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March 2013 volume XX number 1

20th Anniversary — 2013


Speakers – Vendor Room – Sunday Auction 11am (viewing from 9:30am) – Banquet – Workshops Club meetings – Fish Show

Charles Clapsaddle – Breeding Show Fish – Plant Filtration Lee Finley – Catfish Greg Steeves – Lake Victoria Cichlids – CARES Species Andre Carletto – Killifish Todd Gardner – Saltwater Collecting – Carnivorous Plants Mark Denaro – Anabantoids – Reef Aquarium Rachel O’Leary – Invertebrates – Nano Fish Richard Pierce – Filtration Workshop Amanda Wenger – Nano Planted Aquarium Workshop

Leslie Dick 203-748-7800 ConventionChair@northeastcouncil.org www.convention.northeastcouncil.org


Series III ON THE COVER Our cover this month features an African anabantid, Microctenopoma ansorgii, the "ornate ctenopoma." For more information on this uncommonly encountered, but very attractive fish, see Al Priest's article, "The Most Ornate African," on page 26. Photo by Alexander A. Priest GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Board Members

President Dan Radebaugh Vice-President Edward Vukich Treasurer Jules Birnbaum Assistant Treasurer Ron Wiesenfeld Corresponding Secretary Sean Cunningham Recording Secretary Tommy Chang Members At Large

Claudia Dickinson Al Grusell Emma Haus Leonard Ramroop

Pete D’Orio Ben Haus Jason Kerner

In This Issue From the Editor G.C.A.S. 2013 Program Schedule President’s Message Considering 90 Years by Joseph Ferdenzi

December's Caption Contest Winner Cartoon Caption Contest Member Classifieds Pictures from our Holiday/Awards Banquet by Susan Priest

Wet Leaves by Susan Priest

Goliath Groupers of the Gulf by Stephen Sica

Gymnogeophagus balzanii

Committee Chairs

A.C.A. Delegate Bowl Show Breeder Award  Early Arrivals F.A.A.S. Delegate Membership N.E.C. Delegate Programs

Claudia Dickinson Leonard Ramroop Warren Feuer Mark Soberman Al Grusell Alexander A. Priest Marsha Radebaugh Claudia Dickinson Claudia Dickinson Mark Soberman Technology Coordinator Warren Feuer MODERN AQUARIUM

Editor in Chief Copy Editors   Exchange Editors  Advertising Mgr.

Vol. XX, No. 1 March, 2013

Dan Radebaugh Sharon Barnett Susan Priest Alexander A. Priest Stephen Sica Donna Sosna Sica Mark Soberman

A Fun Fish to Keep and Breed by Steve Berman

Good-Bye, Old Friends... by Warren Feuer

Collecting Vintage Aquarium Pumps by Jules Birnbaum

The Most Ornate African Microctenopoma ansorgii - The Ornate Ctenopoma by Alexander A. Priest

G.C.A.S. Bowl Show Rules 2012 Modern Aquarium Article Index Our Generous Sponsors & Advertisers G.C.A.S. Happenings The Undergravel Reporter Stoned Fish

Fin Fun (Puzzle Page) Not So Ancient History

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 15 17 21 22 24 26 28 29 33 34 35 36


From the Editor by Dan Radebaugh

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elcome back to another year at Greater City, and another year (our 20th!) of Modern Aquarium, Series III. For those of you who wonder about what Series III means, I’m sure our speaker tonight, Joe Ferdenzi, will enlighten you during his review of the 90year history of our club, and that of Modern Aquarium in its various incarnations. Our December Cartoon Caption Contest inspired several first-time responders, and the results were close, but Dan Puleo won his second caption contest in a row. Way to go, Dan! One feature not to miss this month is, believe it or not, the Member Classifieds. I believe you’ll see what I mean when I tell you that it really set me thinking. Following her photographic celebration of December’s Awards Banquet (see page 10), Sue Priest reviews the popular “new” fish magazine, Amazonas. See “Wet Leaves” on page 15. By the way, as you look through last year’s Article Index (page 29), you’ll notice that “Wet Leaves” appears in two categories, Book Reviews and Conservation. This is because every “Wet Leaves” column last year dealt with some aspect of conservation. If this subject is an interest of yours, I can’t think of a better way to increase your knowledge and perspective than by reading these columns. Perhaps you’ll even be inspired to go directly to some of the sources she has reviewed for us. Getting tired of the cold weather? Check out Steve Sica’s “Goliath Groupers of the Gulf” for an instant, if perhaps only imaginary warm-up. How did the Bobby Darin song go? “Sometimes I see me on a tropical island…” Coming back to more domestic concerns, Warren Feuer bids farewell to some of his long-time fish friends who perished during the Hurricane Sandy power debacle. Most of us who have been keeping fish for awhile know that its tough losing long-time pets, and mass disasters are perhaps even more difficult to take. I thank Warren for sharing this thoughtful piece.

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Steve Berman contributes an article introducing us to Gymnogeophagus balzanii, a fairly popular representative of that genus in the aquarium hobby, while Al Priest introduces us to an African anabantid, Microctenopoma ansorgii, aka the ornate ctenopoma (see our cover), which is probably not so well-distributed in the hobby. For the historians and collectors among us, Jules Birnbaum checks in with an account of his experiences collecting vintage aquarium air pumps. Ever the optimist, The Undergravel Reporter muses on ways that psychotropic pharmaceuticals in our water supply might actually benefit aquarium hobbyists, and the issue closes, as always, with our puzzle, Fin Fun. * * * Remember, as always, we need articles! Modern Aquarium is produced by and for the members of Greater City Aquarium Society. Our members are our authors, and with ten issues per year, we always, always need more articles. I know several of you are keeping and/or breeding fish that I would like to know more about, and I’m certain other members would be interested as well. Share your experience with us. Write about it! If you’re a little unsure about the state of your writing technique, don’t worry – that’s why there are editors. If you have an article, photo, or drawing that you’d like to submit for inclusion in Modern Aquarium, it’s easy to do! You may fax it to me at (877) 299-0522, email it to gcas@earthlink. net, or just hand it to me at a meeting. However you get it to me, I’ll be delighted to receive it!

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


GCAS Programs

2013

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t is our great fortune to have another admirable cast of speakers who have so graciously accepted our invitation to join us throughout the coming season, bringing us their extensive knowledge and experiences. You certainly won’t wish to miss a moment of our prominent guests, not to mention the friends, fish, warmth, and camaraderie that accompanies each meeting. I know I can barely wait to see you here! Enjoy! Claudia March 6

Joe Ferdenzi 90 Years of GCAS!

April 3

Larry Johnson Lake Malawi

May 1

TBA

June 5

Leslie Dick Livebearers

July 3

TBA

August 7

Silent Auction

September 4

TBA

October 2

TBA

November 6

TBA

December 4

Holiday Party!

Articles submitted for consideration in Modern Aquarium (ISSN 2150-0940) must be received no later than the 10th day of the month prior to the month of publication. Please fax to (877) 299-0522, or email to gcas@earthlink. net. Copyright 2013 by the Greater City Aquarium Society Inc., a not-for-profit New York State corporation. All rights reserved. Not-for-profit aquarium societies are hereby granted permission to reproduce articles and illustrations from this publication, unless the article indicates that the copyrights have been retained by the author, and provided reprints indicate source and two copies of the publication are sent to the Exchange Editor of this magazine. Any other reproduction or commercial use of the material in this publication is prohibited without express written prior permission. The Greater City Aquarium Society meets every month, except January and February. Members receive notice of meetings in the mail. For more information, contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437. Find out more, or leave us a message, at our Internet Home Page at: http://www.greatercity.org or http://www.greatercity.com Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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President’s Message by Dan Radebaugh

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ood Evening! I hope that you all enjoyed our winter break, and that everyone is ready for another exciting year with Greater City! I also hope that all those who were hard hit by Hurricane Sandy have been able to restore their lives to a calmer state. Having just finished our 90th Anniversary in 2012, we now find ourselves in another anniversary year—the 20th Anniversary of our club’s magazine, Modern Aquarium (Series III). Fittingly enough, the topic of our speaker this evening, former long-term Greater City President Joe Ferdenzi, will be the history of our Society, from its origins in 1922 to the present day. Speaking of Modern Aquarium, I don’t think the Editor will mind if I announce that all issues from 2008 through 2012 are now available online. If you look on our Web site, www. GreaterCity.org, you will see a tab for Modern Aquarium, where you will find links to each issue. Current issues of course, are still only available to current members, and are distributed at our monthly meetings. To obtain your copy, just see Marsha Radebaugh at the membership table after you have paid your annual dues (still only $20 per year). Though I suppose that if you’re reading this, you’ve already figured that out. On a more somber note, I received an email a couple of weeks ago from Greater City member Gerry Domingo. Gerry is having a problem with his health, and is undergoing chemotherapy. This is necessitating that he cut back on physical demands, such as caring for his tanks and fish. Please look at our Member Classifieds in this issue for information on what he needs to part with. I’m sure we all share in the hope Gerry comes out of his treatment with a good prognosis. Good luck, Gerry, and Good Health!

Dan

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Considering 90 Years by Joseph Ferdenzi, President Emeritus s we celebrate Greater City’s 90th Anniversary, it is important to remember just what a signal achievement that is. At one time, New York City and the surrounding suburbs were awash in aquarium societies. But today very few are left. Of those that are, Greater City is by far the oldest, with 90 years of continuous activity. I wonder if you can imagine how much effort goes into maintaining a volunteer-run organization for 90 years. Well, it is so difficult that only two other aquarium societies in the U.S. have surpassed 90 years of existence—one is in Philadelphia and the other is in Boston. To be sure, Greater City has had its ups and downs. When the aquarium hobby was all the rage in the 1930s, Greater City was a hobby leader—it sponsored popular shows that were covered by the New York Times. But there were times when the paid membership was under 50 people. Perseverance, however, has won out, and today Greater City seems to be as vibrant a society as it ever was. We are often contacted by old-time former members who find us through the Internet. As the society’s unofficial historian, I am the person who most often gets back to them. One recurring sentiment that is expressed to me is amazement that Greater City is still around. That, to me, reflects the idea that most people believe it difficult for an all-volunteer organization to have such a long existence. When I tell them, moreover, all that we are doing, and that we average 65 people at each meeting, they are even more amazed. I have been a member of Greater City since 1984, and I have extensively read its archival materials. One thing I can say without fear of contradiction is that Greater City’s philosophy has always been one of utmost collegiality. We don’t go in for gimmicks or pretensions; we never claim to be something we are not; we are definitely not run like a business. We are just a group of people with a shared interest who wish to help others enjoy this same interest. This goal, however, cannot be met without the hard work of our many volunteers. If you want to get a glimpse of the most dedicated of volunteers, all you need do is peruse the names in our Roll of Honor (published each year in the December issue of Modern Aquarium). Of course, they are but the tip of the iceberg. And in future years there will be more such volunteers. There have to be. When you reach 90, then 100 is only a stone’s throw away.

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Cartoon by Elliott Oshins

December's Caption Winner: Dan Puleo

Ya know, Jim, it's just not the same as in the old days..

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


The Modern Aquarium Cartoon Caption Contest Modern Aquarium has featured cartoons before. This time though, you, the members of Greater City get to choose the caption! Just think of a good caption, then mail, email, or phone the Editor with your caption (phone: 347-866-1107, fax: 877-299-0522, email: gcas@ earthlink.net. Your caption needs to reach the Editor by the third Wednesday of this month. We'll also hand out copies of this page at the meeting, which you can turn in to Marsha before leaving. Winning captions will earn ten points in our Author Awards program, qualifying you for participation in our special "Authors Only" raffle at our Holiday Party and Banquet. Put on your thinking caps!

Cartoon by Elliot Oshins

Your Caption:

Your Name:

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Member Classifieds WANTED: For Restoration Project: Does anyone have some pieces of bubble-edge glass? Perhaps from a broken or old tank? Need three pieces -- Will pay! Please contact Steve: shhinshaw@gmail.com. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FOR SALE: Need 6 1 2 1

to part with 10 fully set up tanks: Ten-gallon tanks 20-gallon-long 30-gallon tanks 125 gallon tank with wood stand and canopy

Call Gerry: 347-837-5794 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------FOR SALE: Fish Hobbyist’s Dream Home: $189,000! Fishroom: 15 X 26 – Almost 400 square feet. 10 Picture-window tanks, with builtin wall shelving underneath for storage. Room for more tanks, with pressurized air system throughout the room. Full sink (hot/cold) with work space; ceramic tile floor. Pond Room: 12 X 16 – Almost 200 square feet. 300 gallon indoor pond for tropical fish. Mag pump, ceramic tile floor, large cathedral windows, lots of light for growing plants. Gorgeous views. Great place to read the Sunday papers. Rest of House: 2 BR, 2 BA, HUGE kitchen with 49 cabinets and drawers. All rooms huge, LR/desk area. Almost 2,000 square feet. Central A/C. Climate: 340 sunny days last year. Mild winters with absolutely NO snow shoveling. Location: Truth Or Consequences, New Mexico. Great name, huh? Was formerly called Hot Springs (and yes, we’ve got ‘em). Very friendly community. Cars actually stop for you to cross the street. Rarely hear a car horn. Two blocks from town. 8

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


House Location: On historic site for Geronimo and his braves, where they ground holes in huge boulders (on the southern edge of the property) for cooking maize. Evidence still there (placard next to property). Just 20 feet below us stands a fish pond stocked with trout, and another hundred feet down is the Rio Grande River, for rafting, tubing, and fishing. For even greater bass fishing, we’re only five miles from Elephant Butte Lake, the largest lake in New Mexico, which also features water sports such as boating, swimming, fishing, jet skiing, etc. There are two marinas. View: Tremendous! From the front porch (completely tiled) you have the best view of Turtleback Mountain rising majestically above the park and river in front of you. Breakfast on the porch is breathtaking! Lunch too! Taxes: Only $600 per year. Summing Up: We’ve lived here for 19 years, and I had both the fish pond and the fishroom built for my hobby, but I’m now 83, and it’s time to retire from the hobby. We watched our grandchildren grow up as they spent all their summers here. Irreplaceable memories. You could have them too. Charlie Kuhne: (575) 894-2957

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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Pictures from our Holiday

Dan and Marsha Radebaugh

the Flagship Diner welcomes us!

Michael Henderson

Bill amely

Michael Gallo and nephew Marty

andrew Jouan

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Walter Gallo

Emma and Ben Haus

Herb Walgren

March March2013 2013

Michelle Walgren

ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Party/awards Banquet

Photos by Susan Priest

Roderick Mosely

Sharon Barnett

Steve Miller

Ron Kasman

Fran Kasman

al Grussel

Peter Goldfien

lorraine Goldfien

Bob Hamje

Denver lettman

leonard Ramroop

Pete D’Orio

Modern Aquarium - Greater City(NY) A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S

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A Good Time

Ed Vukich and Eliott Oshins

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Donna and Steve Sica

Jason Kerner

Ron Wiesenfeld

Michael Macht

Joe Ferdenzi

Jeff Bollbach

Barbara Small

Gilberto Soriano

Jonathan Jean-Pierre

Horst Gerber

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ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Was Had By All!

Crystal Mattocks

Robert DeBonis

Bob Strazzulla

Bill adams

Rich levy

Harry Faustmann

Jason irizarry

Natalie linden

Mervyn Bamby

Our just dessert! Modern Aquarium - Greater City(NY) A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S

March 2013 March

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GCaS awards

Bowl Show Champion Rich Waizman

Breeder of the Year Joe Graffagnino

aquarist of the Year Jules Birnbaum

author awards

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tommy Chang

Ed Vukich

Jules Birnbaum

Joe Graffagnino

Eliott Oshins

al Priest

March March2013 2013

ModernModern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


(the cover of which is reproduced here), is the “classic aquarium fishes of the genus Pterophylum.” There are four articles discussing the regal altum, genetics, and more. “We have deliberately placed the emphasis on the wild forms in order to increase awareness of these beautiful fishes.” (Within this issue there are also articles a Series On Books For The Hobbyist about corys, rainbow fish, snakeheads, and much more.) by SUSAN PRIEST I believe Mr. Evers said something about “exciting design.” Well! I chose the cover which hen was the last time you picked up a I think best exemplifies this, but the real tropical fish hobby magazine and said excitement takes place inside. “Wow! I’m A discussion of the interested in reading “high quality pictures” everything in here.” If it cannot be separated from aMaZONaS Magazine has been a long time since the exciting design, as Reef to Rainforest Media, llC you have felt that way, they perfectly compliment then let me introduce you each other. Where to start and where to stop to aMaZONaS. when it comes to a The first incarnation of aMaZONaS originated in Germany in 2005. It description of the photography? Bold as well as was re-born with the first English language issue intimate. Magnetic. You will find that you have (Volume I, Number I), which was published in developed sticky fingers, as it will become difficult January/February 2012. I quote editor-in-chief for you to turn the pages. The brilliant colors are aglow on the glossy Hans-Georg Evers: “It paper. There are no is a real pleasure for thumbnail-sized me to welcome you to photos, photos of the first issue of fishes which have aMaZONaS been preserved in magazine in the pickle juice, or English language.” photos labeled as Here are a few look-alikes to the excerpts from his ones being written further comments. about. Even the “aMaZONaS advertising is used to focuses strictly on its best visual fresh water and advantage. I know, I brackish water life know, it’s time to forms. Although the move on. name aMaZONaS “Clear writing,” might imply that we is that what he said? only cover the South Hmmm. That American continent, doesn’t begin to we go wherever describe it. Clear, interesting fishes and yes, but so much aquatic life are found. more. Suddenly I aMaZONaS is find myself created and published floundering for the by aquarists for right words. I think aquarists. Our goal is that the wide range to deliver pure aquatic of authors which are passion expressed new to American through clear writing, hobbyists gives the overall result a certain depth as high quality pictures, and exciting design.” aMaZONaS is published bi-monthly. Each well as a fresh coat of polish. And yes, you will issue has a featured topic with four or five articles find familiar names as well, such as Dr. Paul devoted to various aspects of it. For example, the Loiselle, Dick Au, and Karen Randall, to name but featured topic in the January/February 2013 issue a few.

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One of my favorite articles (so far) is also illustrated with one of my favorite photos. The November/December 2012 issue features an article by Louise Watson entitled Belo Monte: Protests Mount against “Monster Dam” on Brazil’s Rio Xingo. This enlightening yet troubling article tells a new version of a story we have already heard too many times before, that economics and the environment don’t mix. “Damming and diversion of the Rio Xingu will displace tens of thousands of indigenous peoples in the heart of the Amazon basin, and threaten native stocks of fishes caught for food and export to aquarists.” One of the accompanying photos is of “indigenous warriers” protesting this invasion. They actually appear to be quite fierce until you glance down at their feet, They are all wearing flip-flops! Another one of my favorite articles is a treatise on the immortal Malayan Burrowing Snail by Mary Bailey, in the September/October 2012 issue. This is a livebearing snail with a reputation for, well, immortality. You will just have to read this one for yourself. It is easy to see why aMaZONaS comes out bi-monthly instead of monthly. It is simply a matter of logistics, as no one person can be in two places at the same time. Our editor Mr. Evers authors at least one article in every issue, and they usually originate from a fishroom in Switzerland, a river in Indonesia, or any number of places in between. His excursions all over the globe undoubtedly cut into the time he has to devote to the actual work of putting the magazine together. Once in a while you will turn a page and be surprised to discover something you never even knew existed, much less that you are actually interested in. But here is the REAL surprise; it won’t be a bristle worm, a squirrelfish, or a gorgonian, but a freshwater or brackish water fish, plant or invertebrate new to your radar screen. To state this more clearly, aMaZONaS does not devote 50% or more of its space to marine topics or the advertising of marine products. If you are strictly a freshwater geek, then you will feel right at home in its pages. To carry this point one step further, I once again quote Mr. Evers: “Over the years we have been able to publish numerous reports and articles on topics that were previously unexplored.” To offer you but one example, our well-traveled editor gives credit to his guide at the time for the discovery of a new blue-eye, (Pseudomugil paskai, or red neon), but he of course was the one to recognize it as such, and bring it back to the scientific and hobbyist communities. After receiving the first two issues of our subscription, Al and I ordered copies of all the back issues available in English. I have yet to see a copy of aMaZONaS on a news or magazine stand. At

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the back of each issue there is a list of “outstanding local aquarium shops” where it can be purchased. Most every state from Arizona to Wisconsin is represented. There is also a list of “society connections,” to help you plan day trips as well as vacations which include a visit to an aquarium society (just in case you are wondering, yes, GCAS iS on the list). Also worth noting: every subscription to the printed edition of aMaZONaS includes a free digital subscription. So, what’s missing, you might ask? Well, a book review column would be a nice addition, and a letters-to-the-editor column would seem to be conspicuously absent. Also, I am looking forward to an in depth interview with Hans-Georg Evers. The last page of each issue is always a fully enthralling full page photo. Variably entitled “parting shot,” “preview,” or “underwater eye,” it will lure you away from the contents and editorial pages. You will find that the last page in the magazine will be the first one that you turn to! Without actually saying it in so many words (until now), you can see for yourself that I think a modest investment in a subscription to aMaZONaS will reap you a multitude of benefits. If you don’t want to take my word for it, g o t o t h e a M a ZO N a S w e b s i t e (amazonasmagazine.com) and read what Ray Lucas has to say about it. In closing, just let me offer a warm welcome to the new kid on the block.

author’s Note As all of you know, last season was a major milestone in the life of the Greater City aquarium Society. I am of course referring to the fact that in 2012 we celebrated our 90th anniversary. Well, this season is no less of a milestone for us. 2013 is the twentieth season of Modern aquarium, Series III. The issue you are holding in your hands is Series III, Volume XX, Number I. With every issue we publish we are putting our best face forward as well as building our legacy. If you haven’t done so already, and even if you have, I hope each of you will share your aquatic passions with the rest of us in the pages of Modern aquarium throughout this twentieth anniversary year.

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Goliath Groupers of the Gulf Story and Photos Stephen Sica

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Goliath grouper poses next to sunken shrimp boat with a few resident grunts.

arly last summer Donna and her sister decided to meet and visit each other in Florida. Her sister resides with her husband and son, Christopher, in Clearwater. We all decided to meet in Naples (Florida), which is also on the on the Gulf Coast, about two hundred miles south of Clearwater. Donna and I would fly into Fort Myers and drive the thirty miles south to Naples, and her sister would drive from her home in Clearwater. Donna immediately began researching the general area, and found that Marco Island was several miles south of Naples. She found a dive shop on Marco, and informed me that she would like us to go diving in the Gulf of Mexico with our nephew Christopher. When he was in grade school before his family moved to Florida, we would occasionally bring Chris with us to GCAS meetings. When Chris was twelve we arranged for private lessons, and he became a certified diver. Early in his college career he was a volunteer diver at the Clearwater Aquarium until the demands of his studies and Central Florida’s cool winters caused him to re-think that activity. I was ambivalent about taking our diving gear along for one dive day. I decided that we would Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

not take our buoyancy compensators. This piece of equipment, more popularly known as a BC, is an air bladder connected to a harness, and straps to the diver by a harness on the front. One or two bands on the back, strapped to the gas supply, usually a steel or aluminum cylinder filled with either ordinary compressed air, or “enriched air,”—that is, air with a greater percentage of oxygen—usually thirty-two percent. In case you’ve forgotten, normal atmospheric air contains about twenty percent oxygen. The higher percentage of oxygen reduces the chance of getting caisson disease, also known as decompression sickness, or the bends, which is typically caused by nitrogen saturation of the bloodstream, tissues and joints. The BC provides a means for a diver to attain neutral buoyancy underwater by adding or removing small amounts of air. It also provides flotation on the surface. Fortunately, I was able to pack all of our other gear in a twenty-one inch suitcase—small, but heavy! Early on a Friday morning in mid-August of 2012, Donna, Chris, and I found ourselves with another family of three on a small boat leaving Marco Island into the vast Gulf of Mexico. The air was hot, and the water appeared to be green. They March 2013 17


of the shrimp boat. Schools of small grunts swarmed around the wreck. They appeared to be tomtate grunts, Haemulon aurolineatum, but didn’t quite match the coloration, so I couldn’t make a positive identification. Maybe Gulf grunts differ slightly from the Florida and Caribbean species. The tomtate grunt is a common fish in Florida and the Caribbean, so at the time I didn’t bother to study these numerous small fish because I have observed thousands of grunts. As they say in the movies, we were after bigger fish. We swam amid the wreckage, and soon met up with a huge, shadowy lump. It kept its distance from us, but moved away whenever we attempted to approach, staying just above the bottom, and encased in grunts. Chris and Donna hang onto the anchor line for a three minute safety stop at fifteen feet. All sport dives should be nodecompression unless there are special circumstances. A safety stop is an additional precaution.

told us that we’d have at least twenty-five feet of visibility underwater. I wondered how this would even be possible, but said nothing to Donna for fear that she might become disappointed. We were in the company of Captain Craig and Divemaster Jeff, who owned the boat and dive shop. We would travel about eleven miles offshore, where the immediate area by a sunken shrimp boat was inhabited by several Goliath groupers. I asked Jeff how large these groupers were; he responded that each was between 200 and 400 A shadowy Goliath grouper surrounded by grunts hovers a few feet from the fifty foot bottom of the Gulf of Mexico near the pounds. “That’s big,” I replied. wreckage of a shrimp boat. The site is located eleven miles west After about an hour we arrived at the location of of Marco Island, near Naples, Florida. the shrimp boat. The depth finder was used, because For some reason I thought of the planet Saturn, with its you could see nothing below the green surface. Jeff ring-like belts whirling around it. However, this was gave a dive briefing to inform us that there was a slight no planetoid; it was a Goliath grouper, Epinephelus current. He pointed in the direction of the sunken boat itajara. A sea bass, this giant fish can be recognized and instructed us to head for it as soon as we reached by its size alone. It can grow to eight feet and weigh the bottom at fifty feet. He would be in the water to 700 pounds. The grouper that I was looking at was check out us and the other divers. We suited up, jumped hidden in the swarm in, and headed for the of schooling grunts bottom. You could and the algae-laden barely see fifteen water. I could hardly feet, and definitely make it out as a fish, not the bottom until it was so very difficult you arrived there. to see. I figured that The Gulf was very if you can’t see them, murky, with no photograph them, clarity, as a result of so I took one photo. the eighty-six degree Based upon the water water temperature, clarity, I knew that the warmth of which the quality of my caused the water photography would column to be infested be lacking. with small floating As we swam algae particles. It was on, we encountered “pea soup” visibility. The front end of a giant grouper. Note the large mouth and prominent pectoral yet another grouper, Donna, Chris, fins. The greenish tint of the Gulf is evident in this hazy photo. and then we saw and I had no idea two, side by side, to the right of some wreckage. I where we were, nor in which direction the sunken boat extended my arms and inched closer to attempt a was situated. After a couple of minutes, Jeff appeared photograph, until a turbulent “harrumph” emanated in the murk, pointed the direction, and swam away. from the nearest grouper. The sound was distinctive We followed him, and soon came across the wreckage 18

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as an impressive “shock wave” of water hit our bodies. That really got our attention! We managed to find a few more groupers, or maybe they were the same ones in different locations; the water was just too murky to distinguish one of these fish from another. After our grouper encounter, we swam around the wreck trying to observe some local resident sea life. There was minimal hard and soft coral, and sponges, including small basket sponges. There were a few snook, Centropomus undecimalis, in the two-foot size, but they stayed out of range. There was a queen angelfish that kept hiding amidst the wreckage. There were also sergeant majors, Abudefduf saxatilis, and other damselfishes. All these fish were typically Floridian. After fifty minutes we surfaced. I was terribly disappointed with the visibility, and told this to Jeff. He, however, thought that everything was fine. He said that for our second dive we would head further offshore. We dined on a light lunch while the boat

Sergeant major (Abudefduf saxatilis), a damselfish, guarding her eggs that are the bluish mass to the left center on the flat rock.

motored another three miles out. After our surface interval we entered the water again, but Jeff did not come with us. I wondered why for only a few seconds. When I hit the water, I saw nothing but green murk. Donna, Chris, and I swam to the front of the boat and followed the anchor line to the bottom at fifty feet. I signaled them to stay within sight of the line so we wouldn‘t get lost or separated. This meant that no one could venture more than ten feet away. When Chris went off the line, I held onto it and had Donna form a

A juvenile Beaugregory, Pomacentris leucostictes, does its best “Here’s looking at you, kid.” pose for the camera. The adult is navy blue with a wispy yellow tail.

chain with me to keep her nephew within sight. After about twenty minutes of groping around, we surfaced. I only took photos of Donna and Chris swimming up the line because I didn’t see anything else. Back on the boat, the son of the other couple who were diving said that he had seen a lionfish. I was impressed by his boldness. Afterward, I asked Donna, “Do you think that he really saw a lionfish?“ She only shrugged. I told Donna that we had paid a lot of money to hardly see anything, but she countered that it was an experience, and good diving practice in adverse conditions. Donna was pleased that we had seen the huge groupers—these were the largest that we had ever encountered. I left it at that, and accepted that it was another adventure. Next month we would be returning to Key Largo for our annual Halloween diving reunion that was being held in September this year.

Steve, Donna and Chris celebrate a successful dive into the murky Gulf of Mexico, highlighted by the sighting of Goliath groupers.

I guess that the moral of this story is to stay out of the Gulf of Mexico during the summer. But if you don’t, then lots of luck!

Yellowline arrow crab, Stenorhynchus seticornis, stands guard before some rock or coral that may be its home, if it can fit under the tight ledge. This crustacean is in the spider crab family. It is unafraid of divers, and only retreats if molested. This one allowed Divemaster Jeff to pick it up and show it to us.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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Support Fish in the Classroom!

If you have any 5 or 10 gallon tanks, or any filters, pumps, or plants that you could donate to NYC teacher Michael Paoli's classrooms, could you please bring them in or email Rich Levy (rlevy17@aol.com). If you'd like to donate larger tanks, be sure and email Rich so he can make sure Michael can accommodate it.

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


Gymnogeophagus balzanii A Fun Fish to Keep and Breed by Steve Berman

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ymnogeophagus balzani is a South holding offspring, because the jaw is distended American cichlid which has become one and they will not eat. of my favorite fish—both beautiful, and These mouthbrooding females are high on the evolutionary scale. unbelievably good parents. When food is present Around a year and a half ago I bought eight they allow the fry out of their mouths to feed, 1-inch juveniles, as is my custom. They grew but at the first sight of danger (me!), the fry slowly, and after about a year I began to notice immediately seek refuge back in her mouth. sexual demorphism. I had lost one fish along the This behavior makes the fry very easy to way, but the two largest fish began to develop manage. Removal of the fry is simple, as I just the nuchal hump remove the female denoting the male holding the fry and of the species. The place her (and them) males had reached 5-6 into a 10 gallon inches; females were tank. I feed the fry in the 3 inch range. microworms, frozen After a while the brine shrimp, and larger male’s health First BitesTM powered seemed to suffer, food. It’s easy to and the smaller male siphon uneaten food became dominant, and without sucking up eventually he became the fry because, as An adult male Gymnogeophagus balzanii. Photo by Marcelo Casacuberta. always, the female the only male. And so in a 55 gallon tank I ended up with takes the offspring in her mouth at the sight of one male and five females. This was perfect, my approach. because this species is a harem breeder. It wasn’t I leave the female in the 10 gallon tank for long before breeding began in the typical South around three weeks and then remove her before American cichlid manner, with eggs laid on flat she has a chance to gather the offspring in her slate. The male breeds with one female after mouth. Raising the offspring after this has been another. At one point I had three females guarding fairly easy. their eggs or offspring at the same time. I never saw wrigglers, because as soon as the eggs hatched the female takes the wrigglers in her mouth and holds them until they are free Vital Stats swimming. It is easy to see which females are Temperature: 68 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Subtropical, so may benefit from three months a year in the 60s. pH: Neutral Water Hardness: Medium Aquarium size: A fifty-five gallon tank for a pair of fish is recommended. Size: Males 5-7 inches, Females smaller. Diet: Omnivore.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

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Good-Bye, Old Friends... by Warren Feuer

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laid some of my oldest friends to rest this weekend, and I could not allow their passing to go by without writing about them. Because of Tropical Storm Sandy, we lost power in our house for 14 days, and that, combined with cold weather and a Nor’easter in the middle of the second week, sealed their doom. When power came back, there was nothing left to do but empty their tanks, remove their dead bodies, and say goodbye. As you have no doubt figured out by now, what with this being an aquarium society magazine and my admitting to having emptied their tanks, all of my deceased “friends” were fish. But to me, and many others like me, that does not minimize the loss, or the impact of having kept and cared for them for at least 18 years, and in some cases even longer. Please note that I am not comparing the impact of the loss of these fish with the losses that so many others in our area suffered; that’s not why I am writing. I just did not want to let go without a few last words. Here then, are my thoughts about each of these “wet pets” I had the honor and pleasure of keeping: Megladorus uranoscopus “Woody” This fish was a present from Mark Soberman. Mark is a real lover of the Doradidae family, and he has kept so many of them that I can’t even count them all. They tend to be hardy, long lived, and in some cases very large. You may be familiar with the Raphael catfish, or the jaguar catfish. These are some of the smaller, better known Doradadids. Mark did warn me that the fish would grow large, but feeling that it would be OK in my 75 gallon tank, I took the fish in. At its initial 3 or 4 inch length, it was an inconspicuous addition to my tank. However, as the years passed and the fish grew in size, it was hard to miss. Woody acquired its name courtesy of my wife, Susan, who thought it was a piece of wood in the tank. It is easy to see how someone could make that mistake; the fish is brown in color, and it blended in well with the gravel and driftwood decorations in the tank. In addition, it barely moved at all during the day, and just seemed to grow and grow. By the time I began to suspect that I wanted to re-locate the fish, no one would take it, and it was too hard to move. The fish had short, very pointed barbs along its caudal region, and there was no net or bucket that could hold it successfully. Once lifted out of the tank, it would thrash about wildly, and I was the beneficiary of several cuts from its barbs. So, I kept

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Woody. The only successful move of Woody occurred when we moved from an apartment in Queens to a house in Long Island, and I had no choice but to empty the tank. Woody had taken up residence in a clay, octagonal sided drainage tube that I had placed in the tank, and to move the fish, Mark and I put colanders over both ends of the tube and placed Woody in a 38 gallon Rubbermaid® container, which it quickly fouled. Mark kept Woody in one of his larger tanks for several weeks until I had time to, at least temporarily, set up some tanks in my house. For a while, Mark thought he might keep Woody, which would have been fine with me, but the fish was not doing well in its location, and, ultimately we decided to move it back to my 75. As the years passed and the fish got older, there were several times when I thought it was on its way out. When Hurricane Irene struck last year, and we lost power for three days, Woody’s longtime companion, a very large Synodontis decorus, did not survive, and I thought Woody would suffer the same fate. But the fish survived. Although not very active during the day, at night Woody moved around constantly, and it would come to the surface of the tank and take food from my hands on the nights that I fed catfish. (Note: since many catfish are nocturnal, to ensure that they receive enough food, they should be fed in the evening when the lights are off, so that sufficient food can reach them.) Pseudacanthicus leopardus “For Ali” In the late 1980s and early 1990s there was an explosion of fancy Loracarids (plecos) coming out of South America. Gaudily colored and even more gaudily described, with names like red devil pleco, cactus pleco, and of course the fabulous zebra pleco. Being a catfish (and thereby) a pleco fancier myself, I was in both heaven and hell at the same time; heaven because I had the opportunity to keep these beautiful fish in my aquariums at home, and hell because most of them were priced way out of my affordable range. However, where there’s a will there is almost always a way. My path to at least one of these fish was Francis Lee’s store, Nature World. For longtime members of GCAS, Nature World was our hangout, a small pet store in Flushing where you could go and almost always find one or more of our members lurking within. Fran had gotten a few very small specimens of Pseudacanthicus leopardus, which did not really have a trade name, but was one of the red devil/scarlet

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pleco complex type fish. It had a bright red caudal fin, some red on its dorsal fin, and was brown with black spotting, not unlike a leopard—hence the name. Fran offered to exchange one of the fish for a breeding pair of German blushing blue angelfish that I had. What a deal!!! So the new addition to my collection came home with me, just about the same time that my daughter Alison, called Ali by all, was born. For the record, Ali was born on February 7, 1993. The fish was very small when I first got it, easily fitting in a 5 ½ gallon quarantine tank. As time passed, it was moved into a 29 gallon tank and grew. In 2010, the 29 gallon had become somewhat of a leaker, and I was ready to do something different with the space it occupied. I replaced the 29 with a 30 gallon long tank, and set up the décor with the leopardus very much in mind; lots of driftwood and rocks to hide amongst. The tank was also occupied by several of my albino bushynose plecos and two of the clown type Pekoltias. Although quite a few of the plecos have a reputation for being aggressive with other plecos in their tank (the gibbiceps and blue-eyed plecos are notorious for this behavior), I never observed any aggression in the tank with the leopardus. It was clearly the biggest fish in the tank, and would have been the instigator had there been any aggression. Moving the fish turned out to be quite a challenge, as I recall. Big, strong, and fast, I ended up having to drain almost the entire tank and then manipulate it into a spaghetti colander to get it out, and into a temporary holding tank while I set up its new home. I tend not to use nets to catch catfish, as their spines, fins and whiskers (depending on the individual being captured) manage to find their way into the netting, causing general mayhem, stress, and destroyed nets, not to mention potential injury to the fish. However, the move and subsequent relocation to its new home went well. In 2011, when Hurricane Irene resulted in lost power for 3 days, the fish was fine. However, in Sandy’s aftermath, the combination of extreme cold and lack of water movement and filtration proved too much. When power was restored after 14 days, the fish was dead. The loss of this fish hit me really hard; I had always associated it with my daughter, both having come into my life at the same time, and it was always fun to tell people that the fish was the same age as Ali, and see their reaction. Most people don’t realize how really long fish can live. In addition, as it got older, it got even more beautiful and made its presence felt more and more. By accident, I discovered that the fish liked Hikarki Soft and Moist spirulina pellets, and whenever I placed them in the tank the fish would shed its aversion to the light and come scampering out to grab some. In addition, the fish would eat any snails that found their way into the tank, even the dreaded Malaysian livebearing snails. Although several of my tanks have been plagued by those pests, this fish’s tank never had a one! Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

Synodontis angelicus A true “pet fish.” I bought this fish in 1994 during one of my first visits to That Fish Place, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It was one of the fish on my “must have” list, and I bought it at a point when they were pretty readily available. As time and political situations have changed, the fish’s availability has waxed and waned. Today, I think they are once again relatively easy to find, but not cheap. When I bought mine, I set it up in a 30 gallon long with some African tetras as company. Over time, the fish proved to be somewhat less than a good community fish. In fact, it killed one show quality green terror, almost shredded a royal pleco, and when I observed the fish going after the aforementioned tetras that it had lived with for several years, I realized it needed to be by itself. Over time, I also realized that the fish had to be a female, as it was not sleek like a male would be, but round and full, as a female with eggs would be. Another realization that came to me over time was that the fish was not afraid of me at all. On the contrary, when I performed a water change in its tank, it would allow me to stroke its sides, and it would take food from my hand. So you can imagine my horror and sorrow at finding it floating dead in its tank after the power was restored post Sandy. The next time someone tells you that fish do not live long, or that they have no personality, feel free to share this article with them. My experience with these three fish clearly illustrates otherwise, and these days, when I am in my now (mostly) empty fish room, I am saddened by the loss of these long-time friends. I brought them into my keeping and took the responsibility of giving them the best care possible. For many years, I feel that I succeeded, but in the end, I could not protect them from the folly of greed and poor management that was so evident in the aftermath of super storm Sandy. I hope to get my fishroom running again, but I know it certainly won’t be with as many tanks as I had before the storm (25), and I know I will not make a commitment to keep any fish that can live as long as the ones I have written about here.

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COLLECTING VINTAGE

AQUARIUM AIR PUMPS

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by Jules Birnbaum

’ve been a collector of antique American clocks, and now tropical fish. I have collected a few old aquarium books, and thought it would be interesting to look at what drove air into fish tanks in the early days of the hobby. Aquarists collect fish, plants, rocks, and driftwood. Why not vintage equipment used when the hobby first took off during the beginning of the 20th century? A balanced aquarium was thought not to need any air injected into the water, since the plants would take care of that by releasing oxygen and absorbing CO2. A large water surface, fewer fish, and cooler temperatures would also help replenish the oxygen. In the early 1900s, William T. Innes mentions aeration in his Three English Hy-Flo models. book, Exotic Aquarium Fishes. He states in just one small paragraph that there is a modern development in aquarium convenience which is the small electric pump. Herbert R. Axelrod, in his book Tropical Fish, for the first time shows a a sketch of a piston pump—one similar to a rare mint condition pump Cameo Pet Shop still has on display. Steve Gruebel is very knowledgeable about these pumps, and in fact I recently purchased a vintage pump from him. The pump shown by Axelrod in his book is supplying air to several tanks, with the use of rubber tubing and multiple valves. He also discusses cheaper pumps with less capacity. These pumps used a rubber membrane that vibrated rapidly to produce a flow of air. Membrane pumps have An American Oscar Super lower capacity than piston motor. pumps, and are more useful for smaller single tanks. I’m sure they are out there, but I have yet to see a book discussing air pumps in detail. Whatever knowledge I have received has come from retailers and manufacturers trying to sell their products. The 24

way these piston pumps looked and operated was fascinating, and I wanted to learn more about them. I came across some vintage pumps on eBay, and bought a few at reasonable prices. When I plugged my first purchase in, it blew out all the kitchen lights, and my wife said, “throw that damn thing out.” Since I did not want to throw something out that I had paid good money for, I rewired it instead. I plugged it in again (when my wife was not around) and I was fascinated by the movement of the single piston and how quiet it was. After this first step (or misstep) I looked for other vintage pumps, and acquired a few, mostly with a belt driving the piston, which gathered and moved the air. Compared to our modern piston pumps, these old pumps looked and ran like a Model T Ford. The pump I believe to be the best of the lot is the J.B. Maris Co. pump, manufactured in the USA. J.B. Maris filed his U.S. patent in 1933, and it was granted in 1934. I acquired a copy of the original patent application. The document shows a sketch of a pump with a large, exposed metal disk that is rotated by an internal electric motor. This in turn drives a piston which moves the air. The filing document by the attorney is significant in that it states that James Maris had developed a new pump with more power to pump air without increasing the watts consumed. Mr. with the original Redmond Maris manufactured his Marco pump in Bloomfield, N.J. for many years, but the company is no longer in business. An English company, Medcalf Bros., established in 1940, made the British version, Hy-Flo, that is considered by some (the British?) to be more reliable

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


than the Marco American version. Medcalf closed its doors in the 1990s. The company also made air pumps for laboratories. There is someone in London who reconditions and sells these pumps. He started reconditioning them Airmaster Supreme piston by happenstance 25 years air pump. This is what ago. Simon Levine had a aquarists used to pump fish tank near his bed with a air 50 or 60 years ago. diaphragm pump supplying air to the tank. It became too noisy for a hearing condition he had developed, so he dug out an old non-working Medcalf pump a friend had given him. He reconditioned it, and the rest is history. I recently purchased two Hy-Flo pumps from him, models B and C. Each has dual pistons, and each has a manufacturer’s plate with the Medcalf Bros. LTD, Hy-Flo name, serial number, and electrical information. Maris, the USA manufacturer, also provided such a plate on its Marco pumps. I next bought a small voltage converter to run them in America. They are both fun to watch, are very quiet, and they do pump air. I’m not an electrician, so I will not go into great detail about how piston air pumps work. However, my son-in-law, an electrical engineer, gave me a simple

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

explanation. He informed me that his employer, ConEd, has huge versions of piston pumps. Some of these aquarium pumps have an electric motor made by a American manufacturer (Redmond), and have a belt that runs the piston which drives the air. The Maris and the Hy-Flo both use a flywheel to run single or dual pistons. They are also made of very heavy painted steel. These pumps are generally under 60 watts each. The Junior model is only 15W and small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. It can run air to two or three tanks. Hy-Flo pumps were sold directly and by pet shops worldwide. There were several models, a Junior, A, B, and C. There is also a laboratory model. Sonik/-Systems' pumps have customers all over the globe. Check out their website, where you will find more information, pictures and a few videos showing them in action. The website does not show prices, but you can expect to pay in excess of $200 per pump. Additionally, there is a stiff shipping charge and only a wire transfer is accepted in payment. If you are into collecting, and mechanical toys fascinate you, look into picking up one of these rare reconditioned vintage pumps. They will be nice to exhibit, or just play with. I am available to give you some advice, and demonstrate them in action.

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Microctenopoma ansorgii - the Ornate Ctenopoma Article and photo by ALEXANDER A PRIEST

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nabantoids are fish in the suborder Ctenopoma are basically egg scatterers. Their eggs Anabantoidei. They possess a labyrinth generally float to the surface, and usually remain (or, “maze-like”) organ consisting of together under surface debris. Although this multiple folded compartments of thin boney plates floating mass of eggs can resemble a “nest,” it was in the head. Those boney plates, called lamellae, neither intentionally constructed nor will it are covered with thin membranes that allow subsequently be tended or defended. oxygen in the air to pass directly into the fish’s The subject of this article, Microctenopoma blood stream, giving these fish the ability to ansorgii, is probably the most recognizable and survive in stagnant, oxygen-poor water that would “colorful” (if black and orange means that to you) not be able to sustain fish having to rely on gills of the Ctenopoma and Microctenopoma group. In alone to filter oxygen dissolved in the water. (The fact, its generally accepted common names are word “anabantoid” comes from a Greek word “Ornate Ctenopoma” (going back to when this meaning to “travel up,” referring to these fish species was in the genus Ctenopoma) and “Ornate going up to the water’s surface to gulp air.) Bushfish” (they can survive for extended periods The mo s t in mud and wet leaf commonly kept l i t t e r, s o li v e Scientific Name: Microctenopoma ansorgii anabantoids in the specimens can Common Names: Ornate Ctenopoma, home aquarium are sometimes be found Ornate Bushfish, Orange Ctenopoma all endemic to Asia “in the bush” on temperature: 70-82°F (21-28°C) (betta and gourami land near water). pH Range: 6.0-8.0 (acidic: 6.5 to 6.7 optimal) species). African A n o the r Hardness: 5-20°DH (soft) anabantoids are not common name often Size: Up to 2.5 inches (6.4cm) Sl as popular or well associated with temperament: Males can be aggressive to each known among Microctenopoma other; smaller fish may be eaten aquarium hobbyists ansorgii is “Orange Native habitat: Congo River basin for several reasons, Ctenopoma,” so aquascaping: Heavily planted tank and/or tank including the fact named for the with multiple caves and roots, tight lid, that African vertical orange dim lighting anabantoids are (often more reddish) Nutrition: Carnivorous, requiring live food generally less stripes on a dark (or moving frozen or gel) colorful, not easy to brown body that are acclimatize, and distinctive of this tend to be shy and species. The rays on reclusive. They also require live food, and are the dorsal and anal fins come to sharp points, difficult to nearly impossible to breed in captivity. resembling a saw or “comb.” (The word There are currently three recognized genera Ctenopoma comes from two Greek words: kteis, or of African anabantoids: Ctenopoma, ktenos, meaning comb and poma, meaning Microctenopoma, and Sandelia. A review of the “cover.”) The species name ansorgii (sometimes popular Internet website Fishbase.org shows at found in older literature as ansorgei) comes from least 40 currently recognized species of the zoologist William John Ansorge (1850-1913), Ctenopoma and 12 species of Microctenopoma.1 who first discovered them. (The genus Microctenopoma is relatively new. It Microctenopoma ansorgii are native to the was first described in 1995 by the ichthyologist Congo River basin in parts of both the Republic of Steven M. Norris, who placed some species from Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo. A the genus Ctenopoma into a new genus, feral population may also exist on the island of Microctenopoma.)2 Madagascar.3 Microctenopoma are defined by several bone This is not a large fish, usually attaining a differences from Ctenopoma, not because the fish maximum adult standard length (nose to start of are smaller in size. In addition, Microctenopoma caudal, or tail fin) of about 2.5 inches (6.4 exhibit noticeable sexual dimorphism, and centimeters) and a total length (tip of nose to end behavioral characteristics that include bubble-nest of caudal) of about 3 inches (7.6 cm). Males are building and defense. Species in the genus somewhat larger, with larger dorsal and anal fins

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having white on the distal edge. One pair can be a long while (unless they were sick or very old to kept in a 5.5 gallon (or 20 liter) tank. Two pair can start with). Frequent but small water changes are be housed in a tank twice that size, but it must be much better than large changes, unless you are heavily planted and have numerous caves, roots, able to match nearly perfectly the chemistry of the and other hiding places, providing limited “line of water removed. (Even changes for the better sight,” as males can become very territorial and should be gradual, except in an emergency such as will fight if they can see each other. This is not a a total tank breakdown.) schooling or very active fish. Mostly, they stay out Microctenopoma ansorgii are bubblenesters. of sight of each The male builds a other (and, nest of bubbles unfortunately, also under a floating out of sight of the leaf or other aquarist), each in floating material. his or her own cave For this reason, or tangle of roots filtration should or driftwood. The provide minimal tank sizes I surface water provided above are movement. Sponge a b s o l u t e filters are my first minimums—larger choice, and they is better, and also provide a free recommended. source of infusoria Members of for newly hatched the Ctenopoma and fry. Microctenopoma ansorgii Microctenopoma Spawning genera are occurs under the “ambush predators,” meaning that they will wait in nest, with the male wrapping himself around the hiding for their food, seize it, then return to their female to expel eggs. The eggs (reported to be as hiding places (“ambushing” the food). They are many as 600 in a single spawning, but in my primarily carnivores. I feed mine live blackworms experience closer to 100) hatch in around 24 hours. and live brine shrimp (the latter I pre-treat with The fry should not be fed until they are liquid freshwater fish vitamins, because adult brine free-swimming, usually within two to three days. shrimp are relatively low in nutrition). I have They can then be fed very small foods such as found that they just ignore dry flake or pellet green water, paramecia, infusoria, or artificial foods, but they will eat frozen or gel food as long plankton rotifer (APR). It is advisable to remove as it is moving (meaning, I stir up the water when the parents after hatching. After about one week, I feed anything that doesn’t move by itself). slightly larger sized food can be given to the fry, Even though they are native to Africa, their such as brine shrimp nauplii and microworms. care and maintenance is very similar to that These are pretty fish, when you can see them, required for Asian anabantoids. They prefer soft, especially a male in full display. Unfortunately, slightly acidic water. Their tank should have most of the time they are in hiding and even when subdued lighting. Because they are powerful (and they dart out to grab some food, they rarely look as sudden) jumpers, the tank should be tightly good as some of those photos in the books or covered. magazines. This is also not a beginner’s fish, nor Once established in an aquarium, is it one to get with the intention of having it Microctenopoma ansorgii are surprisingly hardy spawn. (They will spawn in the home aquarium, for a small fish. The problem is that they do not but this is fairly rare.) acclimatize well at the beginning. But, if you Nonetheless, they are interesting and every provide the proper water parameters and tank now and then, if you keep them in ideal conditions, conditions, whatever fish you still have after their you will be rewarded with a sight that makes it first three weeks in your tank will probably live for very clear why they are called “ornate.”

http://www.fishbase.org Norris, Steven M.: Microctenopoma uelense and M. nigricans, a new genus and two new species of anabantid fishes from Africa (p. 357) 3 http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/microctenopoma-ansorgii/ 1 2

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BOWL SHOW RULES There is a Bowl Show at every GCAS meeting, except our Silent Auction/fleamarket meeting and our Holiday Party and Awards Banquet meeting (December). These shows are open to all members of GCAS. Rules are as follows: x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

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Only current GCAS members may enter fish in the Bowl Show. There is a limit of 2 entries per member per meeting. Unlike some other clubs, every month is an “open” Bowl Show at the GCAS (i.e., there is no “theme,” such that one month cichlids are judged, the next livebearers, the next anabantoids, etc.). Any fish that wins any prize (1st, 2nd, or 3rd) may not be entered again in the same meeting year. The current Bowl Show Coordinator is Leonard Ramroop, who usually also serves as judge (although guest speakers are often asked to do the judging honors). 2.5 gallon containers are available for use (brought to the meetings by the Bowl Show Coordinator), but entrants are responsible for providing enough (and suitable) water for their fish. For a fish too large (or too small) for those containers, entrants must supply a suitable container, which must be clear on at least three sides. Only one fish per container (i.e., no “pairs”). No plants, ornaments, or equipment (filters, airstone, etc.) are allowed in the judging tank (an external mirror, or opaque cards between containers is acceptable, as is a cover that does not obstruct side viewing). Points are awarded: 5 points for 1st Place, 3 for 2nd Place, and 1 for 3rd Place. Ribbons are awarded: blue for 1st Place, red for 2nd Place, and green for 3rd Place. The person with the most points at the end of the meeting season receives the Walter Hubel “Bowl Show Champion” trophy at the Awards Banquet. The decision of the judge(s) is final. A running UNOFFICIAL total of the points awarded is printed in Modern aquarium. Only the tally of points maintained by the Bowl Show Coordinator is official. in case of ties: 1st Tiebreaker – most 1st Places 2nd Tiebreaker – most 2nd Places 3rd Tiebreaker – most entries

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2012 Modern Aquarium Article Index Month/Pg

ANABANTIDS

“‘Abundant,’ Yet Endangered: Betta uberis” by Alexander A. Priest................................................ 10/13 “Betta balunga: An Easy Mouthbrooding Betta from Borneo” by Alexander A. Priest.....................11/14 “Betta rubra: One Fish, Many Tales” by Alexander A. Priest............................................................04/11 “A Chocolate Covered Cherry” by Alexander A. Priest..................................................................... 08/18 “Tiny Fish — BIG Challenge: Parosphromenus deissneri” by Alexander A. Priest......................... 06/09 “Trials & Tribulations with Betta macrostoma” by Joseph Graffagnino........................................... 09/12

AQUARIUM HOBBY HISTORY

“Deep in the Heart” by Mary and Dan Carson (MA Classics).......................................................... 12/15 “Exotic Aquarium Fishes: The Book, The Collection” by Steven Hinshaw...................................... 03/23 “In Retrospect” by Steven Hinshaw................................................................................................... 06/07 “Exotic Aquarium Fishes: The Book, the Collection, the Update” by Steven Hinshaw.................... 05/09 “An Historical Note on the Balanced Aquarium” by Joseph Ferdenzi.............................................. 09/09 “A History of the Greater City Aquarium Society” by Joseph Ferdenzi.............................................11/09 “It Does Exist!” by Steven Hinshaw.................................................................................................. 07/21 “The Legacy of Dominic Isla: Endler’s Livebearer” by Joseph Ferdenzi.......................................... 10/09 “Nostalgia Notes: Nassau Pet Shop” by Joseph Ferdenzi.................................................................. 08/09

BOOK REVIEWS “WET LEAVES” Column - by Susan Priest “The Aquarium Hobby CARES Preservation Program”.....................................................................11/17 Freshwater Ecoregions of Africa and Madagascar by Michele L. Thieme, et al.......................... 03/29 Freshwater Stingrays by Gonella & Axelrod................................................................................... 05/15 People in Nature Silvius, Bloomer, Fregoso, eds............................................................................. 07/19 Project Seahorse by Pamela S. Turner.............................................................................................. 09/14 “Rachel Carson”................................................................................................................................. 12/19 Rewilding North America by Dave Foreman.................................................................................. 10/25 State of the Wild 2010-2011 Wildlife Conservation Society............................................................ 04/25 The Value of Species by Edward L. McCord.................................................................................... 06/12 OTHER REVIEWS “Fish Wars! A Tale of Two Channels Part I: Monsters!” by Dan Radebaugh.................................... 08/13 “Fish Wars! A Tale of Two Channels Part II: Tank Wars!” by Dan Radebaugh................................. 09/17

CARTOONS “CARTOON CAPTION CONTEST” – by Elliot Oshins March Cartoon.................................................................................................................................... 03/07

April Cartoon...................................................................................................................................... 04/08 May Cartoon....................................................................................................................................... 05/08 June Cartoon....................................................................................................................................... 06/06 July Cartoon........................................................................................................................................ 07/07 August Cartoon................................................................................................................................... 08/08 September Cartoon............................................................................................................................. 09/08 October Cartoon................................................................................................................................. 10/08 November Cartoon..............................................................................................................................11/08 December Cartoon.............................................................................................................................. 12/06

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“CARTOON CAPTION WINNERS” December (2011) Winner: Alexander A. Priest................................................................................. 03/06 March Winner: William Amely......................................................................................................... 04/07 April Winner: Alexander A. Priest..................................................................................................... 05/07 May Winner: Denver Lettman........................................................................................................... 06/05 June Winner: Denver Lettman........................................................................................................... 07/05 July Winner: Alexander A. Priest...................................................................................................... 08/07 August Winner: Denver Lettman....................................................................................................... 09/06 September Winner: Stephen Sica...................................................................................................... 10/06 October Winner: Denver Lettman......................................................................................................11/06 November Winner: Dan Puleo........................................................................................................... 12/05

CATFISH

“Rating the Loricarids” by Warren Feuer (MA Classics).................................................................. 09/20

“The Whiptail Catfish: Rineloricara fallax” by Joseph Graffagnino................................................. 03/14

CICHLIDS

“Breeding the Blue Angels” by Joseph Graffagnino.......................................................................... 05/25 “The Fish Donation Chronicles: George Byrnes” by Sharon Barnett (Mermaid Tales)....................12/11 “Keeping and Breeding Theraps wesseli” by Dan Radebaugh.......................................................... 10/23 “My Experience Breeding Australoheros Sp. ‘Red Ceibal’” by Jules Birnbaum.............................. 07/12

CONSERVATION “Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part One” by Stephen Sica................................................................... 06/19 “Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part Two” by Stephen Sica............................................................................... 07/23 “Lionfish of Aruba and Bonaire” by Stephen Sica............................................................................. 12/13 “Livebearers Lacking a Thingy” by Allen Wood............................................................................... 04/14 “A Plague of Frogs” by Dan Radebaugh............................................................................................ 08/21 “Who CARES? Allen Wood Does!” by Tommy Chang..................................................................... 05/17 “WET LEAVES” Column - by Susan Priest “The Aquarium Hobby CARES Preservation Program”.....................................................................11/17 Freshwater Ecoregions of Africa and Madagascar by Michele L. Thieme, et al.......................... 03/29 Freshwater Stingrays by Gonella & Axelrod................................................................................... 05/15 People in Nature Silvius, Bloomer, Fregoso, eds............................................................................. 07/19 Project Seahorse by Pamela S. Turner.............................................................................................. 09/14 “Rachel Carson”................................................................................................................................. 12/19 Rewilding North America by Dave Foreman.................................................................................. 10/25 State of the Wild 2010-2011 Wildlife Conservation Society............................................................ 04/25 The Value of Species by Edward L. McCord.................................................................................... 06/12

COVER PHOTOGRAPHS

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Australoheros Sp. ‘Red Ceibal’ – photo by Alexandra Horton..........................................................07/C1 Betta rubra – photo by Alexander A. Priest.......................................................................................04/C1 Betta uberis – photo by Alexander A. Priest......................................................................................10/C1 Cardinia cf. cantonensis Sp. Tiger – photo by Wallace Deng............................................................12/C1 Exotic Aquarium Fishes – photo by Steven Hinshaw........................................................................03/C1 The New York Aquarium – photographer unknown..........................................................................09/C1 Parosphromenus deissneri – photo by Alexander A. Priest...............................................................06/C1 The Rock Beauty, Holacanthus tricolor – photo by Stephen Sica.....................................................05/C1 Sphaerichthys selatanensis – photo by Alexander A. Priest...............................................................08/C1 Betta balunga – photo by Alexander A. Priest...................................................................................11/C1

March 2013

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


GCAS Society Issues

2011 Modern Aquarium Article Index............................................................................................. 03/31 Bowl Show Rules............................................................................................................................... 03/22 Bowl Show Rules............................................................................................................................... 04/24 Bowl Show Rules............................................................................................................................... 05/22 Bowl Show Rules................................................................................................................................06/11 Bowl Show Rules................................................................................................................................07/11 Bowl Show Rules................................................................................................................................11/05 GCAS 2012 Award Winners............................................................................................................... 12/25 “GCAS CARES and YOU!” by Tommy Chang................................................................................. 07/26 GCAS Past Award Winners................................................................................................................ 12/24 The GCAS Author Award Program Report for 2012......................................................................... 12/26 GCAS Breeders Award Program Report for 2012.............................................................................. 12/29 GCAS Breeders Award Program Points Totals.................................................................................. 12/31 Rules for August’s Silent Auction/Fleamarket................................................................................... 07/06 Rules for August’s Silent Auction/Fleamarket................................................................................... 08/21

Exchanges “Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica................................................................................ 07/09

“Fish Bytes” by Stephen and Donna Sosna Sica.................................................................................11/25

GENERAL INTEREST and Miscellaneous

“The 90” by Susan Priest.................................................................................................................... 08/23 “Aquarium Lighting for the ‘Real Thing’” by Jules Birnbaum.......................................................... 03/08 “Problems and Solutions” by Jules Birnbaum.................................................................................... 05/13 “The Tao of Greater City” – Photos by Wallace Deng....................................................................... 12/22 “Ten Fishes I Have Loved” by Susan Priest....................................................................................... 04/22 “Ten Tips for Beginners and Other Fishkeepers” by Susan Priest..................................................... 06/17 “That Dreaded Green Stuff!” by Jules Birnbaum................................................................................08/11 “Tropical Fish in a Tropical Storm” by Joseph Ferdenzi................................................................... 12/09 “Tropical Fish to the Rescue” by Jules Birnbaum.............................................................................. 04/20

KILLIFISH

“A Fish Fit For a Desktop” by Jules Birnbaum.................................................................................. 06/14

LIVEBEARERS

“The Legacy of Dominic Isla: Endler’s Livebearer” by Joseph Ferdenzi.......................................... 10/09 “Livebearers Lacking a Thingy” by Allen Wood............................................................................... 04/14 “A Rare Little Wonder from Mexico” by Jules Birnbaum................................................................. 09/26 “A Small, Native American Fish: Heterandria formosa” by Jules Birnbaum................................... 10/20

MARINE FISH

“Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part One” by Stephen Sica............................................................................... 06/19 “Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part Two” by Stephen Sica............................................................................... 07/23 “Lionfish of Aruba and Bonaire” by Stephen Sica............................................................................. 12/13 “My Favorite Marine Fish: The Spotted Drum” by Stephen Sica...................................................... 08/25 “My Favorite Marine Fish: The Peacock Flounder” by Stephen Sica............................................... 10/15 “My Favorite Marine Fish: The Rock Beauty” by Stephen Sica....................................................... 05/23 “The Shy Hamlet: Faux Rock Beauty?” by Stephen Sica.................................................................. 09/10 “Sharks of St. Martin” by Stephen Sica..............................................................................................11/19

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MEMBER PHOTOS

“Pictures from Our Holiday Party/Banquet” by Susan Priest............................................................ 03/16 “Pictures from our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................. 04/18 “Pictures from our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................. 05/20 “Pictures from Our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................ 06/20 “Pictures from Our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................ 07/14 “Pictures from Our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................ 08/16 “Pictures from Our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest............................................................................ 10/18 “Pictures from Our Last Meeting” by Susan Priest.............................................................................11/22 “Pictures from Our Lost Meeting” by Marsha Radebaugh................................................................ 12/08

NEC and FAAS News/Events

“The 2011 FAAS Publication Awards” by Alexander A. Priest......................................................... 07/16 “Award News from the NEC”............................................................................................................ 05/05

OPINION AND/OR HUMOR

THE UNDERGRAVEL REPORTER - a column by The Undergravel Reporter “2 Cars in Every Garage and 3 Eyes on Every Fish”......................................................................... 03/37

“The Case of the Disappearing Fish”..................................................................................................11/29 “Endangered Cheetos?”...................................................................................................................... 06/24 “The Game’s Afoot!”.......................................................................................................................... 08/29 “Leaping Lizards Fish!”..................................................................................................................... 09/31 “An Oldie, but a Goodie”................................................................................................................... 12/33 “Raining Fish”.................................................................................................................................... 10/29 “Take Me Out to the Aquarium”......................................................................................................... 04/31 “Take Me To Your Leader!”............................................................................................................... 05/29 “When Fish Attack!”.......................................................................................................................... 07/29

PUZZLE: “FIN FUN” Page

“90 Years Young”................................................................................................................................11/30 “Bettas: You Betcha”.......................................................................................................................... 04/32 “Dwarfs vs. Giants”............................................................................................................................ 05/30 “Flying Colors”.................................................................................................................................. 07/30 “Fooling Around”............................................................................................................................... 03/38 “Out of the Snow” ............................................................................................................................. 12/34 “See the Seahorse?”............................................................................................................................ 09/32 “Stop & Go”....................................................................................................................................... 06/26 “Things That Go Bump in the Night” ............................................................................................... 10/30 “Yummy Treats”................................................................................................................................. 08/30

SPAWNING

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“‘Abundant,’ Yet Endangered: Betta uberis”, by Alexander A. Priest............................................... 10/13 “Betta balunga: An Easy Mouthbrooding Betta from Borneo”, by Alexander A. Priest....................11/14 “Betta rubra: One Fish, Many Tales” by Alexander A. Priest............................................................04/11 “A Chocolate Covered Cherry” by Alexander A. Priest..................................................................... 08/18 “The Fish Donation Chronicles: George Byrnes” by Sharon Barnett (Mermaid Tales)....................12/11 “A Fish Fit For a Desktop” by Jules Birnbaum.................................................................................. 06/14 “Keeping and Breeding Theraps wesseli” by Dan Radebaugh.......................................................... 10/23 “Livebearers Lacking a Thingy” by Allen Wood............................................................................... 04/14 “My Experience Breeding Australoheros Sp. ‘Red Ceibal’” by Jules Birnbaum.............................. 07/12 “A Rare Little Wonder from Mexico” by Jules Birnbaum................................................................. 09/26 “A Small, Native American Fish: Heterandria formosa” by Jules Birnbaum................................... 10/20 “Tiny Fish -- BIG Challenge: Parosphromenus deissneri” by Alexander A. Priest........................... 06/09 “Trials & Tribulations with Betta macrostoma” by Joseph Graffagnino........................................... 09/12 “The Whiptail Catfish: Rineloricara fallax”, by Joseph Graffagnino................................................ 03/14 March 2013

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


SPEAKER PROFILES

Our Guest Speaker: Felicia McCaulley.............................................................................................. 04/09 Our Guest Speaker: Rachel O’Leary.................................................................................................. 10/07

TRAVELING AQUARIST

“Back on the Road to Key Largo” by Stephen Sica........................................................................... 04/27 “Sharks of St. Martin” by Stephen Sica..............................................................................................11/19 “Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part One” by Stephen Sica............................................................................... 06/19 “Curaçao’s Lionfish, Part Two” by Stephen Sica............................................................................... 07/23 “Undergravel Reporter Imposter” by Stephen Sica............................................................................ 03/10

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GCAS Happenings

March

Here are meeting times and locations of some aquarium societies in the Metropolitan New York area:

Greater City Aquarium Society

Next Meeting: April 3, 2013 Speaker: Larry Johnson Topic: Lake Malawi Meets: Meets the first Wednesday of the month (except January & February) at 7:30pm: Queens Botanical Garden 43-50 Main Street - Flushing, NY Contact: Dan Radebaugh (718) 458-8437 Email: gcas@earthlink.net Website: http://www.greatercity.org

Big Apple Guppy Club Meets: Last Tuesday each month (except Jan, Feb, July, and August) at 7:30-10:00pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Donald Curtin (718) 631-0538

Brooklyn Aquarium Society

Next Meeting: March 8, 2013 Speaker: Kevin Kohen of LiveAquaria.com Topic: Superstar Fishes Meets: 2nd Friday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30pm: NY Aquarium - Education Hall, Brooklyn, NY Call: BAS Events Hotline: (718) 837-4455 Website: http://www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org

Long Island Aquarium Society

Next Meeting: March 15, 2013 Speaker: Laura Birenbaum Topic: Coral and Marine Invertebrates Meets: 3rd Fridays (except July and August) 8:00pm. Room 120 in Endeavor Hall on theState University at Stony Brook Campus, Stony Brook, NY Email: Margaret Peterson - president@liasonline.org Website: http://liasonline.org/

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East Coast Guppy Association Meets: 2nd Tuesday of each month at at 8:00 pm. Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. Contact: Gene Baudier (631) 345-6399

Nassau County Aquarium Society

Next Meeting: March 12, 2013 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: 2nd Tuesday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30 PM Molloy College - Kellenberg Hall ~1000 Hempstead Ave Rockville Centre, NY Contact: Mike Foran (516) 798-6766 Website: http://www.ncasweb.org

NORTH JERSEY AQUARIUM SOCIETY

Next Meeting: March 21, 2013 Speaker: Rusty Wessel Topic: Fishes of the Maya Meets at: The Lyndhurst Elks Club, 251 Park Avenue, Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 Contact: NJAS Hotline at (732) 332-1392 Email: tcoletti@obius.jnj.com Website: http://www.njas.net/

Norwalk Aquarium Society

Next Meeting: March 21, 2013 Speaker: TBA Topic: TBD Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at: Earthplace - the Nature Discovery Center - Westport, CT Contact: John Chapkovich (203) 734-7833 Call our toll free number (866) 219-4NAS Email: jchapkovich@snet.net Website: http://norwalkas.org/

March 2013

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)


A series by The Undergravel Reporter In spite of popular demand to the contrary, this humor and information column continues. As usual, it does NOT necessarily represent the opinions of the Editor, or of the Greater City Aquarium Society.

A

study by researchers at Umeå University in Sweden recently reported in Science magazine1 that human anti-anxiety

Young wild European perch were exposed in an aquarium to the anti-anxiety drug oxazepam, at a concentration similar to that found in real waters. The exposed fish left their schools to look for food on their own, a behavior that can be risky, as school formation is a key defense against being eaten by predatory fish. They also ate more quickly. More aggressive feeding by the perch on zooplankton could reduce the numbers of these tiny creatures. Since zooplankton feed on algae, a significant reduction in zooplankton could allow algae to grow unchecked. That, in turn, could choke other marine life. OK, I know that the global ecological consequences implied by this study are significant, and of major potential negative consequence to all of humanity. However, it does get me thinking. If it worked for European perch in a university laboratory aquarium, might it also work the same way for tropical fish in a home aquarium? I have a few fish I’d like to see more often, but who are so shy and timid that they hide most of the time. I also have some fish I’d like to see eat more. SO, if I dose them with anti-anxiety drugs, would my

Dr. tomas Brodin and his fish laboratory at Umeå University psychiatric drugs that reach waterways via wastewater create braver, less social fish, that eat more quickly than normal. These behavioral changes can have serious ecological consequences.

1

timid fish come out more often. and would my poor eaters then gobble up all traces of the food I give them? If so, would a little Valium or Librium be of value, or would I just get “stoned fish?”

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/339/6121/814.abstract?sid=d2996dc9-dfd8-43a1-99d7-b51cfa0a4ae6

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY) Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S (NY)

March 2013 March 2013

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Fin Fun With this issue of Modern aquarium, our club’s magazine begins its 20th year of publication as “Series 3" (with this puzzle page appearing in all but the very first issue of this series). Tonight’s scheduled speaker, Joe Ferdenzi, is the immediate past President of the GCAS and an aquarium hobby history buff. After hearing Joe’s presentation, see how many of these historical facts about Greater City’s own magazine you know (or can guess). 1) The first editor of Modern aquarium Series 3 was: G William Innes G Joe Ferdenzi G Warren Feuer

G Al Priest

2) Which of the following is true about the photo on the cover of every issue between 1994 and 2002?: G glued on by hand G a pencil sketch G black & white

G much bigger

3) Modern aquarium competes in publication award contests sponsored by (check all that apply): G FOTAS G FAAS G MASNA

G The NEC

4) Which of the following was NOt a special theme issue in Series 3 of Modern aquarium?: G Lazy Man’s Issue G Native Fishes Issue G Ladies’ Issue

G Around The World

5) What was the name of the “newsletter” the club put out in-between “Series 2” and “Series 3?”: G Detritus Digest G Tanks-R-Us G GCAS News

G Network

6) Who is responsible for bringing color photos inside the pages of Modern aquarium?: G Dan Radebaugh G Steve Sica G Sue Priest

G Claudia Dickinson

7) The “Editor’s Babblenest” was a Modern aquarium column of: G Letters to the Editor G Gossip

G Editorials

G Classic reprints

Solution to our last puzzle:

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March 2013 March 2013

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. Modern Aquarium - Greater City(NY) A.S (NY)


Profile for Dan Radebaugh

Modern Aquarium  

March 2013 Volume XX Number 1

Modern Aquarium  

March 2013 Volume XX Number 1

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