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March 2011 volume XVIII number 1


Series III ON THE COVER Our cover photo this month features Sphaerichthys vaillanti, often called Vaillant’s chocolate gourami. For more information about this attractive, but uncommon anabantid, see Al Priest’s article on page 9.  Photo by Alexander A. Priest GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY

Vol. XVIII, No. 1 March, 2011

In This Issue From the Editor Letter to the Editor President’s Message

Board Members

President Vice-President Treasurer Corresponding Secretary Recording Secretary

Dan Radebaugh Edward Vukich Jules Birnbaum Mario Bengcion Tommy Chang

Members At Large

Claudia Dickinson Al Grusell Emma Haus Leonard Ramroop

Pete D’Orio Ben Haus Jason Kerner

Claudia Dickinson Leonard Ramroop Warren Feuer Mark Soberman Al Grusell Alexander A. Priest Claudia Dickinson Claudia Dickinson Warren Feuer

MODERN AQUARIUM Editor in Chief Copy Editors   Exchange Editors  Advertising Mgr.

FAASinations by Alexander A. Priest

Vaillant’s Chocolate Gourami Sphaerichthys vaillanti by Alexander A. Priest

Tempus Fugit by Jules Birnbaum

Corrosion and You

Committee Chairs

A.C.A. Delegate Bowl Show Breeder Award  Early Arrivals F.A.A.S. Delegate Members/Programs N.E.C. Delegate Technology Coordinator

G.C.A.S. 2011 Program Schedule

Dan Radebaugh Sharon Barnett Susan Priest Alexander A. Priest Stephen Sica Donna Sosna Sica Mark Soberman

or: How to Buy Fewer Light Bulbs

2 3 4 5 7 9 13 15

by Susan Priest

Our 2010 Holiday Party & Awards Banquet Photos by Susan Priest

Modern Aquarium 2010 Article Index G.C.A.S. Happenings The Undergravel Reporter How Much Would You Do?

Fin Fun (Puzzle Page) What It’s Not

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From the Editor by Dan Radebaugh

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elcome back to another year at Greater City, and to another year of Modern Aquarium. Before I talk about what’s in this issue, there are some updates to a couple of stories we presented last year. In our June issue Sue Priest reviewed Marc Morrone’s book, Ask the Fishkeeper. Well, I am happy to report that Marc’s television program is back on the air – this time on the Hallmark Channel, for those of you who have cable. Called Petkeeping with Marc Morrone, it currently airs weekdays at noon and 12:30 (two half-hour episodes). The fishkeeper show is on Wednesdays, and I haven’t caught one of those yet, but I have seen a couple of the others, most notably one dealing with exotic pets, and the other with pet-keeping myths. Both were very informative, accessible, and entertaining shows featuring good, useful, common-sense advice. The presentation is child-friendly, but with plenty of great information for adults as well. If you’re home at that time of day, I highly recommend it. Another article, Alan Mark Fletcher’s “The Cardinal Tetra Story” (in our December issue) generated a great deal of interest from the outside world, and is now posted on the web site of the Aquarium Hobby Historical Society. Continuing in the update vein, Jules Birnbaum revisits his December issue fishroom story, “To Build or Not to Build,” with a follow-up article entitled “Tempus Fugit,” while Susan Priest treats us to six pages of photos from our December Holiday Awards Banquet. Al Priest then treats us to an update of sorts, moving from December’s article on the familiar gourami Trichogaster trichopterus to this month’s article on the much less familiar Sphaerichthys vaillanti, often popularly called Vaillant’s chocolate gourami. Al then moves us onto new ground in his “FAASinations” column, where he tells us about a new FAAS Publication Award category – conservation. Now conservation is a very broad and deep subject area. This may be why we haven’t produced more articles dealing with it. Once you start writing, where do you stop? Well, along with the intimidation factor of this breadth and depth come some opportunities as well. For instance, in addition to matters like habitat destruction and fragmentation, invasive species, climate change, toxic waste, plastic trash, pharmaceutical pollution, etc., etc., there are also the more personal aspects of conservation, like how 2

to spend less money on electricity, water, equipment, and so forth. Conserving our personal resources is conservation too, and will resonate within the larger effort. With that thought in mind, Sue Priest has kicked off our conservation articles this year with a piece on corrosion, and how awareness of that process can allow us to squeeze more life out of some of our aquarium electrical equipment. While on the subject of conservation, even though it is not directly relevant to fish or aquaria, I feel I must mention a movie I saw the other night. Filmed by noted nature documentarians Dereck and Beverly Joubert, and narrated by Jeremy Irons, The Last Lions is a truly memorable film. A great story, stupendous cinematography and sound, and a timely message all combine to make this film a must-see for anyone with a passion for animals and the natural world. If you’re a big cat lover, this is the jackpot. Don’t wait for it to come to cable or DVD. See it on the big screen! Go to www.thelastlions.com to find theaters where it’s playing. *** Remember, as always, we need articles! Modern Aquarium is produced by and for the members of Greater City Aquarium Society. Our members are our authors, and with ten issues per year, we always, always need more articles. I know several of you are keeping and/or breeding fish that I would like to know more about, and I’m certain other members would be interested as well. Share your experience with us. Write about it! If you’re a little unsure about the state of your writing technique, don’t worry – that’s why there are editors. If you have an article, photo, or drawing that you’d like to submit for inclusion in Modern Aquarium, it’s easy to do! You may fax it to me at (877) 299-0522, email it to gcas@earthlink.net, or just hand it to me at a meeting. However you get it to me, I’ll be delighted to receive it!

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


...And To the Editor Dear Dan & Joe, That could also read, “Dear Everyone at the GCAS Christmas Party”.... You were gracious, friendly and warm; you made us feel so comfortably welcome and honored. And, you were most generous having us as your guests. What a great party! Thank you. The names that surfaced, from years ago, reminded me of many people I hadn’t thought about for a long time. Those “triggers” were heartening because the memories were rich and warm. Highly talented aquarists, they also were nice people. GCAS obviously continues to attract that kind of members.

the nephew of my very long time “right across the street” neighbor...a nice lady. I knew her mother as well...also a good woman who told me that she always had white birch trees growing in her yard because when the family lived in Sweden in the hard times, with food extremely scarce, they boiled the bark of the birch tree and made a broth that kept them alive. It’s amazing how intertwined we are...links to each other through paths we have paved over generations.... Life is good. Thank you, again. Sincerely, Mary Carson Eckman

An additional “outside” connection: one of your members told us he bought his first angel fish from Terri’s father. Your young man is

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

(718) 469-5444 Jasontech1@verizon.net

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President’s Message by Dan Radebaugh

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elcome back to another season at Greater City! We closed last year with a very successful Holiday Awards Party and Banquet, complete with some visitors from the past – Mary (Carson) Eckman, Terry (Carson) Kenny, and Linda (Cillo) Suppa. In addition to the pleasure of their company, having them here with us was a nice reminder that a Society such as Greater City is in the end made up of people; how those people remember us and how we in turn remember them provides a large part of the fabric of our Society’s raison-dêtre. Time passes, and our roles change. As I mentioned at the end of last year, we have some changes in our Board of Governors. Our long-time Vice President, Mark Soberman, and our long-time Corresponding Secretary, Warren Feuer, have decided that it’s time to step back and let others pull the load for awhile. While I’ll miss their presence on the Board, and their experienced opinions, I can certainly understand that commitments of time and energy sometimes have to be reevaluated. Both Mark and Warren have served on the Board for over ten years, and both are on the Society’s Roll of Honor. In addition to serving as Vice-President, Mark was our Speakers Chair for many years until Claudia Dickinson took on that role. Mark worked on all our fish shows, and was the original advertising manager for Modern Aquarium. Over the years, Mark built a national reputation as a catfish expert, especially on Corydoras. He is a moderator of the Planet Catfish website, and he has been a featured speaker all over the country and in Bermuda. In addition, Mark has won many awards

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at local fish shows and for his articles. He continues serving GCAS on the Breeders Award Program, one of our most complex undertakings, and is himself in the top ranks of breeders. Mark also has one of the largest collections of aquarium literature in the U.S. Warren, in addition to his long service on the Board, was the first Editor of Modern Aquarium Series III. Warren earned many awards, both for his articles and as Editor of MA. Warren also computerized the Breeders Award Program in its present form, a herculean task. He has co-chaired that program with Mark for many years. Warren has worked on numerous GCAS fish shows, and has achieved a national reputation as an expert on Lake Tanganyika shell-dwelling cichlids. In that role he has given presentations at a number of local aquarium societies both here and in Bermuda.  I’m sure I echo the feelings of many here at Greater City as I thank these gentlemen for their years of outstanding service. I also invite everyone to welcome our new Board members, Mario Bengcion, Tommy Chang, and Jason Kerner, as they take up their batons, and to congratulate Ed Vukich, as he moves from his former post as Recording Secretary to that of Vice-President.

Dan

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GCAS Programs 2011

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t is our great fortune to have another admirable cast of speakers who have so graciously accepted our invitation to join us throughout the coming season, bringing us their extensive knowledge and experiences. You certainly won’t wish to miss a moment of our prominent guests, not to mention the friends, fish, warmth, and camaraderie that accompanies each meeting. I know I can barely wait to see you here! Enjoy! Claudia March 2

TBA

April 6

TBA

May 4

TBA

June 6

TBA

July 6

TBA

August 3

Silent Auction

September 5

TBA

October 5

TBA

November 2

TBA

December 7

Holiday Party!

Articles submitted for consideration in Modern Aquarium (ISSN 2150-0940) must be received no later than the 10th day of the month prior to the month of publication. Please fax to (877) 299-0522, or email to gcas@earthlink. net. Copyright 2011 by the Greater City Aquarium Society Inc., a not-for-profit New York State corporation. All rights reserved. Not-for-profit aquarium societies are hereby granted permission to reproduce articles and illustrations from this publication, unless the article indicates that the copyrights have been retained by the author, and provided reprints indicate source and two copies of the publication are sent to the Exchange Editor of this magazine. Any other reproduction or commercial use of the material in this publication is prohibited without express written prior permission. The Greater City Aquarium Society meets every month, except January and February. Members receive notice of meetings in the mail. For more information, contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437. Find out more, or leave us a message, at our Internet Home Page at: http://www.greatercity.org or http://www.greatercity.com Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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FAASinations A report on the Federation of American Aquarium Societies by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST he Federation of American Aquarium Societies (“FAAS”) is an organization founded by and for aquarium societies of North, Central, and South America. In addition to serving as a watchdog organization to alert aquarium societies of pending state and federal legislation potentially having impact on our hobby (the original reason for its founding in 1973), FAAS has an annual publications award competition, open to any FAAS member society. As a long-time FAAS member, the Greater City Aquarium Society has participated in the FAAS publication awards ever since our magazine, Modern Aquarium, was revived as “Series III” in 1994. By the time you read this (at or after our March 2011 meeting), the articles, photos and other contributions you made to Modern Aquarium that were published in 2010 have already been sent to FAAS for judging (the deadline for submission was February 28, 2011). This publications award program judges both the entire output of issues in a given year by a society, and individual articles, columns, cartoons, and artwork. There are numerous categories in which articles may be judged (e.g., Best Humorous Article, Best Article on a Species, Best Article on a Genus, Best How-To Article, etc.). Last year the President of FAAS, Rick Borstein, asked for suggestions for 2011 FAAS initiatives. At the same time, Rick also mentioned that “Due to the very high cost of water and electricity, many hobbyists are shutting down their fishrooms,” and went on to mention that the FAAS Board had discussed ways to save energy in the fishroom. As Greater City’s FAAS delegate, I suggested adding a new Conservation Article category to the publication awards, and this suggestion was adopted. Articles in the new category may be entered in the 2011 submission year (articles written in 2011 which will be submitted in 2012).

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

This new Conservation category is for articles on any of the following topics: 1) Articles on a “threatened” species, defined as a species listed as “vulnerable” or “endangered” or “critically endangered” by the IUCN (the International Union for Conservation of Nature) on the Red List of Threatened Species, or is on the “Species at Risk List” of the C.A.R.E.S (Conservation, Awareness, Recognition, Encouragement, and Support) Preservation Program. 2) Articles on conservation of energy, water, and/or other resources (including recycling) related to fish keeping. 3) Articles on conservation activities related to fish and/or other aquatic life. The Greater City Aquarium Society has long been active in conservation. We have made several donations through the years to help fund expeditions and programs related to conservation. Thanks to the efforts of GCAS member Claudia Dickinson, the C.A.R.E.S Preservation Program was initially launched at Greater City. Our Breeders Award Program gives an extra 10 points for breeding a C.A.R.E.S. species at risk fish. Our own Author Award Program doubles the points credited for an original article on a fish in the C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program (i.e., 10 points for an article of 500 words or less, and 20 points for an article of 501 words or more). Photos and drawings of a C.A.R.E.S. species used in Modern Aquarium also receive double points. So, if you are keeping (or have prior experience in keeping) a species in the C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program, you now have even more incentive to write an article about it. But, this new FAAS publication award category is also open to articles about conservation of resources related to fishkeeping (any ideas to reduce the amount of electricity to heat and filter tanks?), and to articles on conservation activities. Help the GCAS “sweep” this new category — write a conservation article for Modern Aquarium.

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The Tropical Fish Society of Rhode Island presents

Triple Crown Fish Auction Saturday, March 19, 2011 BRING YOUR BEST FISH!

St. Joseph’s Parish Center 1303 Mendon Road (Rte. 122) Cumberland, RI

For a $1 fee you can put a reserve on any lot! YOU set the minimum bid, if the lot doesn’t sell for your price or better, you get it back!

Free Admission! All are welcome! TFSRI’s split is $3 per bag sold, all the rest goes to the vendor. Doors will be open at 10:30 AM. The auction starts promptly at 12:00 PM DIRECTIONS TO THE AUCTION: Route 295 to Route 122, (exit 10). Take a left off the ramp, proceed past the Burger King on your left and Route 116 on your right. Continue on route 122 for approximately one mile. St. Joseph’s church will be on your left. Turn left into the driveway immediately before the church, and follow the driveway around the rear of the church and proceed to the top of the hill. The Parish center will be on your right. The Tropical Fish Society of Rhode Island meets on the third Wednesday of each month (except December) at 7:30 PM. Meetings are free and all are welcome to attend. Go to www.tfsri.net for meeting location

No limit on the number of lots submitted. All lots must be live fish, plants or aquariumrelated items. See rules for complete details. Preregister by March 14th and get a red dot sticker to bump one bag to the start of the auction. Lots not selling for the minimum bid of $3 are returned to the seller. Vendor Fee: $2 Bidder Card: $2 (Waived for Vendors)

Visit www.tfsri.net for complete rules and auction forms. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Al Wagonblott (401) 847-3364 mr_wiggles_sr@hotmail.com or visit us on the web at: www.tfsri.net

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Sphaerichthys vaillanti Article and photo by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST hile I have seen as many as eight species As far as I can determine, this fish was named so identified, the general consensus is to honor a mistake. Sphaerichthys means circle-like that there are four currently recognized (referring to the round body shape); vaillanti is in species of chocolate gourami: honor of Léon Louis Vaillant, a noted French • Sphaerichthys osphromenoides (the physician, zoologist, and botanist. In an expedition “common” chocolate gourami) to western Borneo from November 1890 to January • Sphaerichthys selatanensis (the 1891, civil mining engineer, biologist, explorer (and “thin-barred” or “crossband” chocolate gourami - former President of the Zoological Society of F r a n c e) , M a u r i c e originally considered Chaper, collected fish a subspecies of Scientific Name: Sphaerichthys vaillanti in the Upper Kapuas Sphaerichthys Common Names: Vaillant's chocolate gourami, River and two of its osphromenoides) samurai gourami, special chocolate gourami, tributaries, the Knapei • Sphaerichthys zebra chocolate gourami, red chocolate gourami and Sebruang. vaillanti (Vaillant’s Special consideration: anabantoid (air breather) C h a p e r ’ s chocolate gourami) Adult Standard Length: 3" collection of about 500 • Sphaerichthys pH: 4.0 to 6.5 (acidic) specimens represented acrostoma (the Water hardness: very soft to soft around 100 species. It “black-tailed” or Temperature: 77EF - 82EF (25EC - 28EC) was sent to the “sharp-nose” or, Museum National Distribution: Indonesia (Northwest Borneo) since it is the largst d’Histoire Naturelle in Reproduction: Paternal mouthbrooder member of this Paris, and reviewed by group, the “large” Temperament: Peaceful, timid a professor at the chocolate gourami). Environment: low-light, caves and/or driftwood, museum, Léon Louis Depending on tight-fitting cover with no gaps Vaillant. the authority, Nutrition: primarily carnivore (live or frozen Prior to receiving Sphaerichthys daphina, brine shrimp, etc.) Chaper’s collection, the malayanus is either museum had no a separate species, or material on freshwater fish from Borneo. This may a subspecies of Sphaerichthys osphromenoides. The Eyespot Gourami, Parasphaerichthys explain why Vaillant misidentified several of the ocellatus, is sometimes also referred to as the species in the collection, including one he identified Burmese chocolate gourami, mostly because of the as Ctenops nobilis (the “noble” or “frail” gourami, coloration it takes when stressed. However, it is A.K.A. the Indian paradisefish). That fish, later determined to be an entirely new species, was given unrelated to the previously named “chocolates.” None of the chocolate gouramis in the genus the scientific name of Sphaerichthys vaillanti in his Sphaerichthys are “beginners’ fish.” They should honor (or was it to rub in his mistake?). Until recently, Sphaerichthys vaillanti was only be considered by the more experienced aquarist who is willing to provide the extra care commonly called “Vaillant’s chocolate gourami” for and attention these fish require. Having said this, the reason above1. In 2009, an article in an aquarium the balance of this article will focus on the magazine2 ascribed to it the “common” name of supposedly “easiest” to care for of the “samurai gourami,” without explanation. Possibly Sphaerichthys group, namely Sphaerichthys some exporter decided “samurai gourami” sounded more “catchy,” and the author of the article just vaillanti, or Vaillant’s chocolate gourami). I like to know where in the world any species assumed that to be the generally accepted common I keep originates from. This helps me to determine name. (I’ve also seen them called “red chocolate a suitable diet, water parameters, and aquascaping. gourami3” and, on a list by an exporter, “zebra I also like to know how and when they came into chocolate gourami.” I prefer (and will use in this the hobby — so here is some history and article) “Vaillant’s chocolate gourami.” background.

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Sphaerichthys vaillanti (at the lower left and right you can see its favorite meal - brine shrimp) Appearance As I previously stated, Sphaerichthys means circle-like, referring to the round body shape of all species in this genus. Sphaerichthys vaillanti is more elongated than the others in this group, having a more pointed snout. It has a laterally compressed (flat) body and, as with other gourami species, the pelvic fins are elongated and serve as tactile organs. The caudal fins are nearly transparent at the outer edge. Despite some articles indicating that there is significant sexual dimorphism in this species, they are difficult to sex accurately unless they are in spawning mode. In general, males are brown or gray, sometimes with red highlights. Females are more colorful, with vertical red and green stripes, especially when ready to breed. In both sexes, a dark horizontal stripe runs through the eye. In a planted aquarium with driftwood and rocks they blend in to become nearly invisible. The literature indicates that they attain a maximum adult size of about three inches (males and females alike), but I have not seen any in excess of about two and a half inches. Nutrition Karel Zahradka, the author of the 2009 article, stated that he fed this species “all types of live food — daphnia, cyclops, mosquito larvae, tubifex, and their favorite: brine shrimp.” In an article in the journal of the IGL (the German anabantoid association), author Anke Binzenhöfer reported feeding “artemia nauplii, grindal worms,

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black and glass worms as well as drosophila.” to the “red chocolate gourami3” (yet another “common name” for Sphaerichthys vaillanti that I had never seen used before). In my experience with many different gourami species, I have found that feeding worms (be they the tubifex variety, or black, or white, or blood, or grindal) to any gourami species (and most especially to any species of chocolate gourami) results in almost certain death. So, if you are inclined to try to raise Vaillant’s, or any other, chocolate gouramis, be forewarned. Reproduction Looking at the small pointed mouth, it is hard to believe that Vaillant’s chocolate gourami is a mouthbrooder. As is true for all mouthbrooding anabantoids, it is the male who retains the eggs in his mouth until the young are ready to hatch. It is essential that the fish be well fed prior to spawning. A male who is holding eggs will not eat until the eggs hatch. In a tank of about 79EF (26EC), “it can take as many as 29 days for the father to release his fry.”5 Once released, the fry are miniature versions of the adults and are literally on their own. As long as the adults are well-fed, there is no predation by the adults. However, there also is no parental care once the fry are released. Feeding the fry can be a challenge, as even the smallest food visible to our human eyes may be too large for newly released fry. While green water and paramecium cultures are probably a good choice for

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a first food, my preference is always to have a mature sponge filter running in a breeding tank. This naturally results in infusoria in the sponge, on which the fry can feed (and there is never a problem with overfeeding the tank, which can cause pollution). By “mature” sponge, I mean one that has been actively in use as a filter in a fish tank for at least three months, not a “new” sponge simply rinsed out in aged tank water. Aquascaping All mouthbrooding species require caves and/or other hiding places where the fish holding the eggs can hide and feel safe. Vaillant’s chocolate gourami is a fairly shy species, and the safer they feel, the more they will swim about where they can be seen. So, more caves and other hiding places actually translates into a greater likelihood that you will be able to see them swimming around. They generally prefer a dark tank. If you use gravel or another substrate, a dark almond brown shade is best. Lighting should be subdued, which is to say not overly bright. This species does best in fairly acid and very soft water. When those water parameters are combined with low intensity lighting, few live plants will last very long. (In their natural habitat, tree roots are common, but aquatic plants are not.) Floating plants, (e.g., Salvinia) are a good choice. They help to keep the tank itself dark and remove some otherwise harmful nitrogen compounds. Most species of Anubias also do well under those conditions; and can simply be tied to rocks or driftwood if, like me, you prefer a barebottom tank. In my experience, Java Moss does not do especially well under those conditions. But if it dies off, it does not usually disintegrate and the dead plant still provides both a hiding place for fish and a place for beneficial bacteria and infusoria to populate.

Water Parameters Tank water should be as soft as possible. The water should also be acidic, with a pH between 4.0 and 6.5 (a pH of 5.0 to 5.5 being best to encourage spawning). I use blackwater extract, almond leaves, and driftwood to help keep the pH down. When doing water changes, it is more important that the newly added water closely approximate the pH of the tank than to have it match the exact water temperature. Speaking of temperature, ideally the tank water should be between 77E and 82EF (25E28EC). These fish are very sensitive to water quality and to even minor changes in their environment. I find that small, frequent water changes (10-15% at least once a week, usually more often) are better tolerated. Although most sources would recommend at least a 20 gallon tank for two pairs, I keep my two pairs in a 10 gallon tank, but with three filters: a small power filter, an air-driven filter using chemical pads, and (of course) a sponge filter. The tank also has several small caves. Recommendations These are interesting fish. While slightly more hardy than the common chocolate gourami (Sphaerichthys osphromenoides), they are still quite frail (among other things, they are highly susceptible to oodinium disease, or “velvet,” a condition caused by a parasite), and require considerably more care than most beginning hobbyists are able to provide. While this species can breed in the home aquarium, individual spawns are small (to be expected from a small fish that is a mouthbrooder), and the fry are not easy to raise. So, if you’re mostly looking for breeder award points from your aquarium society, this is not a species for you. However, for the intermediate to advanced aquarist looking for a new challenge, and maybe for something a bit different, Vaillant’s chocolate gourami might just be ideal.

1

See the use of “Vaillant’s Chocolate Gourami” as the common name for Sphaerichthys vaillanti, in: Schafer, Frank. Aqualog: All Labyrinths. Verlog: A.C.S.GmbH, 1997, p. 86. Alderton, David. Bettas and Gouramis. Aquacultural Library, 2003, p. 57. Vierke, Jorg. Bettas, Gouramis and other Anabantoids. TFH Publications,1986, p. 159.

2

Zahradka, Karel. “The Samurai Gourami Sphaerichthys vaillanti.” Tropical Fish Hobbyist. August 2009, pp. 82-84.

3

Binzenhöfer, Anke. “Sphaerichthys vaillanti – the red chocolate gourami.” Der Makropode (the journal of the Internationalen Gemeinschaft für Labyrinthfische). April 2009, pp. 63-66.

4

Zahradka, Karel. “My Story Of Breeding The Samurai Gourami - As Told In Pictures.” The Aquarium Gazette. February/March 2010, pp. 51-55. 5

Ibid, p. 53.

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JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595 –––––––––––––– JSAS Auction, 03.20.11 Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St., Freehold www.jerseyshoreas.org mws71@yahoo.com (732) 859-5595

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For more information or to preregister, e-mail mws71@yahoo.com, call (732) 859-5595, or visit www.jerseyshoreas.org

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Any person may bring quality live fish and aquatic plants to enter into auction. 60/40 split when preregistered by Mar. 18th or 50/50 split when registered at the auction. Auction rules available upon request.

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Live goods registration: 9 to 11 a.m. No guarantee that items registered after 11 a.m. will be auctioned. No used dry goods. Viewing of items: 10 a.m. – 11:45 p.m. Auction starts at noon sharp!

Knights of Columbus 70 E. Main St.

To be held on Sunday, March 20, 2011 Freehold at the Knights of Columbus at 70 E. Main St. in Freehold, NJ.

19th Annual presents its

tropical Fish and Dry Goods auction! Jersey Shore Aquarium Society The

Featuring rare and exotic tropical fish, a wide selection of aquatic plants, and free goodies and door prizes all day long!

Snacks and refreshments will be available. Open to public – free admission ($2 bidder fee).


Tempus Fugit by Jules Birnbaum

of the fish, they provide enough light to grow plants empus fugit is a Latin expression that clock that require low light, such as Java fern, Anubius, and collectors use frequently, and means “time flees” crypts. Occasionally the lights are shut off manually or “time flies.” You see it often as inscriptions for a day to cut down on the growth of algae, and on antique clocks. At our holiday party, Susan Priest help the apple snails and bristlenose plecos keep it in suggested that it was time for a status report as to how check. my fishroom is operating, and what fish are living There is no question that our electric and water there after one year. bills are slightly higher, but the additional cost is I can report that everything is running well. somewhat offset by the proceeds from the sale of fish During the year I bought a more powerful piston at the local auctions and pet pump from JEHMCO, the shops. Also, the enjoyment fishroom supply company the fishroom brings makes in New Jersey. Some of my the extra cost worth it. 20 tanks have two sponge or We just don’t eat steak box filters and I wanted the anymore. I should know ability to have even more air how to control costs by this available. time in my life. Most of it is The Mitsubishi just common sense. heat pump is working The fish I’ve stocked well, providing both are from our auctions, gifts air conditioning in the from friends, online sellers, summer, and now heat. The temperature of the tanks on Steatocranus casuarius (buffalo head cichid) pair. The and Aquabid. I have not met a fish I don’t like. There the lower rack is 8 degrees female is guarding her fry in the cave. are several varieties of rare cooler than that of the top Corydoras catfish acquired from Frank Falcone, one level. Thus for breeding purposes the lower tanks of the top cory authorities in the country. There are contain fish that will do better at 72 degrees rather than new world cichlids from Rusty Wessel’s fish house, at the 80 degrees of the tanks that are at eye level. The descended from stock he brought back from one of heat pump also keeps the humidity at an acceptable his collecting trips to Central America. There are level. All the tanks are covered. My son-in-law, an buffalo heads and Cryptoheros sajicas I acquired from engineer with ConEd, suggested I keep the fishroom our own Ed Vukich, as well as rainbows and Betta door closed to contain the heat and put less pressure albimarginatas from Jeff Bollbach’s fishroom that I on the heat pump. This raised the temperature of picked up at auctions. the lower tanks a couple of degrees and saved some I acquired albino bristlenose plecos, the original electricity. Montezuma swordtails, and much advice from Joe The 48" florescent shop lights hanging above the Ferdenzi. It’s a unique experience to visit Joe’s tanks are on timers, and stay on eleven hours per day. fishroom. Although not the greatest lights to bring out the color

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A male Xiphophorus montezumae, originally from the fishroom of Joe Ferdenzi. Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

A wild Corydoras sterbai, purchased on Aquabid, from a Florida breeder.

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Corydoras sodalis.

Some time ago I attended a talk about keeping Apistogrammas. I was so impressed that I bought some cacatuoides triple reds from a well known West Coast breeder named “Apistogramma Idiots” (interesting website). These fish are housed in their own twenty gallon on the upper, eye level rack, so they can enjoy the 80-degree temperature. This is a beautiful little cichlid with wonderful breeding behavior. Apistos are a great choice for small tanks. I recently added electric blue rams (Aquabid) to go with my numerous Bolivian rams. Each of these species has its own tank. I have five African cichlid tanks: two are custom built 45 gallons (each), one 30, a 29, and the smallest is 20 gallons. Most of these contain medium or smallsized fish from Lake Tanganyika. My favorite fish, Neolamprologus similis, are housed in a 30-long, and they make good use of the many small shells I’ve provided for their dwellings. The pairs form colonies, and I now have over thirty of these wonderful little fish. The adults look like miniatures of the larger African lake fish. I can thank Ed Vukich for the original pair he brought to auction a few years ago at the AFISH Convention. Then there are my “famous” All Black Guppies. It seems my fishroom is where to come if you want these little fish that produce black fry every time. The males have such long fins that they have trouble swimming. To me the males look like miniature Betas. These fish are housed in a 20 gallon tank on the lower level of the rack. When I want to produce more guppies I just take a large plump female and place her in a 5 gallon tank

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These Central American, juvenile cichlids are from the Amphilophus genus, and were acquired from Rusty Wessel at a recent GCAS auction.

with lots of najas or Java moss. A female I recently placed in this tank produced nearly 100 fry. My goal was to acquire rare fish from well known breeders. These are fish that are not often seen in the local pet shops. Isn’t constantly upgrading what collecting is all about, regardless of the hobby? A number of fellow aquarists have visited the fishroom during 2010, and if any GCAS members wish to see it in person, just give me a call. It’s a work in progress that I’m very happy with. My latest prize is an antique sign that my son bought for me, which hangs above the fishroom door, and reads, “Do Not Feed The Fish.” Who knows, maybe we can exchange a few ideas and have a beer from the fishroom refrigerator?

An electric blue ram purchased on Aquabid.

Photos by Alexandra Horton

March 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


or: How to Buy Fewer Light Bulbs by Susan Priest ometimes the simplest (and most costeffective) steps are the easiest to overlook. Here is an example. Most of us are not usually at home when this happens, but at some point during the day any number of timers will “ignite” the light fixtures above our aquariums. It is quite an enjoyable sight, watching as dawn breaks over each of our underwater dioramas. Most often the light bulbs are fluorescent tubes which briefly blink and flicker. They will also make a soft and pleasant noise, not unlike the sound of putting a coffee mug into the dish washer. If you happen to be in the vicinity of your tanks when the lights are going on, or even if you are not, occasionally you will experience an uh-oh situation. Have you guessed what it is? It has happened to every fishkeeper everywhere at some time or another. I am of course referring to the happenstance that one of the lights does not go on. At this point any of several thoughts will pass through your mind. They might include “I’m pretty sure I have a spare bulb, but I don’t know where to look for it,” or “the plants will be O.K. for a few days until I can get a new bulb,” or maybe even “I could borrow a light strip from another tank, at least until I make it to the store.” I’m sure you will come up with a few thoughts of your own, but I’m guessing that I can propose one which you are unlikely to think of, (unless you happen to be an electrician, and maybe not even then). It involves three simple steps, and does not require a shopping trip. Step #1: Remove the fluorescent bulb and the starter from the light strip. (You should probably unplug it first. If you consider this to be a separate step, then there are actually four steps.) Step #2: Briskly rub the prongs on the end of the bulb and the nubs on the end of the starter with something rough such as a nail file, a piece of very fine sandpaper, or even your denim blue jeans. (The goal here is to make the metal look shiny.) Step #3: Replace the bulb and the starter into the light strip. That’s all there is to it. Dare I say voila! Oui! (I mean yes). I am speaking from experience when I confidently say that nine out of ten times this will restore your lighting. Perhaps rubbing the ends of EITHER the bulb OR the starter will achieve the same result, but it is such an easy thing to do that you may as well do it to both. Don’t take my word for this; try it for

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

yourself. It will not work every time, but it is surely worth a try! You will be amazed at the relief you will feel when the light has been restored to your aquarium, even if it has only been off for a few brief minutes. Are you perhaps wondering how and why this simple step works? It has been explained to me that this will interrupt the process of corrosion. What is corrosion? Webster’s Universal Encyclopedic Dictionary describes corrosion as: “to wear away gradually, usually by chemical action (the metal was corroded).” What is it that wears away? I couldn’t say. What chemical is involved? Even Webster doesn’t know. Does Webster have an aquarium? Probably not. But, do we really need to know the answers to these questions? Not really. All we really need to know is that this is a free and easy way to extend the life of our fluorescent bulbs. O.K., let’s review the multiple benefits of this simple procedure: 1) You will save money on light bulbs because you won’t need to replace them as frequently. 2) The fewer light bulbs you buy, the fewer bulbs will end up in a landfill. (Being the responsible citizens that you are, you know that in N.Y.C. light bulbs are not recycled.) 3) Once you tell your friends the secret to making their bulbs last longer, they will be lining up for the opportunity to show their appreciation by taking you out for dinner. It is of course obvious, but I will point it out anyway, that eventually each bulb WILL have to be replaced. But, if you can add a few months of life to most of your bulbs, the benefits far outweigh the small investment of effort required. So, the next time you experience that uh-oh situation, are you going to 1) rummage through the closets in search of a bulb that may or may not be there, 2) run to the store and spend money on a replacement, 3) hijack a light strip from another tank, OR are you going to treat it like the light bulb moment that it is? Don’t let corrosion come between you and your fish. The solution is simple, savvy, and FREE!

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Greater City’s 2010 Holiday Party

Sharon Barnett and Steve Miller

Rich Levy

Barbara and Jeff Bollbach

New Member: IntakabDawood

Fran and Ron Kasman

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Harry Faustmann

Elliot Oshins

Mervyn Bamby

Mario Bengcion

Jakleen and Doug Murk

March2011 2011 March

Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


and Awards Banquet - Photos by Susan Priest

Joe Graffagnino and Bob Strazzulla

Bill Amely

Ann and Mark Rubanow

Horst Gerber

Leonard Ramroop

Tommy Chang with guest Jerry

Louise and Bob Hamje

Richard Waizman and guest Natalie

Michael Gallo and nephew Marty

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

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Brad and Claudia Dickinson

Marsha and Dan Radebaugh

Jason Kerner and Al Grusell

Herb and Michelle Walgren

LaMont Brown

Walter Gallo

Newlyweds Bobby and Desiree

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Denver Lettman

Harsha Perera and guest John

March March2011 2011

ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Joe Ferdenzi and Warren Feuer

Jason Irizarry

Special Guest Linda Cillo Suppa

Ben and Emma Haus

Susan Priest and Claudia Dickinson

Special Guest Terri Carson Kenny

Special Guest Mary Carson Eckman

Our holiday cake!

Modern Aquarium - Greater (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater CityCity A.SA.S. (NY)

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Breeder Award Plaques (awarded for reaching specified BAP point levels)

Master Breeder: Al Priest

Grand Master Breeder: Ed Vukich

Senior Grand Master Breeder: Mark Soberman

Author Award Certificates (awarded for reaching specified AAP point levels)

Author/Correspondent: Jules Birnbaum

Author: Tommy Chang

Writer/Essayist: Marsha Radebaugh

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Columnist: Dan Radebaugh

Senior Grand Master Laureate and Author of the Year (2010): Al Priest

March2011 2011 March

Aquarium City A.S (NY) ModernModern Aquarium - Greater- Greater City A.S. (NY)


Our Highest Honors

Aquarist of the Year: Pete D’Orio

Bowl Show Champion: Al Priest

Breeder of the Year: Jeffrey Bollbach

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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2010 Modern Aquarium Article Index ANABANTIDS

Issue/Pg

“(The) Black Paradisefish: Macropodus spechti” by Alexander A. Priest..........................................05/11 “(The) Cave Secret, or Spawning Mouthbrooding Bettas” by Alexander A. Priest........................... 08/13 “(A) One-Species Community: Trichogaster trichopterus” by Alexander A. Priest......................... 12/10 “(A) Touch of Gold: Betta midas” by Alexander A. Priest.................................................................06/11 “When Three’s NOT a Crowd” by Alexander A. Priest..................................................................... 09/09

AQUARIUM HOBBY HISTORY

“(The) Cardinal Tetra Story” by Alan Mark Fletcher (Postscript by Rosario LaCorte)..................... 12/07 “Hobby Builder: John Cillo” by Dan Carson (MA Classics).............................................................11/18 “(A) Visit to A Living Legend: Rosario LaCorte” by Jules Birnbaum............................................... 07/15

BOOK REVIEWS “WET LEAVES” Column - by Susan Priest Ask the Fishkeeper by Marc Morrone.............................................................................................. 06/09 Catfishes by Lee Finley..................................................................................................................... 03/07 Encyclopedia of Aquarium & Pond Fish by David Alderton......................................................... 04/09 Freshwater Aquarium Models by John Tullock...............................................................................10/11 Malawi Cichlids in their natural habitat by Ad Konings............................................................... 12/12 Tetras and Barbs by Randy Carey.................................................................................................... 07/20 (The) Tropical Freshwater Aquarium by Gina Sandford............................................................... 05/16

CATFISH

“Breeding a Little Mistake” by Jules Birnbaum................................................................................. 10/09 “How NOT to Breed Corydoras sterbai” by Joseph Ferdenzi............................................................11/11 “My Favorite Catfish: Corydoras punctatus” by Stephen Sica.......................................................... 12/15

CICHLIDS

“(The) Chocolate Cichlid: Hypselecara temporalis” by Dan Radebaugh...........................................03/11 “Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 04/19 “Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 05/19 “Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 06/23 “Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 07/21 “Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 09/17 “Going the Distance with Paratheraps synspilus” by Dan Radebaugh............................................. 10/15 “Is That Model Available in Turquoise? by Dan Radebaugh..............................................................07/11 “(The) Pseudotropheus polit Project” by Tommy Chang................................................................... 04/13

CONVENTIONS

“Cichlidically Speaking” Column - by Claudia Dickinson................................................................ 09/17

COVER PHOTOGRAPHS

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Betta midas - photo by Alexander A. Priest....................................................................................... 06/01 Betta raja - photo by Alexander A. Priest.......................................................................................... 08/01 Betta splendens - photo by Alexander A. Priest................................................................................. 09/01 Chocolate Cichlid Pair - photo by Linda Konst................................................................................. 03/01 Fish Tank & Kitten - photo by Marsha Radebaugh............................................................................ 07/01 March 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Lake Malawi Cichlids - photo by Mark Neufeld................................................................................ 04/01 Macropodus spechti - photo by Alexander A. Priest.......................................................................... 05/01 Paratheraps synspilus - photo by Marsha Radebaugh....................................................................... 10/01 Trichogaster trichopterus - photo by Alexander A. Priest................................................................. 12/01 Xiphophorus montezumae - photo by Joseph Ferdenzi.......................................................................11/01

GCAS Society Issues

2010 Modern Aquarium Article Index............................................................................................. 03/19 Bowl Show Rules............................................................................................................................... 03/06 Bowl Show Rules............................................................................................................................... 04/30 GCAS 2010 Award Winners............................................................................................................... 12/19 GCAS Past Award Winners................................................................................................................ 12/18 The GCAS Author Award Program Report for 2010......................................................................... 12/20 GCAS Breeders Award Program........................................................................................................ 04/23 GCAS Breeders Award Program Interim Totals................................................................................. 08/16 GCAS Breeders Award 2010 Program Report................................................................................... 12/23 GCAS Breeders Award Program Points Totals.................................................................................. 12/24 “In Memoriam: Frank Gannon” by Joseph Ferdenzi......................................................................... 07/05 Rules for August’s Silent Auction/Fleamarket................................................................................... 07/06 Rules for August’s Silent Auction/Fleamarket................................................................................... 08/05

Exchanges “Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica................................................................................ 03/09

“Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica................................................................................ 05/09 “Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica................................................................................ 08/19 “Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica.................................................................................11/07

Fishkeepers Anonymous column by Susan Priest Anonymous Fishkeeper: Tommy Chang............................................................................................ 03/17

GENERAL INTEREST and Miscellaneous

“Adopt a Pet!” by Warren Feuer..........................................................................................................11/13 “Enriching Lives” by Claudia Dickinson........................................................................................... 06/06 “My Backyard Aquarium” by Stephen Sica....................................................................................... 08/07 “My Favorite Aquarium” by Stephen Sica..........................................................................................04/11 “To Build, or Not to Build?” by Jules Birnbaum............................................................................... 12/13

GOLDFISH

“Adopt a Pet!” by Warren Feuer..........................................................................................................11/13

HEALTH / NUTRITION

“Feed Your Fish Some Gourmet Cooking!” by Mary and Dan Carson (MA Classics)......................09/11 “I Raise Tropical Fish in my Bathtub” by Jack Oliva (MA Classics)................................................ 06/20 “Live Foods: My Perpetual Daphnia Tank” by Joseph Ferdenzi........................................................08/11

LIVEBEARERS

“How NOT to Breed Corydoras sterbai” by Joseph Ferdenzi............................................................11/11 “My Experiences with A Wild Original from Mexico” by Jules Birnbaum........................................11/16

MEMBER PHOTOS

“Photos from Our 2009 Holiday Party & Banquet” by Alexander A. Priest...................................... 03/14 “Photos from Our October Meeting” by Alexander A. Priest.............................................................11/06 “June’s Bowl Show Winners” by Claudia Dickinson......................................................................... 07/14 “July’s Bowl Show Winners” by Alexander A. Priest........................................................................ 08/18

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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“September’s Bowl Show Winners” by Alexander A. Priest............................................................. 10/13 “November’s Bowl Show Winners” by Alexander A. Priest.............................................................. 12/06 “Presenting Our 2009 FAAS Publication Award Winners” by Alexander A. Priest.......................... 08/16

LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS Photospreads by Claudia Dickinson Our March 2010 Meeting................................................................................................................... 04/16

Our April 2010 Meeting..................................................................................................................... 05/14 Our May 2010 Meeting...................................................................................................................... 06/18 Our June 2010 Meeting...................................................................................................................... 07/18

NEC and FAAS News/Events

“FAASinations” by Alexander A. Priest............................................................................................. 07/07 (The) NEC 2009 Article Competition................................................................................................ 04/05 “Presenting Our 2009 FAAS Publication Award Winners” by Alexander A. Priest.......................... 08/16

OPINION AND/OR HUMOR MERMAID TALES – a column by Sharon Barnett “Holey Texas Rock, Batman!”........................................................................................................... 07/17 THE UNDERGRAVEL REPORTER - a column by The Undergravel Reporter “Giving Your Fish Some Gifts”.......................................................................................................... 12/27 “Happy Valentine’s Day!”.................................................................................................................. 03/26 “Hooked on Phone-ics”...................................................................................................................... 07/27 “Making Fashion Statements”............................................................................................................ 09/23 “(The) More the Merrier”....................................................................................................................11/23 “Prognostications”.............................................................................................................................. 10/21 “Small is the New Big”...................................................................................................................... 08/23 “Smarter Than They Look”................................................................................................................ 05/27 “(A) Very Unusual Creature”............................................................................................................. 04/32 “Why I’m Not Rich”.......................................................................................................................... 06/31

OTHER OPINION/HUMOR “Fame, But No Fortune!” by Elliot Oshins........................................................................................ 07/13 “MTS: Is There a Cure?” by Tommy Chang...................................................................................... 05/17 “Till Death Do Us Part” by Jannette Ramirez.................................................................................... 03/24 “You Know You’re an EXTREME Aquarist When…” by Susan Priest............................................ 09/15

PUZZLE: “FIN FUN” Page

“(An) Armchair Atlas” . ..................................................................................................................... 07/28 “Away to Uruguay”............................................................................................................................ 05/28 “Bon Appetit” .................................................................................................................................... 09/24 “Escape Artist”................................................................................................................................... 04/34 “International Roots”.......................................................................................................................... 10/22 “Name That Cory”.............................................................................................................................. 12/28 “No Bones About It”.......................................................................................................................... 08/24 “(The) Root of the Matter”................................................................................................................. 03/28 “Sweet and Sour”................................................................................................................................11/24 “Word for Word”................................................................................................................................ 06/32

SPAWNING

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“(The) Black Paradisefish: Macropodus spechti” by Alexander A. Priest..........................................05/11 “Breeding a Little Mistake” by Jules Birnbaum................................................................................. 10/09 “(The) Cave Secret, or Spawning Mouthbrooding Bettas” by Alexander A. Priest........................... 08/13 “(The) Chocolate Cichlid: Hypselecara temporalis” by Dan Radebaugh...........................................03/11 “How NOT to Breed Corydoras sterbai” by Joseph Ferdenzi............................................................11/11 March 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


“Is That Model Available in Turquoise?” by Dan Radebaugh............................................................07/11 “(A) One-Species Community: Trichogaster trichopterus” by Alexander A. Priest......................... 12/10 “Something Simple” by Susan Priest..................................................................................................11/09 “(A) Touch of Gold: Betta midas” by Alexander A. Priest.................................................................06/11 “When Three’s NOT a Crowd” by Alexander A. Priest..................................................................... 09/09

SPEAKER PROFILES by Claudia Dickinson

Profile of Tim Nurse: “Diving Lake Tanganyika”.............................................................................. 04/07 Profile of Ken Davis: “Collecting in Uruguay”.................................................................................. 05/07 Profile of Mark Soberman: “Keeping and Breeding Corydoras”....................................................... 06/07 Profile of Jeff Bollbach: “A Fishroom Tour with the Missouri Aquarium Society”.......................... 07/09 Profile of Ed Vukich: “Cichlid Breeding Tails”................................................................................. 09/07

TRAVELING AQUARIST

“Grand Cayman’s North Sound” by Stephen Sica............................................................................. 06/15

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

March 2011

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GCAS Happenings

March

Here are meeting times and locations of some aquarium societies in the Metropolitan New York area: Greater City Aquarium Society

East Coast Guppy Association

Next Meeting: April 6, 2011 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: Meets the first Wednesday of the month (except January & February) at 7:30pm: Queens Botanical Garden 43-50 Main Street - Flushing, NY Contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437 Email: gcas@earthlink.net Website: http://www.greatercity.org

Meets: 2nd Tuesday of each month at at 8:00 pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Gene Baudier (631) 345-6399

Big Apple Guppy Club Meets: Last Tuesday each month (except Jan, Feb, July, and August) at 7:30-10:00pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Donald Curtin (718) 631-0538

Brooklyn Aquarium Society Next Meeting: March 11, 2011 Speaker: Richard Ross Event: Cephalopods Meets: 2nd Friday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30pm: NY Aquarium - Education Hall, Brooklyn, NY Call: BAS Events Hotline: (718) 837-4455 Website: http://www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org

Long Island Aquarium Society Next Meeting: March 18, 2011 Speaker: Al DiSpigna Topic: Livebearers Meets: 3rd Fridays (except July and August) 8:00pm. Greenhouse Meeting Room, Holtsville Ecology Center, Buckley Road, Holtsville, NY Email: Margaret Peterson - president@liasonline.org Website: http://liasonline.org/

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Nassau County Aquarium Society Next Meeting: March 8, 2011 Speaker: Maryann McNamara Event: Trip To The Arctic Meets: 2nd Tuesday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30 PM Molloy College - Kellenberg Hall ~1000 Hempstead Ave Rockville Centre, NY Contact: Mike Foran (516) 798-6766 Website: http://www.ncasweb.org

NORTH JERSEY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Next Meeting: March 17th, 2011 Speaker: TBA Event: TBD Meets: Lyndhurst Elks Club, 251 Park Avenue Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 Contact: NJAS Hotline at (732) 332-1392 Email: tcoletti@obius.jnj.com Website: http://www.njas.net/

Norwalk Aquarium Society Next Meeting: March 17, 2011 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at: Earthplace - the Nature Discovery Center - Westport, CT Contact: John Chapkovich (203) 734-7833 Call our toll free number (866) 219-4NAS Email: jchapkovich@snet.net Website: http://norwalkas.org/

March 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


“Other romantic tunes include Tom Jones’s It’s Not Unusual, Elvis Presley’s I Can’t Help Falling In Love With You and Righteous Brothers’ Unchained Melody complete the list. “Zorro has something of a reputation as a ‘ladies’ shark” and as Mazawabee has been A series by “The Undergravel Reporter” ‘single’ for a number of years now we really thought they would get together very quickly,” In spite of popular demand to the Paul Hale, the aquarium curator, said: contrary, this humor and information “But it’s been months since their first column continues. As usual, it does introduction and although there are certainly signs NOT necessarily represent the that Zorro has been making advances, we would opinions of the Editor, or of the really have expected some serious mating by now. Greater City Aquarium Society. “Research suggests that fish can not only hear music but can appreciate different tunes and t Greater City’s Holiday Party and Awards melodies so we have decided to see if some good Banquet in December, we saw BAP old fashioned love songs will get them in the certificates given out, as well as a plaque for mood!” “Breeder of the Year.” And, yeah, the plaque did Well, World Zoo Today did not report on the look cool. But how much are you willing to do to results of this experiment, but thanks to a get your fish to spawn? examiner.com™ report2 on September 17, 2009 Are you willing to try what one London zoo did (almost exactly a month after the World Zoo to get a pair of zebra sharks to mate? On August article), the world now knows that: “...the baritone 1 19th, 2009, World Zoo Today™ reported : vocalist known as the ‘Walrus of Love’ “The deep seductive voice of Barry White has transformed Zorro been called on at Sea the listless shark into Life London Aquarium a swimming love to try and encourage machine. Zorro, a six-year-old “Initially a cold zebra shark, to mate. fish to tank mate “Hopes were high Mazawabee, Zorro when the aquarium became a real sexual introduced Zorro to predator after fellow zebra shark swimming to the Mazawabee on dulcet tones of Barry Valentine’s Day this White. year. “T h e z e b r a “But despite being shark has moved to noted for his sexual second base and Hopes were high when the aquarium introduced advances to tank mates now engages in Zorro to fellow zebra shark Mazawabee when he was at Sea typical shark Photo: NATIONAL PICTURES Life in Belgium, he foreplay -has not been doing as expected. aggressively biting Mazawabee’s pectoral fins. “Aquarium chiefs have turned to the late soul “The two love sharks go at it so vigorously singer – sometimes referred to as “The Walrus of aquarium guides have to school alarmed visitors Love” – and are playing Baby We Better Try To that Zorro is just being frisky.” Get It Together and My First, My Last, My So, back to my initial question, are you willing Everything. to pipe in music to get your fish to spawn? What “If the singer’s tunes do not work, they are about dimming the tank lights and placing lit considering trying Marvin Gaye’s Let’s Get It On, candles around the fishroom, or adding a wee bit Wet Wet Wet’s Love Is All Around, and Diana of Chardonnay in your next water change? Ross and Lionel Richie’s Endless Love.

How Much Would You Do?

A

1

http://www.worldzootoday.com/2009/08/19/barry-white-songs-used-to-encourage-shark-to-mate-inaquarium/ 2 http://www.examiner.com/offbeat-news-in-national/barry-white-music-an-aphrodisiac-for-love-shy-shark

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S Modern Aquarium - Greater City(NY) A.S. (NY)

March 2011 2011 March

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Fin Fun What It’s NOT As you read through this list of fishy features, you will be engaging in a process of elimination. When you get to the end of the list, you should be left with a single genus of fish which has many species. IT’S NOT a cichlid, a labyrinth fish, a killifish, a a rainbowfish, a characin, a loach, a barb, or a danio. IT’S NOT native to Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe, or North America. IT’S NOT A saltwater or brackish water inhabitant, it does not reside in hard alkaline conditions, and it doesn’t live in extreme hot or cold climates. IT’S NOT a mouthbrooder, a livebearer, or a shell dweller. IT’S NOT a fish which forms pair bonds, except during times of spawning. IT’S NOT a large fish, with most staying well under three inches in length. IT’S NOT nocturnal, it’s not a surface dweller, and it doesn’t have scales. IT’S NOT rare or endangered.

You know what it’s not, so WHAT IS IT? ____________________________________________

Answers to our last puzzle: Name

That Cory!

Common name

Scientific name

Arched Cory

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Corydoras arcuatus

Bandit Cory

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Corydoras metae

Black Top Cory

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Corydoras acutus

Bronze Cory

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Corydoras aeneus

False Bandit Cory

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Corydoras melini

Peppered Cory

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Corydoras paleatus

Pretty Cory

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Corydoras pulcher

Slate Cory

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Corydoras concolor

Tail Spot Cory

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Corydoras caudimaculatus

Two Line Cory

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Corydoras parallelus

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March 2011 March 2011

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


The Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies

Photo by Ad Konings

36th ANNUAL Tropical Fish CONVENTION

March 25-27, 2011 The Crowne Plaza Hotel, Cromwell, Connecticut Speakers - Vendor Room - Sunday Auction 10am – Banquet – AGA meeting Rosario LaCorte – Tetras Kris Weinhold – Planted Aquaria Ad Konings – Rift Lake Cichlids Andy Rhyne – Marine Aquaculture Tom Grady – Killifish

Wolfgang Staeck – Angelfish – SA Dwarf Cichlids Eric Bodrock – Breeding Oddball Catfish Mike Hellweg – TFH Breeder Challenge - Goldfish David Boruchowitz – Our Hobby Ted Judy - TFH Breeder Challenge – Trip to Gabon

David or Janine Banks 802-372-8716 dbanks@together.net Leslie Dick 203-748-7800 ldick@comcast.net

www.northeastcouncil.org/convention


Profile for Dan Radebaugh

Modern Aquarium March 2011  

Series III Vol XVIII No. 1

Modern Aquarium March 2011  

Series III Vol XVIII No. 1

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