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Meg Rotter Editor in Chief Claire Hornacek Deputy Editor Alexandra Folino Art Director Victoria Fok WUD Publications Committee Director Jim Rogers WUD Publications Committee Advisor Deshawn McKinney WUD President

SEPTEMBER 2016 Claire Grummon Caleb Foust Marissa Haegele Cassie Hurwitz Photography Directors Ashley Ng Eva-Delilah Weiland Jameson Zaballos Staff Writers Web Master Alexandra Folino Kelsey Daykin Contributing Writers Reilly Koch Creative Directors Jenna Hayes Makeup and Hair Alexa Carlson Fashion Editor Victoria Dior Savannah Thomas Darby Hoffman Models Lifestyle Editor Kelly Cassel Haley Nippert Alexandra Folino Culture Editor Nolan Ferlic Marissa Haegele Margaret Duffey Photography Arts Editor Jameson Zaballos Special thanks to: Men’s Editor Deb Reimer from Milwaukee Fashion Week Jay W. Filter Anna Olla Eva-Delilah Wieland Special Events Coordinators Taylor Palmby Marketing and Social Media Liason

on the

COVER

Victoria Dior photographed by Kelly Cassel Makeup by Jenna Hayes


BITCH IS THE NEW BLACK. As the youngest of three, I grew up playing the servant to my sister’s queen and learning that the youngest always had to sit in the backseat. While my two siblings are probably my favorite people in the world now, they had a tendency to be quite bossy back then, molding me into the easygoing people pleaser I am now. While my laidback personality has helped me avoid many confrontations and unnecessary stresses, it has also caused me to fall victim to those who like to take advantage. I constantly struggle to find the balance between “too nice” and “too bossy.” When I first came to college four years ago, I had never dreamed of becoming a CEO or Editor in Chief. Along the way, though, I found myself surrounded by some unexpectedly inspiring individuals, both in the form of friend

and celebrity. Sophia Amoruso taught me how to be a Girlboss, Tina Fey told me that “Bitches get stuff done” and Amy O’Dell showed that even from the back row, we are all capable of having a large voice. Now, as fate would have it, I have found myself in charge of a lifestyle and fashion publication (the very one you are currently reading). As incredibly worried as I am about failing, I cannot help but be excited about my newest title. Throughout the late nights of editing and endless emails, I hope to embody some of the qualities of my newfound role models and learn what it means to be the boss. Best,


LIFESTYLE

SEPTEMBER 2016 FASHION

5 33

THE SEPTEMBER EDIT Fall’s must-have trends

PIN THIS, PATCH THAT. The DIY anyone can do

CULTURE

26

LETS TALK ABOUT SEX, MAYBE?

35

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER

How U.S. sex-ed is failing youth & what we can do about it

Celebrating 50 years of Star Trek

11 12

PLUG IN AND RECHARGE

30

REASONS TO UNPLUG

TAKING CHARGE OF YOUR FINANCES Save your money like a pro.

The necessity of a digital detox

ART

8

PHOTOGRAPHING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE

14

COLORING THE CONTROVERSIONAL 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

The Civil Rights Movement through the lens of Danny Lyon

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton influence voters through art

MEN’S

9 31

THE CASE FOR BEARABLE WEARABLES Form meets function

LEADING THE BRAND Hedi Slimane and Oliver Rousteing transform the definition of success

FEATURED

16 38

4 | SEPTEMBER 2016

Embrace your beauty evolution.

TAKE NOTICE TAKE CHARGE Borrowing From the Boys: Moda Takes Milwaukee

POWER MOVES Not all superheroes wear capes.


THE SEPTEMBER EDIT BY ALEXA CARLSON, FASHION EDITOR

HARPERSBAZAAR.COM

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GARDEN VARIETY

asos necktie | $11 | asos.com

Gucci’s recent, exclusive online collection, Gucci Garden, is giving us major inspiration at the moment. The moody jewel tones of the large flora and fauna give the print an edge perfect for the changing season. Funky, vintage-like blooms are now popping up everywhere. Florals, for fall? Now that’s groundbreaking.


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Just because summer music festival season is coming to a close, that doesn’t mean you can’t still be inspired by your favorite bands. Exchange your flowy florals for edgy rock-inspired pieces this fall. Paige Denim’s Fall 2016 campaign with Rosie Huntington-Whiteley is full of leather jackets, 70s inspired cuts, lace-up details, western belts and of course, good jeans. rene caovilla boots | $1,800 | net-a-porter.com

PAIGE.COM


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#TRACKISBACK

Juicy Couture has recently released their brand new #TrackIsBack campaign and we’re kind of loving it. To keep it fresh, opt for a roomier track jacket; a looser fit is what makes this revamp work. Pair the jacket with gold hoops and a velvet choker to give a cheeky but current nod to the 2000s. We can’t wait to see if and how the iconic velour jackets find their way to street style.

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SHAPE UP

Structured totes are the perfect bag for fall. They’re a chic substitute for a backpack and can fit all the essentials for class. Look for bags with stylish details like croc embossing or special hardware that will make a statement.


PHOTOGRAPHING

THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE Looming over Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, the Whitney Museum of American Art’s glass building sits between the High Line and the Hudson River. The building’s surface reflects the city around it, while the outdoor access on the museum’s top three levels offers some of the best views of the Big Apple. While on a family trip and trying to escape the stifling summer heat of the concrete jungle, I led my parents and younger brother across the city to the air conditioned museum. We split up once in the museum, pursuing our favorite pieces without any time constraints. The exhibition, Danny Lyon: Message to the Future, consumed my attention. It features an extensive collection of photographs taken by Lyon, who was born in 1942 and was a major force in the street photography movement of the 1960s. Lyon used his camera to record subjects that traditional media sources were ignoring or glossing over. Subjects included Tennessee transgender youths, Texas prisons, the demolition of sixty acres of New York City nineteenth century buildings and the Civil Rights Movement. In light of the growing Black Lives Matter movement, Lyon’s pieces that focused on the Civil Rights Movement resonated in contemporary America. As racial tension between law enforcement and minority citizens heightens across the country, some of Lyon’s images from forty years ago appear strikingly modern. After watching John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), give a speech advocating for the Civil Rights Movement in Illinois in 1962, Lyon moved south to photograph the movement in action. There, Lyon became the official photographer for the SNCC. He proceeded to record the group’s southern effort in the form of sit-ins, altercations with law enforcement and marches. The images were used to create SNCC brochures and posters aimed at recruiting more movement supporters and raising funds. The poster in the top image employs Lyon’s photograph of a cross armed police officer staring intensely away from the camera. Above the image the SNCC posed the question, “is he protecting you” to push society to reassess law enforcement’s treatment of minorities. The photograph in the bottom image highlights the police brutality the poster was calling into question. Activist Taylor Washington’s struggle against the officer’s chokehold in the photograph reminded me of a more recent image: a cell phone recording of the 2014 death of Eric Garner in a New York police officer’s chokehold. His repeated statement “I can’t breathe” was broadcast around the world and became an anthem for the Black Lives Matter. While Lyon was one of the few people recording the brutality during the Civil Rights Movement, today, in the digital age, images and videos of potential police brutality are far more accessible. Encounters with police are shared on social media and suddenly millions of other eyes have seen them. Lyon was a pioneer for this type of reporting. Without instantaneous access to the internet, he managed to put faces on a movement that was often deprived of a human angle. His decision to move south was a decision to create an accurate recording of history being made. While race relations have changed since the Civil Rights Movement, Lyon’s Message to the Future is still felt today.

SOURCE: whitney.org

BY MARGARET DUFFEY, ARTS EDITOR PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AUTHOR


THE

CASE

FOR

B E A R A B L E

W E A R A B L E S GOODBYE ROLEX, HELLO APPLE. BY CALEB FOUST, CONTRIBUTING WRITER SEPTEMBER 2016 | 9


FITBIT | ZDNET.COM PREVIOUS PAGE | APPLE

Back in December, we covered fashion’s newest collision with Make no mistake, they do solve a few problems. Some of the wearable technology. Wearables have only become more common more alluring features smooth out issues that a smartphone since then. For those who are unfamiliar, wearables are small, can’t solve as easily. The Fitbit, for example, can track how long wearable devices that connect your life with the digital world. and how well you sleep. When I wore a Fitbit Charge HR for a Smart phones, in contrast, are pocket-bound, whereas wearables summer, I grew to adore the silent alarm feature where my wrist attach at the wrist or on clothing. Due to the rise of smartphones, buzzed me awake, allowing me to get up without disturbing my advances in technology opened up the market for smaller devices. girlfriend. The device’s battery only needed charging every few Until the Apple Watch and the Samsung Gear S2, similar devices days and did so in a half an hour, so that I rarely went without that acted as an extension to your smart phone were few and far it. Over time I lost interest, so the Fitbit sat gathering dust. Not between. Consumers’ responses to them having to reach into my pocket to check have been notoriously lukewarm, and even who was calling was valuable, but was more so in the fashion world. “THE REAL QUESTION IS a solution to a problem I was not sure I needed in an age of text messages and WHETHER WEARABLE Considering Apple and Samsung’s social media. DEVICES – FITNESS marketing clout, that comes as a surprise. INCLINED OR NOT – CAN The real question is whether wearable Though lacking in smartphone features, Fitbit’s wearables track your physical REPLACE A TRADITIONAL devices – fitness inclined or not – can activity. They pair with companion apps that replace a traditional watch in looks and WATCH IN LOOKS AND overflow with statistics about your walking, functionality. While most wearables show FUNCTIONALITY.” sleeping and resting habits, turning fitness the time, they come in a limited range into a game. For some, they have been a of stereotypical colors: a few bright blessing. Fitbit shipped 21 million units in fluorescents and the standard black for 2015, about a fourth as many iPhones as Apple shipped in the everyone else, which throws all hopes of color coordination out same period. While still relatively small, the burgeoning market the window. I struggled with this when I tried to wear my Fitbit. for fitness wearables shows that the products can be successful After accepting that I couldn’t pull off the “urban-rugged” look despite being primitive. and wear only the Fitbit, I had my traditional watch on one arm and the Fitbit on the other. I looked like a dweeb, but at least I Their popularity in the fitness realm has not transferred well to knew what time it was and how many steps I’d taken that day. fashion, where they struggle to replace traditional watches. Companies have found that the prestige of a Swiss-made timepiece For now, it is understandable why smart watches have not taken is hard to replicate with expensive electronics. Indeed, Apple’s off. They suffer a plague of issues, cost among them. The prices attempts to break into the high-end watch business through are high enough that they don’t fit within most discretionary luxury versions of its Apple Watch have been unsuccessful at best. spending budgets. Battery technology is still struggling to get The Hermès collaboration failed to attract the fashion inclined in better, meaning that most wearables still need to be charged part because of its steep prices. The obvious parallels between every day at least. smart devices and smartphones, in that companies update the technology every other year or so, leave consumers unwilling While the technology is in its infancy, it shows remarkable to shell out the sums of money required to buy a fashionable promise as our world becomes more connected. Perhaps in fifty wearable when the newer, better version is just around the years, traditional watches will look just as antiquated as a rotary corner. The functionality has been a hard sell, too. When the most phone. Then again, they said the same thing about neckties. attractive selling point of the Apple Watch is that it puts all of your notifications on your wrist, paying $400 to be reminded of your ailing Clash of Clans fortress is less than desirable. 10 | SEPTEMBER 2016


plug in & recharge The beginning of a new school year offers the chance to hit the refresh button. There have been three months of separation; three months of reinvention, revamping and recharging. Heading back to school means showing everyone the changes you’ve made and the new person you’ve become. This change can be through something as simple as a unique haircut, new shoes or a fabulous, signature shade of lipstick. It may not seem like it, but a small change in appearance can completely alter how you feel about yourself, and, in turn, create a positive effect on your mindset for the entire year.

BY CASSIE HURWITZ, LIFESTYLE STAFF WRITER

shades that completely switch up my style. At first, I was a bit disappointed that I was neglecting my old favorites and tried forcing myself to re-wear them. However, the shades did not feel like me anymore, so I accepted the change and am now loving my new look (even if all I did was change up one product). As life around you changes, so too can your beauty routine. Ease yourself into this new school year by getting a haircut or giving in and trying the ‘strobing’ trend that has been driving everyone wild lately. Don’t hold yourself back because it isn’t something that has been typically “you” in the past. Individuals who grow and adjust throughout their lives end up being happier and more satisfied. One small change can be the push you need to recharge, restart and give yourself a boost of confidence for a new situation. Let yourself grow and change into who you are supposed to be, and start your path to happiness.

I have always been a fan of wearing dark lipstick. Red, berry and wine shades seemed to suit me better than light pink or nude, so I rested there comfortably for quite some time. Recently, however, I have been itching to lighten up. In lieu of my typical bold lip, I have been reaching for nude

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NÜGG DEPUFF EYE MASKS

Start your mornings off right by applying these just under your eyes where you might be puffy from late-night study sessions. Leave them on for about 20 minutes while sipping your morning coffee, and head to class knowing you look well rested and revitalized.

MAC STROBE CREAM

Give your cheeks a bit of shimmer to offset your matte lips. Dab this on the tops of your cheekbones and on the center of your nose for a more concentrated effect, or mix it in with moisturizer or foundation for an all-over glow.

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The newest breakthrough in foundation is simple: water-based formulas. This product has 20 shades to chose from, all promising to even skin tone and mask blemishes, while staying lightweight and comfortable.

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KAT VON D LIQUID LIPSTICKS

Matte lips are all the rage right now. Try out a dark nude, like “Lolita,” or go wild with “Echo,” a navy blue, and be amazed as it lasts through classes, studying and ordering pizza with your friends.


TAKING CHARGE O BY CLAIRE HORNACEK, DEPUTY EDITOR PHOTO COURTESY OF FABIAN BLANK, UNSPLASH | ILLUSTRATION BY ALEXANDRA FOLINO 12 | SEPTEMBER 2016


& After a long summer, it’s time to get back into the usual routine as the school year begins. During those warmer months, it can be easy to lose track of spending between the long nights out, raging concerts and weekend getaways. Use the fresh start of a new school year to get back on track with your spending.

MONTHLY INCOME

Calculate your monthly income. If you are on an hourly wage simply determine the hours you expect to work each week and multiply it by your wage. For jobs that rely on tips, like serving or bartending, try to find the average amount you make each week (but it may be better to plan for less if your tips vary greatly from week to week).

RECURRING COSTS

What expenses can you expect to pay each month? This includes rent and utilities, food, gym memberships, car payments and streaming services. Ensure that these costs can easily be covered by your monthly income. These costs should not account for more than half of your monthly income.

FIND WAYS TO SAVE MONEY

Look at your spending history and find areas where you can cut costs. Give yourself a monthly spending limit on “want” items like clothes, makeup and shoes. Experts recommend spending no more than about one third of your monthly income on unessential purchases. Food can be tricky because you need to eat but there are ways to save by spending smart on food. Look at bank statements or keep all your food receipts for a week to calculate approximate food costs. Based on your monthly

a guide to

SAVING

SPENDING income, decide how much you feel comfortable spending on food and drinks. Cooking at home with friends can be even more fun than going out to dinner and the savings are an added bonus. Save money at bars by capitalizing on drink specials or try ordering a water every other drink (you’ll feel so much better the next day, too).

CREDIT CARDS

Only use credit cards to pay for what you can afford! Credit card debt adds up quickly and can take years to pay off. However, if you are making purchases you can afford, charging them to your card and paying them off at the end of the month helps build up a strong credit score. Having a good credit score can make it easier to get loans or make large purchases in the future. If you are struggling with credit card debt, go to your bank and ask to meet with a financial advisor who can help you get back on track.

BUDGET FOR EXPENSIVE PURCHASES

Whether you know you’ll need to buy a car after graduation or you’re planning a big spring break trip, determine how much money you’ll need for the purchase and when you’ll need it by. Then calculate how much money you’ll need to take out of each paycheck to reach your goal.

SAVE

Try to save about 20% of your monthly income. This money can be used to pay off student loans or as a cushion if you find yourself out of work for a month or two.

OF YOUR FINANCES SEPTEMBER 2016 | 13


COLORING

THE

CONTROVER SIAL 2016 PRESIDENTIAL

E L E C T I O N BY EVA-DELILAH WIELAND, ARTS EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Since the success of any politician depends on his or her persuasive power, the presidential election season brings with it an overwhelming amount of media aimed at winning over the public. In the heat of a particularly controversial 2016 presidential election season, the eyes of the world have turned to America, bringing with its increased attention an increased effort to influence the American vote. In order to weigh in on the race between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump, artists have used various mediums to highlight scandals associated with the candidates, evoke emotion and shape opinions.

POLITICAL CARTOONS

The use of political cartoons to criticize politicians and their policies dates back to pre-Revolutionary War America. They utilize humor and drama to bring attention to serious matters. In the cartoon to the right (1), John Micek depicts a villainous Clinton about to set fire to files which are labeled with controversial topics from her political career. The box labeled “classified emails” refers to Clinton’s use of a private email server while serving as United States Secretary of State instead of a State Department account. After an FBI investigation into her use of the private server, it recommended that charges not be pressed against her in July 2016. While some were outraged by the lack of repercussions for Clinton, others defend that she did not know the use of the private server was wrong. As Clinton is about to set fire to the files, covering up the scandals, she says “Let’s get to the bottom of UFOs instead.” Micek created the speech bubble to highlight her avoidance of the controversy surrounding her and uses Clinton’s own campaign logo to allude to her secrecy. On the other side, an anti-Trump (2) cartoon by Henry Payne illustrates Donald Trump as a bomb being carried by a plane labeled GOP. The speech bubble stemming from the plane’s pilot highlights the potential loss of the Hispanic vote for the Republican Party due to controversial statements Trump has made regarding the community throughout his campaign. His disrespect of Hispanic culture and its people throughout his campaign could have a major impact on the election outcome, as it has greatly limited his chances of winning over a significant population.

VERMEER TO POP ART

Some artists also use traditional art pieces and styles to induce emotion and associate the politicians with the moods of existing works. Rodney Pike created a reinterpretation of Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earing to support Clinton (3). In the rendition, the artist replaces the shy, seductive, youthful face of the girl in the original painting with a brazen Clinton. She remains classic and sophisticated in her rich colored clothing, but the mood of the piece is revamped to highlight Clinton’s strong and energetic character. In a piece using the pop art style, an unknown artist shines a positive light on Trump (4). By utilizing primary patriotic colors and including an American flag print on his jacket, the artist encourages audiences to feel pride. The simple and bold word “hero”, along with the serious expression on Trump’s face portray a clear message of power and strength.

STREET ART

Public opinion often emerges through street art with artists using the sides of buildings to produce easily accessible critiques of society and its leaders. Australian street artist Lushsux created the mural of a sexualized Clinton in a USA swimsuit with rosey cheeks and large, mostly exposed breasts on a building in Melbourne, Australia (5). When authorities reported many complaints, the artist edited the piece, painting over the sexual imagery with Muslim garb and a burqa. By covering up the overt sexuality of the original piece, the artist removed the aspects that were outraging viewers. The artist anticipated that some audience members would still be displeased by his work and added, “If this Muslim woman offends u, u r a bigot, racist, sexist islamophobe,” drawing attention to intolerance when it comes to these political issues. Another piece of powerful street art criticizes Trump’s complementary relationship with Vladimir Putin with graffiti of the two kissing on a building in Vilnius, Lithuania(6). The work by local artist Mindaugas Bonanu quickly went viral, gaining attention around the world. The graffiti confronts both Trump’s and Putin’s homophobic reputations while portraying suspicion through the tense embrace and slightly open eyes.


6

MINDAUGAS BONANU CNN

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LUSHSUX, DAILY PAKISTAN GLOBAL

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RODNEY PIKE, FEATURED E MAGAZINE

POLLHYPE

1

NATE BEELER, OBSERVER DISPATCH

2

HENRY PAYNE, TOWNHALL


Take

Notice,

Take

Charge WHY BORROW FROM THE BOYS WHEN YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL TO YOURSELF? VICTORIA DIOR PHOTOGRAPHED BY KELLY CASSEL MAKEUP BY JENNA HAYES CREATIVE DIRECTORS: KELSEY DAYKIN AND REILLY KOCH SPECIAL THANKS TO DEB REIMER FROM MILWAUKEE FASHION WEEK AND JAY W. FILTER


BLAZER | MADEWELL BRALETTE | PINS AND NEEDLES PANTS | J. CREW SHOES | MADEWELL BAG | LONGCHAMP SUNGLASSES | RAY BAN


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JACKET | CHAPS

SEPTEMBER 2016 | 25


let’s talk about sex, maybe?

WHY WHY TAKING TAKING CHARGE CHARGE OF OF SEX SEX ED ED IS IS PARAMOUNT PARAMOUNT BY ALEXANDRA FOLINO, CONTRIBUTING WRITER PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALEXANDRA FOLINO

We teach children about the rights and wrongs of life as they grow older: that forgetting to apply sunscreen may consequently result in an obnoxious sunburn, that choosing not to do your homework will result in a failing grade and that junk food is not always the best option. But when it comes to sexual health, why should it be any different? It’s obvious: the United States’ sexual education system is failing American youth. Rising STI rates, increasingly high rates of teen pregnancy amongst industrialized nations1, inaccurate or incomplete sexual education, a lack of inclusive environments where individuals feel safe to express their gender and sexuality and the prioritization of a penis-owner’s pleasure over a vaginaowner’s all illustrate precisely this. The Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States recently released a statement that “over the past 25 years, Congress has spent over $1.5 billion on abstinence-onlyuntil-marriage programs, yet no study in a professional peerreviewed journal has found these programs to be broadly effective.”2 Abstinence-Only Education is geared at educating youth and teens not to engage in any sexual behavior prior to marriage, treating abstinence as a contraceptive and the only safe sex practice that is morally correct. This education often excludes any discussion of sexual and reproductive health. Abstinence-Only Education operates under an assumption that fear of unwanted pregnancy and STI transmittance will outweigh cultural influence, pressure and curiosity. AbstinencePlus Education includes discussion of contraception, yet strongly infuses the importance of abstinence in its lessons. Comprehensive 26 | SEPTEMBERSexual 2016 Education includes complete sexual

health information including contraception, STIs and teaches “interpersonal and communication skills and helps young people explore their own values, goals, and options.”3 Sexual education models from other countries such as the Netherlands, Germany and France illustrate how to teach adolescents to make safe, healthy and responsible sexual decisions even if they choose to stay abstinent until marriage. Additionally, these models include fully comprehensive information about sexual anatomy including female pleasure, and ultimately foster a more inclusive environment to those who differ from society’s current heteronormative and cis standards.

THE HEALTH RISKS OF SILENCE

Denying children and youth access to comprehensive sexual education can ultimately be harmful to their sexual health, and it is overwhelmingly important to recognize this fact. Indeed, one has virtually no risk of unintended pregnancy, or contracting sexually transmitted infections by practicing abstinence. However, studies have shown that only 1 in 30 Americans successfully wait until marriage to have sexual intercourse.4 The fact of the matter is that by age 18, 70 percent of females in the US and 62 percent of males have initiated vaginal sex.5 The CDC found in a 2011 survey that 47% of high schoolers reported to have already initiated sex. Although the pregnancy rate for women aged 15-19 dropped to 24.2 per 1,000 in 2014, a record low for US teen pregnancy overall, this rate is still substantially higher than other western industrialized nations.6 The CDC estimates that there are 20 million new cases of sexually transmitted infections yearly.7 Not only are adolescents ultimately at increased risk of


SEPTEMBER 2016 | 27


unintended or unwanted pregnancy, but also STI transmission. Perpetuating misinformation by ignoring the need for access to comprehensive sexual education, or pretending like “sex isn’t happening,” isn’t going to cut it any longer. In fact, studies have shown that comprehensive sexual education is effective at preventing unintended or unwanted pregnancy and the spread of sexually transmitted infections, as well as significant in reducing sexual risk behaviors (Kirby, Laris, Rolleri, 2006). Evidence is strong that comprehensive sexual education programs do not lead to sexual promiscuity, but instead shift behavioral outcomes, such as reducing an individual’s number of sexual partners, decreasing incidences of unprotected sex, delaying the initiation of sex and increasing the usage of contraceptives.8 To put this in perspective, society weighs the moral implications of teaching children about sex against a reality where trends show that the onset of sexual behavior most often occurs both premaritally and at a younger age. They would rather stay silent than publicize sexual behavior as an option that can be experienced safely. Comprehensive sexual education grants adolescents the ability to take control of their own sexual health, providing them sexual agency for the rest of their lives.

SEXUALITY, GENDER & INCLUSIVITY

Denying children comprehensive information about sexuality and gender causes harm by inhibiting them from identifying and expressing their gender and sexuality, all the while preventing non-LGBT students from accessing resources which would increase understanding and empathy toward other students’ gender expression and sexuality. Currently, even our “comprehensive” sexual education struggles to tackle discussions about the multiplicities of identity. A lack of education about gender and sexuality causes children who identify in ways that differ from heterosexual and cis norms to believe that non-cishet-normative orientations are invalid. In fact, by not educating children about gender and sexuality, we reinforce the gender binary and heterosocial norms which exist today. LGBT-inclusive sexual education contributes to ending harassment of LGBT individuals by decreasing the stigma that exists amongst youth and adolescents. In a study by The National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, it was reported that nearly 78 percent of those identifying as transgender or non-gender conforming were bullied in K-12 schooling.9 Additionally, their study found that a shockingly high 41 percent of those transgender and nonconforming individuals reported to have attempted suicide. Educating youth on the spectrums of gender and sexuality allows them to better empathize with LGBT individuals, thereby preventing harmful behaviors in the first place. With faulty education, homosexual cis and transgender students are at a risk of decreased access to proper medical care and at risk of higher STI transmission rates. It has been reported that nearly 90 percent of HIV infections have been attributed to young men ages 13-24 through male-to-male sexual contact.10 Additionally, health educators and healthcare professionals often assume that sexual contact between two vagina-owners is “safe.” It is also reported that women are “reluctant to acknowledge their sexual orientation to their doctor” if they differ from heteronormative standards.11 Moreover, education about gender and sexuality variance will help foster inclusive environments for all and generate knowledge about protecting oneself when engaging in sexual

behaviors as a member of the LGBT community. Educating youth about the multiplicities of identities in regard to sexuality and gender allows the breakdown of the idea that cisgender and heterosexual expression are the only accepted ideals, generating social inclusivity for LGBT individuals.

WOMEN AND PLEASURE

Classically, vagina-owner’s get the “short end of the stick” when it comes to sexual pleasure. From pregnancy, childcare and contraceptive use, to the loss of virginity being synonymous with pain and emotional turbulence, those with uteruses are often left with the responsibilities and burdens that come along with the bedroom. Understanding that sexual asymmetry stems from many historical, cultural and societal influences, as well as gendered assumptions about genitals and the gender hierarchy, we must actively acknowledge that comprehensive sexual education today plays a huge role in evening out the playing field for all sexes. In abstinence-only education, youth are provided knowledge about internal reproductive anatomy and sexual intercourse for the purpose of reproduction (and often, reproduction only). In fact, an organization called Abstinence Clearinghouse believes that “diagrams of internal organs are acceptable, but images or pictures of external genitalia in any form, whether diseased or healthy, can be detrimental to the health of young men and women’s minds.” 12 Because of the potential moral implications of teaching sex with these anatomical diagrams, educators often stick to teaching sex as what is necessary for sperm ejaculation and the fertilization of an egg: male internal organs and external genitalia and female internal reproductive anatomy. The way abstinence-only education delivers information about sexual anatomy perpetuates the idea that a girl would not be interested in sex for pleasure and yet a normal boy always would. The Guttmacher Institute reported that more than half of 7th to 12th graders report to having learned about sexual education from the internet, yet in a recent study of nearly 117 sexual health websites “46% of those [articles] addressing contraception and 35% of those addressing abortion contained inaccurate information.” 13 Abstinenceonly education in combination with an internet “education” is grounds for misinformation, which is problematic. This lack of adequate information about sex contributes to what is known as the “orgasm gap,” a discrepancy between experiences of orgasm between heterosexual partners. Research from a large-survey study has shown that in heterosexual partner sex, for every three orgasms a penisowner has, their vagina-owning counterpart experiences one.14 Consider what occurs when we educate an individual about reproductive anatomy that excludes female external anatomy: naturally by excluding education on the capacity for vulval pleasure, we perpetuate the idea that sexual intercourse typically includes a penis-owner’s orgasm, but not necessarily that of a vulva-owner. Regardless of historical and cultural contexts surrounding female pleasure, a society that frames sexual experience as male-priority over female-priority, and one that regards those with a vagina as the solely-responsible partner, can lead to unhealthy, uneven and unsatisfying relationships. Comprehensive sexual education, including full sexual anatomy and its variance, can educate partners while defeating an existing double standard.


“pretending like

WHAT WE CAN DO BETTER

Sexual education practices that have been successful at informing the country’s youth are exhibited in countries like the Netherlands, Germany and France, where governments support comprehensive sex education, and public health policy is not controlled by religious and political interest groups. Societal openness towards sex is generated both through a variety of campaigns that focus both on humor and pleasure, while reinforcing the assumption that adolescents are expected to act responsibly if given the proper education and resources.15 Comprehensive sex education acknowledges that adolescents may ultimately choose to be sexually active, either as a young adult or as an adult prior to marriage, and thus sexual education that is comprehensive provides resources and knowledge to prevent unintended/unwanted pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. This comprehensive education emphasizes healthy relationships, free expression of sexuality and gender, as well thoroughly informs youth about their bodies allowing them to take ownership of their own sexual health. The good news? Thanks to the Obama Administration, for the first time in 25 years no government funds will be allocated for abstinence-only education.16 Yet it is in the hands of our educators, lobbyists, parents and politicians to continue to act upon improving our nation’s sexual education system and programs to provide for and encourage adolescent sexual agency.

‘sex isn’t happening,’ isn’t going to cut it any longer.”

SOURCES: 1. Advocates for Youth, Unintended Pregnancy Among Young People in the United States 2. SIECUS, 2009 3. Advocates for Youth, Sex Education Programs: Definitions & Point-by-Point Comparison 4. CDC, 2014 5. Mosher WD et al., Sexual behavior and selected health measures: men and women, 15-44 years of age, United States, 2002 6. CDC, 2016, About Teen Pregnancy: Teen Pregnancy in the United States 7. CDC, 2015 8. Advocates for Youth, Effective Sex Education 9. The National Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Injustice at Every Turn: A Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey 10. Advocates for Youth, HIV/STI Prevention 11. Advocates for Youth, Young Women Who Have Sex with Women 12. Kay, Julie F. and Ashley Jackson, Sex, Lies & Stereotypes: How AbstinenceOnly Programs Harm Women And Girls 13. Guttmacher Institute, American Teens Sources of Sexual Education 14. Laumann, Gagnon, and Michaels, The Social Organization of Sexuality: Sexual Practices in the United States 15. Advocates for Youth, Facts About European Approaches 16. NYT, President Obama cuts funding for all abstinence-only sex education


Reasons to Unplug: BY DARBY HOFFMAN, LIFESTYLE EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARISSA HAEGELE Despite the fact that you are reading this in a digital format, I am about to tell you to put away the technology. Oh the irony. That’s right, I’m calling for a digital detox. Obsession with and total dependency on our electronics has gone from a sarcastic exaggeration to an unfortunate, screen-lit reality. The days of operating without our devices have instead been replaced by a plague of FOMO, selfies and an app for everything. Rather than critique this digital dependency, many have accepted the transition as simply a change in time and culture. However, acknowledging this excessive reliance on technology and changing one’s behaviors accordingly can generate benefits for one’s self and the world around us. The improvements to a person’s health and productivity that come from distancing yourself from technology are not few. One of the most significant health benefits, however, is an increased ability to sleep. The dangers of blue light emitted from screens are especially prevalent before bed. Monitoring screen time leads to easier high-quality sleep, and one can expect to see differences in both energy levels and feelings of hunger. According to the University of California- Los Angeles (UCLA), “bright light reduces levels of the hormone melatonin, which regulates sleep, and…increases ghrelin, which makes you feel hungry,” therefore, overusing technology can “make us gain weight not just because we’re more sedentary, but because of their effect on our sleep cycles,” said UCLA Chancellor Gene Block.1 Additional health risks connected to blue light exposure include diabetes, heart disease, obesity and several types of cancer, including breast and prostate.2 The effects of technology can also affect a person’s productivity and ability to perform. For example, consider all of the times when your cell phone kept you from completing your homework, or when opening your laptop prevented you from reading a book or going on a hike. In November of 2015, CNN reported that teens spent approximately nine hours per day using media.3

THE PLANET AND YOU This number purely reflects media used for leisure, not those used for school or homework. This exceeds the amount of time spent in school, socializing with family or friends and sleeping.4 By shutting down the devices and focusing your energy (now improved by the lack of blue light) on other tasks, you will check off more on your “To Do” list. Redirect your time into worthwhile activities and leave the cell phone at home. Not only will your health and well-being improve from a digital detox, but doing so will also benefit the planet. According to “The Green Book” by Elizabeth Rogers and Thomas M. Kostigen, “ten percent of the electricity used in your home is burned by communication devices and appliances- when they are turned off.”[5] Consider the amount of additional power used when your phone, tablet or laptop is actually charging! Being a conscious consumer of energy not only acts in your own selfinterest, but also requires the use of less power and the emission of less fossil fuels. This, in turn, creates a lesser toll on the planet and its resources. Disconnecting from technology is difficult, especially with the influential role our devices play in our lives. However, your effort to undergo this change will be rewarded by better sleep, a suppressed, more natural appetite and a healthier world all around you. Pick up a book, go for a walk or meet up with friends for lunch. There are millions of activities to entertain yourself with. Consider these many opportunities and the advantages that accompany them, rather than giving in to the habits of ‘Liking’ and ‘Tweeting’ your days away. Your body and your planet will thank you. SOURCES: 1. newsroom.ucla.edu 2. www.health.harvard.edu 3. www.cnn.com 4. www.hhs.gov 5. The Green Book: The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time


BALMAIN

LEADING THE BRAND BY JAMESON ZABALLOS, MEN’S EDITOR

The recent departure of Hedi Slimane as creative director of Yves Saint Laurent left a sizable impression on the fashion world. He had just orchestrated a years-in-the-making redo of the entire YSL brand and aesthetic, achieving a meteoric makeover on par with Tom Ford’s famous revival of Gucci. This new branding (complete with a name change, from Yves Saint

Laurent to Saint Laurent Paris) captured the youthful rock n’ roll culture which the founder, Yves, drew upon. It’s also no secret that prominent creative directors enamoring the youth masses has been a successful strategy as of late. Olivier Rousteing, the drop-dead-gorgeous creative director of Balmain, has taken Instagram by storm, amassing almost 4 million followers and SEPTEMBER 2016 | 31


propelling Balmain onto the screens of every fashion-forward individual across the globe. Using everyone from Rihanna to the Kardashians, the lifestyle pitch that Olivier and Balmain have put forth makes Balmain’s aesthetic of the sexy, glamorous lifestyle accessible to most anyone. These creative directors have seemingly replaced the label with themselves in terms of who represents the label and the brand, and they’ve both enjoyed success. Why, then, was Hedi fired, while Olivier praised? To answer that question, diving into the reinvented YSL aesthetic is a must. Hedi’s gender-fluid rocker chic was plastered everywhere fashion was relevant. The edgy, provocative advertisements paired with the grunge afterparties to his fashion shows simultaneously brought a massive nostalgia trip (one of the headliners for the show was Joan Jett & the Blackhearts) and crafted a desirable lifestyle image that makes up every successful brand today. Models were thin, androgynous and beautiful. The clothing was merging the line between male and female, with slim cuts and high armholes. The iconic YSL brand, though, had changed as a result of it. His decision to rename to Saint Laurent Paris was met with fury from the media, but the designer stuck to his guns, arguing the change of look under his direction while hearkening back to the Yves of Paris. Oddly enough, he himself placed a different city on the map, by relocation to Los Angeles once he got the gig at YSL. Unsurprisingly, LA is now a hotbed for contemporary fashion. He even added a new dimension to couture by throwing choice items on his website year-round, as opposed to offering each season on its own. They don’t go out of style, and the pricing is competitive (as far as high fashion goes). He was turning the iconic brand on its head, and it seems the higher-ups weren’t appreciating the increased revenue (a lot of revenue) at the cost of reinvention. His rebranding was by all accounts successful - the ever-elusive youth market was eating it up, sales were through the roof and each fashion show received steady and bountiful praise. But when you take a storied house like Yves and turn it inside out, sometimes the success doesn’t matter. In fact, the reason I’ve been using YSL and not the rebranding, SLP, is because the higher-ups at Yves changed the name back post-Hedi’s departure, and labeled his three-year collection tenure as separate from the YSL brand. They even used YSL in their official press release announcing his departure. As if that wasn’t passive-aggressive enough, Yves deleted every single Instagram post from the Hedi era. It’s hard to imagine a harder rejection than that. And while Hedi’s attempts at capturing the youth was met with a mediocre-at-best response from the execs, we can look to Balmain as an example of the opposite.

“AS EACH CREATIVE DIRECTOR TAKES CHARGE OF RUNNING THE LABEL, THE FOCUS SHIFTS FROM THE VISION OF THE BRAND TO THE VISION OF THE DIRECTOR.” Olivier Rousteing is just 30 years old and he’s had more of an effect on the fashion world than some designers have in their lifetimes. Admittedly, the Balmain aesthetic of sexy, exclusive parties and high-energy lifestyles (think the celebrity we all wish we could be) hasn’t changed too much. But his marketing machine has been running full steam since the Instagram was started with no signs of stopping. It’s one thing to have the Insta presence of Olivier, but he’s taken it to another level with his use of celebs. Everyone from Rihanna to the cast of the Kardashians has been involved in his shows and his Instagram. His label has become nearly synonymous with the celebrity lifestyle. The prominence of his models, from Kendall Jenner to Kim Kardashian, propels the brand by itself, piggybacking off the success and following of the celebs they feature.

YVES SAINT LAURENT Kanye West even blurred the lines between music video and fashion show, releasing the much-anticipated video to “Wolves” featuring Balmain apparel and prominent models. It gets noticed. As if his success as a creative director wasn’t enough, he’s added another dimension to the fashion house in the digital age with his relentless push of social media fandom. His Instagram has nearly as many followers as the official Balmain Instagram, and that’s not by accident. As each couture house pushes its lifestyle, Olivier takes it one step further by offering the lifestyle as an Instagram account that feels exceedingly accessible and infinitely more personal. Fashion is more than clothes, it’s a lifestyle and aesthetic that’s offered as a price. The reason brands like Tom Ford are so successful isn’t that they advertises clothes, it’s that they advertise a lifestyle that everyone lusts after and strives for. Crafting such a successful following on social media makes that lifestyle infinitely more accessible and desirable for the masses. And that’s where Olivier has completely succeeded. Even though both creative directors have experienced a definable level of success, they did so in different ways, and while redefining the aesthetic of a label and embracing the 21st century aren’t necessarily compatible, they both adapted successfully to the times. While Olivier has successfully maintained the Balmain lifestyle in his lines, he’s simultaneously capitalized on the youth movement that so desperately craves an accessible aesthetic. Heidi did an arguably equally successful job, but changing the direction of the brand didn’t rub the right way with his bosses, and he stepped down. As each creative director takes charge of running the label, the focus shifts from the vision of the brand to the vision of the director. With both Hedi and Olivier, the success was measurable and viewable, but the reactions from the industry were polarizing. It remains to be seen if the trend of creative directors leading the brand will last, but if recent news is any indication, you should be checking your favorite designer’s Instagram more often.


SONGOFSTYLE.COM

PIN THIS,

patch that.

BY ASHLEY NG, FASHION EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

WHAT ARE PINS AND PATCHES?

For all you 90s babies out there, you may recognize these tiny treasures from your childhood. No, I’m not talking about the daisy or brownie insignias that decorated your Girl Scout vest, but I promise they’re worthwhile (Girl Scout’s honor). If you’ve been stalking this summer’s street style, you’ve probably noticed denim embellished with rock n’ roll logos and bomber jackets covered in nonsense words. Since the last DIY craze, people have seized the opportunity to reinvent their old clothes. Pins and patches are the ultimate way to personalize your style.

WHEN DID THE TREND BEGIN?

Believe it or not, pins and patches are nothing new. We saw pins and patches make their first major appearances during the counterculture hippie movement of the 60s. Hippies sought to achieve harmonious living which was the basis of their social, spiritual and economic beliefs. They steered clear of Western middle-class values in attempt to create their own. Not surprisingly, their style diverged from mainstream attire. Crisp collared shirts and pleated slacks were replaced by flowy dresses; uniform pinstripes were replaced by flowers and peace signs.

WHO WEARS THEM?

Not too long ago, we witnessed the revival of playful patches strutting down the runway in the 3.1 Phillip Lim Fall 2013 ReadyTo-Wear collection. This look was tastefully pulled off by fashion blogger, Aimee Song, better known by her blog name Song of Style, who paired the jeans with a plaid shirt and red Celine heels for a feminine touch. Shortly after, supermodels Cara Delevingne and Jordan Dunn rocked patchwork in the DKNY 2014 Spring/Summer Ad Campaign.

WHY DO WE LOVE THEM?

Every stereotype regarding our generation is true. We’re headstrong. We’re opinionated. And we like to be heard. But who says those are necessarily bad traits? We’re not afraid to wear our beliefs on our sleeves, literally. One of the beauties of pins and patches is the endless selection of icons in any shape or size. That means you get to be in charge of your style.

WHERE CAN YOU GET THEM?

Pins and Patches are popping up in several places, online and in-stores. Hit up Urban Outfitters or Nasty Gal for staple pieces,


DKNY CAMPAIGN

including rainbow patches and pizza pins. If you’re looking for more rare, vintage pieces, Etsy is home to several independent artists selling their punk rock patches and cat pins. You can also find button pins inspired by contemporary social, political and religious stances.

1

Start with your favorite pin/patch and work around that piece. This not only gives you a great starting point, but it’ll draw more attention to that particular pin/patch.

HOW DO YOU WEAR THEM?

Once you have all of your favorite pins and patches picked out, you’ll need to find an article of clothing to flaunt them. Think about the layout you’re trying to achieve and go from there. Do you want a busy scene filled with overlapping patches? Or would you prefer a simple design with a few scattered pins? Popular options to choose from include denim, collared shirts, bomber jackets, baseball hats and backpacks. Now onto the fun stuff. Placement is crucial when it comes to the overall aesthetic of the piece. Keep in mind, there is no right or wrong way to do it. If you find yourself overwhelmed and unsure where to begin, consider the following tips:

34 | SEPTEMBER 2016

3

2

Stagger the sizes of your pins/patches so that they’re aesthetically balanced.

Don’t be afraid to have some lone patches/pins and some overlapping.

5

4

Try orienting your pins/patches differently. You can place some sideways, diagonally and even upside down.

Have fun with it! Your clothes should be inspired by you, so create a piece that’s true to your style!


LIVE LONG AND

PROSPER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

DIVERSE LEGACY,

50 YEARS ON BY HALEY NIPPERT, CULTURE EDITOR

IMAGE: UNSPLASH

SEPTEMBER 2016 | 35


The first episode of Star Trek aired 50 years ago this month on September 8, 1966. Since that time, from its spinoffs to the most recent film reboot, the series continues to enrapture and inspire audiences. Star Trek differs from most major science fiction television and film series in a big way: instead of focusing on a bleak future, where politics and other divisive issues have resulted in the fractioning of different groups or some Great Evil taking power (see Star Wars, Battlestar Galactica and even Firefly), Star Trek presents an often idyllic vision for the future of the universe. As its opening title sequence reads, the mission of both the Enterprise—and arguably the series itself—is “to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.” Star Trek is not simply about mankind’s ability to overcome, but also the capacity for ingenuity, the positive values of curiosity and exploration and, above all, the importance of learning about and working with those of different cultures. These values do not simply translate in the on screen universe, but in the intentional behind-the-scenes choices made by the cast and crew. The original Star Trek series came about during a time of turmoil and social change. Not only was the Cold War ongoing, but the Civil Rights Movement was in full swing, along with the sexual revolution of the 60s. Star Trek, a series which envisioned a future “without conflict and without want or need,” seemed to come at exactly the right time.1 Gene Roddenberry, the creator of Star Trek, had the vision of a crew diverse in both race and species, and this played out in the series’ casting choices. Not only was Leonard Nimoy, a Jewish actor, cast as Spock, the Enterprise’s Vulcan First Officer, but Nichelle Nichols and George Takei originated the roles of Lieutenant Uhura and Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu, respectively. In fact, with her role as Lt. Uhura, Nichols became the first African-American to hold a regular series role on a major network television show.2

MIRROR.CO.UK

Despite the historic nature of her role, Nichols sought to break from her contract after the first season to pursue her dream of being a Broadway star. In an interview with NPR, Nichols revealed that it was due to the intervention of Martin Luther King, Jr., and his stressing that her role was “the first time, [African-Americans] are being seen the world over as we should be seen,” that she decided to remain part of the show.3 It was rather significant that she did so; her role as Lt. Uhura would inspire Whoopi Goldberg and LeVar Burton, both of whom would go on to star in Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) nearly 20 years later.4 The importance of the representation provided by Star Trek’s interracial cast also finds its way into the Alternate Original Series, which began with 2009’s Star Trek. John Cho, who took over the role of Lt. Sulu, credits the character’s originator, George Takei, with inspiring him as a child. Cho revealed on the Today Show that “I just didn’t see anyone on TV who looked like me, and then I saw George Takei being cool and piloting the spaceship on television.”5 He referred to Takei as a “beacon,” echoing the feelings of many individuals who are deprived of representation in media. The opportunity for someone, particularly minorities and children, to see people like them in positions of authority or portrayed in a positive light, allows them to envision more for themselves than what they had previously believed possible. With the July release of Star Trek: Beyond, Cho himself became a beacon of representation within the Star Trek universe: his character, Lt. Sulu, was revealed to have a husband, making him the first LGBT character in Star Trek history.

PROJECTORREVIEWS.COM


THE NEXT GENERATION

Though Star Trek (1966) would end in 1969 after three seasons—only a month before the first man would land on the moon—its impact continues to be felt today. Beginning with The Animated Series in 1973, the series has spawned five television spinoffs, a plethora of comics and novelizations and a total of 13 feature films. From the introduction of the Star Trek universe’s first female captain, Captain Kathyrn Janeway (Kate Mulgrew, Voyager) to relating the complexities of humanity through TNG’s android, Lieutenant Commander Data (Brent Spiner), each one has done its part in preserving Roddenberry’s vision and the legacy of the original series.6 The universe of Star Trek will continue to expand with the upcoming of Star Trek: Discovery in 2017. Created by Bryan Fuller, who previously worked on both Deep Space Nine and Voyager, and Alex Kurtzman, a veteran of 2013’s Into Darkness, Discovery will take place ten years before the original series and focus on a Lieutenant Commander, as opposed to a chief commanding officer like in other Star Trek shows.7 The real excitement comes when looking at Fuller’s vision for Discovery. Not only will viewers get “to see a character from a different perspective on the starship,” but it will be a female Lieutenant Commander heading the series, and more than likely she will be a minority.8 This will mark the second time a woman has taken the lead in a Star Trek series, and is an important shift in the genre of science fiction, which continues to be rather unwelcoming to female fans. In fact, the first pilot for the original series had to be re-shot, in part due to the presence of a female first officer which was seen as unacceptable at the time.1 By presenting a female lead, Discovery creates a space for women to take ownership of their place in both Trekkie fandom and its respective genre.

Though casting has not been announced, Heather Kadin, a co-executive producer for Discovery, revealed at San Diego Comic Con that the series will “feature female, minority, and LGBTQ characters.”9 Of particular note is the purposeful inclusion of LGBT characters. Despite its long history of inclusion, until the release of Beyond this past July, Star Trek had never featured an LGBT character. Discovery comes with the promise of not only more representation for the LGBT community in mainstream media, but also a greater inclusivity in what is one of the best loved science fiction series of all time. For 50 years, Star Trek has been pushing boundaries, whether they are those of space or present day cultural attitudes. Roddenberry created a vision of a diverse future, where our greatest strength lies in working together with those of other races, sexualities and species, and where the capacity for curiosity, hope and discovery outweighs any arbitrary distinctions drawn between people. Star Trek has always aimed to show the best of people, to reveal what we can be by breaking down the attitudes that prevent us from seeing what we share. Even though the future remains uncertain, we can always be sure that Star Trek will continue to boldly go where no one has gone before. SOURCES: 1. Star Trek: Making History. (2013, May 30). Star: Star Trek Collector’s Edition, 12-25. 2. Ibid 3. NPR, Star Trek’s Uhura Reflects On MLK Encounter 4. Star Trek: Making History 5. NBC, Nguyen, M., John Cho on ‘Today’: George Takei Was a ‘Beacon’ for Me. 6. Star Trek: Making History 7. ew.com, Hibberd, J., ‘Star Trek’: Major details revealed about new TV show 8. Ibid 9. trekmovie.com, EXCLUSIVE: Star Trek: Discovery Producers on Ship’s Design, Show’s Themes

SEPTEMBER 2016 | 37


NOT ALL SUPERHEROS WEAR CAPES. LOOKS INSPIRED BY SUPERHEROESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SIGNATURE PIECES. DIRECTED BY ALEXA CARLSON AND ASHLEY NG SAVANNAH THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHED BY NOLAN FERLIC


TOP & SHORTS | STYLIST’S OWN NECKLACE | STYLIST’S OWN


BODYSUIT | FOREVER 21 SHORTS | ZARA BRACELET | STYLISTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OWN SHOES | ALDO


DRESS | ASOS BRACELETS | STYLISTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OWN SHOES | ALDO


BOOTS | UNISA


Moda Magazine: September 2016 Issue  
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