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Accent MidAmerica Nazarene University

Summer 2013

Prepared For The Future MNU Experience Sciences Prepare Grads for Professions

04

Adventures in Africa

14

Alum Finds New Vocation

$450K Raised for Scholarships

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President’s Honors Sets Record


From the President

Living On Purpose In recent years, our national leaders and the popular media have repeatedly stated that the purpose of an education is to get a job. The pursuit of a career is a worthy one, but the mission of a Christ-centered university is to extend to students the challenge of pursuing an even higher calling. At MNU, our mission is to encourage students to pursue a more excellent path that extends beyond a job or financial success — it is a life of significance. Martin Luther wrote that “vocation” is based on a strong belief that God has created each person with gifts and talents that can only be fulfilled through a life of purpose. Such purpose must be lived out before God, one’s family, the world and in one’s work. Vocation traditionally denoted a life of religious service, solitude or priesthood, but Luther expanded the idea of vocation to include all those who seek to live truly meaningful lives through service. Choosing a vocation may involve selecting a major or course of study, but it also represents a deep personal desire to pursue a life of purpose. The pressure students feel to choose a major, decide what they are going to do, then “get it right” often neglects the significance of finding a God-breathed purpose and vocation. Whether you’re a teacher, physician, nurse or pastor, true vocation in the Christian life first demands a commitment to excellence, an affirmation of one’s calling, persistent faith in God and a deep personal devotion to God’s purposes in all aspects of life. For generations, MidAmerica Nazarene University has produced outstanding graduates who have achieved success in many professions. The true measure of success and the fulfillment of our university mission will be formed by those who have discovered their calling and live it out — on purpose.

Dr. David J. Spittal

President

Volume 37, Number 2 Managing Editor

Art and Design

Carol (Knight '81, MA '08) Best

Josh Klekamp ('09) Kelly (Lawler '11) Chesley April (Loomis '92) Hansen Jeremy Hoffpauir

Contributing Editor Kim (Suderman '05) Campbell

Contributors Kelsey Luffman ('13) Katy Ward (CS '14) Chad Jenkins

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Photographers Josh Klekamp ('09) Dan Videtich

Accent is published by MidAmerica Nazarene University and mailed free to alumni, friends and supporters of MNU. It is produced for University Advancement by the MNU Marketing and Communications Office. Postage is paid at Olathe, Kan., and additional mailing offices. News or comments: accent@mnu.edu


Table of Contents

The MNU Experience

04

Pre-professional majors excel

Commencement 2013

06

42nd annual celebration

Why I Teach

10

Sociologist Bo Cassell

06

Adventures in Africa

14

14

Journalist’s experience of a lifetime

President’s Honors

18

Gala photo gallery celebrates achievement

Focused Experience

22

Interns gain vital experience in broadcasting, marine biology and politics

Going Pro

18

22

24

Alums back on the field in arena football league

On The Cover Graduates Leslie Smith ('13), music education major, and Melinda Bond ('13), elementary education major, after commencement May 12, 2013.

Find even more online at www.mnu.edu/accent. Helpful Links

Stay Connected

Articles

www.mnu.edu/alumni www.mnu.edu/give www.mnu.edu/student-referral (Undergrad) www.mnu.edu/referral (Professional & Grad)

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04 10 14 18 22 24

President’s Message Campus News Faculty News Athletics Advancing MNU Alumni News

Outstanding Pre-professionals Why I Teach Adventures In Africa Photo Gallery Vital Preparation: Internships Going Pro

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Article Title

The MNU Experience Outstanding Students Prep for Professional Careers at MNU by Kelsey Luffman

Think that choosing MNU – a small, private, liberal arts university in Kansas – will limit your opportunities for making a difference in the professional world? Think again. Six of MNU’s pre-professional graduates tell the story of finding their paths, achieving their goals and getting accepted to the graduate schools of their dreams. This year, three biology and three kinesiology new graduates have something in common. Though their fields of study and career goals are different, each one has become equipped for their future by choosing MNU – and now, they’ve all been accepted into top-tier graduate programs. “These are some of our best people altogether,” says Professor of Biology Steve Cole. “They’re all excellent, but they’re all different from each other.” Though each student has a unique story and career ambition, they’ve each found that

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The MNU Experience “My time at MNU continually reinforced my decision to become a physical therapist,” Jessica says. “Because of my classes at MNU, I have had enough exposure to the field that I have no doubt I will like being a PT.” But do students have as many opportunities at MNU as they would at other universities? Our pre-professionals have a simple answer to that question – more. Biology major Ethan Alexander (’13) will be pursuing his Doctor of Medicine (MD) at KU School of Medicine. Alexander says that, in reality, other schools don’t compare with the personalized attention at MNU. “I was once scared that being at a small university would hurt my chances of acceptance, especially in a field like science,” Ethan says. “The more I worked, the more I realized that I actually have more access to my professors, as well as things like laboratory instruments and hands-on learning. I feel blessed and prepared (as I can be) for medical school.”

“I’m doing what people told me was impossible,” Christina says. “Part of being a pioneer is doing the impossible.” Additionally, kinesiology major Ben McLane (’13), who will begin his Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) at KU this summer, says that both his major courses and MNU’s general education requirements pushed him to grow as a student. “I've seen a lot of students brush off coursework because it was out of their comfort zone,” Ben says, “but the beautiful thing is that it's only out of your comfort zone until you put in three hours of work.”

MNU provided the perfect foundation for their goals. Kinesiology major Kaitlin Wertz (’13), who will start her master’s program in occupational therapy at the University of Kansas (KU) School of Medicine this summer, says that MNU not only recognized her dream “to help children with special needs reach their greatest potential” – they shared the dream by bringing her closer to achieving it. “When I was trying to decide which college to attend for my prerequisites, MNU was one of the few Christian schools willing to work with me and help me accomplish my goal,” Kaitlin says. Kinesiology major Jessica Gee (’13), who is slated to begin her Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) at KU in June, says MNU gave her the confidence she needed to continue in her career track.

And, of course, all that work eventually paid off for each of these students. Senior biology major Kori Rienbolt (’13), who will begin courses at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry in August, says that after spending four years volunteering and shadowing at dentist offices, getting accepted was worth all the hard work. “I got the most exciting phone call of my life saying that I was accepted,” said Kori. Even beyond the skills they need for their professional programs, our pre-professionals say that MNU has provided them with flexibility. For instance, one student didn’t wait for graduation to start her graduate work. Christina Wilkins (’13) is a biology major with a minor in chemistry. Unlike most undergraduates, she enrolled in her graduate and undergrad programs simultaneously. So when Christina received her bachelor’s degree, she also finished the first year of her Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree at UMKC. “I’m doing what people told me was impossible,” Christina says. “Part of being a pioneer is doing the impossible.” As these six students continue the pursuit of excellence in their graduate work and future careers, they promise to make a difference not only in their professions, but also in the lives of those they serve. “I definitely feel that MNU coursework has prepared me for graduate school,” Kaitlin says. “Not only receiving an education, but receiving it from a Christian perspective, is one of the most valuable things to me. I think [MNU] has shaped me and prepared me not only for grad school, but most importantly, for the rest of my life.” 05 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013


42nd Annual Commencement Family and friends rejoiced with graduates at MNU’s 42nd annual commencement ceremonies May 11-12. The university held two ceremonies: one for Professional & Graduate Studies May 11, and one for Traditional Undergraduate Studies May 12. MNU President David J. Spittal spoke at the Professional & Graduate Studies commencement, and Dr. Elmer L. Gillett, senior pastor of Community Worship Center Church of the Nazarene in

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Brooklyn, N.Y., spoke at the Traditional Undergraduate Studies ceremony. Special awards were distributed during the ceremonies. Dr. Ruth (Gleason ’81) Waggoner, principal of Heatherstone Elementary School in Olathe, Kan., received the Robert I. Brower Award for her excellence as an adjunct professor in the Master of Education program. Traditional seniors Marshall Cloud (’13), a biology major from San Diego, Calif., and Chelsea Coffey (’13), an

organizational leadership major from Wynne, Ark., received the American Heritage Award, MNU’s highest nonacademic undergraduate award.

See more of the weekend fun in the online gallery of 2013 Commencement photos: www.mnu.edu/newsroom/article/ mnu-commencement-2013


Campus News

Kansas Teachers of the Year at MNU: Ramie Allison (MEd ’95), Sue Commons, Colleen Mitchell, Sarah Berlinger, Scott Keltner, Judy Domke, Laura Moyers (MET ’03) and Dyane Smokorowski (MET ’07).

Kansas Teachers of the Year Visit MNU MNU hosted the eight honorees of the 2013 Kansas Teachers of the Year program at a panel discussion for education majors on April 30. The eight honorees travel the state to inspire and motivate future teachers.

Kan.; and Dyane Smokorowski (MET ’07), Kansas Teacher of the Year from Andover, Kan. Smokorowski recently returned from Washington, D.C., where she and winners from other states met President Obama.

Three of the honorees are graduates of MNU’s Master of Education programs: Ramie Allison (MEd ’95), regional teacher of the year from Haysville, Kan.; Laura Moyers (MET ’03), regional teacher of the year from Leavenworth,

MNU Mobile This spring, MNU launched a mobile website designed to provide mobile users, especially potential students, with a streamlined browsing experience.

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To view the site, visit m.mnu.edu.

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Campus Article News Title

Strategic Planning Ongoing MNU leadership is currently engaged in strategic planning consultations with Credo, LLC (www.credohighered.com). Credo representatives met with MNU’s Board of Trustees and MNU employees in a preliminary session May 13, 2013, giving the entire campus community an opportunity to participate in a planning dialogue. Left to right: Rev. Michael Lynch, trustee, pastor of Iowa City Church of the Nazarene; Julie Hiett, administrative assistant, Liberty site; Steve Pillow, assistant professor of education; and others brainstorm during the session.

Nazarene Student Leadership Conference on Campus April 4-7 MNU hosted 130 student leaders from ten North American Nazarene colleges and universities for the Nazarene Student Leadership Conference (NSLC) April 4-7, 2013. In the conference, students were challenged to re-examine servanthood, re-ignite creativity, re-evaluate success, re-address stewardship and rethink leadership. Since 1964, the executive student officers from the North American Nazarene institutions of higher education have come together for NSLC, which emphasizes the development of student leaders. Point Loma Nazarene University, Eastern Nazarene College, Northwest Nazarene University, MNU, Olivet Nazarene University, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Trevecca Nazarene University, Southern Nazarene 08 Accent Magazine / SUmmer 2013

University, Nazarene Bible College, Ambrose University College (Canada) and Nazarene Theological Seminary were represented at this year’s gathering. Photo Caption: NSLC participants enjoyed a barnyard bash at Olathe’s Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop and Farm,

the last remaining stagecoach stop open to the public on the Santa Fe Trail. Students took stagecoach rides, watched blacksmith demonstrations, feasted on apple butter and biscuits, had a cow milking contest and enjoyed a BBQ dinner and hoedown.


Campus News

Beloved Pioneer Goes Home Rollin Gilliland: Feb. 14, 1941 - June 14, 2013 Only a handful of people are as well known to Pioneers everywhere as Rollin Gilliland. Rollin’s homegoing June 14, 2013, released him from his long-term battle with Parkinson’s. His 33-year MNU career, first as director of grounds and then campus locksmith, began in 1969 when he and his wife Margaret moved to Olathe. Raised on a Kansas farm, Rollin was a true jack of all trades. Known as the greatest safe technician in the U.S., Rollin mentored and trained the best in the field. Rollin was a pilot, loved skydiving, scuba diving and restoring military Jeeps. His friendly smile and wry wit was familiar to students and employees alike at MNU, many of whom were the recipients of his kind assistance.

Rollin completed an associate's degree at Iola Community College, Iola, Kan., and a B.A. from Bethany Nazarene College (SNU) in 1963. A long-time member of College Church of the Nazarene, Rollin served on the building committee for the church’s current sanctuary. In 2010, Rollin and Margaret moved to Oklahoma City joining Bethany First Church of the Nazarene. Rollin leaves behind his wife of nearly 50 years, a sister, Juanita Williams; nephews Michael and Danny Williams and niece Jessica Blackmon. Memorials can be made to MidAmerica Nazarene University and Southern Nazarene University for student scholarships; or to the Parkinson's Association of Oklahoma.

Read a tribute written by Dr. Richard Spindle for Rollin’s MNU retirement in 2002 at www.mnu.edu/gilliland-retires.

Adaptive Special Ed Masters Includes Virtual Option Today’s K-12 classroom includes students diagnosed with a wide variety of mild to moderate disabilities. The number of teachers needed to meet this educational demand is expected to grow by 17 percent by 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Starting this fall, educational professionals can develop the leadership and expertise to meet those needs through MNU’s new Master of Education in Adaptive Special Education. Following MNU’s accelerated professional and graduate format, students attend class just one night a week and complete a degree in 18 months. Program leaders say the master’s in Adaptive Special Education will feature the ability to attend the program virtually. Unlike traditional online classes, students in the virtual classroom (who are at least 45 miles from the Olathe campus) can attend from another location, in real time, through Adobe Connect.

“This technology allows the student to ask questions and participate during the class time,” says Dr. Neil Friesland, program coordinator. “The learning experience will be very interactive, no matter where they are.”

Kansas Department of Education’s Adaptive Special Education standards and the Council of Exceptional Children’s professional standards.

Starting September 2013, students will be able to earn special education certification at the elementary, middle school, high school, or K-12 levels. Courses are developed based on the

For more information about MNU’s Adaptive Special Education program, visit www.mnu.edu/master-of-education-sped.

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“It’s about helping students make the connection between who they’re becoming intellectually and who they’re growing to be as human beings, while tying that in to God’s kingdom purposes,” he says.

Why I teach by Kelsey Luffman and Katy Ward

In accordance with Cassell’s vision, recent MNU sociology graduates are doing everything from studying gender inequality in the workplace to serving in adoption agencies. In these roles, they apply the sociological principles they learned at MNU in ways that will serve others. For Cassell, it’s that service that reveals God’s ultimate vision for our lives.

At MNU, there are some professors students seek out not only for their courses, but for their friendship. Professor Bo Cassell is at the top of the list. When he’s not teaching or advising, Cassell can be found dialoging with students, hosting one of his famous campus-wide croquet games or yelling “Sociology rules!” around the behavioral sciences office. It only takes a few minutes of conversation to learn that Cassell’s contagious energy is fueled by love for God’s people and a desire to see them reach their fullest potential. Though that passion has led him to travel the world and work in fields as varied as youth ministry, legal research and publishing, teaching is in his blood. “My gift is teaching, my calling is equipping the church to participate in God’s kingdom and my passion is college students,” Cassell says. “All those factors pointed me to being a professor.” For Cassell, those factors also mean that teaching at MNU is about more than coursework.

Meet Bo Cassell

“Nobody on their deathbed looks back and says, ‘I wish I made more money,’ or, ‘I wish I spent more time organizing my lecture.’ What we look back on is this question: did I, or did I not, impact another person? A professor has the opportunity to impact students and be in the moment – to be present when a student is seeking life answers.” Sociology graduate Josh Calhoun (’13) says that as an MNU professor, Cassell has done just that. “He is one of the best reasons to be a sociology major at MNU,” Josh says.

Q&A

Associate Professor of Sociology

Q What brought you to MNU?

First Year At MNU: 2007

A I knew I wanted to be more connected with students -- to be part of their lives, and to be an influence in their spiritual journey, their life journey and their education.

Education: Master of Divinity with an emphasis in cross-cultural studies, Fuller Theological Seminary; Master of Science in Sociology, University of Missouri-Kansas City; PhD in Sociology, University of Kansas (in progress) Teaches: General Sociology, Marriage and Family, Cultural and Social Anthropology, Social Theory, Casework and Intervention, Sociology of Religion, Sociology and Film, Sociology and Law (co-teaches) Accomplishments: Developed MNU Social Justice minor program; 2010 Diversity Makes the Difference award from Olathe City Council

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Q What is the value of studying sociology? A Sociology answers the questions that we never knew we were asking. It taps into areas of human behavior like inequality, social interaction and power dynamics that other fields do not study and may be unaware of their influence. Q For you, what is the most fulfilling part of teaching? A I love teaching content, but I also love participating in the lives of students. It is a blessing when you can create that relationship with students where they want you to pray with them and want you to be part of their journey. It is fulfilling to participate in the development of the eternal soul of the child of God. It is awesome to be at a university where we can do that intellectually and spiritually.


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Faculty News

Presented Professors of Education Linda Alexander (’84), PhD, and Kim Humerickhouse, PhD, spoke about MNU’s PERK grant partnership at the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education’s (AACTE) 2013 Annual Conference in Orlando, Fla., on March 1. The session was entitled “A Teacher Leader Coaching Model: How Six Rural Districts Partnered with Teacher Education to 'Grow Their Own.’”

Dean Flemming (’75), PhD, professor of New Testament and missions, presented a paper at the annual meeting

of the Wesleyan Theological Society. Flemming’s paper was entitled “‘Won Over Without a Word’: Holiness and the Church’s Missional Identity in 1 Peter.” Watch a summary video of the conference at www.vimeo.com/62717107.

Neil Friesland (’92), EdD, professor of education, also presented at AACTE on “Partnering with Local School Districts to Meet the Needs of Students Diagnosed with Developmental Disabilities.” He also presented at the University of Kansas/ Kansas Department of Education Strategies for Educational Improvement

Conference. The title of his presentation was “Developing Positive TeacherStudent-Parent Relationships In and Out of the Classroom.”

Karen Wiegman, PhD, RN, department chair of Graduate Studies in Nursing, presented “Improving Patient Satisfaction: How What You Do Affects HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) Items” as a continuing education program to the Kansas City Chapter of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses, Feb. 19, 2013.

Published Terry Baldridge, PhD, Department of Fine and Performing Arts, recently had a collection of marimba ensemble arrangements entitled "Marimba Music of Mexico and Central America" published by HoneyRock. The arrangements were performed at the National Percussion Pedagogy Conference in May. Baldridge has also published an article entitled

"Mexican 4-Octave Marimba Music" in the May issue of Percussive Notes, the journal of the Percussive Arts Society.

Global Dictionary of Wesleyan Theology, edited by Al Truesdale (Beacon Hill Press, 2013). Flemming’s articles are on the subjects of "Contextualization," "Idolatry," and "Theology of Mission."

Dean Flemming (’75), PhD, professor of New Testament and missions, wrote three articles for the recently-published

Accomplished Bo Cassell, MA, MDiv, associate professor of sociology, recently chaired the 32nd annual conference of the Association of Nazarene Sociologists and Researchers (ANSR). More than 70 pastors, leaders, professors and students, including 26 MNU students, attended. The conference’s theme was "The Multicultural Church: Are We Better Together?” Read more about the ANSR conference on NCN News.

Kathi Czanderna, associate professor of nursing, recently completed her PhD in nursing from the University of Kansas School of Nursing.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon appointed the Honorable Anthony Rex Gabbert of

Kansas City to the Missouri Court of Appeals, Western District. Judge Gabbert, who is a circuit judge on the 7th Circuit in Clay County, will fill the vacancy on the appellate court created by the retirement of the Honorable James Smart. Dr. Gabbert is an adjunct professor in MNU’s MBA program.

Andrew C. Overholt, assistant professor of physics, successfully defended his PhD dissertation with honors at the University of Kansas on March 7.

Three MidAmerica Nazarene University fine and performing arts faculty were featured at the 28th National SEAMUS (Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States) Conference held at McNally Smith College of Music in Saint Paul, Minn. Maria Harman, PhD, director of music education and instrumental studies, performed "Musashi" (2012), a piece composed by Richard Johnson, PhD, former MNU theory and music history adjunct faculty member. “Wunderkind,” composed by Timothy Roy, adjunct theory faculty, was performed by Keith Kirchoff on the toy piano.

Kelvin St. John, associate professor, instructional technologist, recently completed his Doctor of Ministry degree from Asbury Theological Seminary.

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Through The Lens of a Missions Journalist by Kelsey Luffman

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Article Title

Lake Tanganyika, Africa.

W

hen Brad Livengood (’04) graduated from MNU with a degree in business administration, he didn’t intend to spend his life serving on the mission field. But just five years later, Brad was forever changed

when he participated in a mission trip to India. “India blew my mind,” Brad says. “For the first time in my life, I saw how the majority of the world lives. Poverty is horrendous. However, the biggest takeaway from the trip

was my impression of the [missions] staff. Those Indians were some of the most godly men and women I have ever met. Humble, loving, energetic and well-disciplined. They represented who I wanted to become.” Those staff Brad admired were partners of Operation Mobilisation (OM), a Christian mission 15 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013


Article Title

British nurse David Ross examines an injured boy suffering from malaria.

organization that works with 6,100 missionaries in 100 countries around the world. Specifically, OM works with local churches for evangelism and church planting, as well as relief and development. Once he saw OM’s compassionate work in developing countries, Brad began to explore the possibility of becoming a missionary. Now, four years later, Brad is an OM journalist, using writing and photography to tell the stories of God’s work in people’s lives. The experience, he says, has been an unforgettable adventure. “My role with OM requires that I pioneer into new places and experiences regularly,” Brad says. “In just over one year I have set foot in seven African countries.“ Though mission work may seem far removed from his former corporate ambitions, Brad believes the business administration knowledge he gained at MNU equipped him to excel in his current position. “Through class projects at MNU, I learned how to effectively collaborate with other team members for a common 16 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013

purpose,” Brad says. “Now I communicate with people in different countries, from different cultures, with different talents and abilities. The previous school experience working with others has been very helpful.” His former professors agree that Brad grew tremendously, both personally and professionally, during his time at MNU. Yorton Clark, chair of the department of business administration, remembers Brad as a spiritual leader who challenged his peers through his Christian walk. Dean of the School of Business Jamie Myrtle describes him as “hardworking, definitely committed to Christ in his life and committed to excellence in his work.” OM Support Services Leader Holly Steward, who works with Brad in OM’s Tanganyika field, says his contributions to OM have helped the ministry thrive. “Brad’s gift for photography is exceptional and has had a big impact for many of the fields in OM Africa,” Steward says. “His photos and articles have raised the bar of what we are able to share with supporters.” What’s more, says Steward, Brad has proven to be an invaluable source of spiritual encouragement for his fellow missionaries. “We really appreciate Brad’s openness and willingness to share what God has been teaching him during his first year in Africa,” Steward says. “He is very authentic and doesn’t try to hide it if he

is struggling with something. He is always faithful to spend time with God, and it is an inspiration to others.” Indeed, as Brad reflects on his past year with OM, he does not recount his own accomplishments. Rather, he describes his work as a testimony to the grace of God. “I can’t thank the Lord enough for calling me to himself and to this role with OM,” Brad says. “He takes people that are willing to give him control and he changes and shapes their lives for his Kingdom. He will change you and use you if you truly mean it when you say, ‘Thy will be done.’” Overall, Brad says that being willing to surrender to God, regardless of cost or comfort, is what makes him a Pioneer. “Looking back at the entire process from contemplating joining missions, to raising support, to traveling to new places and working new roles,


Adventures in Africa I see the Lord asking me to make small steps of faith, one at a time,” he says. “Maybe that’s what Pioneers do. They take steps of faith. The Lord has been faithful through it all.”

To learn more about Operation Mobilisation and to find out how you can participate in their outreach, visit www.om.org.

Want to learn more about Brad’s work, art and passion? Connect with him on www.blivengood.com.

OM’s Makwati School in Zambia.

I’ve never worked as a professional photographer or journalist, so this role is a brand-new experience. I had never been to Africa and couldn’t locate Zambia on a map. Really, I had no idea wha`t to expect. The organization provided me few details and looking back, it was probably for the best. My friends and family would ask me lots of questions before I left, and I had to keep answering, “I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know.” All I knew was that I had made a two-year commitment, that it would be tough, but the Lord would get me through it and, in the end, it would be completely worthwhile.

In Brad's Own Words The word “Pioneer” conjures up images in my mind of astronauts launching into space or brave explorers battling the elements as they venture into the unknown, not knowing if they’d ever make it home again. Though setting out into missions in Zambia isn’t quite that extreme, it has definitely been a step of faith for me.

My role with OM requires that I pioneer into new places and experiences regularly. In just over one year I have set foot in seven African countries. Recently I travelled with a small team to Bujumbura, Burundi. We set off from the port of Mpulungu, Zambia, at the southern tip of Lake Tanganyika, the longest freshwater lake in the world. Burundi lies at the northern tip. To get there we boarded the Liemba, a ship

that’s as old as the Titanic and was originally used by the Germans as a gunboat in WWI. After two days on the ship, we found ourselves ashore in Tanzania. Next we had to take a series of taxis that were so beat up you worried the wheels would fall off at any moment, and mini-buses so cram-packed that you couldn’t move or even lift your head without hitting the ceiling. One day later we arrived and the team put on a sports ministry course that was attended, in part, by former child soldiers. What an adventure! Another time I found myself in a wooden boat that was taking on water as we travelled to the remote village of Chibanga that borders the Democratic Republic of the Congo. I watched as one of our national missionaries took a rock and the shaft of a flathead screwdriver and began to pound torn up strips of clothing into the gaps between the planks to stop the leaks. “T.I.A (This is Africa),” I thought.

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It was a miraculous night according to Jon North, vice president for university advancement, when more than $450,000 was raised for student scholarships at the 2013 President’s Honors. “Thanks to all of MNU’s supporters for the impact they are making in helping us raise this unprecedented amount for student scholarships,” North said. Cook Center’s Bell Arena was literally transformed for the event which 481 attended. Donor support was crucial to the success of the event. The Buchanan family, Tim, Gail, Matt and Lauren, of Wichita served as honorary co-chairs. Presenting sponsors were Legend Senior Living/Tim and Gail Buchanan, and Dr. Larry and Donna McIntire. Platinum, gold, silver, bronze and table sponsors also helped make the gala a success. Live and silent auctions were an exciting aspect of the evening contributing more than $128,000 to the funds raised. A highlight of the auction was the President’s Scholarship Challenge which raised more than $72,525 directly for student scholarships. During the event Dr. D. Ray and Elaine Cook, faithful supporters of MNU, were recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award for their outstanding service, dedication and love for MNU. Next year’s event is set for Saturday, April 12, 2014. To donate, become a sponsor or learn more, contact University Advancement at (913) 971-3600.

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President's Honors 1

MNU President David Spittal congratulates Elaine Cook during the Lifetime Achievement presentation.

2

Lauren (Gilmore '09) and Matt Buchanan ('07), co-chairs, bring greetings at the opening of the event.

3

Kent Donley, considers a Thomas Kinkade painting donated by Dr. D. Ray and Elaine Cook.

4

MNU’s own Kevin Borger (’94) served as auctioneer with the assistance of Dr. Sondra (Riley ’81) Cave.

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Part of the evening’s entertainment, Leslie Smith (’13), music education major.

6

Dr. Brent Van Hook ('92), vies for his favorite item.

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Donna and President Spittal enjoy the entertainment.

8

MNU choirs performed several numbers for the crowd.

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8

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Essential Internships Prepare Students

By Carol Best and Kelsey Luffman Internships are increasingly important to a college graduate’s job search. According to a 2012 survey, employers rank relevant work experience second only to the interview when it comes to hiring new graduates. That’s why, as they prepare to make a difference in their chosen fields, MNU students are gaining valuable work experience in everything from multimedia to marine biology.

Adventures in Multimedia Growing up, Josiah Crandall couldn’t wait to tune into Adventures in Odyssey, a Christian radio drama produced by Focus on the Family (FOTF). So when the senior multimedia major began researching internships, FOTF was his top pick. Last summer, Josiah became one of the few students selected to intern at FOTF’s audio drama department in Colorado Springs.


Essential Internships “Working at Focus on the Family is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Josiah says. “It’s kind of a dream job for me.”

Back at MNU, Tyler continued researching MMPs, and hopes his research will someday contribute to effective cancer treatments.

He found that his dream job exceeded his expectations; his summer included memorable experiences directing voice actors for Odyssey characters and editing episodes alongside veteran producers. The FOTF internship has allowed Josiah to increase his already impressive multimedia skillset as he manages MNU’s campus TV station.

“MNU definitely prepared me for the research experience,” he says.

Political Aspirations When she started at MNU, senior honors student Amelia Collins thought she had her career mapped out – attend law school, and then find work in a high-paying public policy position in Washington, D.C. However, Amelia’s career aspirations changed when she spent fall 2012 interning in D.C. for Alaska Senator Mark Begich. While there, she and her classmates visited areas in economic decline to perform community service, learn about public policy, and be what Amelia calls a “faithful presence.” Having learned from public policy experts in the nation’s capital, Amelia hopes to complete a second internship in the Middle East.

“I got the chance to follow scientists in every forensic discipline. My internship let me learn directly from the sort of professional I want to be.” Now, Amelia says, the paycheck hardly matters as she makes plans for the future. “My experience in D.C. showed me I don’t care what I will make,” Amelia says. “I just want to be invested in others. God can use me in any situation I’m in.”

Prestigious Research A key step in Tyler Hageman’s (’13) pursuit of his dream job as a research chemist was his summer internship in the highly selective Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at Miami University, funded by the National Science Foundation. During his REU internship, Tyler studied the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), an enzyme involved in tissue healing. “MMPs assist in tumor development,” he explains. “The idea is to find a way to inhibit these enzymes for people diagnosed with cancer in order to limit tumor growth.”

Tyler’s research also helped him solidify his future plans – this fall, he will begin pursuing a PhD in chemistry at the University of Kansas.

CSI Lab Forensic chemistry major and honors student Rebekah Wilkins (’13) gained experience in the field she loves by interning at the Johnson County Crime Lab in Olathe. There, Rebekah worked alongside professional chemists in the drug chemistry and trace evidence departments. “It was great working in the field I have always dreamed about,” she says. “I got the chance to follow scientists in every forensic discipline. My internship let me learn directly from the sort of professional I want to be.” This fall, Rebekah will continue pursuing a career in the crime lab through a graduate teaching assistantship at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where she will also work toward a PhD in chemistry.

Marine Biology in Kansas Attending a university in the Midwest may seem peculiar for an aspiring marine biologist, but biology major Andrea Holt (’13) thinks outside the box. In addition to excelling in MNU biology coursework, Andrea has gained specialized experiences by working at the Sea Life Aquarium in Kansas City and studying abroad in the Caribbean. “Majoring in biology [at MNU] was completely practical because had I gone to school near the ocean, I still would have studied biology,” Andrea says. “Attending school in Kansas never seemed like a barrier, just another step that I had to take in my journey to reaching the ocean.” Last spring, Andrea secured a highly selective position as an educational specialist at Sea Life Aquarium in Kansas City. Knowing she also needed experience on the ocean, she spent last summer studying abroad with the Broadreach Tropical Marine Biology program in the Caribbean. Andrea gained unforgettable field experiences while living on a catamaran and completing certifications in scuba diving, yachting, and more. Andrea’s professional and academic achievements have paid off with another dream opportunity. This summer, she will intern on the American Pride tallship in Long Beach, Calif., where she will work under the resident marine biologist while living aboard the vessel. As Andrea and her fellow Pioneers reap the personal and professional benefits of internships, they’re equipped for careers filled with passion and purpose.

23 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013


MNU Athletics

#6 Juan Redmon ('12), catches a touchdown pass during the 2011 Homecoming game versus Benedictine.

Going Pro: Alums Back On The Field

by Chad Jenkins

Four MNU alumni and former students — Brandon Smith (’12), Juan Redmon (’12), Jared Elmore (FS ’10) and Brandon Russell (FS ’05) — are players for the newly formed Champions Professional Indoor Football League (CPIFL). All four competed in the 2013 inaugural season. Redmon, who played at MNU from 2008 to 2012, was named four times as a first-team, All-Conference tight end and HAAC MVP as a senior. As a wide receiver for the Oklahoma Defenders, Redmon caught 27 passes for 290 yards and 6 touchdowns in nine games. In March, the Defenders came to Kansas City to play the KC Renegades, who boast three former Pioneers on their roster. Smith, a fullback and defensive lineman from 2008-2012 for the Pioneers, was a three-time All-Conference defensive lineman and led the nation with 14 sacks as a senior. Smith plays defensive lineman for the Renegades alongside wide receiver Elmore and Russell, a defensive lineman. In 11 games for Kansas City, Smith recorded 27 tackles, 24 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013

including eight tackles for loss, five sacks and two fumble recoveries. Elmore was a wide receiver at MNU and as a senior in 2009, he led the team in all receiving categories while finishing in the top 10 in the nation for yards and touchdowns. In eight games for the Renegades, he caught 4 passes for 63 yards and a touchdown. Russell, a three-year starter for the Pioneers and a first-team All-Conference defensive lineman in 2002, has been playing professionally since 2010. In eight games for the Renegades, he had 14 tackles, including 3.5 tackles for loss and 2 sacks. “We’re proud of these young men,” says MNU head coach Jonathan Quinn. “This is the type of athlete we want at MNU. To be a top program, we need athletes who can play at the next level. These guys have proven they have the ability, and now it’s up to them to seize the opportunity.” The focus of the Champions Professional Indoor Football League is to develop the highest level of indoor football in the

Midwest by adding teams to the league and linking “well-established teams currently coming from Iowa, Missouri and Kansas.” The CPIFL brought together the top indoor football teams in the Midwest from existing leagues like the Arena Football League, the Indoor Football League, and the American Professional Football League. The CPIFL is also bringing back rivalries from the past,

Jared Elmore (FS '10). Photo by Rains Foto.

such as Oklahoma vs. Wichita, Lincoln vs. Omaha, and Omaha vs. Sioux City. The league gained its first member August 11, 2012.


MNU Athletics

Baseball Team Finishes Second Pioneer baseball went 17-9 in HAAC play and finished second in the Western division. After a tough early-season schedule that resulted in a 1-5 start, the Pioneers won five of the next six games to get back on track. MNU then started the conference schedule with four straight victories and jumped to an early lead, but seven straight split doubleheaders prevented them from increasing the advantage. After closing the schedule by winning six of eight games, the Pioneers fell in the HAAC conference tournament and finished 24-20. Clayton Brandt, Tyler Meeks, Colin Starr, Kyle Olson and Caleb Swartz were All-Star Conference honorees.

Softball Sees Tourney Play Pioneer softball went 28-15 and 14-4 in conference play to finish second in the HAAC. After an impressive run in the conference tournament, the Pioneers qualified for nationals for the third time since the beginning of the program. MNU fell in the opening round of the NAIA National Tournament, but it was a season to be proud of, and the Pioneers had several honorees. The offense carried the load of the 2013 season, boasting the highest OPS (total bases divided by at bats) in program history. Four starters hit over .400. Tianna George, Jen Polivka, Lynsey Keith and Adriana Asano were named First-Team All-Conference. Katie Williams, Taylor Pearcy and Vanessa Arandules were honored on the second team.

Want to learn more? Visit mnusports.com The men’s team had an inconsistent season. Amid injury and personnel changes, the starting five changed nightly. Despite the turmoil, the Pioneers qualified for the NAIA National Tournament, and there, everything came together.

Basketball Teams See Play at Nationals After a 33-2 season and back-to-back Heart of America Athletic Conference (HAAC) regular season and tourney titles, the Pioneer women’s basketball team entered the NAIA National Tournament with high hopes. Ranked #9 in the country and riding a 20-game winning streak, the team’s goal of securing a spot in the Fab Four was more than reasonable. But MNU ran into a tough William Woods squad and fell in the first round. The Pioneers

controlled most of the game and led by 11 with 10 minutes remaining, but the dominant play of WWU’s Prisila Santos proved to be too much to overcome as the All-American scored 37 points. MNU’s Kelcey Balcom, HAAC Player of the Year, shot 10-13 for a season-high 25 points. Daria Sprew (15) and Kendra Flemming (12) scored double figures as well. The Pioneers finished with a 33-3 record.

MNU faced #7 Cal State-San Marcos in the opening round, and came away with a 109-98 victory thanks to balanced scoring and a 19-point, 20-rebound effort from Jacob French. The next night MNU faced #10 Oklahoma Baptist and trailed by 11 with less than 8 minutes remaining. Rustin Dowd took the game, scoring 11 points down the stretch, and the Pioneers came back to win by two. In MNU’s 10th Elite Eight appearance, the Pioneers faced #2 Lindsey Wilson College. MNU trailed by 8 at halftime and by nearly 20 most of the second half. A furious rally saw the Pioneers come within 10 points in the final minutes, but their efforts weren’t enough, and MNU finished 26-10.

25 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013


Advancing MNU

Advancing MNU When Passion Meets Profession RN to BSN Alum Serves in Uganda By Anna Glendon, with contributors Eva McDorman and Carol Best MNU alumni performing compassionate service across the globe are, in many ways, the hands and feet of Jesus to those they assist. Anna Glendon (’12), a recent RNto-BSN graduate, took a month-long trip to Uganda with Project Helping Hands in January 2013. Originally a cardiac medical/ surgical acute care nurse, a career change to clinical nursing in infectious diseases ignited Glendon’s passion for the care of individuals with HIV/AIDS. Here, Glendon speaks about her experiences in the developing world. I spent one month in Uganda with a nonprofit organization that sends interdisciplinary medical teams to developing world countries. We stayed near Kawempe, one of the most densely populated slums in the world, in the capital city of Kampala. Our team was comprised of six registered nurses, two physicians, one dentist, and at least 125 Ugandan volunteers.

People lined up early and waited hours to be seen. We treated 250-350 patients of varying complexity and gave out 700 prescriptions. A major component of the mission was educating locals and village healthcare providers, with the aim of helping them become self-sufficient. One outstanding memory was of treating an HIV-infected baby who had lost both parents and was taken from a neglectful environment. He is now in a stable, therapeutic orphanage with other HIVpositive kids. My initial reaction was to question how so much bad could happen to an innocent baby. While I was focused on the negative, my Ugandan interpreter said, “That boy is blessed. He should be happy.” The interpreter went on to explain, “His parents died, but he didn’t. His aunt neglected him, but he survived. He lives in an orphanage with other

people like himself, so he won’t be lonely. God has a plan for him and that should make him happy.” In that moment, I was schooled in optimism by a baby who was raised in a Ugandan slum without two shillings to rub together. Therein lies the beauty of mission work -- you are both the teacher and the student. Everyone learns from one another.

Read more and view Anna’s gallery of photos at: www.mnu.edu/glendon

Register now for the MNU Foundation Golf Classic to benefit student scholarships! → 11:30 a.m. – lunch and registration → 1 p.m. – tournament start → Four-person scramble → $700 per foursome; $180 per person → Includes 18 holes plus cart, lunch and dinner

26 Accent Magazine / Spring 2013


Advancing MNU

Drs. Frank and Sue Moore to be Honored at Homecoming 2013 At MNU Homecoming 2013, two guests of honor will be recognized for their influence on the lives of students and the world of missions. Frank Moore (’73), PhD, was an influential faculty member of MNU’s religion division from 1985 to 1998, including serving as division chair. He then served as vice president for academic affairs for a decade. Sue (Potter ’75) Moore, EdD, was a professor of education at MNU from 1990 to 2008. Since 2008, Frank and Sue have served at Olivet Nazarene University. For sixteen years, the Moores led MNU international student mission trips through the College and University Students Serving and Enabling (CAUSE) program. At that time, CAUSE trips involved students from all of the Nazarene colleges and universities, and Frank was instrumental in setting up and coordinating those trips. The Moores' first CAUSE trip was in 1986 to Honduras. Over the next 16 years, more than 300 MNU students learned from Frank and Sue’s leadership and example. After visiting 12 countries, the couple, along with their son, Brent (’00), PhD, (who started traveling with his parents at age nine and is now a professor at MNU’s Liberty site), put their passion to serve to work.

“Frank was incredible at inspiring students to have these experiences,” says Vice President for University Advancement Jon North ('92, MBA '94), who traveled with the Moores to Guyana in 1989 and to Costa Rica in 1990. “There are many missionaries and others serving the Lord now because Frank exposed them to an international worldview.” Beyond leading the groups, Frank did much of the coordination and logistics himself. He recruited team members, coordinated travel, facilitated building projects in the field, found funding and more.

with all MNU alumni and friends, are invited to participate in the trip to Haiti May 24-June 1, 2014. The trip coincides with MNU’s student-led 2013-2014 Passion to Serve project led by MNU student Dylan Aebersold. Both groups will work to build a school in Haiti. Leaders for the alumni group include North and Garber. Frank, Sue and Brent Moore will participate, as will alumni hosts Alan and Madeline Tollefson.

Allen and Madeline Tollefson, construction business owners from Lecompton, Kan., joined the Moores in 1988 along with their son Cary Murphy, who participated in the trip to Belize. The Tollefsons and the Moores became good friends, and the Tollefsons went on to participate in 13 of the 16 trips and donate significant funding for many of them. The Moores will receive special recognition at Homecoming when Director of Alumni Relations Kevin Garber ('89) officially unveils an alumni mission trip commissioned in honor of Frank and Sue. MNU's 300-plus CAUSE trip alumni, along

Garber says MNU is privileged to continue working with the Moores. “Frank and Sue were pioneers of the mission trip concept for Nazarene higher education, and have affected hundreds of lives for the kingdom,” he said.

Whether it’s funding scholarships, providing faculty resources or helping us meet our immediate needs, your University Fund gift is put to use right away, impacting the transformative experiences that define a MidAmerica Nazarene University education.


Alumni and Friends

Alumni News Pioneer Adventures Visits The Holy Land

Jim Edlin ('72), professor of biblical literature and languages, gives a devotional on the Sea of Galilee.

Mollie Grove, Shelley Bennett, April Ebers, Anna Tepera, and Konner McIntire in front of the Dome of the Rock in the Muslim Quarter in the Old City of Jerusalem.

A beggar seated outside of the Dome of the Rock on Jerusalem's temple mount.

grandparents attended MNU, also known as legacy students. According to the Office of Admissions, MNU is expecting more than 50 incoming legacy students this fall. Director of Alumni Relations Kevin Garber ('89) says many older universities have multiple generations in their legacy families. “The University of Kansas has more than five generations of alumni families,” Garber says. “We have 28,000 alumni and several thousand second-generation alumni, but there are very few thirdgeneration families at MNU.”

Derek (’13), Laurie (Peacher ’82), Carly (MNU sophomore), and Craig (’82) Doane, one of MNU’s legacy families at the 2012 Legacy Luncheon. Craig is president of the MNU Alumni Association and a member of the Board of Trustees.

Legacy Family Luncheon Honors Generations of MNU Students MNU’s Office of Alumni Relations will host the second annual Legacy Family Luncheon on August 25, 2013, at noon in 28 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013

Bell Center grand lobby as part of New Student Orientation. The luncheon will welcome students whose parents and/or

One such family is the Osters. Dee Oster (FS ’77), her sons John Jr. (’89), Joel (’94) and Jeffrey (’96), daughters-in-law Donna (Keith ’94) and Wendi (Oster ’93) and grandsons John D. (’13) and Caleb (current student) Oster all attended MNU.

The Office of Alumni Relations invites anyone who is part of a legacy family to send information to alumni relations at alumni@mnu.edu.


AUG 1-2

UPCOMING EVENTS Pioneer Adventures: Durango, Colorado

Hosted by: Greg & Peggy Hephner / Kevin & Shawna Garber Cost: $373 per person For more information or to register, visit pioneeradventures.org or RSVP to Alumni Relations 913-971-3275 or alumni@mnu.edu

OCT 11-13

SEPT 10

AUG 31

AUG 25

AUG 9

AUG 4

Dodge City Round-Up Rodeo

5:00 PM - Chuckwagon dinner at Cimarron Church of the Nazarene Dodge City Rodeo following dinner Cost: $20 per adult; $7.50 per child (under 12) www.mnu.edu/alumni-events/dodge-city-rodeo

Alumni Night at the Kansas City T-Bones

KC T-Bones vs. Fargo-Moorhead (ND) RedHawks at 7:00 PM Cost: $12 per ticket www.mnu.edu/alumni-events/sports-series/kctbones

Legacy Family Luncheon

New Student Orientation weekend More information to come at www.mnu.edu/alumni

Alumni Night at Sporting KC

Sporting KC vs. Colorado at 7:30 PM Cost: $22 per ticket www.mnu.edu/alumni-events/sports-series/sporting-kc

MNU Tuesdays Business and Professionals Luncheon Location: Bell Cultural Events Center - MNU Campus Cost $13. Register on line or pay at the door. RSVP Alumni Relations 913-971-3275 or alumni@mnu.edu www.mnu.edu/mnu-tuesdays/register.html

Homecoming 2013

“Celebrating the Passion to Serve� - Featuring alumni awards and special entertainment by Haley and Hanson www.mnu.edu/homecoming

For more event details, visit www.mnu.edu/alumniandfriends

29 Accent Magazine / SUmmer 2013


Alumni And Friends

Additional News seven Christian publishers, and now have made their digital self-publishing debut with The Skinny Genes Diet. The new project is the culmination of the Frisbies’ 15 years of research on the science of weight loss. David and Lisa have used pen names for the project.

Brent Moore (’00), PhD, assistant professor in MNU’s Master of Arts in Counseling program, was honored at the Kansas City Northland Chamber of Commerce’s Excellence in Education banquet for outstanding instructional practices at MNU.

Jon Bell (’07) has been named principal of Westview Elementary in the Olathe school district.

W. Glen Gardner II (’77) was recently appointed district superintendent for the Eastern Michigan District of the Church of the Nazarene. His wife, Kayla (King ’77) Gardner, is also an MNU graduate.

Lisa Najarian (’07) graduated from the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine in May 2012, and works as an associate veterinarian at Southside Pet Hospital in Olathe.

Kindra Bible (’99) was recently appointed education manager for Extreme Nazarene Ministries in Quito, Ecuador. Bible previously served four years in Arequipa, Peru.

Mike Jasiczek ('02) won Kansas City’s Fox 4 Crystal Apple Award for excellence in teaching.

Kristine Rhoads (’84) ran for alderwoman in St. Louis, Mo., in the April 2013 election. Though her bid was unsuccessful, Kristine says it was a fulfilling opportunity to give voters the chance to make a difference in St. Louis.

Eric Ammons (’83), former president of Mercy Hospital in Independence, Kan., has been named president of Mercy Hospital Jefferson in Crystal, Mo. Ammons is married to alumna Christine (Rogers '83) and has two grown children, Chad (’09) and Lauren (Ammons ’10) Moser.

Pete Brumbaugh (’90) is now director of sustainability at Global Brigades, Inc. Brumbaugh previously served as vice president for marketing communications at Heart to Heart International.

Former MNU football player Will Coatney (’12) and his associate Hunter Browning have created Fannect, a social media smartphone app for sports fans. Coatney and KU athletic director Sheahon Zenger (FS ’88), former football player and student, were featured in an article on the app in The Kansas City Star.

Miranda (Barnes ’09) Edwards, MD, will begin her residency in internal medicine/ pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria, Ill.

Family counselors and authors David ('75), PhD, and Lisa (Jacobson '78) Frisbie have published 22 books with 30 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013

Cody Kraemer (’09), MD, will begin his residency in general surgery at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Congratulations to Gary (’86) and Judy Lenn on the conclusion of 14 years of ministry in Papua New Guinea with Wycliffe Bible Translators. Gary has served as a teacher and principal for the missionary school there. The Lenns will return to the U.S. this summer.

Elizabeth Long (MEd ’10), a first-grade teacher at Edgerton (Kan.) Elementary, was one of two teachers selected by the GardnerEdgerton school district as a 2013 Teacher of the Year.

Ben Moore (’94) was recently featured on NBC affiliate KTVB 7 for the campus ministry and food pantry he operates at Boise State University. Learn more about Moore’s ministry at crosswalkscampusministry.org.

Dan Rushing (’00), founder and CEO of Xtari Games and Dan Rushing Ministries, recently launched his first Facebook game, President Nation. For more about Xtari Games, visit www.xtarigames.com.

Rev. M. Kim Smith (’75) was recently appointed district superintendent of the Iowa District of the Church of the Nazarene.

Stephanie (Stolba ’02) Weeks, founder and president of Our Wellness Revolution, a business devoted to nutritional information, fitness advice, and online or in-person health coaching, has published Skinny Girls Don’t Diet – Living Well Is A Lifestyle, a collection of nutritious recipes and practical health tips.

Billy Wilson (’95) recently completed his Doctor of Ministry in semiotics and future studies at George Fox University.


Alumni Article AndTitle Friends Dan York (’08) has been named the worship and arts pastor at Lawrence First Christian Church in Lawrence, Kan.

Births

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MNU was well-represented by the 21 alumni who were recognized by the 2013 Kansas Educator Recognition Program, in which each school district nominates one elementary and one secondary classroom teacher for Kansas Teacher of the Year. Read all the names in the digital issue of Accent at: www.mnu.edu/accent.

Connect Online facebook.com/MNUAlumniandFriends twitter.com/mnu_alumni youtube.com/MNUAlumni linkedin.com

Marriages Kelly (Lawler ’11) to Jordan Chesley, May 4, 2013. Holly (Moerer ’00) to Danny Spainhour, December 16, 2012.

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12) Brandon (’06) and Megan (Fenton ’05) Hansel, a son: Blake Tyler, born Oct. 31, 2012. Blake joins brother Bryson Brandon, born July 24, 2010. 21

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1) William (’11) and Kasey Ashcraft, a daughter: Elizabeth Paige, born Mar. 25, 2013. 2) Brandon (’05) and Audra (Oglesbee FS ’06) Bell, a son: Quinton Royce, born Mar. 3, 2013. 3) Klint (’05) and Lindsey (Bledsoe ’05) Bitter, a daughter: Ellie Grace, born Mar. 18, 2013. 4) Billy and Allison (Bartholomew ’02) Brimblecom, a son: Leo Harris, born Jan. 10, 2013. 5) Andrew (’02) and Abigail Campbell, a daughter: Ivy Faith, born Oct. 22, 2012. She joins siblings Isabelle, Anna and Coleman.

13) Adam (’08) and Amy (Nunamaker ’06) Hepker, a daughter: Brenley Elizabeth, born Feb. 16, 2013. 14) Jeremiah ('08) and Michelle (Clark '07) Johnson, a son: Maximilian Harth, born Apr. 7, 2013. 15) Jason (’99) and Crystal (Blowers ’98) Lynn, a son: Levi James, born Sept. 20, 2012. 16) Stephen (’08) and Casey (Neden, ’08) Morrison, a son: Joel, born Mar. 5, 2013. 17) Darren and Allison (Quint ’06) Reed, a son: Elijah William, born Sept. 1, 2012. 18) Kyle (’01) and Whitney (Tucker ’99) Rogers, a son: Luke Tucker, born Mar. 12, 2013.

6) Gregory and Emily (Brotzman ’08) Clapp, a daughter: Sophie Lynae, born May 7, 2013.

19) Philip ('01) and Brie (Vieth ’02) Speicher, a daughter: Keziah Helen, born Feb. 15, 2013.

7) D.J. (’05) and Liz (Nielson ’ 04; MET ’08) Crocker, a son: Charlie, born Sept. 24, 2012. He joins a sister, Sabina.

20) Nathan (’10) and Katy (Ryman ’10) Stavig, a son: Noah Malcolm, born Apr. 17, 2013.

8) Steve (’94) and April (Grogan ’95) Elstrom, a son: Benjamin Ronald, born Feb. 26, 2013.

21) Ryan and Kelly (Duckworth ’00) Strong, twin sons: Brock Ryan and Brody Dean, born Jan. 15, 2013. They join brother Max.

9) Tyrone (’99) and Jamie (Carnell ’05) Esser, a son: Toby Thomas, born Nov. 1, 2012.

22) J. Scott (’01) and Desire’e (Harris ’03) Timmons; a daughter: River Ryiah, born Sept. 12, 2012.

Rollin Gilliland (former employee), June 14, 2013. See page 9.

10) Erik (’09) and Courtney (Owens ’08) Gaede, a daughter: Amelia Mae, born Mar. 10, 2013.

23) Andy and Ashley (Rice ’06) Weber; a son: Keaton James, born Mar. 14, 2013.

Rev. Herbert Ketterling (former trustee), March 11, 2013.

11) Ryan (’99) and Andrea Gaines, a daughter: Katherine Anastasia, born Apr. 5, 2013.

24) Noah (’08) and Katy (Perrigo ’08) Wells, a daughter: Blakely Mae, born April 20, 2013.

Condolences Gary J. Leid (’75), January 26, 2013. Tom Clements (’79), March 19, 2013. Sue (Whipple ’93) Warburton, March 4, 2013.

Have news? Want to share births, marriages, and accomplishments with Accent? Please send to alumni@mnu.edu. 31 Accent Magazine / Summer 2013


University Advancement 2030 East College Way Olathe KS 66062-1899 Change Service Requested


Accent Magazine - Summer 2013