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F6F-3 1/48 SCALE PLASTIC KIT ProfiPACK

#8227

INTRO There are few aircraft types that took part in combat during World War Two, that can be described with such one sided outcomes in terms of kill : loss ratio as the Hellcat. Representing the middle of the Grumman Cat lineage, the Hellcat was a unique type right from its beginnings. Success of its older brother, the Wildcat, which carried on its shoulders the bulk of the strain of the Pacific air war in 1942, prompted the US Navy to give Grumman free reign over the independent development of a new fighter. This type was to act as insurance in the event the concept of the F4U Corsair turned out unsuccessful. Grumman designers set forth with the design, with emphasis on ease of manufacture, performance and suitability for carrier ops. On the 30th June, 1941, as Corsair production was initiating, the Navy signed an order for two prototype XF6F1s, and a star was born. Original expectations centered around development of the proven F4F Wildcat, which was to be dominated by installation of more powerful engine. As such, this eventually evolved into a new fighter altogether. The US Navy also had accumulated combat experience, and was able to incorporate pilot suggestions into the design. The Hellcat was some 60% heavier than the Wildcat, was more heavily armed, had a more powerful engine, was more heavily armored, carried more fuel and was generally of a more robust construction. The first prototype took to the air on June 26th, 1942, and by January 1943 equipped the first Navy unit, VF-9, on the deck of the USS Essex. The new type was called Hellcat. The name not only suggested the place to which her enemies would be sent, but was also a play on words. The term in the old west referred to barroom brawlers, and that was what the Navy wanted: a tough fighter with hard fists, that could absorb punishment and had stamina. The Hellcat line didn't result in the most elegant of fighters. It was, after all, over twice as heavy as its main adversary, the Japanese A6M Zero. But elegance certainly doesn't play a pivotal role in terms of the potential survival of the pilot. It was a fighter first and foremost in every sense of the word, designed around the requirements of the pilot to fulfill the combat mission for which it was designed and he was trained. The initial version, F6F-3, was supplanted by the dash five, which modified the canopy, cowl, bombracks and droptanks. The first combat engagement of the enemy occurred on September 1st, 1943, when an Emily was flamed by the half inch guns of two Hellcats. Their advantage over Japanese fighters was well demonstrated on February 16th, 1944, when, in the vicinity of Truk, over 100 fighters were claimed in the air and over 150 on the ground for the loss of four aircraft. Five days later, in the Marianas, a further 160 enemy aircraft were destroyed in the air and on the ground. Often one sided combat was documented in the battle for the Philippine Sea that culminated on June 19th, 1944 in the now legendary 'Great Marianas Turkey Shoot', where Hellcat pilots claimed some 350 enemy aircraft destroyed. A further turkey hunt took place between October 12th and 14th, 1944 over Formosa, seeing the destruction, at the hands of Hellcat pilots, of 300 enemy aircraft for the loss of 27. In October 1944, the Japanese began to escalate night attacks, bringing on a requirement for night fighters to counter them. USAAF P-61s were too far off. Night fighting variants of the Hellcat were introduced in the form of the F6F-3N and F6F-5N, equipped with radar. This new role for the Hellcat first appeared at the end of fall 1944 during the intensification of kamikaze attacks, that required the interception of unorthodox attacks by aircraft that avoided air to air combat. Other major combat was seen over the Japanese islands over the first half of 1945. Although the Hellcat was progressively replaced by its stablemate F4U Corsair, it served in the combat role up to the end of the war. Under the designation Hellcat Mk.I and II, several hundred served with the Royal Navy, notably in the Atlantic covering convoys, and also in the Far East. According to statistics, there were 12275 Hellcats of all versions made. For the loss of 270 of these, Hellcat pilots claimed 5156 kills. That accounts for over half of USN and USMC victories. The Hellcat also became the most successful carrier based fighter in the Pacific in under two years of ops. Lumbering, awkward at first glance, lacking in elegance, barroom brawler – wild, tough, a fearless hulk, able to clear a saloon before turning three times‌..that was the Hellcat in the skies over the Pacific. 8227 - NAV1


ATTENTION

UPOZORNĚNÍ

INSTRUCTION SIGNS

BEND OHNOUT

OPTIONAL VOLBA

ACHTUNG

INSTR. SYMBOLY

PARTS

INSTRUKTION SINNBILDEN

SYMETRICAL ASSEMBLY SYMETRICKÁ MONTÁŽ

OPEN HOLE VYVRTAT OTVOR

DÍLY

ATTENTION

REVERSE SIDE OTOČIT

REMOVE ODŘÍZNOUT

TEILE

SYMBOLES

APPLY EDUARD MASK AND PAINT POUŽÍT EDUARD MASK NABARVIT

PIECES

PLASTIC PARTS

A>

C> 8220 A

8220 C

E>

G>

8220 E

8220 G

H>

J>

8220 H

RP - RESIN PARTS

8220 J 1

1

2

COLOURS

BARVY

GSi Creos (GUNZE)

2

2

FARBEN

PEINTURE

MISSION MODELS

AQUEOUS

Mr.COLOR

PAINTS

H12

C33

MMP-047

FLAT BLACK

AQUEOUS

Mr.COLOR

PAINTS

H54

C365

MMP-065

NAVY BLUE

H316

C316

MMP-104

WHITE

H56

C366

MMP-071

INTERMEDIATE BLUE

H325

C325

MMP-063

GRAY

H58

C351

MMP-059

INTERIOR GREEN

H327

C327

MMP-101

RED

H77

C137

MMP-040

TIRE BLACK

H329

C329

MMP-041

YELLOW

H90

C47

CLEAR RED

H91

C48

CLEAR YELLOW

MC214

MMM-001

DARK IRON

H93

C50

CLEAR BLUE

MC218

MMM-003

ALUMINIUM

H94

C138

CLEAR GREEN

Mr.COLOR SUPER METALLIC

METALLICS

H306

C306

MEDIUM GRAY

SM01

MMC-001

MMP-118

GSi Creos (GUNZE)

Mr.METAL COLOR

MISSION MODELS

METALLICS

SUPER CHROME


A H12 MMP C33 047

PE22

H58 MMP C351 059

FLAT BLACK

INT. GREEN

OPTIONAL: decal 39, 40, 41, 42 PE18

G50 G43

PE4 PE3 PE11

H12 MMP C33 047

PE23

FLAT BLACK

PE24 PE10

H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

PE16 2 pcs.

PE12 PE9 2 pcs.

PE13

PE15

B

PE17

C OPTIONAL: decal 43

OPTIONAL: decal 44 G53 H58 MMP

H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

C351 059 INT. GREEN

G55 PE5 H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

H12 MMP C33 047

H12 MMP C33 047

PE7

FLAT BLACK

FLAT BLACK

PE8 H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

E11

H9 H325 MMP C325 063 GRAY

H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

A PE29

D

G35

E12 H12 MMP C33 047

H58 MMP C351 059

FLAT BLACK

INT. GREEN

H9 PE2

G23 PE6

H58 MMP C351 059

PE1

A

INT. GREEN

B H325 MMP C325 063

C

GRAY

G15

H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

E20

H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

3


H316 MMP C316 104 INS. WHITE

C2

H77 MMP C137 040 TIRE BLACK

G39 G28 C2

H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

PE19 H325 MMP C325 063

G39

GRAY

H3 PE34 H325 MMP C325 063

H325 MMP C325 063 GRAY

GRAY

H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

D

H4 PE34

H58 MMP C351 059

PE25

INT. GREEN

C1 MARKINGS

A ; B ; D ONLY

G2

E2 E16

E3

E7 E6

E15 E13

4


E

H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

G44

MC218 MMM 003

G44

PE31

ALUMINIUM

H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

G12 G12 H306 MMP C306 118 MEDIUM GRAY

G3

G52

G34 H306 MMP C306 118

PE21

MEDIUM GRAY

H12 MMP C33 047 FLAT BLACK

G52

PE20

PE31 G52

F

A C5, C6 - MARKINGS C ; D J3, J4 - MARKINGS B ; E

C3, C4 - MARKING

C4

C5

J4

H325 MMP C325 063 GRAY

PE14 MC218 MMM 003 ALUMINIUM

E14 C3

C6

J3

MC214 MMM 001

G33

DARK IRON

MC214 MMM 001 DARK IRON

G32 G19 MC214 MMM 001

E G21

DARK IRON

F 5


A1

A2

MC214 MMM 001 DARK IRON

A8

G5

G54 A3

MC214 MMM 001 DARK IRON

A9

MARKING

E

A8, A9 - MARKINGS

A ; B ; C ; D ONLY

ONLY

MARKING

E

ONLY

A4 H94 C138 CLEAR GREEN

A6

H13

E4

G E5

A5

H10 H10

SM01 MMC 001 SUPER CHROME

6

H

H90 C47 CLEAR RED

H12


G

G38

G37

H

FWD

G7

G38 H15

G8

G45 G37

G45

SM01 MMC 001 SUPER CHROME

7


I

MARKINGS

A ; B ; D ONLY

H94 C138 CLEAR GREEN

H11

H91 C48 CLEAR YELLOW

H90 C47

H11

CLEAR RED

E1

H14

E10

H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

CLOSED G48

OPEN G16 H316 MMP C316 104

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

WHITE

MC218 MMM 003

H5

SM01 MMC 001

G29

ALUMINIUM

SUPER CHROME

L

R

RP1

2 pcs.

H77 MMP C137 040

RP2

TIRE BLACK

H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

G14 - MARKINGS H316 MMP C316 104

SM01 MMC 001

WHITE

G22

G47

SM01 MMC 001

H316 MMP C316 104

G20

G25

H316 MMP C316 104

SUPER CHROME

WHITE

WHITE

G17

G26

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

SUPER CHROME

H316 MMP C316 104

G14

A ; B ; C ; D ONLY

WHITE

H316 MMP C316 104

G9

G46

WHITE

G18 H316 MMP C316 104

G51

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

G40 G40 - MARKINGS

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

G10

WHITE

G4

H77 MMP C137 040

A ; B ; C ; D ONLY

TIRE BLACK

H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

G51

G4

G4 G40

G14

G51 PE35 left 8

PE36 right

G4 G18

G20

G51


L R H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

G42

H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

MC218 MMM 003

G41

ALUMINIUM

H316 MMP C316 104

G31 H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

WHITE

G41

G42

G4

FWD

G51

G14

G40 G25

G17

G18

G42

G41

G22

G17 G25 G18 G37

G4

G51

G14

G42

G26 G20

G22

G26 G20

G38

G37

G38

RP1 H3

2 pcs. G39

H4

H8

H2 - OPEN

H1 - CLOSED

G39

9


I

J

J

J

MARKING

2 pcs.

H316 MMP C316 104

E

ONLY

G24

G24

H316 MMP C316 104

WHITE

WHITE

G13 PE32

PE33

PE30 PE30 - MARKING

OPEN CANOPY

H2

H8 H58 MMP C27 059 INT. GREEN

H93 C50 H316 MMP C316 104 WHITE

A ;D B;C;E

PE30 - MARKINGS G30 - MARKINGS

PE30

CLOSED CANOPY H1 H8 H58 MMP C351 059 INT. GREEN

E17 10

G30

CLEAR BLUE

H6

H6

G49

E

ONLY


A flown by Lt. Oscar Chenoweth, VF-38, Segi Point airstrip, New Georgia Island, September 1943 Oscar Chenoweth was born on July 16th, 1917, in Salem, Oregon. Having graduated from the High School he continued his studies at the Oregon State University, however he interrupted his education and in October of the same year enlisted in the US Navy. Having completed the fighter training Ens. Chenoweth flew as an instructor at a training unit. In the middle of 1943 he was assigned to VF-38 operating in the Pacific. Here he achieved his fist kill on September 15th, 1943, when he shot down a Japanese Zero nearby Ballale island. Since January 1944 he flew Corsairs with VF-17 achieving another 7.5 victories over Japanese aircraft. Since June 1944 he was in command of the dive bomber squadron. In 1954 he retired from the US Navy and worked for Chance Vought. He passed away on May 9th, 1968 due to the heart attack. Red outline of the national markings was discontinued as of August 14th, 1943, due to the possible confusion with the Japanese Hinomaru. There is no photographic proof that Chenoweth aircraft carried the red outlines at the time of his first kill. It is possible, that in this time carried blue-outlined markings.


B flown by Ens. Gordon Arthur Stanley, VF-27, USS Princeton (CVL-23), October 1944 Gordon Arthur Stanley, born on July 13th, 1921, in Seattle, Washington state, shot down 8 enemy airplanes in the course of World War Two, all achieved flying with VF-27. This unit became famous thanks to its unique marking - cat mouth and eyes, painted by Robert Burnell on all noses of the Hellcats belonging to this unit. Most of the Hellcats sporting the cat mouth with eyes was destroyed on October 24th, 1944, during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The aircraft ended up on the ocean bottom together with Light Aircraft Carrier Princeton sunk by the single bomb launched from the D4Y Suisei (Judy) dive-bomber. Afterwards VF-27 operated from the board of CVL-22 Independence, however without the cat-mouth and eyes markings.


C VF-8, USS Intrepid (CV-11), Summer 1943 Second unit marked as VF-8 was established on June 1st, 1943 under the command of LCdr. William M. Collins Jr. and was dispatched for the operational training aboard USS Intrepid which was sailing in the Caribbean Sea at that time. Tri-color camouflage, introduced as of January 5th, 1943, for the application on the aircraft deployed to Pacific, composed of Non-specular Sea Blue, Semi-gloss Sea Blue, Intermediate Blue and Non-specular White, was applied slightly differently than on the other aircraft. National markings featuring the red outline were introduced as of June 28th, 1943.


D flown by Lt. Lochridge, VF-34, Nissan island, 1944 The very unusual marking consisting of a white spine and part of the tail was typical for VF-34 Hellcats. Even more rare were pin-up girls on U.S. Navy fighter aircraft. Registration number is spray-painted on the engine cowling, used obviously during the deliveries from the manufacturer to the units.


E OTU VF-2, NAS Melbourne, United States of America, October 1944 Naval Air Station Melbourne was established on October 20th, 1942 and the first training course commenced on January 18th, 1943 on F4F Wildcat aircraft. Hellcats started to arrive at the unit as of June 1st, 1943, fully replaced originally operated Wildcats as of October 1st, 1944 and their inventory varied between 75 and 150 machines. During 1944, 546 pilots completed their pilot training at this base, another 916 pilots from January to October 1944. Hellcats belonging to this unit sported a prominent marking carried on the front part of the engine cowling consisting of stripes or other geometrical shapes.


F6F-3

STENCILING POSITIONS W

M

O

Q

N

EE

R

BB Z

L

X

T

P

D

F

D

B

AA

I

B

A

J

J

J

A

V K

2 pcs CC

S

K G

G

D

E

C

C

4 pcs N

2 pcs K 35

36

? BLACK

U

DD

D

Z

W

X

D

G

H12 MMP C33 047

Y

T

P

eduard 16

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Eduard 8227 1:48 F6F-3, схема сборки  

Схема сборки модели самолета F6F-3, Eduard 8227

Eduard 8227 1:48 F6F-3, схема сборки  

Схема сборки модели самолета F6F-3, Eduard 8227

Profile for modeland