__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


modern

AQUARIUM ON THE COVER Project Piaba is working to conserve and maintain the live ornamental fisheries and other renewable resources of the Rio Negro in the Amazon Basin of Brazil at a commercially feasible and ecologically sustainable level through the symbol of hope that is featured on our cover, the cardinal tetra, Paracheirodon axelrodi. In her final series installment in this issue, Claudia Dickinson reflects on the future of the Rio Negro. Photo by Alexander Priest GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Board Members President. . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph Ferdenzi Vice-President. . . . . . . . Mark Soberman Treasurer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Traub Corres. Secretary. . . . . . Warren Feuer & Sharon Barnett Recording Secretary.. . . . Edward Vukich Members At Large Pete D'Orio Jason Kerner Carlotti De Jager Ben Haus Leonard Ramroop Emma Haus Artie Friedman Committee Chairs Breeder Award. . . . . . Warren Feuer and Mark Soberman Early Arrivals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Al Grusell F.A.A.S. Delegate.. . . . . Alexander Priest Members/Programs. . Claudia Dickinson N.E.C. Delegate. . . . . Claudia Dickinson

Series III Vol. XIV, No. 10 December, 2007

FEATURES Editor’s Babblenest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Our Generous Members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Adventures on the Rio Negro - Part IV. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 GCAS Past Award Winners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 GCAS 2007 Award Winners.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Fish Arrival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Wet Leaves Special Edition - Part Three. . . . . . . . . 14 AFISH Convention 2007.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Last Month’s Bowl Show Winners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fishkeeper Anonymous.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Through The Lens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Breeders Award Program 2007 Report. . . . . . . . . . 24 AFISH 2007 Memories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Amusing Aquarium (cartoon).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Wet Leaves Special Edition - Part Four.. . . . . . . . . . 30 A Paragon of the Aquarium Hobby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

MODERN AQUARIUM Editor in Chief. . . . . . Alexander A. Priest Associate Editors. . . . . Susan Priest and Claudia Dickinson Copy Editors. . . . . . . . . . . Sharon Barnett Dan Radebaugh Exchange Editors. . . . Stephen Sica and Donna Sosna Sica Photo/Layout Editor. . . . . . Jason Kerner Advertising Mgr.. . . . . . . Mark Soberman Executive Editor. . . . . . . Joseph Ferdenzi

Author Award Program 2007 Report. . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Editor Extraordinaire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Smart Fish, Dumb People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 G.C.A.S. Happenings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Fin Fun (Puzzle Page). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Articles submitted for consideration in MODERN AQUARIUM must be received no later than the 10th day of the month, three months prior to the month of publication. Copyright 2007 by the Greater City Aquarium Society Inc., a not-for-profit New York State corporation. All rights reserved. Not-for-profit aquarium societies are hereby granted permission to reproduce articles and illustrations from this publication, unless the article indicates that the copyrights have been retained by the author, and provided reprints indicate source and two copies of the publication are sent to the Exchange Editor of this magazine. Any other reproduction or commercial use of the material in this publication is prohibited without express written prior permission. The Greater City Aquarium Society meets every month, except during January and February. Members receive notice of meetings in the mail. For more information, contact: Joe Ferdenzi (516)484-0944. Find out more, or leave us a message, at our Internet Home Page at: http://www.greatercity.org or http://www.greatercity.com


The Editor’s Babblenest

by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST “The report of m y death is an exaggeration” Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain), 1897, after a reporter was sent to investigate whether he had died. (In fact it was his cousin who was seriously ill.) his is my last “Editor’s Babblenest.” W hatever Dan Radebaugh decides to call his editorial page (assuming that he even wants to have an editorial page), I’m willing to bet it won’t be “Babblenest.” Some of the articles in this issue referring to me read like a eulogy or obituary. Just for the record, I am neither dead, nor “retired.” I will still be coming to G CAS meetings (but not to events that are nearly two hours from my home; so it’s unlikely that you’ll see me at next year’s NEC or AFISH Convention). I will still be involved with Modern Aquarium as a contributor and (to the extent that Dan wishes) as a consultant. I intend to devote more time to my fish. Ironically, working on this magazine meant my home aquariums were shortchanged in the care and attention they received. I also need to do extensive repairs and maintenance on the computer and printers I have been using the last few years to work on our magazine. Several boxes of replacement parts for this purpose have been sitting unopened for quite a while, because as soon as one issue of the magazine is completed, work on the next issue has to begin almost immediately. As our new Editor, Dan is going to need your help. He will need articles — a lot of

T

2

articles. This magazine was never my magazine, and it is not going to be Dan’s magazine. It is your magazine. Right now, it is probably the single best monthly amateur aquarium society publication in the country. I have seen GCAS members who had other commitments on the evening of one of our meetings come in, get their issue, and then immediately leave. It is not the Editor who inspires such devotion to our magazine, it’s the original articles from our own members. Please keep those articles coming! Dan has told me that he will try to use the same formats I have been using. I use W ordPerfect to do this magazine because it has some functions rivaled only by high-end desktop publishing programs. W hile a fairly easy program to use for letters or reports, its advanced features are not mastered easily. I commend Dan for at least trying to continue this format. It means that the general appearance of this magazine will not immediately change. It also means that Dan will have a “Backup Editor” in me, should he want or need to take time off. At some point, Dan may decide to produce this magazine by using another program. W hatever Dan decides, I’m sure that this magazine will continue to be of the highest quality. To those of you who have promised me articles and who have not yet “delivered” on those promises, please consider following through and giving those promised articles to Dan. Generally speaking, our GCAS members have been very supportive of this magazine. But (and isn’t there always a “but?”), there have been som e m em bers who prom ise and never deliver, who will travel hours to a convention or to other clubs, but cannot spare a half hour writing about themselves for our “Anonymous Fishkeeper” column. W hile I hate ending my last editorial on a sour note, this may be the only time I can express my long-felt frustration with certain members. They know who they are. For fear of inadvertently omitting even one name, I want to collectively thank everyone who has worked on and/or contributed to this magazine. To anyone I have offended in my zeal to get an issue out, I apologize. Let me conclude with the title of the final episode of the television show M*A*S*H, “Goodbye, Farewell and Am en.”

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


President’s Message by JOSEPH FERDENZI

I

have a number of important topics to address this month, so please, read all the way through.

*

*

*

Let me begin with something most of you all ready know, namely, that this is the last issue of Modern Aquarium for which Al Priest will serve as the primary Editor. Al took over the reins of Modern Aquarium from W arren Feuer in 1997. In the decade since, Al has built Modern Aquarium into North America’s leading amateur aquarium publication. The number of awards bestowed on Modern Aquarium and its authors by the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (FAAS) and the Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies (NEC) is, to my knowledge, unrivaled in the annals of society publications. This exemplary record of achievement owes much to the dedication and talent of Al, who, at all times, was helped by his equally dedicated wife, Sue. In ten years of publication, Al has never missed a deadline. This is impressive enough, but it becomes altogether more remarkable when you consider Modern Aquarium’s rigorous schedule. You see, most other club publications are either not published monthly, or are mailed to members. W hat is the significance of that? W ell, the burden of having a monthly schedule, as opposed to a bimonthly schedule, is obvious. W hat is less obvious, but more pernicious, is the fact that we do not mail the magazine to our members. W hen you mail a publication, you can be somewhat loose on the publication date. After all, what does it matter if you mail it one or two days after your supposed deadline? The members will still receive it in ample time. But, at Greater City, there is no mailing. So, if the magazine is not there on the date of our monthly meeting, the members would have to wait a whole month before receiving the tardy issue at our next meeting. As you can see, there is no margin of error for Modern Aquarium. Even one day late means at least 30 days late. How many of us could handle such a demanding deadline for ten years as successfully as Al has? I daresay, very few. And, Al’s ten year run is the longest of any previous M odern Aquarium Editor. On top of that, as the awards from others have recognized, M odern Aquarium was consistently full of quality articles. This was in Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

large part due to Al’s ingenuity in getting material from th membership. I well remember many of Modern Aquarium’s theme issues, most notably the famous “Ladies Issue,” which was composed of articles solely from women authors, and was undoubtedly the first ever amateur or professional aquarium publication to be authored entirely by women. To the daunting challenges of deadlines and quality, let me add the challenges of quantity and originality. For every issue, Al and Sue had to come up with enough articles, along with other material, to fill some 20 plus pages every month. In addition, since Al did not want Modern Aquarium to be a glorified vehicle for photocopying, they had to largely come up with original material. If you don’t think that this is a rather daunting challenge, just take a look at other monthly publications, and calculate what percentage of their content is made up of reprints from other publications. I assure you that the comparison will leave you impressed. (I should mention that few clubs these days can even mount a monthly magazine, much less one that is filled with original material.) I should conclude by saying that Greater City owes an immense debt to Al and Sue for the their tremendous contribution to the storied life of our Society. However, the Society has already beat me to it by, in 2004, electing Al and Sue Priest to Greater City’s most prestigious pantheon, its Roll of Honor. There they are enshrined for as long as there is a Greater City Aquarium Society. Fortunately for us, one of our newer members, Dan Radebaugh, has gallantly stepped forward to try his hand at editorship. Dan will be assisted by his wife, Marsha. They work together in the publishing industry. W e wish Dan and Marsha much success. They have the full support of GCAS’s Board, and we trust, that of our membership. That Dan and Marsha have volunteered to keep Modern Aquarium going for however long they can, is much appreciated, and speaks highly of their dedication and our good fortune.

*

*

*

Last month, the first ever AFISH (Aquarium Federation of Independent Societies and Hobbyists) Convention was held in Riverhead, Long Island on the Veteran’s Day weekend of November 9-11. AFISH is composed of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, the Greater City Aquarium Society, the Long Island Aquarium Society, and the Nassau County Aquarium Society. The convention was historic in that it was the first event ever sponsored by all four of this area’s major aquarium societies, and it was the first aquarium convention to be held in Suffolk County.

December 2007

3


That Greater City should have taken a lead role in sponsoring an event in Suffolk County should not be altogether surprising inasmuch as Greater City has a history of holding its own shows in neighboring Nassau County, beginning with our Mineola Exposition in 1954, and our tropical fish show in Valley Stream as recently as 1980. However, location aside, the union of all four aquarium societies is what made for a truly momentous event. W hile I do not have a financial report as of yet, I judge the convention to have been highly successful. Quite frankly, I have never judged the success of these events by whether they made (or lost) money. I do know that no aquarium society has been bankrupted by their participation in this event. On the other hand, I know that we had nearly one hundred registrants for the convention a remarkably high number for a first time event. I know that many of our guests, including persons of long-standing experience in attending these types of conventions, complimented us on the manor and style with which the event was run. Perhaps most satisfying to me personally were the thanks I received from some of our newer members who told me that they were grateful for the opportunity to participate in an event of this magnitude that did not require that they travel outof-state. I had known from my own frequent participation in out-of-state events that few of this area’s aquarium society members in fact attended these events. A large measure of my motivation in creating the AFISH Convention was to bridge this void. W ith the help of many, this desire to serve our members as best as I could came to fruition. I and others are already working on next year’s Convention. I assure you that it will be even more fun than the first one. So, make sure you set aside the Veteran’s Day W eekend of 2008 if you want to be part of an event that will be remembered for years to come.

*

*

*

Although I have only been a member of Greater City since 1984, I am the custodian of the Society’s historic archives. More significantly, however, I have read all of this material. This is important because it permits me to recognize events that might otherwise go unnoticed. One such event happens to involve one of our members, Frank Gannon. Frank may or may not be familiar to all of you, but he certainly is familiar to me. For one thing, Frank is very tall. For another, he shows up every year at the first meeting to pay his dues. This is remarkable in itself because it bespeaks his dedication to being a member of our club. However, I think you will readily grasp the significance of this to me when I tell you that he has been doing this since at least 1968! If one looks at the membership roll that is published in 4

our 1968 show journal, you will see Frank’s name. And, you will see his name ever thereafter in our membership rolls. Sadly, Frank is the only person left from this 1968 roll who is still an active member of our Society. In recognition of Frank’s dedication, at this year’s Holiday Party, the Society will present Frank with a plaque commemorating this achievement, and conferring Lifetime membership. So, henceforth, we trust that Frank will show up as he always has, but now he won’t have to pay any dues. He’s all paid up...and then some. Congratulations to Frank.

*

*

*

One can say that the greatest honor Greater City can confer upon one of its members is to be elected to its Roll of Honor. However, when I look upon the names there enshrined, one evident impression is made upon me. Namely, that it is the people whose names are thus registered that have honored Greater City by devoting their time and talents for the sake of the rest of us. Often, they have sacrificed much. Always, we have been the beneficiaries of their efforts. This year, we add another lustrous name to that Roll of Honor. She materialized in 1997 at our 75th Anniversary Diamond Jubilee Show. How propitious it is that she attended. In the ten years since, she has transformed the public face of Greater City, brought immeasurable service to our members, and given great honor to Greater City by its ability to call her our own. Her presence is instantly noticeable at our meetings. She greets everyone with warmth and affection. She brings the candy and the treasured door prizes. She is always there to help and make every member’s participation in the club as enjoyable as possible. She has served as our Membership Chair and our Program Chair for many, many years; two more important jobs carried out to perfection by her. As if that were not enough, she has written numerous award winning articles for Modern Aquarium, and proofread nearly every issue. She has written columns, and she has authored biographies for all of our speakers (for whom she also designs a personalized souvenir and procures a gift). No facet of Greater City is untouched by her caring. On top of all that, she has become one of Greater City’s most outstanding representatives in the aquarium hobby. She is the founder of the m uc h-he ra ld e d C .A .R .E .S . P r e se rv a tio n Program, designed to protect and cherish endangered fish. Its national scope bespeaks her dedication to our hobby. In addition, she has served on the Board of Directors of the American Cichlid Association, the largest association of its kind in America, and

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


has prominently served as the M anaging Editor of its world-famous journal, the Buntbarsche Bulletin. As if those achievements weren’t enough, she did something only one other Greater City member has ever done. She authored a book, Aquarium Care of Cichlids (part of the popular Animal Planet series of books). (The other member was world-renowned guppy breeder Paul Hahnel, who co-authored a book in the 1960s.)

Frankly, the above is only the tip of the iceberg. It is, therefore, altogether fitting that this year the Roll of Honor is once again honored by adding the name of Claudia Dickinson.

*

*

*

I want to end by wishing all of you a very M erry Holiday Season and a Happy New Year! W e now take our winter break, and so I’ll see you all next March. Excelsior!

Our Generous Members ach month a sheet is located on our auction table where those members who donate items to the auction can indicate their donations (and yes, a “50%-50%” split is also a donation) if they wish to do so. Due to the immense generosity of those who donate, we have no shortage of items to be auctioned. A warm thank you to the following members who so generously contributed, making last month’s auction the huge success that it was.

E

Robert Altonen Bill Amely Jeff Bollbach Carlotti De Jager

Harry Faustmann Rich Levy Anton Vukich Ed Vukich

Details by SUSAN PRIEST few people have asked me their own variation of this question: “W hat are you going to do with all the extra time you will have once you’re not working on Modern Aquarium?” I expect (and hope) that I will always be working on Modern Aquarium. I know that I will continue to do the most important thing anyone can do; I will continue to write! I do anticipate having a bit more time for the things I enjoy, such as reading, gardening, and maybe even fishkeeping. The people who have written about Al’s Editorship have left out a few details. They didn’t tell you about how grouchy he gets when he can’t find an article in the computer, or the copies of proofreading corrections which he has just printed, or he can’t find out if the print shop is open the day before, or the day after, or even the day of a certain holiday. W hen the computer shuts itself off at a crucial moment (aren’t they all crucial?) forget abut it! Actually, this list could get quite long. It’s time to move on. Have you ever wondered how he gets everything to fit precisely, that is, not overlapping onto the next page for two sentences, or falling short of the end of the page? W ell, the secret of his success is in the tool box that sits between his ears. It is a bit rusty, and it squeaks when he opens it, but it contains a solution to every problem. If there are 30 pages, he has 30 different solutions. I’m not sure what all of them are, but I know that one of them is a shoehorn! W hen each article finally gets a page number, and the contents has been typed up, you would think that Al could indulge himself in a well-deserved sigh of relief. Not so. Proofreading seemingly never ends, and last minute changes are notoriously deadly. They are the most likely places for errors to creep in that will get noticed by you instead of us. Certain things never suffer. W e always attend church, and we rarely miss a meal, but sleep is another matter. W hen we don’t get enough sleep because we were working late, rather than starting out again feeling refreshed because we are that much farther along, Al starts out, yep, you guessed it, Grouchy! The time finally comes when there is no choice but to let it go; to turn Modern Aquarium over to the print shop, and ultimately to all of you. Then you can see it and hear it and feel it in every part of him. He would never say it, so I will say it for him. He is proud!

A

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

5


Adventures on the Rio Negro Part IV by CLAUDIA DICKINSON Photographs by the author oving upriver throughout the night, our destination is the whitewaters of the Rio Branco, noted for its richness of wildlife. Pausing on our journey northward to take the canoes out for exploration, our guides machete a path so that we can make our way through the dense thickets that cloak the small hidden streams, from which we break out into the open and glide deftly through the expansive floodplains. The Rio Negro and its outlying waterways are infinite in their beauty, from the exquisite early morning sightings of macaws, to the brilliant blue butterflies that flit in and out amongst the fruits and flowers of thick vegetation. A massive iguana is spotted sunning itself on a branch high above our heads, lazily observing us, confident in its safe roost. Yellow-rumped caciques watch over nests that drip from the treetops, and swarms of green Amazon parrots scold loudly with a sharp show of bravado as they fly above our heads, remaining at a distance that belie their saucy display of courage. A brief stop for dipnetting and seining in the blackwaters along the sandy shoreline bring the discovery of apistos, tetras, and Hypselecara temporalis (chocoloate cichlids). Tiny baby Monocirrhus polyacanthus (leaf fish) are an additional exhilaration to find in our nets, and we bring them back to the boat for photographing. W ith the evening comes an entirely new set of creatures and qualities. As the sun dips just below the horizon, casting its final orange glow softly over the mighty river, bats arrive in droves, swooping down on the water to collect the insects that have also taken the dusk hour to gather. The strong beams of our flashlights pierce through the night’s blackness, revealing numerous other animals that are wide awake during this prime hunting hour. Those who sleep are awakened by our intrusion, their instincts taking over to hold them in stark stillness in hopes of going unnoticed. A background symphony of uncommon whistles, chortles, croaks, calls, and shrieks builds to a loud cacophony holding an unexpected harmony of sorts, bringing with it a sense of sheer wonder under the star-filled sky. A jungle that is beautiful beyond belief, and yet unmerciful at its slightest whim, rears its head with reality when we come across a young woman who, five days earlier, was bitten by a venomous snake. Her infant son cries in

M

6

bewilderment, and her husband’s deep, dark eyes look down solemnly, and a worried furrow covers his brow. His wife lies quietly, her face silently stoic, with a leg that is swollen to three times its normal size. The crew have set up a hammock for the woman, and the cook and her daughter feed the family and play with the baby as we speed back down river to the closest town, still hours away. Finally, we arrive in Novo Airaõ, which has facilities to treat the snakebite, and the woman and her family are immediately taken onto shore. Later, we learn that she has been successfully treated and will recover. Had she not been found and received medical assistance, her chances would have been questionable. That is the way of the jungle. W e happen to be docked at a floating “restaurant,” and so take the opportunity to feed and swim with a group of Amazonian pink dolphins, which have made their home here. This convivial bunch make it quite apparent that they are accustomed to treats and human company! Of course, I am taken by the family’s red front Amazon parrot which we successfully entice with trail mix and crackers to come down from the top of the doorway. Immense Victorian water lilies, caiman, an emerald tree boa, sloths, extraordinary birds, lovely insects, breathtaking flowers, dense jungle, thick with twisting, draping vines, huge fronds of palm leaves, papayas — and fish. The Rio Negro’s captivating mystique is all that I had dreamed of, and oh, so much more. The awe that this enchanted land instilled in Henry W alter Bates and Alfred Russel W allace is now understood with crisp clarity as I feel their presence, following in their footsteps of two centuries ago. Approaching port, my eyes linger over the magnificent river and its surrounding jungle with a hesitancy and deep desire that this might never end. May we pay attention now, while there is still time for the Rio Negro and the Amazon River. Project Piaba is striving to maintain the fisheries and other sustainable resources, actively involving the people who rely on the river and the land. “Buy a fish, save a tree.” Together, let us work to keep this dream alive, for those who follow in our footsteps two centuries from now.

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


The canoe glides through the tall grasses of the floodplains, at times breaking out into the open. Seining in the blackwater along the s a n d y s h o r e lin e b r in g s in Hypselecara temporalis (chocolate cichlids), along with assorted tetras and Apistogramma spp.

Yellow rumped caciques bring food for their young, their nests collectively hang from the treetops.

How exciting to discover this huge Amazonian bullfrog, sleeping along the banks at night! Some of the frogs and toads excrete a venom when handled that can irritate or sting the skin. This fellow, however, did not seem to have such a defense mechanism.

This exquisite emerald tree boa is discovered in the middle of the night, high in a tree overhanging the river. After four hours of exciting attempts, much to the snake’s disapproval the determined crew is able to capture her for admiring and photographing. She is then returned to “her tree!�

A wide variety of species of tarantulas sport a rich, deep velvety coat, the tips touched with a lovely sheen of greens, blues, and reds.

The immense Victorian water lilies grow up to six feet in diameter, their lovely flowers up to eight inches, and the underside of the huge leaf is as exquisite as the top.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

7


The inquisitive and amicable Amazonian pink dolphins come up for a snack! These pods contain a deep “paint” that has many uses, being to decorate the face body, just as we use blush lipstick.

red one and and

S t i n g r a ys a r e p le n tifu l fishermen’s holding tubs.

Our primitive fishing line and pile of bait does the job as perfectly as any fancy rod and reel!

Many of the fish that are collected have lost large chunks of their body to piranha.

One of the larger tetras of the Rio Negro.

Beautiful white sandbars appear out of nowhere, some as huge expanses of beaches, in stark contrast to the shallow black waters.

Piranha and assorted catfish are sauteed to a delectable crispy delight for dinner. 8

in

December 2007

Ryan McAndrews and Scott Dowd stir the pot of stew as the jungle air fills with the delicious aroma.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Thick carpets of leaf litter, where our fish actually live in nature, need to be seen to truly understand their needs in our aquariums.

The perfect locale for discus and angelfish.

The smoke from burning land cuts sharply through the ethereal beauty.

The celebrated “wedding of the waters,” where the blackwater of the Rio Negro meets with the whitewater of the Rio Solimões. There is no mixing of the mineral-rich whitewater with the tannic blackwater that is virtually void of nutrients. Just west of this juncture the Rio Solimões is referred to as the Rio Amazonas.

Sweets are a rare treat, bringing wonder to the children...

Together, let us work to keep this dream alive...

‘Adventures on the Rio Negro’ is dedicated with heartfelt warmth to Ross Socolof, true inspiration to me, and a rare treasure to the aquarium world. Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

9


GCAS Past Award Winners JOSEPH FERDENZI ROLL OF HONOR Gene Baiocco Charles Elzer Paul Hahnel Joe Bugeia Joe Ferdenzi Ben Haus Mary Ann Bugeia W arren Feuer Emma Haus Dan Carson Herb Fogal Jack Oliva

Al Priest Susan Priest Herman Rabenau Marcia Repanes

Nick Repanes Don Sanford Mark Soberman

DON SANFORD BREEDER OF THE YEAR (Since 1981) 1981-82; 1982-83.. . . . . . . Ginny & Charlie Eckstein 1993-94. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1983-84; 1984-85.. . . . . . . Rich Sorensen 1994-95. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 1985-86. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yezid Guttierez 1995-96. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tom Miglio 1986-87. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1996-97. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Soberman 1987-88. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patricia Piccione 1997-98. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff George 1988-89. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1998-99; '99-'00. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tom Miglio 1989-90. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Francis Lee 2000-01. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Soberman 1990-91. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eddie Szablewicz 2001-02. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexander Priest 1991-92. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dominic Isla 2002-03; '03-'04, '04-'05. . . . . . . . . Anton Vukich 1992-93. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 2006. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W arren Feuer GENE BAIOCCO AQUARIST OF THE YEAR (Since 1990-91) 1990-91. . . . . . . Diane & Harold Gottlieb 1998-99.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vincent & Rosie Sileo 1991-92. . . . . . . Doug Curtin & Don Curtin 1999-00.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete D’Orio 1992-93. . . . . . . Mark Soberman 2000-01.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bernard Harrigan 1993-94. . . . . . . W arren Feuer 2001-02.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jason Kerner 1994-95. . . . . . . Steve Sagona 2002-03.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlotti De Jager 1995-96. . . . . . . Alexander & Susan Priest 2003-04.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Traub 1996-97. . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 2006. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anton Vukich 1997-98, '04-'05. Claudia Dickinson W ALTER HUBEL BOW L SHOW CHAM PIONS (Since 1983-84) 1983-84. . . . . . . . Tom Lawless 1990-91. . . . . Eddie Szablewicz 1984-85. . . . . . . . Tom Lawless 1991-92. . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 1985-86. . . . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1992-93. . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 1986-87. . . . . . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1993-94. . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 1987-88. (tie). . Mark Soberman 1994-95. . . . . Carlotti De Jager and Mary Ann & Joe Bugeia 1995-96. . . . . . . Mary Eve Brill 1988-89. . . . . . . . . . Jason Ryan 1996-97. . . . . . . . Steve Sagona 1989-90. . . . . Eddie Szablewicz 1997-98. . . . . . . . Steve Sagona

1998-99. . . . . . . . . Tom Miglio 1999-00. . . . . . . . . Tom Miglio 2000-01. . . . . . . Pat Coushaine 2001-02. . . . . . . . . . Bill Amely 2002-03. . . . . . . . Evelyn Eagan 2003-04. . . . . . . . . . Bill Amely 2004-05. . . . . . . . Evelyn Eagan 2006. . . . . . . . . . . . . Ed Vukich

VICTOR BECKER M EM ORIAL AWARD For most outstanding species bred (1st awarded 1994-95) 1994-95. . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Bohme (Serrasalmus nattereri) 1995-96. . . . . . . . . . . . . John Moran (Synodontis multipunctatus) 1996-97. . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlotti De Jager (Betta simplex) & Mark Soberman (Corydoras duplicareus) 1997-98. . . . . . . . . . . . . Greg Wuest (Nothobranchius foerschi) & Joe Ferdenzi (Corydoras adolfoi) 1998-99. . . . . . . . . . . . . Tom Miglio (Rasbora heteramorpha) 1999-00. . . . . . . . . . . . . Charley Sabatino (Spathodus erythrodon) DINO BARBARISI HORTICULTURAL AW ARD 1993-94.Don Curtin & Doug Curtin 1995-96.Vincent & Rosie Sileo 1994-95.Steve Gruebel 1996-97.Joe Ferdenzi GCAS PRESIDENTS (Post 1945 1946-49 Elliott W hiteway (4) 1950-51 Robert Greene (2) 1952-53 Robert Maybeck (2) 1954-55 Leonard Meyer (2) 1956-57 Sam Estro (2) 1958 Leonard Meyer (2+1) 1959-64 Gene Baiocco (6) 1965 Andrew Fazio (1) 1966-68 Charles Elzer (2)

10

— number in parenthesis = consecutive terms) 1968-70 W alter Hubel (2) 1981-84 Brian Kelly (3) 1970-72 Dave W illiams (2) 1984-86 Jack Oliva (2) 1972-73 Dan Carson (1) 1986-97 Joe Ferdenzi (11) 1973-75 Herb Fogal (2) 1997-99 Vincent Sileo (2) 1975-76 Richard Hoey (1) 1999-00 Jeff George (1) 1976-77 Ted Tura (1) 2000-07 Joe Ferdenzi (11+8) 1977-78 Gene Baiocco (6+1) 1978-79 Louis Kromm (1) 1979-81 Don Sanford (2)

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Greater City Aquarium Society

— 2007 Awards — To be awarded December 12, 2007

JOSEPH FERDENZI ROLL OF HONOR CLAUDIA DICKINSON

GENE BAIOCCO AQUARIST OF THE YEAR AWARD EDWARD VUKICH

DON SANFORD BREEDER OF THE YEAR AWARD JEFFREY BOLLBACH

WALTER HUBEL BOWL SHOW CHAMPION EDWARD VUKICH

MEMBERSHIP AWARD FRANK GANNON

BREEDERS AWARDS SENIOR GRAND MASTER BREEDER (800 points) ANTON VUKICH

MASTER BREEDER (300 points) JEFFREY BOLLBACH

ADVANCED BREEDER (100 points) DICK MOORE

AUTHOR AWARD PROGRAM (AAP) AWARDS Only authors making contributions printed during 2007 (or who received AAP points as a result of NEC and/or FAAS publication awards announced in 2007) and whose AAP levels changed are listed below. Bill Amely. . . . . . . . . . . . Author Joseph Graffagnino. . . . Essayist Sharon Barnett. . . . . . . . . W riter p Bernard Harrigan. . . . Grand Master Laureate Evelyn Eagan. . . . . . . . . . Author Jerry O’Farrell. . . . . . . Journalist Frank Fallon. . . . . . . . . . . Author Leonard Ramroop. . . . . Author Harry Faustmann. . . . . . . Author Charley Sabatino. . . . . . Essayist Joseph Ferdenzi. . . . . . . . Master Laureate Stephen Sica. . . . . . . . . Journalist Horst Gerber.. . . . . . . . . . W riter

pBernard Harrigan is Author of the Year for 2007! Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

11


The Fish Arrival by Claudia Dickinson Photographs by the author except where noted here is something profound about looking at the inhabitants of an aquarium and recalling precisely where they came from, and the circumstances surrounding the acquisition. They might have been a kind gift from a treasured friend, or acquired from a club auction, a convention, a favorite local aquarium shop, an online auction that you placed the highest proxy bid on that you could — just to be certain — and then received them at an excellent price or, you might have collected them in their native habitat! Recently, I had just returned from the Peruvian Amazon and a shipment of fish was soon to follow that my colleagues and I had collected. There were 28 boxes in total, three of which would be touching down at Long Island Islip MacArthur Airport, with my name on the manifest. How exciting! Time is wonderfully unimportant in South America, and exactly when the fish would arrive was anybody’s guess! There were plans, followed by the expected delays, and then strikes, and then a Peruvian Holiday, and once the weekend passed, there were more plans. My dear friends, Joe Ferdenzi and Mark Soberman (as well as my husband, Brad!), were extraordinarily patient as they arranged their schedules to be prepared at a day’s notice to meet us at Joe’s house whenever the shipment arrived. Finally, the day of arrival came and this time, it was actually true! I had to smile as the man at the airport cargo building remembered me from the past, and knew that there were fish in those boxes. The next time, I am going to open a box to

T

From the Peruvian Amazon jungle… photo by David Snell

12

show him the fish. He may wish to start a fish tank — and join the GCAS! The evening of the fish arrival was, of course, late at night, as are all the most memorable fish arrivals. Joe’s lovely wife, Anita, was so kind to greet us at the front door at such an hour, and welcomed us into the Ferdenzi home with open arms. As we unpacked the fish in Joe’s fishroom, there was a shared sense of fishy camaraderie as each box was opened, each bag held up to check for condition, survival, and identification, and each batch of fish transferred to a bucket for some fresh water and a closer look. Speaking of fre sh water, Joe, in his characteristically thoughtful manner, had filled up numerous bottles of water several days before in anticipation of the arrival, knowing that this would be refreshingly welcome to the well-traveled fish — which it was! He also had the forethought to purchase a huge bag of blackworms, which he so generously shared with each of us. Our wild specimens would be most appreciative and accepting of the live food for their first meals. Once the fish had been unpacked and all were settled in, we said our goodbyes, and Brad and I headed east on our journey to Montauk. Tucked safely in the back, the new arrivals began the final leg of their long journey. A bag of blackworms sat on the front seat, and a particular warmth filled my heart, with the certainty that in the future these aquarium inhabitants would surely evoke special memories of native lands, and treasured moments with dear friends.

...to the boat... photo by David Snell

...to the packing house/exporters...

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


The fish finally arrive in the US! Once in Joe Ferdenzi’s fishroom, the fish boxes are opened by M ark Soberman.

M ark Soberman has the buckets stacked in preparation.

Brad Dickinson opens the tightly banded bags.

The fish are sorted in buckets and given fresh water.

Brad Dickinson, Joe Ferdenzi, and M ark Soberman make this fish shipment a particularly memorable one! Joe Ferdenzi generously bags up fresh blackworms for a first meal that will be welcomed by the wild fish.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

13


Special Edition a Series On Books For The Hobbyist by SUSAN PRIEST

Exotic Aquarium Fishes by Dr. Wm. T. Innes A Seventy-Two Year Perspective Part Three: Review of Editions Nineteen, Twenty and Twenty-One icture yourself at the beach, walking along the ocean’s edge. The seagulls, the sun, and the sand are all in their places, and yet something is not quite right. Suddenly you realize what it is. The waves are moving away from you! As you look out over the water, it is rolling towards the horizon rather than the shore. A complete reversal of the tide has taken place. As startling and dramatic a change as the one I have just described is about to take place, as the subsequent generations of Exotic come under scrutiny. Specifically, editions nineteen, twenty, and twenty-one will be compared to earlier editions (see Parts One and Two of this article in the November 2007 issue of Modern Aquarium), and to each other. For the first twenty-two years (1935 through 1957), Exotic was under the care and control of its creator. Then, due to the influence of exactly what happenstances no one can say for sure, Dr. Innes let the copyright lapse. Shortly thereafter, other publishers saw this as an opportunity for personal gain. The results of their forays were mixed. T he n in etee nth editio n was rife with confusion. For starters, there were three different nineteenth editions. The first one, with a publication date of 1957, was the last to be revised by Dr. Innes, and it did have his signature leatherette cover. Then came two different versions of the “nineteenth edition revised.” At this point I am going to return to the e-mail conversation from the Aquarium Hobby Historical Society (AHHS).

P

14

“The first Nineteenth Edition, Revised was published in 1964, which was of the same fine quality as all the issues previously produced by the Innes Publishing Company, and having the green leatherette cover with color images throughout. It was published jointly by The Aquarium Publishing Company and E.P. Dutton and Company. The second Nineteenth Edition, Revised was the one published in 1966 by Pet Books, Inc. (Metaframe).” Raymond W etzel The copy of the nineteenth edition, revised which I have available for review is the 1966 version. Let’s start with what it does have. It does have the front and rear maps. It does have a black and white photograph of the color illustration of the rasboras (a poor substitute), and it does have a portrait of Dr. Innes. It has 593 pages. The text is true to the spirit of Dr. Innes. In fact, it is virtually identical to my thirteenth edition, with the exception that a few more fishes were included. (I will go out on a limb here, and make the assumption that they were also included in the 1957 nineteenth edition.) T h e m a j o r difference, which is immediately evident, are the black and white photos throughout. Occasionally you will come across a photo with a small notation in one corner. For example, accompanying the text which describes the Head-and-TailLight Tetra there is a photo which says “color plate page 551.” “Aha!,” you say to yourself, as you discover the section of color illustrations at the rear

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


of the book. A comparison of the two photos will reveal that they are identical in every detail, except for the color. Each of the color plates refers the reader back to the correct page number of the biography for that fish. Further investigation leads you to a color representation of the trademark rasbora illustration at the beginning of the color plates. (Once again, it is a poor substitute.) “The book lost its unique character when the color plates were all put in the back (to save money), and the lovely leatherette cover was replaced.” Alan Mark Fletcher O n e o t h e r difference, a footnote, if you will, is the texture of the paper. My first, eighth, and thirteenth editions all have smooth paper which lets your fingers glide over the pages. The 1966 Metaframe version has coarser paper. The twentieth edition, published in 1979 by the Metaframe Corporation (you may remember that this was my first copy; see my discussion of the cover in Part One), is a whole new animal, so to speak. The first thing you will want to know is that it has (only!) 266 pages. There are no maps, no rasbora illustration, and no portrait of Dr. Innes. The title page still proclaims him to be the author, but it has been “edited and updated by Klaus W oltman.” Updated to basically half the number of pages! Hmmm. Is it just me, or does something smell fishy here? The best way for me to convey the flavor of this edition is to quote a few excerpts from the fo r e w o r d , w hic h w a s written by Mr. W oltman. “The 20th edition of Exotic Aquarium Fishes is the first Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

major revision since the book was originally published in 1935 . . . The most obvious and notable revision is the replacement of all original color plates a nd b la c k a nd white photographs with modern color photographs of the highest quality . . . A few marginal species had to be omitted because quality specimens suitable for photography were unavailable to us . . . Chapters of former editions have been deleted either because they had become hopelessly obsolete, or because our knowledge about the subject matter has increased to such an extent that to treat the subject adequately would go beyond the scope of this book.” W ell! I can’t imagine that I could insult you any more than Mr. W oltman already has when I say that this was a clear case of literary rape! By the time I acquired my well used copy, anyone associated with this, the twentieth edition of Exotic, had long since stopped receiving any financial gain from its sale. W e can only hope that the aquarists of 1979 were familiar enough with the classic editions to steer a wide and clear path around this one. I would like to add my own brief comment about the new “high quality” photographs. They actually seem quite serviceable until you compare a few of them to those taken by Dr. Innes himself. Now we come to the last, and very definitely the least, of the versions of Exotic under consideration. This is the twenty-first edition. It was published by T.F.H. Publications, and my copy has a date of 1994. The title is Innes’s Exotic Aquarium Fishes. Once again, there are no maps, no rasb o ra illustration, and no portrait of Dr. Innes.

December 2007

15


W hat we have here is a study in contradictions, mixed together with some deja vu. This is (in part) what it says on the back cover: “Here is the most recent edition of a true aquarium classic. It represents major changes in the original Exotic Aquarium Fishes, by Dr. W illiam T. Innes, to the extent that neither any of Dr. Innes’s photos nor any significant portion of his original text appears in this book.” (If all of that were true, then wouldn’t you call it something else?) The contradiction is that, in fact, most of the text is Dr. Innes’s. Quoting from the Foreword to the twentyfirst edition (again, in part): “Metaframe elected to rewrite the book almost completely. They called this edition the 20th Edition of the Innes Exotic Aquarium Fishes. That edition was published in 1979. The sales of that book were so poor that it was never reprinted.” Here is where the deja vu comes in. Between the covers of the twenty-first edition, much of the text and most of the photos are virtual clones of those in the Metaframe twentieth edition. Even sections of the foreword are copied verbatim from the foreword of the twentieth edition. The differences were so subtle that if you didn’t know what the cover looked like, you would be hard pressed to determine which book you were reading!

A few familiar features can be found, such as the original diagrams of fish anatomy. Readers of editions up to and including the nineteenth will feel at home with most of the text, however abbreviated. At 288 pages, the twenty- first edition cannot live up to its claim of being “greatly expanded from the original edition.” (I’m not sure which edition they might be referring to. As you may remember, the first edition had 463 pages, and subsequent editions grew to be well over 500.) I must apologize for my negativity. Those of you who read my “W et Leaves” column with any regularity know that I am not a book basher. In this circumstance of comparing and contrasting the different editions of Exotic, I have no choice but to “tell it like it is,” as well as to stand by my metaphor of the reversal of the tide. I return one last time to the AHHS forum, only to add that the comments of these very well known and highly respected hobbyists were much more harsh than mine (so much so that I decided not to quote from them). However, the opinions they have expressed coincide with my own. Don’t worry; I haven’t forgotten about the question I left you pondering last month. W hat fish was W m. T. referring to when he said “They sail like swans asleep?” It was Greater City’s own signature fish, the elegant angelfish.

American Cichlid Association

2008 National Convention July 17th through July 20th, 2008 The American Cichlid Association ACA holds an annual convention, usually in July, featuring cichlid experts as speakers, a competitive cichlid show, an auction of cichlids, and opportunities to meet other cichlid hobbyists. This weekend-long event is the highlight of the year and is usually attended by 600 or more people. The 2008 American Cichlid Association Convention is being held in Atlanta, Georgia, from Thursday, July 17th through Sunday, July 20th, 2008. It will be hosted by the Atlanta Area Aquarium Association (AAAA). http://www.aca2008.com/

16

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


AFISH Convention 2007 A dream comes true ~ now forever a treasured memory…… by CLAUDIA DICKINSON W ith photographs by the author ur GCAS President, Joe Ferdenzi, had a dream. After two years of preparations, the culmination of that dream, the first AFISH Convention, has come and passed, going down in history as an extraordinary success, and leaving behind fond memories, along with the anticipation of many more to follow in the ensuing years. Brimming with an unmatched warmth and camaraderie of fellow hobbyists who convened from the four counties that make up Long Island, NY — Kings, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk — as well as New Jersey, Connecticut, and beyond, the first AFISH Convention was held in Riverhead, NY, on November 9th ~ 11th 2007. It took place at the Best W estern Hotel, just minutes away from the Atlantis Marine W orld Aquarium. Joe, along with Al DiSpigna and Joseph Graffagnino, past and current Presidents of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, Harry Faustmann and Michael Foran, past and current Presidents of the Nassau County Aquarium Society, and Vinny Kreyling and Arie Gilbert, past and current Presidents of the Long Island Aquarium Society, joined together to form AFISH, the Aquarium Federation of Independent Societies and Hobbyists. M eticulous planning went into this exciting project, providing an opportunity for hobbyists in the Long Island and metropolitan New York area to experience a convention and all that it has to offer, including celebrated speakers, vendors, side trips, and of course, the sharing of deep friendships. AFISH had it all! Finally, a convention that was less than a four hour trip for most attendees, the majority had a short drive of less than two hours, and many lived within 15 or 20 minutes of the site. Of course, a huge thank you to those who did make the effort to travel a further distance! The event was suffused with the generous support and goodwill of all who came. No sooner had I pulled my car up to the curb on Friday night than I was greeted by the welcoming voice of Ray “Kingfish” Lucas, immediately followed by cheerful smiles and warm hugs from Harry Faustmann, Mike M cNamee, Joseph Graffagnino, Ken Davis, and Frank Laudato, with as many helping hands so kindly

O

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

pitching in to assist me with unloading boxes of treats and decorations. Making my way down the hall to my room, my steps quickened at the wonderfully familiar jovial laughter resounding from behind one of the doors. It was all I could do to hastily drop my luggage off, and back I went to join in with heartfelt hugs, and much conviviality amongst dear friends, Joe Ferdenzi, Chuck Davis, Jeannie and Rosario LaCorte, Al Di Spigna, Mark Soberman, and M ichael Foran. Joseph Graffagnino, Ken Davis, and M ike M cNamee had found their way here as well, making it a Grande way to start the celebration! Earlier in the evening, the Long Island Killifish Association had gotten the convention underway with a presentation by Mark Denaro of www.anubiasdesign.com fame, and it was now time to sit back, relax, and enjoy each other’s company. Sensibility finally reined me away to get some rest for the coming day’s large agenda. Saturday commenced with renowned catfish experts, Lee Finley and Mark Soberman, teaming up for an audience of eager listeners, while curator and cofounder of Atlantis Marine W orld, Joe Yaiullo, spoke on Reef Aquariums. Next up, Senior Aquarist for the New York Aquarium, Frank Greco, presented Freshwater Shrimp, while Chris Paparo, Senior Aquarist at Atlantis Marine W orld, shared his knowledge on Macro Algae Cultivation. A dear gem of the organized hobby, Chuck Davis, spoke to a packed audience on Anabantoids, while Mark Denaro’s renowned expertise with aquatic plants was met by an enthusiastic audience. Following a break for lunch, our treasured aquarium hobby legend, Rosario LaCorte, treated us to his years of wisdom on Rare and Exotic Fish, while Atlantis Marine W orld Aquarist, Todd Gardner, presented his wealth of knowledge on Seahorses. For a perfect rounding out of the afternoon, noted aquarist (maintaining 600 tanks!) Ken Davis gave an excellent presentation on Discus, while the famed Tullio Dell Aquila brought his many years of experience on New Lighting Technology. Throughout the day, the vendor room and foyers were animated with the bustle and

December 2007

17


exuberance of dear friends, ardent fish talk, and hearty laughter. Lance Reyniers, inventor of the Python water changer, every aquarist’s most essential tool, was on hand to personally answer questions and offer advice, alongside the illustrious and beloved Ray “Kingfish” Lucas. Special friend to the entire aquarium hobby, Lee Finley, of Finley Aquatic Books, www.finleyaquaticbooks.com, brought his exemplary collection of new and collectable books, and Ken Menard of Ken’s Fish, www.kensfish.com, had a virtual store of fabulous merchandise. Craig Shaubach of Eastern Aquatics made certain that we all went home with a generous helping of fresh, luscious blackworms, while the Tropical Fish Hobbyist booth, resplendent with the artistry and brilliance of one lovely cover after another, passed out free issues of the celebrated magazine. Booth after booth filled our arms with such wonders as only we can understand, as the cheerful and informative vendors went out of their way to lend their ideas to be taken home along with their wares. So many faces, so many GCASers, and so many from our fellow societies! Surely it was family with every turn of the head - Joe Ferdenzi, Mark Soberman, Pete D’Orio, W arren Feuer, Brad Dickinson, Sharon Barnett, Dan and Marsha Radebaugh, Michael Foran, Jeff Bollbach, Artie Friedman, Harry Faustmann, Mike McNamee, Lenny Ramroop, Jack Traub, Al Grusell, Ed Vukich, Bennie Graham, Rich Levy, Horst Gerber, Michael and Natalie Boscia, Fred Bellise, Ben and Emma Haus, Steven and Donna Sica, Andrew Jacovina, Bill Amely, Joseph Graffagnino, Al DiSpigna, Jim and Margaret Peterson, LaMonte Brown, Mario Bengcion, Karen Ottendorfer, Gino Cusano, Jerry O’Farrell, Izzy Zwerin, Chuck Davis, Rosario and Jeannie LaCorte, Christine and Frank Policastro, all the way from New Jersey (!), Vinny and Jeanette Kreyling, and oh, so many more… … As the evening banquet approached, we changed into our “finery,” tables filled, and glasses toasted amongst the lively conversation that filled the air. Following a sumptuous buffet, coffee was poured and a divine cake, garnished with the AFISH logo, was brought out along with a lovely bouquet of flowers in celebration of Jeannie and Rosario’s 56th anniversary. How wonderful that we were able to share this joyful occasion with them! Joe Ferdenzi took the podium in his characteristically genuine welcoming style, making us all feel at home, and glad that we came to AFISH. The eminent cast of speakers, the exceptional vendors, and the large team of dedicated people who worked to make this first AFISH Convention possible were given words of deep appreciation. To thunderous applause, three 18

very special awards were presented to those who had inspired Joe, and so many of us in the hobby, over the past years — Rosario LaCorte, Chuck Davis, and Ray Lucas. It was then time for a rare treasure to the aquarium world, a man passionate for his subject, and vibrant with infectious enthusiasm, Anton Lamboj, to give the AFISH keyn ote p resentatio n o n T h e G en u s Chromidotilapia. After Anton’s fascinating and informative talk, we regrouped for further discussion and laughter — reminiscing and relaxing, enjoying each other’s company well into the night. Sunday began with delicious pastries and jam, fresh eggs, crisp bacon and sausages, accompanied by steaming hot coffee and tea, p a r t a k e n in a m o n g s t th e c o m f o r t a b l e companionship of true friends. W ith the huge auction to begin at noon, expanses of tables, overflowing with bags of fish and plants, attracted throngs of viewers who wound their way in and around the assemblage amidst excited exclamations over the bounty of finds. Ray “Kingfish” Lucas had us off to an exhilarating start, auctioning off an enormously generous amount of dry goods donated by Python Products, Aquarium Pharmaceuticals, Ken’s Fish, Tropical Fish Hobbyist, and Atlantis Marine W orld, among many other magnanimous contributors. After this rousing opening, the audience was warmed up and prepared for raising their bidding cards high on the hundreds of bags of fish and plants that followed, to the finesse of such auctioneer greats as Chuck Davis, Joe Ferdenzi, Mark Soberman, and Ken Davis. It was time to say final farewells. Huge hugs, warm smiles, and words of friendship that would hold our spirits fast, and solidify our kinship until we meet again. The first AFISH Convention is now a wonderful memory to last through eternity. Joe had a dream. A dream that we might all be given the opportunity of sharing the joy of our hobby with one another. W hat great pride we have in what Joe has accomplished, and for having a dream and following it. For this, he will always be able to look back and say, “I am so glad that I did!” And, to our great fortune, we will always be able to look back and say, “we are so glad that he did,” as well!

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Joe Ferdenzi honors three pillars of the aquarium hobby with special AFISH awards.

Chuck Davis Ray “Kingfish” Lucas Rosario LaCorte

Joe Ferdenzi presents a bouquet to the lovely Jeannie LaCorte in celebration of R osario and True treasures of the aquarium Jeannie’s anniversary. hobby, Rosario and Jeannie Tropical Fish Hobbyist’s booth of LaCorte make a special wish prior spectacular brilliance generously to blowing out the candles on their offers free copies of the magazine. AFISH anniversary cake!

The author steps on the other side of the lens to share time with special friends.

Claudia Dickinson and our superb AFISH discus speaker, Ken Davis. Claudia Dickinson and Lance Reyniers, inventor of the Python water changer, every aquarist’s Claudia D ickinson and our most indispensable tool! inimitable AFISH keynote speaker, Anton Lamboj.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

19


The bags of fish for auction were piled high! M ark Soberman in full AFISH a u c tio n e e r in g s w in g ( A r tie Friedmann assisting on the left).

Karen Ottendorfer and Horst Gerber are having a Grande AFISH time!

Dan McKercher, Chuck Davis, and Ed Vukich celebrate the first AFISH Convention!

Last Month’s Bowl Show Winners

Bill Amely !st Place

Ed Vukich 3rd Place

M ario Bengcion 2nd Place 20

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


by SUSAN PRIEST

? ? ANONYMOUS ? ?

Thank you, Jack, for sharing your his is the last issue of 2007. W hat does that mean? It means that we have all enjoyed adventures and your advice. I have a little advice two full seasons of my own for you. of Fishkeepers Try talking to your Anonymous. I would wife about the 100 Suggested Questions like to heartily thank gallon tank of your T Please introduce yourself. everyone who has dreams. I have a T Tell us about your favorite aquarium. participated so far. I feeling that she will be T W hat was your very first fish? sincerely hope that happy to help you fill T Tell us about your education as a fishkeeper. this column will be it w ith s p a rkling T Is there someone you think of as a mentor? gracing the pages of schools of fish. If she Tell us about him or her. Modern Aquarium for seems to be hesitating, T Describe your “Fantasy Fish Tank.” many more years to just remind her that T If you were a fish, which one would you be? come. her grandchildren will T W ho is your “Hobby Hero?” Didn’t last enjoy it most of all. T W hat fish which you have never kept would month’s author give By now you you like to acquire? us a great read? He have noticed that there T Describe your biggest fishkeeping “blooper!” starts out by making is no new author this T Describe your most memorable fishkeeping us wonder what his month. I know some experience. occupation is, and he of you are thinking T W hat advice would you give to a doesn’t give us very about doing it. I know beginning fishkeeper? many clues to work you all lead very busy T W hat are your fishkeeping goals? with. He tells us that lives, and that writing - OR write a narrative story his hobby hero is up your story for Chubby Checker!! F i s h k e e p e r s Are we all talking Anonymous is not at about the same hobby here? the top of your list of things to do. However, I also My favorite part was the blooper. Can know how much you enjoy reading it each month you imagine the look on your own face if 15 (even more than I do, because you don’t know who gallons of fish tank it is at first). water was being W e are about to begin our winter break. siphoned into your Among other things, winter means that you don’t window? (You just need to mow the grass. In the time it takes to mow can’t make this stuff the grass just once, you can answer a few of the up!) questions from the suggested list, and send them Do you off to either Dan Radebaugh, or Al, and myself. know who he is yet? Maybe you will enjoy reading your own story in Just look around the the pages of Modern Aquarium even more than we room in search of the will. See you next year! Jack Traub face that is always smiling. I really Greetings of the Season from my heart to yours! mean it - always! Your gaze will land on our Love, Sue treasurer, Jack Traub. If you were collecting, counting, and spending other people’s money, maybe you would be smiling, too. By the way, his occupation is a Certified Public Accountant.

T

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

21


Looking through the Photos and captions

GCAS Program Chair Claudia Dickinson gives a warm thank you to President Joe Ferdenzi for his excellent presentation on “Home GCAS President Joe Ferdenzi Depot for the Aquarist.” d e m o n s tr a te s a v a r ie ty o f imaginative uses for the soda bottle, showing us that they are not only good for holding soda and hatching baby brine shrimp! GCAS President Joe Ferdenzi gets creative at the hobby shop, making innovative use of plastic embroidery grids in fashioning this holding container for larger fish.

Our GCAS charm, Emma Haus, organizes the upcoming Holiday party with her excellent efficiency! After their immense efforts at the enormously successful AFISH weekend, Frank Laudato, Harry Faustmann, and Jeff Bollbach take this perfect evening to relax and enjoy each other’s company.

B roo klyn A quarium Society President Joseph Graffagnino is t h r i l le d b y th e w o n d e r fu l outpouring of attendees at the AFISH Convention, certainly due in great part to his diligent work on publicity for the event!

Jim and Margaret Peterson take the evening to sit back and reminisce after their months of dedicated efforts to ensure that the vendors and numerous other AFISH details were carried out to perfection! Rich Levy and Ed Vukich celebrate the huge success of AFISH, in which they both played an integral role! 22

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Lens with the GCAS by Claudia Dickinson

Sharon B arn e tt a n d M a rio Bengcion are heading straight for Home Depot, shopping lists in hand, after learning of the many Due to the evening’s presentation, effective ways to use inexpensive T em e s M o has disc o vere d items in their fishrooms! numerous clever items to put into use with his own fish tanks!

Michael Gallo is thrilled with his winning ticket for one of the W e can feel relatively certain that evening’s Door Prizes! the “Back to Nature Aqualog of Catfishes” will be in a future Modern Aquarium book review, as our very own W et Leaves columnist, Sue Priest, collects her Door Prize win.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

23


GCAS BREEDERS AWARD PROGRAM – 2007 Breeder

Species

Points

1st

15 25 15 5 15 5 5 10 10 15 5 25 15 5 5 15 10 10 5 20 15 5 5 5 5 5 25 20 5 15 5 15 25 15 15 5 15 5 15 15 15 15 20 20 10 5 25 5 15 15

* *

C.A.R.E.S.

Jeff Bollbach

# of fish ----->

Glossolepis pseudoincisus Melanotaenia lacustris Melanotaenia boesemani Melanotaenia praecox Mikrogeophagus ramirezi Xiphophorus montezumae Xiphophorus birchmanni Archocentrus sp. ‘Honduran red point’ Pterophyllum scalare Xiphophorus malinche Xiphophorus helleri Apistogramma viejita Xiphophorus clemenciae Poecilia (lebistes) reticulata Xiphophorus variatus Ancistrus sp. Aequidens pulcher Pelvicachromis pulcher Melanotaenia herbertaxelrodi Badis bengalensis (Dario dario) Poecilia petensis Heterandria formosa Tateurndina ocellicauda Poecilia picta Aphyosemion australe Fundulopanchax gardneri ‘nigerianus’ Nomorhamphus hageni Ameca splendens Poecilia latipinna Lucania goodei Limia tridens Melanotaenia parva Betta simplex Apistogramma trifasciata Apistogramma borelli Girardinus metallicus Melanotaenia trifasciata Poecilia vellifera Cilatherina bleheri Bedotia geayi Poecillia salvatoris Betta smaragdina Pachypanchax omalonatus Pachypanchax sakaramy Aphyosemion celiae ‘Winifredi’ Xenotoca eiseni Chlamydogobius eremius Melanotaenia splendida Chilatherina fasciata Alfaro huberi 50 total pts -----> 615

Ì Ì

* * *

* *

* Ì * Ì Ì

* Ì Ì * Ì Ì

* * *

Douglas Curtin # of fish ----->

24

Tanichthys albonubes 1 total pts ----->

5 5

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


W arren Feuer

# of fish ----->

Altolamprologus calvus "inkfin" Corydoras aeneus Tropheus moorii Neolamprologus ornatipinnis Pelvicachromis pulcher 5 total pts -----> 85

Joseph Graffagnino Aphyosemion celiae Fundulopanchax gardneri Trichogaster trichopterus Cichlasoma facetum Herichthys deppii Gymnogeophagus meridionalis Julidochromis ornatus Parophiocephalus unimaculata Laetacara curviceps Corydoras aeneus Fundulus cingulatus # of fish -----> 11 total pts -----> 135

25 10 15 25 10

10 5 10 10 20 25 15 10 10 10 10

*

*

* *

Dick M oore

# of fish ----->

Stomatepia pindu Prognathochromis perrieri 2 total pts -----> 80

45 35

* *

Ì Ì

Betta macrostoma 1 total pts ----->

40

*

Ì

40

Herichthys carpintis 1 total pts ----->

10

Corydoras aeneus 1 total pts ----->

10

Al Priest # of fish -----> Dan Radebaugh # of fish ----->

10

M ark Soberman # of fish ----->

10

Anton Vukich

# of fish ----->

Heros oblongus Barbus gelius Melanotaenia lacustris Metriaclima estherae Tilapia snyderae Melanotaenia boesemani Melanotaenia parva Cubanichthys pengelleyi Celestichys margaritatus 9 total pts -----> 160

10 20 15 20 20 15 25 20 15

Neolamprologus signatus Xenotoca eiseni Archocentrus sajica Fundulopanchax gardneri ‘nigerianus’ Pelvicachromis pulcher Aulonocara jacobfreibergi sp. ‘Eureka’ 6 total pts -----> 65

15 5 10 5 15 15

* Ì *

* * *

Ì Ì Ì

Edward Vukich

# of fish ----->

1st (*) means first recorded breeding of the species in the GCAS Breeders Award Program C.A.R.E.S. (Ì) means a species at risk that is listed in the C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

25


AFISH 2007 Memories Photos by Harry Faustmann Captions by Joseph Ferdenzi

Registration Chair Mike Foran and his assistant, James Quattropani, greet some registrants for the AFISH Convention.

The Long Island Killifish Association (LIKA) Bowl Show at their special Friday night meeting held in conjunction with the AFISH Convention.

Part of the audience for the LIKA auction.

Some of the fish, plants, and other items for the LIKA auction. Some more of the Friday night auction.

26

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


One of the Convention.

vendors

at

the

AFISH

Joe Yaiullo, Curator of Atlantis M arine W orld Aquarium in Riverhead, preparing to give his presentation on Saturday morning.

Ray “Kingfish” Lucas (center) speaking to some visitors to his huge manufacturer’s display.

Another of Convention.

the

vendors

at

the . . . and some of the items that Ken’s Fish had for sale.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

27


Karen Ottendorfer and Sharon Barnett (seated left to right) waiting for their turn at the Saturday evening Banquet.

GCAS Treasurer Jack Traub hard at work on a laptop computer.

Horst Gerber (left) and others listening to Jeannie and Rosario LaCorte (with their backs to the camera) at the banquet.

Jeannie and Rosario blowing out the candles on the surprise cake especially made to celebrate their 56th W edding Anniversary.

A view of the start of the giant AFISH auction that took place on Sunday afternoon. 28

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


THE AMUSING AQUARIUM

“Maybe I should clean the tank more often.”

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

December 2007

29


Special Edition a Series On Books For The Hobbyist by SUSAN PRIEST

Exotic Aquarium Fishes by Dr. Wm. T. Innes A Seventy-Two Year Perspective Part Four: Summary y original plan was simply to review the 1935 first edition of Exotic. Then I realized that I had a couple of other volumes (the nineteenth, revised and twentieth editions), so I decided to include these, as well. Then I thought to myself “maybe I can fill in the gaps with a couple more editions,” so I did a little on-line shopping. W ell, you have seen the results. Perhaps now you will want to do a little “Exotic” shopping of your own! In my naivete, I actually purchased (sight unseen, of course) a volume which was described as having “embossed ‘gold fish’ on the cover.” W ell, you can guess what I thought it meant. Now we all know better. I know that there is a version with a discus on the cover, but I don’t know when it was published, or by whom. I’m sure there must be others out there, as well, which I have not encountered. Let me paint some broad strokes with a wide brush, as I make some very generalized statements. There are few aquarists who would disagree with the statement that every edition of Exotic from the first in 1935, up to and including the nineteenth in 1957, qualifies as a true classic, and that with each new revision it was improved upon. W hen Dr. Innes was no longer in control of Exotic, and other publishers started to experiment with his formula, the finished product(s) were diminished. Even the new hobbyists of today can reap countless benefits by reading the works of Dr. Innes from the 1930s, 40s and 50s. Here we are in December of 2007, seventy-two years (and counting) into the phenomenon known as Exotic Aquarium Fishes. W hat have we learned so far? A rhyme from my childhood comes to mind. It goes like this: “Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver and the other gold.” Even though the names of the fishes have changed, the fishes themselves have not. Even though many of the techniques and much of the equipment we use are different, this is not to say that all of them are better. The most important thing we have learned is that we still have much to learn from the “golden age” of fishkeeping, as

M

30

exemplified by the writings of our trusted friend (do we know him well enough to call him Bill?), Dr. W illiam T. Innes. W e have also learned to safeguard our copies of Exotic; to keep them dry, and away from the other pets in the house! So, where do we go from here? Unfortunately, it is difficult to imagine any real future for Exotic. Is there someone with the necessary combination of integrity and experience, as well as the time to devote to it, who might approach the task of a twenty-first century revision; perhaps even a Centennial Celebratory Edition to be published in 2035? Keeping it true to the spirit of the original, as well as infusing it with the latest information, along with up to the minute nomenclature, would be a daunting task. As I think of what Dr. Innes and his staff accomplished long before anyone had even heard the word “computer,” I am quite in awe. The influence that Exotic has had on the well-being of freshwater tropical fish cannot be either estimated, or underestimated. Ever since the first aquarist opened the cover of the first copy of Exotic in 1935, fish have led longer, happier, healthier lives. Perhaps the same can be said of their keepers, as well. I would like to thank the following people who have helped me in the preparation of this Special Edition of W et Leaves: Joseph Ferdenzi Bernard Harrigan Alexander Priest Members of the AHHS Look for the companion article to this four part perspective , “Dr. William T. Innes: A Paragon of the Aquarium Hobby” by Joseph Ferdenzi, on page 31 of this issue.

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Dr. William T. Innes:

A Paragon of the Aquarium Hobby by JOSEPH FERDENZI illiam T. Innes is considered by many to be the Father of the American Aquarium Hobby. Historically, he may not have been the first to make a significant contribution to the development of the hobby, but he was a man who made enormous contributions early on, and who has left a lasting imprint on those who came after. I never had the privilege of meeting Dr. Innes, but I have become friend s with Alan Fletcher, who did have the privilege of working for Dr. Innes. Alan confirms that Dr. Innes was a gentleman, and a true hobbyist at heart. It is undoubtedly these qualities, which permeate his publicatio ns and w r itin g s , t h a t h a v e endeared Dr. Innes to generations of aquarists who, like me, only knew him through his books and magazines. W i l l i a m Thornton Innes was born in 1874 to a prominent Philadelphia publishing family. As a young man, he developed an interest in photography, which was then an emerging hobby. Shortly thereafter, he attended a Philadelphia exhibition of fancy goldfish, and from there began his lifelong interest in aquarium fish. As can be gleaned, his connection to publishing and photography were a perfect combination for promoting the aquarium hobby. Although Innes published aquarium books as early as 1917, his first big breakthrough came in 1932 with the publication of a monthly magazine, The Aquarium. This magazine was significant not only because it contained well-written (and edited) articles by the leading hobbyists of the day, but it featured extensive black and white photos inside and, outstanding for its day, a color photograph

W

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

on the cover. Actually, most of these “color photos” were actually black and white photographs that were then hand painted, thus creating a striking illustration somewhere between a photo and a drawing. The Aquarium magazine became a smash success, and was published until 1967. Undoubtedly spurred on by the success of the magazine, in 1935 Innes published the first edition of what was to become the most famous American aquarium book o f a l l t i m e , E x o tic Aquarium Fishes. This book went through 19 e d itions before Innes retired from the publishing field. It became the “Bible” of the American aquarium hobby, and was often the first book on which many an aquarist built their knowledge of the hobby (your author included!). Dr. Innes was a prominent man of Philadelphia. He often p a r tic ip a te d in c iv ic fe stivitie s dre sse d a s B enjamin Franklin, to whom he bore a striking resemblance. His home was located on the campus of Temple University. In 1951, Temple awarded Innes an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters. W hen he died in 1969, at the age of 95, he willed his home to the university. The Temple library houses many of his papers, as does the American Philosophical Society, which is also located in Philadelphia. Dr. Innes was also honored in the 1930s by having the famous Neon Tetra’s scientific name dedicated to him (Paracheirodon innesi — originally it was called Hyphessobrycon innesi). Today, it is still one of the most popular aquarium fish — a fitting tribute to a popular author and hobbyist like W illiam T. Innes.

December 2007

31


The GCAS Author Award Program elcome to all of our new and continuing participants in the GCAS Author Award Program (AAP). This is our ninth year (we began in 1999). For 2007 we have 27 participants - the most so far in a single year. W e would like to call your attention to an important point. The Article Awards from the Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies (NEC) for both 2005 and 2006 were announced in 2007, as were the Publication awards from the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (FAAS) for 2006. All three of these are reflected in the Bonus Points column of our chart. Congratulations to all of our winners!

W

Overview The GCAS AAP awards points for contributions to Modern Aquarium. Persons acquiring a specified number of points will receive additional recognition in the form of a certificate for having reached designated Accomplishment Levels. (See “Accomplishment Levels.”) Each person making a qualifying contribution to Modern Aquarium (and that includes writing for our “Anonymous Fishkeeper” column!) receives points, as well as chances for a Prize Drawing at the Annual Holiday Party. Eligibility Any member of Greater City who makes a contribution to M odern Aquarium is automatically a participant. Points Five points will be awarded for an original article of 500 words or less. Ten points will be awarded for an original article of 501 words and over. Five points will be awarded for an original photograph, drawing, or illustration submitted with, and as part of, an original article. If more than two photographs, drawings, or illustrations are submitted with a related article, only two will be given points (this is in addition to the points awarded the article, based on its size). Ten points will be awarded for an original color photograph that is used on the front cover. Photographs must be the work of the member submitting them, and must not have been previously published, or submitted for publication, in any commercial or amateur publication. Two or more related photographs or illustrations submitted with captions, and occupying one or more pages, will be counted as two photos (10 points) and as an article over 500 words (10 points), for a total of 20 points. An 32

example would be a photo spread with captions. An original article on a fish in the C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program will receive double points (i.e., 10 points for an article of 500 words or less, and 20 points for an article of 501 words or more). Photos and drawings of a C.A.R.E.S. eligible species will also receive double points. Five points will be awarded for an original puzzle which is used on the “Fin Fun” page of Modern Aquarium. Points are awarded only once for an article, drawing, puzzle, or photograph. No points are awarded for subsequent reprints, regardless of whether the original article was awarded points in the AAP previously. To be eligible for AAP points, a contribution must first have been submitted to Modern Aquarium. However, if an article previously published in Modern Aquarium is significantly revised by its author (as a result of new information or developments), and if such a revision is first submitted to Modern Aquarium, it will be treated as a new article. Points are awarded in the year the article is printed. An article deemed unacceptable by the Editorial Staff of Modern Aquarium for reasons of appropriateness of topic, suitability, or possible violations of copyright or libel laws, will be ineligible for participation in the GCAS AAP. Decisions of the Staff are final. Points credited to an author may not be carried over or credited to subsequent calendar years for the purposes of raffle prize chances or “Author Of The Year” designation. Bonus Points If, in the year following its publication in Modern Aquarium, an article is given a 1st, 2nd or 3rd place award by the North East Council of Aquarium Societies (“NEC”) or by the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (“FAAS”), an additional 10 points will be awarded if the author is a GCAS member in the year the NEC or FAAS award is announced. This applies only to articles (not to drawings, columns, cartoons or photos). These bonus points are credited in the year that the award is announced, not the year it is awarded for. Prize Drawing For every 5 AAP points earned in a calendar year, the recipient is given one chance in our “Authors/Contributors Only” Raffle. Author of the Year

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


The person with the most points in a calendar year receives a certificate as “Author Of The Year” for that year. This is our most prestigious award, and the winner truly exemplifies the high value which they place on the contribution of experience and knowledge to the aquarium hobby at large. Accomplishment Levels For the accomplishment levels specified below, points are cumulative over the life of the AAP program.

Author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 to 45 Correspondent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 to 95 W riter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 to 145 Essayist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 to 195 Journalist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 to 295 Columnist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 to 495 Laureate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 to 745 Senior Laureate. . . . . . . . . . . . . 750 to 995 M aster Laureate . . . . . . . . . . 1000 to 1495 Grand M aster Laureate.. . . . 1500 to 1995 Sr. Grand M aster Laureate. 2000 to 10000 Editor Emeritus . . . . . . . . . . . . . over 10000

pts pts pts pts pts pts pts pts pts pts pts pts

Author Award Program Report A Status Report - Points Awarded March to December 2007

Author

Bill Amely

Art W ork (in points)

Number of Articles1

Awards

Photo/ Drawing (up to two per article) 2

500 words or less 5

Bonus 3 Points

5

1

over 500 words

Raffle 4 Chances

10

2

50

10

15

3

10

2

160

n/a

1

10

2

1

30

6

15

3

40

n/a

5

1

30

6

20

4

10

2

120

400

80

10

10

n/a

1

20

4

20

4

2

1

Mario Bengcion

1

1

10

Claudia Dickinson

40

6

Evelyn Eagan Frank Fallon

20

Harry Faustmann

10

Alison Feuer

6

2

30

30

20

5

W arren Feuer

3

Horst Gerber

20

Joseph Graffagnino Bernard Harrigan

5

1

Joseph Ferdenzi

1 125

9

11

Jason Kerner Desiree Martin

2

Prize

Current Year Total: March to December

Sharon Barnett

Brad Dickinson

Total Points

Jerry O’Farrell

10

1

Elliot Oshins

10

2

10

40

8

Alexander Priest

95

7

40

250

n/a

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

1

December 2007

33


Author

Art W ork (in points)

Number of Articles1

Awards

Photo/ Drawing (up to two per article) 2

500 words or less 5

over 500 words

Bonus 3 Points

Current Year Total: March to December

Raffle 4 Chances

10

11

50

210

n/a

2

10

40

8

10

20

4

10

2

Susan Priest Dan Radebaugh

10

Jannette Ramirez

2

Leonard Ramroop

1

Charley Sabatino Stephen Sica

5

1 30

Jack Traub

10

45

9

4

20

90

18

10

2

20

130

26

10

10

2

11

Ed Vukich

Prize

3

1

Undergravel Reporter

Total Points

1

Points are doubled for each article on a fish in the C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program. Points are doubled for each photo or drawing of a C.A.R.E.S. fish used on the cover. 3 Bonus points are awarded to participants for awards received from the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (FAAS) Publication Awards, and The Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies (NEC) Article Awards, in the year these awards are announced, not in the year it is awarded for.. 4 M odern Aquarium staff members are ineligible for the Raffle, as well as for the designation of “Author Of The Year.” Family members of staff ARE eligible. 5 Editorials and President’s Messages are excluded. 2

Here are the total AAP points for all GCAS members as of December 2007. If you have questions, or feel that there are errors, please contact Al Priest. Bill Amely. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Sharon Barnett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Fred Bellise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 M ario Bengcion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Steve Berman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Tom Bohme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Victoria Bohme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Roger Brewster.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Donald Curtin.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Doug Curtin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Carlotti De Jager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Les Deutsch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Brad Dickinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Claudia Dickinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2360 Al DiSpigna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Pete O’Orio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rod Du Casse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Evelyn Eagan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Frank Fallon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Harry Faustmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Anita Ferdenzi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Francesca Ferdenzi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

34

Joseph Ferdenzi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1025 M ichael Foran. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Artie Friedman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Alison Feuer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 W arren Feuer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Peter Foster.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Jeff George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Horst Gerber.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Steve Giacobello. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Joseph Graffagnino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Steve Gruebel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Al Grusell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bernard Harrigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1625 Jason Kerner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Denver Lettman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rich Levy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bill Luckett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 John M alinowski. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Desiree M artin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Tom M iglio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Jerry O'Farrell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Elliot Oshins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Jim Peterson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 M argaret Peterson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Alexander Priest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1410 Susan Priest.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1380 Dan Radebaugh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Jannette Ramirez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Leonard Ramroop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30* M ark Rubanow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Charley Sabatino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Donna Sosna Sica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Stephen Sica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

Vincent Sileo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Danielle Soberman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Ilyssa Soberman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Robin Soberman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 M ark Soberman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Jack Traub. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Undergravel Reporter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900 Anton Vukich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Edward Vukich.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Greg W uest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

*Corrected total

Editor Extraordinaire by CLAUDIA DICKINSON erusing the pages of Modern Aquariums past, a smile steals over my face as I come across familiar articles from days gone by. Fond memories surface as shared moments with the GCAS are captured forever in time. It is amazing to see how many years we have been reading some of the columns that we still look forward to each month. “W et Leaves” has become an institution, “Fin Fun” has been testing our aquatic acumen seem ingly forever, the “Undergravel Reporter” has kept us laughing for so many years, while the mystery autho r is co nsistently recognized with awards for his, her, or “its” ramblings. Our “President’s Message” is a mainstay that we look to for updates on the present, as well as a look back at the past, and another into the future. Beginning way back when, with a point and shoot camera, “Looking Through the Lens” has chronicled all of us ¯ some members who have come and gone, and most of us who still remain. Then, of course, with each issue there is “The Editor’s Babblenest,” written by none other than our M odern Aquarium Editor in Chief, Al Priest. W hat great fortune it has been for the GCAS to have Al serve in this immense role for so long, spending ten months of each year dedicating his time to meticulously and creatively placing together this award winning magazine. Al and his lovely wife, Sue, have put in countless hours to bring us a publication that draws the largest crowd

P

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

of all at our monthly meetings! There is no doubt that serving on the staff of Modern Aquarium has been one of the greatest joys in my life, and this has been made most particularly so due to the amazing editor that we have ~ for Al is like no other! I have often referred to Al as the *wizard,* and that is exactly what he is as he transforms typed documents of text into precisely arranged and perfectly aligned pages. W orking together with Al as Editor in Chief, and Sue as Associate Editor, I have gained not only the experience of working with one of the most exceptional editorial teams, I have, most importantly, gained treasured friends. Al may be stepping aside as our M odern Aquarium Editor, but his, and Sue’s, cherished friendship, along with the years of Modern Aquariums published under Al’s editorship, is something that shall always remain.

A warm welcom e to Dan and Marsha Radebaugh as Dan steps up to take on the role of Modern Aquarium Editor in Chief! Here’s to the next decade that I have no doubt will bring as m uch joy, and friendship, as the last!

December 2007

35


American Killifish Association 2008 National Convention

http://www.aka.org/convention/

American Livebearer Association 2008 Annual Convention May 1-4, 2008 San Antonio Texas See our web site for more details: http:.www.livebearers.org

Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies 2008 Annual Convention

April 11 - 13, 2008 at the Marriott Hotel in Farmington, CT Each year, the NEC Convention has a “theme” with a prize awarded to the person whose costume most closely exemplifies that year's theme. The theme for the 2008 Convention is: the “Pirates of the NEC.” more details to follow Visit the NEC website at: http://northeastcouncil.org/html/

36

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Smart Fish, Dumb People A series by “The Undergravel Reporter” In spite of popular demand to the contrary, this humor and information column continues. As usual, it does N O T n ecessarily rep resen t the opinions of the Editor, or of the Greater City Aquarium Society. ome recent news reports are pointing to the conclusion that people are getting dumber, but many animals, including fish, are a lot smarter than we thought they were.

S

Smart Fish: United Press International has reported that Australian scientists discovered fish use the threat of punishment to maintain stability in their social order. Australian Research Council scientists at James Cook University said their discovery has implications for the entire animal kingdom, including humans. Studying small goby fish at Lizard Island on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, Marian W ong and colleagues showed the threat of expulsion from the group acts as a powerful deterrent to keep subordinate fish from challenging those more dominant than they. In fact, the researchers discovered subordinate fish deliberately diet to remain smaller than their superiors — and so present no threat that might lead to their being cast out and subsequently perishing. Dumb People: According to United Press International, a law stating that, in Liverpool, only a clerk in a tropical fish store is allowed to be publicly topless, was voted the third most ridiculous law in England in a poll conducted for UKTV Gold television. In case you’re wondering why this was only the third most ridiculous law in England (even if, according a spokesman for the Liverpool City Council, this law does not exist, and is only an urban myth that has gained some notoriety), the English law voted the most ridiculous was one making it illegal to die in the Houses of Parliament.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

(The law voted to be the second most ridiculous is one making it an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the image of the ruling British monarch upside down on an envelope.) Smart Fish: Reuters reports that the Mangrove Rivulus, Rivulus marmoratus, a killifish from mangrove swamps across the Americas, can survive out of water for months at a time. In laboratory tests, this fish was found to be able to survive for up to 66 days out of water without eating, and with their metabolism functioning (that is, without estivation). W hen their habitat dries up, they live on the land in logs. No other known fish can be out of water as long as the Mangrove Rivulus and remain active. Surviving on land is not the only unusual behavior exhibited by the fish. They have both testes and ovaries, and essentially clone themselves by laying their own (already fertilized) eggs. Dumb People: Hey, I enjoy my fish as much as the next person, and sometimes I may talk aloud while doing tank maintenance (especially if I accidentally spill water, or can’t get a filter to restart!). But, I don’t think that any of my fish truly appreciate my subtle humor. However, Professor Richard W iseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, who conducted a study of 2,000 owners of pets of all kinds, declares that, “almost 60% of us are convinced that their fishy friends have a personality and a sense of humour.” “It may be hard to think of fish having personality, but fish owners insist that they do,” said Prof. W iseman. Based on the ratings given by their owners, the study suggested that 62% of dogs, 57% of fish, 48% of cats, 42% of horses, 38% of birds, and zero per cent of reptiles had a good sense of humor. This study also concluded that “no-one is happier than a keeper of tropical fish.” I agree. Smart Fish: United Press International reports that Logan Grosenick and his Stanford University colleagues found that male cichlids (Astatotilapia burtoni) were able to infer the relative dominance of fish engaged in a series of staged fights between pairs of unfamiliar rivals. The researchers found the territorial fish show rudiments of logical reasoning, and the study suggests cichlids have the capacity for transitive inference (the ability to deduce unknown relationships based on knowledge of known relationships).

December 2007

37


CAMEO PET SHOP TROPICAL FISH AQUARIUM Specializing in Tropical Fish and Aquarium Supplies Large Selection of Aquatic Plants Knowledgeable Staff Same Location Since 1947. (718 ) 8 4 9 -6 6 78

115 -2 3 J am aica A v e n ue R ich m o n d H ill, N Y 114 18

! Marine Biologist On Staff ! Custom Tank Builders for the NY Aquarium ! Manufacturers of Aquarium & Filter Systems ! Custom Cabinetry & Lighting ! Largest Selection of Marine & Freshwater Livestock in NY ! New York’s Largest Custom Aquarium Showroom ! See Working Systems on Display 2015 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11234 (718)258-0653

Open Saturdays and Sundays Amex, Discover, MasterCard, Visa 2 miles off exit 11N of the Belt Parkway www.WorldClassAquarium.com

38

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


G.C.A.S. HAPPENINGS W elcome new member: Richard W aizman Thanks to renewing members: Temes M o, M ichael Henderson

Last M onth’s Bowl Show W inners: 1) Bill Amely 2) M ario Bengcion 3) Ed Vukich FINAL results for 2007 Season: Ed Vukich 19; Carlotti De Jager 11; Bill Amely 10; Kin Ha 8; M ario Bengcion 8; Artie Friedman 7; Claudia Dickinson 3; Darwin Richmond 3; W arren Feuer 1 Here are meeting times and locations of some aquarium societies in the Metropolitan New York area: GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Next M eeting: M arch 2008 Speaker: Izzy Zwerin Date, Location, and Speaker’s topic to be announced. W atch our website and (for paidup members) your reminder postcard. Contact: Joseph Ferdenzi (516) 484-0944 E-mail: GreaterCity@compuserve.com W ebsite: http://www.greatercity.org

Brooklyn Aquarium Society December 14, 2007- BAS Holiday Party January 11, 2008 - Harry Faustmann speaking on “Aquarium Jewels: Killifish” Meets the 2nd Friday of the month (except July and August) at 7:30pm: NY Aquarium - Education Hall Surf Ave. at W est 8th St., Brooklyn, NY Call: BAS Events Hotline: (718) 837-4455 http://www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org

East Coast Guppy Association

Big Apple Guppy Club

Meets: 1st Thursday of each month at Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. at 8:00 pm Contact: Gene Baudier (631) 345-6399

Meets: Last Tuesday each month (except Jan. & Feb.) at Alley Pond Environmental Ctr.: 228-06 Northern Blvd. at 7:30-10:00pm. Contact: Donald Curtin (718) 631-0538

Long Island Aquarium Society

Nassau County Aquarium Society

December 14, 2007 - Holiday Party! January 18, 2008 - Joe Yaiullo “Setting Up Atlantis' 20,000 gallon reef tank.”

Next M eeting: January 8, 2008

Meets: 3rd Fridays (except July and August) at Holtsville Park and Zoo at 8:00pm. 249 Buckley Road - Holtsville, NY W ebsite: http://liasonline.org/ Email: Arie Gilbert - president@liasonline.org

Meets:2nd Tuesday of the month (except July and August )at Molloy College - Kellenberg Hall ~1000 Hempstead Ave - Rockville Centre, NY Contact: Mike Foran (516) 798-6766 W ebsite: http://www.ncasweb.org

North Jersey Aquarium Society Next M eeting: !/17/2008 at Meadowlands Environmental Center - One Dekorte Plaza - Lyndhurst, NJ Contact: NJAS Hotline at (732) 332-1392 W ebsite: http://www.njas.net/ or e-mail: tcoletti@obius.jnj.com

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Norwalk Aquarium Society Next M eeting: December 20, 2007 Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at: Earthplace - the Nature Discovery Center - W estport, CT Contact: John Chapkovich (203) 734-7833 E-mail: jchapkovich@snet.net Call our toll free number (866) 219-4NAS W ebsite: http://norwalkas.org/

December 2007

39


Fin Fun I’m sure you are familiar with the long-running quiz show where they give you an answer, and you have to come up with the question. Here is a category which you will all be able to sweep, “GCAS.” 1) He supplies the members with coffee and cake at every meeting. 2) W arren Feuer, Al Priest, and Dan Radebaugh. 3) Historian, speaker, award winning author, auctioneer, and host to the board meetings. 4) January and February. 5) The Recording Secretary. 6) One for $1 and six for $5. 7) Artist/author of the “Amusing Aquarium” cartoon column. 8) ~ Daily Double ~ She is the newest enrollee in the GCAS Roll of Honor.

Solution to last month’s puzzle:

Math is Fun!

1) If you have one bucket with five gallons of water, and one bucket with two gallons of water, and one bucket with four gallons of water, how many buckets do you have? ANSW ER: Three

2) How many guppies does it take to fill a ten gallon tank? ANSWER: Two

3) If you have a 90 gallon tank, and you drain out half of the water, then you add ten gallons, and then you remove 30%, how much water do you have to add to fill up the tank? ANSW ER: Only Python Man knows for sure, and even he doesn’t care!

4) If you have a 2½ gallon tank, a 5 gallon tank, and a 10 gallon tank lined up next to each other in your livingroom, how many gallons of water do you need to fill them all up? ANSW ER: None. Nobody keeps three empty tanks in their living room! 5) If you have a tank with half a dozen neon tetras, 8 white clouds, and an oscar, how many fish do you have? ANSW ER: One.

40

December 2007

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Profile for Dan Radebaugh

Modern Aquarium December 2007  

Volume XIV Number 10

Modern Aquarium December 2007  

Volume XIV Number 10

Advertisement