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‘Four steps to achievement: Plan purposefully, proceed positively and pursue persistently’. - William Arthur Ward ‘Every person – with his or her own skills, abilities and uniqueness – can contribute to others and bring great joy to those that fortune has not smiled upon’. - Shari Arison


Planning for a session Following a process can be beneficial when planning for a session as it enables coaches to maximise the use of the floor space, equipment and time in an orderly and systematic manner. The four-step process below might assist coaches with their own training sessions: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Identify the factors that will affect a training session Determine the purpose of the session Deliver the session Evaluate the session

1. Identify the factors that will affect a training session The three main factors that will affect any training session are: A. The coach B. The athlete C. The environment A. The coach Coaches are responsible for setting and maintaining the professional standards of each and every session. Remember that a coach’s attitude will affect his/her behaviour, which can affect the athlete’s attitude and behaviour. B. The athlete Athletes should be supported and encouraged to take responsibility for their learning and development before, during and after training sessions. C. The environment A training environment should be a positive, encouraging and exciting place to train, but safety should also be taken into account when preparing for a session.

Safe, supportive  and   encouraging   training   environmnet    

Positve coach/ athlete   relationships  

Optimum conditions  

‘Your positive action combined with positive thinking results in success’. - Shiv Khera


2. Purpose of session Has the session been designed to promote acquisition of a new skill or develop an existing one? Or has it been designed to improve a certain physical quality or qualities? One of the most effective and efficient ways to coach ModBox is to conduct separate sessions for physical preparation and skill development. A. Physical preparation These sessions are designed to improve the physical qualities of the athletes, including: • Muscle endurance • Speed endurance • Reactive power • Aerobic capacity • Resistance to injury B. Skill development These sessions are designed to develop the technical skills of the athletes while increasing their understanding of the tactical appreciations of the sport. From a technical and tactical perspective athletes need to: • Develop and maintain a suitable stance that minimizes the target area • Display good technique when applying an attacking or defensive action • Make appropriate decisions in attack and defence • Learn movement patterns • Develop an understanding of the ModBox concept

What's the purpose of the session?

What equipment is needed?

What outcomes do I want acheive?

How should the session be delivered?

Four questions every coach should ask when planning their training sessions.


3. Delivery of a session These suggestions might assist ModBox coaches when they are going to deliver a training session: • Be professional • Be enthusiastic • Remain true to your beliefs • Use plenty of variety with drills and exercises • Carry out prior planning to minimise time wasting 4. Evaluation of the session Evaluating a training session is important as the information can assist with the planning and delivery of more effective sessions in the future. Evaluating a training session can be achieved through use of a number of inexpensive methods, including: • Evaluation forms • Participant feedback • Video review of session • Self-analysis and reflection • Mentor review and feedback

Plan

Revise

Reflect

Implement

Evaluate

‘Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better’ - Maya Angelou


Session plans Having a plan for each session helps to guide the training sessions and assists in achieving outcomes by sequencing activities in a logical order and ensuring that the selected activities are manageable. What should a session plan include? • Name, location and date of session • Aim of the session and outcomes to be achieved • Length of the session • Session content and timing of each component • Resources that may be required Components of a training session Most training sessions would include the five components below. Providing a similar sequence may assist in the delivery of engaging and appealing training sessions. Ø Introduction Ø Warm up Ø Main component Ø Cool down Ø End of session discussion

Who am I coaching?

How will I coach?

How will I know if the athletes understand?

‘I would spend almost as much time planning a practice as conducting it. Everything was planned out each day’. - Coach John Wooden


Introduction This provides an opportunity for coaches to formally introduce a training session, while providing a brief outline of the content and outcomes hoped to be achieved. Coaches should take time to explain the purpose and reason behind each of the training drills when introducing a session. Warm-up Warm-ups need to be dynamic, progressive and functional; they also need to be specific for the content of the session. Warm-ups are designed to physically and mentally prepare the athletes to perform at their best, while reducing the risk of injury. Main component The main component of a ModBox training session focuses on physical preparation or skill development. When developing new skills limit the number of key points to two or three and use plenty of demonstrations and explanations so the athletes will understand why these points are important. When focussing on physical preparation, coaches will need to place sufficient physical demands on to the athletes to get the desired effect. Cool-down This is an important part of the recovery process and should be performed after each session. A good cool-down will assist the heart rate and breathing patterns to return to normal levels, help with the removal of waste products (such as lactic acid) from the muscles, help with blood flow and prevent blood pooling. End of session discussion Post-training coach/athlete discussions provide opportunities for the sharing of information, which often helps with the planning and implementation of future training sessions.


Insights for an effective strength and conditioning session Although there are many different ways to stage an effective sportspecific strength and conditioning training session, Boxing Australia’s high performance coaches mostly use circuit-based training to prepare athletes for World Championships, and Olympic and Commonwealth Games. In addition to sprint training and long distance running, high-intensive, boxing-specific, circuit training sessions are used to develop certain physical qualities and to improve the general conditioning of athletes. As noted by Head Coach, Mr Kevin Smith: ‘Circuit training works well for developing strength, muscle endurance and power repeatability. Its’ great for general fitness and caters for a wide variety of fitness levels, making it a great time saver that can be a refreshing and fun way to train’. ModBox coaches may also find it beneficial and productive to use circuit training when conducting their fitness sessions. The following examples are provided to assist with the planning and implementation of such sessions. However, these examples should not be used as complete session plans and coaches will need to incorporate effective warm-up activities and allocate significant time for cooling down when planning their own sessions.

‘Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength’. - Arnold Schwarzenegger


Example 1 Method: Participants complete an appropriate number of rotations of the circuit, with each rotation separated by 1-minute periods of rest. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 40 seconds work: 40 seconds rest. Progression: Slowly reduce rest period. Double up some of the drills, add new exercises and increase work periods. Exercise selection Station 1: Shuttle sprints or running on the spot Station 2: Push–ups Station 3: Step and strike Station 4: Squats into burpee jumps (6 squats and 3 burpees) Station 5: Front raisers Station 6: Overhead strikes Station 7: Mountain climbers Station 8: Arm curls into reverse-grip shoulder press Station 9: Sidesteps with punches Station 10: Bench dips

Please click here to watch an example of how this session has been conducted.


Example 2 Method: An appropriate number of rotations of the circuit, separated by 1 minute periods of rest. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 40 seconds work: 40 seconds rest. Exercise selection Station 1: Push–ups into mountain climbers (6 push-ups and 12 mountain climbs) Station 2: Jumping and striking (forwards and backward) Station 3: Straight punching (punching bags, or stationary punching with light hand weights) Station 4: Body-weighted squats Station 5: Shoulder press Station 6: Diagonal punching Station 7: Bench dips into chest press Station 8: Coordinated striking (20 seconds each leg) Station 9: Up-downs Station 10: Front-raisers

ModBox strength and conditioning training sessions should aim to meet the needs of each individual within the group.


Example 3 Method: An appropriate number of rotations of the circuit, separated by 2-minute periods of rest. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 1 minute work: 1minute rest. Please note: Work rate for each station is: 20 seconds moderate pace, 20 seconds best work rate, 20 seconds moderate pace. Exercise selection Station 1: Up-downs Station 2: Shoulder press Station 3: Jump squats/normal squats Station 4: Chest press Station 5: Overhead punches Station 6: Push-ups Station 7: Hip raisers Station 8: Diagonal punching Station 9: Straight punching on punching bag Station 10: Medicine ball throws

ModBox strength and conditioning training sessions should be a challenging but rewarding experience for all participants.


Example 4 Method: An appropriate number of rotations of the circuit, separated by 1 minute periods of rest. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 40 seconds work: 40 seconds rest. Please note: Athletes work for 20 seconds at a moderate pace followed by 20 seconds best work rate for each station. Exercise selection Station 1: Shuttle sprints or running on the spot Station 2: Front raise Station 3: Squats Station 4: Bench dips Station 5: Up-downs Station 6: Chest press Station 7: Step and punch Station 8: Push-ups Station 9: Jump and punch Station 10: Arm curls into reserve grip shoulder press

ModBox strength and conditioning training sessions should provide opportunities for continued improvement.


Example 5 Method: An appropriate number of rotations of the circuit, separated by 1 minute periods of rest. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 40 seconds work: 1-minute rest. Please note: Athletes perform each exercise for 20 seconds with no rest between exercises. Exercise selection Station 1: Body-weighted squats followed by up-downs Station 2: Bench dips followed by front raisers Station 3: Lunges followed by jumping with strikes Station 4: Push-ups followed by shoulder press Station 5: Mountain climbers followed by burpee jumps Station 6: Step and punch followed by around the worlds Station 7: Chest press followed by arm curls Station 8: Steps with overhead strikes followed by running on the spot with punches Station 9: Hip raisers followed by diagonal strikes Station 10: Short fast punching followed by long straight punching

ModBox strength and conditioning training sessions should be an enjoyable experience for athletes and coaches.


Group training with punch bags The punch bag drills that were previously mentioned are ideal for highintensity circuit training. Implementing these sport-specific training drills into a group circuit can be done with considerable ease and is an excellent way to increase variety. Coaches may find the following example useful for planning their own punch bag training sessions. Example 1 Method: An exercise is performed for 30 seconds, which is immediately followed by a second exercise for the same period of time. Athletes do 3 to 4 rotations of the circuit with 1 minute break periods between each rotation. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 1 minute work: 1 minute rest. Progression: Slowly increase the duration of the rounds. Round 1: Running on the spot with punches (punch bag drill for 30 seconds) followed by mountain climbers (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 2: Lead hand uppercut, backhand uppercut, lead hand hook, backhand hook, lead hand straight, backhand straight (punch bag drill for 30 seconds) followed by body-weighted squats (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 3: Short fast explosive punching (punch bag drill for 30 seconds) followed by step and punch (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 4: Long straight punching (punch bag drill for 30 seconds) followed by push-ups (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 5: Short fast explosive punching followed by long straight punching (punch bag drills for 30 seconds, approximately 15 seconds of each activity) followed by diagonal strikes (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Repeat circuit for an appropriate number of rounds.


Example 2 Method: Punch bag drill is performed for 1 minute before resting. Suggested work/rest ratio within each rotation: 1 minute work: 1 minute rest. Progression: Slowly increase the duration of the rounds. For example: 1:15, 1:30, and 1:45, up to 2:00 minutes. Round 1: Short fast punches (15 seconds), long straight punches (15 seconds), short fast punches (15 seconds), long straight punches (15 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 2: 6 punch combination, (Lead hand uppercut, backhand uppercut, lead hand hook, backhand hook, straight lead hand, straight backhand) Rest: 1 minute Round 3: Short fast punches (30 seconds), long straight punches (30 seconds) Rest: 1 minute Round 4: 3 punch combination, (lead hand uppercut, lead hand hook, straight backhand), followed by (backhand uppercut, back hand hook, straight lead hand) Rest: 1 minute Round 5: A series of punches, (Straight lead hand, straight lead hand, straight backhand) Rest: 1 minute Round 6: Running on the spot with punches, (15 seconds easy, 15 seconds sprint, 15 seconds easy, 15 seconds sprint) Rest: 2 minutes Repeat circuit for an appropriate number of rounds.


Example 3 Method: Punch bag drill is performed for 30 seconds, which is immediately followed by a 10 second shuttle sprint and a second exercise for an additional 20 seconds. Suggested work/rest ratio: 1 minute work: 1 minute rest. Progression: Slowly increase the duration of all exercises. Round 1: Long straight punches (straight lead hand, straight back hand for 30 seconds), 10-second shuttle sprints and 20 seconds of push-ups Rest: 1 minute Round 2: 4 punch combination, (lead hand uppercut, backhand uppercut, lead hand hook, backhand hook for 30 seconds), 10 second shuttle sprint and 20 seconds body-weighted squats Rest: 1 minute Round 3: Running on the spot while punching for 30 seconds, 10 second shuttle sprints and 20 seconds of push-ups into mountain climbers (6 x push-ups, remainder of time devoted to the completion of the mountain climbers) Rest: 1 minute Round 4: Short fast punches (15 seconds), long straight punches (15 seconds), 10 second shuttle sprints and 20 seconds of body-weighted squats and burpee jumps (5 x squats, remainder of time devoted to the completion of the burpee jumps) Rest: 1 minute Round 5: Short fast punches for 30 seconds, 10 second shuttle sprints and 20 seconds of diagonal punching Rest: 2 minutes Repeat circuit for an appropriate number of rounds.


Conducting an effective ModBox skill development session Below are some examples for conducting an effective and successful skillspecific training session with a Game Sense approach. These examples may help to provoke more ideas in regard to the planning and staging of training sessions with game-based activities. To assist coaches with this task, additional information about the use of Game Sense is provided in the links below. •

Play with purpose: An introduction to the Game Sense approach

Game Sense - Video One - Explanation

Game Sense activities

Participants developing their ModBox skills and tactical awareness of the sport through a game of peg boxing.


Example 1 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs and allocate 2 pairs per station. Ø Participants engage in the games and activities outlined below for a pre-determined period of time (for example 1:00min) ensuring that the allocated time allows for learning outcomes to be achieved. Ø Group discussion. Ø Return to games and activities. Ø Further questions and discussions. Ø Pairs move onto next station. Ø Repeat the above process until each group has rotated through all the stations. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Repeat the above process until participants have rotated through each of the stations. Ø Cool-down. Ø End of session discussion.

Peg boxing

Bounce the ball

Toe the line

Fetch

Catch me if you can

The use of a circuit format is a safe, fun, effective and efficient way to implement a ModBox skill development training session.


Example 2 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Break participants into pairs. Ø Warm up. Ø Participants engage in a game of peg boxing for a pre-determined period of time (for example 1:00min). Ø Questions and answers. Ø Return to game. Ø Further questions. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Participants play new game (change it around) for a pre-determined period of time. Ø Group discussion. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other ensuring games are stopped whenever a teachable moment occurs. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Cool-down. Ø End of session discussion.

Game appreciation

Fun and

Tactical awareness

enjoyment

Athlete

Performance

Decisionmaking

The use of the above athlete-centred, inquiry based approach to learning is a proven method for the development of sport-specific skills [163].


Example 3 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Break participants into pairs. Ø Participants warm up in pairs. Ø Participants engage in a game of hit and miss for a pre-determined period of time. Ø Questions and group discussions. Ø Return to game. Ø Further questions. Ø Progress the game so that participants can use both hands but can only use a strike and assess approach for their attacks. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other ensuring games are stopped whenever a teachable moment occurs. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Cool-down. Ø End of session discussion.

‘Skill becomes not just the replication of bodily movements, but also the ability to perform it in the context of game pressure that encompasses strategies, tactics and decision-making’. - Forrest, G.J., Webb, P. and Pearson, P. (2007).


Example 4 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs and allocate 2 pairs per station. Ø Participants engage in modified games and activities (as per example 1). Ø Pairs move onto next station. Ø Repeat the above process until groups have rotated through all training stations ensuring that games are stopped whenever a teachable occurs. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Participants engage in a game of hit and miss for a pre-determined period. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Progress game so that participants can use both hands but can only use a strike and assess approach. Ø Repeat the above process 4-6 times ensuring participants change partners at the end of each interval. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Cool-down. Ø End of session discussion.

‘Teaching players during practice was what coaching was all about to me’ - John Wooden


Example 5 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs. Ø Participants engage in game of countdown scoring. In this game each participant is allocated a certain number of points at the start of the game and they attempt to strike the upper arm and torso regions of their opponent without being struck. If contact to the target areas occurs the participant loses 1 point. The game continues until all points are lost, or until the time allocated for the game elapses. Ø Participants play the above game for a pre-determined period of time (for example 1:00min) using only their lead hand for the attacking actions with a strike and assess approach. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Group discussion. Ø Progress the game so that participants can use both hands for their attacks. Ø Questions. Ø Cool-down. Ø End of session discussion.

‘It is a happy talent to know how to play’. - Ralph Waldo Emerson


Combining two approaches for the development of skill Coaches may sometimes find it beneficial and sometimes necessary to use the Game Sense approach in conjunction with a traditional approach when delivering their skill-specific training sessions. The use of a combined approach for skill development still involves the use of modified games, however time is also devoted to the improvement of the individual technical components of a skill. The following examples are provided to assist coaches with the planning and implementation of this combined approach for skill development. Example 1 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs and allocate 2 pairs per station. Ø Participants engage with modified games and activities (as per the example on page 146). Ø Repeat the above process until each group has participated in every station. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Participants play peg boxing for a pre-determined period of time ensuring games are stopped whenever a teachable moment occurs. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Traditional approach Ø Participants line up in rows adopting an on-guard position and have to respond to verbal cueing from the coach. For example, practicing coordinated movement patterns would progress in the following sequence: Ø Stepping without strikes Ø Stepping with straight lead hand strikes Ø Stepping with straight lead hand and backhand strikes Ø Progressing to moving to in all directions with various strikes (straights, hooking and the underhand actions) is an example of how this training drill could be further progressed. Ø Cool down and end of session discussion.


Example 2 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs. Ø Participants engage in a game of change it around for a predetermined period of time. Ø Repeat process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Participants play a new game (catch me if you can). Ø Repeat process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Traditional approach Ø Participants face each other in the on-guard position standing approximately 1.5 metres apart. Ø Task 1: One person advances (moving forward without striking) while the other person moves backwards, trying to maintain the same distance. Ø Reverse roles. Ø Task 2: One person advances using straight lead hand strikes while the other person steps backwards to avoid the incoming strike. Ø Reverse roles. Ø Progress drill to include lateral movement patterns. Ø Reverse roles. Ø Continue drill for predetermined period of time. Ø Cool down Ø End of session discussion.


Example 3 Format Ø Introduction. Ø Warm up. Ø Break participants into pairs Ø Participants play game of countdown scoring for a pre-determined period of time (for example 1:00min) using only lead hand attacks and a strike and assess approach. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Progress the game so that participants can use both hands for their attacks. Ø Drink break and group discussion. Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other. Ø Traditional approach Ø Participants face each other in the on-guard position. Ø One person makes the attacking action (straight lead hand and straight backhand to the upper arm target). The other person makes the defensive action (downward parry to counter the opponent’s straight lead hand and the sway back to avoid the backhand). Ø Reverse roles after 1-minute. Ø Continue drill until each participant has played the role of attacker and defender 3 times. Ø Group discussion. Ø Introduce new attacking and defensive actions (lead underhand strike to the body - countered by elbow block and lead hand hooking action to the upper arm target – countered by lead hand block). Ø Reverse roles after 1-minute. Ø Continue drill until each participant has played the role of attacker and defender 3 times. Ø Group discussion. Ø Return to game of countdown scoring (this time participants use both hands for their attacks). Ø Repeat the above process until all participants have partnered with each other and attempt to link what was previously practiced into the games. Ø Cool down. Ø End of session discussion.


Suggestions for staging longer periods of training The following information is included to help with the implementation of longer periods of training. The information was gathered over a five-year period and is based on the progressive refinement achieved during the course of 2,000 modified boxing training sessions. Implement training programs during school terms Adopting this approach enables coaches to plan, advertise and conduct multiple training programs over a twelve-month period. Gradually increase workloads, intensity and demands Coaches should aim to make their training sessions progressively more challenging by placing greater demands (skill and physical development) on athletes over appropriate periods of time. Provide options To assist in meeting the needs of each individual, coaches should aim to provide athletes with a range of training options. For example, push-ups performed on the knees in addition to full range push-ups and the use of various loads for exercises such as the shoulder and chest press. Focus on participant enjoyment Coaches should focus on creating opportunities that promote safety, fun and enjoyment and celebrate factors such as prolonged participation and reaching of personal milestones as significant sporting achievements in their own right. Target specific outcomes When implementing training programs, coaches should target the following: • Health outcomes: cardiovascular fitness, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. • Skill development: agility, coordination, reaction and technique. • Personal skills: goal setting, perseverance and the development of the 5Cs.


Provide variety Constantly changing the exercises/training drills and varying the class format will not only help to reduce repetitiveness but will provide a much more enjoyable training experience for participants. Use participant feedback to guide program development ‘People who are involved in the recognition of a problem will be more likely to assist in identifying solutions to the problem. Similarly, those who are involved in the identification of potential solutions will be more willing to work towards implementing the solutions and institutionalising the selected interventions’. - Arnold Kaluzny PhD Online resources The information in the links below has been prepared by Dr Ralph Richards, Senior Research Consultant, Clearinghouse for Sport, Australian Sports Commission and contain additional information that could also be helpful for the implementation and development of community-based modified boxing programs. •

Sports clubs administration, management and development

Sport for community development

‘Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them’. - James Baldwin


An example of a three-day a week training schedule Below is an example of how a three-day a week ModBox training program has been successfully implemented [6]. Coaches may consider using a similar approach for the implementation of their own programs. Monday Sport-specific strength and conditioning circuit (Targeting muscle and speed endurance) Wednesday Skill development (Developing tactical awareness and improving technical proficiency) Friday Punch bag circuit training (Boxing-specific training that combines punch bag training drills with bodyweighted exercises)

ModBox coaches should keep in mind that the facilitation of positive training experiences is often due to the way a program is delivered and not because of the activity itself Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure Experiences 5th Edition.


An example of a two-day a week training schedule The example below helps to illustrate how a ModBox training program could be structured and delivered twice a week. Some coaches may find this approach more suitable when designing and implementing their own programs. Coaches should however be mindful that although training programs have the potential to provide a positive and rewarding experience, ultimately successful outcomes are determined by athlete perceptions of their experience. Tuesday ModBox strength and conditioning circuit training, alternating each week with High-intensive punch bag training Thursday Skill development training with extensive use of the Game Sense approach

           

Providing space and time for people to enjoy the benefits of regular exercise regardless of age, gender or level of functionality should be one of the main aims of a ModBox program. .

Suggestions For Planning And Delivering Safe, Fun And Effective ModBox Training Sessions  

This information guide highlights the factors that can affect a training session, provides suggestions to assist with the planning and deliv...

Suggestions For Planning And Delivering Safe, Fun And Effective ModBox Training Sessions  

This information guide highlights the factors that can affect a training session, provides suggestions to assist with the planning and deliv...