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July 2011 volume XVIII number 5


Series III ON THE COVER Our cover this month features Ctenopoma kingsleyae, The tail spot bushfish. For more information on this African anabantid, see Al Priest's article on page 11.  Photo by Alexander A. Priest GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Board Members

President Vice-President Treasurer Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretary

Dan Radebaugh Edward Vukich Jules Birnbaum Mario Bengcion Tommy Chang

Members At Large

Claudia Dickinson Al Grusell Emma Haus Leonard Ramroop

Pete D’Orio Ben Haus Jason Kerner

Committee Chairs

A.C.A. Delegate Bowl Show Breeder Award  Early Arrivals F.A.A.S. Delegate Membership Programs N.E.C. Delegate Technology Coordinator

Claudia Dickinson Leonard Ramroop Warren Feuer Mark Soberman Al Grusell Alexander A. Priest Marsha Radebaugh Claudia Dickinson Claudia Dickinson Warren Feuer

MODERN AQUARIUM Editor in Chief Copy Editors   Exchange Editors  Advertising Mgr.

Dan Radebaugh Sharon Barnett Susan Priest Alexander A. Priest Stephen Sica Donna Sosna Sica Mark Soberman

Vol. XVIII, No. 5 July, 2011

In This Issue From the Editor G.C.A.S. 2011 Program Schedule President’s Message Rules for August's Silent Auction Our Guest Speaker: Jeff Bollbach Our Generous Sponsors & Advertisers The Common Denominator of Successful Aquarists

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by Jules Birnbaum

Our Generous Members Aquaria As Art by Stephen Sica

Try A Different Aftrican Challenge

Ctenopoma kingsleyae - The tail spot bushfish by Alexander A. Priest

Pictures from our Last Meeting by Susan Priest

Wet Leaves by Susan Priest

Wet Leaves (All of Them!) by Susan Priest

G.C.A.S. Happenings The Undergravel Reporter The Weirdest of the Weird!

Fin Fun (Puzzle Page) Homeward Bound

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From the Editor

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by Dan Radebaugh

rom time to time in past columns I’ve reflected on the curious way that a particular issue of Modern Aquarium will take on its own theme with no premeditation on my part. This month’s issue is a good example of that. The theme for this issue could be called “something a bit different.” Jules Birnbaum starts us off on this path immediately. His article, “A Common Denominator of Successful Aquarists,” was inspired by an episode of TV’s 60 Minutes, which dealt with a group of Greek Orthodox monks who live and pray on the Greek island of Athos. Something about the story caused Jules to connect the monks’ way of life to principles he learned in sales training, and then he further connected both to an outlook that might be called “the way of the aquarist.” It really goes to show that we can learn something profound about one part of our lives from something seemingly not connected at all. Steve Sica follows with “Aquaria As Art.” Whereas in our articles and discussions about fishkeeping we all tend to deal mostly with pragmatic issues, such as our fishes’ diets, water and temperature preferences, spawning requirements, social outlook, etc., our accompanying photos reveal that we are also very much concerned with how our aquaria look. It’s nice to have an article that brings that aspect of our hobby out into the open, and calls it what it is―art! Al Priest actually names this issue’s theme in his article, “Try a Different African Challenge,” an introduction to the uncommonly encountered African anabantid Ctenopoma kingsleyae, or the tail spot bushfish. For those of you who are attracted to fish like bettas and gouramis, with their understated curiosity, but would like something a little larger, and/ or a little different, one of these Africans could be a fascinating choice. Sue Priest follows with three entries. First is our monthly art entry of photos from our last meeting, then she reviews an owners’ manual for the discus fish. While you might not think about this as being different, Sue points out that it’s been ten years since she’s reviewed a book on discus. It’s also been awhile (though I haven’t counted) since we’ve had an article on them, so they definitely fall into our issue’s theme. Sue then follows with another “different” and welcome item: an index of all the aquarium books reviewed in “Wet Leaves” from 1994 through 2010. What a great thing for us to have a record of!

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The Undergravel Reporter is always at least a little bit different, but the title this month reveals that Undie was indeed tuned in to the cosmic mood. “The Weirdest of the Weird” sort of says it all about being different. In the “Fin Fun” puzzle, we help a Florida flagfish find its way home to Florida. In July.

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Remember, as always, we need articles! Modern Aquarium is produced by and for the members of Greater City Aquarium Society. Our members are our authors, and with ten issues per year, we always, always need more articles. I know several of you are keeping and/or breeding fish that I would like to know more about, and I’m certain other members would be interested as well. Share your experience with us. Write about it! If you’re a little unsure about the state of your writing technique, don’t worry – that’s why there are editors. If you have an article, photo, or drawing that you’d like to submit for inclusion in Modern Aquarium, it’s easy to do! You may fax it to me at (877) 299-0522, email it to gcas@earthlink.net, or just hand it to me at a meeting. However you get it to me, I’ll be delighted to receive it!

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GCAS Programs 2011

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t is our great fortune to have another admirable cast of speakers who have so graciously accepted our invitation to join us throughout the coming season, bringing us their extensive knowledge and experiences. You certainly won’t wish to miss a moment of our prominent guests, not to mention the friends, fish, warmth, and camaraderie that accompanies each meeting. I know I can barely wait to see you here! Enjoy! Claudia July 6

Jeff Bollbach How to Get Rich Breeding Fish

August 3

Silent Auction

September 7

TBA

October 5

TBA

November 2

Ted Judy Going Gabon!

December 7

Holiday Party!

January

Winter Break

February

Winter Break

Articles submitted for consideration in Modern Aquarium (ISSN 2150-0940) must be received no later than the 10th day of the month prior to the month of publication. Please fax to (877) 299-0522, or email to gcas@earthlink. net. Copyright 2011 by the Greater City Aquarium Society Inc., a not-for-profit New York State corporation. All rights reserved. Not-for-profit aquarium societies are hereby granted permission to reproduce articles and illustrations from this publication, unless the article indicates that the copyrights have been retained by the author, and provided reprints indicate source and two copies of the publication are sent to the Exchange Editor of this magazine. Any other reproduction or commercial use of the material in this publication is prohibited without express written prior permission. The Greater City Aquarium Society meets every month, except January and February. Members receive notice of meetings in the mail. For more information, contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437. Find out more, or leave us a message, at our Internet Home Page at: http://www.greatercity.org or http://www.greatercity.com Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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President’s Message by Dan Radebaugh

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his is July, and that brings us at least two items of interest for Greater City members. First, the American Cichlid Association is holding their annual convention in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Capital Cichlid Association. The dates are July 21-24. Please visit the ACA’s website at http://www.ccadoesaca.com/ for more information. Several Greater City members are also long-time members of the ACA, and the conventions really are worth attending.

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The second item of interest for GCAS members is that next month is August, and that means our meeting will be devoted to our Silent Auction and Flea Market. If you have odds & ends lying about with no use in sight, bring them in! Remember the old saying about one person’s junk being another’s treasure. To make sure everything goes smoothly, please familiarize yourself with the rules listed below. Good luck, and good hunting!

Dan

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


The G.C.A.S.

Proudly extends a most Warm Welcome to

Our Guest Speaker Jeff Bollbach Speaking on How to get Rich Breeding Fish

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GCAS Thanks You! Our Generous Sponsors and Advertisers The Greater City Aquarium Society extends our heartfelt thanks to the following manufacturers for their generous donations. Thanks also to our advertisers, whose contributions to our success as a Society are deeply appreciated. Please patronize our supporters. Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Aquarium Technology Inc Ecological Laboratories HBH Pet Products Koller-Craft Kordon, LLC Marineland Microbe Lift Ocean Nutrition America Omega Sea Red Sea

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Rena Rolf C. Hagen San Francisco Bay Brand Seachem Zoo Med Laboratories Inc. Cameo Pet Shop Coral Aquarium Nassau Discus World Class Aquarium Zoo Rama Aquarium

July 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


The Common Denominator of Successful Aquarists by Jules Birnbaum ast night I saw something quite amazing on the TV show 60 Minutes. It was about the way of life of a group of Greek Orthodox monks. They live on Mount Athos, in isolated stone buildings set on the edges of cliffs overlooking the ocean, pray 21 hours a day, sleep just three hours every night, and eat two meals a day which last for just ten minutes each. How could they do this all their lives? And yet when the CBS narrator interviewed several monks, one of whom had graduated from Harvard before becoming a monk, they each said they did not even give it a second thought. They had formed the habits needed to become successful monks, and the monks there have been doing this for over 600 years. It is said that, “a stitch in time saves nine,” and “don’t put off for tomorrow what you can do today.” Better yet, form the habits that failures never form. In sales, we learn that people fail for many reasons, but the biggest reasons are that they fail to plan, and fail to form the habits that successful people develop early in life. Now let’s take this idea and apply it to our hobby. Feeding your fish on a regular basis, such as one or two times daily, with frozen or live food once a week, is a habit we all should get into. Water changes―distasteful to some―should be performed on a regular basis; whether once a week for a heavily populated tank, or once a month for one that is sparsely populated. You can see that forming the habit of performing this chore say, every Monday night, will assure that your fish will have a long and healthy life. The regular water changes will save you time and money in the long run. Also, if you’re called away because of family matters or on business, missing a Monday every so often won’t hurt. Cleaning filters on a regular basis is important to maintaining both water quality and the life of your filters. Testing your water occasionally to see that what you are doing is working to maintain proper pH and temperature is highly advisable. Varying the diet of your fish on a regular basis will maintain healthy fish that will grow properly, and be resistant to diseases. Make it a habit. Maintain regular hours for light, either manually or by use of timers. If you

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grow plants, eleven or twelve hours of light a day is essential. Habit? You bet. Reading about the hobby in books, magazines, and on the internet on a regular basis makes the hobby more interesting, and sharpens your knowledge. Although there is much misinformation on the internet, there’s also much good information. I’m logged in every day to various websites specializing in tropical fish information. You might say, “Oh, this is much too timeconsuming,” but I’m not online for more than a few minutes a day, and only when I’m already using my PC anyway. I find it gratifying to get into a discussion with some of our hobby’s experts, and to realize I can speak their language. Attending our GCAS meetings on a regular basis, which for me is every month (except January and February), is a great habit. Even though I’m busy with the auction and raffle, there is still time to ask Joe Ferdenzi, Warren Feuer, Mark Soberman, Ed Vukich, Jeff Bollbach, Harry Faustmann, Joe Graffagnino, and other knowledgeable members some of my questions. I’ve made a habit of picking their brains, and you can too. Successful hobbyists have formed habits that have made their fishrooms a success and worth visiting. Just ask a few of our successful breeders, and I’m sure they will agree that what they are doing is automatic. They have formed the habits that have made them successful. Here is an idea for how you can develop the habits required, which will eventually become second nature, and thus no longer drudgery. Get hold of a monthly calendar big enough to write on―perhaps an appointment book or wall calendar. Or use one on your PC. With this, you can now see how much time is actually available to you. Next, fill in all the business time you use to make a living. Then fill in all the family time, such as weekly shopping, social engagements, parties, et cetera. You will be amazed at how much free time you really have. Fill in tropical fish time such as water changes and other maintenance functions that need to be done on a regular basis. If a tank needs to be broken down, moved, or resealed, schedule time for this as well. Even write in a planned July 2011 7


visit to your local pet shop, such as Cameo, to pick up live food and supplies. (One of the nice things about being an aquarist is that we don’t have to form the habit of walking the dog three or four times a day in all kinds of weather.) Twelve months or less after formulating a program, it will become automatic and you won’t even need the calendar, though you might want to keep it anyway, because it works! Try hanging it near your fish tanks. I know it works for sales people (such as myself), and it can work for you. Forming good habits is the common denominator of all successful people! Sunset on Mount Athos in Greece. Photo by Yiannis Papadimitriou

Our Generous Members Each month a blue sheet is located on our auction table where those members who donate items to the auction can indicate their donations if they wish to do so. Due to the immense generosity of those who donate, we have no shortage of items to be auctioned. A warm thank you to the following members and others who so generously contributed, making last month’s auction the bountiful success that it was: William Amely Sharon Barnett Mario Bengcion Jules Birnbaum

Jeff Bollbach Joe Graffagnino Dan & Marsha Radebaugh Ed Vukich

Computer Consulting Jason Kerner Consultant

Repairs / Upgrades Virus Removal Data Recovery DSL / Cable Setup Wireless Internet A+ Certified 8

(718) 469-5444 Jasontech1@verizon.net

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Aquaria As Art Story and Photo by Stephen Sica remember the day very clearly. It was Sunday, March 13th and my wife Donna was cooking an early St. Patrick’s Day corned beef and cabbage dinner for her sister and nephew who were visiting us from Florida, as well as for two additional guests—one appropriately named Kelly. As a result of this company, Donna suggested that I clean the algae from the walls of the two fish tanks that we keep in the den. We usually do our entertaining in this room. I cleaned the walls, and changed the water in the 8-gallon first. The plants were wilted, so I removed them, salvaging several, which I put in tanks in my basement to regenerate. I decided that I would also redo the design of the tank in a simple way. This squarish tank had black, number five stones about two inches deep for a substrate. I placed a clump of Java moss in the left rear, in front of the submersible heater to block most of it from view. I added a small artificial driftwood branch that I had not used for many years. I think that the Penn Plax company makes this identical branch design in three different sizes; I was using either the small or medium size―I think it was the medium. I leaned the driftwood with the branches in the gravel so that it would enclose most of the moss that was near the heater in the left rear of the tank. The tank’s built-in filter shoots a stream of water which is fairly strong in the small tank, so it is difficult to keep the moss in place. Real driftwood may have been more artistic or at least more authentic, and I have many pieces that I could have substituted, but I liked the branch look. Artistic license, you might say. Diagonally opposite the moss and driftwood I placed a small gray and white striated rock with a small pointed peak―sort of a three inch miniature Matterhorn―in the right front of the tank. This tank has been home to five purple passion danios for a year or longer. The fish did not seem to mind the alteration, or should I say renovation, of their home. Three days later Donna commented that the

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tanks looked good―in other words she could see their interiors clearly―but the small one seemed "sparse." I told her that I decorated it by using the “art of being simple” as the tank’s theme. She inspected it, gave her approval, and commented that it was artless. I won’t offer an explanation as to the meaning of this word, under the assumption that it is known to this audience. As they say, never speak down to your audience, but if you are not sure of its meaning, please look it up. I never knew what the word meant until my last year in college. When I was a student teacher in the English department at a local high school, the chairperson instructed me to develop a theme and decorate the enclosed bulletin board/display case on the wall outside the department’s office. If I recall, I did something about Shakespeare. When the chairman inspected my work she offered a kind remark and told me it was quite artless! I nodded, but was wondering if this was a subtle criticism, so I just had to look it up as soon as I got home. I had related this story to my wife many years ago―unfortunately, on more than one occasion―so she feels compelled to use it if an opportunity arises. One of Donna’s interests is vocabulary and the meaning of words. In fact, she keeps a notebook with new words that she learns. I see a bit of Webster in her―not Daniel, who knew the Devil, but Noah, who knew something about words. She recently began studying the word artless in earnest, and informed me that it also has a more negative connotation. I prefer to believe in the “good” meaning. I also believe that one’s credentials as art critic can be described from a layman’s viewpoint as simply personal taste. I think that the concept of personal taste is what makes every person an artist (as well as an art critic) to some degree. As a result, my decorated fish tank shows me as an artist (very basic, I do admit) and my aquarium as an art form. Even a photograph of it is another expression of art. July 2011 9


Of course, Modern Aquarium is itself a higher form of art, thanks to all the people who are responsible for its being! It is my singular honor to occasionally contribute in a small way. Thank you to all who do so, and let us offer a good deal of encouragement for more

to give it a try. Writing skill is not essential―only a good thought or theme. Don’t worry about criticism, because no one does it. Besides, if you’re like me, when I read our club publication I only look at the pictures!

Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies Serving the Northeastern Portion of the United States

SUMMER AUCTION - 2011!    Location: THE CROWNE PLAZA 100 Berlin Road Cromwell, CT (860) 635-2000  : Register at www.northeastcouncil.org, 1 red dot, add’l red dot/10 *lots,

60/40 split, and preprinted lot labels (please label your bags) Lots registered day of auction receive 50/50 split *Acceptable lots will be determined by the auction committee Vendors: TBD

Food & Refreshments will be available 

REGISTRATION.................................8:30 AM TO 12:00 PM VIEWING OF GOODS........................9:30 AM TO 11:45 AM AUCTION..................................................12:00 PM TO 5 PM RAFFLE..........................................................................50 / 50

 10

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Ctenopoma kingsleyae - The Tail Spot Bushfish Article and Photos by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST hen most aquarium hobbyists think of Most aquarium hobbyists are familiar with, fish from Africa, they usually are or at least know of, Asian anabantoid species such thinking about cichlids. So, I’m as bettas and gouramies. Less well known, and guessing that this article will serve as a first less commonly seen in the hobby, are the African introduction for many of our members to African anabantoids, of which there are three currently anabantoids. recognized genera: Ctenopoma, Microctenopoma, Anabantoids have long been my aquarium and Sandelia. A review of Fishbase indicates at hobby favorites. What distinguishes the fish in the least 40 currently recognized species of suborder Anabantoidei is a special breathing organ Ctenopoma and 12 species of Microctenopoma.2 (The genus Microctenopoma is relatively new, called the “labyrinth” organ, located in their head described in 1995 by the ichthyologist Steven M. and above their gills. Since it occupies most of the Norris, who placed some species, then in the genus gill-chamber, the gills of anabantoids are usually Ctenopoma, into a new genus, Microctenopoma.)3 reduced in size, meaning that, for many of the fish Although one might think that “micro” in this group (especially adults), the gills Ctenopoma would consist of all of the smaller themselves often cannot supply enough oxygen to species of the genera, this is not the case. sustain the fish without help from the labyrinth Microctenopoma are defined by several bone organ. differences from Ctenopoma. In addition, The labyrinth organ is so named because it Microctenopoma exhibit noticeable sexual consists of multiple folded membranes, somewhat dimorphism, and behavioral characteristics that resembling a maze or “labyrinth.” The labyrinth include bubble-nest building and defense. On the organ holds a gulp of atmospheric air from above other hand, the water’s surface Ctenopoma are within small basically egg m a z e - l i k e Scientific Name: Ctenopoma kingsleyae scatte re rs , and compartments of Common Names: Tailspot Bushfish, Tailspot while their eggs thin boney plates Ctenopoma, Tailspot Climbing Perch, generally float to called lamellae. Kingsley's Ctenopoma, Gray Ctenopoma the surface and (The word Temperature: 77-82°F (25-28°C) usually remain anabantoid comes pH Range: 6.0-8.0 (6.4 to 6.6 ideal) together under from a Greek word Hardness: 5-20°H surface debris to meaning to “travel Size: Up to 10 inches (25cm) SL resemble a nest, up,” referring to the Temperament: Aggressive to smaller species there is no fish going up to the Native habitat: Widely distributed from intentional nest water’s surface to Mauritania to the Congo building or take a gulp of air.) Aquascaping: Heavily planted tank and/or tank t e r r i t oria l nes t The lamellae are with multiple caves and roots, tight lid, guarding among the covered with thin dim lighting various Ctenopoma membranes that Nutrition: Carnivorous, requiring live food species. allow oxygen in the (or moving frozen) As is true for air to pass straight all anabantoids, the into the fish’s blood ability of members stream. Because of the genera Ctenopoma and Microctenopoma to the labyrinth organ allows anabantoids to use “breathe” atmospheric air allows them to survive oxygen from the air, it gives them the ability to out of the water for much longer periods of time survive in stagnant and oxygen poor water that than other fish (as long as their bodies do not dry would not be able to sustain fish which only rely out). Because they can survive for extended on gills to filter oxygen dissolved in the water. In periods in mud and wet leaf litter, it is possible to addition, since air is a better transmitter of sound occasionally find live Ctenopoma on land (albeit than water, when the labyrinth organ is filled with moist land near water); and so members of the air, anabantoids have more acute hearing than most genus Ctenopoma (and also of the genus other species of fish.1 Microctenopoma) are commonly called “bushfish.”

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The rest of this article will focus on the largest of the Ctenopoma species, Ctenopoma kingsleyae, a not-so-gentle giant that reaches nearly 10 inches in length (although six to eight inches is more common in the home aquarium). It has been reported to live in aquaria for as long as 30 years, and may not even reach sexual maturity until it is between five and ten years old.4 Ctenopoma kingsleyae was named in honor of Mary Kingsley, a British explorer and writer who first collected it, along with over a hundred other specimmens, in the Ogowe (also spelled Ogooué) River of Gabon in 1894-1895. Mary Kingsley was one of the first European explorers (and certainly the first European woman) to do extensive fish collecting from that river. Species in both the Ctenopoma and Microctenopoma genera are primarily carnivorous. In their native habitats, and in the home aquarium, most are “ambush predators,” hiding in caves or among roots or plants until a suitably sized fish swims by (and “suitable” for these species means anything that can fit in their mouths). It has been my experience that, at least in the home aquarium, Ctenopoma kingsleyae are considerably less shy and much more active hunters, at least as compaired with my Ctenopoma acutirostre (leopard ctenopoma), who almost never venture from their caves until I put in live blackworms, and then they rapidly grab some worms and retreat back into hiding. While males will sometimes appear to fight with each other, I have never seen any damage result from these interactions. I have been told

that, despite their size and the sharp spines on their bodies, they often fail to defend themselves when attacked. On the other hand, there are reports5 that they can and will hold their own with large aggressive cichlids. From my personal experience, I can neither confirm nor deny either report. However, it is my opinion that they are certainly capable of holding their own against nearly any similar sized fish. Regardless, they are best kept by themselves in a species tank, or with other similar sized, but non-aggressive species. (remember that they will eat almost any smaller sized fish!) Ctenopoma kingsleyae is basically an overall gray fish, with a black spot at the caudal peduncal. That spot is the reason that, among their common names, they are called tailspot ctenopoma or tailspot climbing perch (they are also sometimes referred to as Kingsley's ctenopoma or the gray ctenopoma). The body is elongated, with spines running the length of both the dorsal and anal fin. The spines on the larger Ctenopoma species are quite sharp, and special care is required when handling them. Those spines can catch in nets, and I can attest to the fact that it is very unwise (and painful!) to handle them with one's bare hands. In addition, if you intend to put them in a bag for transport or mailing, a very heavy duty bag (or three or four standard bags) should be used to lessen the risk of puncture. (As an aside, a few years ago, the then GCAS President, Joe Ferdenzi, came to my house to capture some of my Ctenopoma acutirostre to take them on his visit to

Although the female is on the upper right, you can see that it is not all that easy to determine sex by sight alone while the fish are in the tank.

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the Bermuda Fry-Angle Aquarium Society. We met by housing a single five to six inch pair, by captured them using plastic food strainers to avoid themselves, in a 40 gallon tank (preferably larger). damage to either the fish or our hands. Ctenopoma The latter requirement is a bit harder to achieve, as kingsleyae are similarly armored, and similar most members of the genus Ctenopoma are not precautions should be easy to sex. taken in their handling.) Ctenopoma kingsleyae In the aquarium, are not sexable until Ctenopoma kingsleyae they are at least four should be given heavily inches in total length. planted tanks and/or While an adult tanks with multiple female tends to have a caves and roots. They fuller body shape due to are fairly aggressive, the presence of eggs, a and they should not be very well-fed male kept with smaller might also exhibit a species. They prefer round body. So far, the soft, slightly acidic most reliable method to water. They also are determine the sex of The most accurate way to identify a male powerful (and sudden) Ctenopoma kingsleyae jumpers, so the tank Ctenopoma kingsleyae is the presence of is by the presence of spines in the area just behind the eye. should be tightly tiny spines behind the covered. As noted eye (this is also true for previously, they are primarily carnivorous, and I C. acutirostre). Those spines are very hard to see have found that they do just fine on a diet of live while the fish is in the tank, and finding them blackworms and live brine shrimp (pre-treated with usually requires manually feeling for the spines liquid freshwater fish vitamins). I have never been (which are in a curved pattern from behind the eye, able to get any species of Ctenopoma to accept dry pointing towards the tail) with your finger. Move or frozen food. All attempts to do so resulted in your finger slowly from the gills (be careful, both me having to syphon out uneaten and decaying sexes have spines on the outer edge of the gill food the next day. I have been told that some covers) towards the eye. If you can feel sharp species will accept frozen food if it is moving (due spines behind the eye, then it’s almost certainly a to water current), but I have not been able to male. Females either have no spines behind the achieve success using this method. eye, or have spines that are so short as to be barely There is a great deal of misinformation about noticeable. The spines become easier to identify as the breeding of Ctenopoma kingsleyae in the home the fish gets older and grows larger. aquarium, with many accounts indicating that it is Ctenopoma kingsleyae are very tolerant of a nearly impossible to accomplish. While spawning variety of water conditions as long as the water is in the home aquarium is not common, it does changed fairly regularly. Poor water conditions happen. Thousands of eggs are expelled, fertilized, quicky affect them, with clamped fins and cloudy and rise to the surface. The warmer the water, the eyes being the most visible external signs. One or sooner the eggs hatch. At 84°F (about 29°C), the two water changes and the fish usually returns to eggs hatch in a little over 24 hours. Two days normal with no apparent ill effects. later, the fry are swimming horizontally and able to So, if you’re looking for a different type of eat microworms or baby brine shrimp. African species, this might be the one for you. Ctenopoma kingsleyae require a fairly large tank if they are to spawn and, of course, you need a male/female pair. The former requirement can be

http://www.mrcmekong.org/download/programmes/fisheries/Labyrinth_desc.pdf http://www.fishbase.org 3 Norris, Steven M.: Microctenopoma uelense and M. nigricans, a new genus and two new species of anabantid fishes from Africa (p. 357) 4 http://www.seriouslyfish.com/profile.php?genus=Ctenopoma&species=kingsleyae&id=59 5 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:5558rNKh_aMJ:forums.tfhmagazine.com/ viewtopic.php%3Ff%3D84%26t%3D18478+%22Mary+Kingsley%22+ctenopoma&cd=4&hl=en&ct= clnk&gl=us&source=www.google.com 1 2

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Pictures from our

Our speaker: George Richter.

George with Dan Radebaugh.

Bob Hamje

Sharon Barnett Jerry O’Farrell

Gino Cusano

Wallace Deng Brad Dickinson

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Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


last meeting Photos by Susan Priest

Welcome to our new and returning Greater City members:

Our newest member: Sean Cunningham

Welcome back, Roger Brewster

Last Month’s Bowl Show Winners:

1st Place: Bill Amely

2nd Place: Mario Bengcion

3rd Place: Richard Waizman

Last month’s Door Prize Winners (Pictured with Claudia Dickinson):

Jason Irizarry Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Gerry Domingo July July2011 2011

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scientific name. At the time this book was published, one genera and two species were in usage, these being Symphysodon discus (the Heckel discus) and Symphysodon aequifasciatus (the blue discus). Rather than tick off the titles of the chapters, which are fairly predictable categories, I will dig a A Series On Books For The Hobbyist little deeper and list some of the more specific topics under discussion. In no particular order, by SUSAN PRIEST some of them are: osmoregulation, black water hen I am choosing books to review for extract, heating mats, feeding schedule and this column, I try to offer a variety of procedures, recognizing and creating mated pairs, topics. Recently I ion exchange resins, and the was perusing my carbon cycle, along with Discus Fish comprehensive list of titles, countless others. This brief By Thomas A Giovanetti which spans the better part of sampling should give you a and Oliver Lucanus eighteen (18!) years. One fact taste of the amount of detail Barrons, 2005 which floated to the surface offered by our authors. was that I hadn’t reviewed a The front cover alerts us book about discus in ten (10!) to a special chapter on the years. I decided it was high time to revisit this planted discus aquarium. Much of the information fish, as it is one of the most popular in the hobby. throughout this very thorough discourse can be Another thing I try to do is find recently applied to most planted aquariums which are home to other types of fish. Several strategies for algae published titles. Do Fish Sleep? by Judith Weis, control are presented. Here is just one of them. in the April issue, is a perfect example. Well! The “Put several algae most recently eating fish in the published book about planted aquarium at discus which I could the very beginning. find (and had not After the first three already reviewed) has months you may a copyright date of remove some but not 2005, and this all of them. An represents a re-issue excellent fish for from 1991. So I will control of algae is the dust off Discus Fish, f l y i n g f o x and offer you a (Epalzeorhynchus source for the most siamensis). u p - t o - d a t e This book information available describes itself as between two covers. having “handsome (There is probably a full color photos.” lot more recent stuff The photos can only available on the be as handsome as internet, but if I start their subjects, and the tapping into vast array of colors cyberspace I’ll have and patterns of these to change the name of fish are handsome this column to Eindeed. However, the Leaves!) “perfect discus” is Having said all illustrated by a of that, this modest drawing, and not a volume (92 pages) photograph. Apparently perfection in a discus is gives its readers a remarkable amount of detailed more often an aspiration than a reality! information. I am thereby challenged to succinctly Some of the hot topics for discus afficionados present you with a complete picture of what it has can be found on the following pages: the oxygen to offer. cycle (page 47), beef heart mixture (page 75), and Let’s start with the name of the fish. Since HLLE, that is, head and lateral line erosion, AKA 1840 when these fish were first described, there hole in the head disease (page 83). have been numerous permutations of their

W

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“Timid nature,” (page 10), does not mean shy plants, or that discus would like their tank to be surrounded by mini-blinds. Rather, it refers to the personalities of these fish, and the fact that they will not thrive among very active tankmates. Silver dollars and danios are examples which our authors use as inappropriate choices. The chapter on breeding jumps around a bit. Even though it does offer specific information about such topics as stimulating spawning and rearing fry, it is not comprehensive enough to guide a beginning discus keeper through the process. Even our authors describe this section as brief, and expect that it will only serve to whet our appetites. They do refer their readers to the internet, but without recommending

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specific web addresses, as they are prone to frequent change. “A proper diet [for discus] is one that fulfills the nutritional requirements of the fish in a system that is easily managed by the average aquarist.” By now I hope you understand that anyone who undertakes the care and breeding of discus must be “well above average.” Volumes of prior fishkeeping experience (the hands-on kind, as well as being well read on the subject), along with plenty of time to devote to your fish, are absolute must-have qualifications. However, if you are just beginning your adventures with discus, this book would be a great place for you to start.

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F

or my own purposes I have compiled this chronological and all-inclusive listing of Wet Leaves columns. Dan felt that there might be enough interest on the part of our readers to print it in Modern Aquarium. So, here they are, all 96 columns, well over100 books (several of the columns, such as the one on the Jare Sausaman collection, review more than one book), and 17 years of Wet Leaves, from 1994 through 2010. The list does not include any books reviewed so far in 2011. I thank all of you who have shown your loyalty and support throughout its tenure. It truly amazes me how many people read, and even look forward to reading, Wet Leaves.

Susan

11/94 - You and Your Aquarium* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dick Mills 12/94 - Freshwater Fishes of Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Gerald Allen 1/95 - School of Fish* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Fell Keppler 2/95 - Aquarium Fish Breeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inez Scheurmann 5/95 - A Step by Step Book About Seahorses* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Giwojna 6/95 - Nature Aquarium World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Takashi Amano 9/95 - The Complete Aquarium* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter W. Scott 11/95 - ASPCA Pet Care: Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Evans 3/96 - Fishkeeping Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karen Youngs, Editor 5/96 - Koi and Garden Ponds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Herbert Axelrod 9/96 - Apple Snails in the Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Gloria Perera & Jerry G. Walls 11/96 - “Aquarists’ Library” Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lee Finley, AFM 12/96 - Discus For The Perfectionist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Wattley 2/97 - Confessions of a Tropical Fish Addict** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ross Socolof 3/97 - The Cichlid Aquarium, 2nd Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Paul V. Loiselle 5/97 - The Fascination of Breeding Aquarium Fish . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Herbert Axelrod & Mary Sweeney 9/97 - “My Summer Vacation” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reflections on the Jare Sausaman book collection 11/97 - Livebearing Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Dawes 2/98 - Aquarium Fish of the World (two books with the same title) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1) Ivan Petrovicky, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2) Sakuri, Sakamoto & Mori 4/98 - Bettas, Gouramis and Other Anabantoids; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorg Vierke - Labyrinth Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helmut Pinter 5/98 - Colored Atlas of Miniature Catfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Warren Burgess 6/98 - Nature Aquarium World II and III (two books) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Takashi Amano 9/98 - Official Guide to Goldfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Goldfish Society of America 10/98 - Freshwater Angelfishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Herbert Axelrod and Dr. Warren Burgess - Angelfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Braz Walker 11/98 - “Aquarist’s Library” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Book review column by Lee Finley 12/98 - The Biotope Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rainer Stawikowski 2/99 - Aquarium Plants Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ines Schuermann 4/99 - GCAS Author Award Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How to write a book review 5/99 - Lake Tanganyican Cichlids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Phillip Smith 6/99 - The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freshwater Aquariums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Wickham 9/99 - Discovering Fossil Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John G. Maisey 12/99 - Guppies: Fancy Strains and How to Produce Them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noboru Iwasaki 4/00 - Baensch Fossil Atlas of Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karl A. Frickhinger 6/00 - Rasboras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Martin R. Brittan 9/00 - Tanganyican Secrets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ad Konings & Horst Walter Dieckhoff 10/00 - The Zero Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Books referencing neon tetras 11/00 - A to Z of Tropical Fish Diseases . . . . . . . . . Dr. Peter Burgess, Mary Bailey, and Adrian Exell 2/01 - Understanding Tropical Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gina Sandford 4/01 - North American Fishes for the Home Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David M. Schleser 5/01 - Hobbyist Guide to the Natural Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Chris Andrews 6/01 - Dictionary of Aquarium Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John H. Tullock 10Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) Modern

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9/01 - Tropical Fish Lopedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Bailey and Dr. Peter Burgess 11/01 - The World’s Most Beautiful Seashells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leonard Hill 12/01 - Aquarium Plant Paradise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Takashi Amano 3/02 - Gardener’s Guide to Water Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Derek Lambert 4/02 - Fancy Goldfish: A complete Guide . . . . . . . . Dr. Erik L. Johnson, D.V.M., and Richard E. Hess 9/02 - Discus Breeding for Beginners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Wattley 10/02 - Creating a Natural Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Hiscock 11/02 - Fish Behavior in the Aquarium and in the Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephan Reebs 2/03 - The Simple Guide to Freshwater Aquariums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David E. Boruchowitz 4/03 - Stocking Your Garden Pond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Herbert Axelrod 6/03 - The Toy Fish: a History of the Aquarium Hobby in America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Albert J. Klee 9/03 - The Cichlid Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. George W. Barlow 10/03 - Rainbowfishes in Nature and in the Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Gerald R. Allen 11/03 - Bristlenoses-Catfishes With Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathy Jinkings 12/03 - Damselfishes of the World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Gerald R. Allen 2/04 - Aquarium Designs Inspired by Nature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Hiscock 5/04 - Living Fossil-The Story of the Coelocanth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keith S. Thompson 6/04 - The Guppy 1859-1967 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert J. Klee 9/04 - Ecology of the Planted Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diana Walstad 11/04 - Killifish-A Complete Pet Owners Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steffan Heffner 12/04 - American Aquarium Fishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Robert F. Goldstein 2/05 - Aquarium Atlas Photo Index of Volumes 1-5 . . . . . . . . . Hans A. Baensch and Gero W. Fischer 5/05 - Complete Guide to Dwarf Seahorses in the Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alisa Wagner Abbott 10/05 - Pufferfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Ralph 4/06 - The Pond Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Nash 6/06 - Mini-Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Hiscock 9/06 - The Everything Tropical Fish Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlo DeVito and Gregory Skomal 10/06 - Four titles (for children) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alan Mark Fletcher 12/06 - The Manual of Tankbusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gina Sandford and Richard Crow 4/07 - Breeding and Raising Angelfishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ed Stansbury 6/07 - Aquarium Care of Cichlids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claudia Dickinson 9/07 - Tropical Freshwater Aquarium Fish From A-Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ulrich Schliewen 10/07 - Tropica Aquarium Plants (catalog) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holgar Windelov 11/07 - Exotic Aquarium Fishes, Special Edition, Parts One and Two . . . . . . . . . Dr. William T. Innes 12/07 - Exotic Aquarium Fishes, Special Edition, Parts Three and Four . . . . . . . . Dr. William T. Innes 3/08 - Focus on Freshwater Aquarium Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geoff Rogers and Nick Fletcher 4/08 - What Fish? A Buyer’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Fletcher and Geoff Rogers 5/08 - The Super-Simple Guide to Breeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Muha 6/08 - The Amazon Kindle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . review of electronic book reader - Freshwater Aquariums in Your Life (Kindle version) . . . . . . . . . . . . . review of electronic book 9/08 - The Ocean at Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernd Brunner 11/08 - The Back to Nature Guide to Catfishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. David D. Sands 12/08 - Aquarium Care of Oscars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neal Pronek 4/09 - Aquarium Owner’s Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gina Sandford 6/09 - Today’s Essential Guide to Growing Aquarium Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Hiscock 7/09 - New York City Zoos and Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Scheier 9/09 - Saltwater Aquariums Make a Great Hobby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Tullock 11/09 - Aquariums for Dummies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maddy and Mic Hargrove 12/09 - Theatres of Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebecca Stott 3/10 - Catfishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lee Finley 4/10 - Encyclopedia of Aquarium and Pond Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Alderton 5/10 - The Tropical Fresh Water Aquarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gina Sandford 6/10 - Ask The Fishkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marc Morrone 7/10 - Tetras and Barbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Randy Carey 10/10 - Fresh Water Aquarium Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Tullock 12/10 - Malawi Cichlids in their Native Habitat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ad Konings *Authored by Alexander Priest **Authored by Joseph Ferdenzi

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FOTAS CARES, the largest conservation themed convention ever organized for the aquarium hobby in North America will take place November 4th - 6th 2011 at the Airport Doubletree Hotel in beautiful San Antonio, Texas. What is FOTAS? The Federation of Texas Aquarium Societies (FOTAS) is a collection of aquatic organizations based throughout Texas and Oklahoma. Annual conventions rotate among the member organizations and have been held annually since 1953. In 2011, the Hill Country Cichlid Club, based in south central Texas, will host FOTAS for a second time. What is CARES? An acronym for Conservation, Awareness, Recognition and Responsibility, Education and Encouragement, Support and Sharing, CARES is a hobbyist based organization. It was initially formed to promote the creation of a solid base stock of conservation priority species within the collective tanks of hobbyists. Since formulation of this concept, CARES has spread into the U.S. school system as well as worldwide projects such as the rebuilding of the Kenyan Marine and Fisheries Institute in Kisumu, Kenya. With hundreds of colonies registered and many success stories, CARES gives threatened fish a fighting chance for survival. On the 7th anniversary of this organization, we celebrate with a gathering of like-minded scientists, conservationists, and hobbyists. The Hill Country Cichlid Club, together with the Federation of Texas Aquarium Societies, the Oklahoma Aquarium Association, and USA Fish Box are supporters and participants in CARES. FOTAS CARES! We have assembled a stellar lineup of speakers including: Les Kaufman Well known for his knowledge on the haplochromine species of the Lake Victoria region, Les Kaufman is responsible for the introduction of many haplochromines into the aquatic hobby. On the forefront of identifying the deep problems that plague Lake Victoria, Les Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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was the scientist responsible for erecting the Lake Victoria Species Survival Plan (LVSSP). Many of the colonies of fish collected for the LV-SSP have since been extinguished from the great African lake and survive only in captivity today thanks to his foresight. Les is presently involved with studies on coral reefs of the world and played a pivotal part in bringing the CARES effort to Kenya. Ad Konings A prolific author on the cichlids of Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika, as well as cactus, Ad Konings is a perennial favorite among hobbyists throughout the world. Ad’s perspective on the fish of Africa’s Great Rift has been keeping aquarists on the edge of their seats for decades. Ad is presented at FOTAS CARES courtesy of USAFishBox. Anton Lamboj A prominent scientist best known for his work with West Africa cichlids, Anton Lamboj is an excellent presenter, frequent visitor, and friend to many. Anton lectures at the University of Vienna in Austria and has written countless books and papers and has described many West African cichlids. Paul V. Loiselle Author of many publications dealing mainly with cichlid fishes, Paul Loiselle is well known for his ongoing conservation efforts around the globe, and in particular, dealing with the environmental changes occurring in Madagascar. A champion of bridging the gap between the hobbyist and the scientist, Paul is considered among the most knowledgeable minds with regards to changing environmental conditions and the consequences to aquatic life on Earth. Melanie Stiassny Considered to be the ichthyologists' ichthyologist, Melanie Stiassny is sought after to present at conferences and conventions around the planet. Her current work on the Congo River is examined on a National Geographic special. We are extremely proud to present Melanie at FOTAS CARES. This is a rare opportunity to meet the most preeminent ichthyologist on the planet today. Kathy England Kathy England is well known in the fish world as a longtime aquarist and water gardener. She maintains a large fish house together with her husband, Marvin, containing many varieties and species from around the globe. Kathy comes to us from the Texas Cichlid Association. Charles Jones A well known hobbyist who has worked at many levels within the hobby, Charles Jones has presided over his home club, Houston Aquarium Society, and is current President of the Federation of Texas Aquarium Societies. Charles will share his knowledge of the history of aquatics in Texas. FOTAS CARES Show

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July 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


As with other aquatic events, FOTAS CARES will have a show that is free for all to participate in. However, this is not your typical show! Breaking from the traditional method of showing fish rows of bare tanks, this show will consist of participants creating displays for their fish. Each entrant may contain only one species but one may enter as many displays as they wish. These displays may or may not consist of live fish. Examples include tri-fold displays, aquariums displaying live individuals, posters, video displays or anything else the entrant can come up with. The species being depicted must be reserved in advance. Substantial prize lots including cash, auction credit, goods, and awards will be presented to the three winners. Criteria being judged include presentation, educational value, and aesthetics, with bonus points being awarded for depiction of a CARES species. Vendor Information For information on vendor space please contact David Fair midmitt@att.net. Rare Fish Availability The largest gathering of CARES species will be available for sale in the main CARES room. For those wishing to sell fish, rental tanks will be available and must be purchased in advance. For more information and to reserve the aquariums you require, contact Dan Schacht at dwschacht@gmail.com. Babes in the Cichlid Hobby The ‘Babes’ will be in attendance continuing their incredible tradition of funding efforts in areas of cichlid conservation. Registration Registration packets contain unlimited entrance to all FOTAS CARES events including a pizza party with Melanie Stiassny on Friday evening, all speakers and special happenings, a TexMex Awards Banquet Saturday night, and entrance to the giant auction all day Sunday. For up to date information on FOTAS CARES, stop by and visit the forum at www.hillcountrycichlidclub.com.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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GCAS Happenings

July

Last Month’s Bowl Show Winners: 1 William Amely 2 Mario Bengcion 3 Richard Waizman

Orange Half-Moon Betta Bi-Color Double-Tail Betta White Short-tail Betta

Unofficial 2011 Bowl Show totals to date: Mario Bengcion 14 Richard Waizman 8

Harry Faustmann 5

Joe Magnoli 4

William Amely 5

A warm welcome back to renewing GCAS members Mervyn Bamby, Bob Hamje, Ron Pandolfi, Soberman!

and

Mark

Here are meeting times and locations of some aquarium societies in the Metropolitan New York area: Greater City Aquarium Society

East Coast Guppy Association

Next Meeting: August 3, 2011 Speaker: None Topic: Silent Auction/Flea Market Meets: Meets the first Wednesday of the month (except January & February) at 7:30pm: Queens Botanical Garden 43-50 Main Street - Flushing, NY Contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437 Email: gcas@earthlink.net Website: http://www.greatercity.org

Meets: 2nd Tuesday of each month at at 8:00 pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Gene Baudier (631) 345-6399

Big Apple Guppy Club Meets: Last Tuesday each month (except Jan, Feb, July, and August) at 7:30-10:00pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Donald Curtin (718) 631-0538

Brooklyn Aquarium Society Next Meeting: September 9, 2011 Speaker: Joe Caparette Event: Unique Corals Meets: 2nd Friday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30pm: NY Aquarium - Education Hall, Brooklyn, NY Call: BAS Events Hotline: (718) 837-4455 Website: http://www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org

Nassau County Aquarium Society Next Meeting: September 13, 2011 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: 2nd Tuesday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30 PM Molloy College - Kellenberg Hall ~1000 Hempstead Ave Rockville Centre, NY Contact: Mike Foran (516) 798-6766 Website: http://www.ncasweb.org

NORTH JERSEY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Next Meeting: July 21, 2011 Speaker: Karen Randall Event: Plants/Aquascaping/Aquarium Plants Meets: Lyndhurst Elks Club, 251 Park Avenue Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 Contact: NJAS Hotline at (732) 332-1392 Email: tcoletti@obius.jnj.com Website: http://www.njas.net/

Long Island Aquarium Society Next Meeting: September 17, 2011 Speaker: Rit Forcier Topic: My Million Gallon Salt Water Tank Meets: 3rd Fridays (except July and August) 8:00pm. Room 120 in Endeavor Hall on theState University at Stony Brook Campus, Stony Brook, NY Email: Margaret Peterson - president@liasonline.org Website: http://liasonline.org/

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Norwalk Aquarium Society Next Meeting: September 15, 2011 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at: Earthplace - the Nature Discovery Center - Westport, CT Contact: John Chapkovich (203) 734-7833 Call our toll free number (866) 219-4NAS Email: jchapkovich@snet.net Website: http://norwalkas.org/

July 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


The Weirdest of the Weird! A series by The Undergravel Reporter In spite of popular demand to the contrary, this humor and information column continues. As usual, it does NOT necessarily represent the opinions of the Editor, or of the Greater City Aquarium Society. he website of the Christian Science Monitor recently featured a slideshow of “The 20 weirdest fish in the ocean.”1 Some of the mostly marine fish in this slideshow would probably not be considered “weird” to aquarium hobbyists. Fish such as the lionfish, an oranda goldfish, and a pufferfish may look somewhat odd, but I would certainly not call them “weird.” So, for your entertainment and amusement, I have made my own personal selections from their list, which I call “the weirdest of the weird.”

T

A male jawfish with eggs in his mouth.

A young box fish off Sulawesi Island, Indonesia.

The common fangtooth, Anoplogaster cornuta, is a small, deep-sea fish with some of the largest teeth in the ocean, proportional to its size.

Coffinfish are deep-sea fish with a short bioluminescent lure on their first dorsal fin that dangles forward over the mouth. The website address is below. Visit it, and see if you agree with my selection of the “weirdest of the weird.” http://www.csmonitor.com/CSM-Photo-Galleries /In-Pictures/The-20-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean

1

Although inedible, because the blobfish lives at the same depths as crabs and lobsters it is in danger of extinction due to commercial fishing. Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

July 2011 July 2011

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Fin Fun This American Flag Fish, Jordanella floridae, needs to navigate a maze to get home to Florida. See if you can help it out. Solution next month.

Answers to last month’s puzzle: Scientific name

Common Name

Hyphessobrycon serpae

Serpae Tetra

X

Moenkhausia colletti

Colletti Tetra

X

Nemacheilus pardalis

Leopard Loach

X

Chapalichthys pardalis

Spotted Goodeid

X

Inpaichthys kerri

Kerry Tetra

X

Paracheirodon axelrodi

Cardinal Tetra

X

Brachyrhaphis episcopi

Bishop Livebearer

X

Helostoma temminckii

Kissing Gourami

X

Nematobrycon lacortei

Rainbow Tetra

X

Hemigrammus boesemani

Boeseman’s Tetra

X

26 24

July2011 2011 July

Tetra

Other

Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Modern Aquarium July 2011  

Series III Vol. XVIII, No. 5 July, 2011

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