Page 1

OCTOBER 2017

MEDICARE PART D: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW NOW PAGE 16

SENIOR HOUSING WORTH THE WAIT LIST PAGE 28

THE COMEDIC GENIUS OF JEAN SHEPHERD PAGE 12

BETTER BROWNIES PAGE 32

and her — é n n e Maria G focused dance itycommun changing the art is troupe — in Minnesota of aging 4 PAGE 3


Contents

20

CULTURAL CAPITAL Historic Frankfurt offers old-world comfort food and charm alongside modern art and a diverse population.

⊳⊳ After World War II, Frankfurt’s citizens chose to rebuild its quaint historic quarter exactly as it stood for centuries. Photo by Anton_Ivanov / Shutterstock.com

34

ON THE COVER In the moment: Maria Genné, the founder of the local Kairos Alive! dance company, has been cultivating community in Minneapolis for nearly two decades. Photos by Tracy Walsh

44

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

6 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

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48

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FROM THE EDITOR

8 Maria Genné is changing the art of aging one dance hall at a time.

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MY TURN

10/20/16 1:41 PM

10 Dave recommends some uncommon tips for whole-person wellness. SINCE 1971

MEMORIES

12 Jean Shepherd's body of work evokes Midwestern, mid-century memories.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

2017 TOURS

14 American Indian tensions led up to The Battle of Sugar Point on Leech Lake.

GOOD HEALTH WELLNESS

16 Medicare Part D has evolved. There are some changes you should know about.

CAREGIVING

18 Finding time for fitness can start with little tweaks to your daily routine.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

28 Vibrant Becketwood in Minneapolis is not your typical senior-living community.

FINANCE

30 It's a good idea to weigh the pros and cons of pulling from Social Security early.

IN THE KITCHEN

32 Moist brownies made with black beans are the delicious source of protein you need now.

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FROM THE EDITOR Volume 36 / Issue 10 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall, Skip Johnson Kari Logan, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck Robin Sauerwein, Carla Waldemar Jenny West

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Dani Cunningham Kaitlin Ungs

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Taylor Severson

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Learning to dance BY SARAH JACKSON

L

ook at our fabulous cover star this month — Maria Genné! I know: Isn’t she amazing? See how she just glows with positive energy? I first met Genné in 2015 at the Midwest Arts & Aging Conference in St. Paul. Immediately, I was enchanted by her energy and struck by her passion for bringing the arts — in her case, dance — to older adults. I wasn’t surprised to see art classes geared toward older adults, including painting, poetry, storytelling and even music. Photo by Tracy Walsh But dance? tracywalshphoto.com I could scarcely believe — as Genné demonstrated her interactive Kairos Alive! workshop to conference attendees — the power of her grace, her ability to get everyone engaged, the light in her eyes, her dancing heart. And so with this issue, I’m delighted to have her on our cover (which happens to be our annual Fitness Issue) to showcase her Kairos Alive! teaching philosophy. Genné is changing the art of aging one dance hall at a time, not just in the Twin Cities, but also around the country, where she speaks on the power of dance — and intergenerational programming — among older adults. See, it’s not just that Genné has a knack for getting folks dancing, including people using wheelchairs or who have memory problems. Genné also strives to make her workshops multicultural as well as intergenerational. Though she could have become a stage dancer, Genné realized early in her career that she wanted to dance among others — with others. So she soon found herself working with young children, seniors and people with developmental disabilities, too. And she loved it. She wondered: “How do I keep that creative connection going across generations? If I want people of all different ages to really come together, I have to show what that looks like. So that’s the reason for starting Kairos,” she said. Genné, it seems to me, is living out the sentiment: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” “We are empowering each other to create a better world, a place we all want to grow old in, be in, and have our grandchildren in,” she said. Check out the entire profile on Genné in this issue, and just see if you aren’t impressed.


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MY TURN

Working toward health BY DAVE NIMMER

T

his month’s Good Age is about fitness and I heartily endorse eating right, exercising regularly, drinking responsibly and driving carefully. But anyone who carries an AARP card and has a Medicare supplement knows that none of the above is going to protect us from the body nicks and paper cuts of aging: ⊲⊲ Waking up in the morning with a dull pain in your shoulder that wasn’t there the night before, ⊲⊲ Bending over and feeling an unusual tug in your groin, ⊲⊲ Spending a half-hour trying to tie a small hook on a monofilament line, ⊲⊲ Trying to cut your toenails and nipping your toe instead of your nail. 10 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Yep, that’s the reality of this part of life. And we might as well get used to it because these aches and pains come with the senior territory. I’ve spent too much time fearing, complaining, raging and exaggerating — and not enough time coping and accepting. But I’m getting better, and I’ve discovered some actions and antidotes that seem to help.

Find a sense of humor As exasperated as I was after 30 minutes of trying to tie an 8-ounce jig to the line on my ultra-light rod and reel, I had to laugh at the sweat running down my brow and the tremor in my right hand. I’d been at it half an hour, and I was still trying. If it hadn’t involved fishing, I’d

have been finished 28 minutes ago. I stuck it out for another 15 minutes and tied the damned thing on the line.

Take a long walk When I’m feeling poorly, it helps me to stretch out, to walk. Briskly. With my head up. With my arms swinging. I can get into the rhythm and let my mind wander away from aches and pains and onto the woods and water around me. (Walking along a nature trail is the best medicine.) You can talk out loud to yourself without fear of being committed.

Listen to music This is best done in a car, singing loud and along with your favorite CD.


South St. Paul HRA My personal favorites include Bob Dylan’s Forever Young, Janis Joplin’s Me and Bobby McGee, Aretha Franklin’s Amazing Grace and Leonard Cohen’s Closing Time: Áh, we’re drinking and we're dancing And the band is really happening And the Johnny Walker wisdom's running high …” The lyrics get a little raunchy and raucous after that — even better for taking your mind off what ails you.

Gin This is for drinkers only. Those, like me, who find sobriety sane and sensible, can jump to the next tip.

Talk to a friend This is a relief for your spouse or significant other. A friend might not have heard your complaint in all its gory detail at least a dozen times. So you may get the benefit of a receptive, sympathetic and thoughtful response. And, it’s possible the friend has more maladies than you do. In that case …

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Help a friend This is really the best medicine for me. When I’m taking a buddy shopping, picking up a prescription, doing the laundry or cleaning a bathroom other than my own, I somehow feel useful. The task that occupies my hands quiets my mind. Among friends, it helps to cultivate some younger ones. For me, that means going to lunch or supper with former students at the University of St. Thomas. I’m older than most of their parents, and if I get too involved in a litany of aches, pains, bruises and bumps, it takes only a minute for me to realize most of them have no idea of what I’m complaining. They multitask, sleep through the night and take only an occasional ibuprofen tablet. Pretty soon the conversation turns to their turf, where the sun shines brighter — and I feel better. I’ve been told grandchildren produce the same effect.

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Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 11

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MEMORIES

The creative genius of 'Shep' BY CAROL HALL

H

umorist Jean Shepherd is best known for his role as co-screenwriter for the hilarious 1983 MGM movie, A Christmas Story, which became a holiday classic. But I first learned of Shepherd through another of his films: The Great American Fourth of July and Other Disasters, which came out a year earlier and aired on PBS. Both films are set during the 1940s and are based on Shepherd’s youth in Hammond, Ind. The stories center on the blue-collar Parker family, particularly Ralphie, the older of two young sons, and are part of an anthology that also includes Ollie Hopnoodle’s Haven of Bliss and The Star-Crossed Romance of Josephine Cosnowski, following Ralphie into his teen years during the 1950s. All are brilliantly narrated by Shepherd in his easy-going, folksy style, a skill he honed in an earlier radio career. I laughed myself silly watching every one of them, loving the repeated punchline in A Christmas Story, regarding Ralphie’s beloved air rifle: “You’ll shoot your eye out!” Having grown up in a small Minnesota town during the same era, I could easily identify with Shepherd’s characters and events — including one that involves chain letters with washrags as the prize. Shepherd began his broadcast career working at various radio stations in Ohio and Pennsylvania in the late 1940s 12 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲MGM released A Christmas Story in November 1983, starring Peter Billingsley as Ralphie Parker (and featuring Jean Parker Shepherd as adult voice of Ralphie).

and early ’50s, telling stories about growing up in northwest Indiana and its steel towns. He delivered his tales, amazingly, without a script. Shep, as he was called, eventually settled in at WOR-AM in New York City in 1955 for a 21-year run. Railing against the conformity of the 1950s, Shepherd gained a devoted audience that willingly participated in comedic stunts. The most famous occurred in 1956 when he was working an overnight slot. Believing it was easy to manipulate the bestseller lists, which

then were determined by demand as well as sales, Shepherd suggested his loyal listeners shop for the nonexistent book, I, Libertine. This, in turn, created a demand for the book, prompting book sellers to vainly try to purchase it from their distributers. Shepherd’s prank brings to mind a local hoax from the same era. Discovering the rules were lax for contestants in the 1962 Miss St. Paul contest (a precursor to Miss Minnesota and Miss America), comedy writers for Dudley Riggs’ Brave New Workshop entered one of their actors as a fake contestant.


Having grown up in a small Minnesota town during the same era, I could easily identify with Shepherd’s characters and events. For the talent competition, she sang a morbid song about her dead boyfriend, Herman, while snapping her fingers and repeating “ooh, ooh, ooh,” which broke up the audience and caused great consternation to event sponsors. Although best known as a radio raconteur, Shepherd gained enormous popularity on the eastern seaboard for his writing, which appeared in a vast assortment of publications such as the Times, National Lampoon and Playboy. He also made live appearances to soldout audiences at eastern colleges and even Carnegie Hall. Shepherd died in 1999, but his comedic genius lives on. It’s found in the narrative form of Garrison Keillor’s Lake Wobegone vignettes. Standup comedian Jerry Seinfeld credits Shepherd as the inspiration for his style. And the rest of us have A Christmas Story to enjoy again and again. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

The Battle of Sugar Point BY LAUREN PECK

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⊳⊳ Bagonegiizhig, an Ojibwe Indian, became a central figure in the last official conflict between the U.S. military and American Indians in 1898 near Walker, Minn. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society.

hen people think of the long history of fighting between the U.S. government and American Indian tribes, Leech Lake in northern Minnesota doesn’t usually come to mind first. But in October 1898, Leech Lake was the site of the Battle of Sugar Point, commonly called the last military conflict between the U.S. and American Indians. In the late 19th century, tensions were high between many Ojibwe in northern Minnesota and the government, including conflicts over logging on reservations. Timber companies often violated the law, taking more trees than allowed and were late with tribal payments for the wood. On Sept. 25, 1898, less than two weeks before the Battle of Sugar Point, several Ojibwe leaders petitioned President William McKinley, writing, “We now have only the pine lands of our reservations for our future subsistence and support, but the manner in which we are being defrauded out of these has alarmed us.”

A mistreated witness The battle also grew out of attempts to arrest an Ojibwe man who lived on Bear Island in Leech Lake, Bagone-giizhig, whose Ojibwe name means Hole/Opening in the Sky/ Day. In early 1898, he was arrested on a bootlegging charge and taken to Duluth for prosecution. When he was released due to lack of evidence, Bagone-giizhig was forced to find his own way back home through 100 miles in cold April weather. This treatment of American Indians 14 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

wasn’t uncommon for local authorities. So when Bagone-giizhig (sometimes spelled Bugonaygeshig) was called to Duluth as a witness in a trial later that year, he ignored the summons. Local authorities eventually arrested him in September 1898. However, when authorities led him to a boat to head to Duluth, several nearby Ojibwe fought back and helped him escape. The local deputy marshal sent a telegram

to St. Paul asking for military assistance to arrest Bagone-giizhig and 20 people who helped him. On Sept. 30, about 20 soldiers from Fort Snelling arrived in Walker, near Leech Lake. The two sides attempted to negotiate, but soon the government side called for more men. Even as some 77 troops — led by Gen. John M. Bacon — boarded steamers on Oct. 5 to cross Leech Lake to Sugar Point, a


⊳⊳ The home belonging to Bagonegiizhig became part of the battleground for the Battle of Sugar Point near Leech Lake in 1898.

small peninsula, nobody on either side truly expected a battle. Both sides agreed not to shoot unless they were shot at first. After arriving at Bagone-giizhig’s cabin on Sugar Point, the soldiers searched for the wanted men, eventually arresting two, while 20 or so Ojibwe fighters stationed themselves in the woods. Bagone-giizhig himself wasn’t involved in the fighting; instead, he left his home to wait things out somewhere safe.

Casualties and hysteria There are two versions of how things turned into a battle. The military claimed one of the soldiers, who were mostly new recruits, failed to set the safety on his gun. It accidentally discharged, causing the Ojibwe side to think they were being fired on. (Henry White, the son of Bah-DwayWe-Dung, who fought in the battle, disputed that claim much later — in 1970 — when told the Minneapolis Tribune the real story involved a soldier firing on Ojibwe women in a canoe. The Ojibwe men shot to defend the women, starting a fire fight, he said.) By the morning of Oct. 7, the soldiers left Sugar Point with six men dead and 10 wounded, plus one civilian death — an American Indian police officer, who may have been mistaken for one of the Ojibwe fighters.

Most of the casualties occurred in the battle’s first half hour. There were no reported casualties or wounded among Baghone-giizhig’s defenders. As word of the fighting spread, panic and misinformation ensued, fanned by members of the press, who had few facts of what it had happened. Several northern Minnesota newspapers announced oncoming American Indian attacks, and residents in Bemidji even locked themselves in a courthouse until a militia came from Duluth. A 1980s oral history of the battle by the Leech Lake Indian Reservation Business Committee summed up what was really going on: “Contrary to popular belief, there weren’t hundreds of Chippewa Indians on the warpath. There were perhaps 20 men ... involved in a skirmish.” Gov. David Clough received many reports from concerned citizens asking for military protection, and he insisted the War Department send reinforcements. The federal government had received word of the battle’s details from Bacon, and decided to station soldiers along the Great Northern Railway north of Leech Lake to help quiet fears.

Working toward solutions On. Oct. 10, William A. Jones, the U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, arrived and

When he was released due to lack of evidence, Bagone-giizhig was forced to find his own way back home through 100 miles in cold April weather. began meeting with Ojibwe leaders, who shared their side of the story and the grievances they had with the U.S. government. They met in council for about a week and eventually agreed to give up the men who still had warrants out for aiding Bagone-giizhig. They each were sentenced to two to six months in prison, and President McKinley issued a general pardon in June 1899 for everyone involved in the battle. The battle served to publicize many of the problems the Leech Lake Ojibwe had experienced. Jones announced in the New York Times that the practice of taking American Indians hundreds of miles to trial and then “turning them adrift without means to return home” was a problem. He also spoke out against the illegal logging practices. Bagone-giizhig himself was never arrested and eventually reappeared in the Leech Lake area. He went on to appear in many parades in Walker until he died at age 80 in 1916. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 15


WELLNESS

Navigating the Medicare maze BY KARI LOGAN

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f you’re 65 or older, you probably have a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. If you don’t — and you’re not signed up for other Medicareapproved creditable coverage — you’re most likely accruing a penalty. And if you think you don’t need to sign up for a plan because you aren’t currently taking prescription drugs, you’re mistaken. It doesn’t matter. It’s been 11 years since Medicare Part D was enacted, and the program has evolved. To get up to speed on the rules and regulations, we turned to John Ward, a certified Medicare health insurance counselor with the Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging, an outstanding Minnesota resource that offers free information through its Senior LinkAge Line. According to Ward, here are some things you need to know:

16 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Drugs, premiums and deductibles Medicare Part D regulations come directly from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), but plans are run and administered by individual insurance providers. Medicare requires certain drugs to be placed in the formularies of the insurance companies; the rest may differ from plan to plan. All plans have premiums and copays, but they can also charge deductibles of up to $400. Fees vary for both brand-name and generic medications, so it’s important to research availability and costs based on your prescriptions. Every year, providers can make changes to formularies during the year, according to guidelines set by Medicare. If the change involves a drug you’re taking, your plan must provide written notice to you at least 60 days prior to the date the change

becomes effective. Also, at the time you request a refill, your plan must provide written notice of the change and a 60-day supply of your current medication under the same plan rules, prior to the change. If you disagree with a coverage or payment decision made by Medicare, your Medicare health plan or your Medicare prescription drug plan, you can file an appeal.

Penalties Two years into the program, Medicare began imposing penalties. Americans are eligible for Medicare Part D coverage up to three months before and three months after turning 65. If you don’t sign up during this time-period, you’re charged 1 percent of the national base premium ($35.63 in 2017) times the number of months you go without creditable coverage — and it’s a lifetime penalty.


TIPS FOR MASTERING MEDICARE PART D

Plans There are fewer Medicare Part D plans available today than in the past, but you still have several creditable options with service provisions to meet your needs. (“Creditable” means the coverage is expected to pay on average as much as the standard Medicare prescription drug coverage.) Creditable providers are determined by the CMS and provide annual notice (usually in September) as to the current creditability of your plan: This is the best time to review your plan, confirm that it’s meeting your needs and shop for cost comparisons — during the Open Enrollment Period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. There are also other creditable prescription drug plans offered by private companies that contract with Medicare. These Medicare Advantage Plans include Health Maintenance Organizations, Preferred Provider Organizations, Private Fee-for-Service Plans, Special Needs Plans and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans. Health Partners, Blue Cross Blue Shield and Medica also have Cost Plans that include Medicare Part D, so you can choose to keep it all under one roof or choose a separate, stand-alone drug plan. In Minnesota, the costs of Medicare Part D plans range from $17 a month to more than $100 a month and can change from one year to the next. The rule of thumb is to choose a plan that covers your medications, knowing that premiums will vary, depending on your drugs. If you’re eligible for veteran’s benefits, you may have special options. Check with your veteran’s clinic, hospital or contact your County Veterans Service Officer.

The donut hole Comparing dollars to donuts is appropriate here. Most Medicare prescription drug

Fees vary for both brand-name and generic medications, so it’s important to research availability and costs based on your prescriptions. plans have a coverage gap, also called the donut hole. This means there’s a temporary limit on what drugs your plan will cover. The coverage gap begins after you spend a certain amount for covered drugs. This year, $3,700 spent by you and your plan will put you in the donut hole. But guidelines now include giving prescribers a discount on brand-name drugs, once in the donut hole. Monitor your monthly Explanation of Benefits statement from your drug plan, so you know when you’ve reached it. If you do, you’ll pay no more than 40 percent of the plan’s cost for covered brand-name prescription drugs. People with Medicare who get extra help with paying for Medicare Part D coverage through a low-income subsidy aren’t impacted by the coverage gap. For more than 25 years, Kari Logan has helped Minnesotans find the words to educate, promote and inspire readers across multiple industries, state government and non-profit organizations. She lives in Falcon Heights with her husband, Ian, and is the proud mother of a daughter who is following in her writing and public relations footsteps.

Navigating your way through Medicare Part D can be challenging, along with keeping up with annual changes to the plans. Here are eight tips from John Ward, a certified Medicare health insurance counselor with the Metropolitan Area Agency: ⊲⊲ Determine what your budget will allow you to spend on a Medicare Part D plan. ⊲⊲ Don’t just shop for the lowest premium. Look at your prescriptions and find a plan that covers them. ⊲⊲ Use the Eligibility and Premium Calculator at Medicare.gov for estimates. ⊲⊲ Because your prescriptions sometimes change, revisit your plan during the Open Enrollment Period (Oct. 15 to Dec. 7). ⊲⊲ Shop pharmacies for the best prices on your medications. ⊲⊲ Consult your pharmacist, a good reference for information. ⊲⊲ You may save money by ordering maintenance drugs (such as blood pressure or cholesterol medications) by mail, which can allow you to pay a two-month copay for a three-month supply. ⊲⊲ Premiums and your costs for prescription drugs can be tax deductible, depending on your income. For more information on Medicare Part D prescription drug plans, go to Medicare.gov or call Senior LinkAge Line (800-333-2433) to speak with trained Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging representatives, who provide free, non-biased information, plus connections to additional resources and support.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 17


CAREGIVING

Finding time for fitness BY JENNY WEST

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xercise is beneficial for everyone, no matter when you decide to become more active. By staying strong, you’re able to complete everyday activities with more ease and decreased stress levels. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and two or more days of muscle strengthening for older adults — every week. However, if you have the responsibility of caring for someone else during your day, how can you possibly fit exercise into your already-busy schedule? Adding small amounts of exercise into your day can be just as beneficial as one long session. One small — but important — step is to reduce the time you spend sitting each day. Research has shown that sitting for long periods may be detrimental to our cardiovascular health. Break up those bouts of sitting by standing up, stretching your legs and walking around the room. The simple act of standing improves posture and circulation, increases metabolism and tones muscles in the core and legs — a fact that’s boosted the popularity of standing desks in residential and commercial office settings. But standing is just the beginning of finding time for fitness. Try some of these creative ways to include fitness into your everyday life, even while you’re ticking other items off your to-do list.

18 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

On your own ⊲ Take the stairs instead of the elevator. ⊲ Use good posture, standing tall with your shoulders back. ⊲ Do pushups against a counter while waiting for your food to heat in the microwave.

⊲ Stand up and walk around when you talk on the phone. ⊲ If you ride the bus, get off one stop early. ⊲ Nobody will know when you’re exercising your glutes. Just tighten those muscles, hold for two seconds, release and repeat.

While running errands ⊲ Park as far as possible from store entrances. You’ll walk more and your car will be easier to locate. ⊲ When shopping, go down every aisle, even when you don’t need anything, to add extra steps into your day. ⊲ Return your shopping cart to the front of the store instead of a nearby cart corral. ⊲ When you return home, bring in one bag at a time.

During caregiving ⊲ If you’re keeping someone company, do some squats, arm curls or core exercises. ⊲ Go for a walk together, either outside or at the mall. If your companion walks slowly, use that time to bring your knees up as high as you can with each step. ⊲ If your balance is good, walk backwards to engage different leg muscles. ⊲ Dance with one another. It’s good exercise and another way to connect. ⊲ Consider a pet. Families who own


Keep in mind, however, the best trick for staying consistent with any fitness routine is to find something that you enjoy doing and that renews your soul with positive energy and strength. and walk a dog regularly spend an extra 22 minutes each day walking. Pets also often give unconditional love that can lift an entire household’s spirits. These tips can help caregivers sneak exercise into their very busy schedules. Keep in mind, however, the best trick for staying consistent with any fitness routine is to find something you enjoy doing, something that renews your soul with positive energy and strength. When the mindset of fitness is perceived as something you have to do, then it will always remain on the bottom of your to-do list. Even small steps to add exercise into your day will provide stress release, increased mood and energy to make reaching 150 minutes every week easier. Jenny West works at FamilyMeans in Caregiving & Aging Services. FamilyMeans (familymeans.org) and is an active member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative (caregivercollaborative.org). Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 19


TRAVEL

Though downtown Frankfurt is the commercial center of the country (if not all of Europe), the city’s old town is a major attraction for tourists.


o o T

GOOD to miss Don’t bypass vibrant Frankfurt on your way to ‘greater’ Germany — BY CARLA WALDEMAR — Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 21


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reaming of Germany, are you? Castles on the Rhine. The beautiful Black Forest. Beer halls with oom-pah bands. They’re waiting for you. But wait: After landing at the Frankfurt airport (the busiest in the nation), tarry a while to discover another vivid face of Deutschland before you hurry on. Behind those shiny skyscrapers lining the River Main that breed nicknames like “Main-hattan” and “Bankfurt,” the city’s Old Town (Altstadt) is as charming as many in the land. And beyond it blooms a bohemian district of hometown city life, plus a line-up of museums that rival — indeed, surpass — those of many a European city. And there’s food, both traditional and trendy. Plus shopping. And did we mention a rich history to discover? What do Frankfurters love most about their city? Its diversity.

22 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ As the historical center of Frankfurt, Old Town (Altstadt) has existed from Frankfurt’s beginnings, dating back to 794.


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GOOD to miss

“We embrace our contrasts,” citizens boast. Thus, you’ll hear German spoken on the streets, but Turkish and Farsi, too. You’ll discover a (safe) red-light district in the very shadows of those towering pillars of commerce — institutions that, because of Brexit, are primed to take London’s place as the continent’s business center. Diversity here also takes on other forms — a busker playing Bach on an accordion and a coffeehouse that sells underwear.

WHERE TO START? Hop a tram to the city’s Old Town. When World War II bombs left the city flattened, Frankfurt’s citizens chose to rebuild this historic quarter exactly as it stood for centuries, starting with Romerberg square, which serves as its epicenter, anchored by a neo-Gothic Romer city hall, often busy with wedding parties streaming in and out. Near it, tiny St. Nikolai Church, first erected in the 13th century, welcomes visitors to its tiny chapel. The square’s cobblestones act as the city’s living room, where mimes perform, balloon sellers wander, kids chase pigeons, cafes peddle beer and brats, and a historic marker remembers the site’s Nazi-led book burning on this spot in 1933. In today’s happier times, it’s the site of the city’s famous Christmas Market. Behind it weaves Saalgasse, a lane lined with futuristic buildings envisioned by fanciful architects (more diversity). Just beyond, the lacy Gothic spire of the grand cathedral looms. St. Paul’s, nearby, once a holy site, now shines as the center of democracy. It’s here — when the Holy Roman Empire collapsed — that Germans held their first-ever elections. (Here, too, JFK delivered his now-famous Frankfurt speech of 1963.) ▲▲The Goethe House in Frankfurt, once home to the famed poet and statesman Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, was destroyed during World War II, but was later restored and turned into a museum. Photo by Holger-Ullmann / frankfurt-tourismus.de 24 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


PLAN YOUR TRIP

Visit frankfurt-tourismus.de

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MUSEUMS GALORE Turn a few more corners to come upon the poet Goethe’s House (an excellent post-bombing recreation), which is open to tour. Then cross the river to the city’s unique museum row, staking its claim as an illustrious cultural capitol with seven different museums. The Städel serves as grande dame for bold-name painters such as Raphael, Fra Angelico, Rembrandt and Monet. Meanwhile, the museum’s ultra-modern wing makes Minnesota’s own Walker appear old-fashioned, including pop-art works such as Andy Warhol’s portrait of homeboy Goethe. Wander a block further to Liebighaus, showcasing a capsule history of sculpture since time began, (well, since ancient Egypt, anyway) through the glories of the Renaissance. Then move on to other museums devoted to architecture, film, Jewish history, glittering Christian Orthodox icons and yet another that honors the city’s own history, which includes a topographical map of Frankfurt before and after its near-destruction during World War II.

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▲ Paintings by masters are on display at the Städel Museum in Frankfurt, Germany. Photo by Rainer Lesniewski / Shutterstock.com


▲▲Seven herbs make up “gruene sosse” (green sauce), an official culinary staple of Frankfurt, often served with eggs, schnitzel and other dishes. ⊳⊳ Frankfurt is an ideal place to sample apple wine, a cider-like, low-alcohol drink that can range from crisp and tart to lightly sweetened. Photos by Holger-Ullmann / frankfurt-tourismus.de

DRINKING AND DINING Next venture to the streets behind these glam facades into the heart of a neighborhood called Sachsenhausen. Once the outpost of the working class, today it’s a hipster magnet, lined with indie shops between apartment buildings, greenways and scores of old-time taverns (the kind folks picture when they dream of German cuisine). These time-honored establishments offer leafy courtyards set with picnic tables at which to relax over a refreshing quaff of Sachenhausen’s famous apple wine, delivered in iconic earthenware pitchers. Daheim im Lorsbacher Thal, which debuted its cellars in 1803, offers flights of the low-alcohol, easy-to-like cider (apple wine), ranging from crisp and tart to gently sweetened with a touch of quince. Pair the drinks with a matching flight of local snacks, including a popular spread called hand cheese, sausage salad and the city’s signature “green sauce,” lush with herbs. Eat it with hardboiled eggs and potatoes, or wander over to Wagner’s (in business s since 1931) where it sides a hearty schnitzel.

SHOP IT OFF (OR EAT SOME MORE) Well fortified, wander back across the bridge and onto the wide, pedestrian-only shopping avenue called Zeil, home to every

brand name known to modern man, where the people-watching vies with the couture. If you prefer to wear your purchase on your hips instead of atop them, a stop at Klelnmarkt Hall is a must. Patrol its scores of stalls selling everything good to eat — cheese and sausages, buns and fruit — then take a DIY picnic to the open-air balcony. Leave room for dinner divine at the fine-dining (but relaxed and inviting) restaurant within the Grandhotel Hessischer Hof, a lovely hotel that was once the mansion of a Hessian noble, still furnished with the family’s antiques. Sip wines from their nearby vineyard while you sup on tender beef tartare or grilled scallops with avocado and chimichurri, then veal three ways (filet, foie, sweetbreads) or cognac-flamed salmon with kohlrabi, kimchi cucumber and wild rice. Dessert? Don’t resist the cheese cart. Not ready to call it a night? Neither are the folks in the hotel’s bar named Jimmy’s. Live music and lively tipples are offered until 4 a.m. — just in time to head back to the train station after your love affair with the city. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 27


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

During the summer months, Becketwood residents practice t’ai chi chih at Hidden Falls Regional Park in St. Paul. Photo by Don Darnutzer

Worth the wait list BY SARAH JACKSON

W

hen Becketwood Cooperative was founded on the banks of the Mississippi River in 1986, the founders reportedly told the architects: “We do not want a brick box!” And, indeed, the independent-living community in Minneapolis — 211 units in all — maintains a distinctive feel to this day with Tudor-style architecture, including the use of wood and brick, angled hallways and uniquely shaped (not boxy) floor plans. Thanks to steel and concrete structural supports, the units, which can include decks, balconies, bay windows, fireplaces and vaulted ceilings, are also quiet. Becketwood, being a cooperative community, is owned entirely by

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resident members, who participate in almost every aspect of the community, said Kari Tweiten Macdonald, Becketwood’s marketing coordinator. That includes serving on committees, planning programs and excursions, assisting with grounds keeping and stocking the in-house self-service pantry. “Our members say our supportive, welcoming community is one of the biggest reasons they move here,” Tweiten Macdonald said. Becketwood’s website hints at the community’s unique member culture, which is known for being popular with older adults who are active, artistic, energetic and, above all, involved: “We’re a lively, eclectic and spirited

group of people who believe in cooperative, democratic living. Bring your energy, talents and skills to add to the enriching Becketwood mix. This spirit of involvement and participation is a key component of active independent senior living here.” The cooperative, which prides itself on rarely imposing special assessments for maintenance and repairs, also provides regular allowances toward flooring, paint and appliances. Residents also are encouraged to remodel their units as elaborately or as minimally as they see fit with help from in-house refurbishment staff, who offer vendor coordination and assistance. Another big draw?


Booth Manor

BECKETWOOD COOPERATIVE WHERE: 4300 W. River Parkway S., Minneapolis OPENED: 1986 FOR AGES: 55 and up LEVELS OF CARE: Becketwood

offers only independent living. Individual members/residents may bring in their own health services.

NUMBER OF UNITS: 211 units with 14 different floor plans

OPENINGS? There are no-risk

waiting lists for each unit style.

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: $90,000 (for a

570-square-foot 1 bedroom/1 bath) to $450,000 (for a 1,630 square-foot 3 bedroom/2 bath). Monthly operations charges range from $750 to $1,660 per month and include everything but electricity, personal insurance and extras such as parking and meals. Because Becketwood is a “market-rate cooperative,” unit purchase prices are set by the sellers.

PROPERTY OWNER:

Becketwood’s members are the owners. Becketwood contracts with Episcopal Homes for property management services.

INFO: becketwood.com or 612-722-4077

“Location! Location! Location!” Residence For Seniors 62+ Tweiten Macdonald said. “We are located on 12 wooded acres with • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income gorgeous gardens, trees and green • Utilities Included spaces everywhere you look.” • Service Coordinator Members also enjoy riverfront • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room walking/biking trails that provide • Smoke-Free Building But selling a home shouldn’t be. access to both sides of the Mississippi 1421 Yale Place, Mpls are here to help River, includingWe a 0.9-mile walk to you & your 612-338-6313 family with your move. Minnehaha Falls in Minneapolis ornext a two-mile jaunt to the heart of Hidden Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1 12/6/13 10:14 AM Falls Regional Park in St. Paul.

Amenities ⊲ Exceptional enrichment programs and a wide variety of excursions ⊲ Dining room with gourmet-casual cuisine ⊲ Catering available ⊲ Several community rooms for hosting parties or meetings ⊲ Member garden plots ⊲ Workshop and craft/art center ⊲ Game room and fitness center with classes such as yoga, Pilates, Silver Sneakers and more ⊲ Up-to-date library staffed by members (including many former librarians) ⊲ Self-service convenience store ⊲ Coffee shop ⊲ Historic chapel with non-denominational services (also available for member use) ⊲ Hair and nail salon ⊲ Guest rooms ⊲ Pets allowed ⊲ Underground parking. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.

Where does your home stand in today’s market?

Check your current home value and how it compares to your neighborhood. edinapropertysource.smarthomeprice.com

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952-300-7874

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FINANCE

What’s your strategy? BY SKIP JOHNSON

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hen you retire you want a steady stream of guaranteed income coming your way so you can pay your bills and live comfortably throughout your retirement. Social Security, since being signed into law in 1935, is one of the best ways to achieve that income. According to government data, for 48 percent of married couples, Social Security benefits account for at least half of their income. For roughly 1 in 5 couples, Social Security makes up 90 percent of income in retirement. As you digest those numbers, you might be wondering: Will the benefits be around when my retirement finally arrives, and, if so, how do I maximize my pot of gold? During the past Presidential election, there was a lot of chatter about the threat of Social Security going away. According to the Social Security Board of Trustees’ June 2016 annual report, “Social Security is fully funded until 2034, and after that it is about three-quarters financed.” While that 75 percent coverage could cause concern, the Social Security Board is confident the shortfall can be fixed by lawmakers who can make that happen in a variety of ways, such as increasing contribution rates, lifting the cap on earnings subject to contribution, drawing on other revenue sources or lowering benefit amounts. But that part of the system is out of your hands. What you can do is maximize the options that are available to you.

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Waiting for bigger payments You can begin to receive Social Security benefits at age 62, but you leave money on the table if you take it right away. According to government data, more than 40 percent of workers opt to begin receiving their benefits at age 62. If you do claim at 62, your payout will be 25 percent less than if you waited until your full retirement age (66 or 67, depending on the year you were born). In short, the longer you can wait to claim benefits, the more money you’ll receive each month. And the money keeps growing until you reach maximum retirement age (70). According to Social Security data, payments increase at an annual rate of 8 percent each year, so delaying benefits can mean tens of thousands of dollars added to your bottom line. If you’re married, the benefit can be even more lucrative. For example, if one spouse is the bread winner in the family, he or she can delay receiving benefits until age 70 and lock in a maximum benefit for life, while also locking in the highest possible survivor benefit should the other spouse outlive him or her. So, for couples, delaying the benefit for the higher earner, can truly be a win-win.

Cashing in early Delaying benefits isn’t the best choice for everyone. For many, Social Security payments are a major source of income.

Social Security isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution. It’s very specific to you and your personal situation. If you’re among those who have no other income or just a small amount of savings, then it could be beneficial to you to draw on your claims right away. Also, if you’re suffering from serious health issues, it might not make sense to wait for a bigger check later, when you need the income to pay for your health-care needs immediately. Depending on whether you’re in or near retirement, one thing to know is Social Security isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution. It’s very specific to you and your personal situation. That’s why it’s always best to consult with a financial professional and find the strategy that works best for your needs. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financialplanning firm and insurance agency with locations in Minneapolis, Richfield, Plymouth, White Bear Lake and Duluth. Johnson appears regularly on FOX 9’s morning news show. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.


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IN THE KITCHEN

PROTEIN TREATS You don’t even need to like black beans to enjoy these rich brownies. (In fact, you can’t even taste them!) Truly delicious — and flourless — these super-moist treats have almost four times the protein and 10 times the fiber of boxed brownies. And they’re made with less than half the oil. Win!

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BLACK BEAN BROWNIES Ingredients 1 15-ounce can of black beans 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 3 eggs 3/4 cup sugar ½ cup cocoa powder ½ teaspoon baking powder Pinch of salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup mini chocolate chips Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8-by-8-inch baking dish. Drain and rinse black beans. Process beans in a food processor until smooth and creamy. Pour in oil and eggs and blend. Blend in sugar, cocoa powder, baking powder, salt and vanilla until all ingredients are mixed well. Add ½ cup chocolate chips and pulse a few times until incorporated. Spread the batter into the baking dish and smooth the top with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle with ½ cup chocolate chips. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until the edges start to pull away from the sides of the baking dish and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan before slicing into 2-inch squares.

Source: We discovered this recipe through Coborns Delivers’ new To the Table fresh meal kits. It’s one of more than 20 seasonal meal and dessert options for busy families that can be added to online grocery orders. Learn more at cobornsdelivers.com/ tothetable.


Twin Cities dancer and choreographer Maria GennĂŠ has offered award-winning dance, music and story programs for older adults as part of her dance company, Kairos Alive!, since 1999. Photo by Tracy Walsh

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dancing heart MEET MARIA GENNÉ, THE CHARISMATIC CENTER OF THE TWIN CITIES-BASED DANCE GROUP KAIROS ALIVE!

By

ROBIN SAUERWEIN

Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 35


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dancing heart

We are empowering each other to create a better world, a place we all want to grow old in, be in, and have our grandchildren in. That together piece is what’s going to help us survive and thrive. People need to be engaged. They need to feel like they matter. — Kairos Alive! founder Maria Genné

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As a child,

Maria Genné was always dancing. “I couldn’t sit still,” she said. “It has been such a life source for me. It drives me.” And so Genné didn’t stop moving, she kept on dancing and even made dancing her profession. In 1999, she founded her own one-of-a-kind dance company, Kairos Alive! Her 19 company dancers, ages 8 to 91, don’t usually perform on a stage, however. No, they — with Genné’s incredibly contagious energy and dancer’s grace at the helm — make their dance magic in Twin Cities schools, nursing homes and community centers. Kairos Alive! performances, you see, aren’t meant for watching, but for joining, including those who can’t even stand.


⊳ Maria Genné has mastered the art of dancing with people who are seated. Photo courtesy of Kairos Alive!

Genné named Kairos Alive! after the Greek word for “in the moment.” “I tell elders, ‘It’s when you’re having such a good time that you forget what time it is.’ A good thing for an intergenerational group,” Genné said. Why elders? Why intergenerational? Although Genné studied back in the day with famous choreographers such as Merce Cunningham — who was at the forefront of the American modern dance movement for more than 50 years — she realized she didn’t want to be in someone else’s dance company. “From a very young age, I thought that if you were just on stage, you weren’t connecting. I always wanted to figure out how you could do both,” she said. During her career, Genné found herself working with young children, seniors and people with developmental disabilities, too. She wondered: “How do I keep that creative connection going across generations? If I want people of all different ages to really come together, I have to show what that looks like. So that’s the reason for starting Kairos,” she said. The Kairos Alive! mission is to transform lives through dance and story with intergenerational, intercultural participatory arts programs for all ages and abilities, designed to nurture, heal and create community. And for the past 10 years, Genné has been succeeding in that mission at a

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dancing heart time when it’s perhaps needed most — as baby boomers begin to age in large numbers — by working alongside professionals in the arts, health care and social services with a special emphasis on older adults.

Choreography of care Brain research supports the importance of being creatively engaged as we age. In 2001, The Creativity & Aging Study — directed by the late Dr. Gene Cohen, then director of the Center for Aging, Health and Humanities at George Washington University — documented the positive impact of elders’ participation in creative programming, including improvements in physical, social and emotional well-being. In The Mature Mind: The Positive Power of the Aging Brain, Cohen (a friend and mentor to Genné) concluded that both hemispheres of the brain are used more efficiently and become more creative, not less, as we grow older.

Contrary to the old belief that brain cells stop forming, Cohen asserted that humans continue to grow new brain cells throughout life. Regular dancing may also be beneficial for the aging human brain. Scientists believe the social and creative aspects of dancing make it a particularly powerful activity for older adults. Social dancing is even being used to teach people with Parkinson’s. “It’s one of the best things we can do for health and well-being — no matter what your age or cultural background is,” Genné said. Kairos Alive! offers a variety of Choreography of Care programs designed to promote personal and community wellbeing, including Intergenerational Dance Hall programs for the public as well as Dancing Heart weekly programming in long-term care centers and assisted-living facilities.

Dance for all Even people who are physically frail or who face Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s can participate in weekly arts activities. “We are moving away from a model that assumes the inevitability of declining health and isolation as we age,” the Kairos web site proclaims, “toward a strengths-based, research-based approach that focuses on potential, vital engagement, health maintenance and prevention and continued connections to community.”

⊳⊳ Maria Genné, known for her unique ability to engage older adults, was featured in the PBS documentary, Arts & The Mind, in 2012. Photo courtesy of Kairos Alive!

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If I want people to really come together of all different ages, I have to show what that looks like. So that’s the reason for starting Kairos. — Kairos Alive! founder Maria Genné

Genné developed her award-winning Dancing Heart program in 2001. “I just saw frail elders who did a lot of sitting around,” she said. The Dancing Heart program taps into the creativity of older adults and invites them to be collaborators in the artistic process of dance, music and storytelling. Genné and her company of dancers engage older adults of all abilities in the weekly 90-minute programs, incorporating elders’ personal stories of joy and grief into the choreography of the dance, helping them become creatively engaged not just physically, Genné said. “We would start dancing and playing music and people would start waking up,” Genné said. “To be alive in one’s body and express through one’s own self, can be incredibly joyful — even from a chair.”

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A chair dance As a seasoned choreographer, Genné has been able to create many different ways

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dancing heart to do what she refers to as a chair dance. Charismatic, fit and muscular, she dances with — and around — folks in wheelchairs, throwing in sidekicks, hip sways and delicate toe tapping, too. Her seated partners can’t seem to resist her beaming smile, her graceful outstretched, swaying arms. Genné encourages sitting participants to use their upper bodies by stretching their arms up and out, by leaning side to side, even incorporating their legs and hips, all while sitting. They begin to move their arms on their own — with vigor. Their toes start tapping right along with hers in smaller, yet similar, steps of their own. In Maria & Ida, a 2014 YouTube video, Genné does all the above and more in a beautiful simple dance with an elder. In yet another video, she does the bunny hop with a room full of older adults sitting in wheelchairs. They’re reluctant at first, but by the end it's clear they've converted their inhibitions into joy. “We are all creative,” Genné said. “My job is to foster the creativity in people. We empower elders and their families and communities to build healthier lives through dance, music, story and research.”

A different kind of dance hall To really appreciate Genné’s work is to attend one of her Kairos Alive! dance halls (or view one on YouTube). All ages, backgrounds and abilities are invited to dance to live music by professional musicians with a goal of promoting arts participation, health education and community well-being. Dr. Gary Oftedahl, board chairman for Kairos Alive!, attended a Kairos Alive! event at the local VA hospital. When he arrived, he saw “over 30 veterans, many sitting slumped in wheelchairs and appearing dispirited.” But 90 minutes later, Oftedahl said, “there were smiles, voices raised in song, people both mobile and in wheelchairs engaged in dancing with volunteers which literally almost brought tears to my eyes.” Several of those in attendance, shook his hand, thanked the group for coming, and said it was “the most fun — and the 40 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

best they’d felt — in years.” Oftedahl, who’s worked in the health-care industry for more than 40 years, said Genné’s work has opened his eyes. “It has inspired me to work on convincing health-care providers of all types that there is great value in bringing in the unique elements personified by the Kairos Alive! approach to engagement.” He said Genné’s work transcends ethnicity, mental status and location. “Her work engages people — and brings great joy and happiness to what is often a lonely, isolated, dispirited population,” he said.

Learn more

Read about the other teaching artists and dancers involved with Kairos Alive! at kairosalive.org, where you’ll also find videos of Kairos Alive! in action, volunteer and donation opportunities and information about creative aging.


▲ Maria Genné’s community dance company, Kairos Alive!, hosted an Intergenerational Dance Hall at East Side Neighborhood Services’ Adult Day at Friendship Center in Minneapolis in June. Photo by Tracy Walsh

One elder who attended a dance hall last year said, “Nothing hurts now. I came as a 72 year-old, and now I feel 52! I am filled with joy and a sense of aliveness!” Last year, Kairos Alive! facilitated 50 dance halls at 17 different locations. “People end up leaving smiling,” Genné said. “When people feel they can be a partnership, there is a collaboration. They are vested. They realize they matter and, for me, that is really fun. The best dance is in a circle. In a circle, everybody is included.”

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dancing heart

⊳ Live music is a crucial component of the Kairos Alive! Intergenerational Dance Halls, including this one at East Side Neighborhood Services’ Adult Day at Friendship Center in Minneapolis. Photo by Tracy Walsh

Kairos Alive! also offers Moving Well training and education series to people involved with intergenerational or older adult programs; Community Arts and Wellbeing residencies; and, about a dozen times a year, Kairos Alive! Performance Troupe performances, featuring works from the company’s repertoire, including pieces created in collaboration with partners.

Keeping the vision alive

The best dance is in a circle. In a circle, everybody is included. — Kairos Alive! founder Maria Genné

42 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Genné grew up in Chicago in the 1960s during the early Civil Rights movement. She lived in Hyde Park near the University of Chicago, a richly integrated multicultural neighborhood where she witnessed social change, including a Martin Luther King Jr. rally. Her mother paid for some of her first dance lessons with a Social Security check that came after Genné’s father passed away. “Dance is a language and intelligence. I always believed in that as a child,” she said. “How I learned is through moving.” Genné’s work in the field of arts and aging hasn’t gone unnoticed. In 2012, Kairos Alive! was featured in the PBS documentary, Arts & The Mind. Her intergenerational programs have received numerous awards and she’s invited to speak at aging conferences around the country. When Genné sees dance participants enjoying what she calls “Kairos moments” — when art and community come together in the moment — she feels empowered. When she’s not dancing, Genné is busy writing grants and making new connections to keep her vision alive, including the key elements of accessibility and creativity. She’s experimenting with technology to reach more people, including Zoom. Using the web-conferencing software, Genné is producing what she refers to as “webasodes,” live productions that would allow people to watch and participate at the same time — ideally with someone else in the room, dancing with them, of course. Her goal is to eventually host a weekly program. Genné and her husband, Cris Anderson, a filmmaker, writer and creative consultant, have called Minneapolis home for 38 years and have raised two daughters, Elinor and Parker, during that time. “Minnesota is a great place to be an artist, a human, a parent,” Genné said. “I don’t believe there is any other place like this in the country.”


The big picture Genné’s daughter, Parker, who works at Kairos, said her mother has helped her see — and celebrate — the gifts in people that usually go unnoticed. “Her generosity, love, energy and belief in every person to express themselves through their hearts, is just who she is as a person and how she lives her own life. My mom’s work is a part of her soul.” Lately, Genné has been thinking about the future of her work, her legacy. “You want your gifts to be usable and understandable. What is the recipe of so many years of what I’ve been doing?” she said. “It’s important to put something down.” Radical Welcome, a book she hopes to be writing soon, will detail her process for working toward community wellbeing and her methods for sharing the joy of music and story together. “We are empowering each other to create a better world, a place we all want to grow old in, be in, and have our grandchildren in,” she said. “That together piece is what’s going to help us survive and thrive. People need to be engaged. They need to feel like they matter.” Genné knows she, like all of us, is destined for older adulthood. “There is a real big picture here. I want to keep on giving as I get older, too,” she said. “I also want to be with others, creating together. I don’t want to be done until I’m done.” Robin Sauerwein is a local freelance writer who lives in Northeast Minneapolis where she writes about the people and places in her neighborhood. She encourages others to write in her community education classes. Follow her musings at robinldyson.wordpress.com.

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9/22/17 10:29 Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / AM 43


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR OCTOBER

LIFE COULD BE A DREAM

→→See an award-winning musical about a doo-wop singing group preparing to enter a radio contest with a dream of making it to the big time. Show songs will include Fools Fall in Love, Tears on My Pillow, Runaround Sue, Earth Angel, Stay, Unchained Melody, Lonely Teardrops and, of course, Life Could Be a Dream. When: Oct. 6–Feb. 17 Where: Old Log Theatre, Excelsior Cost: $30–$40 Info: oldlog.com

ONGOING

EYEWITNESS VIEWS

AMVETS POST #5

→→This smart, tightly wound sci-fi thriller explores the consequences of living out private dreams in a world of ever-advancing technology.

→→Commissioned in the 1700s by princes, popes and ambassadors, painters recorded many important events first-hand. This first-ever exhibition on the golden age of view-painting — subtitled Making History in 18th-Century Europe — features many paintings never seen before in America.

→→Artist Xavier Tavera pairs photos of Mexican and Mexican-American veterans with their stories of returning from the battlefields to their homes in West St. Paul. This exhibit serves as a reminder of their contributions as soldiers as well as their struggles with racism and apathy after returning home.

THE NETHER

When: Through Oct. 15 Where: The Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$45 Info: jungletheater.com

44 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Through Dec. 31 Where: Mia, Minneapolis Cost: $20 Info: new.artsmia.org

When: Through April 22 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: $10–$12 Info: mnhs.org


SEPT. 28–APRIL 26

THURSDAY MORNING ARTIST SERIES →→Presented since 1892, this annual series features some of the best local musicians, performing a variety of works by classical composers on select Thursdays in the intimate recital setting of MacPhail’s Antonello Hall. When: 10:30 a.m. Arrive at 10 a.m. for free coffee and donuts. Where: MacPhail Center for Music, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets, all sold at the door, are $15 ($10 for groups or eight of more and $6 for students). Info: thursdaymusical.org

OCT. 1

CAPONI ART PARK MEDIEVAL FAIR →→The Middle Ages come to life with authentic costumes, music, dance, weaponry and interactive demonstrations by the Society for Creative Anachronism. When: 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Oct. 1 Where: Caponi Art Park, Eagan Cost: $5 Info: caponiartpark.org

OCT. 3

BOOKS & BARS →→Jeff Kamin is reinventing the book club. Lively, moderated discussions about books alternate between venues in St. Paul and Minneapolis on the first two Tuesdays each month. This month’s featured book is The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict (who will be in attendance). When: 5–8 p.m. Oct. 3 Where: Amsterdam Bar and Hall, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: booksandbars.com

OCT. 5–7

TEXTILE GARAGE SALE POP UP →→The Textile Center invites bargain seekers, artists, students and crafters to donate as well as shop and create at

this celebration of fiber and thrift. Sale items include fabric, yarn, thread, books, buttons, beads, looms, sewing machines, knitting machines and more. When: Festivities start with a donation day on Oct. 5, a preview sale on Oct. 6 and the big sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 7. Where: Textile Center, Minneapolis Cost: Preview sale tickets cost $15 or $20 at the door. Info: textilecentermn.org

OCT. 8–MAY 13

SUNDAYS AT LANDMARK →→This annual fall-to-spring series of cultural and arts events is designed to entertain, enrich and educate all ages. When: Events start at 1 p.m. (except where noted) and are free through 2017: Oct. 8 (Nooks and Crannies Tour), Oct. 22 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony), Oct. 29 (Great Pumpkin Festival), Nov. 12 (Traditions of Germany), 6:30 p.m. Nov. 26 (Rose Ensemble) and Dec. 10 (Santa’s Workshop) — plus more to come in 2018. Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: All the events listed here are FREE. Info: landmarkcenter.org

OCT. 12

THE SPLENDID TABLE LIVE →→Incoming host Francis Lam honors retiring longtime host, Lynne Rossetto Kasper, in this special live event. The episode, which features conversations sprinkled with musical interludes, will be recorded as Lynne’s final broadcast of The Splendid Table. When: 7 p.m. Oct. 12 Where: Fitzgerald Theater, St. Paul Cost: $22–$49 Info: fitzgeraldtheater.org

OCT. 12–22

DISCOVERY OF SIGHT →→Cantus, Minnesota’s own world-touring men’s vocal ensemble, kicks off its 23rd season with much-loved masterpieces such as Richard Strauss’ Traumlicht,

Franz Schubert’s Die Nacht, Eric Whitacre’s Lux Aurumque and a new commission, Coffee with Borges. When: Oct. 12–22 Where: Various venues in the Twin Cities Cost: $20–$40 Info: cantussings.com

OCT. 13–15

ST. PAUL ART CRAWL →→View and purchase a wide variety of art mediums and meet artists at this annual community event. When: Oct. 13–15 Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: saintpaulartcrawl.org

OCT. 13–NOV. 5

SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER →→Considered one of the most poetic — and shocking — plays of Tennessee Williams, this production tells the story of a prominent New Orleans family mourning the sudden death of their only son. When: Oct. 13–Nov. 5 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $18–$22 Info: theatreintheround.org

OCT. 14

THE GREAT CANDY RUN 5K →→Support the Fetal Health Foundation with this family-friendly festival and 5K with games, activity stations, face painting, refreshments and more. When: Oct. 14 Where: Lake Phalen, St. Paul Cost: Run registration costs $30–$40. Info: thegreatcandyrun.com

BT5K →→This annual event benefits the American Brain Tumor Association. When: 9 a.m. Oct. 14 Where: Como Lake, St. Paul Cost: Registration fees apply. Info: BT5K.org Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 45


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

PUMPKIN NIGHTS

→→Walk a half-mile path lined with more than 3,000 carved pumpkins, larger-than-life displays and multi-sensory experiences, plus food and activities for all ages. When: Oct. 13–Oct. 29 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul; Enter at 1719 Como Ave., Falcon Heights. Cost: $16–$20. Parking is free. Info: pumpkinnights.com

OCT. 14

OCT. 31­–NOV. 5

→→Internationally renowned visiting authors, local literary heroes and kids’ activities are at the heart of this daylong festival. You’ll also find a book fair that offers a snapshot of the local publishing scene (as well as great deals on new and used books).

→→This highly acclaimed Broadway show follows the relationship between playwright J.M. Barrie and the family that inspired Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, one of the most beloved stories of all time.

When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Oct. 14 Where: Historic Progress Center & Fine Arts buildings, Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: raintaxi.com

When: Oct. 31­–Nov. 5 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $39. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

TWIN CITIES BOOK FESTIVAL

OCT. 14 AND 21

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION →→Join Chris Thile for his second season hosting Minnesota’s venerated variety show, featuring storytellers, musicians and comedians. When: 4:45 p.m. Oct. 14 and 21 Where: Fitzge­rald Theater, St. Paul Cost: $33­–$49 Info: fitzgeraldtheater.org 46 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

FINDING NEVERLAND

CONTINUING

TAKING STEPS →→The Theatre in the Round Players open their 66th season as the longest-running theater company in Minneapolis with the story of a hard-drinking tycoon and the crumbling old mansion he wants to buy. He’s joined by his unhappy wife, his brother-in-law and others, who find themselves confused by a series of misunderstandings that escalate into an evening of hilarious theater.

When: Weekends through Oct. 1 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets are $22 ($18 for ages 62 and older on Friday and Sundays) Info: theatreintheround.org

STORYCORPS →→This renowned nonprofit organization — celebrating the stories of everyday Americans — will record interviews in the Twin Cities as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour. Having collected more than 65,000 interviews from Americans in all 50 states, StoryCorps has gathered one of the largest single collections of human voices ever recorded. Minnesota Public Radio is hosting StoryCorps as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. The MobileBooth is an Airstream trailer outfitted with a recording studio. When: Through Oct. 6 Where: George Latimer Central Library, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: Call 800-850-4406 or visit storycorps.org to make a reservation.


JOURNEY TO THE SOUTH PACIFIC →→Go on epic adventure through the tropical islands of West Papua, New Guinea, to experience one of the most extraordinary places on Earth, as seen through the life of Jawi Mayor, a 13-year-old boy. When: Through Oct. 12 Where: Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Cost: Tickets are $9.95 for adults and $8.95 for ages 4 to 12 and 65 and older. Info: smm.org

THE ABOMINABLES →→Minnesota’s unique youth hockey culture is the star of this one-of-a-kind world-premiere musical, created by and for Minnesotans. Geared toward ages 8 and older, the story follows Mitch, who’s always played on the A team, but is worried he might get sent down to the B team. When a young hockey-

playing yeti appears at Bantam tryouts, things go from bad to worse. When: Through Oct. 15 Where: Children’s Theatre Company, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $15; $5 lap passes are available for ages newborn to 3 years. Info: childrenstheatre.org

COMING UP

world, including music, dance, food, pets, crafts and more at this annual international event series. When: 1 p.m. Jan. 21 (Bulgaria), Feb. 11 (Japan) and 25 (Iceland), March 11 (Bolivia), April 15 (TBA) Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

ANNIE

→→One of the best-loved musicals of all time brings to life the extraordinary story of an orphan who ends up in the lap of luxury. When: Dec. 7­–31 Where: The Ordway, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $47. Info: ordway.org

JAN. 21–APRIL 15

MORE ONLINE! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com.

URBAN EXPEDITION →→Experience cultures from around the

Minnesota Good Age / October 2017 / 47


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Use it or Lose it

BARBELLS BIKING CALISTHENICS CARDIO CHALLENGING DANCE EXERCISE

FLEXIBILITY GYMNASIUM HEALTHY HIKING JUMPROPE LIMBER PILATES

PLANK RUNNING STRETCH SWEAT SWIMMING WALK YOGA

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48 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA 1. 10,000 (about five miles a day)

Source: Wilhelm von Humboldt


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ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM True enjoyment comes from activity of the mind and exercise of the body; the two are ever united.


Crossword

69 Frankfurt’s state 70 Lowdown 71 Soon, to a bard

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Ophthalmic sore 5 Season-ending college football game 9 Stories spanning decades 14 __ hygiene 15 Bounce off a wall 16 Chopin piece 17 Evening show with headlines and stories 19 Flabbergast 20 Swiss convention city 21 Fist-pump cry 23 Sales force member 24 ’60s protest org. 25 Periods that may decide 5-Acrosses, briefly 27 Andean animal 29 Like perceptive hindsight 33 Promise before testimony 36 Take to court 50 / October 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

37 Journalist Couric 38 German coal valley 39 Lifts on slopes 42 Gotten a glimpse of 43 Uncomfortably pricey 45 One collaring a perp 46 Watch displays, briefly 47 Generic pre-sunrise hour 51 Prefix for Rome’s country 52 Use a shovel 53 Pound sound 56 __ Palmas: Canary Islands city 58 “No damage done” 60 Five cents 62 Yellowish brown 64 Farm’s remote acreage 66 French sweetie 67 Inland Asian sea 68 Eve’s opposite

1 Billy Joel creations 2 Trapped on a branch 3 Signs of boredom 4 “Is there something __?” 5 Software trial 6 Halloween mo. 7 Food for Miss Muffet 8 Needing company 9 Seattle athlete 10 Fast-cash spot, for short 11 “Money-back” assurance, perhaps 12 Carving tool 13 Ooze 18 Swear to be true 22 Bottom-row PC key 26 Dismiss with disdain 28 Insultingly small, as a payment 29 “... or else!” remark 30 Instruct 31 Even on the scoreboard 32 Strong desires 33 Not exactly 34 Writer: Abbr. 35 Things to wash after dinner 40 __ rage: PED user’s aggression 41 Very light rain 44 Grassland 48 Netherlands airline 49 “That’s a shame” 50 Jubilant end-of-week cry 53 Ohio rubber city 54 Back in style 55 Swashbuckling Errol 56 __ Ness monster 57 Steady pain 59 Corn syrup brand 61 Unconscious state 63 Ambulance destinations: Abbr. 65 Golfer’s hat


October 2017  
October 2017  
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