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AQUARIUM

NOVEMBER 2003 volume X number 9

Greater City Aquarium Society - New York


modern

AOTJARITM ON THE COVER The "Bushynose" (or "Bristtenose") Pfeco (Ancistris sp.) is, as you will learn from both Bemie Harrigan ("Seven Steps to Cleaning Your Freshwater Aquarium") and our "Wet Leaves" book review column, one of the best algae eating freshwater fish you can have. The fish on our cover is a juvenile, who has not yet acquired the characteristic nose appendages that make sexual differentiation possible. Photo by Susan Priest GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Board Members President . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph Ferdenzi Vice-President ....... Mark Soberman Treasurer . . . , . . . . . . . • : , . . . Jack Traub Gorres. Secretary . . . . . . . Warren Feuer Recording Secretary ... .Edward Vukich

Series III

Vol. X, No. 9

November, 2003

FEATURES Editor's Babblenest

2

President's Message

3

2002-2003 Breeders Award Program

3

Seven Steps to Cleaning Your Freshwater Aquarium

5

New and Old

7

A Cameo Primer: Perspectives on 70 Common Tropical Fish

8

Members At Large Steve Chen Pete D'Orio Cartotti DeJager Claudia Dickinson Jason Kerner Ben Haus GregWuest Emma Haus

Author Award Program - Brief outline

13

Non-Stop Fun at the NJAS 50th

14

Committee Chairs Breeder Award . . . . . Warren Feuer and MarkSoberman Early Arrivals . . . . . . . . . . . .Pete D'Orio F.A.A.S. Delegate ...., Alexander Priest Members/Programs . Claudia Dickinson N.E.C. Delegate . . . . Claudia Dickinson

Paracyprichromis nigripinnis - "Blue Neon"

MODERN AQUARIUM Editor in Chief ..... Alexander A. Priest Associate Editors . . . . Susan Priest and Claudia Dickinson Copy Editor Dora Dong Photo/Layout Editor Jason Kerner Advertising Mgr. Mark Soberman Executive Editor . . . . . . Joseph Ferdenzi

. . 16

Photos from our Last Meeting

18

The 2003 Norwalk Show

20

Wet Leaves (Book Review)

21

His, Hers, Ours, and Theirs

23

G.C.A.S. Happenings

25

Fin Fun (Puzzle Page)

26

Articles submitted for consideration in MODERN AQUARIUM must be received no later than the 10th day of the month, three months prior to the month of publication. Copyright 2003 by the Greater City Aquarium Society Inc., a not-for-profit New York State corporation. All rights reserved. Not-for-profit aquarium societies are hereby granted permission to reproduce articles and illustrations from this publication, unless the article indicates that the copyrights have been retained by the author, and provided reprints indicate source and two copies of the publication are sent to the Exchange Editor of this magazine. Any other reproduction or commercial use of the material in this publication is prohibited without express written prior permission. The Greater City Aquarium Society meets every month, except during July and August. Meetings are the first Wednesday of the month and begin at 8:00 P.M. Meetings are held at the Queens Botanical Gardens. For more information, contact: Joe Ferdenzi (718)767-2691. You can also leave us a message at our Internet Home Page at: http: //ourworld. CompuServe, com/homepages /greatercity


me

by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST

few years ago, the editor of another aquarium society publication, in reviewing Modern Aquarium, stated that he would "kill" for authors like ours. While I'm very happy that I never had to go to such lengths for contributions (especially since our society's President works in the District Attorney's office of the county where I live!), I will admit to occasional lapses in courtesy when dealing with our contributors, especially when the Modern Aquarium printing deadline is very close. So, I want to make special mention of several people who provided considerable assistance to me (and to Greater City) last month in getting an issue out under an unusually tight deadline. First, I want to thank my "Number One" proofreader, assistant, and best friend for over 25 years: my wife and partner, Susan. Next, I want to thank our President, Joe Ferdenzi, who, for the sake of this magazine, is willing to tolerate my occasional emotional outbursts. I want to thank Dora Dong for assisting with our proofreading. I want to give special thanks to Claudia Dickinson who was able to overcome technological and logistical barriers (and to give up a considerable amount of sleep!) to get last minute proofing to me right up to our deadline (in fact, Claudia's final review was received by me at 1:30AM on the day the issue was sent to be printed). Finally, and by no means last in importance, I want to thank Jason Kerner who, although he received the final pages later than usual, and experienced his own technological problems (when it rains, it pours!), still got our magazine printed in time for our meeting last month. I know I don't say it often enough (probably because a "nice editor" is an oxymoron, which is to say a contradiction in terms), but I'm saying it now: "Thanks!" In this issue of Modern Aquarium, there is another "first" for us. We have had articles from

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our own members, from our guest speakers, and we have reprinted articles from other sources. But, in the 10 years that I've been associated with this magazine, this is the first time we have had an article written by one of our advertisers. Steve Gruebel of Cameo Pet Shop (see their ad on page 24) has provided us with a chart of most of the commonly available freshwater fish found in pet stores, outlining the basic information needed for keeping 70 listed species offish. I want to announce a project—something that I would really like to see become a reality. Aquarium hobbyists are, in my opinion, blamed too much for ecological problems (such as destruction of the coral reefs, or the introduction of non-indigenous species of plants and animals), which, more often than not, are the result of government actions, or the result of plants or fish eggs being transported (however inadvertently) by pleasure boats, from one body of water to another. Yet, hobbyists can, should, and indeed DO play a part in conservation. This is why I would like to have a special issue of Modern Aquarium devoted to Conservation and Endangered Species. Are you keeping an endangered species? If you think you are, but are not certain, go to the Internet site below and enter the information for your fish: http://www.redlist.org/ If you are involved with a Species Maintenance Program for endangered or threatened aquatic species, please share information about your experiences with us for this special issue. Also, if you have children at home, or young nephews, nieces, cousins, or grandchildren who are keeping fish (even if it's one betta or goldfish), Modern Aquarium would like to have a "juniors" issue, with articles and artwork from our "next generation" of hobbyists. Filially, I'd again like to remind everyone that Modern Aquarium needs more proofreaders. The more we have, the burden will be on any one person. Proofreaders must have access to Internet e-mail, and agree to check it at least once a day in the two weeks before our issue goes to print. Proofreaders are asked to provide a reply (by e-mail or phone) within two days after the e-mail was sent to them. They also need to know proper American English grammar and spelling (but hopefully, my computer's spell checker will catch most misspellings, except for proper names and scientific names). Thanks in advance to any of you who even consider adding another task to your already hectic lives.

November 2003

Modem Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


President's Message by JOSEPH FERDENZI y message for this month will really be brief. Please be reminded that we have a Bowl Show every month (except January and April), and we have a Breeders Award Program. They are fun and easy to participate in. Just ask me about them, and I'll get you started.

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Also, start saving your unwanted aquarium equipment for our annual Silent Auction/Flea Market (in April). Don't forget that our January meeting features our Holiday Party — always a friendly gathering that is sure to feature a grand raffle, where everyone walks away with a prize. Last, but not least, I'd like to congratulate Ed Vukich for standing for election to the position of Recording Secretary. His service is deeply appreciated.

GCAS BREEDERS AWARD PROGRAM June 2002- September 2003 Season This is a report of the spawnings reported to, and accepted by, the Greater City Aquarium Society Breeders Award Program ("BAP"). Only the names of members who submitted spawnings for this period are shown, and the total points for each breeder is the total earned during this period (and is not necessarily the total amount accumulated to date). An asterisk means that this was the first reported spawning of that species in the GCAS BAP. Questions on participating in the BAP, as well as questions about the report below should be directed to our BAP chairpersons: Warren Feuer and Mark Soberman. Name Carlotti De Jager

Fish

Pts

Date

Nematobrycon palmeri Betta unimaculata Cory dor as sterbai Thayeria boehlkei

10 25* 15 25*

9/4/2002 1 1/7/2002 6/4/2003 6/4/2003 total pts 75

Warren Feuer

Neolamprologus speciosus Xiphophorus maculatus Xiphophorus helleri

25* 5 5

3/4/2003 3/4/2003 6/4/2003 total pts 35

Joseph Graffagnino

Paracyprich row is n igrip in n is Hoplosternum theracatum Haplochromis schoutedeni Cyathopharynx foai "mbita " Labeotropheus trewavasae Pseudotropheus accii Statacranus gibbiceps

20 25* 25* 30* 10 10 20*

9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 1 1/7/2002 5/7/2003 6/4/2003 6/4/2003 total pts 140

Al Priest

Macropodus opercularis

10

11/7/2002 total pts 10

Charley Sabatino

Betta splendens Apistogramma cacatuoides Archocentrus sajica Heros appendiculatus Poecilia reticulata Nanochromis parilus

5 15 10 10 5 20*

9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 2/5/2003 2/5/2003 total pts 65

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

November 2003


Name Mark Soberman

Fish

Pts

Date

Heros oblongus

20*

6/4/2003 total pts 20

Anton Vukich

Zoogoneticus tequila Giradinus metallicus Microgeophagus ramirezi Trichogaster trichopterus Nematobrycon palmeri Xiphophorus helleri Aphyosemion australe Epiplatys sexfasciatus Xiphophorus maculatus Cynolebias (Nematolebias) whitei Nematobrycon palmeri Nannacara anomala Cory dor as hastatus Inpaichthys kerri Jordanellafloridae Betta splendens Haplochromis sp. "Madonna" Fundulus cingulatus

15* 15 * 15 5 10 5 5 20* 5 5 10 15 15 20* 5 5 25* 20*

9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 9/4/2002 10/2/2002 10/2/2002 12/4/2002 12/4/2002 12/4/2002 12/4/2002 3/4/2003 5/7/2003 6/4/2003 6/4/2003 total pts 215

Edward Vukich

Xiphophorus helleri Pterophyllum scalare Poecilia reticulata

1/8/2003 4/2/2003 4/2/2003

5 10 5

total pts 20

NASSAU DISCUS > QUALITY DISCUS > MANY VARIETIES (call) > ALREADY QUARANTINED > ALREADY CONDITIONED i SOLD DIRECT TO HOBBYISTS ONLY (appointment required)

MarkRubanow 205 8th Street, Hicksville, NY 11801 (516) 939-0267 or (516) 646-8699 (beeper) morgansfin@aol.com

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Seven Steps to Cleaning freshwater uanum by BERNARD HARRIGAN

he most common horror story that I've heard from a novice fishkeeper is that they kept a spotless fish tank, but all of their fish died. I've also seen some long-time hobbyists do some questionable things when it comes to aquarium cleaning. I've read tons of books on the hobby that cover everything from turbo-protein skimming to keeping species offish which are so rare that they don't even have a Latin name —just a number. I can't remember ever reading in one spot all of the pitfalls that could be encountered when cleaning your aquarium. This step-by-step method should do just that.

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STEP ONE: Assess Your Tank A wise man once said, "How can you know where you're going if you don't know where you've been?" The most important step you can take before you start cleaning is to see what needs to be done. Check out your fish. Are any of them missing? Do their bodies look clean and disease-free? Are their fins ripped or tattered? Are the barbels on your catfish O.K.? How about your plants, are your plants clean and healthy? Do you see new growth, or decaying leaves? Is your equipment working properly, or is it hindered by algae or age? How does the water look? Is it murky, yellowish, or do you notice a lot of suspended particles? Is your hood or cover water-spotted and/or encrusted? If your fish are having trouble, then you have to find out the cause. I'm not talking about disease. Disease is always in your tank. I'm talking about what allowed your fish to become susceptible to the disease. The number one cause of sick fish is stress. Stress can be caused by a number of things. Start with testing your water. You don't have to test it every time you clean your tank. You should do it every time you notice that your fish are in distress. If your fish are distressed, nine times out often, a good tank cleaning is what they need. Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

STEP TWO: Clean Off Excess Algae The reason I said "excess algae" is because it's next to impossible to remove all of the algae out of your fish tank, and you shouldn't want to. Algae can be very beneficial. It can make your equipment more natural looking. Even airline tubing ends up looking like a plant's root or stem with a good coat of algae. Many fish eat algae, and for some it's their only source of food. Plus, it helps with the removal of ammonia from the water. Clean all of the algae off the front glass of the tank. There are several algae scrapers/scrubbers on the market. Clean the algae off the side panels of the tank. You don't have to be as thorough with the sides. Remember, algae doesn't hurt glass, and it can be helpful. Algae does hurt plants, though. Lightly wipe any algae off of plant leaves with your fingers. Leaves that are overgrown with algae are of no use to the plant, and could possibly kill it. Scrubbing the leaf will damage it, so be gentle. Remove all of the algae from the heater, the flowtubes of the filter, and the hood area. If it's not hampering the equipment, leave it alone. Algae will just help equipment to look more natural. Wipe excess algae off of rocks and decorations. There are things you can do to prevent your tank from becoming overrun with algae. Remember, an aquarium is a manmade environment. You make it the way it is. You can also change it. Do you have the fishtank light on for most of the day, or do you have your tank near a window, where it gets direct sunlight? If so, put the tank light on a timer. Keep the light on for no longer than ten hours each day. If necessary, move the tank, or block it, from the direct rays of the sun. Do you overfeed your fish? Excess food which is not eaten by your fish, will feed your algae. Add plants to compete with algae for the nutrients. Floating plants will compete for light, too. You can also add algae eating fish to help

November 2003


keep algae in check. Bristlenose plecos such as Ancistrus dolichopterus, and cichlids such as Melanochromis auratus, cross a range of water conditions and are good algae eaters. STEP THREE: Vacuum Your Gravel and do a Water Change The reason that these two are put together is because they are done at the same time. There are several gravel cleaners/washers on the market. Always use one that removes detritus and water from your tank at the same time. Battery powered gravel vacuums release trapped ammonia into the water, and can cause an ammonia "spike," by not removing the ammonia-laden water which builds up around the detritus. So, make sure your gravel cleaner will remove water, as well. Just understand that you always want both going on. If you're cleaning the gravel, you want to be removing water. If you're taking water out, you want to be removing detritus with it. First, unplug your filter(s) and heater(s). Move all decorations and equipment from the right side of the tank to the middle. Put your gravel washer in the front right hand corner of the tank, as far down into the gravel as it will go. Start the syphon. Work a row along the right hand edge, going straight to the back. Dig into the gravel as far as you can each time. Run the second row right next to the first. Keep doing that until you've reached the middle of the tank, or removed 25% of the water. If you are syphoning into a bucket, keep emptying it until you are done. You can put a mark on the back corner of your tank to let you know when it's 3/4's full. Next week, you'll do the other half of the tank. Never clean more than half of your tank at a time. Anything more than that could cause an ammonia spike. Some special consideration has to be paid to plants and intricate rockwork. Vacuum in and around plants, being careful not to harm them, or their root systems. Don't push the syphon hard into the gravel around the plants. Prune your plants of dead or dying leaves. Now is the time to add any additional plants you may want. If you have intricate rockwork that you don't want to disturb, disturb it anyway! Intricate rockwork is a detritus magnet. It can get clogged up with waste and build up toxins. If it's too much trouble for you to clean all of that rockwork, then get it out of your tank, and keep it out. This will make cleaning less of a chore, and rid your tank of hidden pockets of waste. Put your decorations and equipment back in place. STEP FIVE: Clean Your Filtering System I could write a twelve page article on how to clean every filter on the market. Just follow

your manufacturer's instructions on how to clean the filter you own. Here are a few general points on aquarium filtration. There are three basic types of filtration used in aquariums: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Mechanical filtration removes solid waste from the water, hopefully before it has a chance to break down into ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Different filtering materials can be used. Coarse sponge, filter floss, and fine polymer wool are just some of the materials used. Filter wool/floss doesn't have to be changed every time you clean your filter, but it does have to be rinsed out. The fibers of the material hold useful bacteria. Don't clean it in hot water, because you want to get rid of the dirt without killing the bacteria. Pump speed is also important with mechanical filtration. You want your water to turn over two to four times an hour. So, for a 29 gallon aquarium, anywhere from sixty to one hundred GPH ("Gallons Per Hour") would be good. Chemical filtration, simply put, changes the water chemically without using any living organisms. Carbon is the most common chemical filtering media used. Other commonly used materials include resins, pumice, marble chips, and even peat moss. Make sure you replace your chemical filtration media regularly; especially the carbon. If carbon is too old, it will leach into the water the very toxins it has removed. If your water has a yellow tinge, you will know that you need to change your carbon, unless you're using peat. (Peat, peat extract, and blackwater extract are used for some fish that need soft, acidic water. When they are used, or when driftwood is used, the water will naturally be tinted.) Biological filtration is accomplished by the presence of helpful bacteria. The filter media should have a large amount of surface area and not clog easily. There are a number of items on the market made just for this purpose: ceramic "noodles," bio-balls, sponges, and fluidized beds, just to name a few. Remember, every surface in your tank has helpful bacteria, including the tank walls, the gravel, the plants, and all of your submerged equipment and decorations. The bacteria causes what is known as the "Nitrogen Cycle." Fish and uneaten food produce ammonia. Nitrosomonas bacteria changes ammonia to nitrite. Then, nitrobacter bacteria changes nitrites to nitrates. Nitrates are absorbed by algae and plants. STEP SIX: Rebuild and Reset-up Using aged tap water to refill your tank is best. If your tank is too large for that, or if your water supplier uses chloramine (a combination of

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


chlorine and ammonia that does not evaporate over time), then you must use a commercial tap water conditioner to dechlorinate the water, such as Wardley速 Chlor Out. The water you add back should be adjusted to the same temperature and pH as the water already in your tank. You may want to add an additive that protects the natural slime coating on fish (which, in turn, reduces stress related illness), such as Stress Coat速. Restart your filters, heater, and any other equipment which you have unplugged. Check to make sure everything is running properly. STEP SEVEN: Clean the Outside of the Tank Start from the top, and work your way down. Clean the hood and light. Clean the sides of the tank. Remove any water spots, or encrusted

mineral buildup. Wipe down the stand and the floor. Get rid of any signs of water or stains. Never spray a cleaner directly on any part of your tank. If you have to use a glass cleaner, spray it onto a rag away from your tank. Then, carefully wipe down your tank. Make sure the rag and cleaner never touch the water. That's it: seven steps and you're finished! If done on a monthly basis, you will have spent a couple of hours or less. You have taken the responsibility to care for living creatures. You brought them into your home, and placed them in a most unnatural environment, just for your own pleasure. Never forget that you are their self-appointed guardian. How long they live is up to the care you give them.

New and OLD by JERRY O'FARRELL ecently, I went to a new aquarium store called "Aquarium Adventure" at 177 Glen Cove Road, Carle Place, NY 11514 (516-294-9699). They also have a website that is one of the best I have seen for a store this size. It is well laid out and user friendly. It was the reason I took a ride to Long Island to check it out. The site is: [http://www.aquariumadventure.com]. To me, it was worth the trip. If you are in the neighborhood, go and check it out. This store is fairly large for a fish store, but it is well laid-out and has all types of fish and ecosystems set up throughout the store. Their inventory is pretty complete. They have well laid-out isles of dry goods for fresh and saltwater fish. They have a good selection of filters and filter media, as well as a large selection of tanks and stands. Although the store is well stocked, it is a little pricey, but well worth your time to go and check it out. The one room that I really liked was the library room, which has a couch and a huge saltwater tank to look at while you check out some of the books, or just sit and wait for your other half to finish shopping. When I went, they had only been open for three weeks, and were still cycling a lot of the tanks. There are more than 100 tanks, and three quarters of them were full at the time. They also have a shoppers' discount card that gives you 25% off fish and 10% off dry goods. So, if you happen to be on Glen Cove Road, stop in and check out this store. Pick up a discount card, enjoy the couch, and most of all, enjoy something new.

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

To enjoy something old, you had to go to the 50th Anniversary Show and Auction of the North Jersey Aquarium Society ("NJAS"), held at the Sheraton in Piscataway. It was well organized. As with everything Gino and I do, it was an adventure. We got lost as usual, and took some time in finding the place. But once we did, we had a lot of fun. The only bad thing was that they had the Betta and Guppy Auction at the same time, so you had to pick one or the other if you wanted those types offish, as they were in separate rooms. I did not realize there were so many different types of guppies. The shows were held in three different rooms, and were well attended, according to the members of the club. Gino and I went to the auction on Sunday, and had the honor of sitting next to Pam Chin (a very well noted aquarist, author, and one heck of a nice person). Wayne Leibel was also there. Although the auction was long and slow moving, they did have a large selection offish and supplies that went at reasonable prices. Joe DiBartolomeo, the President of NJAS, did a great job of trying to keep things moving right along. Well, it ended late, and we did not get home until 10:30 that night. Congratulations to the NJAS on its 50th Anniversary, and may it have many more. Now I'm going to the peace and serenity room to relax and unwind. JL

November 2003


A CA Perspectives on 70 Common Tropical Fish by STEVE GRUEBEL teve Gruebel w the current owner of Cameo Pet Shop, a family owned and operated store since 1947. Steve himselfbegan working in the store some 40 years ago, and took over the store when his father-in-law, Everett Byrnes, retired. Needless to say, with that many years on the job, Steve has a wealth of practical experience when it comes to tropical fish. Cameo specializes in advising customers on how to maintain a balanced community aquarium. Therefore, the information presented in the accompanying chart is geared towards the hobbyist with that in mind. It is not intended to be a breeding guide. Please note that the "pH Preference " refers to a range no greater than 8.0 (alkaline) and no less than 6.5 (acid) — p H o f l . O is neutral. For example, if it states that a fish prefers an alkaline pH, this means a pH between 7.0 and 8.0. No preference indicates that the fish can easily tolerate anything between 6.5 and 8.0. Also, with respect to the compatibility guide, please remember that this is generalized; some of the fish that are "best kept by themselves " may be compatible with similarly sized or aggressive fish, but they are simply not candidates for the average "community" tank. - Joe Ferdenzi

pH Preference OK. with Comments Best kept by Community Alkaline Acid plants? Themselves Tank Angelflsh Pterophyllum scalare Banded/Three-lined Rainbowfish Melanotaenia trifasciata Betta/Siamese Fighting Fish Betta splendens Black Ghost Apteronotus albifrons Black Neon Tetra Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi Black Phantom Tetra Megalamphodus megalopterus Black Ruby Barb Barbus nigrofasciatus Black Tetra Gymnocorymbus ternetzi

see

comments

None

None

Yes

Wild caught - acid water home bred - alkaline water

Yes*

*Only eats Anacharis

Yes

No Tiger Barbs or gouramis, as they will pick on bettas

Yes

Predatory - as long as fish are too large to be swallowed; always hides

Yes

Very peaceful

Yes

Highly recommended

No

Like most barbs, it will pick on plants

Yes

Very peaceful

None

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


pH Preference Best kept fay Community O.K. with Comments Alkaline Acid plants? Themselves Tank Bleeding Heart Tetra Hyphessobrycon erythrostigma

Blue/Three-Spot Gourami Trichogaster trichopterus Blue Acara Aequidens pulcher

Boeseman's Rainbowfish Melanotaenia boesemani

Bristle-nosed Catfish Ancistrus sp.

Bronze Cory Cory dor as aeneus

Buenos Aires Tetra Hemigr animus caudovittatus Clown Knifefish Notopterus chitala

Common Pleco Hypostomus punctatus Convict Cichlid Archocentrus nigrofasciatus

Common Hatchetfish Gasteropelecus sternicla

Discus Symphysodon aequifasciatus Dwarf Gourami Colisa lalia Dwarf Suckermouth Catfish Otocinclus affinis

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Nippy; good to keep with barbs

Yes

Except for bettas, which it will pick on

Yes

Typical territorial cichlid

Yes

Yes

Good algae eater

Yes

Very peaceful

Yes

Nippy; hardy

Yes

Big; carnivorous - will eat small fish

Yes

May pick on flat-sided fish, like discus

None

Clown Loach Botia macracanthus

Yes None

Yes None

• •

Neutral

Yes

Can get very large - can damage Amazon Sword plants

No

Don't recommend them; very aggressive, but easy to breed

Yes

Minimum 80°F; finicky eaters - mostly live foods

Yes Yes

None

November 2003

Short-lived algae eater; inexpensive; won't bother flat-sided fish


pH Preference O.K.witti Comments Best kept by Community Alkaline Acicl plants? Themselves Tank Peter's Elephantnose Gnathonemus petersii Firemouth Thorichthys meeki

Flying Fox Epalzeorhynchus kallopterus

• •

Glass Catfish Kryptopterus bicirrhis

Glowlight Tetra Hemigrammus erythrozonus

Giant Danio Danio aequipinnatus Danio malabaricus

Green Terror Aequidens rivulatus

Harlequin Rasbora Rasbora heteromorpha

Kissing Gourami Helostoma temminkii

Leaf Fish, South American Monocirrhus polyacanthus

10

Territorial

Yes

Algae eater

Yes

Long-lived; center to surface dweller

Yes

No

Likes cool water shouldn't be kept with tropicals

No

Very beautiful, but aggressive

Yes Yes

Singapore/Florida farms water is 7.2 pH

No

Very aggressive - how do you think they got their name?

Yes

They get large and become aggressive; will pick on flat-sided fish, like discus

Yes

Easy to breed

Yes

Predatory - will eat small fish

None

Jack Dempsey Nandopsis octofasciatum

Kribensis Pelvicachromis pulcher

No

Yes

Jumpers

None

Goldfish Carassius auratus

Guppy Poecilia reticulata

Yes

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


pH Preference Best kept by Community O.K. with Comments Alkaline Acid plants? TTiemsdves Tank Yes

Marble Hatchetfish Carnegiella strigata

Molly, Sailfin Poecilia latipinna

Neon Rainbow Melanotaenia praecox

Neon Tetra Paracheirodon innesi

None

None

Oscar Astronotus ocellatus

Pacu Colossoma macropomus

Panda Cory Corydoras panda

Paradiseflsh Macropodus opercularis

None

None

Pearl Danio Brachydanio albolineatus Pearl/Lace Gourami Trichogaster leeri

Peppered Cory Corydoras paleatus

Pictus Catfish Pimellodus pictus

None

Very pretty

Yes No

Gets very large; will dig up plants

No

Gets very big; eats plants; will eat small fish

Yes

Yes

None

Yes

None

Yes

Platy, Variable Xiphophorus variatus

Pristella Tetra Pristella maxillaris

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Yes

A little aggressive; keep with fast moving fish; great snail eaters

Yes

Yes

Yes

Platy, Southern Xiphophorus maculatus

Rainbow Cichlid Herotilapia multispinosa

Not as hardy as the Silver Hatchetfish, but excellent community fish

None

November 2003

Good community fish; tends to be less aggressive than other gouramis

Predatory - will eat small fish

Yes

Yes Yes

Very pretty when kept under the right conditions

No

Doesn't dig as much as other cichlids

11


pH Preference Best kept by Community; O.K.witti Comments Alkaline Aeid plants? Themselves Tank Ram Cichlid Microgeophagus ramirezi Red Eye Tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae

Red-tailed Black Shark Epalzeorhynchus bicolor

Red Zebra Metraclima estherae

Rummynosed Tetra Hemigrammus bleheri

Fin nippers

Yes

Can only be kept one per tank - rogue individuals can become territorial

Yes

Gets very large - will eat anything that fits in its mouth

No

Can be aggressive

Some* All barbs nip soft plants Yes with Java Ferns, Anubias and Amazons Yes

Original location is acid water

Yes

Serpae has stripe behind gillplate; minor has a dot behind gillplate, and is usually a deeper red

None

• None

Severum Heros severus

Siamese Algae Eater Crossocheilus siamensis

Silver Dollar Metynnis hypsauchen

Silver/Bala Shark Balanteocheilus melanopterus

Swordtail Xiphophorus helleri

Threadfin Rainbowflsh Iriatherina werneri

12

Yes

None

Rosy Barb Barbus conchonius

Serpae Tetra Hyphessobrycon serpae Hyphessobrycon minor

Most come from fish farms

None

Red-tailed Catfish Phractocephalus hemioliopterus

Yes

None

None

None

November 2003

No Yes

No Yes

Very good jumpers

Yes

Also jumpers

Yes

Peaceful, but should be kept by themselves or with very peaceful fish like small rasboras or corys

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


pH Preference Best kept by Community Q.K.with Comments Alkaline Acid plants? TTiemseives Tank Tiger Barb Barbus tetrazona

White Cloud Mountain Minnow Tanichthys albonubes Zebra Danio Brachydanio rerio

The GCAS Author

No

See comments on Rosy Barbs - nippier than Rosy Barbs - keep with small cichlids, or with fast moving fish like danios

Yes

Can be kept at cool temperatures, less than 60°F

Yes

Good first egglayer for beginners

(Program

his is a reminder of our Authors Award Program ("AAP"). In January, the total points credited to contributors to Modern Aquarium will be printed, along with the complete rules (which are also available in booklet form at the Information Table at the rear of our meeting room. The GCAS AAP awards points for certain contributions to Modern Aquarium. Persons acquiring a minimum number of points will receive certificates for reaching each designated "Accomplishment Level." The person earning the most AAP points in a calendar year is the "Author Of The Year" for that year. Each person making a qualifying original contribution to Modern Aquarium receives points and chances in an "Authors/Contributors Only" raffle to be held at or before the Annual Holiday Party. Modern Aquarium staff members (other than Editorial Assistants) are not eligible for the Prize Drawing. Below is a very brief outline of the AAP. The complete program is outlined in the booklet.

T

• 5 points for an original article of 500 words or less • 5 points for each fishkeeping related trick, hint, or tip (until December 31, 2003, only). • 10 points for an original article of 501 words and over. • 5 points (to a maximum of 10) for an original photo or illustration submitted with an original article. • 10 points for an original color photo used for a front cover (a related article is not required). • Two or more related photographs or illustrations, not part of an article, but submitted with captions and occupying one page or more will be counted as two illustrations (10 points) and as an article of over 500 words (10 more points) for a total of 20 points (For example, a photo spread with captions). • 5 points for an original puzzle suitable for use on the "Fin Fun" page ofModern Aquarium. • Points are awarded in the year the article is printed. However, fishkeeping tips are awarded points in the year received. If the same tip is submitted more than once, only the first tip counts. Acceptance of an article, and/or awarding of points is no guarantee any article will be published. • If, in the year following its publication in Modern Aquarium, an article is given any award (1st, 2nd or 3rd, but excluding Honorable Mention) by the North East Council of Aquarium Societies (the "NEC") or by the Federation of American Aquarium Societies ("FAAS"), an additional 10 points will be awarded. • For every 5 AAP points earned in a calendar year, the recipient is given one chance in an "Authors/Contributors Only" Raffle at the Holiday Party. Staff Members ofModern Aquarium (other than Editorial Assistants) are not eligible for this drawing. There is no limit to the number of raffle chances any one person may accumulate.

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

November 2003

13


Ncn-Stcp Fun at the NJAS by SUSAN PRIEST photos by AL PRIEST t was a beautiful weekend (or was it; I think maybe it rained). Anyway, the weather was the last thing on the minds of everyone who gathered on September 26th-28th, 2003 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the North Jersey Aquarium Society. We were all there to have fun. This was the first time Al and I had ever attended an event held by the NJAS. The only practical route for us from the Bronx is by the G.W. Bridge, which can be a wild ride that we try to avoid. So, why did we finally "bite the bullet?" First, because a Golden Anniversary calls for some serious celebrating, and second, because the NJAS has been a major supporter of our shows in the past, and this seemed like a perfect opportunity to return the favor. So, Friday night — the traffic was what it was; let's just leave it at that! When we arrived, things were already well under way. By the time we registered for the hotel, the show, and got our entries squared away, we had missed a speaker or two. We had to choose between supper and Pam Chin's talk, so naturally she had to speak loud enough to drown out our grumbling stomachs. Two things stand out in my mind as highlights of the weekend. The first was finally putting faces to the names I have heard and read about for so long. The second was the opportunity to scribe for Ginny Eckstein, as she was doing her judging. She was generous in sharing her wide-ranging knowledge, and often asked me not only what I thought, but why. However dubious my contributions were, I felt like a member of the judging team.

I

Sue Priest 14

Joe DiBartolomeo

Most of what I knew about NJAS I had learned from reading their newsletter, the NJAS Reporter. I had often thought to myself that they seemed to be a bit "rowdy." Well, by Saturday evening, I had revised my opinion. I now think of them as a passionate and hard-working team. Joe DiBartolomeo, President of the NJAS, was the consummate host, but there was one person who stood out above all the rest as the heart and soul of this celebration. Helen DiBartolomeo gave her personal attention to every detail. She was everywhere at once! If ever an aquarium society event had a "homecoming queen," this one did, and she was it! Another unsung hero is the calligrapher. None other than Chuck Davis hand-inscribed names on what had to have been close to one hundred certificates in very short order. Also, Honorable Mention goes to Ted Coletti who assembled the historical display of NJAS's first 50 years. Oh, yeah; there were also some fish there! The Best of Show fish was a Betta enisae owned by Larry Jinks. Al was especially gratified to see a "species Betta" (that is, a Betta other than a Betta splendens), take top honors. All in all, there was never a dull moment! The speaker lineup was stellar; the vendors were top-notch, with something for everyone, and there were endless opportunities to shmooze about fish, or gossip about fish people (especially the ones that weren't there!). You had to be in a coma not to have had a good time!

Pam Marsh

November 2003

Wayne Leibel

Joe Ferdenzi

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


The female will position herself head down alongside the vertical rock and only a couple of inches off the substrate. The male will be above her and off to her side away from the rock side. The female then drops an egg, which she picks up with her mouth prior to its reaching the gravel. Meantime, the male is releasing his sperm and finning it toward the female and the vertical rock in the attempt to fertilize the eggs and to have his milt bounce off the rock side to the waiting female's eggs. In this way, the eggs are fertilized prior to the female taking them into her mouth. The females have a transparent jaw so you can see and count the eggs she is holding and revolving in her buccal cavity. The clutch size varies depending on the size, maturity and tank environment of the fish, but they generally can have between 6 and 25 eggs. It would be best to remove the female and place her in a small holding tank, with vegetation and rocks for comfort, in which she will release the fry. If the female feels threatened, she will not release the fry; and I have had cases where the fry were released dead because they were starved. I have had to strip the females between the 14th and 18th day for safety of the mother and her babies. It is important to remember when stripping these females that their jaws are weak. Extreme care must be taken for the safety of the mother and her well-being. If you intend on stripping the mother of her fry, keep the female in a holding area and feed her high protein food to regain her strength. Keep the fry in a separate tank with a tight cover, because they are jumpers. If you choose to keep the mother with the fry together in a separate tank, keep the tank dark with a lot of floating plants, or a piece of floating

wood. The dark tank, plants, and wood provide security, and establish a safe place to release and raise the fry. Feed the same food to mom and the fry; to build their strength and a good growth rate. The fry are often released when they are approximately one inch in length. They are able to take care of themselves and can take micro pellet food, artemia, live baby brine shrimp, cyclops and crushed flakes (a combination of quality growth food and spirulina flakes). When the fry reach two inches, you can move them back into the main tank. These fish are a beautiful addition to an aquarium with peaceful fish. You are guaranteed to enjoy these "Blue Neons" in your home aquarium. Watch them interact and you can never be bored. I would recommend at least a 30-gallon tank, with dark blue fluorescent lighting, a dark background and dark gravel. Add some plants (live or plastic), some wood and caves. Keep the temperature between 75째- 82째 degrees Fahrenheit, with a pH of 7.6 - 8.4. Use high-grade charcoal and a generous portion of ammonia chips in the filter. I prefer an outside overflow-type filter because it creates a slight current for the fish, which they enjoy. Try some "Blue Neons," you'll be glad you did! References: Enjoying Cichlids, by Ad Konings. Cichlid Press, 1993, pgs. 87- 89. Tanganyika Cichlids In Their Natural Habitat, by Ad Konings. Cichlid Press, 1998, pgs. 142-143.

The Greater City Aquarium Society is happy to welcome tonight:

Douglas Patac speaking on:

Focus On Our Youth in the Classroom

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

November 2003

::<v;

17


Photos From Our Last Meeting

18

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

November 2003

19


The 2003 Norwalk Show by JOSEPH FERDENZI ell, another Norwalk Aquarium Society show has come and gone. This one was their 37th in a row (!), and was held on the weekend of October 4-5, at the Earthplace in Westport, CT. (It was formerly known as the Westport Nature Center.) It is always a lovely setting for the show, and this weekend it was especially so, given the sunny, but typically crisp, New England weather that dominated the weekend. There were 213 entries, which is a very good showing in this day and age. I was pleased to see participants from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this made for a competitive, but friendly, atmosphere. There were many beautiful fish in the show, and this alone makes going to a show worthwhile. This year's Best of Show award went to a male Betta splendens. It was a fancy split-tail blue variety owned by one of Norwalk's Junior members. The winner was Stephen Gustafson., who is 16 years old, and it was delightful to see the smile on his face. I'm sure it's an experience he will long remember fondly. Reserve of Show went to a Coral Red Pencilfish (Nannostomus mortenthaleri) owned by showman extraordinaire Larry Jinks of the North Jersey Aquarium Society. (Larry took Best of Show at the previous weekend's North Jersey Aquarium Society 50th Anniversary Show with a Betta enisae.) GCAS was well represented at this show, and its members took a fair number of prizes. Mark Soberman swept the Corydoras Catfish Class, with his Corydoras sterbai taking first place, and being awarded the International Catfish Championship (Norwalk has four catfish classes). Mark also took first place in the Mixed Pairs Class

W

with his Odessa Barbs (Barbus odessd). He also garnered Second Place in both the Other Catfish Class and the Killifish Class. All in all, Mark took home seven prizes! The author entered four fish, and each took a prize. A Melanotania boesmani took First Place in the Rainbowfish Class, a Xiphophorus montezumae took Second Place in the Platies and Swordtails Class, aSynodontis clariastook Second Place in the Synodontis Catfish Class, and an Aphyosemion striatum placed Third in the Killifish Class. GCAS member Anton Vukich (who is also on the Board of the Norwalk Aquarium Society) entered some spectacular fish. He took First Place in the Dwarf Old World Cichlids Class with a magnificent Apistogramma borelli. (Anton brought fry of this fish for auction at the GCAS October meeting.) I'm sure this fish was in the running for the Best and Reserve of Show awards. Anton also took First Place in the Killifish Class, which means that GCAS members swept the prizes in that class. As usual, there were many friendly hobbyists in attendance. It is always a pleasure to see them, and swap "fish" stories. And, as usual, Sunday's feature was a huge auction of fish donated by hobbyists, and products donated by various manufacturers. The Norwalk Show is an event that I look forward to every year, and one in which I have been participating since 1987. I always have a great time there, and I congratulate the Norwalk Aquarium Society on another successful show.

Vr

T'fianksgiving 20

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


WET LEAVES A Series On Books For The Hobbyist by SUSAN PRIEST he first thing I noticed about this lovely book was that the author has a sincere fondness for these fish; so much so that she has invested a lot of time as well as T.L.C. in telling us why. Such terms as endearing, attractive, charming, delightful, fascinating (to name but a few), clue us in to the fact that we are about to read a love story of sorts. The illustrations consist of an eclectic variety of drawings, photographs, diagrams, charts and maps. With each turn of the page, the reader is offered a new visual perspective. (You will not be able to guess the location of this fish's taste buds.) There is plenty of practical advice which can be instantly applied to your fishkeeping practices. Here are a few examples: •Acclimatize these fish to new environs very slowly. (Using a bucket, and spending as long as 24 hours, would not be effort misspent.) •These fish require very high oxygen levels, and will become stressed without it. The more the water is moving, the happier these fish will be. A Bristlenose near the waterline is in need of an immediate evaluation of the status of your filtration. •Their long intestinal tract is designed to extract maximum nutrition from their vegetarian diet. This author recommends cucumber, lettuce, spinach, boiled potato, and shelled peas. [OCAS' own catfish expert, Charley Sabatino, recommended broccoli stems to Al and I, and we have found this to be a well-accepted and very clean food for our Ancistrus.] •They prefer water temperatures on the warm side (78° F, and up to as high as 90° F), and a pH range of 5.5-7.8. •Bristlenoses get on well in virtually any community aquarium. The only exception would be a tank offish such as anabantoids, which require still water. [Modern Aquarium author, and selfconfessed auction-o-holic, Jerry O'Farrell, keeps some Ancistrus in one of his alkaline African cichlid tanks to keep it free of algae.]

T

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Chapter 6 (entitled "Species of Bristlenose"), as well as the appendix (entitled "Collection Locations of Ancistrus Species"), serve as a primer on how to distinguish Ancistrus from other loricarids (that is, suckermouth catfishes). This is not as cut and dry as it sounds. In recent years the aquarium hobby has been flooded with countless new species, most of which have not been properly scientifically described, and it is often difficult to deduce exactly what you are buying. Ms. Jinkings wants you to be specifically warned that the genus Xenocara is not a newly discovered variety; just the opposite — it is an obsolete term which many present-day hobbyists are not familiar with. A careful reading of this information will go a long way toward helping you make a purchase appropriate for your circumstances. O.K., O.K., I know that some of you are starting to fidget because you want to know about the breeding behavior of these fish. Ms. Jinkings didn't disappoint you in this area, and neither will I. These fish are crevice-spawners. The male chooses an appropriate space, usually a hollow opening in a piece of driftwood or bogwood. An egg-laden female will approach to assess the male and his lair. After some "skittishness" and posturing, which may last mere moments, or a few days, the female will enter the crevice, and lay her eggs. They are bright yellow or orange, and "form a clump like a giant orange raspberry." The male backs into the crevice as he fertilizes the eggs, with his bristled head perfectly positioned to deter predators. At this point the female leaves, and the male will guard the opening of the crevice until the last fry has left home. The author gives us some wonderful photos of this sequence, as well as many more details which you will want to read. This book was published in England, and I have never come across it in local outlets. I got my copy from Finley Aquatic Books (the address is: 150 North Road, Pascoag, RI 02859-2054 U.S.A.). I will let Ms. Jinkings close out this review with a few words of her own: "This is not the complete book of the bristlenose; such a book can never be written as there will always be something new to discover. New information is not solely the province of scientists. The contribution of hobbyists to our knowledge is immense and everyone can contribute to the ever increasing pool by learning from the best teachers-your fish."

November 2003

21


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November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


His, Hers, Ours, and Theirs A series by "The Undergravel Reporter" In spite of popular demand to the contrary, this humor and information column continues, As usual, it does NOT necessarily represent the opinions of the Editor, or of the Greater City Aquarium Society t struck me recently that my household has quite a few items which can be labeled "his," "hers," "ours," or "theirs." Most people have their own toothbrush. Well, I have a collection of toothbrushes I use only for fish jobs. No, I don't ask my angelfish to "open wide" while I minister to their oral hygiene (although I have no doubt they have "fishy breath!"). But, I have found a toothbrush to be an excellent tool to scrub algae from the corners of a tank, or off of small rocks or other decorations. So, the red toothbrush is "hers," the blue one is "his," and the yellow ones (purchased in a pack at the local dollar store and stiff enough to buff stainless steel!) are "theirs." I have a collection of kitchen utensils and gadgets dedicated solely to fish care and maintenance. These items include a teaspoon and tablespoon (for measuring medications and water additives, and for mixing media for live foods). Other such items include measuring cups, a turkey baster (used for "spot cleaning" of smaller tanks and for fry removal), eyedroppers (for dispensing medications, and feeding "green water" to fry), chopsticks (for moving and positioning plants and ornaments), tweezers (for removing parasites from live food), and single-edged razor blades (for chopping live food and scraping eggs from glass, among other things). The spoons and other smaller items are kept in a "fish cup" (one of several plastic cups used only for fish related jobs). The measuring cups (used for a variety of fish jobs, such as measuring salt for brine shrimp hatching and raising), and the turkey baster, are on a "fish shelf (containing only fish care items). In this case, if those items are in a "fish cup" or on a "fish shelf," then they are "theirs" (meaning, the fishes'); otherwise, they are "ours."

I

Modem Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

At times, I have to chop worms. My spouse seems to be a bit uncertain of my claim that the worms are "clean," and everything related to their preparation would come out in the wash. So, in addition to separating the cutting implements (the previously mentioned single-edged razor blades), I have a separate plastic cutting board. This board is used only for fish food preparation (and is another item from the local dollar store). The cutting board hangs on one of several "fish hooks," which are a series of hooks I have mounted, onto which I hang fish related items (including an assortment offish nets, brine shrimp nets, and even several small flashlights and magnifying glasses, for fish inspections). Simply, if it's on a "fish hook," then it's "theirs"; otherwise, it's "his," "hers," or "ours." In addition to an aversion to sharing utensils and cutting boards with tropical fish, my spouse also has (and this is somewhat harder for me to understand) an aversion to using towels I previously used for "fish jobs" (e.g., wiping up spills, drying ornaments, cleaning glass, etc.). So, we have "fish towels" stored in one of several "fish drawers." While I can usually identify which towel belongs in a "fish drawer," there are times when my spouse needs to be called in for a "his, hers, ours, or theirs" consultation. (So far, we have resisted the temptation to sew "theirs" labels onto the "fish towels," but that may come in time.) I use a variety of sponges and scrubbers while performing my fish maintenance chores. Obviously, I don't want to have one of them accidentally used with soap or cleanser for household cleaning. For sponges, I cut one edge to a point (so that the rectangular sponge now resembles the outline of a pointed roofed house). These "fish sponges" are kept in a "fish bin" under the "fish sink" in my "fish room." Because fertilizers or soil minerals can be absorbed into the walls of terra cotta flowerpots, I keep a supply of flowerpots which were never used for plants. Since my spouse is also a garden and plant lover, we sometimes have to negotiate which flowerpots are for "them," and which are not. "Their" flowerpots are put into a "fish cabinet," along with driftwood, gravel, dolomite, crushed coral, smooth river stones, slate, and assorted other items used for and on substrates (although I am sometimes forced, for the sake of family harmony, to cede some gravel or decorative rocks for my spouse's flowerpots or garden). When I reflect on the "fish cup," "fish shelf," "fish hooks," "fish drawer," "fish sink," and "fish cabinet" in the "fish room," I wonder if it's not becoming a case of "us vs. them," and if it is, then I think "they" are winning!"

November 2003

23


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November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


G.C.A.S. HAPPENINGS Bowl Show Winners last meeting: 1st: Rich Levy (Platy) 2nd: Carlotti De Jager (male Yellow Betta);

3rd: Evelyn Eagan (male Crowntail Betta)

Inofficial- 2003-2004 Bowl Show totals to date: Carlotti De Jager: 8pts. Rich Levy: 6pts. Evelyn Eagan: 4pts. Welcome back, and thanks, to the nine members who renewed their GCAS memberships and Welcome our newest members: Gino Cusano and Priscilla Rosa Last Month's Door Prize Winner: Rich Levy won the book Rainbowfishes,..in Captivity Here are meeting times and locations of some aquarium societies in the Metropolitan New York area: GREATER CITY AQUARIUM SOCIETY Next meeting: December 3, 2003 Jeff George hosts the game: "Fish Wits" 8pm: Queens Botanical Garden 43-50 Main St., Flushing, NY

Brooklyn Aquarium Society Next Meeting: November 14,2003 Speaker: David E. Boruchowitz (Editor in Chief of Tropical Fish Hobbyist magazine) Topic: "Aquarium History 101" 7;30pm Education Hall at the NY Aquarium Surf Avenue at West 8th St., Brooklyn, NY

Contact: Mr. Joseph Ferdenzi Telephone: (718) 767-2691 e-mail: GreaterCity@compuserve.com http://www.greatercity.org

Call: HAS Events Hotline (718) 837-4455 http://www.brooklynaquariumsociety.or2

East Coast Guppy Association

Big Apple Guppy Club

Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 1st Thursday of each month at the Queens Botanical Garden Contacts: Jeff George7 Gene Baudier Telephone: (718)428-7190 / (516)345-6399

Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at the Queens Botanical Garden Contact: Mr. Donald Curtin Telephone: (718)631-0538

Long Island Aquarium Society

Nassau County Aquarium Society

Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Friday of each month (except July and August) at: The Holtsville Park and Zoo 249 Buckley Road ~ Holtsville, NY

Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 2nd Tuesday of each month at the American Legion Post 1066 66 Veterans Blvd., Massapequa, NY Next meeting: November 11,2003 Speaker: Horst Gerber Topic: Aquascaping Contact: Mike Foran (516)798-6766 http://ncas.fwsl .com/index.html

Contact: Vinny Kreyling (516)938-4066 http://liasonline.org/ North Jersey Aquarium Society

Norwalk Aquarium Society

Meets: 8:00 PM - 3rd Thursday of the month at the Meadowlands Environmental Center 1 Dekorte Park Plaza - Lyndhurst, NJ

Meets: 8:00 P.M. - 3rd Thursday of each month at: Earthplace - the Nature Discovery Center Westport, CT

Next Meeting: November 20, 2003 Speaker: Randall Kohn Topic: "A Study in Cichlid Diversity" Contact: NJAS Hotline at (732) 332-1392 http://www.njas.net/ ore-mail: tcoletti@obius.jnj.com

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

Contact: Mrs. Anne Stone Broadmeyer Telephone: (203) 834-2253 http://norwalkas.org/html/

November 2003

25


Fin Fun Scrambled and Unlisted In this issue of Modern Aquarium, we have a very comprehensive listing of "common" freshwater aquarium fish. Of course, it is nearly impossible to name all the fish that commonly appear in local stores. Below are the scrambled letters for several fish that did not make the list in this issue. To help you unscramble them (and because we know that last month's puzzle was unusually difficult), we are also giving you the (unscrambled) scientific name for each of the fish. Scrambled common Name

Unscramble it Here

Scientific Name

LATETRAINCARD

Paracheirodon axelrodi

TOILBINBARF

Barbus schwanefeldi

TRAPMEORTEER

Nematobrycon palmeri

WISHDUEFATNIPSCOD

Synodontis nigriventris

YOURFEES

Anableps anableps

HADATIGHTATEDILLTREAN

Hemigrammus ocellifer

MUSKDIPPER

Periophthalmus barb arm

FINEPINGUSH

Thayeria obliqua

CHRYBBREAR

Barbus titteya

UKILLHICOAH

Pangio kuhlii

Solution to last month's puzzle J(lLLIflfll fWITGKROO

Former scientific name

Current Scientific Name

Panchax rubrostigma

Aplocheilus lineatus

Haplochilus calliurus

Aphyosemion australe

Fundulopanchax multicolor

Aphyosemion bitaeniatum

Aphyosemion caeruleum

Fundulopanchax sjoestedti

Fundulus sjoestedti

Callopanchax occidentalis

Aplocheilus boulengeri

Epiplatys multifasciatus

Panchax carnapi

Aphyosemion exiguum

Haplochilus schoelleri

Aplocheilichthys loati

26

November 2003

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Profile for Dan Radebaugh

Modern Aquarium  

November 2003 volume X number 9

Modern Aquarium  

November 2003 volume X number 9

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