was finally approved, funding has been tied up in the bureaucracy of Sacramento. This has been a long hard fight that we will continue, as this new courthouse will bolster our local justice system and be a cornerstone for downtown economic development. These are just some of the many things we do on a regular basis to advocate for vital economic growth and business development in our region.

RELATIONSHIPS

Over thirty years ago, former Chamber President Dave Kilby started a program called Leadership Modesto. That program has trained approximately 25 business and community leaders each year (over 700 local leaders overall). This continues today with each class collectively choosing and funding a project to enhance our City. This last year the class funded the musical crosswalks that help frame the intersections around the Gallo Center for the Arts. Our Leadership Modesto program has built long-term relationships with key leaders in the business world and local community. The Modesto Chamber specializes in building relationships among business and serving the nexus to businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies We host monthly networking events, “Business Before Hours” and “Business After Hours” that usually have 50 to 100 business people attending. We host other events such as State of the City and State of the Region, and President Club receptions that are great networking opportunities.

We also have served on Stanislaus Partners in Education (SPIE) for the last 25 years. Our Harvest Lunch and Ag Aware Committees have been celebrating our heritage and connection to agriculture for over 50 years, and raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for local students: Modesto FFA scholarships and Modesto Junior College graduating Ag Department students scholarships. We are very proud of the hard work and dedication of these committees. All of this is in keeping with our pledge to help provide a ready workforce to serve local employers and keep our next generation situated and working here. We also serve on the Stanislaus County Workforce Development Board. We invest time and effort in these endeavors because we believe that education is fundamental to economic success.

SERVICE

We have an ongoing connectivity with SCORE that provides free counseling to startup and existing businesses that need professional guidance or mentoring. The Chamber Board and staff are active on many nonprofit and government committees, donating their business expertise, time, energy, and resources. The Chamber also serves its individual members by hosting ribbon cuttings and grand openings which introduce new businesses to the community. We offer both free and cost-effective marketing opportunities, exposure to social media, workshops and training from our business partners and their associates. This last year, we had “Chamber University” classes taught on a variety of topics by members from Cloudy in California, the Littler labor law firm, and AgSafe. Dale Carnegie also conducts courses in our conference room. The prime event for training this year was hosting Disney Institute’s Approach to Business Excellence professional training at Stanislaus State. We received so much positive feedback that we will be hosting another course module next Autumn as well. When contemplating the Chamber’s involvement in one of these areas of C.A.R.E.S., I often ask myself, if not the Chamber then who? This drives us towards our goal to continue to develop economic vitality to help our businesses prosper and create a better quality of life for all. It has been our pleasure to serve you for the last 105 years, and we aim to keep serving this community in the same vein. | P

SERVICE 20

EDUCATION

We believe that to have a healthy and balanced economy that creates jobs, we must have an educated work force. This requires our involvement, investment, and connection to our educational institutions. The Chamber serves the education community by hosting the annual State of Business and Education event. We have developed relationships with Sylvan Union School District, Modesto City Schools, Stanislaus County Office of Education, Modesto Junior College, and California State University, Stanislaus, by serving on many panels, committees and advisory groups.

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG


MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

WORK IN PROGRESS a series spotlighting some of our area’s most innovative and successful companies

BEARD LAND:

A COMPANY OF THE COMMUNITY By: Noel Daniel

Just like the railroads are the veins of our county, companies like Beard Land and Investment Company are essentially the lifeblood of the community. “So whether it’s folks on our executive team that sit on various community boards, or just trying to focus and be active in the community,” said Dillon E. Olvera, the CFO of Beard Land and Investment Company. Chief among their community-driven achievements are how active they were in supporting Measure L; how many community boards they sit on; their work with Opportunity Stanislaus on the VOLT Institute; and a large spec building that was created with the impetus of bringing business into the area. “We made a large investment,” said Olvera. “We did it without having a known tenant at our doorstep, now we’ve filled almost a 500,000 sq. ft. building with a couple of different tenants that bring jobs and business activity specifically to Modesto. We’ll take on some risk to see the success in the city.” The VOLT Institute also functions with the intent of creating business in the community. It’s a vocational training center that allows for locals to attend various different types of courses. By getting through the course, they receive various core training that is relevant for companies in the area. It might be a mechanics course or a management course, but no matter the field, VOLT Institute is to be a name that’s reputable enough that—once a student got through that training—local companies would know that they’ve been through adequate training and would be a good, valuable employee in the company. Another of their good works in the community is actually the culmination of numerous large projects of the last few years.

“We’ve invested a lot of funds to enhance our railroad infrastructure to accommodate the receipt of railcars for existing companies and essentially keep that infrastructure up to standard to support what’s going on today with our customers and what they need to bring in,” Olvera explained. In particular, they have one trestle or “bridge” in the district and are presently in the midst of a several-months project that finishes this year that aims to enhance the bridge to be able to take more train activity at higher speeds and higher weights. “That allows companies like Gallo Glass and Stan Foods and other companies within the district to be able to receive product via rail and ship out product via rail to be competitive with their own competitors right here in Modesto,” said Olvera. There are a number of good reasons to keep the rails as carefully as Beard Land does, as updated rails are both safe and can hone the competitive edge of local companies. “In addition to bringing product into and out of Modesto, we have access to both Rail Class 1 railroads: Union Pacific Railroad (UNP) and Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF),” said Olvera. “That gives our customers a competitive edge that other short-line railroads don’t have. Typically, a lot of the short-line railroads connect to a single, larger railroad. The fact that we connect to two Class 1 railroads allows for our customers to dictate who they use, whether it’s from a product availability perspective or from a cost perspective: hopefully both.” For more information about Beard Land and Investment Company, visit www.beardland.com. | P

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B r a n di n g . S t r ate gy. D e si gn.

THE CHAMBER C.A.R.E.S. The Chamber stands by this statement. We practice it on a daily basis. As an organization, we use Chamber Members exclusively. We hope we can ‘count on you’ to practice using Chamber Members to meet all of your business needs. You can find new and current members online at www.ModChamber.org. Progress Magazine is the voice of the Modesto Chamber of Commerce, and the leading business publication in Stanislaus County. For more information or advertising info call 209.526.9136.


PRESIDENT’S CLUB CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE PLATINUM LEVEL

SILVER LEVEL

Flowers Baking Co. of Modesto, LLC

Seven Up Bottling Corporation

E. & J. Gallo Winery

Acme Construction Company, Inc.

F & M Bank

Solecon Industrial Contractors

Kaiser Permanente

American Chevrolet

Galletto Ristorante

Solid Networks, Inc.

Walmart

American Medical Response

Gianelli & Associates

Stanislaus Distributing

Walmart Neighborhood Market

Aramark Uniform Services

Gilton Solid Waste Management, Inc.

Stanislaus Food Products Company

Atherton & Associates, LLP

DIAMOND LEVEL

Golden Valley Health Centers

Grimbleby Coleman CPAs, Inc.

Bank of the West

Bank of Stockton

Beard Land and Investment Co.

Brightwood College

Capax-Giddings, Corby, Hynes, Inc.

Brunn & Flynn

Doctors Behavioral

California State University, Stanislaus

Care One Home Health

Health Center- DMC

Certified Public Accountants

Stanislaus Surgical Hospital Storer Coachways SunOpta Aseptic, Inc.

Grover Landscape Services, Inc.

Sutter Gould Medical Foundation

I.J. Larsen Pumps, Inc.

Telcion Communications Group

Infiniti of Modesto

TSM Insurance

International Paper Company

Turlock Irrigation District

Iron Mountain, Inc.

Union Bank

JS West & Company

US Bank

Lewis Capital Advisors

Valley Children’s Healthcare

Central Valley Automotive

Maxx Value Foods

Valley First Credit Union

Pacific Southwest Container

Central Valley Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge

Mercer Foods

Valley Lexus-BMW

Physician Referral Service-DMC

Central Valley Nissan

Mocse Credit Union

Vintage Faire Mall

Central Valley Volkswagen Hyundai

The Modesto Bee

W.H. Breshears, Inc.

GOLD LEVEL

Central Valley Medical Group

Modesto Toyota

Warden’s Office Products Center

5.11, Inc.

Central Valley Specialty Hospital

Oak Valley Community Bank

Crystal Creamery

Chuckchansi Gold Resort & Casino

O’Brien’s Market

DoubleTree Hotel

Clark Pest Control

Pacific Gas & Electric Company

Fiscallini Cheese Company

Cloudy in California

Panelized Structures Inc.

HealthSouth Rehabilitation

Collins Electrical

Comcast

Pepsi Bottling Group

Doctors Medical Center-DMC

Frito-Lay Company, Inc.

Central Sanitary Supply Co.

MedAmerica Billing Services, Inc.

Central Valley Ag Grinding

Modesto & Empire Traction Co.

of Modesto

and Hospice, Inc.

Memorial Medical Center

Covanta Stanislaus, Inc.

Modesto Irrigation District

Damrell, Nelson, Schrimp, Pallios,

Modesto Nuts Professional Baseball

RACOR, Division of Parker

Del Monte Foods

Delta Sierra Beverage

Hannifin Corporation

Pacher & Silva

Insurance Agency

Yosemite Meat Company, Inc.

Prompt Staffing

D.B.A Courtesy Staffing

Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Rizo-Lopez Foods, Inc.

Sysco Food Services of

English Oaks Nursing &

Rogers Jewelry Company

San Joaquin Valley College

Rehabilitation Hospital

Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green

Prime Shine Car Wash

The Eberhardt School of Business

Central California

Wells Fargo Bank

PMZ Real Estate

Seneca Foods, LLC

Taco Bell

Warden’s Office Furniture Outlet

Final Cut Media

Save Mart Supermarkets

First Choice Physician Partners

Smile Shine Family Dental

CONTACT THE CHAMBER TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR PRESIDENT'S CLUB LEVEL BENEFITS

Food Maxx

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

SERVICE

BYRD PEST CONTROL

NADRICH & COHEN, LLP

Pest Control Services

DOWNTOWN STORAGE AND MAILING

254 Sperry Ave #2

1305 10th St.

2909 Coffee Rd #14,

Patterson, CA 95363

Modesto, CA 95354

Modesto, CA 95355

209.892.2973

209.338.6140

209.232.2933

byrdpest.com/modesto-pest-control

modestostorageinc.com

personalinjurylawcal.com

MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I MODCHAMBER.ORG

Legal Support Services


IS

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Progress December 2017  
Progress December 2017  

Serving Our Community for Over 100 years

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