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Infinite Sex

are a group of Kuhli Loaches (Pangio kuhlii). They slither their bodies from side to side, much more like a snake than a fish. Their fins are very small. The caudal fin is straight-edged. They do move quite quickly, so the pectoral fins are probably contributing to their locomotion.

Some fishes use one or more of their fins as a "sexual aid." Here are some examples: o

The anal fin of male livebearing fishes has been adapted for the purpose of depositing sperm inside of a female. This "fin" is known as a gonopodium.

o

Some fishes use their fins as a means of "wooing" a mate. Again, this is most likely to be a male. A classic example of this is the "flaring" behavior of the male Betta splendens, as well as other species of bettas and labyrinth fishes.

o

Some fishes put their fins into service as "purses" to transport eggs to a suitable location. One example is the Corydoras group, which carry eggs in between their pelvic fins.

o

Some fishes use their fins to stay near each other during spawning. For example, the anal fins of male Characins have tiny hooks to help hold the two fish together.

o

The males of many species are marked by exceptionally large and/or colorful finnage which serves to attract females. The more colorful they are, the more likely they will succeed in luring the females away from other males.

Summary - Let's Visit Some Fish Tanks Now I'll conduct a mini-tour of some of the fish in my own house to see if their behavior corresponds with what we have learned. o

o

o

Our first stop is the 10 gallon tank which is home to two trios of Betta albimarginata. These fish appear to "tread water" much of the time, probably as a result of slowly moving their pectoral fins. Their caudal fin is shaped like the end of the oar from a rowboat. Nearby is a 90 gallon community aquarium. Its upper level is occupied by several Giant Danios (Danio aequipinnatus). They are in constant motion; they are either swimming fast, or faster. Their caudal fin is forked, and is moved from side to side by the base of the tail, also known as the caudal peduncle.

o

The fins of the three Ctenopoma ansorgii are indescribable (only because I never get to see them!). Their owners rarely leave the drainpipe, log, and coconut shell, respectively. Turning the light on facilitates the growth of the plants, but not the viewing of these fish. Even when they are fed, they wait for the live brine shrimp to come to them. If you want to see what their fins look like, turn to page 620 of Volume I of the Baensch Atlas (or the cover of the March 1998 issue of Modern Aquarium).

o

For our last stop, lef s look in on a pair of Corydoras adolfoi. They swim up and down as well as back and forth. Their tails are forked, and again, the back-and-forth movement that pushes them forward seems to originate in the caudal peduncle area. They are stylishly adorned with a rather fashionable adipose fin. Hmmm. Maybe its purpose is nothing more complicated than to look good! Final Exam - Fin Fun

Now, go to Fin Fun (page 24) for your final exam. After you have completed it, turn to page 18 in this issue to receive your diploma. Congratulations on mastering "infinity!" References: Curtis, Brian (1949). The Life Story of the Fish: Dover Publications. Frey, Hans (1961). Illustrated Dictionary of Tropical Fishes: TFH Levin, Joseph S. (1991). The Complete Fishkeeper: William Morrow & Co.. Inc. Mills, Dick & Vevers, Dr. Gwynne (1989). Tropical Aquarium Fishes: Tetra Press Zupanc, Gunther K.H. (1988). Fish and Their Behavior: Tetra Press

In the lower reaches of the same tank, January 2000

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Xiphophorus Hybrids by LEONARD RAMROOP any of us in the tropical fish hobby dislike the idea of hybridizing fish. I, for one, have always been fascinated by it. The one hybrid that comes to mind is the parrot fish (which is a cross between a Red Devil X Severum). This hybrid has "spawned" great debate among fish enthusiasts because of its mixed parentage. Many of today's standard live bearing fish, such as mollies and swordtails, would not have come about without experimentation with hybridization. The biological definition of a hybrid is an offspring resulting from the mating of two distinct species. The resulting young can be fertile, infertile, or a combination of both. Many factors are involved in creating a hybrid, the primary one being how closely the two species are related genetically. There have been many stories about the creation of the many varied swordtail varieties, in the home aquarium, various research laboratories, and even fish farms. This is my story. I decided to separate some Xiphophorus helleri females along with some Xiphophorus variatus males in a five-gallon tank. This tank was basically set up to select the best of both species for future breeding. The female in question is a Gold-Wag Swordtail, with typical lateral lines on its side. The male is a Hi-Fin variatus platy, with a yellow body, a bright redorange tail, and with two or three vertical bars on either side. The females' mother is a Red-Wag Swordtail, therefore she carries genes for both gold and red color. As stated before, several virgin females were placed together with young variatus males. (To my knowledge, only the Gold Wag Swordtail was impregnated during this harem housing.) The first group of young were born in the Spring of '98, and were followed by additional births during the summer months. The young initially are like clones of the mother, appearing to be normal Gold-Wag Swordtail babies. In about a month, they started to change to a reddish color, with the vertical bars of the father on their sides, faint lateral lines, and a slightly black tail. (It appears that the red coloration that develops in the latter stages comes from the maternal grandmother and is dominant in this particular cross.) Since the Hi-Fin trait is heterozygous in the variatus, and in all probability the trait does not exist naturally in the

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

swordtail, the offspring should be 50% carriers and 50% non carriers of this trait. The Hi-Fin trait in its homozygous form is lethal, and the young do not develop. As of this writing, the young are perfect examples of hybrids, exhibiting the traits of both parents, while developing into a particularly unique fish. I thought that this would be the end of this story, but it's not. I have learned the hard way that you do not write a conclusion until you have all the facts. The entire Fl generation developed into "platy type" fish. This brood became sexually dimorphic at about eight months of age. The males began to take on some coloration of the variatus (some yellow) but remained mostly red. They developed a spike on the tail, but this appendage did not eventually develop into a typical long sword. The females also exhibited red coloration, but they did not attain the full deep color of the males. The Gold-Wag female had a third drop before she died. This group of young, for the most part, developed into regular swordtails. In this group, the males remained very small, and did not attain the size of a normal swordtail. The thing that I found of interest was that they were developing swords. How could this be? The female swordtail does not carry the gene responsible for males to develop swords, or so I thought, and there is no way the variatus male could possess this trait. I was quite perplexed. The Hi-Fin Swordtail and platies are all descended from fish bred by Mrs. Thelma Simpson, a California hobbyist who developed this strain in the early 1960s. A mutation occurred among a couple of her red swordtails causing their dorsal to become larger and longer. Through meticulous breeding, Mrs. Simpson established the strain of fish that bear her name today. She then proceeded to introduce them to the hobby. This trait was then introduced into the many platy and swordtail varieties of that day. Swordtails and platies are, for the most part, genetically identical, and are probably derived from one common ancestor. Female swordtails do possess a gene for the expression of a sword, however most are spike-like or very short. The spike on the male hybrid reflects the limited expression that the female sword carries. During the many crosses that were made in the early 1960s, platy and swordtail genes were combined in a myriad of combinations.

January 2000


Through this accidental cross, I obtained many examples of initial Fl types of past breeders. As of this writing (spring '99), my Fl "platy type" fish have mated and produced their own young. It will be interesting to see what ratios and combinations come out of this cross in future generations. It has been some 38 years after the introduction of the Hi-Fin trait into platies. I have a great appreciation for the work of both

Gregor Mendel and Mrs. Simpson, and a greater appreciation for all the dedicated hobbyists that toil for years, making many of our standard aquarium fishes of today possible.

References: "The Development of Fancy Livebearers in Hawaii," Mike N. Yamamoto and Glenn Y. Takeshita, Tropical Fish Hobbyist, January 1998

The Federation of American Aquarium Societies by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST ere are the Greater City winners of the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (FAAS) publication awards, for articles published in 1998. It is interesting to note that three of these award winning articles came from the same issue, our fifth anniversary issue of December 1998. Congratulations to everyone! The rules for the 1999 award contest have not, as of the time of this writing, been received. I hope to get a complete list of the winners for all of the participating societies next month, when it is published in the January /February issue of the FAAS Report. For reasons that may reflect the decreased participation of our members in submitting articles (our December 1998 issue being an exception that required months of advance preparation), Modern Aquarium did not win any award in the Best Publication category — a first since we began publishing this current series of our magazine six years ago. While this factor cannot be dismissed, and is something our membership has the power to change, I also suspect other factors were at work, which may the subject og a future article.

H

Best Do It Yourself Article Jeff George - 1st Place "How To Get The Most Out Of A Box Filter" Best Article on a Species of Fish Jeff George - 1st Place "Xenotoca eiseni" Joe Ferdenzi - 2nd Place (tie) "Black Butterflies in the Aquarium" Jeff George - 2nd Place (tie) " Heterandria form osd'

Best Article on Plant Maintenance/ Cultivation/Reproduction Warren Feuer - 1st Place "Maintenance And The Planted Tank" Vincent Sileo - 2nd Place "Mad Lace" Best Show Article Claudia Dickinson - 2nd Place "On The Road To The NEC"

Best Article on a Genus of Fish Mark Soberman - 2nd Place "Corydoras Catfish - South America"

Best General Article on Society Management Jeff George - 3rd Place "The Coffee Complaint"

Best Spawning Article 500-1,000 words Joe Ferdenzi - 2nd Place "Five Days in the Life of Corydoras adolfoi"

Best Cartoonist Bernard Harrigan - 1st Place

January 2000

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


by BERNARD HARRIGAN hen I think of fun fish, the first one to intestines. At times you can hear a smacking come to mind is the Weather Loach, noise as it surfaces to take in air. Misgurnus fossilis. Eel-like in Feeding this fish is a breeze — flakes, appearance, the front part of the body is freeze dried, pellets, as well as live food are cylindrical, while the back end is strongly readily taken. While mostly a bottom feeder, it's compressed to the tail. This fish has small fins been known to feed from the middle, and it will and mouth, with two long pair of barbels in the sometimes even feed right from the surface. If upper jaw and one short pair in the lower jar. Its you have a spot in your tank that detritus b o d y is accumulates, the yellowishWeather Loach brown, with will move that some pretty out for you in b r o w n his relentless horizontal pursuit of food. bands. It has an Food does not odd beauty all hide from this its own. guy. To the This hobbyist, it is an fish got the absolutely name "Weather undemanding, Loach" because peaceful fish — it's sensitive to com ical at the electricity in times, with its the air or to e e 1- 1i k e changes in atmospheric movement. As it pressures, which pushes its drawing by B. Harrigan cause it to barbels around Weather Loach (Misgurnus fossilis) become restless to an almost nervous state. At searching for food below the gravel, through Java times like that, if the fish have been properly moss, and plants, and sometimes down an conditioned, you'll be treated to an interesting undergravel filter tube, it seems almost dog-like mating game. The fish will flit around the tank in its search for food. This is no automatronic side by side, or chasing each other, They will lay fish that just swims in circles. It checks eggs singly or in small clumps, on plants on or everything in the tank out. near the bottom. The Weather Loach is native to Central The Weather Loach is truly a treasure to and Eastern Europe, coming from slow moving to be kept in almost any tank. It is as much fun to stagnant shallow waters. At dry times in nature, watch as it is to keep. I wouldn't hesitate to it digs itself into the mud and may remain there recommending it to beginner or advanced for long periods. When the rains come, the hobbyist alike. Weather Loach is reactivated, springing to life Until next time, remember to have fun and ready for a fresh start. It is very hardy, and fish keeping! A it can get oxygen right from the air through its

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

January 2000


GCAS past ROLL OF HONOR Gene Baiocco Joe Bugeia Mary Ann Bugeia Dan Carson

Charles Elzer Joe Ferdenzi Ben Haus Emma Haus

Winners Herb Fogal Paul Hahnel Jack Oliva Herman Rabenau

BREEDER OF THE YEAR (Since 1981) 1981-82; 1982-83 . . . . Ginny & Charlie Eckstein 1983-84; 1984-85 . . . . Rich Sorensen 1985-86 Yezid Guttierez 1986-87 Joe Ferdenzi 1987-88 Patricia Piccione 1988-89 Joe Ferdenzi 1989-90 Francis Lee 1990-91 Eddie Szablewicz

Marcia Repanes Nick Repanes Don Sanford Mark Soberman

1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98

Dominic Isla Steve Sagona Joe Ferdenzi Steve Sagona Tom Miglio Mark Soberman Jeff George

ALL - TIME BREEDER AWARD STANDINGS (As of June 1998) Joe Ferdenzi - 790 John lannone - 485 Francis Lee - 390 Steve Sagona - 655 Ginny & Charlie Gerald Gorycki - 370 John Stora - 540 Eckstein - 455 Marcia & Nick Repanes - 355 Jose Aranda - 505 Richard Sorensen - 420 Jack Oliva - 345 AOUARIST OF THE YEAR (Since 1990-91) 1990-91 . . . . Diane & Harold Gottlieb 1991-92 . . . . Doug Curtin & Don Curtin 1992-93 . . . . Mark Soberman 1993-94 . . . . Warren Feuer

1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 . . . . .

BOWL SHOW CHAMPIONS (Since 1983-84) 1983-84 . . . . Tom Lawless 1984-85 . . . . Tom Lawless 1985-86 . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1986-87 . . . . Joe Ferdenzi 1987-88 . . . . (tie) Mark Soberman and Mary Ann & Joe Bugeia 1988-89 . . . . Jason Ryan ~ 1989-90 . . . . Eddie Szablewicz

Warren Feuer

Harold Ketterer The Lombardis Don Sanford Mark Soberman

- 335 - 325 - 310 - 305

Steve Sagona Alexander & Susan Priest Joe Ferdenzi Claudia Dickinson

1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98

Eddie Szablewicz Steve Sagona Steve Sagona Steve Sagona Carlotti DeJager Mary Eve Brill Steve Sagona Steve Sagona

VICTOR BECKER MEMORIAL A WARD For most outstanding species bred (1 st awarded 1994-95) 1994-95 Thomas Bohme (Serrasalmus nattereri) 1995-96 John Moran (Synodontis multipunctatus) 1996-97 Carlotti DeJager (Betta simplex) & Mark Soberman (Corydoras duplicareus) 1997-98 Greg Wuest (Nothobranchius foerschi) & Joe Ferdenzi (Corydoras adolfoi) PINO BARBARISI HORTICULTURAL 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 . . . . . . . . . GCAS PRESIDENTS (Post 1945 1946-49 Elliott Whiteway (4) 1950-51 Robert Greene (2) 1952-53 Robert Maybeck (2) 1954-55 Leonard Meyer (2) 1956-57 Sam Estro (2) 1958 Leonard Meyer (1) 1959-64 Gene Baiocco (6) 1965 Andrew Fazio (1)

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AWARD Don Curtin & Doug Curtin Steve Gruebel Vincent & Rosie Sileo Joe Ferdenzi

— number in parenthesis = consecutive terms) 1978-79 Louis Kromm (1) 1966-68 Charles Elzer (2) 1979-81 Don Sanford (2) 1968-70 Walter Hubel (2) 1981-84 Brian Kelly (3) 1970-72 Dave Williams (2) 1984-86 Jack Oliva (2) 1972-73 Dan Carson (1) 1986-97 Joe Ferdenzi (11) 1973-75 Herb Fogal (2) 1997-99 Vincent Sileo (2) 1975-76 Richard Hoey (1) 1999-00 Jeff George 1976-77 Ted Tura (1) 1977-78 Gene Baiocco (1) January 2000

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


Greater City Aquarium Society 1998 — 1999 Awarded January 5, 2000

GENE BAIOCCO AQUARIST OF THE YEAR AWARD VINCENT & ROSIE SILEO

DON SANFORD BREEDER OF THE YEAR AWARD TOM MIGLIO

WALTER HUBEL BOWL SHOW CHAMPION TOM MIGLIO

VICTOR BECKER MEMORIAL AWARD TOM MIGLIO [breeding Rasbora heteramorpha]

BREEDERS AWARDS SENIOR GRANDMASTER BREEDER (800 points) . . . JOSEPH FERDENZI MASTER BREEDER (300 points)

TOM MIGLIO

ADVANCED BREEDER (100 points)

JEFF GEORGE WARREN FEUER

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

January 2000


by fin fin, investigative fry reporter et water is the code name for the investigation that threatens the very existence of the Greater City Aquarium Society. It will expose the truth behind THE BOARD and THE ORGANIZED HOBBY. This reporter has obtained scintillating details of this yet to be released report from a very reliable source, who will remain anonymous for their own safety. I will refer to them only by their code name DEEP GILLS. Who is THE BOARD? Where did they come from? What is their purpose? And, most importantly, what is their agenda for YOU, the members of the Greater City Aquarium Society? These questions, and more, will be answered in this report. To understand the true implications of this report, we must identify the actual officers and members of THE BOARD, uncover their backgrounds, and see what makes them tick. We will start at the top, with the President, Mr. Jeff George. He's the boy wonder who mysteriously appeared out of the deteriorating bowels of La Guardia Airport to participate in our 75th Anniversary Fish Show. We were all amazed at his willingness to participate and stunned by his terrific ideas and quick solutions to just about any problems faced during the Show. Who was this stranger that was happy and willing to help in any way that he could? What was his motivation? Did he have his eyes on the Presidency even then? How did this outsider rise to the Presidency in only three short years? Don't be fooled by his boyish good looks, Mr. George is no newcomer to THE ORGANIZED HOBBY. This reporter has heard first hand accounts of Mr. George's activities within many organizations including THE AMERICAN CICHLID ASSOCIATION, THE AMERICAN LIVEBEARER ASSOCIATION and the infamous EAST COAST GUPPY CLUB. Mr. George's fish activities within THE ORGANIZED HOBBY have been rumored from coast to coast, and all over this great land of ours. This wealth of experience and knowledge impressed the powers that be and he was invited to join THE BOARD shortly after his one year probationary period. Mr. George spared no time coming to the aid of THE BOARD which was filled with veterans eager to lighten their burden. Once on THE BOARD, Mr. George displayed many of the behaviors we had first witnessed at

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

the 75th Anniversary Show. His enthusiasm, know how, and willingness to take on new projects inspired many of the board members and brought new life to an ailing organization. It wasn't long before Mr. George was involved in all aspects of THE BOARD, but none of us were prepared for what happened next: FISH WITS. Yes, FISH WITS, is an addictive game which could be used to replace any speaker at a moments notice. We were all wrapped up in it, eager to have our aquarium knowledge tested. But only a chosen few could officially participate, while the rest of us had to bite our tongues when we wanted to shout out the correct answer. It seemed to take on a life of its own, appearing at fish auctions and holiday parties. The envy of aquarium societies everywhere, it was soon being played all over the tristate area! I'm sure that Mr. George's intentions were honorable, but what's next, FISH WITS on the public access stations?! Only time will tell. Then tragedies befell the families of the President, Vice President, and Treasurer all within a single year. THE BOARD struggled on; but it was clear that new leadership was needed if they were to continue with the level of competency which the Greater City Aquarium Society had come to expect. Battle weary and spent, the veterans were in no shape to take up the call. And even Mr. George did not appear eager to take on the heady responsibilities of leadership, having his hands full with FISH WITS and a rumored fledgling business, which was actually supposed to pay the rent. It appeared that the Greater City Aquarium Society was about to lose much of its greatness. But having witnessed the demise of other great institutions due to similar circumstances, Mr. George could not allow this to happen to a Society he had come to know and love. So he took up that challenge, ensuring the stability of the Greater City Aquarium Society. We all owe Mr. George a debt of gratitude for putting aside his personal desires and jeopardizing his financial future for the good of our society. Who is this man who goes by two first names and what are his future aspirations? Some questions remain yet to be answered. Watch for this column in the next issue of modern AQUARIUM when we will uncover what's really going on between the Vice-President and Treasurer!

January 2000

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rmoram A Status Report For 1999 With the announcement of the 1998 FAAS Awards, we can now include those "bonus points" in our Author Award Program point totals. Bonus points are given for winning an NEC or FAAS publications award, and are given to the author in the year the award is received, not in the year the article was written. So, even though the award winning articles were published last year, the bonus points are awarded this year, which is the year the awards were announced. The Raffle will be drawn in January. Art Work

Author

Picture/ Drawing/ Puzzle

Articles 500 words or less

Points Awarded

over 500 words

Bonus1 Points

Prize

Total to date (1/99 - 12/99)

Raffle2 Chances

Donald Curtin

1

10

2

Douglas Curtin

2

20

4

1

15

3

Chuck Davis

1

Claudia Dickinson Joseph Ferdenzi

I1

120

24

11

21

205

N/A2

4

I1

55

N/A2

5

51

110

14

1

5

1

30

N/A2

10 1

Warren Feuer Jeff George3

7

8

2

Bernard Harrigan Jason Kerner

5

1

Alexander Priest3

1

4

8

110

N/A2

Susan Priest

1

7

75

N/A2

Leonard Ramroop

1

10

2

30

2

20

2

2

25

4

10

100

20

Vincent Sileo3

3

Mark Soberman

1

Greg Wuest Undergravel Reporter

1

I1

'For NEC and FAAS awards presented for articles (not including awards for columns) this year. Each "Bonus Point" represents one award, which translates into an 10 AAP points each. See page 6 of this issue for the FAAS awards. 2Editorial Board members are ineligible for the Raffle 3Editorials and President's Messages excluded The following contributors have qualified as "Author" (25 to 45 points): Jason Kerner; Vincent Sileo; Greg Wuest The following contributors have qualified as "Correspondent" (50 to 95 points): Warren Feuer; Susan Priest The following contributors have qualified as "Writer" (100 to 145 points points): Claudia Dickinson; Jeff George; Alexander Priest The following contributor has qualified as "Journalist" (200 to 295 points) Joseph Ferdenzi 12

January 2000

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


econd Reprints deserving a second look Selected by ALEXANDER A. PRIEST s an introduction to this new column, I selected an article from the publication of our nearest sister society, the Brooklyn Aquarium Society's Aquatica. An interesting thing about this article is that both the author, Tom Miglio (who is also a GCAS member), and my wife and I, "discovered" Joe Ferdenzi and the Greater City Aquarium Society at the same time — that is, when Joe made a presentation titled "Fish Sex" as a speaker at a meeting of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society.

A

My Idol Tom Miglio, BAS I first become a member of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society in May of 1991. In the middle of August of that year I went to the Tropical Fish Supermarket pet shop to buy some supplies. There I saw a poster announcing the September meeting of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society. The featured speaker that month was Joe Ferdenzi.. The topic was "Fish Sex." I asked Charlie, the owner of Tropical Fish Supermarket, about Joe and he said Joe was the president of Greater City Aquarium Society and is a well known cichlid breeder. I couldn't wait for the meeting. The night of the meeting Seth Kolker, the president of Brooklyn Aquarium Society, introduced Joe to the members and Joe proceeded to give his lecture. I was very impressed with the way Joe gave his lecture. He used scientific names offish and then told you their common names. His presentation was so educational and enjoyable that a person like myself, just starting out with cichlids, was able to understand the entire lecture. He also had some outstanding slides to go along with the talk. When the lecture ended, I went over to Joe and introduced myself. I told him how much I enjoyed his presentation. I asked several questions and Joe gave me some interesting answers, he also gave me some great advice. He said "Keep your approach to breeding fish simple." (Something I have tried to do over the years.) Later that year I went with several members from the BAS to a Greater City Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

meeting. There Seth introduced me to Joe again, this time as a new board member of the BAS. I again asked Joe several questions and again he gave me some good suggestions. That night I became a member of Greater City Aquarium Society. Joe suggested that I enter some of my fish in the show that Greater City was having that year. I entered five fish in the show and took two awards. Since then I have entered many shows and taken many awards. To increase my knowledge of fish keeping and breeding, I make sure to look at the fish that Joe has entered in shows, studying their size, color and finnage. I asked him about his fish and how he got them that to look that good. I try to do my best by taking his advice on caring and breeding my fish. Through the years Joe has continued to make suggestions that have helped me breed my cichlids and many other species of fish. Joe is the best person I know for information on fish. He's helped me in so many ways that there is not enough room in this article to mention them all. He is also one of the nicest people I have ever met in the hobby. If you see a notice that Joe is going to speak, do your very best to attend, because when Joe speaks, everyone listens. Reprinted from the December 1999 issue of Aquatica, the publication of the Brooklyn A.S.

January 2000

13


1999 Modern Aquarium Article Index AQUARIST'S SKETCHPAD - Bernard Harrigan/Warren Feuer Neolamprologus multifasciatis Nymphoides aquatica (Banana Plant) Synodontis multipunctatus Poecilia reticulata (Guppy) Pterophylum scalare (Angelfish) Neolamprologus sp. Daffodil Nannacara anomala Betta splendens (Siamese Fighting Fish) Synodontis angelicus Apistogramma pertensis

1/99 2/99 3/99 4/99 5/99 6/99 9/99 10/99 11/99 12/99

ANTIQUARIUM - Advertisements From The Past - Jason Kerner Reliance fish food (June 1933) WestLo food and heater (December 1933) Metaframe Aquariums (January 1966) Glo-Stones (October 1969)

9/99 10/99 11/99 12/99

BOOK REVIEWS: "WET LEAVES" Column - Susan Priest Aquarium Plants Manual GCAS Author Award Program (how to write a book review) Lake Tanganyikan Cichlids The Complete Idiot's Guide to Freshwater Aquariums Discovering Fossil Fishes Guppies: Fancy Strains and How to Produce Them

2/99 4/99 5/99 6/99 9/99 12/99

BREEDING 15 Easy Points (Geophagus steindachneri) - Jeff George . . . Cichlid Care and Breeding (My Way!) - Mike Sheridan The Blue Gularis - Joseph Ferdenzi Neolamprologus meleagris — A Learning Experience - Warren Feuer Is There An "Annual" Tetra (Cynolebias magnificus) - Joseph Ferdenzi The Madagascar Rainbowfish (Bedotia madagascariensis) - Joseph Ferdenzi

1/99 3/99 4/99 4/99 5/99 6/99

CARTOONS: "THE AMUSING AQUARIUM" - Bernard Harrigan WWW.Algae.com Flossing Fish Steroid Use UPC Price Symbol Madagascar Fish Come-On Line Dueling Banjo Catfish

.

1/99 2/99 3/99 4/99 5/99 6/99

CICHLIDS 15 easy Points (Geophagus steindachneri) - Jeff George Cichlid Care and Breeding (My Way!) - Mike Sheridan Neolamprologus meleagris — A Learning Experience - Warren Feuer Melanochromisjohanni - Jeff George

1/99 3/99 4/99 11/99

EXCHANGE COLUMN: Surfing The Pubs - Alexander Priest North Jersey Aquarium Society — Grower's Award Program Granite Fisher - New Hampshire Aquarium Society International Aquaria Websites The Fish Fancier - Houston Aquarium Society

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January 2000

2/99 5/99 6/99 11/99

Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)


GCAS Society Issues 1998-1999 Breeders Award Season Totals - Greg Wuest 10/99 1999 Reader Survey: Part I - Alexander Priest 9/99 1999 Reader Survey: Part II - Alexander Priest 11/99 Author Award Program Report - Alexander Priest 3/99, 6/99 Carl Kaplan: Aquarist of Our Golden Era - Joseph Ferdenzi 1/99 Do You Bowl? (GCAS Bowl Show) - Vincent Sileo 9/99 Fish Frolic - Vincent Sileo 3/99 How To Make Fish Keeping Fun (introducing a new series) - Bernard Harrigan . . . 12/99 In Memoriam: Eugene Baiocco 4/99 In Memoriam: Bill Jacobs 6/99 Modest Goal Reached (BAP) 11/99 Silent Auction Rules 4/99 Special Thank Yous - Claudia Dickinson 12/99 To The GCAS Membership ~ A Special Thank You - Claudia Dickinson 6/99

GENERAL INTEREST AND MISCELLANEOUS A pH Raising Experience - Joseph Ferdenzi A Weekend To Remember (NJAS Extravaganza)- Joseph Ferdenzi pH Quick Chart - Jason Kerner pH Soup - Susan Priest Dragon Murder Case Revisited - Joseph Ferdenzi How to Move Really Big Fish - Warren Feuer & Mark Soberman North Jersey's Grande Extravaganza- Claudia Dickinson Power of Clean (on tank maintenance) - Jeff George State of the National Health - Vincent Sileo Solitary Starfish - Susan Priest Spawning Mops - Joseph Ferdenzi Water Quality - Jeff George and Gene Baudier What's Going On? A Mysterious Fish Disaster - Warren Feuer

3/99 12/99 3/99 3/99 5/99 12/99 12/99 6/99 10/99 6/99 11/99 3/99 3/99

KILLIFISH Is There An "Annual" Tetra (Cynolebias magnificus) - Joseph Ferdenzi 5/99 The Blue Gularis (Fundulopanchax sjoestedti) - Joseph Ferdenzi 4/99 The Fire Killie - Handle Carefully (Nothobranchius rachovii) - Joseph Ferdenzi . . . . 9/99

LIVEBEARERS New Experiences With An Old Friend (Guppies) - Warren Feuer Trinidad: Land of the Guppy - Leonard Ramroop

9/99 10/99

LOACHES Oddball One — The Banded Loach (Botia hymenophysd) - Chuck Davis

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OPINION AND/OR HUMOR "UNDERGRAVEL REPORTER" Column When Rare Means Well Done Warning: Read Your Label It's NOT What It Sounds Like! Double Your Pleasure Ice Fishing The Case of the Tetra Egg Life Lessons Turnabout is Fair Play With Fingers Crossed A Federal Case

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Other Opinion and/or Humor Why Is This So? - Warren Feuer

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Modern Aquarium - Greater City A.S. (NY)

January 2000

15


Profile for Dan Radebaugh

Modern Aquarium  

January 2000 volume VII number 1

Modern Aquarium  

January 2000 volume VII number 1

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