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OCTOBER 2016

A no-fear Election Day

PAGE 10

EASY CHICKEN VERDE

The rise of the ‘granny pod’

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PAGE 18

Resort-style living in Sartell PAGE 26

The Minnesota

rned busine hockey legend tu

ss

new play as a man is making a

restaurateur

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Scenic, lovely Lanesboro PAGE 20


Contents 20 30

→→On the cover Life of a legend: After an amazing career in hockey (playing, coaching and managing), Lou Nanne is keeping busy. Photos by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com

Scenic Lanesboro Come for the natural beauty and tasty food. Stay for the thriving arts scene.

Subscribe! Want to receive Good Age at your home? Our magazine is free at more than 1,000 rack sites around the Twin Cities, including most senior centers, libraries and metro-area Walgreens. But if you'd like to get the magazine mailed to your home, send a $12 check for a one-year subscription to Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55403. Write “Good Age magazine” on the memo line.

37 Can’t-Miss Calendar 40 Brain Teasers 6 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


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Good Start From the Editor 8 Lou Nanne, a Minnesota legend, still isn't slowing down at age 75. My Turn 10 The Republic will survive, despite this year's turbulent election. Memories 12 The Brave New Workshop came from a tradition of satire. This Month in MN History 14 The Wheatley in Minneapolis was a beloved community center.

Good Health House Call 16 Fortunately, irritable bowel syndrome won't harm overall health.

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Caregiving 18 Learn about 'granny pods' at an independent living conference.

Good Living

Housing 26 Chateau Waters' resort-style living may remind you of a vacation. Finance 28 Our state is ranked as the fourth-worst for retirement saving. In the Kitchen 29 This easy, five-ingredient slowcooker chicken dinner is a winner. Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 7


Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 35 / Issue 10 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick Sam Patet, Lauren Peck Dave Nimmer, Dr. Michael Spilane Deb Taylor, Danielle Walker Tracy Walsh Creative Director Dana Croatt Graphic Designers Valerie Moe Amanda Wadeson Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2016 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

A Minnesota story By the time Lou Nanne was 50 years old, he was retiring from one heck of a hockey career that took him on many adventures far and wide, on and off the ice. In fact, the man had become a Minnesota legend in his own right by the time he reached that milestone birthday. And yet, that life change wasn’t an end, but a new beginning. That was when Nanne launched his second career as a sales leader in the asset management business — a role he’s still enjoying Photo by Tracy Walsh to this day, including a heavy load of worktracywalshphoto.com related travel. And that’s on top of his philanthropic efforts to raise millions for the Gopher Athletics department at his alma mater, the University of Minnesota. Not bad for a guy who’s 75. And that’s not all: Our Good Age Cover Star this month is shooting for a career hat trick with the recent opening of Lou Nanne’s, a new fine-dining establishment in Edina. The American-style grill is Nanne’s first foray into the restaurant business with local restaurateur Mike McDermott, perhaps best know for his Rojo and Ling & Louie establishments in the Twin Cities. Lou Nanne's is filled with memorabilia, including a framed photo of him in his iconic green-and-gold North Stars jersey. (Oh, those were the days!) Add to that family life — including three hockey-playing grandsons — and you’ve got quite a Minnesota story. Our profile of Nanne is one of the many articles I’m excited about in this issue. Check out our story on Lanesboro, a charming Minnesota town. I can’t wait to make my own escape there to take in the area’s biking trails, including a pit stop for pie. In this issue, you’ll also find a brand-new occasional series in our Housing section — called Housing Spotlight — featuring new and interesting seniorhousing options. Whether you’re looking for housing for yourself or a loved one, these virtual tours will, I hope, give you a glimpse of just some of what’s out there for Minnesota seniors who are seeking their own new beginnings as they enter “older” age if not “old age” or, as we like to call it, the Good Age!


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

A dumpster fire →→Take heart, voters, the Republic will survive

I have more than a few acquaintances who are pessimistically viewing the upcoming election as a “dumpster fire” — no good choice, no decent alternative, no hopeful outcome. I can understand their angst and anguish, but I have no doubt this Republic will survive. I begin with the fact we still have a free press in America, reporters willing to ask tough questions and sort through complex documents. They’ve been persistent, insistent and consistent in their coverage of this year’s election. I have no doubt they’ll continue in their watchdog role, whether they work for websites, national newspapers, networks or alternative weeklies.

New voices, faces This year the disaffected in America — white males feeling left behind in the economic recovery and college students feeling left out by party professionals — got their chance to be heard. They didn’t whisper or whimper. They hollered and whooped, for Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. And all the political parties were forced to pay attention. Just as the new voices were being heard, new faces are being seen around the country — immigrants, refugees, new citizens who add to the diversity, intensity, vitality and energy in America. While I can understand fears about terrorists and troublemakers, the overwhelming effect of the newcomers is positive, no more so than in Minnesota. They roof houses, gut turkeys, drive taxis, serve food and design software. And now a few sit on city councils, school boards and in the Minnesota Legislature. The evidence is obvious when I drive down University Avenue in St. Paul or Lake Street in Minneapolis — a Vietnamese restaurant, a Hmong market, a Somali grocery, a Cambodian dress shop and a Mexican mall. The invigorated avenues are the result of new blood, brains and brawn. For those old-timers who harbor prejudices against immigrants, I have a piece of advice: Get over it. In all likelihood, you’ll end up being lifted, assisted, fed and clothed by someone whose parents weren’t born in America.

Change marches on I want to be accepting of most of the changes that confront us. And I believe we’ve put a few divisive issues behind us:

10 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Hardly anyone under age 30 rejects equal rights for gays and lesbians. Interracial couples are now as common as Pronto Pups and French fries at the Minnesota State Fair. Minnesota companies, including Xcel and 3M, are leaders in promulgating alternative energy and sustainability, even if lawmakers are slower to react. Perhaps even more encouraging is a recent survey of high school scholars that found young people are looking for employers committed to the environment, social causes, communities, teamwork and flexible schedules. They appear committed to the kind of country I believe Michelle Obama described in her speech at the Democratic National Convention: “That is the story of this country, the story that brought me to this stage tonight, the story of generations of people who felt the lash of bondage, the sting of segregation, but who kept striving and hoping and doing what needed to be done so that today I wake up every morning in a house built by slaves.” Yep, we’ll get past this election and we’ll move forward. As a group, we do have good hearts, decent instincts and strong wills. They’re what make America great and always have — for generations now. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.


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Name Address Telephone (

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Father’s Name

Social Security #

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AUTHORIZATION FOR CREMATION I, the undersigned, authorize and request the Cremation Society of Minnesota or its assigns to cremate the remains of , and further authorize and request that the following disposition of the cremated remains be made: . I will indemnify and hold harmless the Cremation Society of Minnesota and the crematory from any claims to the contrary including all liability and claims related to the shipment and storage of the cremated remains. Signature

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

Satire’s cutting edge →→Minneapolis’ Brave New Workshop gave rise to improv and social commentary in the late ’50s

‘I’m going to Dudley Riggs’ Cafe Espresso,’ she announced as she swept out the door of our Minneapolis apartment, clad all in black, her eyes sooty with mascara. As I thumbed through Brave New Workshop — the 2015 book by Rob Hubbard, a St. Paul arts writer — it was 1958 again. My “Beatnik” roommate was heading for her favorite hangout at 18 University Ave. NE, which is richly described in the book. She (I’ve forgotten her name) was one of many roommates who came and went back then. All small-town girls, we’d moved to the city and were working at non-descript clerical jobs. I always wondered if her intellectual coffeehouse friends recognized this irony as they discussed the likes of existentialism, with the espresso machine hissing in the background and, behind the bar, Dudley Riggs — the former circus aerialist who founded the coffeehouse.

Comedy sketches A flashback of another kind altogether from the early 1960s hit me as I delved further into Brave New Workshop. Riggs, having by then moved his establishment to larger digs at 207 E. Hennepin Ave., and inspired by Chicago’s Second City, engaged a group of local actors to perform comedy sketches. The group, the Brave New Workshop Company, specialized in “sinking its satirical talons deep into the culture of Minneapolis and St. Paul.” In the fall of 1963, a conundrum made to order for satire occurred: Ultra-liberal University of Minnesota political science professor Mulford Q. Sibley, with a bit of ⊳⊳ The Brave New Workshop began performing at 207 E. Hennepin Ave. in 1961, within Dudley Riggs’ Cafe Espresso. The company moved to 2605 S. Hennepin in 1965. Photo courtesy of Keith Fountain

12 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

tongue in cheek, publicly put forth the idea that a student Communist club be established at the university, as well as a nudist club, an association promoting free love and an atheist group. Milton Rosen , a St. Paul city councilman and plumber, was outraged. Rosen demanded Sibley be fired. The two men engaged in a debate on campus, attended by 1,200 students.

→→Learn more Brave New Workshop: Promiscuous Hostility and Laughs in the Land of Loons by local arts writer Rob Hubbard tells the history of the Minneapolis comedy theater. Though Riggs sold the Brave New Workshop in 1997 after operating the venue for 39 years, the theater organization is still going strong today with a theater, box office and event space at 824 Hennepin Ave. in downtown Minneapolis. Owners and theater enthusiasts John Sweeney and Jenni Lilledahl still put on shows and teach improv classes to all ages, including corporate groups at the BNW’s Student Union and offices at 727 Hennepin Ave. Lady and the Trump — an election show and sketch comedy revue — is showing through Nov. 5. Tickets are $28 to $36 with $4 discounts for seniors. See bravenewworkshop.com.


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It caused a major uproar that involved the State Legislature, the University Board of Regents and the American Legion. It was even carried on local television. Yet, curiously, no mention is made of the Brave New Workshop players having lampooned this debacle. Another omission: I’d then begun working as a stewardess for Northwest Airlines. Although it seemed out of character — and therefore noteworthy — another stewardess, Cynthia Nimmer, was then acting with the group. Cynthia famously portrayed Laura Lovely, Miss Dinkytown, in a Miss America parody. But she isn’t among the many actors profiled either. Whatever. The many outrageous skits the troupe performed through the years that Hubbard describes uniquely reflected the times they portrayed. I laughed my way through the entire book. As for my Beatnik roommate, she, of course, vanished ages ago. However, she left behind a copy of A Coney Island of the Mind: Poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. And in the years that followed, I actually came to appreciate them. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Writer her at chall@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ In 1950, the Wheatley Aires performed at the Wheatley House, which had become a recreational, educational and cultural gathering place for the African-American community in the Twin Cities. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

The goal was to “foster a wholesome leisure-time program for men, women and children.” Because the settlement house offered four departments — recreation, education, music and dramatics — a visitor could take an art class, sing in the glee club, play sports or all of the above.

Community center →→The Wheatley in North Minneapolis offered recreation for African-American residents

In the late 19th century and early 20th century, settlement houses began appearing in Minnesota and around the country. Usually in immigrant neighborhoods, these houses, led by middle-class reformers, were often places where new arrivals could learn English and other skills and take advantage of services to find their way in a new country. But Phyllis Wheatley Settlement House was different: It focused on Minneapolis’ African-American community.

A growing population Phyllis Wheatley got its start when local social workers and philanthropists saw a need for a recreation facility for African-Americans, a growing population in the state. In 1900, only 4,690 African-Americans lived in Minnesota. By 1920 — in the midst of the Great Migration — the black population had nearly doubled to 8,655 and was growing as African-Americans were attracted to jobs in Minneapolis, particularly with the railroads. Named for the 18th-century African-American poet, the Phyllis Wheatley Settlement House opened its doors on Oct. 17, 1924, in a former Hebrew school in North Minneapolis. 14 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Orchestra and basketball The organization’s head was executive director W. Gertrude Brown, an AfricanAmerican woman from Dayton, Ohio. Brown was a graduate of Columbia University and boasted vast experience in the settlement-house movement. The Wheatley, as the settlement house became known, quickly became a community center, reporting attendance of 620 people in its first month. Brown wrote in one of her early reports that a basketball game and an 18-piece orchestra rehearsal could be found going on at the same time at the Wheatley. Within a few years, the organization needed a new home. The new building at 809 Aldrich Ave. N. came equipped with a library, gymnasium, nursery, community kitchen, club rooms and more.

Full of life It was clear the Wheatley was more than just a building. On the venue's 25th anniversary, the president of the board wrote, “This is the history of a House:


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During that same time, local hotels refused to admit traveling black celebrities such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Marian Anderson, Duke Ellington and Langston Hughes, so the Wheatley hosted them.

Razed along with Rondo

▲▲Wheatley house executive director W. Gertrude Brown, a graduate of Columbia University who boasted experience in the settlement-house movement, poses with children at the house in 1924.

not a pile of brick and stone, woods and metal, but a living, neighborly institution, which pulsates with the ebb and flow of the life of the community.” Minneapolis residents could not only play sports and participate in clubs, but they also could learn about the AfricanAmerican community at the Wheatley. The library offered African-American newspapers and books by black authors and poets. Organizations like the NAACP, Pullman Porters, the American Legion and various church societies regularly held meetings there. During the civil rights movement in the 1960s, community meetings at the Wheatley attracted up to 500 people. The Wheatley also worked to battle segregation and Jim Crow policies that persisted in Minneapolis. When the organization first started, black University of Minnesota students weren’t allowed to live on campus, so the settlement house offered rooms.

The settlement house also dealt with racial tensions within. White philanthropists had funded much of the start of the organization, and early directors of the board were all white women, who dictated policy and programs to the executive director. It wasn’t until the 1940s that the executive director gained more control and the board’s makeup became more diverse. In the late 1960s, the Wheatley house on Aldrich Avenue was razed to make way for the construction of Interstate 94, which also infamously carved its way through St. Paul’s African-American Rondo neighborhood. Despite this setback, 92 years after its opening, the Wheatley — now called the Phyllis Wheatley Community Center — is still going strong today in North Minneapolis at 1310 N. 10th Ave. Today the organization continues to serve as a community space and also is a nonprofit focused on lifelong learning, family support and child development. Its Mary. T. Wellcome Child Development Center, which first opened in 1929, is the oldest continuously operating child development center in the state. Learn more at phylliswheatley.org. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

Unpredictable IBS →→Symptoms of spastic colon often fluctuate along with the ups and downs of life stress

The colon is best heard from once a day, and otherwise should be out of mind. But for those who suffer with a spastic colon condition, this organ unfortunately is often top of mind. Doctors call it functional bowel syndrome, but spastic colon or irritable colon are more descriptive terms. It’s also known as IBS, short for irritable bowel syndrome. Whatever the name, the characteristic irregularity of bowel movements and associated colon distress brings misery to many. The symptoms of spastic colon include constipation, diarrhea, belly cramps, gaseousness and bloating, mucous in the stool and passage of rabbit-like bits of stool. All of these symptoms may exist, but one or a few are usually prominent. Irregularity is the common feature. Most people with spastic colon complain of both constipation and loose stool, one following the other in a poorly predictable fashion. Some experience only constipation, and some have only looseness and increased frequency of movement. Distention, bloating and cramps may be as distressing as the irregularity. The symptoms of spastic colon typically persist for months, years or even a lifetime. It’s the persistence of symptoms — without deterioration in general health — that distinguishes this disorder from other colon ailments. Weight loss, fever, bleeding, steady worsening of symptoms and ill health aren’t due to a spastic colon condition.

Forces of nature The cause of a spastic or irritable colon is a disturbance in bowel motility. The colon (or lower bowel) normally contracts slowly and smoothly, forcing stool toward the rectum. With spastic colon, the motility rhythm is disturbed and colon contractions are overactive in some areas and diminished in others. The final symptoms depend on the balance of the contractile forces. Most experts feel there’s an association between emotional stress and the presence of a colon motility disorder. Easygoing people who cope well to stress are less likely to suffer from a spastic colon than those who are tense, compulsive and

16 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

prone to worry. An overly simplistic explanation is that stress causes the nervous system to send jumbled signals to the colon. There’s no test or X-ray that allows a physician to diagnose a spastic colon condition. A doctor performs tests only to make sure that other, more serious ailments that can cause similar symptoms don’t exist. Tests are less likely to be ordered if symptoms are chronic, typical and not progressive.

Colon cancer, diverticulitis (tics), colon infection and colon inflammation are diseases that can produce symptoms similar to those caused by a spastic colon. The prognosis with a diagnosis of spastic colon is excellent. The person suffers, but general health remains good. The symptoms may be relentless and the colon may try to rule the person’s life, but most often the troubles are tolerable. Symptoms often wax and wane in concert with the ups and downs of life stresses. In its very mildest form (might we all have a bit of it?) there’s loose stool with stress and constipation with travel.


visitdecorah.com Treatment is drug free The only good news about spastic colon is that a person needn’t go broke buying medications. In fact, medications are best avoided. Treatment starts with an evaluation by a physician and education about the nature of the problem. Regular wellbalanced meals, high in bulk and low in sugar, are helpful. Avoidance of foods such as milk products and spices proves worthwhile for some. Exercise, along with moderation in use of alcohol and caffeine, are helpful parts of a treatment plan that’s directed at changing lifestyle. The most effective, and most difficult, way to alleviate symptoms is to control stress and worry. Maybe there’s more good news — functional bowel syndrome isn’t more common in older persons than in those who are younger. But in an older adult, a physician may too readily attribute symptoms to functional bowel syndrome and dismiss them as harmless when they actually may be caused by another more serious disease. If you suffer symptoms of spastic colon, take comfort in the knowledge that a whole lot of others have the same problem. Make sure a physician advises you that the troubles aren’t caused by something more serious, and then follow your doctor’s advice on how to control your symptoms.

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Dr. Michael Spilane, now retired, spent more than four decades practicing and teaching geriatric medicine in St. Paul. Send comments or questions to drspilane@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Health / Caregiving / By Deb Taylor

GETTING SMART

The Drop Home

→→Technology — including portable ‘granny pods’ — can enable more independent living

The so-called golden years can be a rich time of life to enjoy. It’s a time to truly enjoy the benefits of free time — to pursue a new hobby, take a class, visit loved ones or volunteer to help others. Along with those advantages, of course, come inevitable aches and pains, reduced mobility and other physical and mental challenges that vary widely from person to person. With a little support, however, older adults can enjoy life more fully and safely in ways not available to previous generations, often thanks to assistive technology.

Getting ‘smart’ about senior care Today ‘smart home’ sensors, specially designed smart pendant necklaces and specialty cameras can help caregivers and seniors better enjoy life. High-tech dispensers can report to a family member if a loved one forgets to take medications. Shoes can be GPSequipped to help locate a wandering senior with dementia. Motion sensors can detect changes in the normal household routine that may indicate a problem. These tools help older adults live and move about more safely, summoning help when there’s an urgent need. Senior Community Services will showcase some of this potential at its statewide Independent Living Technology Conference on Oct. 14 in Minnetonka. Caregivers, seniors, city officials, health professionals and others will gather to discover the latest advancements in assistive technology to enhance life for the state’s growing population of older adults. U.S. Sen. Al Franken will welcome attendees with video comments. The keynote address, about innovations in senior housing, will be presented by John Louiselle, CEO of NextDoor Housing of New Brighton. ⊳⊳ NextDoor Housing of New Brighton has developed a new, portable seniorhousing option called a Drop Home that can stay warm in Minnesota winters. Learn more at nextdoorhousing.com or 612-200-0849. Photo courtesy of NextDoor Housing

18 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

NextDoor Housing has developed a new, portable senior housing option called The Drop Home. A Drop Home is a small, handicappedaccessible housing unit that measures 30-by-8 feet — 210 to 240 square feet in all. Mounted on steel trailer that can be hauled by a pickup, it’s looks like a cross between a small home and an RV and can be temporarily placed on a family member’s residential property. A model version of the home — defined as a type of temporary family health care dwelling or “granny pod” — will be available for touring at the conference, which is open to the public.

A new law Effective Sept. 1, 2016, Minnesota cities must allow the installation of temporary family health care dwellings (granny pods), unless the city has a law specifically banning the units. A temporary family health care dwelling, according to the law, must

→→Independent Living Technology Conference What: Minnetonka-based Senior Community Services will showcase a variety of technologies and innovations in senior living and caregiving. When: 1–5 p.m. Oct. 14 Where: Minnetonka Community Center, Minnetonka Cost: Admission is $45 for ages 60 and older or $75 for others (plus fees). Info: seniorcommunity.org/ events


Booth Manor Residence

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

For Seniors 62+

JAMES G. ROBAN be constructed off site, have access to Attorney at Law • 1 Bedrooms utilities and be located on a property • Based on Income 261 Ruth Street where a designated caregiver or relative • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator is taking care of a mentally or physically (651) 738-2102 • Resident Activities & Programs impaired person.” • Community Room Will: $40 A temporary dwelling permit, under • Smoke-Free Building PoWer of Attorney: $20 the law, must be valid for six months 1421 Yale Place, Mpls HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70 and the permit may be renewed once for 612-338-6313 an additional six months. Drop Home prices start at $45,000 or Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1 12/6/13 10:14 Roban, AM James GA 0513 12.indd 1 3/28/13 3:23 PM $1,250 a month for a rental package that includes maintenance, utilities management and additional services. During the conference, a panel discusHas a doctor told you that you have sion and Q-and-A session will focus high blood pressure? on the benefit of granny pods, which are being studied, evaluated and, in a Are you interested in taking part in a study investigating a couple cases, banned by communities new device-based system for high blood pressure? throughout Minnesota. If you are between the ages of 18 and 75 years, have healthy kidneys as far as you know, would be willing to change your blood pressure medications for several weeks Other tech tools and make frequent hospital visits to have your blood pressure checked (possibly more The conference will also feature demonthan 10 visits in a year), then you may be a suitable candidate for this new device study. strations of other assistive technologies by representatives of the Minnesota Contact Rose Peterson at 612-863-6051 or at Rose.Peterson@allina.com STAR Program, a federally funded initiaFor further information visit: mplsheart.org/radiance-htn/ tive to support seniors and families. MPLS Heart Institute Foundation GA 0816 H4.indd 1 7/18/16 3:11 PM Representatives from the CareNextion website will explain the free, easy-to-use web tool developed by Senior Community Services to help families — especially those with members widely dispersed — better manage care and communications about their older loved ones. As Minnesotans come together to reimagine aging at this upcoming conference, let’s ensure our goal is to make technology fit the older adult lifestyle — not the other way around. Deb Taylor is CEO of Senior Community Services and its Reimagine Aging Institute, a nonprofit organization that advocates for older adults.

Rain Taxi GA 1016 H4.indd 1

9/22/162016 12:58/PM Minnesota Good Age / October 19


Good Living / Travel

Scenic L The south branch of the Root River flows into Lanesboro, where an old dam creates a picturesque waterfall.

a


anesboro

BY SAM PATET

This quaint small town — known for its natural beauty, arts scene and popular restaurants — offers an ideal weekend getaway. In fact, it’s worth repeating.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 21


⊳⊳ Aroma Pie Shoppe in Whalan (population 63) offers a rotating selection of freshbaked slices, plus sandwiches. Photo by Sam Patet

Scenic Lanesboro

I

t had been a long week at work. A long week. I needed a vacation, and I needed it fast. But where could I go on a small budget with no plane ticket and zero time off work? I found the answer in a town I’d visited two years earlier — a small town rich with charm, dining options and engaging activities — both indoors and out. That town was Lanesboro, Minn. It had everything I wanted — stunning natural vistas, a picturesque downtown, delicious food and a thriving arts scene — and all just a two-hour drive from the Twin Cities, about 40 miles southeast of Rochester. It was time to go back. Nestled amidst the rolling hills, corn fields and limestone bluffs of the Root River Valley, Lanesboro became a rural tourist destination in the 1970s after the town’s milling industry fizzled out. When you’re a city dweller, a relaxed, gridlock-free, quiet town like this — population 754 at the time of the 2010 Census — is a most welcome change.

Friday-night agenda

I chose to stay at O’Leary’s Bed and Breakfast, a restored 1910 home with five rooms (all with private bathrooms). 22 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Lanesboro, dubbed the bed-and-breakfast capital of Minnesota, boasts nearly 20 B&Bs and non-chain hotels. (In 2004, Outside Magazine named Lanesboro one of the “20 Best Dream Towns in America.”) My first big stop after settling in was the town’s historic St. Mane Theatre for Over the Back Fence, a community variety show offered on the second Friday of the month March through November. The 90-minute show — which is broadcast the following Wednesdays on Winona State University’s KQAL 89.5 FM — included songs, skits and jokes from local performers, as well as special musical guest singer-songwriter Jake Manders and storyteller Al Batt. The next morning, I awoke to a fantastic B&B breakfast at O’Leary’s, which included fresh-baked raspberry and blueberry scones from the Lanesboro Pastry Shoppe, a local favorite famous for its treats and other breakfast offerings.

Saturday: Biking (and pie)

My first activity on Saturday was a bike ride along the Root River State Trail. Constructed in the 1980s over a former Milwaukee Railroad bed, the 42-mile-long east-west trail system connects six towns in Fillmore and Houston counties, including Lanesboro. In addition, the 18-mile north-south Harmony-Preston Valley


State Trail connects with the Root River State Trail 4.7 miles west of Lanesboro and travels to the towns of Preston and Harmony. I didn’t bring a bike, so I rented one from Little River General Store, one of several outfitters in Lanesboro that rent bikes, canoes, kayaks and inner-tubes. Having laced my shoes and donned my helmet, I hit the trail and headed northeast for Whalan, Minn. I wasn’t planning to bike very far — it’s less than five miles between the two towns. Honestly, I just wanted to visit Whalan’s famous Aroma Pie Shoppe. Open for more than 30 years, the shop is currently owned by Karna Hudoba, who bought it this past April. It’s going well. On one of its busiest days, the shop sold more than 600 slices to hungry visitors, Hudoba said. Not bad for a town with a population of 63 (as of 2010). A whiteboard displayed the flavors of the day — apple, peach, coconut cream and maple oatmeal, to name a few. I went with a slice of blueberry cream cheese silk and a cup of coffee. After biking back to Lanesboro, I stopped at Pedal Pushers Café for lunch. Co-owner Angie Taylor said she and her husband, Scott, change their extensive lunch and dinner menus each year, although they keep some comfort food items no matter what, including liver and onions, chicken pot pie and Norwegian meatballs. I had grilled fish tacos served with sweet potato chips and a lime Italian soda.

Adventure awaits

▲▲Minnesota's Root River State Trail is picturesque and popular with cyclists. Photo by Sam Patet

Next, it was off to Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center. Six miles north of Lanesboro, this privately run nonprofit center offers a variety of environmental classes for adults throughout the year — such as crocheting, fly fishing and bird watching — as well as programs for kids. Nine miles of hiking trails are open to the public here seven days a week, too. But I went for another popular attraction at the center — the high ropes course.

→→Resources Lanesboro: Plan your trip at lanesboro.com. Root River & Harmony-Preston Valley State Trails: Download a guide (including a printable color map) for the Blufflands State Trail System in southeastern Minnesota at tinyurl.com/blufflands. Commonweal Theatre Company: See what shows are playing at commonwealtheatre.org. Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center: Explore course listings and hours of operation at eagle-bluff.org.

▲▲The high ropes course — 30 feet off the ground — at Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center near Lanesboro affords views of the Root River Valley. Photo courtesy of Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 23


Scenic Lanesboro Open year-round, the course features views of the Root River Valley. As I made my way between seven platforms — 30 feet off the ground — I had to take deep breaths to calm my nerves every so often. Note: Eagle Bluff’s spokeswoman Sara Sturgis said older adults do attempt the course, but it’s recommend for people who are comfortable with at least moderate physical activity.

Theater for all

Afraid of heights? Other activities include a bus tour of the area’s Amish communities, a trip to one of the area’s two underground caves or, in the winter, cross-country skiing. You can find information on all these opportunities at the town’s visitor center, which is open seven days a week. I didn’t have much time to rest after my ropes-course adventure. I had to get ready for an evening performance at Commonweal Theatre. Now in its 28th season, Commonweal is run by a company of 14 professionally trained actors. In addition to performing, the actors manage all aspects of the theater’s operations, including ticket sales, marketing, fundraising and facilities maintenance. The theater produces six shows a year, including one every year by the 19th-century Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. I had the pleasure of seeing playwright Ken Ludwig’s adaptation of The Three Musketeers. You still can see it — it runs through Oct. 24 — or, if you head down in November or December, you can

▲▲Lanesboro's quaint downtown features an array of shops and galleries. Photo by Adam Wiltgen

see Pride’s Crossing or A Christmas Carol. Before the show, I had dinner at Intermission, a small restaurant next door to the theater. Dining there was a treat for me. I went for the New York strip steak with roasted garlic and jalapeno butter, with a glass of Zinfandel. Reservations are recommended.

Sunday goodbyes

Before heading out on Sunday morning, I took a stroll through the historic downtown, stopping at several gift stores and antique shops. I also visited the Lanesboro Arts gallery. Operated by Lanesboro Arts, a nonprofit that also produces the Over the Back Fence variety show, the gallery features work by artists from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa as well as special exhibitions throughout the year. And with that, I was back in my car and headed north for the Twin Cities. Lanesboro, alas, was even better than I remembered it. Whether you’re still working or retired, on your own or traveling with the grandkids, Lanesboro might be your perfect weekend getaway. ▲▲The Three Musketeers is showing at Lanesboro’s Commonweal Theatre through Oct. 24. Tickets cost $35. Photo by Jason Underferth 24 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Sam Patet works for Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit that offers health care to older adults, and is a freelance writer on the side. Check out his work at tinyurl.com/samuel-patet.


Good Living / Housing / By Sarah Jackson ⊳⊳ Outdoor features at Chateau Waters in Sartell include deck and patio areas, a fire pit, a grilling area, walking paths, an on-site man-made lake and private manicured gardens. Other outdoor ammenities include a putting green and a pickleball court.

→→Chateau Waters Where: 960 19th St. S., Sartell Opening date: August 2016

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

RESORT-STYLE LIVING →→CentraCare Health’s new facility in Sartell boasts posh finishes and green spaces

Senior housing options aren’t what they used to be, which is to say, they’re no longer limited to so-called nursing homes.

They come in all sizes, price ranges and locations (rural, suburban, urban). And the array of services, amenities and levels of care are varied and vast as well. Frankly, the options are almost dizzying. How can you tell them apart? Answer: Tour them. Web sites and brochures are helpful, but they won’t tell you how a place feels. Ask lots of questions. Take notes. Compare. Prioritize. To give our readers an idea of what’s out there — especially what’s new and unusual — we’re kicking off an new occasional Good Age series called Housing Spotlight, featuring miniature profiles of local senior housing options. Here’s quick look at Chateau Waters, a brand-new four-story facility in Sartell. The 72-unit facility’s claim to fame is that it’s the first resort-style senior housing option in the St. Cloud area. High-end stone and tile finishes give the apartment complex a luxury appeal, along with amenities focused on health and wellness, including an on-site manmade lake with walking trails and an in-house wellness center.

26 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Ages welcome: 55 and older Number of units: 72 1- and 2-bedroom independent-living apartments with 12 different floor plans to choose from at 800 to 1,400 square feet Cost: Rent starts at $2,600 a month and includes wireless Internet, utilities and a $150 restaurant credit. Level of health care: Independent-living apartments with optional home-care assistance, which includes wellness checks and scheduled nurse visits focused on maintaining senior health. Ownership: St. Cloudbased CentraCare Health is a nonprofit integrated health care system in St. Cloud that runs six hospitals, seven senior-care facilities, 18 clinics, four pharmacies and numerous inpatient and outpatient specialty-care services. Chateau Waters is one of CentraCare’s three St. Benedict’s Senior Community locations. The other two — in Monticello and St. Cloud — provide housing to more then 500 residents. Info: 320-654-2352 or chateauwaters.com.


Amenities ⊲⊲ 24 private therapy suites connected to the building for patients recovering from an illness or injury that required hospitalization ⊲⊲ Concierge services ⊲⊲ Housekeeping, room service and laundry ⊲⊲ Grand entry, roaring fireplace and cozy seating areas ⊲⊲ Movie theatre, chapel and media

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center ⊲⊲ Art studio ⊲⊲ Gift shop ⊲⊲ Outdoor activities such as Multiple dining venues, including a bistro and a restaurant with a bar ⊲⊲ Venue for community events and performances ⊲⊲ Club room ⊲⊲ Guest suite ⊲⊲ Indoor storage units ⊲⊲ Heated underground parking ⊲⊲ Car wash.

Wellness center features: ⊲⊲ Heated pool ⊲⊲ Spa services ⊲⊲ Massage therapy ⊲⊲ Personalized fitness programs ⊲⊲ Specialized equipment ⊲⊲ Yoga studio ⊲⊲ Exercise classes ⊲⊲ Personal trainers ⊲⊲ On-site dietician ⊲⊲ Full-service salon. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@ mngoodage.com with the subject line HOUSING SPOTLIGHT.

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Good Living / Finance / By Skip Johnson

DON’T FALL SHORT →→Minnesotans are lagging in retirement savings; here’s how you can buck the trend

Minnesota seniors have a retirement savings shortfall. In fact, The Land of 10,000 Lakes ranks as the fourth worst state when it comes to replacing income in retirement in the United States. There’s no magic number to ensure a comfortable retirement, but a good goal is to be able to replace at least 70 percent of your pre-retirement income. You may want to save more, especially if you plan to travel or build a new home — or if you’re expecting large medical bills. Seniors in most states are falling short. Only three states meet that 70 percent threshold (Hawaii, Alaska and South Carolina, according to Bankrate.com). Nationally, the median income for ages 65 and older is just 60 percent of the median income for 45- to 64-year-olds. In Minnesota, that gap is even bigger — 53 percent. Here are some ways to make up for lost time:

Max your accounts Anyone age 50 and older can take advantage of catch-up contributions in retirement accounts. In 2016, older workers can save an additional $6,000 on top of the $18,000 maximum allowed for a 401(k). IRAs also have higher limits for workers age 50 and up. Younger workers can save $5,500 in an IRA, older workers can save $1,000 on top of that. (That’s unless your income exceeds a certain amount.)

Delay Social Security Deciding when to claim Social Security is one of the decisions that will have the biggest impact on your retirement. The majority of retirees claim their first benefits as soon as they’re eligible at age 62. If you wait even longer, your benefit will grow 8 percent for every year you delay up to age 70. Just 3 percent of Americans take advantage of the additional income by waiting until age 70 to file, according to the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

Work longer By staying on the job longer, you can continue building up your nest egg instead of withdrawing from it. But working later in life isn’t something you can count on: More than half of retirees say they left the workforce earlier than they had planned, according to TransAmerica Center. You can take steps in your 50s to boost the longevity of your career. Take advantage of any training opportunities your company offers to build up your marketable

28 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

skills; grow your business network; and don’t forget to take care of your health, too.

Minimize fees Finally, there’s some good news about investment fees: They dropped to 0.89 percent in 2013, down from 1.02 percent in 2009, according to research by BrightScope. Still, if you’re behind in savings, any fees can have a negative impact. Start with your Human Resources department and ask for your plan benefit book to find out how much you’re paying in fees. Let your company know if the fees are too high. If the fees cannot be reduced, contribute enough in your 401(k) to get the company match, then allocate extra funds elsewhere, like a spouse’s 401(k) plan or an IRA.

Get help You don’t have to go it alone! A recent study shows people who work with a financial advisor double their retirement preparedness. A financial professional can help you navigate important decisions when it comes to saving, investing and claiming Social Security so you can avoid falling short in retirement. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial in New Hope, a financial planning firm and Minnesota insurance agency. Skip also offers investment advisory services through AdvisorNet Wealth Management, a registered investment advisor. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.


Good Living / In the Kitchen / Recipe and photo by Danielle Walker

SLOW-COOKER CHICKEN VERDE 1 tablespoon ghee or coconut oil 6 chicken hind quarters (thighs with legs attached), bone-in and skin-on Sea salt and cracked black pepper 2 cloves garlic, minced or crushed into a paste 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground coriander 2 cups roasted tomatillo salsa (store-bought or homemade), divided

EASY-PREP DINNER

Yep, it’s fall, the perfect time to break out the slow cooker. This recipe, despite requiring only about 20 minutes of prep time and five key ingredients, delivers a surprising amount of flavor. Serve the chicken over cauliflower “rice” (tinyurl.com/aga-rice) and sauteed summer squash or a simple salad.

⊲⊲Season the chicken generously with salt and pepper. ⊲⊲Mix the garlic, cumin and coriander in a small bowl, and rub it all over the chicken. ⊲⊲Heat the ghee in a heavybottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. ⊲⊲Brown the chicken on all sides, working in batches, for about two minutes per side. ⊲⊲Pour 1 cup of the salsa into a slow cooker and arrange the browned legs on top. ⊲⊲Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. ⊲⊲Serve the chicken with the remaining cup of the salsa.

Source: Danielle Walker, an acclaimed food-blogger and bestselling cookbook author, is the founder of the hugely popular cooking website, againstallgrain.com. Her latest book is Against All Grain Celebrations: A Year of Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free and Paleo Recipes for Every Occasion. Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 29


LE 30 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


the life

OF A

EGEND After a barn-burning career in pro hockey, Lou Nanne found a successful second act in the world of finance. Now the 75-year-old is making a new play as restaurateur. BY JULIE KENDRICK

||

PHOTOS BY TRACY WALSH

Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 31


the life OF A LEGEND

H

e’s the best-known name in Minnesota hockey and a respected partner for institutional investors throughout the country. Now Lou Nanne, 75, has shown he’s hungry for more by opening a new restaurant — Lou Nanne’s American Grill in Edina.

Here’s a look at the three-period career of one of Minnesota’s most respected athletes.

Sweet Lou from the Soo Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, (which explains the “Soo” in his nickname), Nanne grew up playing hockey with Hockey Hall of Famers Phil and Tony Esposito. He went on to become a member of the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers hockey team from 1959 to 1963, under beloved Eveleth-born Coach John Mariucci. In 1963, Nanne earned All-American honors in addition to winning the league MVP and the scoring championship.  After graduating with a bachelor’s in business from the U of M, Nanne was originally headed for the Chicago Blackhawks. But after a contract dispute, Nanne opted to instead start his business career in the Twin Cities while playing on the weekends for the local Rochester Mustangs with the U.S. Hockey League. “I went to work,” said Nanne, who started in sales with the agribusiness firm Archer Daniels Midland and went on to Harvey Mackay’s Mackay Envelope Co. It didn’t last too long. Soon the Canadian was asked to play in the 1968 Olympics for Team USA. Congress passed a bill granting him citizenship and he was eventually named captain of the U.S. Olympic Team.  “That’s how I became a U.S. citizen,” Nanne said. After the 1968 Olympics, Nanne joined his new hometown’s expansion team — the North Stars — and emerged as the team’s first real star. He played primarily as a defenseman with the exception of one season as a forward in 1971–72. Nanne played for the U.S. at the Ice Hockey World Championship tournaments in 1976 and 1977 and in the inaugural Canada Cup in 1976.  Nanne played 635 NHL regular-season games in all for the Minnesota North Stars before hanging up his skates in 1978.

32 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


A North Star Nanne, having lived in the U.S. since age 18, selfidentifies as a Minnesotan. But his two favorite memories on the ice as a Minnesota North Star happened in Canada. “I got a hat trick in Montreal. That was my favorite place to play. We won 6-5. It was a good game,” Nanne said. “I also — in the playoffs — I scored the winning goal in Montreal. It was the first time an expansion team had beaten an established team in the playoffs.” As impressive as Nanne’s playing career was, the man is often more recognized more for what he did next as a general manager and coach, both for the North Stars and for the United States’ Canada Cup teams. With an infusion of notable players from a merger with the Cleveland Barons — and through the draft — Nanne rebuilt the ailing North Stars into a team to beat. In 1981, the team reached the Stanley Cup finals, followed by the semifinals in 1984 as well as the playoffs for seven consecutive seasons. Simultaneously, Nanne served as general manager of the U.S.

Canada Cup teams in 1981, 1984 and 1987. In 1988, after a few lackluster seasons, Nanne resigned from his general manager position with the North Stars, citing health reasons. Nanne’s reputation as a Minnesota hockey legend and advocate for the sport continued. In 1998, he was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame. In 2004, he was inducted into the International Ice Hockey Federation Hall of Fame.

▲▲Memorabilia featuring Lou Nanne is on display at the restaurant, which took shape inside a completely renovated space formerly occupied by Romano’s Macaroni Grill.

A family affair His family, meanwhile, is carrying on his legacy as well. Three of Nanne’s 11 grandchildren — Louis, Vinni and Tyler — are currently playing university hockey. His granddaughter, Erin, served a stint as the community relations coordinator at the Minnesota Wild. She’s now vice president of giving for United Heroes League, which helps keep the children of military kids healthy and active in sports, including hockey. And for the past 52 years, Nanne’s been the voice behind the microphone at the Minnesota State High School League Boys’ Tournament. Nanne broadcast the championship game Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 33


the life OF A LEGEND

→→Lou Nanne’s American Grill 7651 France Ave. S., Edina 952-658-7800 | lounannes.com Read Rick Nelson’s Star Tribune restaurant review at tinyurl.com/lou-nannes.

when his son, Marty, scored the winning goal. He was also in the booth in 2011 when grandson Louis’ team won and in 2013 and 2014 when grandson Tyler’s team won. “Those were, by far, the toughest games I ever had to broadcast,” Nanne said. “I had to focus on the game itself and be unbiased. But at the same time, my stomach was churning because I wanted them to do well.” Nanne is also on the air for sports radio shows twice

managing director for institutional sales. John Taft, former CEO of RBC’s U.S. Wealth Management has worked with Nanne since the mid-1990s. “I was nominally his boss for about a decade, but nobody is really Lou’s boss,” Taft said. “He’s the hardest-working person I have ever known. He’s been an inspiration to me and to everyone he’s worked with.” Nanne clearly enjoys the working life, even

a week — KFAN on Tuesdays at 5:20 p.m. and KSTP at 10 a.m. on Thursdays.

viewing the rigorous travel requirements in a positive light. “The job gives me the opportunity to travel quite a bit, calling on prospects and visiting clients,” he said. “I logged 130,000 air miles last year.” Nanne’s second career in business plays into his life philosophy: No matter how much you love athletics, education is equally important. “You can’t play athletics all your life,” Nanne said. “I’m still working at 75 because I found things I enjoy doing, and I committed myself to doing them. It’s a simple way to go through life and enjoy every minute.”  

Financial power play It was only after 23 years working in the State of Hockey that Nanne made good on a promise to his wife, Francine, and retired from the hockey establishment at age 50. Not long after that, however, he entered the world of finance, starting at Piper Capital Management and then moving to the institutional sales department for Voyageur Asset Management. When RBC Global Asset Management purchased the firm in 2000, he stayed on as RBC’s senior 34 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Opening a restaurant So why did Nanne want to open a restaurant this past March, especially when he’s reached an age at which most people might be thinking about slowing down, not revving up? “I’ve had previous opportunities offered to me, but they were always for sports-bar concepts, and I didn’t want to do that,” Nanne said. “It didn’t seem like a good business model: If the team is winning, people are happy. But if they’re losing, not so much.” But when the opportunity came up to partner with local restaurateur Mike McDermott, who owns and operates Rojo Mexican Grills and Ling & Louie’s Asian Bar & Grill restaurants in the Twin Cities, Nanne was intrigued. McDermott wanted to do an upscale restaurant, not just another sports bar. “And that’s what I had envisioned, too,” Nanne said. Lou Nanne’s American Grill — known simply as Lou Nanne’s — is in the Centennial Lakes Office Park in a former Romano’s Macaroni Grill space on France Avenue in Edina. The renovated venue includes seating for 165 in the dining room and 52 in the bar, plus a seasonal patio overlooking Centennial Lake with seating for 90. Hockey memorabilia featuring the Nanne is integrated into the dining areas, including of the star in his icon green-and-gold North Stars jersey.

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(Lou Nanne) is as committed and passionate about Gopher Athletics as anyone you will ever know. He has that blend of intelligence, common sense and competitive spirit that only great leaders possess, and his storytelling and humor are legendary. — Randy Handel, University of Minnesota’s Associate Athletics Director for Development

9/22/16 11:11 Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / AM 35


the life OF A LEGEND The food Lou Nanne’s entree prices range from a $14 cheeseburger to more upscale items like an 8-ounce filet for $39 and a 22-ounce bone-in ribeye for $53. McDermott sings Nanne’s praises: “Lou has been a great partner to work with, and I really can’t say enough good things about him,” he said. “He’s a great ambassador of the concept, taking pictures with people when he’s in the restaurant and doing a great job being the ‘face’ of Lou Nanne’s.” When he’s not traveling for work, Nanne enjoys frequenting his restaurant, especially if his wife of 54 years is out of town. He typically orders the restaurant’s only pasta — Nanne’s Bolognese. Seventy-three-year-old Francine Nanne, an enthusiastic home cook who accompanies Nanne on many of his business trips, developed the dish, incorporating influences from her husband’s Italian mother, recipes from friends and also by recalling meals she and her husband enjoyed in Italy. The recipe, according to Star Tribune food critic Rick Nelson, “is a generous bowl of thick, toothy bucatini liberally tossed in a milky, garlicky tomato sauce that pops with oregano, thyme and plenty of prime ground beef.” (Bucatini is a thick spaghetti-like pasta with a hole running through the center.)

Pride of the Gophers It’s not only paying work that Lou pursues with such passion. He’s also a strong supporter of his alma mater, the University of Minnesota, and is the current chairman for a fundraising campaign to generate $190 million for the university’s Athletics department. “People ask me to do things, and if they’re interesting to me, I say yes,” Nanne said. “The more I do, the more I get asked to do, it seems. It’s a lot, but I have a hard time saying ‘no.’” University of Minnesota’s Associate Athletics Director for Development Randy Handel said Nanne is an ideal person for the role. “He is as committed and passionate about Gopher Athletics as anyone you will ever know,” Handel said. “He has that blend of intelligence, common sense and competitive spirit that only great leaders possess, and his storytelling and humor are legendary. We’re truly indebted to him and Francine for giving their time, talent and treasure.”

Bringing family together As busy as he is, Nanne still makes time for his family, which faced a tragedy three years ago, when his son, Michael, died of brain cancer at age 48. (At the time, Nanne told the Star Tribune, “He was an incredible person who faced adversity without any complaint.”) The remaining Nanne offspring, Michelle, Marc and Marty, all live within 15 minutes of Lou and Francine’s Edina home. The clan continues to gather frequently at the family cabin on Balsam Lake in Wisconsin, northeast of Taylors Falls. 36 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Lou Nanne’s new fine-dining restaurant in Edina includes a 90-seat patio overlooking Centennial Lake.

“My grandchildren are my friends,” Nanne said. “I feel more like their contemporary than their grandfather.” He delights in gathering the family together for vacations. They’ve traveled twice to Italy, and also to France and to Beaver Creek, Colo. “We recently had a Nanne family reunion with my brother and sister and their kids and grandkids,” he said. “It was more than 60 people.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in Minneapolis and blogs at kendrickworks. blogspot.com.


Can’t-Miss Calendar

Photo by John Cheng

October Kellogg’s Gymnastics Champions →→This nationally touring event will showcase gymnasts from the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games plus local gymnasts. Those scheduled to appear include Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles and Laurie Hernandez, among others. When: 5 p.m. Oct. 9

Where: Target Center, Minneapolis

Cost: Tickets start at $36.

ONGOING

Chanhassen Concert Series →→Upcoming tribute shows include Frank Sinatra (Sept. 30–Oct. 1), The Music of Martin Zellar of the Gear Daddies (Oct. 7–8), Power Balladz (Oct. 13–15), E Street Shuffle/Detroit Muscle: Bruce Springsteen and Bob Seger (Oct. 21–22), Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon and Other Floydian Tales (Oct. 28–29) and Bridge Over Troubled Water (Nov. 4–5). When: Dinner is at 6 p.m., followed by concerts at 8 p.m., except for Sunday events, which start earlier. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $40 per person and $15 more for dinner Info: chanhassendt.com

Camelot →→This beloved Lerner & Loewe production returns to the Twin Cities for the first time in 15 years. Follow the story of King Arthur and his knights adapted from T.H. White’s novel, The Once and Future King, featuring popular songs such as Camelot, The Lusty Month of May, If Ever I Would Leave You and I Wonder What the King Is Doing Tonight.

When: Sept. 30–Feb. 25. Preview performances run from Sept. 30–Oct. 6, followed by an official opening night on Oct. 7. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $65–$85 Info: chanhassendt.com

Up and Down: The H.H.H. Metrodome Portfolio →→As the Minnesota Vikings and football fans celebrate the opening of U.S. Bank Stadium, this exhibit by photographer Mark E. Jensen looks back at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome and 30 years of change in downtown Minneapolis. When: Through Nov. 6

Info: kelloggstour.com

Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: Located in the museum’s Mill Commons, the exhibit is free and open to the public during regular museum hours. Info: millcitymuseum.org

Rise Up, O Men →→This brand-new musical comedy — the sixth production in the locally developed Church Basement Ladies series — features the men of the church and the women who serve them. As these hard-working farmers discuss their scrap lumber piles and the benefits of weld versus solder, they unintentionally disrupt the order of the kitchen. When: Through Nov. 13 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Sept. 30

Celtic Thunder →→This international singing sensation will deliver a mix of lively and upbeat songs including A Place in The Choir, Galway Girl and Raggle Taggle Gypsy that represent the fun-loving nature of the Irish, along with slower, classic Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 37


Can’t-Miss Calendar ballads such as Danny Boy, Noreen and Buachaille On Eirne.

artists face to face.

Oct. 1–2, 8–9

Oct. 15

Apple-Tasting Weekends

BT5K

→→Taste-test University of Minnesota research apples and rate your favorites. Evaluate them for flavor, size and texture to help researchers discover the next Honeycrisp and visit with Master Gardeners, too. Some apple varieties will also be for sale in the gift and garden store.  

→→This second-annual event benefits the American Brain Tumor Association and its mission to provide resources to those diagnosed with brain tumors and also fund research to extend, and someday save, the lives of those impacted by brain tumors, which affect all ages.

When: 8 p.m. Sept. 30 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $43.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

When: 1–3 p.m. Oct. 1–2, 8–9 Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Oswald Visitor Center, Chaska Cost: Free with gate admission, which is $12 for ages 13 and older Info: arboretum.umn.edu

Oct. 6

Thursday Morning Artist Series Kickoff →→This popular fall-through-spring series features some of the best local musicians, performing a variety of works by classical composers on select Thursdays in an intimate recital setting. Kicking off the season is a free concert on Oct. 6 including three acts — a flute-piano duo, a piano duo and, finally, a clarinet trio.

When: Oct. 6 with a 9:30 a.m. reception featuring guest moderator MPR announcer Steve Staurch, followed by refreshments at 10 a.m. and the concert at 10:30 a.m.; other concert dates will be Oct. 27, Nov. 3 and 10, Dec. 1, Jan. 19, Feb. 2 and 16, March 2 and 16 and April 6 and 13. Where: MacPhail Center for Music, Minneapolis Cost: Admission to the opening concert is free. Info: thursdaymusical.org

Oct. 8

Airline Collectible Sale & Get Together →→Browse all sorts of airline memorabilia, including timetables, safety cards, models, T-shirts, china, wings, playing cards, postcards, photos, posters and more from a variety of airlines, presented by the volunteer-run NWA History Centre. When: 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Oct. 8 Where: Best Western Plus Hotel, 1901 Killebrew Drive, Bloomington Cost: $5; free for ages 11 and younger Info: nwahistory.org

Oct. 12–13

Conservation Through the Lens →→World-renowned National Geographic photographer Jim Brandenburg and Northwoods-inspired singer-guitarist Michael Munroe will combine their art forms to create a presentation featuring some of the natural wonders of Minnesota. Proceeds will benefit the arboretum and the Brandenburg Prairie Foundation. When: 6:30–9 p.m. Oct. 12–13. Doors open at 6 p.m. Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: Tickets for $74 to $139 include arboretum admission, a cash bar, appetizers and desserts. Info: arboretum.umn.edu

Oct. 14–16

St. Paul Art Crawl →→Tour 24 sites — featuring the work of 400 artists — as part of this 25th-annual event that allows community members to view a wide variety of art mediums and meet 38 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Oct. 14–16 Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: saintpaulartcrawl.org

When: 9 a.m. Oct. 15 Where: Como Lake, St. Paul Cost: $35 for adults, $20 for children Info: BT5K.org

Twin Cities Book Festival →→Now in its 16th year, this event features internationally renowned visiting authors, local literary heroes as well as a book fair that offers a snapshot of the local publishing scene, plus great deals on new and used books. When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Oct. 15 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: raintaxi.com/twin-citiesbook-festival

Divorcing Divas →→With a theme of Control, Confidence and Closure, this eighthannual conference aims to give women going through divorce hope, encouragement, inspiration and empowerment, including advice from financial advisors, attorneys, realtors, life coaches and psychologists. When: Oct. 15 Where: DoubleTree by Hilton, St. Louis Park Cost: $50–$60 Info: divorcingdivas.com

Oct. 16

An Evening With Gordon Lightfoot →→Considered by many to be Canada’s greatest songwriter, Lightfoot — perhaps most famous in Minnesota for his chilling tune, The Wreck of the


Can’t-Miss Calendar 18; and mandolinist/composer Peter Ostroushko on Dec. 16.

When: Cocktails are at 7 p.m., followed by concerts at 8 p.m. Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the door Info: landmarkcenter.org

Oct. 23–May 14

Sundays at Landmark →→This annual fall-to-spring series of mostly free cultural and arts events is designed to entertain, enrich and educate all ages.

Pumpkin Nights

→→Founded by the creators of The Color Run, this new all-ages event features a 1-mile walking path lined with more than 3,000 hand-carved pumpkins in 12 unique areas, including a space ship-themed Pumpkin Galaxy, an underwater world with mermaids and jelly fish (The Great Pumpkin Reef), an interactive Scarecrow Row and a locally inspired Picture Minnesota section, too.

When: Oct. 14–Oct. 31 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: $18 for ages 4 to 12 and ages 65 and older, $23 for ages 13 to 64; online tickets purchased in advanced are $2 to $3 cheaper. Info: pumpkinnights.com

When: Events start at 1 p.m. and are free, except where noted: Oct. 23 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony); Oct. 30 (Great Pumpkin Festival); 4 p.m. Nov. 13 (Saint Martin’s Day); Dec. 11 (Santa’s Workshop); 1 and 3:30 p.m. Jan. 8 (Minnesota Boychoir); 3 p.m. Jan. 29 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony); Feb. 19 (Carpathian Celebration, $4– $6); 11 a.m. March 19 (Day of Dance, $6); 11 a.m. April 1 (Scottish Ramble, $6); 3 p.m. May 7 (Rose Ensemble); May 14 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony Mother’s Day Concert). Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: Various Info: landmarkcenter.org

Oct. 30

Slice of the Twin Cities Edmund Fitzgerald — will perform from his vast catalog that spans five decades. When: 7 p.m. Oct. 16 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $48.50–$58.50 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

Oct. 18–23

Stomp! →→This unique combination of percussion, movement and visual comedy employs both household and industrial objects as musical instruments in the hands of body percussionists, who use everything but conventional instruments, including dust bins, tea chests, radiator hoses, boots, hub caps and even synchronized stiffbristle brooms. When: Oct. 18–23 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $45. Info: ordway.org

Oct. 21, Nov. 18, Dec. 16

Red House Live →→Hosted by various local radio personalities, these concerts are preceded by a cocktail hour with complimentary refreshments and a cash bar. Upcoming acts include folk-pop-bluegrass singer Heather Masse on Oct. 21; Chastity Brown, whose styles include indie rock, roots, soul, rock, blues and country, on Nov.

→→This new Minnesota Monthly event features local pizzerias competing to be named the best by a panel of culinary experts.

Where: Minnetonka Orchards, Minnetrista When: 1–5 p.m. Oct. 30 Cost: Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door for ages 21 and older, $10 for ages 11–20 and free for ages 10 and younger.   Info: minnesotamonthly.com

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / October 2016 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search WORKOUT AEROBICS CARDIOVASCULAR CRUNCHES CYCLING DANCE FITNESS FLEXIBILITY

HEARTBEAT JOG METABOLISM PILATES RUNNING SPORTS STRENGTH

STRETCH SWEAT SWIM TENNIS WALKING WEIGHTS YOGA

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TRIVIA

Answers 40 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Trivia FITNESS 101 1. What type of activity can help you prevent the common cold?

2. At what age do humans begin to lose muscle mass and function, regardless of activity level?

3. What mood-enhancing chemicals are released in the body when you exercise?

Source: WebMD.com

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12/9/152016 12:00/PM Minnesota Good Age / October 41

CROSSWORD

Answers

Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword

ACROSS 1 First assassin to attack Caesar 6 Marvel Comics mutants 10 Folk singer Joan 14 Arctic or Indian 15 Bit of trickery 16 In the style of, in ristorantes 17 End that “I face,” in Sinatra’s “My Way” 20 Feudal laborer 21 Popeye’s Olive 22 Given to giving orders 23 Grounded Aussie birds 25 Twirl or whirl 27 Gentlemen’s partners 30 It has 32 pieces and a 64-square board 34 Surrounded by 35 __ accompli 36 Often rolled-over investment 37 Prepare to fly 42 / October 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

41 Kind 42 Self-images 43 Gold bar 44 Vital phase 47 Decadent, as the snobs in a historic Agnew speech 48 Blessed 49 Get-out-of-jail money 50 Drinks with floating ice cream 53 Windy City summer hrs. 54 Jersey or Guernsey 58 Broadway do-or-die philosophy, and a hint to the ends of 17-, 30-, 37- and 44-Across 62 Informal negative 63 “No __!”: “Easy!” 64 Brief 65 Activist Parks 66 Words meaning the same thing: Abbr. 67 Furry swimmer

DOWN 1 Emergency shelter beds 2 Throb 3 Fortuneteller 4 The jolt in joe? 5 “Give me __!”: start of a Hoosier cheer 6 Diagnostic tests 7 Ponder (over) 8 Top-left PC key 9 Modern, in Munich 10 Twirled sticks 11 “That’s a shame” 12 Yale alumni 13 Madcap 18 We, to Henri 19 Grand slam homer quartet, briefly 24 Prefix with hit or store 25 Backs up in fear 26 Cats and dogs 27 Eye surgery acronym 28 More than enough 29 Foolish, in slang 30 Easily tipped boat 31 Burn slightly 32 Rye grass disease 33 Try, as food 35 Swimming in pea soup? 38 Hand out cards 39 Coffeehouse connection 40 Like airplane services 45 California peak 46 British balderdash 47 Food, in diner signs 49 Buffalo Wild Wings nickname based on its initials 50 Marquee name 51 Cincinnati’s state 52 Family rooms 53 “Let’s get goin’!” 55 Chimney sweep’s sweepings 56 Passed-down knowledge 57 __’acte: intermission 59 Covert or black doings 60 Droll 61 Chinese menu general


October 2016  
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