Page 1

AUGUST 2017

BBQ magic

Famous Dave is back with a second barbecue venture, plus a new role with his old namesake PAGE 32

LIFE AFTER CAREGIVING PAGE 18

WHY YOU NEED TO SEE DETROIT PAGE 20

AVOIDING SENIOR SCAMS PAGE 28

ZUCCHINI FRITTERS PAGE 30


Contents Visitors to Belle Isle Park, can rent kayaks, canoes, pedal boats and stand-up paddle boards. Photo by Vito Palmisano

20 32

→ On the cover The king of ’que: Famous Dave Anderson is back with a second barbecue venture, plus a new role with his old namesake. Photos by Robb Long rlimaging.com

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38 Can’t-Miss Calendar 40 Brain Teasers 6 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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Memories 12 A pilot gives us a glimpse into an experience in a NASA simulator. This Month in MN History 14 Why does Minnesota have two state constitutions?

Good Health Wellness 16 The truth about what’s really in your store-bought orange juice. Caregiving 18 A ‘re-entry’ group provides support for caregivers after loss.

Good Living Housing 26 Senior housing won’t accept us with teenagers still in the house?

In the Kitchen 30 Don’t give your excess zucchini away! Try this flavorful recipe.

Finance 28 Been a victim of a scam? Why you should report it.

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Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 36 / Issue 8 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Darryl Dahlheimer Wendell Fowler, Carol Hall Jessica Kohen, Robb Long Dave Nimmer, Carla Waldemar Warren Wolfe Creative Director Valerie Moe Graphic Designers Dani Cunningham Kaitlin Ungs Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

The man behind the BBQ Famous Dave is all around us

— his restaurants (from Uptown to the burbs); on the street (with catering vans emblazoned with that smiling pink piglet); at Costco and Menards, where Famous Dave’s pickles and barbecue sauce are available by the gallon; and even on the radio with commercials inviting us to indulge in ribs. But who exactly is this man — and longtime Minnesota icon — otherwise known as Dave Anderson? It turns out, he’s a truly fascinating guy, who Photo by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com until recently had completely cut ties with his namesake barbecue chain — a struggling enterprise, yet an American institution. So where is America’s Rib King now? He’s actually reunited with Famous Dave’s (serving as a brand consultant and ambassador). And he’s opened a brand new chain of fast-casual restaurants, under the name of Old Southern Barbecue, an homage to his Oklahoma-born father, Jimmie. In this issue, Dave gets personal about his life’s triumphs and struggles, too. I was surprised to learn Minnesota’s most famous foodie served during the George W. Bush administration as assistant secretary of the Department of the Interior for Indian Affairs, responsible for a $2 billion budget and 10,000 employees. And that’s in addition to numerous other government, tribal, nonprofit and corporate positions in which he thrived. (And did you know Dave’s very first business was a floral operation in Chicago?) These days, Dave’s coming full circle back to his entrepreneurial roots to compete in a thriving Twin Cities restaurant scene, including more than 50 barbecue restaurants. Like any good businessman, however, Dave has reinvented himself time after time. I hope both his barbecue endeavors can thrive. Dave — who at 64 has lived through enough to know — believes if there’s a will, there’s a way: “There isn’t anything that can’t be overcome if you never, ever give up on your dreams.” And, indeed, Famous Dave is proof of that.


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer ⊳⊳ Dave Nimmer and Will Wallace meet up at Broadway Pizza in North Minneapolis.

Man on the street →→Will Wallace works to steer young men away from gangster life toward a new path

St. Paul and Minneapolis officials have spent time and

resources this summer to curtail gang-related crime and violence. I would argue that one of the best weapons is my friend Will Wallace, a former Gangster Disciple who’s preaching a gospel of love, not violence, to dozens of young gangsters and wannabes. What he’s offering is patience, respect, training, jobs and support through the North 4 program at Emerge. Officially, the program provides training, employment and counseling for at-risk youth. Unofficially, Wallace is the program’s on-call mentor, part-time father and sometimes spiritual confessor. As an unabashed liberal, I’m sometimes troubled by social programs with lofty goals and great mission statements. Often they have too many people behind desks writing reports and too few on the streets finding kids. Wallace is a street guy. He knows how to find the young brothers. He knows how to listen. He knows what to say. Part of his message is simple: Keep doing what you’re doing (drugging and dealing) and your world will be small. Your troubles will grow. Your peace will be gone. Your life will be short. The alternative, he admits, isn’t easy. Come in (from the streets). Get trained. Go to work. Stay at it. And think about going back to school.

Finding a way out Wallace’s life is one heck of an example. He went from a life of slinging drugs and running wild to working hard and standing tall. In the early ’90s, he came under the influence of Bobby Hickman, a teacher and 10 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

counselor at The City, an alternative school where Wallace graduated. That’s where I met him when I took my broadcast reporting students (when I taught journalism at the University of St. Thomas) to talk with students and staff who lived a life far different from the Tommies. One day, Wallace came over to St. Thomas and announced he wanted to go to college. He took a summer remedial course and enrolled as a freshman in 1997. He worked full-time, went to class and raised a family. He lasted two years before being placed on academic probation, a victim of beginning German and shrinking resources. “I learned a lot in two years,” Wallace recalled, “including the history of my people. Until I took a history course, I never knew of the underground slave railroad.” A few years ago, Wallace brought a dozen of his Emerge young men over to the St. Thomas campus where books and classes rule the day. “Some of my guys,” Wallace said, “had never been across the bridge from Lake Street to Marshall Avenue.” In his first stint at Emerge, Wallace reached out to 113 young men. All of them stayed alive, half of them got jobs and seven of them went to college. He left Emerge to work in a school

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

⊳⊳ Inside the cockpit of NASA’s first space shuttle simulator was a dizzying wall of controls. Though the simulator was bolted to the floor, today modern airliner simulators move on hydraulic actuators. Photos courtesy of Ron Kenmir

Space flight! →→A retired Northwest Airlines pilot recalls his adventures in NASA’s first shuttle simulator

All airline pilots “fly the simulator” once a year as part of their recur-

rent ground training. An exact mock-up of an airliner cockpit, the simulator presents realistic emergency situations for the pilot to control. Retired Northwest Airlines Capt. Ron Kenmir once “flew” in a very different kind of simulator. Carol: What, when and where, Ron? Ron: The NASA Space Shuttle simulator — 1979 — the Rockwell International facility in Downey, California, just south of Los Angeles. C: Was this the simulator for the space planes used in the Columbia, Challenger, Atlantis, Discovery and Endeavor missions? R: That’s the one, alright.

C: Surely not just anyone would be allowed this privilege. How’dja pull it off? R: The invitation came through my dad, who also was a pilot but who was unable to use it himself. Having flown Northwest military charters to Vietnam, I had the required high-level security clearance. And I was on a long airline layover in Los Angeles. C: I imagine once inside the Rockwell facility you had to go through layers of security? R: Well, actually, a man wearing a big Texas floppy-brimmed hat — and chewing on an unlit cigar — came looking for me. He stuck out his hand and said, “Howdy, I’m 12 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

the chief research pilot for the program.” I can’t recall his actual name, but at that moment he became “Tex” to me. C: Tex sounds like Slim Pickens from the movie Dr. Strangelove. R: Well, it just gets better. Loping over to the simulator room, he said, “C’mon in.” And there it stood — the eerie big box containing man’s latest tech shrine. Once inside it, with Tex in the left seat and I the right, he spun his index finger to the ceiling at three waiting men, wearing white coats, and shouted, “OK guys, let’s take her for a spin!” With that, instrument flags disappeared. A symphony of clicks and hums came from the myriad panels in front of us. And — bingo! — we were tipped upside down, and going backwards in orbit, virtually! C: Wow! How did that feel? R: It’s a thrill that’s hard to explain, except to say that I felt freed from the earth as it got smaller and I watched our speed displayed in feet per second. C: Describe the return to earth. R: Tex fired the reentry jets and twisted the joystick on his left. Noticing the


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It’s a thrill that’s hard to explain, except to say that I felt freed from the Earth as it got smaller and I watched our speed displayed in feet per second. primary instrument cross-hairs were not precisely centered, I said, “Don’t you have to be more accurate than that?” “Nah, not at this altitude. It just doesn’t matter,” he replied, dashing my expectation of cutting-edge science precision! C: What happened next? R: Tex got precise coming through 250,000 feet. And then, abruptly, the ride was over. I’d entered God’s playground. I’d flown copilot inside the highest pinnacle of man’s longest reach to the stars! I’d done it! I flew in space! C: Has anything since topped the thrill of space flight? R: Well, as a matter of fact, that very evening, I attended a movie premiere for star Laurence Olivier, thanks to an invitation from some Hollywood friends. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Jessica Kohen ⊳⊳ Rep. Joe Rolette, a fur trader and politician during Minnesota’s highly partisan territorial era of the 1850s, purposely disappeared from the legislature with a bill to move the capital from St. Paul to St. Peter, thus preventing a vote before the session ended.

In the 1850s, the people of the Minnesota Territory framed and adopted a constitution, a necessary step in being granted statehood by the federal government, a process that took about 18 months. While the journey to statehood moved relatively quickly, it was anything but civil.

Early government

A divided territory →→Minnesota’s earliest lawmakers were so at odds, they ended up submitting two state constitutions

On Aug. 29, 1857, members of Minnesota’s Republican and Demo-

cratic parties, refusing to sign their names next to one another on the new state constitution, instead signed their own copies. As a result, today Minnesota has two state constitutions, identical in words and meaning, if not in handwriting and signatures. 14 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

The Minnesota Territory was established in 1849, and during that time the governor, secretary and judges were appointed by the President and were members of the Whig and Democrat parties. They governed largely from the older established towns of Stillwater, St. Anthony and St. Paul. The legislature, by contrast, was elected by the people, and large-scale immigration in the 1850s brought many new arrivals from anti-slavery northern states, who settled south and east of the Minnesota River around St. Peter and New Ulm. These farmers firmly supported the values of the nascent Republican party. The Republicans were largely antislavery, while the Democrats were not. Some Democrats who opposed slavery left the party to join the Republicans. The Whigs were largely split over the issue, which is one reason why the party fell apart leading up to the Civil War. Other important issues in the 1850s included forming the future state’s boundaries, securing valuable federal land grants to construct railroads and determining


⊳ Minnesota has two nearly identical state constitutions, due to conflicts between Democrats and Republicans, who refused to sign the same document. Photos courtesy of Minnesota Historical Society

where to locate the state capital. Discussions in the legislature became quite heated and even involved subterfuge: During one debate about the location of the capital, Rep. Joe Rolette, a Democrat, disappeared from the legislature with a bill in hand that would have moved the capital from St. Paul to St. Peter. He made a point of not returning with the document until it was too late to pass any more bills.

Partisan bickering With the rapid growth of Republican voters moving into the state, Democratic territorial leaders decided to move quickly to establish statehood. In December 1856, Democrat Henry M. Rice, a delegate to the U.S. Congress, drafted a bill that enabled Minnesota to adopt a constitution, organize a government and become a state in the Union. The bill, however, provided boundaries for Minnesota that favored the interests of St. Paul, St. Anthony and Stillwater. From that point on, political events — including the work of drafting a new Minnesota Constitution — developed almost entirely along party lines. As July 13, 1857, drew near — the day for the opening of the constitutional convention — tensions mounted. Democrats were accused of tampering

with the clock in the chamber of the House of Representatives to keep Republicans from participating in the opening day of the convention. Meanwhile, Republican delegates — who had gathered before the convention was set to start — rebuffed Democrats who, upon their arrival, tried to take control.

Modeled after other states From that point on, the two factions worked independently to craft a state constitution. Working for six weeks in separate rooms of the territorial capitol, the lawmakers largely took inspiration from other state constitutions, especially those from New York, Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. Concerns continued to grow over the separate working groups. Many worried about violent reactions if two constitutions were submitted to Minnesota voters. In addition, Congress might refuse or delay admission of the new state to the Union if the two sides couldn’t agree. In early August, both sides appointed five members to a conference committee that would meet in secret to work out a compromise. By Aug. 24, the committee members had deadlocked, mainly over the question of whether to open suffrage to non-whites. The tension reached a breaking point when, on Aug. 25, former territorial Gov. Willis A. Gorman attacked Republican Thomas Wilson with his cane. Wilson rose to use his own cane on Gorman, and the two were separated. Both were asked to

The tension reached a breaking point when former territorial Gov. Willis A. Gorman attacked Republican Thomas Wilson with his cane. Wilson rose to use his own cane on Gorman, and the two were separated.

leave, and a compromise constitution was soon completed.

Divided until the end Despite the agreements reached, some members of each party refused to recognize the validity of the other and wouldn’t sign the same document. As a concession, two groups of copyists worked late on Friday, Aug. 28 to create two copies of the compromise constitution for each party to sign. The versions differ somewhat in punctuation, spelling and in other minor respects, but are otherwise the same. Later that fall, on Oct. 13, voters ratified the constitutions. The following spring, on May 11, 1858, Congress admitted Minnesota as the 32nd state of the Union. Jessica Kohen is the media relations manager for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 15


Good Health / Wellness / By Wendell Fowler

Not so fresh →→Unless you’re OK with flavor packs being added to your orange juice, squeeze your own

Orange juice holds a high position in the pantheon of American

breakfast icons. However, is it truthfully fresh or are you getting jerked around? Ads tell us it’s pure and natural, so we obediently buy the orange nectar for the sentiment. Nevertheless, much of the orange juice on the market isn’t fresh or even domestic with half of all orange juice in the world produced in Brazil. Keep in mind, two of America’s most popular OJ brands are owned by beverage giants PepsiCo and Coca-Cola. According to a New York Times interview with Alissa Hamilton — a fellow with the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and the author of Squeezed: What You Don’t Know About Orange Juice — the largest fabricators of “not from concentrate” or pasteurized orange juice keep juice in million-gallon aseptic storage tanks to ensure a year-round supply. This storage method strips the sun-blessed ambrosial nectar of vital oxygen, so the juice doesn’t oxidize in tank farms, where juice loiters for up to a year.

Chemical fragrances Shopping at a whole foods grocery, I noticed an orange juice label touting, “No flavor pack added.” Interest piqued, my research began. OJ drinkers, you’ve been hoodwinked about what you’re actually drinking. Big brands touting their product as “pure and simple,” add 16 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

flavor packs to make it fresh again. ABC News reports that flavor packs are fabricated from chemicals that make up orange essence oil. Flavor and fragrance houses that create high-end perfume break down orange essence oils into their constituent chemicals then reassemble the individual chemicals in configurations resembling nothing in God’s nature. Lip-smackin’ ethyl butyrate is one of the other charming chemicals found in high concentrations in flavor packs. Flavor engineers discovered it imparts a fragrance Americans associate with fresh squeezed.

Make your own One company in recent years reformulated its healthy-heart juice by adding fish oil and fish gelatin for added omega 3 fatty acids — OJ meets sardines. Food Renegade.com weighed in: “The food industry follows its own logic because of the economies of scale. What works for you in your kitchen when making a glass or two of juice, simply won’t work when trying to process thousands upon thousands of gallons of the stuff.” It’s time to return to a pre-industrial revolution mentality. If half the world can, why can’t we? Score a juicer and properly nourish your body with fresh deliciousness. Or better yet, just eat an entire orange, pulp and all. Chef Wendell Fowler is a syndicated food columnist and the author of  Eat Right Now: The End of Mindless Eating.


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Good Health / Caregiving / By Warren Wolfe ⊳⊳ Former caregivers meet at a Roseville church for a support group organized by the new Dementia Caregiver Re-Entry Initiative.

Life after caregiving →→A new ‘re-entry’ support group helps caregivers whose loved ones suffered from dementia

George lost his wife two years ago to dementia and still misses Annie

deeply — her companionship, her voice, her touch, even the endless tasks that gave his life meaning as he brought her peace and comfort in a world she no longer understood. Marian’s husband died four years ago, and even though “he is now at peace” — after dementia led him deep into disruptive behavior — her calmer life also includes difficult times of aloneness, despite attentive friends and family. “The worst is at night. Holidays are great with my kids, but I come home to an empty house,” she said. “I’m learning how to be comfortable with myself, but that takes time.” George and Marian are among about 15 Roseville-area residents who for the past 10 months have been gathering in two groups to explore how to re-engage with life and better care for themselves after years of caring for someone with dementia.

Laughter and tears The Dementia Caregiver Re-Entry Initiative includes one group that welcomes former caregivers and current ones nearing the end of their journey. It meets on the first Wednesday of each month at the Roseville Area Senior Center. A second group, reserved for former caregivers, meets on the third Tuesday monthly at New Life Presbyterian Church in Roseville. Four or five participants often attend both groups, which meet from 1 to 2:30 p.m. At the gatherings, emotions sometimes are raw as participants talk about lost physical intimacy; shattered retirement plans; and careers or volunteer work lost due to caregiving. 18 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

But there’s also laughter — and delight in new-found physical fitness, planting flowers, visiting relatives, stretching into new friendships, adapting recipes, resuming hobbies and even the idea of dating. Each group has two co-facilitators who cared for parents with dementia. Most participants were in support groups during caregiving. Only a few current caregivers have attended, and most participants are widowed. “I may suggest a topic, but those who come know what they need to talk about,” said Sue Van Zanden, a co-facilitator who also leads a caregiver support group at the senior center. “Mainly my job is to open the door and get out of the way.” “It helps to talk with people who understand what you’re going through,” said Ed, whose wife died two years ago after a decade of decline with dementia. “My kids care. My friends care. But nobody who hasn’t lived it really knows how hard that time was, and how hard it is to find a new path.”

How it all began The idea for the Dementia Caregiver Re-Entry Initiative came about two years ago, when Sheryl Fairbanks — struggling to figure out “Who am I now?” after a decade of intense caregiving for her mom with dementia and her dad with physical issues — attended a few national meetings with aging experts, seeking a re-entry support program she could replicate, but found none.


So she and three colleagues created their own new program with the Roseville Alzheimer’s and Dementia Community Action Team (RSVL A/D), a volunteer group she joined in 2014. They introduced the concept at a community forum in September 2016, and monthly meetings began in October. While the initiative focuses primarily on former dementia caregivers, the model also could serve other care partners, said Lori La Bey, a co-facilitator whose three decades of caring for her mom led her to start the online Alzheimer’s Speaks blog and podcast, and Minnesota’s first memory cafe. (A memory cafe is a safe and comfortable space where caregivers and their loved ones can socialize, listen to music, play games and enjoy other appropriate activities. Find locations at memorycafedirectory.com.) Thanks to La Bey and other groups, an increasing number of caregivers are learning they don’t have to feel isolated because of their challenging caregiving journeys. ⊲⊲ In November, La Bey will lead people with dementia and their families on a Caribbean cruise combining relaxation and education. ⊲⊲ On Nov. 9, Dementia Caregiver Re-Entry Initiative support group participants will describe their experiences at a Caring & Coping series talk — and will post tips on forming similar groups at cityofroseville. com/dementiainfo. Warren Wolfe is retired Star Tribune reporter who covered aging and health-care policy. He’s a member of the RSVL A/D and a co-facilitator of a caregiver re-entry group.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 19


TRAVEL

Comeback C omeback cit cityy Detroit’s post-Recession renaissance offers travelers delightful dining, art, music, architecture and recreation BY CARLA WALDEMAR

20 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Detroit, a 1.5-hour flight or a 12-hour drive from the Twin Cities, has rebounded with gusto from the Great Recession.

T

his just in: Among urban getaways, Detroit is the new black — as in “in the black” again and ready for prime time. The red ink of its headliner bankruptcy crisis has faded, thanks to civic heroes and everyday folks who refused to let their city die. The new Detroit is a hustling, can-do city, sporting vibrant downtown towers; a light rail line and a new multipurpose stadium set to open this year (Little

Caesars Arena), adjoining the fields of glory of the Tigers and Lions; a festive, four-mile Riverwalk; and a recent designation as a UNESCO City of Design — the first in the U.S. to win that honor. Eye-stopping design is just in Detroit’s DNA. Take a gander at the facades, outdoor sculptures and mighty murals that fuel the city’s public arts on a free architectural walking tour offered by Detroit Experience Factory, which ▷ Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 21


Comeback C omeback cit cityy “looks at the city through the lens of art and design,” said our guide Isabelle Weiss, who reminds visitors ogling those fab facades that “During the ’20s, Detroit was the wealthiest city in the country.” (Thanks, auto industry.) Result: A skyline of towers whose owners threw money at starchitects to erect something bigger, better. Everybody’s favorite is the Guardian Building, a flamboyant Mayan Revival Deco wonderland blazing with mosaics, murals and stunning geometry, constructed in 1929. (Bonus: Today its interior hosts a Made in Detroit gift shop, offering everything from Motown recordings to messenger bags made of recycled seat belts.)

Seeing the city Campus Martius, downtown’s outdoor living room, features fountains, a faux beach, lawn, a bandstand and picnic benches — and an adjoining block of public basketball courts backed by murals designed “for people who’d never visit a gallery.” That’s true also for the “secret” alley called The Belt, squeezed

between two parking ramps, all of which are dressed in vivid murals; bystanders can often watch the artists paint. Downtown’s above-street People Mover train stations all sport murals unique to their neighborhoods, too. (Pay 75 cents for a 20-minute loop ride.) Then it’s off to the Riverwalk, where outdoor sculptures erupt (along with an antique cannon, aimed at Canada across the river, just in case). Follow the broad promenade past welcoming Adirondack chairs, volleyball courts, a marina and food trucks to a carousel, whose bobbing saddles sit atop Midwestern critters, such as walleye and heron.

No longer a ghost town How did this renaissance happen, so soon after suburban flight turned downtown into a ghost town? Well, local leaders didn’t wait around for mega-grants and lengthy studies. They just went ahead and did things. Jeanette Pierce, executive director of the Detroit Experience Factory, said: “It’s due to a development philosophy of ‘lighter, quicker, cheaper’ that got swift (and award-worthy) results.” Even the city’s venerable Eastern Market — at 125 years old and 250 vendors, the oldest and largest in the country — has caught the fever. Its buildings also flaunt flamboyant murals. Linda Yellin, of Feet on the Street tours, leads the curious and hungry on a belt-busting trek (“Come hungry, leave happy”) that includes Supino’s Pizza, On the Rise Bakery and DeVries’ Cheese Shop, ▷ Detroit’s Eastern Market is one of the oldest and largest year-round markets in the U.S. Photo by Bill Bowen


Detroit’s People Mover is a fun way to see the city. Photo by Vito Palmisano

Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 23


Comeback C omeback cit cityy with a frozen finale of Mootown’s ice cream. Neighborhoods are fast-renewing, too. Corktown, once home to penniless Irish immigrants, has emerged from it gritty roots as a hot new center of urban hip. Today it’s flush with vintage shops, bars and cafes like Slows BAR BQ with its hours-long line and Two James distillery (tours and samples). Steve Johnson’s Motor City Brew Tours stops in Corktown, too, among many other neighborhoods, such as Midtown — another revival success, drawing the “Eds and Meds” of nearby Wayne State U and Detroit’s premier hospital. Top shops lead off with Shinola, whose home base here peddles its legendary bikes, leather goods and watches at prices that call for a second mortgage, along with must-haves such as designer thumbtacks and hand-crafted string. Across the street, City Bird and Nest supply the “yoga and yogurt” crowd’s cravings, whetted by Motor City Brewing Works and HopCat pub.

Art and music, too Midtown also boasts two of the city’s top three attractions, leading off with the Detroit Institute of Art. Yes, that museum, where city fathers not so long ago threatened to sell off its masterpieces to solve the city’s debt. Didn’t happen. It still boasts all its rock stars, including Breughel, della Robbia, Fra Angelico and Rembrandt. But the piece — THE piece — everyone views slack-jawed with wonder is Diego Rivera’s 1932 room, a workingman’s Sistine Chapel whose four walls of murals showcase Detroit’s achievements, noting inventions good (smallpox vaccine) and bad (bomb development), culminating in the story of the Ford Motor Plant. (See if you can spot Edsel’s portrait. Diego’s too.) Nearby, Motown celebrates the infectious story of how young black artists like Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye got their start in this recording studio. But you want your music live, you say? Try the lineup at the gorgeous former movie houses of the Roaring Twenties, the Fox and the Fillmore. Or head to the Majestic, a burger-joint-turnedbowling-alley with nightly jazz. Or Bert’s, in Eastern Market, to get down with wings and ribs around the performance stage.

The Detroit Zoo features four types of penguins (macaroni, king, Gentoo and rockhopper) at its Polk Penguin Conservation Center, the largest penguin facility in the world. Photo by Bill Bowen


WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

261 Ruth Street North St. Paul (651) 738-2102 Will: $40 PoWer of Attorney: $30 HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70

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SINCE 1971

▲ Detroit’s Guardian Building, built in 1929, is a showcase for Mayan Revival Deco architecture. Photo by Bill Bowen

Where to eat For serious eats, head to Chartreuse (in a room where Rivera and Kahlo once hung out) for its best-selling twice-cooked egg on spicy greens; delectable short ribs with eggplant and mushrooms; trout atop spaetzle; and down-home vanilla pudding, jazzed with lemon-basil syrup. Hearty cuts of critters reign at Roast, where the short rib is equally outstanding — and huge enough to make one wonder, “rib of … brontosaurus?” So’s the lamb shank. And silky salmon dressed in olive tapenade. Or make a meal of starters like the horseradish-spiked beef-cheek pierogies and pork belly partnered with watermelon. Hungry for information? Check out visitdetroit.com. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

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Good Living / Housing / By Lynette Lamb

I WISH! → Senior living offers everything my husband and I want, but right now we’re too young

Many of us baby boomers don’t want to admit we’re getting

old. We sport cargo shorts and Lycra, we travel to groovy places like Guatemala and India, we huff and puff our way through spinning class and Bikram yoga (although here I confess to using the pronoun "we" loosely). Lots of us still have kids at home, too, which allows us to maintain the illusion of youth long after our AARP cards and mirrors tell a different story. After all, if we’re still elbowing our way through back-to-school nights and dozing through middle-school band concerts, we can’t possibly be geezers yet — can we? (By the way, this particular fiction works only until some sweet young thing asks you what grade your grandchildren are in. Yes, this has happened to me — twice.) For similar reasons, many of my peers are horrified at the notion of leaving their single-family homes. After all, downsizing to a condo or an apartment means you’re getting up there in years, and God forbid we should declare that to the world. No, these folks would prefer to soldier on through what I’ve come to think of as the

26 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Minnesota carousel of bad yard chores — rake up moldy, grime-coated leaves; plant things to replace the stuff that died during our most recent ice age; weed, mow, repeat; rake, rake, rake and repeat until first snowstorm; shovel, shovel, shovel and repeat until final snowstorm. Perhaps because I am 1) married to a disabled guy and 2) constitutionally lazy, I fail to see the charm of this particular carousel (though my kids will tell you I’ve been known to push small children out of the way to ride an actual carousel). All of which brings me to my infatuation with Oakwood Village, a cluster of spacious senior citizen apartments set amidst, yes, oak trees, in my Wisconsin hometown. Please note that the average resident of Oakwood Village was born during the Hoover administration, sports an appliqued sweater (her) or throat-grazing pants (him), and tends to retell the same


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My peers are horrified at the notion of leaving their single-family homes. After all, downsizing to a condo or an apartment means you’re getting up there in years, and God forbid we should declare that to the world.

stories nightly — none of which has in any way diminished my desire to move in amongst them. Why? Because Oakwood’s attributes far outnumber its downsides. To wit: The underground, heated garage! The helpful dudes who fix your faucets and hang your pictures! The indoor skyway that takes you to dinner! The dinner (and lunch and breakfast) — cooked, served and cleaned up by someone other than you. The lack of a roof, eaves, siding or other maintenance time-and-money sucks. And most gloriously of all, the lovely landscape to gaze and stroll upon, requiring not one jot of work from you. What’s not to like? Or as my husband, stretching out in my father’s easy chair, so aptly put it, “When can we move in?” Alas, although we’re certainly old enough to buy an Oakwood apartment, its management steadfastly refuses to allow in teenagers, and apparently the authorities don’t look kindly on housing your offspring in the basement storage units. So senior living, in all its low-maintenance splendor, will have to wait a few more years. But perhaps then, when the kids finally move into their dorms, I can move in next door to Dad. I already know all his stories anyway. Lynette Lamb, whose 1957 birthdate puts her squarely in the middle of the Baby Boom, is a Minneapolis writer and editor. Two years after writing this essay, she and her family moved into a downtown apartment with every amenity she coveted — except the food service.

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Good Living / Finance / By Darryl Dahlheimer

FIGHTING FRAUD →→Most older adults are sharp and manage their finances well; but two factors make them targets

Financial scams continue to be aimed at elders and remain one of the

most under-reported crimes of our time. And the stakes are high: Multiple studies show that an estimated one in five seniors (ages 65 and older) have been victims of financial fraud — with an average loss of $36,000, according to Allianz Life. The challenge is finding effective ways to empower seniors. Many of the “scold and scare” approaches to fraud-prevention education may actually contribute to under-reporting due to victims feeling ashamed. Fortunately, LSS Financial Counseling has uncovered a new way make this topic more palatable with seniors during local fraud-prevention workshops — humor. We wondered if embedding jokes, skits and stories into our sessions would help seniors talk about a difficult topic. It worked. In every workshop, we heard new stories and laughs. So far — thanks to grants from Allianz Life — LSS has led more than 60 workshops throughout the metro region, with more than 1,000 seniors attending. Here are three important lessons about senior fraud prevention:

Ask questions Seniors are most targeted, but not because they’re naive. Most older adults are sharp and manage their finances well; but two demographic factors make elders ideal targets. First, seniors have the most assets, built over a lifetime of saving and investing. The famous crook Willie Horton, when asked, “Willie, why do you rob banks?” replied honestly, “Because that’s where the money is.” Scammers aim for seniors for the same reason. Second, seniors are from a generation of trust that believes in “giving people the benefit of the doubt.” Scammers try to take advantage of this goodwill. Seniors can maintain this admirable trait, while becoming safer, if given tools to spot scams and ways to be assertive without losing their friendliness. We teach, “It’s not rude — it’s shrewd — to ask questions.”

28 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

This becomes even more important when facing “affinity fraud” where the scammer seems trustworthy because of affiliations such as religion or military service.

Learn the types of scams Con artists have updated their playbook, so scams can come in every form, including over the phone, through the U.S. mail and via emails, seeking to lure people in with fake prize notifications, emergency calls claiming to be from a grandchild or “get rich quick” schemes. One new scam is “debt buyers.” This industry buys up old debts and has been caught many times calling people with similar names in hopes to get paid by all of them. If you get this call and don’t recognize the debt, tell the caller, “I need you to send me written proof of the debt.” By law, they must stop any further calls unless they send written proof.

Always report fraud There is redemption in reporting fraud. Financial fraud is unbelievably under-reported, with only 1 in


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Stopping scam artists requires awareness among seniors and a willingness to actually report financial crimes. 100 senior victims ever reporting the crime, according to Investor Protection Trust, a nonprofit education and research organization. It’s easy to imagine how someone might feel embarrassed or worried that family members might see such a misstep as proof of not being able to handle finances independently. One of the most significant things we’ve learned, however, is the redemptive quality of reporting fraud. Sometimes, reporting can lead to getting lost money back. Often times, reporting helps the authorities catch crooks and find patterns of theft, while also making victims feel they’re helping others stay safe. Help stop scams by calling the Minnesota Attorney General hot line — 651-296-3353 — to report fraud and put scammers out of business. Darryl Dahlheimer is program director at LSS Financial Counseling in Minneapolis. If your senior center or independent living campus or older adult group would like to host a senior fraud prevention workshop, contact LSS at 1-888-577-2227. Learn more about LSS at lssmn.org.

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V

T ! U O G E

IT’S ZUCCHINI SEASON!

Don't give away your excess summer squash! Celebrate the season by turning these delectable fruits — skin and all — into a fun side dish for breakfast or dinner.

30 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


ZUCCHINI FRITTERS Oil or cooking spray 1 1/2 zucchini 1 large egg, beaten 1/4 medium onion, minced 1/4 cup grated cheddar cheese 1/3 cup seasoned bread crumbs 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt Black pepper to taste Cayenne pepper to taste Makes 15 fritters

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray or oil a baking sheet or a minimuffin tin pan. If using a muffin pan, be sure to grease the depressions thoroughly to prevent sticking. Grate the zucchini onto a clean dish towel or paper towels until you have one packed cup.  Wring all of the excess water out of the zucchini. Combine all the ingredients in a medium bowl and season with salt and pepper. Scoop 1 tablespoon of the mixture in your hands and shape it into a small oval. Repeat and place the ovals on the baking sheet about an inch apart. If using mini-muffin tins, fill each muffin section to the top, pushing down on the filling with a spoon to make sure it’s compacted.  Bake for 16 to 18 minutes or until golden. If you’re using the baking sheet, turn the fritters halfway through cooking.

Source: Adapted from The Two Bite Club and Skinny Taste blogs. Find more recipes that use fresh zucchini at skinnytaste.com and thetwobiteclub.com.


RIB KING Famous Dave is back with a new barbecue venture, plus a new role with the restaurant that started it all

By Carla Waldemar

W

hen Famous Dave started out, he wasn’t famous — and authentic Southern barbecue wasn’t the nationwide obsession it is today. “Twenty-three years ago, the Twin Cities had only three barbecue

restaurants,” said Dave Anderson, the founder of the Famous Dave’s restaurant chain. “Now there are 50, and each has its own interpretation.” So why is Dave back with yet another barbecue restaurant chain in a highly competitive Twin Cities foodie scene at age 64, when he could be leisurely swinging golf clubs or packing for a cruise? It would seem you can take the man out of barbecue — and maybe even the Dave out of Famous Dave’s (for a while) — but you can’t take the barbecue out of the man.


Famous Dave’s founder Dave Anderson still supports the publicly traded company that bears his name by serving as a consultant — in addition to operating his own new chain of Old Southern BBQ quick-serve restaurants. Photo by Robb Long Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 33


RIB KING Dave, who currently works closely with Famous Dave’s as a consultant and brand ambassador, has also opened not one but four locations of a new fast-casual restaurant chain called Old Southern BBQ, also known as Jimmie’s. Ribs, brisket, pulled pork, chicken and hot links, plus BBQ bowls, sandwiches, BBQ tacos and sides, can be ordered to eat in, to go or in large batches for catering. “Everything is made from scratch, and just minutes before service,” said Dave, who recently opened his first Twin Cities location at 44th and France in the former Chatterbox space. “The sauces are totally different. I created all-new recipes. And people have embraced it.” Indeed, customer reviews are quite positive so far online and on the street. But Dave’s also extremely proud of the fact that his Old Southern BBQ Smokehouse in Hayward was recognized in 2016 by his peers as “One of The Best Barbecue Restaurants in America” in the National Barbecue News. “This is huge,” he said of the award, given by top barbecue professionals. Travel Wisconsin, meanwhile, recently named Old Southern

BBQ one of “The Top BBQ Joints in Wisconsin.” While Famous Dave’s restaurants are big, bold and sit-down, Old Southern is fast-casual and smaller with meals served, Dave said, “right out of the pit.” That means locals can now not only compare two types of restaurants created by America’s Rib King, they can also sample two different sauce lines, including traditional Famous Dave’s products sold everywhere (including Famous Dave’s pickles at Costco), and now his Old Southern line, including flavors such as Chicago Blue, Dixie Red, Diablo’s Batch and Southern Gal (sold online and at his new restaurants). If all that weren’t enough to keep the man busy, Dave is also active on the keynote speakers’ circuit and is planning yetanother book. (He's written six already.) He and his wife, Kathy, live in Edina and their two grown sons, James and Tim, live in the Twin Cities as well.

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS So who’s Jimmie — the new restaurant chain’s official namesake? That’s Dave’s dad, a Choctaw from Southern Oklahoma who met an Ojibwe gal, Iris Johnson, from Hayward. Both were both uprooted — “orphaned,” Dave puts it — by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and placed in American Indian boarding schools. But they didn’t cross paths until they met at the Haskell Institute for Indians, a junior college in Lawrence, Kan. After serving in the Army in World War II, Jimmie steered his young family (Dave is the oldest of three) to Chicago, where jobs were to be had. But Jimmie was so homesick for Oklahoma southern cooking and barbecue that he drove back twice a month until his wife mastered the beloved southern-style techniques. (She’d been selling her fried bread and chicken-wild rice soup at American Indian powwows for years.) “That’s how I got my passion for barbecue. From my dad. I was born into it,” Dave said. “But it was my mother who taught me how to cook.” Those twin fervors fed both his stomach and his soul — which school decidedly did not. “I was in the bottom half of my class in high school. Teachers made me feel dumb, always lost,” said Dave, who was then challenged by an undiagnosed attention deficit disorder. ⊳ Famous Dave’s Calhoun BBQ & Blues Club opened in 1996 and early on was regarded as one of the top Blues stages in the Midwest. Today the venue still features live music and trivia nights along with ribs and other Southern barbecue dishes. Photo by Robb Long


EVER SINCE I WAS 14, I’D BEEN TINKERING WITH BARBECUE SAUCE. STILL, PEOPLE TOLD ME, ‘YOU’RE NUTS! IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, WITH ALL THOSE SWEDES AND NORWEGIANS, YOU DON’T STAND A CHANCE.’

A MIND FOR BUSINESS At 18, Dave launched his own business. But it wasn’t barbecue. His fondness for plants spurred him to create dish gardens, which he sold to Chicago’s leading florists. “I hustled. I got up every day eager to go to work. I worked harder, longer, than anyone,” Dave said. “Nobody could outwork me!” Not that salesmanship came easy either. “I was shy,” he said. “I stood in the basement in front of a $5 K-Mart mirror with a book and read out loud so I could overcome my shyness about speaking.” Then along came the infamous Chicago blizzard of 1979, closing city streets for the duration, causing florists to go out of business, and Dave right along with them. Bouncing back — and by then a veteran of President Jimmy Carter’s 1977 task force studying the problems of minorities in small businesses — he joined a Fortune 500 company (the former American Can Co.) in 1979 and turned its worst territory into its best, bringing in more than $1.25 million in sales. After his wife, Kathy, got a call from Minneapolis to manage the Eddie Bauer store in the Foshay Tower, Dave returned to his tribal roots. And Hayward. He was hired by the Lac Courte Oreilles Chippewa tribal government to serve as the tribe’s first business CEO. He put together a top-notch business board with all non-tribal members — an arrangement he insisted on when accepting the position — designed to separate the tribe’s business from the “roller-coaster politics of the tribe.” “This was something I fought hard for and it was very special at the time,” Dave said. The structure worked: Dave doubled revenues, vaulting the tribe’s business finances from red to black. President Ronald Reagan paid notice, recognizing the Lac Courte Oreilles tribe as one of eight outstanding economically progressive tribes in the nation, according to his Presidential Commission on Indian Reservation Economies. He also appointed Dave to a Bureau of Indian Affairs’ task force

on reservation gaming. Back in Dave’s home state, a succession of minority-business and tourism appointments followed for the rising star. The Bush Foundation also took note, naming Dave a Bush Leadership Fellow in 1985, allowing him to go on to earn a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, despite not coming into the program with the standard undergraduate degree. Meanwhile, the management and investment company Dave had formed in 1989 to specialize in emerging gaming markets was lauded by Fortune magazine as “the fastest growing company in America.”

SELLING RIBS TO SWEDES It wasn’t until 1994 that Dave began pursuing his lifelong dream by opening his now-aptly named Famous Dave’s barbecue restaurant in his hometown of Hayward. “Ever since I was 14, I’d been tinkering with barbecue sauce. Still, people told me, ‘You’re nuts! In Northern Wisconsin, with all those Swedes and Norwegians, you don’t stand a chance.’ “But from the outset, we were serving 6,000 customers a week in a town of 2,000, with no advertising, just word of mouth,” Dave said. Fans soon begged for more: “‘Chicago! Minneapolis!’ So I took over a former gas station in Linden Hills with 2,500 square feet and 50 seats.” Lines formed down the block. And from that point on, he was smokin’. Nation’s Restaurant News, the industry’s bible, called Famous Dave’s “the hottest concept in America.” Why? “Top-quality food and service,” Dave said. “I hire smiles.” That led to a second store in Roseville, which eventually morphed into a national enterprise with more than 170 locations, including company-owned sites and franchises in more than 30 states, plus Puerto Rico, Canada and the United Arab Emirates. Next came what Dave looks back on as his “biggest mistake.” In 1996, he was advised to allow Famous Dave’s to be publicly traded. Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 35


RIB KING “Barbecue is a lifestyle,” Dave said, a nuance that didn’t mesh well with the world of Wall Street execs and quarterly reports. Dave increasingly felt the leadership that took over Famous Dave’s wasn’t making decisions in the company’s best interests. “I’d never do it again,” Dave said. “I didn’t work to make money, but to make people happy. I always believed that if I made people happy first, then the money would follow.” On March 31, 2014, Dave became “emotionally, legally and financially separated” from Famous Dave’s. Today, however, new folks have taken over the reins with Famous Dave’s — and they’ve encouraged the brand’s founder

BEYOND BARBECUE In the years leading up to those difficult changes surrounding Famous Dave’s, Dave kept busy. In 2002, in fact, he got a call from the White House, then occupied by George W. Bush, stating: “The President would like to interview you.” It was regarding a post as assistant secretary of the Department of the Interior for Indian Affairs: “Would you consider it?” they asked. When it comes to public service, Dave’s never been one to back away. After a Senate confirmation and FBI clearance — a process that took a year — he was on the job, responsible for a $2 billion budget and 10,000 employees. It was a frustrating experience, however. “I learned the government is basically broken,” he said, “and

and namesake to come back as a consultant to bring back the

that the real strength of America is what happens in our own

company’s authenticity and credibility, Dave said.

communities where we live.”

“I am tasked with working on recipes and making sure the

Back in the community, the high-school dropout had made

core legacy recipes are staying true to the original formulations,”

the American Dream come true. So what does this self-made

Dave said.

man do with a lot of money? He gives it back.

He's also been asked to be the face of Famous Dave’s through the company’s marketing efforts, including social media. The Minnetonka-based chain, according to the Minneapolis-

He and Kathy established The LifeSkills Center for Leadership, a private nonprofit foundation created with a $1.5 million gift from the Andersons. Its rigorous training program, provided by

St. Paul Business Journal, is the state’s 55th-largest public

Dave’s son, James, is designed to help at-risk Native American

company when ranked by revenue.

youth learn — as Dave stresses the make-or-break factor —

Sales at Famous Dave’s have been down in recent years and news stories have focused on the struggling company’s string of

“job skills not taught in school.” For this kind of personal commitment to others, Dave

CEOs who have come and gone in rapid succession during the

received Oprah’s Angel Network Award, cherished among his

past decade.

700-plus accolades.

Sporadic restaurant closings, including Twin Cities locations

Jim Smart, a principal at Smart + Associates, a Minneapolis-

such as the Mall of America, Eden Prairie and, most recently,

based design firm that specializes in restaurants and shops,

Stillwater, founded in 1997.

describes Dave as a “wildly creative” guy who always has a “bril-

Mike Lister, who in October became Famous Dave’s chief executive and operating officer, is a longtime friend and business associate of Dave’s. “I’ve had the pleasure of working with Dave for the past 20

liant idea” to share. “He’s got the biggest heart of anybody I know,” Smart said. “He puts his money where his mouth is — a real sweet guy.”

years,” Lister said. “He is the ultimate entrepreneur, mentor

HIS TOUGHEST BATTLES

and visionary, and has earned his title of America’s Rib King

During his multi-faceted career, Dave has overcome a multitude of

by staying committed to his passion for all things BBQ. He is a

challenges amid the many honors and awards, including bank-

Famous Dave’s ambassador who truly lives our BBQ culture.”

ruptcy (during his floral days), a life-threatening auto accident and even chemical dependency: He’s been sober 22 years, since 1995.

36 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


“I don’t think you can ever overcome life’s greatest adversities if you never accept responsibility,” Dave said. “A lot of folks have often asked me about my toughest challenges being an entre-

▲▲Dave Anderson’s latest barbecue sauce flavors are sold — and served — at his four new fast-casual Old Southern BBQ restaurants, including a new location at 44th and France in Linden Hills, Minneapolis. Photo by Ken Goodman

preneur, expecting me to say that being a minority might be a road block or not having access to capital in the early days. But I surprise them when I always answer that I have been my own toughest challenge.” Dave credits his wife, Kathy, who stood by him during their toughest times. “We never gave up,” he said, adding that he hopes his willingness to share his life’s ups and downs can help others when they feel hope is lost. “There isn’t anything that can’t be overcome if you never, ever give up on your dreams,” he said. ⊳⊳ Old Southern BBQ restaurants offer ribs, brisket, pulled pork, chicken and hot links, plus sides such as coleslaw, mac and cheese and cornbread muffin tops. Photo by Old Southern BBQ

“One of the most important lessons I’ve learned is to be humble enough about asking for help when times are tough.” Those words, of course, aren’t just talk. Despite a heartbreaking separation from his most treasured brand, Dave is, yet again, starting something new — and even building bridges with his original brand, after all. Though the original location of Famous Dave’s on Round Lake near Hayward was destroyed by a devastating fire in 2014 — and has since been replaced by a new waterfront restaurant, Props Lading Waterfront Grille — Dave Anderson’s presence in that town continues on with his new already-renowned Old Southern BBQ Roadhouse. And that’s not to mention his Old Southern BBQ locations in Rice Lake and Hudson, Wis., and in Minneapolis’ Linden Hills neighborhood — yet another return to his original entrepreneurial roots. “I am at the top of my game when it comes to barbecue,” Dave said, noting that he’ll be inducted into the American Royal Barbecue Hall of Fame this fall at an awards ceremony in Kansas City. “So I’m back in the business." Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around  the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 37


August

Can’t-Miss Calendar

Grease

→ This hugely popular Broadway-style production is back for the first time in more than a decade. First staged at Chanhassen Dinner Theatres in 2006, it became the venue’s best-selling show of all time, and it has remained so since. Photo by Dan Norman

When: Through Oct. 28 Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $65–$89 Info: chanhassendt.com

Ongoing

Aug. 3–13

Fly Over America

Minnesota Fringe Festival

→ Go on a small-plane ride across America (and now Canada) at this movietheater-style ride. Music and special effects — such as mist, wind, sounds and scents — make you feel like you’re truly flying through the scenes displayed before your eyes. When: 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Monday–Saturday and 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Sundays Where: Mall of America, Bloomington Cost: Tickets are $12.95–$16.95 for one film or $19–$25 for two. Info: flyover-america.com

July 28–Aug. 13

Nordrsaga

→ St. Paul’s own Circus Juventas, the largest performing arts youth circus school in the U.S., presents its summer show, steeped in little-known Norse mythology, adventure and magic. When: July 28–Aug. 13 Where: Circus Juventas, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $18.50. Info: circusjuventas.org

38 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

→ The Midwest’s largest performingarts festival will host hundreds of performances. When: Aug. 3–13 Where: Venues in Minneapolis Cost: Day passes cost $16 on the weekdays, $22 on the weekends and $5 for ages 11 and younger. Info: fringefestival.org

Aug. 4–6

Uptown Art Fair → See the work of professional and youth artists, plus enjoy live music and dance performances, familyfriendly activities and festival-style food and beverages.


of musicians, magicians, jugglers and mimes and more than 250 marketplace artisans. When: 9 a.m.–7 p.m. weekends Aug. 19–Oct. 1, plus Sept. 4 (Labor Day) and Sept. 29 Where: Rural Shakopee Cost: $14.95 for ages 5 to 12, $21.95 for ages 62 and older and $23.95 for adults. Info: renaissancefest.com

Aug. 20

Japanese Oban Festival →→Bonsai, martial arts, singing, dancing, drumming, food and other aspects of Japanese culture are at the heart of this annual family-friendly event, which includes a traditional lantern-lighting ceremony at dusk.

Capitol Grand Opening →→Celebrate of the newly restored 112-year-old Minnesota State Capitol with special events, tours with guides from the Minnesota Historical Society, plus kids’ activities all weekend long.

When: Aug. 11–13, including a Prince dance party Aug. 11 and fireworks on Aug. 12 Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: mn.gov/admin/capitol-grand-opening

When: Aug. 20 Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: In years’ past, admission was $5 for ages 13 and older, $3 for ages 3–12. Info: comozooconservatory.org

Aug. 24–Sept. 4 When: Aug. 4–6 Where: Uptown Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: uptownartfair.com

Aug. 9

Music in the Cafe →→Enjoy free music over the lunch hour — bluegrass fiddle performers Brian Wicklund and Mike Cramer — in Landmark Center’s Musser Cortile atrium. Visitors are encouraged to bring their lunch or purchase one from Anita’s Cafe. When: Noon Aug. 9 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

Aug. 11–13

Irish Fair of Minnesota →→Celebrate all things Irish with multiple stages dedicated to dance and music performances and kidfriendly activities, including face painting, arts and crafts, dance lessons, games, races and visits from native dogs. When: Aug. 11–13 Where: Harriet Island, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: irishfair.com

Twin Cities Polish Festival →→Learn about Polish culture and traditions at this family-friendly event, featuring folk-dance exhibitions, live music, food, beverages, arts and crafts, cultural exhibits and a petting area filled with cuddly Polish sheepdogs.   When: Aug. 11–13 Where: Old Main Street in northeast Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: tcpolishfestival.org

Aug. 19–20

Greek Summer Festival →→Take a weekend getaway to Greece without leaving Minnesota with Greek food, kids’ games and activities, plus live music and dancing with the Greek Dancers of Minnesota and free hourly tours of the church sanctuary. When: Aug. 19–20 Where: Saint George Greek Orthodox Church, St. Paul Cost: FREE; food tickets can be purchased in advance online for $10. Info: stgeorgegoc.org

Aug. 19–Oct. 1

Renaissance Festival →→King Henry and his court invite one and all to his immersive 16th-century European village, featuring 12 stages

Minnesota State Fair →→Sample Minnesota’s finest agriculture, horticulture, art and industry, plus carnival rides, games, live music and food vendors aplenty. This year’s newest feature is a Great Big Wheel — a 156-foot-tall Ferris wheel with 36 enclosed gondolas each carrying six people.

When: Aug. 24–Sept. 4 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: Advanced tickets start at $11. Gate admission is reduced from $12 to $9 on Aug. 31 for ages 65 and older (Senior Day) and for military on Aug. 29 (Military Appreciation Day). Info: mnstatefair.org

Aug. 30

African Children’s Choir →→Enjoy lively African songs and dances, including children’s songs, traditional spirituals and Gospel favorites from this group organized by Music for Life, which operates education programs and relief efforts in seven African countries. When: 7 p.m. Aug. 30 Where: The Basilica of Saint Mary, Minneapolis Cost: FREE; donations will be accepted. Info: africanchildrenschoir.com

Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search DINING RESTAURANT SPICY SRIRACHA SUSTAINABLE VEGETABLES ZUCCHINI

HEALTHFUL HEIRLOOM HOMEGROWN LOCAL ORGANIC PICNIC RESERVATION

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TRIVIA

Answers 40 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Trivia TAKE OUT 1. What is the average cost of a three-course dinner for two at a mid-range restaurant in Minnesota? 2. Which local restaurant was named the Best for Dessert in the Southwest Journal in 2017? 3. According to the National Restaurant Association, what is the hottest food trend for 2017? Sources: numbeo.com, southwestjournal.com, restaurant.org

Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder. If you are interested in an art residency for your school or organization, visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information. In the Heart of the Beast MNP 2016 S3 filler.indd 1

7/6/16 10:25 AM

Sharing and Caring Hands Needs Your Help! Your donations provide:

SUDOKU Garlic, Ethnic, Global

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6/28/13 8:33/AM Minnesota Good Age / August 2017 41

CROSSWORD

Answers

As long as there’s pasta and Chinese food in the world, I’m okay.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword 70 Bump in the night, say 71 Cancún cash 72 Place for Girl Scout badges 73 Furry sci-fi creatures

ACROSS 1 Blue gem, briefly 6 See 10 Units of electrical resistance 14 “You __ serious”: “I don’t believe it” 15 When doubled, toy train sound 16 Actress Cusack 17 Bungle 18 Don’t have 19 Number after dix 20 *Spider-Man’s alter ego 23 DOJ anti-narcotics arm 24 Gen-__: boomers’ kids 25 Lustrous patterned fabric 27 Rim 30 SOS responder 33 Vain dresser 34 Protestant minister 36 Leaving out 42 / August 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

40 Mined metal 41 Pseudonym ... and what the end of each answer to a starred clue is 43 Texter’s guffaw 44 Like shish kebab 46 A __: based on deduction rather than experience 48 Family reunion attendees 49 Be an omen of 51 __ in the back: betray 52 Prickly plant 55 Burn soother 57 “Ben-__” 58 *Striped African equine 64 Superstar 66 BMW competitor 67 Studio warning sign 68 Sushi bar soup 69 Corp. VIP

DOWN 1 End table accessory 2 Soul singer India.__ 3 Irksome one 4 Reference aids in reference books 5 Sock away 6 Mercedes line of autos 7 __-Pei: wrinkly dog 8 Small indentation 9 Hitched together, as oxen 10 Spanish eye 11 *Midsize SUV 12 Perplexing passages 13 Tiptoe, say 21 One shaping a rosebush 22 Roof support 26 Witty remark 27 Long narrative poem 28 Chocolate option 29 *Hellenic religious symbol 31 Apartment type 32 Start-the-day ABC talk show, familiarly 35 “Let me in!” 37 Drives forward 38 “You’ve Got Mail” director Ephron 39 Smooth-talking 42 Platte River st. 45 Punster 47 “Finally got it” 50 From Copenhagen, e.g. 52 Zoo primate 53 WWII hero Murphy 54 Reactions to fresh comments 56 Depleted atmospheric layer 59 Luminous glow 60 Mid-month date 61 “Charles in Charge” actor Scott 62 Take a chance on 63 Warring son of Zeus and Hera 65 Lav, in Leeds


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