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DECEMBER 2017

THE ALLURE OF NEW ORLEANS

MOVING MADE EASIER

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1940s SNAPSHOTS

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INJUSTICE SLAYER MILES LORD PAGE 10

Mystery: Solved! [

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William Kent Krueger hits the best-seller list again with his 16th Cork O’Connor novel PAGE 30


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Contents

18

CITY SAMPLER It's hard to experience and see everything New Orleans has to offer in a single trip. Here's a look at the essentials for your first visit to The Big Easy.

⊳ Café du Monde in New Orleans’ famed French Quarter serves beignets 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Photo by Paul Broussard

GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

8 I hope you feel inspired and proud of the Minnesotans featured in this issue.

MY TURN

10 Roberta Walburn is the perfect author for telling the story of Miles Lord's life.

MEMORIES

12 I don't know what to do with all my old scrapbooks and vintage photos.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

14 Ada Comstock of Moorhead paved the way for women to go to college without ridicule. 6 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

GOOD HEALTH

GOOD LIVING

WELLNESS

16 Coconut oil, when consumed in moderation, can be a tool in weight loss due to its molecular structure. Apple cider vinegar, green tea and hot peppers can help, too.

HOUSING

24 Hate moving? Now you can hire a service to manage the entire messy process for you.

FINANCE

26 End the year right with money tips from our finance guru, Skip Johnson.

IN THE KITCHEN

28 Lake fish just got a sophisticated boost from a local foodie and author.


DECEMBER

30

ON THE COVER On top again: William Kent Krueger, who goes by Kent, celebrates the release — and Top 10 New York Times best-seller status — of his 16th Cork O’Connor mystery. Photos by Tracy Walsh

38

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

40

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11/21/172017 3:43 PM Minnesota Good Age / December /7


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 36 / Issue 12 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Suzy Cohen, Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall Skip Johnson, Tina Mortimer, Dave Nimmer Lauren Peck, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Dani Cunningham Kaitlin Ungs

DESIGN INTERN Victoria Hein

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Beacons of light BY SARAH JACKSON

I

f you’re a fan of Cork O’Connor — one of Minnesota’s most famous fictional characters of all time — then this issue is for you! That’s because our Cover Star is none other than the man who created O’Connor more than 20 years ago — William Kent Krueger of St. Paul, who recently sat down with us for a chat about his fascinating path to becoming an acclaimed mystery series author, including his most recent New York Times best seller, Sulfur Springs. Krueger attributes his success to decades of persistence and disciplined hard work, including Photo by Tracy Walsh daily early morning writing sessions. tracywalshphoto.com Indeed, Krueger was nearly 50 years old — and working a non-literary day job at the University of Minnesota — when he published his first two books, Iron Lake and Boundary Waters, in 1998 and 1999. “I’m living proof that you’re never too old to start writing,” Krueger said. “So many people that I know in this business have had gray in their hair before they started.” Today Krueger is writing his 17th Cork O’Connor installment. He’s also penning the highly anticipated sequel to Ordinary Grace, his 2013 stand-alone hit novel. If you’re not totally impressed and inspired by Krueger’s story, check out the rest of the issue, where you’ll find my new favorite late Minnesotan, Ada Comstock, a Moorhead native who paved the way for women like me to go to college. Her brilliant mind and incredible story of undeterred efforts to improve opportunities for women in higher education nationwide make me incredibly proud. (As a Moorhead State University alum, I take a special pride in her triumphant achievements.) And, finally, I hope you’ll read Dave Nimmer’s memories of Minnesota’s corporate behemoth slayer, Miles Lord, the former U.S. District Judge fondly remembered in Roberta Walburn’s recently published biography, Miles Lord: The Maverick Judge Who Brought Corporate America to Justice. The importance of Lord’s efforts to protect Lake Superior from taconite tailings and to protect women from the negative effects of the Dalkon Shield birth control device aren’t lost on me. In fact, these three wise and tenacious Minnesotans make me feel hopeful for all that faces our state, our country — and even our world — in the new year.


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MY TURN

A slayer of corporate behemoths BY DAVE NIMMER

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oberta Walburn’s recently published biography of former U.S. District Judge Miles Lord brings back for me some cherished memories that capture the color, character, conscience, courage and candor of the most interesting public man I ever met. Lord, who died in 2016 at age 97, was a reporter’s dream. I learned this when I was a 23-year-old rookie in the newsroom of The Minneapolis Star. I overheard a conversation between the then-U.S. District Attorney and a veteran courts reporter, Larry Fitzmaurice: “Dammit, Miles, I got a deadline here. And I need to know what you’re going to do now — not later.” I can imagine Lord telling Fitzmaurice what he could do with his deadlines as Fitzmaurice hung up the phone. But Fitz had the story in the paper’s home edition. Miles couldn’t help himself: He loved reporters (at least most of ’em).

and the case of A.H. Robins and its dodgy Dalkon Shield contraceptive, are revealing and riveting. She builds the stories’ suspense one chapter at a time, then another and another. In one instance, she describes the judge’s efforts to get the drug company to produce a relevant paper trail: “He (Lord) is excited that his order will result in the production of documents, as he later says, ‘from here to hell.’… Things are starting to move. By first thing the next morning, however, when the doors open to the clerk’s office for the Eighth Circuit, A.H. Robins is ready to file its papers to try to stop Judge Lord in his tracks.” I’m not troubled by Walburn’s unabashed admiration and affection for the judge. I know he had critics — and Walburn cites and writes about them extensively — who feel he overstepped judicial boundaries, especially with his rhetoric.

Man of the people But I believe the judge was acting in the best interest of the people — common, not corporate, people. The Dalkon Shield was injuring women and the taconite tailings were polluting Lake Superior. Most of the time, Miles Lord was right. One of those times involved a plea bargain with a defense contractor accused of defrauding the federal government. When I was at WCCO, I was assigned to cover the plea. I stopped by the judge’s office before the afternoon session and Lord gave me a candid and careful summary of the case. Suddenly, I looked at my watch and realized he was due in court 15 minutes ago. Lord smiled. “Don’t worry," he said, “They’ll wait. They’ve got six lawyers who probably just racked up a couple thousand bucks worth of fees cooling their heels.” Back in the courtroom, Lord told

The right writer Walburn, a former Star Tribune reporter, is the perfect biographer. She’s a lawyer. She clerked for the judge. She admires tough and testy. She writes with an active voice in the present tense. Her prose, reflecting her newspaper background, is crisp, clear and colorful. Her narratives, especially those involving Lord’s decisions in the Reserve Mining taconite tailings case

10 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

ABOUT THE BOOK

Miles Lord: The Maverick Judge Who Brought Corporate America to Justice ($29.95, University of Minnesota Press) tells the story of Lord’s humble beginnings on Minnesota’s Iron Range and his rise to become one of the most colorful and powerful judges in the country, described as “an unabashed Prairie populist” and “a live-wire slayer of corporate behemoths.” Learn more at upress.umn.edu, where you can find book-group discussion questions, videos, reviews and more.


Roberta Walburn, a former Star Tribune reporter, is the perfect biographer. She’s a lawyer. She clerked for the judge. She admires tough and testy. them he’d accept the plea, but he wanted the real names, not the corporate covers, of those involved.

Not immune to aging I remember the last time I saw the judge. He was having lunch at The Lexington on St. Paul’s Grand Avenue, and former Star Tribune reporter Bob Whereatt and I were at a nearby table. Before we finished lunch, we walked over and said hello to the judge who appeared tired and, well, frail. Before he left, Lord came over to our table and asked us to write down our names because he wanted to make sure he could recall our encounter. I felt like crying. Somehow I thought the man who seemed immune to the powers that be could escape the rigors of age. Sadly, that doesn’t happen in real life. But Walburn’s biography keeps the legacy alive.

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MEMORIES

Black and white revelations BY CAROL HALL

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here I stand, stiff-legged and serious, clutching my high school diploma. Here, I’m a little younger, waving a small American flag, ready to march in the Memorial Day parade. And here, our family is gathered around my sailor brother, home on leave from the Pacific during WWII. These and other black-and-white snapshots from the 1940s and early ’50s fill one of many scrapbooks stored in the attic of my house. Going through them, I’m reminded that picture-taking then was a big deal — but it often seemed like an ordeal. Flash attachments weren’t readily accessible in our little town — or at least my family didn’t have one — so we’d troop outside and pose, holding still and squinting into the sun until the shutter finally snapped. The results often depict closed eyes and fixed smiles — Cheese! — that 12 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

came off as grimacing. A few indoor shots are in my albums. How they were lit is a mystery. But invariably, like one of a family Christmas gathering, they portray several adults squeezed together on the living room sofa, holding kids on their laps — everyone mouthing “Cheese!” in unison. And that was that! Film was expensive. Only one shot per event was taken. And so there you were, preserved for the ages, like it or not. Although inexpert, we were all eager to view these photos — wondering “how they’d turn out.” Anticipation mounted while the film was at the drugstore, being processed. I could hardly wait to see the ones I’d taken myself of my girlfriends with my Kodak Baby Brownie camera. After we’d had a quick peek, my mother would carefully arrange the photos in an album. The popular style then consisted of a cardboard cover

and construction-paper pages bound together with a twisted cord. Four black photo corners held the jagged white edges of each photo in place. And so, there they are, still today, grouped together in my attic — leaving me with a dilemma: I’ve reached an age where I feel I should do something with these albums. But what? My younger family members don’t want them. I can’t bring myself to toss the whole collection into the trash as some of my peers have done. It would be like saying, “Hey! I’m not dead yet. But there goes my life!” And there goes a valuable snippet of history. These photos offer an authentic glimpse of a typical, small-town Midwest family during — and just after — WWII. These were the clothes we wore then, and how women styled their hair. The occasions pictured are ones we revered. Even the stuff caught in the background,


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▲ Highlights from my old album collection include my family in 1943 with my sailor brother on leave from World War II (far left); my Sunday School class in 1948 (I’m the girl with the white headband) (middle photos); and my friend, Beverly and me with matching dolls in 1941 (above).

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our screened porch, the old Hudson family sedan in the driveway, speak volumes for those times — as does the Christmas tree in the family-gathering shot. It’s a bit scrawny. It’s decorated with those large, unreliable lights and popular clear glass ornaments with colored stripes — and over-decorated with handfuls of shiny tinsel. I don’t know where this photo will end up. But with it in mind, dear reader, Merry Christmas — and “Cheese!”

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Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

Determination — undeterred BY LAUREN PECK

N

o one could have guessed that a leader in women’s education would come from Moorhead, Minn., when the city was first founded in 1871. But Moorhead’s own Ada Comstock, throughout her lifetime, left her mark on many institutions, including the University of Minnesota, Smith College and Harvard. Comstock was born Dec. 11, 1876, in Moorhead to Solomon and Sarah Comstock, a lawyer and former schoolteacher, who both valued education. Comstock’s mother taught her at home until she was 8, attempting to make her self-professed tomboy daughter into a proper Victorian lady. When Comstock entered school, she quickly stood out, skipping grades until she graduated Moorhead High School at age 15 in 1892. With her father’s encouragement, she entered the University of Minnesota’s College of Science, Literature and the Arts.

Quite a college career Women were a fairly small presence on campus. In 1893, 208 men and 42 women graduated. Female students often weren’t taken seriously. In 1940, Comstock recalled of her early college days: “The effort of women for higher education was still regarded as more or less a humorous thing.” But even as a young college student, Comstock was determined to have the education she wanted. In a letter to her father, she wrote, “The Registrar objected to my taking both French 14 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

and German, but I went to President Northrop and had it fixed.” After two years, Comstock transferred to the all-female Smith College in Northhampton, Mass. She was elected Phi Beta Kappa and graduated in 1897. Comstock returned to Moorhead to earn a teaching certificate, and then she went on to complete a master’s degree at Columbia University in English, history and education. Only about 300 U.S. women earned master’s degrees in 1899–1900, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

Working life For her first job, Comstock became an assistant in the department of rhetoric and oratory at the University of Minnesota. In addition to her teaching, she focused on helping female students. Campus space exclusively for the university’s hundreds of women was limited to a single lounge in Old Main, which burned down in 1904. After the fire, Comstock lobbied the university president to build a women’s center instead of a chemistry building. Her efforts succeeded, and Shevlin Hall was built. It offered an entire building for women to study, eat and socialize. Comstock’s role as an advocate for female students was formalized in 1907 when she was named the University of Minnesota’s first Dean of Women. She oversaw the creation of the first women’s residence hall — the majority of female students lived in off-campus boarding houses — and worked on

women’s scholarships. She even took on the editor of a Minneapolis newspaper, asking that the paper stop writing about University of Minnesota women in a joking way. Even when the editor laughed at her, her determination to advocate for women did not falter.

Keeping at it In 1912, Comstock returned to Smith College to become its first dean. Like at the University of Minnesota, she evaluated student housing and worked to increase the number of scholarships. She also urged students to respect themselves and be aware of the opportunities they could have outside of marriage and motherhood. For about six months in 1917, Comstock served as acting president of Smith. However, the college’s trustees refused to officially give her the acting president title because of her gender. In her defense, incoming president William A. Neilson declared, “In a different world, Miss Comstock would have sat on the Supreme Bench of the United States.” In 1923, Radcliffe College, an allwomen’s college in Cambridge, Mass., offered Comstock the role of the school’s first full-time president. There she launched a nationwide admission program and raised Radcliffe’s reputation nationally. She also managed the school’s often-rocky relationship with Harvard, then an all-male institution. From Radcliffe’s beginning,


⊳⊳ Ada Comstock worked tirelessly throughout her career to enhance opportunities for women in higher education. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

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Harvard faculty repeated their classes for Radcliffe students. But by the 1930s, Harvard’s president was considering severing the relationship, feeling it drained Harvard’s resources. Under Comstock, the two schools reached an agreement in 1943 where Harvard officially took full responsibility for educating Radcliffe women, who were finally allowed in Harvard classrooms. Fifty years later, in 1999, the two schools officially merged.

Married life After this achievement, Comstock retired and surprised many people when, at 67, she married Wallace Notestein, professor emeritus of history at Yale. They’d known each other since their time as University of Minnesota instructors, and Comstock had even turned down a marriage proposal from Notestein in 1910. They lived in New Haven and traveled

extensively. Comstock stayed involved in education, including serving on Smith’s board of trustees and working on a graduate center at Radcliffe. She died of congestive heart failure at age 97 in 1973. Over her life, Comstock received 14 honorary degrees and three college dorms were named after her. Smith College has a scholarship program for nontraditional students in her honor, and the University of Minnesota honors female faculty every year with the Ada Comstock Distinguished Women Scholars Award. Visitors can explore Ada Comstock’s childhood home in Moorhead and learn more about her life and family at the Comstock House, which is on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the Minnesota Historical Society’s historic sites. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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WELLNESS

5 thermogenic foods BY SUZY COHEN

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he fastest way to lose weight is to exercise more (including, some might say, building lean muscle mass) and shrink your portions at each meal (while also, some might say, eating fewer refined calories). But there are some foods and beverages that can naturally increase calorieburning or thermogenesis. Here are a few that can help when consumed in moderation: ⊲⊲ Cinnamon. This low-calorie treebark powder is thought to help balance blood sugar, which can be a major factor in losing weight. Sprinkle it over a bowl of fresh berries with a splash of your favorite milk or cream, put some on top 16 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

of your morning oatmeal or add it to a protein shake or smoothie. Cinnamon tastes great on top of coffee, too. It’s rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals and has been linked to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in people who have diabetes as well as decreased inflammation and a reduced risk of cancers and neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. ⊲⊲ Apple cider vinegar. In 2009, researchers found that acetic acid, the main ingredient in apple cider vinegar, promotes the production of fat-burning enzymes in the livers of mice. Don’t drink it straight,

because it is very acidic and can damage your tooth enamel and esophagus. It always has to be diluted in something, so use it to make salad dressing or dilute a teaspoon in a cup of water and, boom, down the hatch! ⊲⊲ Coconut oil. This cooking oil’s molecular structure makes it uniquely able to bypass the digestive process (where its calories would be stored as fat). It can move straight to the liver where it can be used for fuel. So coconut oil isn’t thermogenic because it increases calorie-burning, per se, but because it doesn’t as easily convert to fat. It can also be used to replace “bad” fats in your diet and has been associated with decreased belly fat in obese women.


Coconut oil’s molecular structure makes it uniquely able to bypass the digestive process. ⊲⊲ Green tea. Drinking green tea, even once or twice daily (iced or hot) can — even with an unchanged diet — help you lose as much as 2.9 pounds in three months, according to a 2013 article from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers theorize that it’s a combination of the caffeine content and the polyphenols present in green tea that produce a thermogenic effect. Drinking organic teas; the flavor doesn’t matter, but if you put sugar in it, you might be defeating the purpose. ⊲⊲ Hot peppers. Mmm, spicy food! It helps you burn calories due to the heatforming compound called capsaicin. So next time you eat hot chili or salsa, or green curry — and feel yourself starting to get hot under the collar — remind yourself that you’re not being socially awkward, you’re being metabolically upregulated! Suzy Cohen, a longtime licensed pharmacist and functional medicine practitioner, is the author of numerous books, including Diabetes Without Drugs, Healthy Thyroid and Drug Muggers.

Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 17


TRAVEL

18 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


HEART AND SOUL Ease into New Orleans with just a taste of The Big Easy’s cuisine, cultures, architecture and tunes BY CARLA WALDEMAR Jackson Square, a historic park in the French Quarter of New Orleans, faces St. Louis Cathedral and is often busy with musicians, artists and other street performers.


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hey call it The Big Easy. But that’s a fib. Sure, the lifestyle of New Orleans is laid-back by prim Minnesotan standards, and the French Quarter — its heart and soul — is simple to enjoy. But here’s the hard truth: It’s never easy to cram all the attractions of this warm city — celebrating its 300th birthday in 2018 — into a single visit. So relax. Give in to its allure as you sample its cultural stew, flavored with food, architecture and music with a Creole accent. Then plan to come back.

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Climb aboard & take a trip of a lifetime!

Beignets and balconies Start your day (or end it: It’s open 24/7) at the Café du Monde by ordering its entire menu — café au lait plus beignets, served in drifts of powdered sugar — as you watch the world go by and listen to street

musicians coaxing wails from horns. The legendary café on Jackson Square faces St. Louis Cathedral, named to please the French, who once owned the land. The gent on the bronze horse in the park between them is Andrew Jackson, perpetually tipping his hat to the ladies. On either side, platoons of elegant apartments from the 1850s flaunt their lacy, wrought-iron balconies, sheltering sidewalks occupied by caricature artists and fortune tellers plying tarot cards. Behind the cathedral, you can find the former digs of William Faulkner (bookstore, too), Tennessee Williams (yes, that famed streetcar really stops at Desire) and Truman Capote. Sign on for a walking tour for insider info on the townhouses of history’s aristocrats, their slaves’ voodoo parlors and the Ursuline Convent of 1750, the oldest building in the city. Then amble past the antique shops and art galleries on Royal Street and the bars lining Bourbon Street (where a permit to carry refers not to firearms but cocktails in to-go cups) as Dixieland tunes from pop-up bands put a grin on your face. That music also is part of funeral parades. In New Orleans, the deeply departed reside in stunning aboveground cemeteries called Cities of the ⊳ New Orleans’ famous donuts — beignets — come doused in powdered sugar and are served with chicory coffee. Photo by Paul Broussard

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PLAN YOUR TRIP

See neworleanscvb.com

▲▲In the historic, tourist-popular French Quarter of New Orleans, apartments from the 1850s flaunt lacy, wrought-iron balconies. Photo by GTS Productions / Shutterstock.com

Dead, open for tours and scattered around the town. Most famous among them is St. Louis Cemetery #1, walking distance from the French Quarter on historic Basin Street. Near Jackson Square you can pick up the Moon Walk, a riverside promenade on the Mississippi River that’s home to a paddleboat cruises, ferry rides to Algiers on the opposite bank (ideal for skyline photos) and a waterside aquarium, featuring gators as well as more global swimmers.

Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 21


HEART AND SOUL

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On Canal Street, hop on the St. Charles streetcar for a trip that jangles you past the Audubon Zoo and the fancy mansions of the Garden District, housing celebs past and present from Confederacy President Jefferson Davis to Tubman helps people of all ages and genders facing relationship author Anne Rice. violence, sexual exploitation, Those avenues are packed — packed! addiction, mental health challenges, — with parade-watchers during Mardi or other forms of trauma. Gras. But you don’t have to immerse yourself in the insanity to get a behindTubman Center MNP filler V6.indd 1 11/21/17 3:56 PM Sharing and Caring Hands the-scenes view of those fabled floats: Needs Your Help! Simply visit Mardi Gras World to peer into its “den” — featuring platoons of floats and their papier-mache “celebs” — including Winston Churchill, Elvis and King Kong. You can also tour the studios of artists preparing for next year’s extravaganzas. Indeed, more than 50 events are slated Your donations provide: between Jan. 6 and Fat Tuesday, which is • Showers • Meals • Help with Feb. 13 this year. Emergency Needs • Shoes • Shelter • Clothing • Medical & Dental • A Safe Haven for You’ll get a bite of King cake to enjoy People Living on Services • Beds the Streets while viewing a film of past proceed• Household Goods • Glasses • Toys • Food ings, with crowds screaming “Throw me 92% of your donations somethin', Mistah!” as bangles, coins and go to serve the needs of the poor candy hit the streets. Tax Deductible Donations can be sent to: Also in the Garden District, grab an Sharing and Caring Hands 525 No. 7th St. Mpls, MN 55405 elegant lunch at the award-winning, Name historic Commander’s Palace, featuring Address its famed turtle soup and 25-cent City/State/Zip ❍ Check ❍ Visa ❍ MC martinis with an entrée purchase: “Limit Card# Exp. / / three per person — ’cause that’s enough.” For information or to donate online: www.sharingandcaringhands.org Another above-ground cemetery —

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Lafayette No. 1 and No. 2, dating back to 1832 — sits across the street and is open for daily tours by reservation.

Immerse yourself in history Back downtown, be sure to set aside at least half a day (minimum, trust me) of your attention — the National World War II Museum, which covers both European and Pacific fronts through gripping newsreels from the times (hear Roosevelt’s famed fireside chats while sitting aside a fireplace of the Forties) and video accounts from former servicemen. Across the street, stands another don’t-miss museum — the Ogden Museum of Southern Art — a showplace for regional artists. Finally, head back to the French Quarter to visit an under-the-radar outpost of the multifaceted (and free) Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve. Visitors can follow the evolution of the city as well as its unique accents, both Cajun and Creole: “Want your po’ boy dressed?” (translation: sandwich garnished) “with my-nez?” (that would be mayo). Listen, too, to a panoply of music — zydeco, brass band, folk — whatever’s your fancy. To hear those tunes live, head to the venerable, always-crowded Preservation Hall, or the many restaurants and bars on Frenchman Street.

Where, oh where, to eat? Now to the most pressing question: Where to eat? Here, dining is a contact sport, and “diet” is a swear word. The centerpieces to this heritage are its holy words — gumbo, jambalaya and etouffee. They star on many a menu, including the fabled Antoine’s, graciously serving folks for five generations. The Gumbo Shop serves a delicious version of its namesake, along with po’ boys and a


dandy bread pudding. Old-timers argue the merits of Arnaud’s vs. Antoine’s — “but we’re a Galatoire’s family, so I wouldn’t know,” humphed our genteel tour guide. For contemporary interpretations, visit NOLA, by “bam!” Chef Emeril, or any restaurant by Chef John Besh, vested in preserving the city’s multi-cultural heritage. For oysters, Acme shucks them in front of your eyes. Muffaletta sandwich? It’s stacked best at Central Grocery; carry it across the street to enjoy it on the levee. Or have a sit-down muffaletta experience (whole, half or even quarter) at the 200-year-old Napoleon House, offering another New Orleans classic, the gin-based Pimm’s cup, garnished with a cucumber slice. But my all-time favorite spot is Mother’s, since 1938 serving eggs-andbacon-and-grits, biscuits-and-gravy and anything else your Southern-beating heart desires, delivered by career waitresses who call you darlin’. Doesn’t get better than that.

Wild Louisiana white shrimp, tasso ham, pickled okra and sweet onions at Commander’s Place. Photo by Todd Coleman

Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 23


HOUSING

Moving made easier BY SARAH JACKSON

H

ave you ever heard of a Senior Move Manager? It’s a thing — a trademarked thing with the National Association of Move Managers. In fact, it’s a Minnesota-made phenomenon, born out of one woman’s struggle to move her aging mother four times in the final seven years of her life. It was the late 1980s, and Mercedes Gunderson of Edina found the process of repeatedly relocating her mother overwhelming — not just for her as a devoted daughter, but for the whole family. So she and her husband, Bernie, founded Gentle Transitions, a new business model to offer hands-on moving and downsizing assistance specialized for seniors and their families. Today Gentle Transitions is the longest-operating business of its kind in the U.S., and its move managers — who helped set a national standard of excellence — are still helping families in the Twin Cities. In 2016, in fact, the company coordinated more than 900 moves in the metro area. “We are known for superior customer service, compassion, professionalism and the utmost attention to detail,” said Diane Bjorkman, who is the current co-owner of Gentle Transitions, with her husband, Bill Lehman. Gentle Transitions isn’t a moving company, but rather a relocation-coordination service. It’s someone to take care of all the

24 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Edina-based Gentle Transitions is family owned by the wife-husband team of Diane Bjorkman and Bill Lehman. Photos courtesy of Gentle Transitions

details, including estimating for, scheduling and supervising a professional moving company. Services can also include professional packing; sorting and help with decisionmaking about what to keep/sell/gift; and/ or the coordination of hiring others to manage estate sales, document shredding and donations to charitable organizations. It also includes “total resettling” — things like utility and address changes, space planning, furniture arranging,

unpacking and removing boxes, and other finishing touches such as picture hanging and bed making. “Picture hanging is such a wellreceived portion of our services,” Bjorkman said. “We’ve hung up to 100 pictures on a single move.” Moves can be long-distance (to or from other states) or from one residence to another in a single community. A complimentary first visit from Gentle Transitions includes a written estimate for


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coordination costs as well as an estimate for what it would cost to hire movers. Bjorkman is proud of the company’s highly skilled move managers. “Our employee group sets us apart, and they are unsurpassed,” Bjorkman said, adding that the Star Tribune has named the company a top workplace during the past four consecutive years. Gentle Transitions also boasts an A+ accreditation with the National Association of Move Managers. Repeat business makes up a third of the company’s customers, Bjorkman said. “We’ve moved people up to eight times,” she said. “That’s our record.” Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility (or service) in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line #HousingSpotlight.

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Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 25

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FINANCE

End the year right BY SKIP JOHNSON

W

ith 2017 winding down, now is a great time for Minnesotans to enjoy the holiday season. Maybe you plan to travel to see loved ones or maybe you have them coming over to see you. Whatever the situation, think about how much stress you alleviate when you take time to thoughtfully plan out that wonderful holiday feast or carefully work out the logistics of traveling to see family. You can get that same boost when you make plans to make end-of-year financial moves. If you follow these simple steps, you’ll be amazed at how much money you can save on taxes or by adding to your nest egg:

Check your contributions When you make a contribution to a 401(k), you’re making an investment in yourself. If you’re already making a contribution, ask yourself: Does your employer offer a match? Are you at least contributing up to the amount of the company match? If not, you’re essentially leaving free money on the table. If you do choose to max out your contributions this year, be aware of the limits. For 2017, the maximum you can contribute to a 401(k) is $18,000 or $24,000 for workers who are 50 or older. If your employer allows after-tax contributions, you can keep adding to the total — $54,000 this year, or $60,000 if you’re 50 or older.

26 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

IRAs, too The maximum contribution amount for an IRA is $5,500 for 2017. If you’re 50 or older, you can contribute $6,500 for the year. You can also save by making contributions for your spouse. There are a couple of rules and limitations to be aware of: A non-working spouse can make a deductible IRA contribution of up to $5,500 ($6,500 if age 50 or older as of Dec. 31, 2017) as long as 1) the couple files a joint return and 2) the working spouse earned income that equals or exceeds the sum of the nonworking spouse’s contribution plus the working spouse’s contribution.

Charitable giving Another way to give during the holiday season, while saving on taxes, is through charitable giving. There are a few rules to follow: Before you give, research the organization to make sure it qualifies for a tax deduction. If it does, then your contributions are tax deductible for up to 50 percent of your income. To claim your charitable deductions, you’ll need to itemize them on your 1040 tax form. Also, be sure and keep a receipt of your deductions as proof for the IRS. And consider the following strategies with giving to charities: A DAF (a donor advised fund) works as a charitable savings account, offering the donor both flexibility and control over donations; a QCD (qualified charitable distribution) allows someone to give up to $100,000 to charity directly from

If you follow these simple steps, you’ll be amazed at how much money you can save. an IRA, without being taxed, if the donor is older than 70½ years old.

Seeking advice The holiday season — and year end — is an excellent time to give. But remember, it’s also an opportune time to make sound financial decisions for yourself, including setting up a meeting with a financial professional, who can help you efficiently and effectively work through decisions in the years ahead. Before your appointment, make a list of the topics you’d like to cover, including your retirement accounts, tax deductions or any other questions you may have about your finances. Following these financial tips is a great gift to give to yourself — and a gift you’ll be able to enjoy in the years to come. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financial planning firm with offices in Minneapolis, Richfield, Plymouth and White Bear Lake. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.


IN THE KITCHEN

A LOCAL TW IST “The next time some coastal dunderhead tells me that the Midwest is landlocked, I will hold up this book as sacred proof to dispel that myth. Freshwater fishing is a tradition, an institution and a way of life around here, and this book is full of creative recipes for preparing the juiciest, most pearly fleshed fish you will ever eat.” That’s what Amy Thielen, author of The New Midwestern Table, had to say about Lake Fish: Modern Cooking with Freshwater Fish by Minneapolis food writer Keane Amdahl. If you’re an angler or know one (or simply love local fish), check out Amdahl’s inspiring new book. Here’s his recipe for pike, which has a firm, white flesh that’s similar to walleye. 28 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


PAN-ROASTED PIKE INGREDIENTS

4 tablespoons butter, divided 4 cups roughly chopped carrots 1 cup sliced almonds 1/4 cup honey 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 1 teaspoon red chili flakes 1 tablespoon olive oil 4 skinless northern pike fillets (6 ounces each) Fresh dill Salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

Heat 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add a pinch of salt, the carrots, and enough water to cover them halfway, 1–2 cups, depending on the size of the pan. Bring to a boil and continue to cook until the water evaporates, the butter starts to brown and the carrots begin to caramelize. Add the almonds and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes or until the carrots are fork tender. Season with salt. Stir together honey, vinegar and chili flakes in a small saucepan over medium-high heat and cook until the sauce just starts to simmer. Remove from heat and set aside. Place a skillet over medium-high heat and add olive oil and the remaining 2 tablespoons butter. Pat fish fillets dry, season with salt, and, once the butter has fully melted, place fillets in the skillet. Cook on one side while basting with melted butter and oil until the fish is about two-thirds done, about 3 minutes. Flip and finish cooking, about 1 minute. Flip again and baste with the glaze. Portion fish and carrots onto serving plates and drizzle with the remaining glaze. Garnish with fresh dill.


No ordinary life St. Paul author William Kent Krueger hits best-seller list again with his 16th Cork O’Connor mystery BY TINA MORTIMER | PHOTOS BY TRACY WALSH

W

hen the author William Kent Krueger — or Kent, as he prefers to be called — meets with local journalists to talk about his latest New York Times best seller, he sometimes suggests his favorite writing spot as the interview venue. You might imagine a small, inconspicuous cafe with dark wood paneling where regulars talk in hushed tones over pints of Leinies — Leinenkugel’s, the Wisconsin brew favored by Cork O’Connor, the protagonist in Krueger’s mystery novels. You might picture the author himself, meanwhile, sitting at a dimly lit corner table, crafting his next great American novel. But you’d be wrong — at least about the setting. Where the legendary Minnesotabased Krueger actually writes every day is The Underground Music Cafe in St. Paul. It is neither dimly lit nor quiet. And although the café serves beer, ice cream and waffles are also on the menu. Loud music plays from overhead speakers and kids noisily slurp milkshakes. Could this really be where an Edgar Award-winning author writes about drug runners, human traffickers and vigilantes? (That’s not all he writes about; those are just some of the characters you’ll find in his latest novel, Sulfur Springs.)

Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 31


No ordinary life

The answer is, yes, but only in the afternoon. Krueger starts his day early every morning at a Caribou Coffee, a couple blocks away from his Como-neighborhood home. This strict multi-venue writing regimen is part of the of the creative process for Krueger. “I can’t write when it’s too quiet,” he said. “I love noise, as long as the noise has nothing to do with me. I’m too easily distracted at home. That’s why I go to a coffee shop. It’s like going to the office.” Writing daily is a discipline Krueger began soon after he moved to St. Paul with his family in 1980. And although — after authoring 18 novels — he no longer needs to get up at the crack of dawn every day to write, he still does.

Finding home Krueger was born in 1950 in Torrington, Wyo. His father, an English teacher who ended up going into the oil business to put food on the table (though he eventually returned to teaching), moved the family often.

32 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ William Kent Krueger of St. Paul has been writing commercially and critically successful novels for two decades, including his best-selling Cork O’Connor mystery series, set primarily in Minnesota.

By the time Krueger graduated from high school, he’d lived in 18 different cities and six states. Ask Krueger where he’s from and he’ll tell you Hood River, Ore., where he spent a good chunk of his formative years. “I’ve lived in several different small towns in the Midwest, but I never thought of any place as ‘home’ until I moved to St. Paul,” he said. For Krueger, the road home was long. After his nomadic childhood, he landed at Stanford University for a year, before he was dismissed in the spring of 1970 for “radical” (anti-war) activities. It was a career-inspiring wake-up call. “Being kicked out of Stanford made me realize that if I did go back to an academic setting, I wasn’t going to learn what I needed to learn to become a writer,” he said. So he logged timber, worked in construction and mopped


hospital floors before landing a job as at the University of Minnesota with the Office of the Registrar and, later, the Institute of Child Development, where he worked until 1999.

A long apprenticeship After reading that one of his favorite writers — Ernest Hemingway — liked to write first thing in the morning, Krueger decided to give it a try. Thus began a lifelong ritual that would produce a number of short stories, some of which won awards, and eventually, his first two novels. It all began at the Saint Clair Broiler. For 15 years, Krueger got up at 5:45 a.m. every morning, walked the two blocks from his house in the Midway area of St. Paul to the Broiler, and sat down to write. At the time, his wife, Diane, was in law school, and Krueger was the sole supporter of his family of four, including their daughter, Seneca, and son, Adam. He’d write for exactly an hour and 15 minutes, pay for his coffee and catch the bus to his job at the U. It was a period of intense creativity and discipline for Krueger. And like his novels, setting played a significant role. He credits the Broiler with being part of the “magic” that helped him write his first novels. When the Broiler closed its doors in September after more than 60 years in business, Krueger wrote a heartfelt goodbye to the cafe on his Facebook page, describing its closing as akin to “losing an old friend.”

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Never too old to start Despite his determination and discipline, Krueger’s success didn’t come quickly. He was nearly 50 years old when he sold his first two books, Iron Lake and Boundary Waters, in a bidding war. Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 / 33


No ordinary life The books, published in 1998 and 1999, were the first in what would become the immensely popular Cork O’Connor mystery series, which now includes 16 books and counting. All but two are set in Minnesota. “Minnesota offers everything a fiction writer looks for — conflict, especially the conflict of different cultures,” he said. “It also offers the conflict of the weather, which can kill you if you’re not careful.” The part-Irish and part-Ojibwe protagonist of his novels, Tamarack County Sheriff Cork O’Connor, is a man whose life is rife with conflict. He encounters criminals and corrupt individuals at every turn. His wife is murdered. He nearly loses his son to a gunshot wound. The weather is often a strong adversary for Cork — from the brutally cold winters of Minnesota to the suffocating heat of Arizona in July. At the heart of every one of Krueger’s mysteries is a compelling social issue. “Windigo Island deals with the sex trafficking of young, native women. Manitou Canyon explores the rape of the land by large corporations. Red Knife deals with the influx of drug and gang culture on reservations,” he said. And while the issues may change, readers know they can always count on Cork to follow his heart and persevere, much like the author himself. “I’m living proof that you’re never too old to start writing,” Krueger said. “So many people that I know in this business have had gray in their hair before they started. I tell people to write first thing in the morning — because then it doesn’t matter what happens the rest of the day. You’ve taken care of this thing that is so significant. It’s a way of centering.”

Listening to his heart Krueger’s novels have received numerous awards, including the Minnesota Book Award, the Loft-McKnight Fiction Award, the Anthony Award, the Barry Award, the Dilys Award, and the

34 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Krueger creates his novels not in a quiet home office, but in public spaces such as The Underground Music Cafe and the Caribou Coffee shop near his home in St. Paul.

Friends of American Writers Prize. Many of his novels have become New York Times best sellers. Sulfur Springs, Krueger’s 16th novel featuring Cork O’Connor, was published in August, and it’s already a New York Times best seller. Moreover, it’s the first of his novels to be crack the top 10 New York Times best-selling fiction novel list. Publishers Weekly called Sulfur Springs, “Moving and suspenseful,” adding, “as usual, Krueger does a fine job combining distinctive characters with a satisfying plot.” The Star Tribune deemed the novel, “A blistering Wild West mystery.” Yet the reception for this latest book hasn’t been all positive. Like all of Krueger’s stories, Sulfur Springs deals with some weighty themes. In this case, immigration and refugees on the border of Arizona and Mexico. “I am, I freely admit, an unrepentant bleeding-heart liberal, and my response to the tragic situation involving refugees coming across our border with Mexico rises out of a deep compassion for anyone in desperate need,” he said. “I have received a number of notes from previously committed fans who now tell me that because I followed my own conscience in the


writing of this story they will never read another of my novels. They must listen to their own hearts, as I must listen to mine.”

Another one on the way Krueger is currently working on the 17th installment of the series, Desolation Mountain, due to hit bookstores in August 2018. Once he finishes it — he’s contractually obligated to produce one Cork O’Connor novel a year — he plans on returning to his passion project, a companion novel to the immensely successful Ordinary Grace, called This Tender Land, due to hit bookstores next fall. Published in 2013, Ordinary Grace was Krueger’s second stand-alone novel and a major hit. It received the Edgar Award, given by the Mystery Writers of America in recognition of the best novel published that year. It’s a quiet coming-of-age, murder mystery, set in the fictional town of

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No ordinary life

⊳ William Kent Krueger, who calls St. Paul home, will follow up his immensely successful 2013 novel, Ordinary Grace, with a companion novel next fall, called This Tender Land.

Aurora, Minn., in the summer of 1961. The novel, while hugely successful, was a risky endeavor for Krueger. His first standalone book, a thriller called Devil’s Bed (2003), didn’t sell. “One of the pitfalls of writing a popular series with a protagonist people love is that readers often won’t follow you if that character is not in your novel,” he said. “So no one bought Devil’s Bed. After that sales debacle, my publisher said only Cork O’Connor novels.” Krueger wrote the book anyway. “I didn’t have a choice. I had to write Ordinary Grace,” he said. “I wrote it not knowing if anyone was ever going to want it. Of course, when my publisher saw how well it did, they wanted me to write a companion novel.”

A writer’s writer

I had to write Ordinary Grace. I wrote it not knowing if anyone was ever going to want it. Of course, when my publisher saw how well it did, they wanted me to write a companion novel. — Author William Kent Krueger of St. Paul 36 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

For someone with such a talent for writing best-selling mysteries, you’d think Krueger grew up reading the genre or at least watching Perry Mason or The Fugitive. Not so much. Remember, he was the son of an English teacher. “Growing up, all I was allowed to read was literature with a capital L,” he said. “I didn’t even get to read The Hardy Boys.” So how did Krueger become such an expert at the slight of hand that is the mystery genre? He did what so many local aspiring writers do: He took a class at The Loft Literacy Center in Minneapolis, a haven for writers since 1975.


“A bunch of us formed a group called Crème de la Crime, which I participated in for more than 20 years,” he said of the informal mystery writers’ support group. “It’s still active now, but I had to quit a couple years ago because of my busy schedule.”

Love for indie booksellers That busy schedule currently includes a book tour for Sulfur Springs and numerous readings and guest appearances around the country. (FYI: Sulfur Springs comes out in paperback on June 5, 2018.) Krueger appears at roughly 100 book events each year, many of which are held at libraries and bookstores in rural communities. He’s a fierce supporter of local booksellers, often driving hundreds of miles to attend events. Why would a best-selling author feel the need to visit these small-town shops when he could probably be accepting an award somewhere — or definitely be writing another best seller in the comfort of his local coffee shop? “There used to be a lot of players in the game, and every neighborhood had a bookstore,” he said. “If the independent booksellers are gone, who is making the choices about what we read? I want to make sure the independents are strong so all our voices are heard.” Another reason he loves to visit local libraries and booksellers? The people. “Booksellers are friendly, knowledgeable, and with every book they sell comes a smile. There’s heart in the transaction. And that’s priceless.” Tina Mortimer is an essayist and a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in White Bear Lake with her husband and two children. Follow her work at tinatwotimes.com. City of Edina GA 1217 S3.indd 1

11/6/17 2:05/PM Minnesota Good Age / December 2017 37


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR DECEMBER

DULUTH WINTER VILLAGE

→ A two-day outdoor winter market on the historic Glensheen mansion grounds will feature local vendors selling holiday gifts out of pop-up wooden cabins, food, a new beer garden, music, live animals, children’s activities, fire pits and s’mores. Limited tickets will be available for Glensheen mansion Christmas tours ($9–$15). When: Dec. 1–2. (Glensheen will be decorated for Christmas through Jan. 7.) Where: Glensheen, Duluth Cost: FREE Info: glensheen.org

ONGOING

AND THEN THERE WERE NONE

→ Christopher Boone, a young man on the autism spectrum, sets out to investigate the bizarre death of a neighbor’s dog.

→ Ten strangers are lured to an island mansion off the coast of England. One by one, they’re mysteriously killed according to a macabre nursery rhyme in this adaptation of Agatha Christie’s best seller.

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

When: Through Dec. 3 Where: Mixed Blood Theatre, Minneapolis, which has a no-cost admission program and can offer transportation to and from the show. Every performance has supertitles for people with hearing loss. And wheelchair users may watch from throughout the auditorium. Cost: Tickets are free two hours before the show or $25 each for reserved tickets. Info: mixedblood.com 38 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Through Dec. 17 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22; $18 on Fridays and Sundays with a senior discount (for ages 62 and older) Info: theatreintheround.org

COCO’S DIARY → Based on the best-selling book Through No Fault of My Own: A Girl’s Diary of Life on Summit Avenue in the Jazz Age, this musical evokes the

sights and sounds of upper-class 1920s St. Paul through the true story of Coco Irvine, who lived in the mansion that now houses the governor. When: Through Dec. 23 Where: History Theatre, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $25. Info: historytheatre.com

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST JR. → Disney’s beloved production, based on the original Tony-award nominated Broadway production, comes alive for an all-ages audience. When: Through Dec. 28 Where: Stages Theatre Company, Hopkins Cost: $18–$30 Info: stagestheatre.org


MISS BENNET: CHRISTMAS AT PEMBERLEY → Revisit Jane Austen’s beloved Pride and Prejudice characters at the Darcy home for the holidays. This sequel centers on Mary, the middle Miss Bennet, as she learns to be the heroine of her own story. 

HELP US BRING JOY TO ISOLATED SENIORS WITH YOUR GIFT!

When: Through Dec. 30 Where: Jungle Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$45 Info: jungletheater.com

MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT → Celebrate the holiday season with special events, including festive light displays, live music performances on weekends, photos with Santa, wreath making, guided walks, booking signings, holiday teas and a winter gift market. When: Through Dec. 31 Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Cost: Admission is $15 for ages 16 and older, free for ages 15 and younger and free for all on the third Monday of the month; some special events may cost extra. Info: arboretum.umn.edu

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners – people like you.

CHRISTMAS WITH CANTUS → This local vocal ensemble reimagines beloved stories through familiar carols alongside new holiday classics. Singers will also narrate passages from timeless holiday tales such as A Christmas Carol, Gift of the Magi and ’Twas the Night Before Christmas. When: Dec. 12–22 Where: Wayzata, Minneapolis, Stillwater, Fridley, Apple Valley, Edina and St. Paul Cost: $20–$40 Info: cantussings.org

MORE ONLINE! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com.

HOW TO HELP Host a Gift Barrel • Organize a Gift Drive Individual Shopping • Find us on AmazonSmile

GIFT IDEAS Cardigans • Slacks • Shirts • Blouses • Sweats • Fleece Nightwear • Robes • Socks • No-skid slippers • Hats • Scarves Mittens • Towel sets • Small appliances • Clocks (big numbers) Sheet sets • Blankets • Pillows • Dishes • Flatware CD or DVD players • Books • Music • Movies • Puzzles Personal care sets • Grocery gift cards • Cash donations Feel free to use this list for shopping ideas! We only accept new, unwrapped gift items.

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info@giftsforseniors.org Gifts for Seniors GA 2-3.indd 2

9/22/172017 10:29 Minnesota Good Age / December / AM 39


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Get Inspired

ACROBATICS BAKE COOK DANCE DESIGN DRAW EDITING

CRYPTOGRAM Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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40 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

ANSWERS

K W Z L

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3. 78 percent

C D E Z L

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2. Cognitive functioning

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Clue: L = E

SCULPT SEWING SPEAK STORYTELLING THEATRICS WOODWORKING WRITE

TRIVIA 1. 72 percent

Source: Alan Alda

GAMING GRAPHICS IMAGINATION INVENT ORIGAMI PAINT PHOTOGRAPHY


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TRIVIA Creativity 1. What percentage of people experience creative epiphanies in the shower? 2. Which bodily function is most enhanced by creative arts? 3. What percentage of people believe that being creative improves their lives? Sources: fastcompany.com, todaysgeriatricmedicine.com, bkv.com

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ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM Be brave enough to live life creatively. The creative place where no one else has ever been.


Crossword

70 Choice word 71 Not reached, as a goal

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Knight’s “shining” protection 6 Elegant 10 WWII servicewomen 14 Car body style 15 Mennen shaving lotion 16 Get one’s ducks in __ 17 Devotee of singer Gloria 19 Heavy book 20 Buck or doe 21 Beluga yield 22 Viewed to be 24 Precise price 27 Mineral springs 30 Believer’s suffix 31 Five-time Wimbledon champ Björn 32 Portion out 34 “Westworld” network 42 / December 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

35 Bon Ami alternative 39 Mata Hari story, e.g. 43 Simplicity 44 The “I” in TGIF 45 Family car 46 Disney’s “__ & Stitch” 48 Above-the-street trains 50 Chapter in history 51 Garden purchase from a Lowe’s rival 56 Truck capacity 57 Coffee order: Abbr. 58 Image to click on 62 Gadget’s rank: Abbr. 63 According to the U.S. Census Bureau, it’s 63 for retirement 66 Slugger Sammy 67 Earth orbiter 68 Wafer brand 69 Jacob or Esau

1 Scored 100 on 2 Went up 3 Sound-off button 4 Wagner work 5 Striped-shirt wearer 6 Happen as expected 7 Buyer’s proposal 8 BART stop 9 Hammer or screwdriver 10 Nixon Era scandal 11 Pleasing smell 12 Tailed celestial body 13 31-Across, by birth 18 Rainbow shapes 23 Poetic “always” 25 Credit in a footnote 26 “Dancing Queen” group 27 Place for valuables 28 Not guilty, for one 29 Gift for the poor 33 Skillet for folded egg dishes 34 Growth chart nos. 36 Green stone 37 Banned apple spray 38 TV warrior princess 40 It’s often followed by .pdf 41 On the summit of 42 Old U.S. gas brand 47 Swearing-in words 48 Timeless, in verse 49 Women’s links gp. 51 Lift up 52 Televised as we speak 53 Soccer great Lionel 54 Black-and-white cookies 55 Marketing gimmick 59 Period “before the storm” 60 Look at lasciviously 61 Without ice, at the bar 64 TV loud-soft control: Abbr. 65 Bearded antelope


December 2017  
December 2017  
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