Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2016

TRAVEL

How one of Minnesota’s own created the nation’s longest-running independently produced cable program

THE AMAZING MARY HANSON PAGE 32

CHARMING CHARLESTON PAGE 20

FINANCE

MONEY LESSONS FOR YOUR GRANDKIDS PAGE 28

MY TURN

THE LAWYERS WE DON’T NEED PAGE 10


Contents 20 32

→→On the cover The art of the interview: Mary Hanson started her successful broadcasting career — on a whim — more than 35 years ago. Photos by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com

Charleston charm! This historic city is rich with beauty, local cuisine and friendly people.

Subscribe! Want to receive Good Age at your home? Our magazine is free at more than 1,000 rack sites around the Twin Cities, including most senior centers, libraries and metro-area Walgreens. But if you'd like to get the magazine mailed to your home, send a $12 check for a one-year subscription to Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55403. Write “Good Age magazine” on the memo line.

42 44 48 Housing Resources Can’t-Miss Calendar Brain Teasers 6 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


September Good Start From the Editor 8 Your career path may not be as straight and narrow as it seems. My Turn 10 Frivolous health lawsuits can drive up the costs of health care. Memories 12 Layaway was a great idea until it spiraled out of control. This Month in MN History 14 Duluth’s ‘leatherheads’ football team helped shape the NFL.

Good Health House Call 16 Shaky hands, known as tremors, are just part of aging in most cases. Caregiving 18 Caring for grandchildren brings up special challenges. Get help.

Good Living Housing 26 Kids are bringing young life to senior homes in the Twin Cities. Finance 28 Grandparents can play an important role in finance education.

In the Kitchen 30 Got grandkids? Skip the processed nuggets and try these! Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 7


Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 35 / Issue 9 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall, Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick, Jessica Kohen, John Liburdi, Dave Nimmer, Janet Salo, Dr. Michael Spilane, Tracy Walsh Creative Director Dana Croatt Graphic Designers Valerie Moe Amanda Wadeson Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2016 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Taking chances Isn’t it crazy, how much the seemingly little decisions we make every day can sometimes completely change our lives? A chance meeting at a coffee shop could lead you to your future spouse. One decision on the highway can end — or save — a life. That quick email you sent or that phone call you made to an old friend could land you a job. Our paths in life seem so set in stone on the surface — so calculated and planned and Photo by Tracy Walsh predictable. tracywalshphoto.com But they’re really not. Mary Hanson — this month’s vibrant Good Age Cover Star — is proof of that. Though today she’s the host of The Mary Hanson Show — the longest-running independently produced cable program in the U.S., more than 35 years ago she was on an entirely different track. She had a busy life, two young children and a thriving career as a licensed independent social worker and social services consultant. But with a spontaneous turn of her steering wheel three decades ago, she found herself in the parking lot of an AM radio station, launching a whopper of a second act — a broadcasting career that has helped her reach millions of people. To this day, Hanson is still incredibly excited to produce her TV program. And the word retirement isn’t even on the table. “Sometimes it’s hard for me to go to bed at night because I’m so busy planning the next week’s show,” she said. “I work with guests — well past the so-called retirement age — who are coming up with new strategies and goals, so I’m less afraid of aging because of these models who inspire me.” If you’re not familiar with Hanson’s show, check it out on TPT MN or YouTube or at maryhansonshow.com. Hanson not only has a gracious and kind — yet inquisitive — way with the fascinating Minnesotans she invites on the show, but she also has a warmth and a glow that make her positively magnetic on screen. She’s a Minnesota gem, who truly shines.


Building Stable Homes, Strong Futures and Vibrant Communities Since 1971.

NORTHWEST SUBURBS

GREATER MINNESOTA

NORTHERN SUBURBS

ARBOR LAKES COMMONS Maple Grove • (763) 416-0369

DELANO COMMONS Delano • (763) 972-2930

CENTURY TRAILS Maplewood • (651) 288-9162

BASSETT CREEK COMMONS Plymouth • (763) 543-2457

GOLDENDALE HOMES Annandale • (320) 274-5871

CONCORDIA ARMS Maplewood • (651) 280-4680

BOULEVARD GARDENS Minnetonka • (952) 542-9338

ST. MICHAEL’S HOUSING New Ulm • (507) 794-9631

EAST SHORE PLACE Mahtomedi • (651) 770-7964

MAPLE TERRACE Maple Plain • (763) 479-1131

TOWNE CLUB SENIOR HOUSING Rochester • (507) 424-1671

GARDEN TERRACE Little Canada • (651) 481-9028

MILL POND GABLES Champlin • (763) 576-8696

WELLSTONE COMMONS Northfield • (507) 645-4146

GARDEN TERRACE COMMONS Little Canada • (651) 481-9028

NORTH GABLES Blaine • (763) 786-0232

MINNEAPOLIS

SILVER LAKE POINTE Mounds View • (763) 785-4771

NORWOOD SQUARE Fridley • (763) 574-2187

BII DI GAIN DASH ANWEBI (612) 843-5391

SOUTHERN SUBURBS

PLEASANT PLACE Rogers • (763) 428-4494

THE COOPERAGE SENIOR HOUSING (651) 290-6228

FAIRFIELD TERRACE Lakeville • (952) 469-1414

ROBBINS WAY Robbinsdale • (763) 537-6868

RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS (612) 843-5885

MOUNT CARMEL MANOR West St. Paul • (651) 451-0030

WESTERN SUBURBS

ST. ANNE’S (612) 588-4663

OAK RIDGE MANOR Hastings • (651) 437-1367

SOUTH HAVEN Edina • (952) 831-3372

SEWARD TOWER EAST (612) 339-1711

OAK TERRACE Oakdale • (651) 730-6440

SOUTH SHORE PARK Excelsior • (952) 474-9036

SEWARD TOWER WEST (612) 333-7472

RED ROCK MANOR Newport • (651) 459-2786

SUMMIT POINT Edina • (952) 920-6113

SHINGLE CREEK COMMONS (612) 588-2303

SPRUCE PLACE Farmington • (651) 463-2511

WESTONKA ESTATES Mound • (952) 472-4952

AN ARRAY OF RENTS TO FIT EVERY BUDGET SHINGLE CREEK COMMONS • (612) 588-2303 4600 Humboldt Avenue N, Minneapolis, MN 55412 • Seniors 55+ • Affordable & Market Rate Rents • On-Site Laundry • Fitness Room, Library & Sun Room • Controlled Access Entry • SMOKE FREE BUILDING

AFFORDABLE RENTS IN FRIENDLY FARMINGTON SPRUCE PLACE • (651) 463-2511 300 Spruce Street, Farmington, MN 55024

• Affordable Rent for Income Qualified Seniors (62+) or Disabled • Just right 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments • Controlled Access Entry • Lounges and Decks on Each Floor • On-Site Laundry • SMOKE FREE BUILDING

CALL US AT: (651) 291-1750 OR VISIT US AT: WWW.COMMONBOND.ORG/FINDHOUSING


Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

Unnecessary lawyers →→Fanciful and frivolous personal-injury claims are wasting time and money

I’ve always liked lawyers. In fact, I loved two of them — my best friend and my wife of 18 years. But recently I’ve been put off by the ambulance-chasing tactics of personal-injury lawyers. I was involved in a freeway accident in which my Honda Civic was sideswiped by another car, sending me spinning into the ditch. I wasn’t hurt and I said so at the time. But you’d never know it based on the dozen letters I received within the next 10 days.

Predatory pitches I realize that personal-injury lawyers play a real role in achieving justice for truly aggrieved victims. One of my friends won very valuable verdicts (millions of dollars) for victims of medical malpractice and corporate chiseling. But he doesn’t send out letters to a universe of potential victims, and he routinely turns down those whose claims are fanciful or frivolous. Meanwhile, the lawyers — ready to do battle on my behalf for injuries I did NOT have — came from St. Paul, St. Louis Park, Minneapolis and beyond. Here’s a sampling of their pitches: ⊲⊲ “You’re No Dummy. You have been injured in an accident that wasn’t your fault. Call Us Now!” ⊲⊲ “Sorry to hear you’ve been involved in an accident. Besides the trauma of the accident, you may now face medical bills, car repair bills, wage loss, insurance companies that drag their feet on paying money they owe or the possibility of no insurance coverage.” ⊲⊲ “It has come to our attention that you were recently involved in an auto accident. Quite often people in your situation are not sure of their legal rights and would like to consult an attorney.”

10 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

This last letter seemed more responsible and realistic than the others. However, the letter from the National Victims Compensation Group in Washington, D.C., left me breathless and bewildered: ⊲⊲ “Hello ______________.” (Apparently they didn’t know who I was, but that didn’t seem to be a stumbling block.) “Due to your recent accident and injuries, you have qualified for an immediate $1,000 cash settlement advance.” In addition, the national victim’s group said it would give me the name of local attorneys who would fight for me and doctors who would “document, treat and rehabilitate” my injuries. When I called the group’s 800 number, a woman offered to refer me to a local representative. I declined to give my name and effectively ended the charade. Sure, you could dismiss all of this as shameless huckstering, but the implications are more serious: Frivolous lawsuits from baseless claims can certainly drive up the cost of health care for all of us. I’m hoping that the Affordable Care Act is modified to make it harder for people to file such claims. In return, perhaps the law could also make it easier for the government to negotiate for lower prescription drug prices.


South St. Paul HRA • 50+ Community • Income Based Rent • All Utilities Paid

You could dismiss all of this as shameless huckstering, but the implications are more serious.

• Newly Remodeled • Elevators • Controlled Entries • On Site Caretaker Call for an appointment 651-554-3270

South St Paul HRA GA 0916 12.indd 3

8/3/16 2:24 PM Coming Winter 2016 — A Stylish & Timeless Redesign!

Silver lining While the response of the lawyers to the accident was annoying, the reaction of the teenage driver who struck my car was gratifying. She came rushing over to ask if I was hurt. Then she told me the accident “was entirely” her fault. Thinking her vehicle had been brushed by a car to her left, she swerved into my lane — and my car. When her lower lip started to quiver, I told her we were both lucky and that I admired her courage and candor. She told me she’d never had an accident before and this was such a shock. She told me she was a senior about to graduate from high school, with plans to enter a private college in Minnesota this fall. I suspect she will do just fine. That made two of us — without any help from a lawyer. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

20 Metro Locations www.StPaulFarmersMarket.com

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 11


Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

Delaying gratification →→Layaway deserves a resurgence

Once upon a time, long, long ago, a Great Depression encompassed our land, leaving consumers with little money available for big-box purchases. Merchants, having inventory to move, were greatly distressed. They needed a plan to stimulate sales. And so, they created the Layaway Plan. By its terms, if a shopper would put down a small deposit and make regular payments over a period of several weeks, the store would hold the desired item in a warehouse until payment was made in full. Shoppers happily obliged. With their merchandise reserved, a possible price increase would be avoided. The payments were manageable and interest-free. Henceforth, refrigerators, davenports, washing machines and the like began disappearing from showroom floors and into shopper’s homes. And all was well and good in our land. And no one had to go into debt.

Is this a fairy tale? Today’s buy-now, pay-later, “instant gratification” generation may think so. But doing without until you’d saved enough money to pay in full was a way of life for their Depression-era great-grandparents. To the older generation, a wait to bring purchases home (usually 60 to 90 days) was almost a positive thing. It gave people something shiny and new to look forward to during bleak times. And by not having to pay interest, it also made them feel good about managing what little money they had.

Creating a monster But, ironically, this very mindset unwittingly helped set in motion today’s freespending culture. It happened in stages. The children of Depression-era parents continued to carry the cautious and conservative financial habits of deferred gratification that they had learned while growing up. But they raised their children with a dramatically different philosophy about money. Weary of doing without, they felt their kids should have an easier time of it, and were willing to cosign loans and dig into their own savings to make it happen. But as often happens, things that come too easily end up losing value. Being repeatedly bailed out, the children grew up with little respect for money and began to believe

12 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Neither a borrower or a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. — William Shakespeare

that “money grows on trees.” The convenience and availability of credit cards, allowed a great many of people to spend extravagantly. Living beyond one’s means became routine.

New hope But — as often happens — what goes around, comes around. In the 1980s, layaway virtually disappeared. However, some merchants, such as Sears, Wal-Mart, Marshalls, Toys R’ Us and T.J. Maxx, are bringing it back. Today’s consumers — at least while shopping at these stores — have the opportunity to put away the plastic and do as great-grandpa did. And maybe even “live happily ever after.” Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Writer her at chall@ mngoodage.com.


A LIFETIME OF CARING

Both Communities are Brand New and Now Open Offering Assisted Living & Memory Care

From the director to our aides, we strive each day to create a warm and caring environment where old friendships are renewed and new ones are created. Special Features

Included in Your Rent • • • • •

Personal pendant call system 24 hour access to staff Daily OK checks Health and wellness programs 3 meals per day

• Individually controlled heat and air conditioning • Sewer, water and trash pick-up • Complimentary laundry facilities

Meadow Ridge Senior Living 7475 Country Club Drive, Golden Valley 651-706-3591 MeadowRidgeSeniorLiving.com

Outdoor patio Library Public computer for internet access Community room Fitness center Card room

Maple Hill Senior Living 3030 Southlawn Drive, Maplewood 612-599-7668 MapleHillSeniorLiving.com


Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Jessica Kohen ⊳⊳ Football players in the 1920s wore leather helmets like this one, including Duluth’s early pro teams. The 2008 comedy, Leatherheads, starring George Clooney and Renee Zellweger, was loosely based on the Duluth Eskimos. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Legends and lore →→A ‘leatherhead’ football team from Duluth helped create the NFL as we know it today

American professional footall got off to a rocky start in the opening decades of the 20th century. Although college football captured the hearts of American sports fans, the pro game was disorganized, with players jumping from team to team, the rules of play changing from field to field, and no governing body providing oversight. In 1920, in an effort to bring organization to the sport, the leaders of 11 pro teams met in Canton, Ohio, to form the American Professional Football Association; two years later they would change the name to the National Football League. In Duluth, a team known as the Kelleys operated as an independent semi-pro club that played against Iron Range teams. In 1923, the manager of the Kelley Hardware Store, M.C. Gebert, along with three players, signed franchise papers and joined the NFL. They held their first game on Aug. 23, 1923, in front of a packed Athletic Park in Duluth, near today’s Wade Stadium. They ended the season 4-3. By 1925, the NFL was struggling financially, and so were the Kelleys. That year, Duluth posted a miserable record of 0-3, and with fan interest waning,

14 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

the team rarely saw profits. It didn’t help that the Kelleys had to pay other teams to come to Duluth to play. By the end of 1925, the owners were fed up. They sold the team to Ole Haugsrud, the team’s volunteer secretary-treasurer, for $1 in exchange for his commitment to assume the team’s growing debt. Other NFL teams were also struggling. In 1925, the Chicago Bears signed Red Grange, an All-American running back they hoped would command public attention. He did just that, with 36,000 fans turning out for his first home game against the Cardinals and 73,000 fans turning out for his next game against the New York Giants.

Starting a second league At the end of the season, Grange asked for more money, and when he didn’t get it, he and his manager, C.C. Pyle, decided to start their own league, the American Football League. Looking for another marquee player, Pyle made an offer to All-American fullback Ernie Nevers. The news of the new league and its potential to score a star player sent the NFL reeling. But all was not lost: Nevers (who had played college ball at Stanford) had grown up in Superior, Wis. And he went to school with Haugsrud. Haugsrud met with Nevers and bettered Pyle’s offer.


Booth Manor Residence Nevers accepted! After Nevers signed on, Haugsrud changed the team name to “Ernie Nevers’ Duluth Eskimos.” He also added the first NFL team logo, an igloo, to the team jerseys and signature overcoats. The league was ecstatic. Bringing in the talented Nevers, who was handsome to boot, instantly lifted the NFL’s reputation. League president Joe Carr proclaimed to Haugsrud: “You’ve just saved the National Football League.”

Building a team During the team’s first season as the Eskimos, Nevers had strong players in Doc Kelly, Walt Kiesling and Johnny “Blood” McNally. Building on the team’s popularity, Haugsrud scheduled a 117-day, 29-game barnstorming tour that took the players across the country and back. They finished the tour 19-7-3. Attendance was up across the NFL in 1926. Meanwhile, the new AFL struggled to win fans, and teams folded, one by one, until the league shut down. Its last remaining franchise, the New York Yankees, and its star player Red Grange, joined the NFL. With fewer teams and stronger rosters around the league, the Eskimos struggled

→→See the exhibit Fans can see Eskimo uniforms and gear in a recreated locker room in the new exhibit Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, opening Sept. 24 at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. See mnhs.org.

For Seniors 62+

American professional football got off to a rocky start in the opening decades of the 20th century.

• 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1

12/6/13 10:14 AM

in 1927, finishing 1-8. Nevers left the team to coach baseball with his former Stanford coach Glenn Warner.

A new franchise Without Nevers, the Eskimos’ future prospects and profits seemed slim, and Haugsrud suspended the team from play in 1928 and sold it in 1929. As part of the sale, Haugsrud stipulated he would get the first chance to bid for a team whenever a new franchise was granted in Minnesota. In 1961, he bought into the Minnesota Vikings. In 2008, a major Hollywood movie called Leatherheads, starring George Clooney and Renee Zellweger, was released. Named for the leather helmets that players wore in the 1920s, the film was loosely based on the Duluth Eskimos. The inaugural induction class for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, included three men from the Duluth Eskimos: Nevers, Kiesling and McNally. Jessica Kohen is the media relations manager for the Minnesota Historical Society.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 15


Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

Coping with shaking →→Tremors become more common as we age

A slight hand tremor or shake shouldn’t be cause for alarm if it’s transient and can be blamed on anxiety, excess coffee or over-indulgence in alcohol. Worry begins when a tremor persists without an obvious cause. The likelihood of hand tremor increases with advancing age: By age 80, about 20 percent of older adults notice at least some trouble. The most common type of tremor is termed “essential.” Physicians call a symptom or ailment essential when the cause isn’t understood and the problem exists by itself without other associated troubles. Essential tremor has also been called benign tremor, familial tremor and senile tremor. Essential is the preferred term since the shakiness is not benign (or harmless) to the person who shakes, doesn’t always run in the family and can begin at younger ages. Essential tremor is characterized by a rapid shake (six to eight movements per second) that’s exaggerated by certain positions of the arms. It may decrease with the initiation of voluntary movement, only to worsen as the hand reaches its destination. And it often subsides, or even disappears, with total rest of the arm and hand.

Maintaining confidence Although uncommon, essential tremor can also involve the head and tongue. The tremor most often begins in the sixth or seventh decade, but can present much earlier. It may slowly progress in severity, but more often it remains unchanged for many years. The shaking is usually mild and a nuisance, but it can be severe and incapacitating. It’s made worse by fatigue, stress and caffeine. Ingestion of alcohol dramatically reduces the movements. Use of alcoholic beverages to relieve the shake, however, is strongly discouraged: Tremors may diminish after a drink or two, but is often worse the following day. A person with essential tremor carries not only the burden of spilled coffee, but also the fear of social rejection. The worry of being noticed in public and considered senile can lead to isolation, and even to depression. Self-confidence is essential for those with an essential tremor, and it begins with understanding that the shake is not associated with other health problems and has nothing to do with loss of mental faculties.

Treatments Essential tremor is generally resistant to medical interventions, but beta-blocking drugs such as propranolol and metoprolol may provide some relief. 16 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Unlike essential tremor, the shake of Parkinson’s disease is associated with other problems. The tremor is just one part of a much larger symptom set, and the troubles tend to be progressive. Parkinson’s disease almost always includes generalized rigidity of body muscles, slowing of gait, imbalance and a reduction of spontaneous gestures and facial expressions. The tremor is very noticeable in most, but is absent is some. It’s coarse and slow (about 4 movements per second) compared to the finer and quicker shake of essential tremor, and is more pronounced when the arms and hands are at rest. The tremor of Parkinson’s disease almost always begins in just one hand, but eventually involves both.

Drugs can cause tremors Prescription and non-prescription drugs can cause or exacerbate a hand tremor. A careful review of all medications is essential for anyone who is experiencing a new hand tremor. If you’re told that you have essential tremor, be reassured that it will not affect your general health. Openly discussing the matter with family and friends is a good way to begin building self-confidence and to avoid psychological consequences from the problem.

Dr. Michael Spilane, now retired, spent more than four decades practicing and teaching geriatric medicine in St. Paul. Send comments or questions to drspilane@ mngoodage.com.


Golden LivingCenters of Minnesota Golden LivingCenters of Minnesota offers dementia care, short-term rehab, respite care and long-term care. For more information on a facility near you see our website: www.GoldenLivingCenters.com FACILITIES IN MINNESOTA: Anoka Benson Bloomington Delano Excelsior Franklin Fridley Henning

Hopkins La Crescent Minneapolis Moorhead Olivia Rochester Roseville Rush City

Slayton St. Louis Park St. Paul Stillwater Wabasso Walker Wayzata Whitewater

For admission assistance call direct connect today:

855-855-8114 Equal opportunity provider of healthcare services. GLS-12050-14 A045


Good Health / Caregiving / By Janet Salo

Caring for kids →→How to cope when you become a caregiver for a child unexpectedly

Robin, a single grandmother, was faced with the unexpected need to request custody of her 6-year-old grandson. Although she’d been his primary caregiver for many years, she said the responsibility of taking on full-time parenting felt overwhelming. She had so many questions: What legal help was available? Could the county assist with resources for child support? How could her grandson adjust to his new situation? How could she support him through this difficult transition? With help from an attorney, the school district, county and Kinship Family Support Services at Lutheran Social Service, she tackled each matter one step at a time. “For myself, being part of Kinship Caregivers and connecting with other grandparents like me was reassuring to know that I am not alone,” Robin shared. “The resource fairs, support groups and workshops are fabulous because they provide the tools and resources that we grandparents may not have been aware of.” There’s a big need in the Twin Cities for services to these unique families, typically called kinship families. Currently, there are more than 90,000 children in Minnesota being raised by family members or friends. Being a kinship caregiver brings unique challenges because children may arrive unexpectedly in the home and may have a variety of physical, emotional

18 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

and/or behavioral needs based on the circumstances they may have experienced.

How you can help You might have a co-worker, friend or relative who is suddenly caring for a child while the child’s parents address health issues, mental-health concerns, addiction or other concerns that leave them unavailable to consistently parent. Here are some thoughts to keep in mind if you want to help: ⊲⊲ Try to stand “alongside” the caregiver with support and encouragement, not judgment. ⊲⊲ Provide concrete offers of respite care, such as, “We are going to the zoo on Friday. Would your Charlie like to join us?” ⊲⊲ Help the caregiver reach out for community resources to manage financial demands. ⊲⊲ Offer to accompany caregivers during appointments for legal help or aid.

→→Kinship Caregiver Resource Fair What: This third-annual event is designed to help kinship families connect to other families and resources. When: 9 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Oct. 29 Where: The Center for Changing Lives, 2400 Park Ave. S., Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: RSVP for the annual Kinship Caregiver Resource Fair at kinshipcaregivers.org or by calling 651-917-4640 or 877-917-4640. You can also write warmline@lssmn.org.


How can you help? Offer to accompany caregivers during appointments for legal help or aid. ⊲⊲ Let caregivers know about LSS Kinship Family Support Services. They can call the LSS Kinship Warmline at 651-917-4640, write warmline@lssmn.org or see kinshipcaregivers.org.

Getting help Kinship caregivers may not know where to find resources or what assistance they can access in the community or through government benefits. Kinship Family Support Services’ family-support specialists can connect caregivers to legal options, financial resources, support groups, workshops and Family Circle Conferences that help caregivers develop caregiving plans for children. Another helpful resource for older adults is the Senior Linkage Line, which can be reached by calling 800-333-2433 or by visiting mnaging.org. Janet Salo is a family support specialist at Kinship Family Support Services, a program of Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota. She is also a member of the Twin Cities’ Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative (caregivercollaborative.org).

Affordable independent living for adults 55 and better carvercda.org • 952-448-7715

All CDA communities are smoke FREE!

Carver County CDA 55 and Better Rental Properties: Oak Grove Senior Residence in Norwood Young America 952-373-2200 • oakgrovesr.com The Crossings at Town Centre in Waconia 952-442-8232 • crossingsapt.com Centennial Hill in Chanhassen 952-474-4060 • centennialhillapts.com All 55 and Better Properties Offer: In-Unit Washers/Dryers • Underground Heated Parking Beauty Salon • Community Room • Heat included Guest Suite • Smoke-Free • Affordable Rents

Inquire about Waybury Apartments, Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. Waybury Apartments in Chaska 952-448-5022 • waybury@carvercda.org Waybury Apartments Offers: One and Two-Bedroom Apartments • Heat Included Community Room with Full Kitchen and TV • Library Individual Garages & Decks • Controlled Access Entry Income limits apply. Residents pay 30% of their adjusted gross income for rent.

The Carver County Community Development Agency Provides Housing Opportunities and Fosters Economic Development in Carver County. Carver County CDA GA 0916 S3.indd 1

8/5/16 2:15/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 19


Good Living / Travel

g n i m r a Ch r a h C Charleston’s City Gallery overlooks the iconic pineapple fountain in the city’s 12-acre Waterfront Park. Pineapple decorations, which symbolize hospitality, are used in architecture throughout this historic city.


g n o t rles i

rd By John Libu

Founded in 1670, this friendly city is rich with history, cuisine and culture. And it’s easy to explore without a car

T

he irreverent nickname for Charleston, South Carolina, is Chucktown — originally named Charles Town after King Charles II of England. The town’s more reverent moniker is the Holy City — for its many historic churches as well as its founders’ longstanding principle of welcoming religions of all types. (Today, more than 400 houses of worship dot the city.) Charleston is a marvelous place to visit when it’s blessed with relatively cool weather. Early May and early October are the two optimum times to enjoy all that Historic Charleston has to offer. (October boasts an average high of 77 and an average low of 56, versus 89 and 72 in August.) Furthermore — except for those who are serious patrons of the arts — it would be smart to avoid overbooked hotels and congested traffic during Charleston’s annual Spoleto Festival that starts in late May. Note: The official Atlantic hurricane season begins in June and ends in November — with August and September as the typical peak months.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 21


CHARMING CHARLESTON

Getting around Exploring Charleston is easy enough. Forget about a rental car: Use a taxi or shuttle service to reach the heart of the port city where the historic center is located. Even if you drive into Charleston, your visit will be infinitely more enjoyable if you keep your car parked and use the many available forms of public transportation — city buses and taxis, free hop-on/hop-off trolley buses, free Scoop Car electric taxis, horse-drawn carriages and pedicabs. You’ll also notice skateboarders in the midst of all the traffic. (In Charleston, skateboards are treated as street-legal vehicles.) Finding your way around downtown Charleston is a snap. Just a few points of reference and you’ve got it nailed: Meeting Street and King Street give you a north-south orientation. Calhoun Street and Broad Street provide east-west orientation. To make it even easier to locate places of interest, tour companies offer 90-minute get-acquainted excursions aboard small buses with large windows. The buses depart every half hour from the big 22 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲As a tourist destination, The Battery — a defensive seawall and promenade in Charleston — is famous for its stately antebellum homes.

visitors center on Meeting Street; there you can also sign up for tailored tours that include outlying mansions and plantations.

Military histories You’ll quickly realize that Charleston’s history has a dominant military theme, from the Revolutionary War all the way through to even our most recent conflicts. ⊳⊳ A 13-inch Civil War mortar (cannon) with shells (bombs) is on display along The Battery in historic Charleston.


▲▲Hoppin’ John is a rice dish with black-eyed peas or dried local field peas, onion and sliced bacon. Though it’s available year-round at Charleston restaurants, Hoppin’ John is especially popular at family celebrations on New Year’s Day.

Landmarks and monuments everywhere manifest Charleston’s proud military heritage. Among them are The Citadel, The Battery, Fort Sumter and Patriots Point. The latter includes the Congressional Medal of Honor Museum aboard the USS Yorktown. If you opt for a boat excursion out to the Fort Sumter island fortification, note that the huge Charleston Aquarium is also located at the dock area you’ll be departing from for your trip.

Food and drink            Dining is a pleasure in Charleston. You’ll find a rich variety of fast-food joints on King Street, many of which are locally born establishments. And there are restaurants aplenty for those who favor more formal dining experiences, too. But check prices before committing. After-the-fact sticker shock could sour your sweet desert. Charleston features some can’t-miss unique fare such as She Crab Soup (a cross between a bisque and a chowder, made with blue crab meat), Hoppin’ John (a rice dish made with black-eyed peas) and Huguenot torte (an apple and nut dessert that’s a bit like pecan pie without a crust). On Saturday mornings, there’s a vibrant farmers market in Marion Square where you can enjoy the area’s specialties as you wander around the small park. A common denominator in local cuisine is the use of fresh rather than frozen ingredients: Take note, seafood lovers.

We buy gold, silver, coins, & currency Mill City Numismatics Honest, Knowledgable & Experienced

Please call Andrew at

(612) 770-6578 Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 23

Mill City Numismatics GA 0513 V6.indd 1

3/28/13 4:02 PM


CHARMING CHARLESTON

To make it even easier to locate key places of interest, tour companies offer 90-minute get-acquainted excursions aboard small buses with large windows. ▲▲Scenic Folly Beach is a 25-minute drive from the heart of Charleston. It’s situated on Folly Island — a barrier island on the Atlantic Ocean.

Nightlife Surprisingly, the historic district has a very youthful spirit that’s largely due to the presence of a university and several colleges, including The Citadel military college. Smart-looking young folks are always walking and jogging throughout the city. By the way, there’s little doubt that young gals wearing scanty shorts led to the demise of the textile industry in the Deep South; they greatly reduced the demand for fabric! At any rate, the downtown area hosts a happy mix of folks, most of whom enjoy Charleston’s jazzy nightlife late into the night.

Authentic souvenirs Now what about a keepsake to take home? The city’s market is in the southwest portion of the peninsula, Market Street to be precise. You’ll stroll through a series of large buildings that create a bright and airy tunnel of sorts — with hundreds of imbedded shops offering too many choices. Beyond the requisite refrigerator magnets, two big favorites are handmade reed baskets and cypress carvings — not made in China. Local craftspeople weave a variety of reed baskets well suited for holding fruit and bread, and the cypress carvings are especially nice because termites can’t stomach that type of wood. 24 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Charleston is known as The Holy City for its more than 400 places of worship, including St. Michael’s Church, the city’s oldest religious structure, built between 1751 and 1761.


62+ Independent Living

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis www.NokomisSquare.com

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

We’re ideally located in a comfortable Minneapolis neighborhood.

261 Ruth Street (651) 738-2102

Call to schedule your tour today!

Will: $40 PoWer of Attorney: $20 HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70

612.721.5077 Equal Housing Opportunity

3/28/13 Nokomis 3:23care PM Square GA 0214at 12.indd The wide range of services and options The1Residence at 1/15/14 North Ridge is one of the reasons we’re considered one of the best senior housing facilities in the community.

Roban, James GA 0513 12.indd 1

▲▲Sunrise illuminates a tree-lined walk in a downtown Charleston.

Pretty place, friendly people Clearly, at least one visit to Charleston is an absolute imperative. The well-preserved European-style architecture — characterized by Georgian, Neoclassical and Greek Revival-style plantation homes and mansions — is extremely impressive. And, perhaps most important, this port city is the heart of gracious Southern culture: You’ll be treated well in the Lowcountry, and there’s no need to feel out of place. In fact, the locals don’t even declare themselves to be native Charlestonians unless they can officially trace their family roots back to the earliest immigrants. So, although you may not be a descendant of The Old Guard, wonderful Charleston is unofficially your town, too — even if just for a few pleasurable days. John Liburdi is a freelance writer. His latest book, Italian American Fusion: Italy’s Influence on the Evolution of America, is available at amazon.com. Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson contributed to this story.

Assisted Living Independent Living • Adult Day Program • Comprehensive Rehab Program

4:37 PM

Outpatient Therapy Rehab On-site Child Care Program • Assisted Living Memory Care available in 2017

To learn more about how The Residence at North Ridge’s commitment to best practices and quality care can benefit you or your loved one, give us a call at 763-592-3000. 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope, MN 55428 Licensed by the state of Minnesota as a Housing with Services establishment and a Comprehensive Home Care agency. Residence at North Ridge GA 0516 H6.indd 1

4/21/16 2:38 PM

Pay Tribute

No matter which location or service you choose, you will always find an exceptional level of professionalism and care. Our experience, coupled with our perspective on the importance of ceremony, will help you discover ways to pay tribute. Whether traditional or unique, these tributes allow us to love, laugh, and live well again.

The McReavy Family

17 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS BLOOMINGTON 952-884-8145

EDINA 952-920-3996

WEST BLOOMINGTON 952-941-7686

HOPKINS 952-938-9020

EDEN PRAIRIE 952-975-0400

ROBBINSDALE 763-537-2333 CRYSTAL 763-533-8643

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS 763-789-4436 COON RAPIDS 763-767-1000 NOKOMIS PARK 612-721-1651

UPTOWN 612-377-2203

NEW BRIGHTON 651-636-9821

CRYSTAL LAKE 612-521-3677

NORTHEAST MPLS. 612-781-6828

NORTH MPLS. 612-529-9691

BLAINE PRE-ARRANGEMENT CENTER 763-231-0506

HILLSIDE 612-781-1999

www.washburn-mcreavy.com Washburn McReavy GA 0116 S3.indd 1

12/9/15 12:00 Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / PM 25


Good Living / Housing / By Sarah Jackson

KIDS AND SENIORS →→KinderCare kids are reaching out to elder communities in the Twin Cities

Arts programs in the aging community have received a lot of press lately. Retirement communities, assisted-living centers and especially memory-care facilities have incorporated visual arts activities, dance classes, music lessons and more to enhance the lives — and even overall health of — their residents. And now there’s another trend in senior housing that’s taking off nationwide — and right here in the Twin Cities. It’s called intergenerational engagement and it’s a rising star in the realm of housing centers that cater to older adults. KinderCare Learning Centers, a Portland, Ore.-based early childhood education provider, and Brookdale Senior Living, a Tennessee-based assisted living and retirement community provider, have partnered to bring together some of Minnesota’s youngest and oldest residents. As part of the program, children from local KinderCare centers are making monthly visits to seniors with Alzheimer’s or dementia at Brookdale centers around the Twin Cities. Kids from multiple KinderCare locations will visit Brookdale locations in Blaine, Eagan, Edina, North Oaks and West St. Paul. In the coming months, the program will expand to five other metro-area Brookdale communities.

Simple beginnings The new program is the brainchild of Kimberly Baar, director of the Shoreview KinderCare center, who last fall forged learning relationships between her students and a local memory-care center. ⊳⊳ Older adults and children in the Twin Cities get to engage a variety of activities thanks to a new intergenerational partnership between Brookdale Senior Living and KinderCare Learning Centers. Photo courtesy of Shoreview Press

26 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

It was a natural fit: Kids were able to visit with elders as well as engage in activities together, including crafts that required at least some fine motor skills. “This is a simple program any school can do,” Baar said. “The children not only gain an appreciation for older people, but a self-esteem boost from being able to assist others. The seniors, in turn, are able to form connections with people outside of their immediate family and caregivers, thus lessening the isolation that often accompanies old age.” Before heading over to the center, Baar talked with the children about how to treat older adults respectfully, share stories and recognize when both sides might need a break. “Our teachers were proud of how compassionate and empathetic their students were — how engaged they became with the seniors,” Baar said. “The children were also proud of themselves and the positive impact they had on others in their community.”

Other models Around the country, other similar programs have earned praise, including a senior-care facility in Seattle recently featured in The Atlantic for its intergenerational programming. Residents there — who boast an average age of 92 — spend five days a week in a 300,000-square-foot facility with 125 children, ages 0 to 5. In Minnesota, there’s Olu’s Center, a daycare center in North Minneapolis that offers intergenerational programing. Entrepreneur Gloria Freeman — the founder of Olu’s Home, an organization that provides housing and in-home


care for older adults and people with developmental disabilities and mental illness in Twin Cities — founded Olu’s Center in 2015. In 2016, the U.S Small Business Administration named Freeman Minnesota Small Business Person of the Year. “You’re going to see more and more intergenerational programs as people live to be older, and more young people are being born,” Freeman told the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal. Indeed, Augustana Care — a nonprofit organization that provides housing, health care and communitybased services to older generations — recently acquired a historic threebedroom home adjacent to its Chapel View campus in Hopkins to accommodate a different kind of intergenerational living. Residents at the home, known as Stepping Stones, will include one older adult looking for new living arrangements, plus two other residents who must be students or professionals. Priority consideration will be given to applicants who are either studying or already established in fields such as nursing, psychology, social work, geriatrics and spiritual care. “We are repurposing this beautiful home in a way that allows us to remain true to our history, while starting an exciting, intergenerational program,” said Augustana’s regional housing director, Mary Jo Thorne.

Learning about seniors Beth Landers, Brookdale’s business development director, said intergen-

erational programs give participants valuable opportunities for being around older adults. In the case of the Brookdale program, that can include adults with various forms of dementia. “It allows children to feel comfortable with their own grandparents and gives a platform for dining-room conversations with Mom and Dad about Grandma or Grandpa,” Landers said. “By removing the stigma and fear of aging and dementia with children, we are providing a platform for these conversations and general awareness.” Baar said children and adults, even those with memory issues, do quite well together. “The elderly are living in the moment,” she said. “They’re all about the fun they’re having right then and there —just like kids.” Baar hopes other Minnesota schools, preschools and childcare facilities will start their own intergenerational programs. “It can be as simple as taking craft activities from the center over to local nursing homes and inviting residents to join in,” she said. “These are wonderful opportunities to help children make an impact on another person’s life. My hope is that by the time students leave our center, they will have learned to have compassion and understanding for the elderly for the rest of their adult lives.”

Our handmade craft and bake sale is back, and bigger than ever!

Fri. Oct 7 from 4 - 7pm Sat. Oct 8 from 9am - 1pm GREAT DOOR PRIZES TOO! 8131 Fourth Street North, Oakdale 651-578-0676 • www.oak-meadows.org

Oak Meadow GA 0916 12.indd 2

8/4/16 11:17 AM

Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more info.

In the Heart of the Beast MNP 2016 12 filler.indd 1

7/6/16 10:39 AM

Sarah Jackson is the editor of Minnesota Good Age. Send story ideas or submissions — especially stories on the topic of senior housing — to editor@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 27


Good Living / Finance / By Skip Johnson

HELPING KIDS SAVE →→You can play a crucial role in teaching your grandchildren how to manage money

Grandparents play a special role in the lives of their grandchildren. And I’m not talking about spoiling them with treats. Rather, grandparents have a unique teaching opportunity when it comes to money. According to a recent study, a majority of young adults are open to talking about money with their grandparents, and most say their grandparents already have an impact on their saving and spending habits. Working together with parents, grandparents can help set their grandkids up for financial success. You can start talking with your grandchildren when they’re as young as 3 or 4 years old:

Share history Kids love hearing stories, and grandparents can start the conversation by talking about their own experiences. Share how you earned spending money when you were young, how you paid for your education and any other stories of saving up for something you really wanted. These types of conversations can serve as transitions into discussing your grandchild’s goals, whether they’re small, like buying a video game, or big, like saving for college.

Help wanted Before you buy your grandkids the toys they’ve been eyeing, you can help them earn them! Kids can sweep the floor, rake leaves or carry groceries. By paying grandkids for the jobs they do, you can help them learn the concept of working for money. Even if you don’t live nearby, you can have them do chores during visits or set up a system with their parents

28 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

in which you provide money for extra chores the kids do around the house.

Tangible examples Use real-life experiences to teach your grandkids about money. The next time you’re shopping, look at different brands of the same product to teach price comparison. Talk about what you bought when you were growing up — and how much it cost — to show how the value of money has changed over time. If you go to the store at a slow time, you can give hands-on lessons by having them count cash and figure out the change. (If there’s a line behind you, you can always do a re-enactment at home.) Once kids get older, the lessons change a bit. Try these ideas for teenagers:

Grandparent Match Think of the Grandparent Match like an employer match for a 401(k). You can help reward your grandkids by matching a certain percentage of the money they save. The idea applies to short-term savings goals or long-term goals, like a new car, college or even retirement. You may want to offer more generous terms than a standard 401(k) to give them an incentive to save.


We’re Just What You Are Looking For! I’ve heard of Grandparent Matches of 400 percent up to a fixed amount. That may be too good to pass up.

One or two bedroom units from 695 sf to 1,360 sf Memberships: $32,988 to $66,064 Monthly fees: $589 to $1,167

Beyond savings accounts Don’t limit your match money to a savings account; explore other options that can yield higher returns, like a Roth IRA, in which money is contributed on an after-tax basis and earnings grow tax-free. Roth IRAs are intended for retirement, so there are some rules to follow. You can withdraw contributions at any time, but your grandchild has to wait until age 59 1/2 to withdraw the earnings without a penalty and/or tax.

DISCOVER 55+ COOPERATIVE LIVING

5688 Brent Avenue, Inver Grove Heights gramercyinvergrove.org | 651-450-9851 GramercyInverGrove-St.Paul GA 0916 H6.indd 1

8/10/16 4:13 PM

Give educational gifts There are some excellent books about personal finance, including books that cover budgeting, saving and investing. You could also give older teens a consultation with a financial planner. I have clients who bring in their grandkids to get them exposed to money management. The bottom line is to have conversations early and often to expose your grandkids to new ideas and concepts.

Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial in New Hope, a financial planning firm and Minnesota insurance agency. Skip also offers investment advisory services through AdvisorNet Wealth Management, a registered investment advisor. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.

Come Home

to Auburn

Independent Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Skilled Nursing Care Rehabilitation Services

Serving Seniors in the Spirit of Christ’s Love • Locations in Chaska & Waconia

CALL TODAY 952-227-0494 For Employment and Volunteer Opportunities Visit Our Web Site: www.auburnhomes.org Auburn Homes & Services GA 1014 H4.indd 1

9/4/14 3:39/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 29


Good Living / In the Kitchen

GOLD NUGGETS! Got grandkids coming to visit? Skip the frozen-section nuggets and try this down-home recipe which relies on melted butter, along with Parmesan cheese and a few common pantry items. It’s so simple, you can make it with the grandkids, and you’ll actually want to eat them, too. Really!

⊲⊲Preheat oven to 400 degrees. ⊲⊲Cut chicken breasts into 1 ½-inch pieces. ⊲⊲Whisk together the bread crumbs, cheese, salt, thyme and basil in a shallow dish. ⊲⊲Put the melted butter in another shallow dish. ⊲⊲Dip the chicken pieces into the melted butter, then coat with the breadcrumb mixture. ⊲⊲Place well-coated chicken pieces on a lightly greased cookie sheet. ⊲⊲Bake for 20 minutes or until there’s no pink in the center of the nuggets.

→→Tips

BAKED CHICKEN NUGGETS 3 skinless, boneless chicken breasts 1 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs ½ cup very finely grated Parmesan cheese

½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dried thyme (optional) 1 teaspoon dried basil (optional) ½ cup unsalted butter, melted

Source: We adapted this recipe from allrecipes.com, where it received a cumulative rating of 4.5 out of 5 stars, based on more than 1,000 reviews. Read the original recipe and reviews — and watch a video to see how easy it is to make — at tinyurl.com/nuggets-mn. 30 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

For best results, use real grated Parmesan cheese without any shreds or shavings. It should look like a fine powder, which works better for breading. Avoid the shelf-stable stuff sold in cans. Many reviewers recommended broiling the nuggets for a few minutes at the end of cooking for a crispier texture.


LiveLife You want the security and peace of mind that comes with being a part of a caring community with many services and amenities. From senior housing to assisted living to home care to skilled care services, you’ll find Crest View offers choices and options to fit your individual needs. Crest view Senior Community on Reservoir Boulevard 4444 Reservoir Blvd, NE Columbia Heights ph: 763-782-1601 • The

Boulevard Senior housing

• Columbia

village Senior housing for people on limited incomes

• Royce

Place Assisted living and memory care

• Crest

view Lutheran Home Short term rehab, long term andme mory care, and end of life care

CrestviewCares.org

Crest view on 42nd Assisted living and memory care

OPeNiNG fALL 2016! Crest view Senior Community at Blaine Senior housing to assisted living and memory care. 12016 Ulysses Ave. NE, Blaine ph: 763-755-0712


Photo by Tracy Walsh


THE ART OF THE

INTERVIEW How Minnesota’s own Mary Hanson created the nation’s longestrunning independently produced cable program — and a satisfying new career — on a whim

BY JULIE KENDRICK

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 33


THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW

Photo by Tracy Walsh

W

hen she turned 35, Mary Hanson already had a busy life, two young children and a thriving career as a licensed independent social worker and social services consultant. ||||||| One fall morning, she attended a speech by a noted professor at the University of Minnesota. ||||||| “As I walked out, I looked around and saw there were only a handful of people in the audience,” Hanson said. “I thought, ‘He was a brilliant thinker and deserved a bigger audience.’”

34 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


A CALLING DISCOVERED What happened next can be chalked up to fate, serendipity or perhaps the wellknown business axiom of “making your own luck.” That same morning, after sitting through that spottily attended lecture, Hanson was driving to a consulting job and passed a local radio station, KCHKAM. “I made a spur-of-the-moment decision and found myself suddenly turning my car into the parking lot,” she said. “I went in and asked to speak to the station manager.” Hanson left with an agreement to create a radio show that “would do something for the community,” in the station manager’s words. “I walked out the door,” Hanson said, “not realizing I had just experienced the beginning of a major career shift.” Hanson’s radio show started out as a five-minute program and evolved into a 30-minute show. Two years later, she began programming on what was then a new kind of medium — cable television. In 1980, she became the host and executive producer of The Mary Hanson Show, now the longest running independently produced cable program in the United States. She’s interviewed local, state and national leaders, often on topics of health and social issues. For the past 20 years, the show has also been broadcast on the PBS affiliate, Twin Cities Public Television, on TPT 2-2, also know as The Minnesota Channel or TPT MN. The show’s received numerous awards over the years, including the MinneMinnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 35


THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW

THE MARY HANSON SHOW

Mary Hanson has interviewed many famous Minnesotans on The Mary Hanson Show, the longest running independently produced cable program in the United States.

Don Shelby

David Mech

Ann Bancroft

Elmer Anderson

Martin Sabo

Arne Carlson

George Latimer

George and Sally Pillsbury

Patty Wetterling

Mary Hanson’s next season starts Sept. 19 on TPT MN, also known as TPT 2-2 or The Minnesota Channel, reaching all of Minnesota and North Dakota and western Wisconsin. The show airs Mondays at 4 a.m., 10 a.m., 4 p.m. and 10 p.m. Find a list of your TPT channels at tpt.org/channels. Viewers can catch the show year-round at 9 p.m. Mondays on the Metro Cable Network, Channel 6, which interconnects all 14 cable systems in the seven-county metro area. Learn more — and watch past interviews — at maryhansonshow.com. 36 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


sota Medical Association Media Award for Excellence in Medical Journalism (three different years), the Minnesota Psychiatric Society’s top award for Excellence in the Media and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Minneapolis Telecommunications Network. Hanson, 73, is in her 36th year of broadcasting.

NOTABLE GUESTS Over the years, Hanson has interviewed countless famous newsmakers and personalities, including politicians, business leaders, physicians, psychologists, authors, explorers and scientists. Some of her past guests include Arne Carlson, R.T. Rybak, Don Shelby, Ann Bancroft and Patty Wetterling. She recently interviewed Reatha Clark King — a former president of Metro State University and former vice president of General Mills — about race relations and her experiences growing up in segregated Georgia. One of Hanson’s most memorable interviews was with motion-picture legend Milos Forman, who directed Amadeus and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. “His personal story, as someone who had lost family members during the Holocaust, was an excellent example of resilience,” Hanson said. One of Hanson’s most challenging interviews was with famed psychologist Joyce Brothers. “Her husband had recently died, and she started crying on camera during our interview,” Hanson said. “I believe crying is healthy, and that it releases pain, so we kept going, and she talked through her tears.”

Enjoy Comfort – Enjoy Community – Enjoy Life! at

LEE SQUARE COOPERATIVE Move into our 55+ Community & Enjoy:

• Virtually maintenance-free living • Walking path around building on 6+ acres • Hurry! Units currently available for sale ~ phone for a tour

763-522-5095 or 1-855-422-0022 4400 36th Ave North ~ ROBBINSDALE, MN

www.leesquarecooperative.com Lee Square Coop GA 0916 H4.indd 1

8/9/162016 12:52/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 37


THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW

Hanson’s guests have come from all walks of life. “Almost everyone I interview is passionate about what they are doing,” Hanson said. “It might be a worker in the trenches at a homeless shelter or the CEO of a major company.”

STICKING WITH IT What’s kept Hanson inspired all these years? It’s that same spark she felt so many years ago — bringing her guests’ ideas and knowledge to a larger audience. “People ask: ‘Are you going to retire?’ The show, I believe, is making a difference, so I want to keep it going,” said Hanson, who is working on plans to archive many of her interviews from the past four decades. Hanson’s guests appear to enjoy their time on the show as much as she does. On camera (and off) Hanson is exceedingly welcoming, gracious and positive. She’s known for her sincere curiosity, penetrating questions and a calm, almost 38 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Mary Hanson talks with Reatha Clark King, a former president of Metro State University and former vice president of General Mills, in a recent interview about growing up in segregated Georgia and race relations today. Photo by Elandra Mikkelson


Stay in the home you love! Don’t let stairs keep you from enjoying your entire home! Stair Lifts Residential Elevators Wheelchair Lifts

• Sales & Service • Large Selection • Licensed Techs

Blaine 763-786-2780

Bloomington 952-253-2000

www.arrowlift.com

SANDBERG FUNERAL & CREMATION SERVICES

Arrow Lift GA 0915 12.indd 1

7/29/15 1:40 PM

Our Family Serving Yours Since 1942 Luncheon Options

Mary Hanson with her grandsons, Makai, 9, and Julian, 6.

Remodeled and Spacious (chapel seating 200) 2593 E. 7th Ave., North St. Paul, MN 55109

651-777-2600

sandbergfuneralhome.com

serene, interviewing style. Ellen Kennedy, the executive director and founder of World Without Genocide, wrote to Hanson: “I have been interviewed by so many people all around the country and abroad, and your interview was by far the best.” Richard Leider, a public speaker and author of 10 books, including Repacking Your Bags and The Power of Purpose, said: “Mary Hanson is one of the best interviewers in the country.” Hanson has set herself apart by discussing topics that get less airtime from larger outlets.

“There are two kinds of people in the world,” said Michael Osterholm, a public health scientist, nationally recognized biosecurity expert and former Minnesota state epidemiologist. “Those who have been on The Mary Hanson Show and those who want to be.”

4/9/13 4:16 PM

Relax. P lay. Stay.

Sandberg Funeral GA 0513 12.indd 1

FAMILY LIFE Hanson lives in Southwest Minneapolis in a home that’s more than 100 years old. “I’ve been single, married, divorced and widowed, and being widowed is by far the hardest experience,” she said. Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 39


THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW

Photo by Tracy Walsh

She remains close to her two grown daughters. The oldest, Camille, is a professional dancer and independent choreographer. She lives in Madrid, Spain, and performs all over the world. “She is 47 and is still dancing at the highest levels of modern dance,” Hanson said. Her younger daughter, Jennifer, lives in Minneapolis. Divorced, she works full-time for the School of Psychology at Walden University. Jennifer has two children, one of whom has special needs and is non-verbal due to an undiagnosed neurological disorder.

diem” (seize the day) philosophy. “That loss led to my determination to live life to the fullest and make each day as good as possible,” Hanson said. “I’ve never had great deal of financial security as an independent producer, but for me, doing something that is making a difference

“I try to help her out as much as I can, because it’s really a 24/7 job,” said Hanson. “Plus, I love hanging out with my grandsons!”

— and that I love doing — is energizing enough to compensate. Sometimes it’s hard for me to go to bed at night because I’m so busy planning the next week’s show.”

VITAL AGING At a time when many baby boomers and other older adults are living longer — and sticking with careers well past traditional retirement ages — Hanson is an example of how to remain vital later in life. Hanson also stays active by doing part-time work with seniors — her elders, actually. “I get to work with people from a generation ahead of me, some well into their 90s who are still enjoying life, seeing the humor in situations and feeling needed and productive,” Hanson said. “On the show, I work with guests — well past the so-called ‘retirement age’— who are coming up with new strategies and goals, so I’m less afraid of aging because of these models who inspire me.” After losing her father when he was 46 and she was 14, Hanson developed a “carpe 40 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

LOOKING AHEAD Hanson and her beloved production crew are gearing up for a brand-new season. Upcoming guests will include civil rights activist Josie Johnson, the first African-American to serve on the University of Minnesota Board of Regents; and Mitch Pearlstein, founder of the conser-


Reimbursed Senior Volunteer Positions:

On the show, I work with guests — well past the so-called ‘retirement age’— who are coming up with new strategies and goals, so I’m less afraid of aging because of these models who inspire me. vative think tank, The Center of the American Experiment. Hanson’s strong environmental focus will continue with guest Karen Zumach, director of community forestry from Tree Trust with a discussion about endangered ash trees. Reflecting on a second act that’s brought so much purpose to her life, Hanson said: “There is something to pre-planning your career, but there’s also value in going with intuition and spontaneity.” She’s convinced that it doesn’t take the full-time commitment she’s had to add a new sense of purpose to life. “You can pursue something you’re passionate about, even for a very small percentage of your week or as a volunteer, and it can make life much more rewarding and exciting,” she said. “I started out with a five-minute radio show, and look where it’s led.” Julie Kendrick is a frequent contributor to Good Age and many other local publications. She lives in Minneapolis and blogs at kendrickworks.blogspot.com.

Senior Corps is seeking volunteers aged 55+ willing to help seniors as friendly visitors in their homes and for outings in the community OR to help kids in schools as mentors. Tax free stipend, travel reimbursement, and other benefits. Contact Melissa Grimmer at 651.310.9443 or Melissa.Grimmer@lssmn.org Senior Companion & Foster Grandparent GA 0916 H6.indd 1

8/8/16 12:05 PM

Distinctive Senior Living!

Welcome to Our Community of Neighbors Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring, living at Gramercy is a wonderful thing!

• Great location in the heart of Richfield within walking distance to everything you need. • Conveniently located across the street from beautiful Wood Lake Nature Center. • 1, 2 & 3 bedroom spacious homes with washer/dryer. Pet friendly. • Many social activities & amenities • Carefree lifestyle

Contact us

6711 Lake Shore Drive, Richfield, MN 55423 gramercylakeshore.com • 612.861.1378 Gramercy Park at Lake Shore Dr GA 0916 H4.indd 1

8/16/16 10:26 AM

Has a doctor told you that you have high blood pressure? Are you interested in taking part in a study investigating a new device-based system for high blood pressure? If you are between the ages of 18 and 75 years, have healthy kidneys as far as you know, would be willing to change your blood pressure medications for several weeks and make frequent hospital visits to have your blood pressure checked (possibly more than 10 visits in a year), then you may be a suitable candidate for this new device study. Contact Rose Peterson at 612-863-6051 or at Rose.Peterson@allina.com For further information visit: mplsheart.org/radiance-htn/ MPLS Heart Institute Foundation GA 0816 H4.indd 1

7/18/16 3:11/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 41


Housing resources • Memory care

• Assisted living

Auburn Homes & Services ••••

Auburn Homes and Services is a nonprofit organization serving seniors in the spirit of Christ’s love. 501 North Oak St Chaska 591 Cherry Dr Waconia 594 Cherry Dr Waconia 952-227-0494 auburnhomes.org

Augustana Care of Minneapolis •••• Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurant-style dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

Benedictine Health System ••••

Benedictine Health System is a missionbased, non-profit health system headquartered in Minnesota, sponsored by the Benedictine sisters of St. Scholastica Monastery in Duluth. BHS provides a full continuum of care services for aging adults, including independent housing, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and rehabilitation services. Benedictine Health Center at Innsbruck 651-633-1686 bhcinnsbruck.org Benedictine Health Center of Minneapolis 612-879-2800 bhcminneapolis.org Benedictine Senior Living at Steeple Pointe 763-425-4440 steeplepointe.org

42 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

• Independent housing

• Long term care

Cerenity Senior Care, St. Paul & White Bear Lake cerenityseniorcare.org Interlude Restorative Suites Fridley 763-230-3131 interluderestorativesuites.org Regina Senior Living Hastings 651-480-4333 regina-seniorliving.com St. Gertrude’s Health and Rehabilitation Center 952-233-4400 stgertrudesshakopee.org 1-800-833-7208 bhshealth.org

Carver County CDA •

Offers affordable independent living for adults 55 and better throughout Carver County including Chanhassen, Chaska, Waconia, and Norwood Young America. We offer Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. All properties are smoke free. 705 N Walnut St Chaska 952-448-7715 carvercda.org

City of South St. Paul, Housing Division •

The City of South St. Paul owns and manages 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for those 50+ years old. The rent is based on 30% of a tenant’s income. The building

• New construction

amenities include all utilities paid, an on-site caretaker, security building, after hours answering service, elevators, community room, resident activities & services, and laundry facilities. Call today to set up an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

Colonial Acres Health Care Center at Covenant Village of Golden Valley ••••

With Colonial Acres Health Care Center's convenient location right off Highway 100 and Duluth Street, we are the perfect location for all your health care needs. We have Skilled Nursing, Transitional Care/Rehab, Long Term Care, and Memory Care. Also on campus: Residential and Assisted Living options. 5825 St. Croix Ave N Golden Valley 763-732-1422 colonialacreshealthcarecenter.org

CommonBond Communities ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing


ADVERTISER LISTINGS

Gramercy Park Cooperative of St. Paul •

Nokomis Square Cooperative •

Lee Square Cooperative •

Oak Meadows •••

Gramercy 55+ cooperative housing combines the tax and equity advantages of home ownership with the convenience of community living. When you purchase a membership you have a vote and a voice in shaping your community. Everything at Gramercy is designed with you in mind. 5688 Brent Ave Inver Grove Heights 651-450-9851 gramercyinvergrove.org

The Lee Square Cooperative lifestyle offers you many exciting choices for convenient and carefree living in a congenial community! We offer 4 main floor plans, 6+ acre grounds with 1/3 mile walking path, 24-hour staffing, a beauty shop, programmed activities, Bible Study and more. Contact us for a tour today! 4400 36th Ave N Robbinsdale 763-522-5095 leesquarecooperative.com

Minnesota Masonic Home ••••

Minnesota Masonic Home is located on an historic 80-acre estate overlooking the Minnesota River Valley in Bloomington. We offer Independent Living, Assisted Living, Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care, Skilled Nursing Care, and Transitional Care/Rehab. Call to schedule a tour. 11501 Masonic Home Dr Bloomington 952-948-7000 mnmasonichomes.org

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. 5015 35th Ave S Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

Award winning Oak Meadows has an 18 year track record of providing excellent service and care to seniors and their families. We offer 48 assisted, 12 memory care and 62 independent apartments. Lifesprk provides 24/7 on-site homecare. 8131–8133 4th St N Oakdale 651-578-0676 oak-meadows.org

Salvation Army Booth Manor ••

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 one-bedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor

about the campus in St. Cloud, Monticello or Sartell, our philosophy remains the same; offer independence and choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters Now Open Showroom/Sales Office 320-654-2352 chateauwaters.com St. Cloud Senior Housing: 1810 Minnesota Blvd SE St. Cloud 320-203-2747 centracare.com Monticello Senior Housing: 1301 East 7th St Monticello 763-295-4051 centracare.com

The Residence at North Ridge •••• We offer the perfect mix of care, services and living options to ensure wellness and enrichment. Assisted Living, Independent Living, Adult Day Programs, Comprehensive Rehab Programs, Outpatient Rehab Therapy, On-site Child Care Program. Memory Care coming in early 2017. To learn more, please give us a call! 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope 763-592-3000

St. Benedict’s Senior Community ••• St. Benedict’s Senior Community is a leader in offering a wide range of housing options for those 62 and better. Whether speaking

Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 43


September Can’t-Miss Calendar

ONGOING

Chanhassen Concert Series →→The Andrews Sisters (Aug. 27), Johnny Cash (Sept. 9–10), MTV Unplugged (Sept. 17), the Eagles (Sept. 22–24), Frank Sinatra (Sept. 30–Oct. 1) and The Music of Martin Zellar of the Gear Daddies (Oct. 7–8). When: Dinner is at 6 p.m., followed by concerts at 8 p.m., except for Sunday events, which start earlier. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $40 per person and $15 more for dinner Info: chanhassendt.com

St. Paul Walking Tours →→Landmark Center guides will lead a variety of free tours highlighting the history of St. Paul. Photo by Bernadette Pollard

When: 10 a.m. on a rotating schedule of Wednesdays through September with themes such as Heart of the City, Rice Park and The Great River. Where: St. Paul Cost: Tours are free. Reservations are required. Info: landmarkcenter.org

Up and Down: The H.H.H. Metrodome Portfolio →→As the Minnesota Vikings and football fans celebrate the opening of U.S. Bank Stadium, this exhibit by photographer Mark E. Jensen looks back at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, Home to the Vikings from 1982 to 2013. Jensen documented the Metrodome’s construction from 1980-1982, using a large-format camera patented in 1898. In 2014, he photographed the stadium’s demolition. The resulting pairs of black and white photographs chronicle the Metrodome’s life — and 30 years of change in downtown Minneapolis.

Camelot

→→This beloved Lerner & Loewe production returns for the first time in 15 years. Follow the story of King Arthur and his knights adapted from T.H. White’s novel, The Once and Future King, featuring popular songs such as Camelot, The Lusty Month of May, If Ever I Would Leave You and I Wonder What the King Is Doing Tonight.

When: Sept. 30–Feb. 25. Preview performances run from Sept. 30–Oct. 6, followed by an official opening night on Oct. 7. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $65–$85 Info: chanhassendt.com

44 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Through Nov. 6 Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: Located in the museum’s Mill Commons, the exhibit is free and open to the public during regular museum hours. Info: millcitymuseum.org

Rise Up, O Men →→This brand-new musical comedy — the sixth production in the locally developed Church Basement Ladies series — features the men of the church and the woman who serve them. As these hard-working farmers


discuss their scrap lumber piles and the benefits of weld versus solder, they unintentionally disrupt the order of the kitchen. When: Through Nov. 13 and Jan. 5–April 8 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Renaissance Festival →→Immerse yourself in a 16th-century European village, featuring 12 stages of musicians, magicians, jugglers and mimes, including more than 500 engaging memorable characters. More than 250 artisans fill the festival marketplace to create a unique shopping experience, now in its 46th year. Themed weekends include Oktoberfest, Shamrocks & Shenanigans, Highland Fling and more.

When: Through Oct. 2, plus Monday, Sept. 5 (Labor Day) and Festival Friday, Sept. 30 Where: Seven miles south of Shakopee. The festival will move to a new home in 2020. Cost: $23.95; $14.95 for ages 5 to 12, $21.95 for ages 62 and older. Buy tickets online or at local stores to save money and avoid lines at the event. Info: renaissancefest.com

Thomas & Friends: Explore the Rails →→Take the grandkids to this popular hands-on exhibit designed to teach little engineers problem solving, mathematics, physics, spatial relations and time telling, too. When: Through late November Where: Minnesota Children’s Museum, St. Paul Cost: Admission is $9.95 for ages 1 and older. Info: mcm.org

Aug. 25–Sept. 5

Minnesota State Fair →→The Great Minnesota Get-Together is one of the largest and best-attended expositions in the world, attracting nearly 1.8 million visitors every year, showcasing Minnesota’s finest agriculture, horticulture, art and industry, plus carnival rides, games, live music and food vendors aplenty.

When: Aug. 25–Sept. 5. Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: Advanced tickets start at $10. Daily gate admission is $13 for ages 13–64; $11 for ages 5–12 and 65 and older; and free for ages 4 and younger. Seniors & Kids Day is Aug. 29 with gate admission reduced to $8 for ages 65 and older and ages 5 to 12. Seniors Day is Sept. 1 with $8 gate admission for ages 65 and older. Look online for information about library, military and other discount days. Info: mnstatefair.org

Sept. 9–11

Taste of Greece →→Sample authentic Greek food and handmade desserts and enjoy live music, dancing, church tours and a Greek boutique at this annual festival with proceeds benefiting charitable organizations. When: Sept. 9–11 Where: St. Mary’s Greek Orthodox Church, Minneapolis Cost: Admission is free. Food tickets are $1 each. Festivalgoers are encouraged to bring three non-perishable food items to receive two free food tickets. Info: mplsgreekfest.org

Sept. 15

The Power of Purpose →→Join Richard Leider as he discusses the importance of identifying individual purpose in life. Leider, known as The Purpose Coach, is a bestselling author and international speaker. His books include The Power of Purpose, Repacking Your Bags, Life Reimagined and Work Reimagined. This is the fourth-annual speaker event organized by the local Lifetime of Learning Task Force.

When: 7 p.m. Sept. 15 Where: Armstrong High School, Plymouth Cost: FREE. Donations of new hygiene products will be accepted for Kody’s Closet. See kodyscloset.org for more information. Info: alifetimeoflearning.org

Sept. 16–18

St. Paul Oktoberfest →→Enjoy beers, bratwurst and authentic German cuisine at this annual event, including the centuries-old German traditions of bed races, polka, strongman competitions and, of course, beer songs and games. When: Sept. 16–18 Where: Rice Park, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: saintpauloktoberfest.org

Sept. 17

Wild Rice Festival →→Celebrate wild rice — including Minnesota’s harvest season and Native American culture — at this annual festival, featuring activities, educational presentations, engaging exhibits and food trucks. View historical vignettes, including a replica tipi with representative artifacts of traditional Dakotah life as well as honey-extraction and cider-pressing demonstrations. When: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sept. 17 Where: Harriet Alexander Nature Center, Roseville Cost: FREE Info: wildricefestival.org

Excelsior Apple Day →→This Lake Minnetonka street festival features live music and local art, crafts, food vendors and a kids’ corner, plus a pie-eating contest, a wine and beer garden that opens at 1 p.m. and an old fashioned street dance in the evening. When: 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Sept. 17 Where: Downtown Excelsior Cost: FREE Info: excelsiorlakeminnetonkachamber.com

Sept. 24

Museum Day Live! →→Smithsonian magazine’s annual event includes free admission to many museums nationwide, including more than a dozen Minnesota museums, such as The Works in Bloomington, Pavek Museum of Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / 45


Can’t-Miss Calendar

Home Tour

→→Explore 17 new and remodeled homes, all designed by registered members of the American Institute of ArchitectsMinnesota. This ninth-annual self-guided tour features a range of project sizes, styles, techniques, budgets and neighborhoods throughout the Twin Cities.

When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sept. 17–18 Where: Twin Cities Cost: Advance tickets may be purchased online or at AIA-Minnesota for $15 (until noon on Friday, Sept. 16). They will also be available at each home during the tour for $20. Info: homesbyarchitects.org

Broadcasting in St. Louis Park, Bell Museum of Natural History in Minneapolis and Gibbs Farm in St. Paul. When: Sept. 24 Where: Go to smithsonianmag.com/museumdaylive to see a list of participating Minnesota museums. Cost: FREE. Downloadable tickets, good for two people each, are required. Info: smithsonianmag.com/museumday

Sept. 25

Czech and Slovak Festival →→Experience the sights, sounds and flavors of Czech, Slovak, Bohemian and Moravian cultures at this annual festival with live music, ethnic food and beer, folk dance performances, children’s games, craft booths and more. When: 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Sept. 25

46 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Where: CSPS Hall, 383 Michigan St., St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: sokolmn.org

Sept. 30

Celtic Thunder →→This international singing sensation will deliver a mix of lively and upbeat songs, including A Place in The Choir, Galway Girl and Raggle Taggle Gypsy, that represent the fun-loving nature of the Irish, along with slower, classic ballads such as Danny Boy, Noreen


and Buachaille On Eirne.

When: 8 p.m. Sept. 30 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $43.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

COMING UP

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions →→This nationally touring event will showcase gymnasts from the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games plus local gymnasts.

Out-of-pocket medical costs shouldn’t keep you from getting the healthcare you need.

Enabling Minnesota Medicare recipients to get the care they need by bridging the financial gap between Medicare coverage and medical bills. FREE screening with no obligation.

Call today to talk to someone about Senior Partners Care 952-767-0665 Senior Community Services GA 0816 H6.indd 1

7/14/16 10:35 AM

When: 5 p.m. Oct. 9 Where: Target Center, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $36. Info: kelloggstour.com

SUN-DAMAGED SKIN?

BT5K

ROUGH, RED SPOTS ACTINIC KERATOSES??

→→This second-annual event benefits the American Brain Tumor Association and its mission to provide resources to those diagnosed with brain tumors and also fund research to extend, and someday save, the lives of those impacted by brain tumors, which affect all ages.

Minnesota Clinical Study Center is evaluating an investigational topical medication for patients with Actinic Keratosis We need research study participants who: · Are 18 years or older · Have AK spots on the scalp

Qualified research study participants will receive: · Study-related examinations by a Board Certified Dermatologist and investigational medication at no charge · Compensation for time and travel

When: 9 a.m. Oct. 15 Where: Como Lake, St. Paul Cost: $35 for adult, $20 for children Info: BT5K.org

If you are interested, please call today to find out more.

An Evening with Gordon Lightfoot →→Considered by many as Canada’s greatest songwriter, Lightfoot — perhaps most famous in Minnesota for his chilling tune, The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald — will be performing from his vast catalog that spans five decades. When: 7 p.m. Oct. 16 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $48.50–$58.50 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

Phone: 763-502-2941

Steven Kempers, M.D.

MN Clinical Study Center GA 0916 H4.indd 1

8/4/16 4:47 PM

27th Annual Pumpkin Patch Festival Nelson Family Farm, Litchfield, MN

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com.

Weekends & MEA

Sept. 24th–Oct. 30th MEA: Oct. 20th–23rd Saturdays & MEA 11am–5pm Sundays 12pm–5pm Nelson Farm MNP 0916 H4.indd 1

Visit Our Website For Special Events, Activities, Daily Schedule and Admission Fee

NelsonFarm.com 320-693-7750

8/16/16 3:55/PM Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 47


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search GRANDPARENTING ANCESTORS BELOVED CAREGIVERS CARING COOKIES ELDERS FAMILY

GENERATION HERITAGE HISTORY KINDNESS MATURE NANA PAPA

POP SAGE SPOILED STORYTELLERS SUPPORTIVE TRADITION WISDOM

Y

F

A

M

I

L

Y

U

N

B

U

S

M

E

E

R

E

C

S

B

A

S

R

A

T

T

U

H

V

L

O

G

A

D

E

P

P

O

C

O

Q

J

V

I

D

T

A

T

N

O

I

T

A

R

E

N

E

G

T

E

S

S

O

I

H

S

K

Y

P

M

S

E

Y

R

R

I

R

L

H

F

W

T

O

A

X

R

R

T

O

S

H

E

E

G

E

E

I

T

O

N

X

G

K

P

K

D

Q

G

V

L

R

U

S

O

C

G

G

O

P

I

U

C

Y

L

I

R

I

I

D

N

X

P

U

U

N

C

A

E

N

E

G

T

T

I

O

O

P

H

S

D

B

R

D

U

O

I

E

R

A

P

M

S

A

V

N

Cryptogram

S

P

O

T

D

C

A

R

U

G

C

F

V

L

E

Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

U

G

Q

A

M

C

Q

D

A

U

E

Y

X

N

S

J

G

R

Z

N

A

J

O

F

C

S

G

H

E

S

Source: Sam Levenson

T

T

T

D

E

V

O

L

E

B

G

J

F

M

K

A

N

A

N

A

N

C

E

S

T

O

R

S

K

G

Clue: T = E ,

A J T

V E P Q E

R A H J N T K L

L A R ,

T U T J

Word Scramble

L E T

Complete the following three words using each given letter once.

Q E P D I

AT

, Q O J

A F T M O L T ,

P K

T

IARC R

RM H

A

H A

IR

AMAR M

C

2. 7 percent (5 million children)

K P W F D T K L

1. 824

L E T

I

. O

N M O J I F O M T J L .

3. 48

Q O D D T I

TRIVIA

Answers 48 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Come and check out the contemporary center in the heart of downtown Minneapolis. Trivia GRAND STANDING

SKYWAY SENIOR CENTER

1. The record for most living descendants belongs to Pennsylvanian Samuel S. Mast. How many children and grandchildren (including great- and great-great) did he have when he died at age 96? 2. What percentage of kids in the U.S. are being raised by their grandparents? 3. What is the average age of a U.S. grandparent?

950 Nicollet Mall, Suite 290 (Target/Retek Building) Stop in Monday-Friday 9am–3pm minneapolismn.gov/health/seniors Call 612.370.3869 to get the free newsletter Skyway Senior Center GA 2016 filler H6.indd 1

5/26/16 1:00 PM

A simple, dignified alternative to the traditional funeral. Cremation is the cost-conscious, environmentally concerned alternative to traditional burial. $1595 for Basic Cremation.

17 Convenient Locations Serving the Metropolitan Area

Source: Grandparents.com

Minnesota Cremation & Memorial Society 2301 Dupont Avenue S., Minneapolis, MN 55405

mncremation.com

For FREE (no obligation) Brochure Call 612-789-4345 Today Washburn McReavy - MN Cremation Society GA 0914 H4.indd 2

8/11/14 4:07 PM

SUDOKU Matriarch, Armchair, Tamari

WORD SCRAMBLE

Volunteer WITH A PAYCHECK SEEKING CAREGIVERS...

Right at Home is seeking caring, kind and compassionate caregivers whose calling is to make a difference in the lives of others. Working with Right at Home is an opportunity for people who want to have meaningful employment that is dedicated to improving the quality of life for others. If you enjoy flexibility in your schedule, then Right at Home is Right for You. Part-time. Weekday. Weekend. Evenings. Right at Home can create a schedule that works with the demands of your day-to-day activities. Use your existing skills and experiences to provide a daily positive impact and improve the quality of life for someone else.

Apply Online at: www.rah-tc.net/employment or Call 612-284-1857 Right at Home GA 0916 H4.indd 2

8/18/16 3:09 Minnesota Good Age / September 2016 / PM 49

CROSSWORD

Answers

The simplest toy, one which even the youngest child can operate, is called a grandparent.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword 68 Hand-me-down 69 It’s often spoken with one hand at the edge of one’s mouth

ACROSS

36 Sailor’s pronoun

1 Stage segments

37 Company with a crocodile logo

5 Apiece

41 Pitching stat

9 Fur fighters, initially

42 Banks on some magazine covers

13 Revealed

44 Golfer Woosnam

15 Slushy treat

45 Spikes

16 Lumberjack

47 Strike site

17 “Lone Survivor” actor Hirsch

51 Insect that may live for 17 years

18 Strike site

54 Live-in helper

20 LBJ, for one

55 Psychologist May

21 Champs-Élysées sights

56 Date bk. listings

23 Shady garden denizen

58 Peeples of “Walker, Texas Ranger”

24 Go through again

60 Strike site

26 Counter alternatives

62 Unspoiled spots

27 Strike site

64 Vikings’ home: Abbr.

30 Signature scent since 1968

65 Opinion

31 Place for an anvil

66 Mournful music

32 Works at Museo del Prado

67 Get too much sun

50 / September 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

DOWN 1 Retired 2 Resisting being taken? 3 Academic term 4 Poivre’s tablemate 5 Statue of Liberty architect 6 One of 640 in a square mile 7 Top suits 8 Tom’s mate 9 Lummox 10 Live and breathe 11 Mahler’s last symphony 12 Fields 14 Loudness measure 19 God with a hammer 22 Co-star of Burt in “The Killers” 25 Author Harper 26 D.C. : Metro :: S.F. : __ 27 Nonpareil 28 Téa of “Madam Secretary” 29 Strasbourg step 33 They’re often found in dens 34 Forest age indicators 35 “Duck soup!” 38 Electronics brand relaunched in 2015 39 19-time All-Star Ripken 40 Went by 43 Rock-clinging mollusk 46 __ carte 48 Have too much, briefly 49 Took a snooze 50 Inner, as a feeling 51 Bit of Hansel’s trail 52 Land of ancient Asia Minor 53 Toast-making sound 56 Cries of discovery 57 Elbow 59 “I’d hate to break up __” 61 Good name for a cook? 63 Guacamole, e.g.


With more than 3,600 courses and new ones being added every week, you could learn something new every day for the next several years from the comfort of your own living room! These courses and video tutorials are FREE. Have your library card barcode handy and visit melsa.org/Lynda to link to a metro public library website. Start learning something new today!

Twitter

Design

Web

Photography

Education

Facebook

Video

Audio + Music

Pinterest

September 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you