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Contents

Good Start From the Editor 6 I’m looking for hope in a scary world. Sometimes it’s hard to find. My Turn 8 Islamic people came to town to worship, and I welcomed them. Memories 10 Recycling isn’t what it used to be in Moose Lake and beyond. This Month in MN History 12 Dissent, dismay weren’t allowed here during World War I.

Good Health

18

Door County This Wisconsin destination should be on your weekend-escape bucket list.

House Call 14 You need more than a fan to avoid heat stroke in Minnesota. Caregiving 16 Start your caregiving journey with a support system in place.

30

Good Living

Cookie queen: Sweet Martha (aka Martha Rossini Olson) co-founded Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar at the state fair more than 35 years ago. Photo by Tracy Walsh / tracywalshphoto.com

Finance 26 Don’t assume old age will bring you financial wisdom.

→ On the cover

→ Correction The letters provided for the Word Scramble in the July issue of Good Age were incorrect. The letters should have been T P U S T S R P.

Housing 24 Should you buy your first home during retirement?

In the Kitchen 28 This tasty quick bread is delicious and easy to make and uses seasonal ingredients.

37 Can’t-Miss Calendar 40 Brain Teasers Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 5


Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 35 / Issue 8 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall, Skip Johnson, Dave Nimmer, Sam Patat, Lauren Peck, Karen Telleen-Lawton Dr. Michael Spilane, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh, Jen Wittes Creative Director Dana Croatt Graphic Designers Valerie Moe Amanda Wadeson Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2016 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

6 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Looking for hope Our world is a pretty scary place right now. We live under the constant threat of international terrorism at home and abroad — and have been for over a decade. And we have our own deadly wars — of race, religion and politics — raging on with increasing regularity right here in Minnesota. Some days I wonder if our American flags will ever fly for more than a week at a time at full staff. Photo by Tracy Walsh Honestly, it’s hard not to fear for our lives — tracywalshphoto.com and those of our loved ones — in such seemingly unstable times. I can scarcely fathom the mounting number of random and not-so-random acts of violence we’ve seen in the past month. I don’t have a cure for what ails us. Even Mr. Rogers’ hopeful, oft-cited quote has nearly ceased to bring me comfort because we’ve had to come back to it so often in the past year: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’” And yet, maybe there’s some strength still to be found in his words. There’s so much good in the world, so much light. Our always-on news cycle — and the unfortunate sequence of recent events — has just made it much harder to see it. Maybe this issue of Good Age can help revive some of that hope and love. I mean, just look at our Cover Star, Martha Rossini Olson, aka Sweet Martha. She’s a Minnesota State Fair icon, who brings joy to tens of thousands of people a year with a quintessentially American, soul-comforting treat — the beloved chocolate chip cookie. Other points of light in this issue include a travel story about idyllic Door County, Wisconsin; helpful resources for caregivers; and, perhaps most important of all, Dave Nimmer’s tale of local Lutherans and their open-hearted acceptance of an Islamic temple in Afton. Maybe it’s not so much helpers we need to be looking for, but for folks offering love when the expected or most common response is hate. I think that — with a side of cookies for everyone — would be a good place to start.


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

the Islamic Society plans to open a new mosque to serve its growing membership in the east metro, to be built on a 29-acre plot of farmland about five miles from my Lutheran church in Afton. In light of some growing anti-Muslim rhetoric around the state — highlighted in a recent front-page story in the Sunday Star Tribune — I’m kind of proud of Memorial Lutheran (ELCA) of Afton, whose members skew older and whiter. About a dozen members of the congregation showed up at an Afton City Council meeting to urge passage of a conditional use permit to build the mosque. The council agreed — with a 5–0 vote.

keenly aware that threats and force are just part of their jihad attack. This is an invasion.” Jon Kroschel, a Memorial member and former mayor of Afton, wasn’t buying that nonsense. He was pleased with the council’s decision. “This makes a statement,” he said, “that the world is getting smaller. They’re our neighbors. We welcome them.” I was glad to be part of that welcome, no longer hiding behind the objectivity I thought I had to project as a reporter. My last reporting gig was 20 years ago, and I figured it was high time I took a public stand — not that Afton’s council members were breathlessly waiting for my words of wisdom.

Welcoming neighbors

Many pathways to God

I figure that makes my fellow Lutheranians (as my Catholic buddy dubs us) a kind of advance welcoming party, which, I believe, is good for our congregational soul. Our appearance at the council meeting was preceded by four informational sessions about Islam initiated by interim pastor Sam Wolff. Those attending included longtime church member Bob Swenson, who lived in Saudi Arabia for many years, with Muslims as bosses, employees, neighbor and friends. Swenson, 84, ran food services for several outfits, including oil companies and a Saudi Royal Commission, and he read the Quran before going to the Middle East (and found it less threatening than the Old Testament). “I lived in a home in Saudi four doors from a mosque,” Bob told the Afton council. “And we got along very well. I found Islam to be a loving religion, that even recognizes Jesus Christ as a prophet.”

The truth is it just felt good to do the right thing. “I’m 75 years old, “ I said, “old enough to know that there are several pathways to God, and I welcome our Muslim

Without exception → Members of the Islamic Society are building a mosque near my church — and I welcome them

In a little more than a year,

Fear of ‘invasion’ One Afton resident, her voice quavering as she read from a prepared statement, argued that Islam and its followers should be feared, especially since (it was her understanding) that no Afton residents requested that the mosque be built. “That means the pressure to erect it is coming from outside the city of Afton,” she said. “We are

8 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


brothers and sisters on this journey.” When the mosque is built, it will comply with all the rules and regulations of this largely rural community — no minarets higher than the surrounding church spires, no loud speakers on the outside of the building and no bright lights to disrupt the peace and quiet of evening. A row of evergreens will provide a privacy screen for any nearby neighbors.

Faith and ice cream When I — and my fellow church members — walked out of the town hall after the vote, most of these new neighbors shook our hands and said, “Thank you.” What we did that spring evening was just living up to the mission statement we’ve got written on our church wall: “To welcome without exception, listen without judgment, support without prejudice all people, and in this way, to be Christ for others.” We also held an ice cream social on a sunny, summer Sunday afternoon — a gaggle of Lutherans and Muslims — and more than 100 attended. We exchanged names, told stories, shared faiths. In the end, we discovered what we already knew: We believe in the same God. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

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6/23/16 2016 11:54 AM Minnesota Good Age / August /9


Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

‘Don’t you recycle?’ → Putting a plastic item in a bin is nothing compared to the culture of reusing we’ve lost

For all I know, there could be waterfalls in International Falls, butter in Butterfield and saints in St. Peter. But — for sure — there are no moose in Moose Lake. My friend, retired airline pilot and writer, Dale Hagfors, told me this. And Dale ought to know. Moose Lake is his ancestral home; his immigrant grandparents settled there in 1919. A “Hagfors Road” west of town identifies their original property. Realizing recycling was a way of life for these subsistence farmers — which they passed along to their offspring — recently caused Dale to lament: I can’t help but chuckle when one of my kids chastises me for tossing some plastic item into the garbage. “Don’t you recycle?” they ask, as though to pull me from the dark ages of waste and pollution. When I try to explain that I’ve been recycling the important stuff since before they were born, and then attempt to launch into some constructive dialogue, I can see their eyes glaze over. When I was a boy, recycling was simply a way of life. Nothing was thrown away that had possibilities of being used again. When the Great Depression was ended and the world was at war, waste became even less of an option. Tin cans were flattened and collected along with rags by the ragman. Newspapers and magazines were saved for the “paper drives” at the local school-

10 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

yard. Used foil and string were rolled into large balls. Tires were retreaded and booted until they had no life left. Hand-me-downs were a fact of life. My brother was two years older, so I got everything he’d already worn, and sometimes these were used items from aunts or uncles. The war ended, but the mindset continued. Our mothers saved and traded buttons, scraps and sewing patterns, while we kids swapped comic books. Used flour sacks inevitably became aprons or dish towels. Our dads usually had garages or basements with collections of used nails, bolts and such, sorted in coffee cans. Scraps of wood were stored in the corners for future projects. Even drain oil would find an eventual use somewhere. More often than not, when the family car needed a part, a trip to a salvage yard was in order. My dad was reluctant to buy “new” if “used” was available for half the price. Besides, he would reason, “What sense is there in having a new part in an old car?”


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My dad was reluctant to buy ‘new’ if ‘used’ was available for half the price. Besides, he would reason, ‘What sense is there in having a new part in an old car?’ I must confess that the contents of my garage today are similar to what I remember of my father’s. My brother, who has a seasonal place next door, never goes to the hardware store without first checking my garage. You could say I’ve always been recycling, but my kids wouldn’t understand. Incidentally, just as there are no longer any moose in Moose Lake, there are no Hagforses living along Hagfors Road today. Not so incidentally, more of Dale’s reminiscences will appear in future issues of Good Age. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Writer her at chall@ mngoodage.com.

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12/9/152016 12:00 /PM Minnesota Good Age / August 11


Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ During World War I, a sevenmember Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, headed by Gov. Joseph Burnquist, was formed to support the war efforts at home. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Doubts about the draft →→Perceived disloyalty was a concern of Minnesota’s Commission of Public Safety during World War I

When the U.S. entered into World War I in April 1917, the country quickly mobilized to support the war effort. In Minnesota, the legislature decided to create a unique organization to coordinate state efforts — the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety (MCPS). This seven-member commission was tasked with everything from food distribution to conserving fuel, but soon one of the biggest items on its agenda became rooting out perceived disloyalty to the United States. As the country joined the ongoing war against Germany, the commission was particularly suspicious of Minnesota’s German-American population, the state’s largest ethnic group. Were they loyal to the Kaiser or to President Wilson? It didn’t help that, prior to the war, many German-Americans advocated for neutrality.

Rally in New Ulm Armed with broad powers from the state — including the ability to seize and condemn property and examine any public official’s conduct — the MCPS was eager to stamp out potential threats. In the summer of 1917, several public officials in New Ulm, a city founded by German immigrants that was still heavily German, found themselves under the commission’s scrutiny. 12 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

On July 25, 1917, 8,000 people gathered at a draft rally in New Ulm, where 2,000 draft-age men, a color guard and two orchestras paraded through town. Three-term New Ulm mayor, Dr. Louis Fritsche, and Albert Pfaender, the city attorney, spoke to the crowd, urging men to comply with the draft. But they shared hopes that New Ulm citizens wouldn’t be sent to fight fellow Germans in Europe. Pfaender gave the main address, declaring that German-Americans were loyal to the U.S. and ready to do their duty. But he also wondered if war with Germany was supported by the majority of the country. He added that the Constitution allowed for a draft only if an invasion of the U.S. occurred. Petitions circulated during the rally, calling on Congress to not send draftees abroad.

German leaders under fire Within a few weeks, the MCPS charged Fritsche and Pfaender with “promoting and participating in seditious public meetings” and demanded they appear before the commission. When Pfaender visited St. Paul on Aug. 14, one of the commission members declared that he deserved to be shot for his words at the rally. The commission also gave the two men a loyalty statement to sign, but they both refused.


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▲ This Minnesota Commission of Public Safety poster was circulated to boost loyalty during World War I.

The MCPS recommended that its chairman, Gov. Joseph Burnquist, suspend the men from office, which he did on Aug. 21. At the same time, the commission planned a campaign to convince Minnesotans that true patriotism meant accepting the draft. Sept. 4 was declared Dedication Day to honor draftees, and Burnquist made sure to appear at a meeting in New Ulm. At a New Ulm banquet for draftees, guests were given a loyalty pledge, which included declaring that criticism of the draft laws was a “menace” to the war effort.

‘Un-American’ In the fall of 1917, the government held removal hearings and took testimony in New Ulm. Fritsche and Pfaender attempted to offer their resignations to the city council, but the MCPS ordered the council not to accept them. In hearings, the men denied that they were attempting to stir up a seditious

movement and argued that the main objective of the rally was to educate and placate men on the draft laws, which were unpopular in Brown County. But it became clear that, in the eyes of the MCPS, anything less than full support of the national war effort and its policies from public officials was unacceptable. On Dec. 1, the governor permanently removed Fritsche and Pfaender from office, on the grounds of malfeasance for sponsoring an “unpatriotic and un-American” rally. The Brown County Bar Association also expelled Pfaender, and the MCPS urged the State Medical Society and the Brown-Redwood County Medical Society to revoke Fritsche’s license.

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Returning to normal Pfaender and Fritsche’s removal were only part of the MCPS’ wider efforts to stamp out potential sedition from German-Americans. Throughout its tenure, the commission investigated German textbooks for anti-American content and started a registry of non-citizens, among other activities. But when World War I ended in November 1918, the commission’s purpose disappeared and it soon ceased its activities, officially dissolving in 1920. Removal from office wasn’t the end for Fritsche and Pfaender. By 1920, New Ulm had returned them both to their old positions of mayor and city attorney. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

Avoid heat stroke → Seniors can face special challenges during high temperatures and elevated humidity

Heat-related illness is a serious problem in Minnesota, especially for older adults. Though air conditioning keeps most (but not all) of our homes and buildings cool, exposure to the elements in summer should bring with it caution for seniors — and all ages — in cases of extreme heat. Understanding the way your body responds to heat can help you treat heatrelated illness before it becomes a threat.

How it works The body uses two main physiologic mechanisms to keep itself cool. The first is dilation of blood vessels in the skin to increase blood flow and promote heat loss by radiation. The next is sweating — evaporation cools the skin and the body. Heat illness can occur when the body’s thermoregulation systems are overwhelmed by a combination of excessive metabolic production of heat (exertion), excessive environmental heat and impaired heat loss. Exertional-heat illness is common in outdoor laborers, athletes and first responders wearing heavy protective equipment. For older individuals, even mild exertion can be dangerous if it’s prolonged when it’s hot and muggy. Non-exertional heat illness occurs most often in elderly and infirm individuals with impaired heat-loss mechanisms. Certain medications that hinder sweating can compound problems for people with age-related impairment of sweating. Problems arise more readily if there’s exposure to high humidity as well as high temperature because a humid environment makes sweating less effective in cooling the body.

The symptoms The initial symptoms of heat illness are often called heat exhaustion. They include muscle cramps, weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness, nausea, headache and excessive sweating. Body temperature may become

14 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

as high as 104 degrees. If left untreated, heat exhaustion may become heat stroke, a more serious and life-threatening condition. Sweating ceases, body temperature rises to more than 104 degrees, blood pressure drops and pulse rises. Confusion and collapse are common.

The cure To avoid a heat illness, an ounce of prevention is important: Watch the temperature. Pay attention to weather forecasts and heat alerts. If it’s very hot and humid, stay indoors in an air-conditioned place. Don’t rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an extremeheat event.


Don’t rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an extreme heat event.

Don’t use the stove or oven to cook. It will make you and your house hotter. Drink plenty of fluids. Dehydration is a key factor in heat illness. Help your body sweat and cool down by staying well-hydrated with water. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink fluids. Dress appropriately. Lightweight, loose-fitting clothing helps sweat evaporate and keeps you cooler. Avoid dark colors, which can absorb heat. If you go outdoors, wear a light-colored, widebrimmed hat. Understand your medical risks. Ask your doctor if you’re taking any medications — or if you have any medical conditions — that could increase your risk of heat-related illnesses. If you start to feel ill after prolonged exposure to heat and humidity, drink extra fluids, take a cool bath or shower and have a family member or friend check on you. Dr. Michael Spilane, now retired, spent more than four decades practicing and teaching geriatric medicine in St. Paul. Send comments or questions to drspilane @mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 15


Good Health / Caregiving / By Sam Patet

New to caregiving? → Find support early to feel empowered

You just found out your mom has been diagnosed with a progressive, debilitating disease. As the years pass, she’ll need more and more help carrying out everyday tasks — things like cleaning the house, shopping for groceries, managing medications and bathing and grooming. With your siblings living out of state, it’s all up to you. You commit to helping mom with some of these tasks. Whether you were expecting it or not, you’re now a caregiver. Does this sound familiar? It does to hundreds of thousands of Minnesotans. According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, more than 500,000 Minnesotans served as family caregivers in 2014. If you’re new to caregiving, you might feel overwhelmed by the demands and challenges. You might be asking yourself questions like, “Who will watch mom when I have to pick up the kids after school?” “What if dad falls and hurts himself when I’m not there?” or, “Will I be able to maintain my full-time job as I start to care for my spouse?” If you’re in this situation, know there are people, services and resources available to help you care for yourself and your loved one. No one should have to walk the caregiver journey alone. Tool up early. Here are two types of resources that can equip you for your caregiving journey:

Support groups for everyone A support group brings together people facing similar situations and allows them to share experiences and advice. Sharing your personal experiences in this way can help you cope better and feel less isolated. One myth about support groups is that you have to be outgoing to be a part of one. This isn’t the case. In fact, group participants don’t have to share if they don’t want to — and there’s value in simply listening to others’ successes and struggles. 16 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Know there are people, services and resources available to help you care for yourself and your loved one. While support groups come in a variety of forms — in person, online, over the phone — they do have some common traits. Groups usually consist of eight to 12 people and a facilitator. The facilitator, who may be caring for someone also, is present to make sure everyone has a chance to speak and to jumpstart the conversation, if needed. A group usually meets once or twice a month for an hour to an hour-anda-half. Meetings are confidential, meaning no one can share what was talked about outside of the group. Caregivers, spouses and adult children can be members of groups dedicated to all sorts of conditions, including: ⊲ Caregiving in general ⊲ Dementia in general or specific types of dementia (such as Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy Body, frontotemporal) ⊲ Parkinson’s disease ⊲ Hearing loss. To find a support group in your area, contact the Senior LinkAge Line at 800-333-2433 or visit MNHelp.info and search for “caregiver support group.”


There are many educational resources that can help alleviate the stress and anxiety around caregiving or the particular condition your loved one faces. They include classes at community centers, online articles, webinars and online chat groups. Some valuable resources include:

⊲ Powerful Tools for Caregivers: To find a class in your area, visit mnhealthyaging.org. ⊲ National Stroke Association: See stroke.org. ⊲ National Parkinson’s Foundation: Go to parkinson.org. ⊲ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Information & Support for In-Home Dementia Caregivers: Visit tinyurl.com/ dementia-veterans. ⊲ Alzheimer’s Association: See training.alz.org/home. ⊲ AARP Caregiving: Go to aarp.org/ home-family/caregiving.

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Good Living / Travel

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By Carla Waldemar

T

he Cape Cod of the Midwest is what they call this gorgeous sliver of Wisconsin. The official title of this finger of land — dividing rippling Green Bay from the rest of Lake Michigan — is Door County. And it’s only about five hours (due east) of the Twin Cities. Forest-green limestone cliffs border the rich fields of farmers, whose famous cherry trees blanket the land in blossoms each May, while birch and maples create kaleidoscopes of blazing autumn color, all attracting 2 million visitors a year.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 19


EXPL RE DOOR COUNTY

Not to worry: There’s room at the inn — and at motels nostalgic of an earlier era, homey B&Bs, country-luxe waterfront suites and classic cottages. On the warmer, more sheltered bay side of Door County, Highway 42 ambles through a succession of small villages — Egg Harbor, Fish Creek, Ephraim and Sister Bay are the standouts — populated by friendly, laid-back folk, operating family-run cafes and wineries scattered amongst art galleries, craft shops and outdoors outfitters. It all seems designed to keep you smiling — and gawking at the low, low prices. Because the tourist season is short and sweet (May through October), chains can’t afford to do business here. This year’s harvest is expected to start in late July and continue into early August. (Check the bloom and fruit reports at doorcounty.com for current details.) For a physical overview of the area, rent a bike or kayak or — highly recommended — take a tour aboard a Door County Trolley, based in Egg Harbor, where gregarious guides take folks through Peninsula State Park (one of five state parks in Door County) with its blue blaze of wild forget-me-nots and ivory trilliums carpeting the

20 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Many of Door County’s beaches have rocky shores, but Ephraim’s public beach on Eagle Harbor is sandy. Photo by Mike Roemer

→→Learn more See doorcounty.com or call 800-52-RELAX (800-527-3529).


⊳⊳ The Montmorency cherry — a sour or tart variety — is the most commonly grown in Door County. Though Montmorency cherries can be eaten fresh, they’re more commonly used for pies, cookies and other desserts, as well as for making wine, juice, jams and preserves. The 2016 U-pick cherry season is expected to begin in late July.

forest floor en route to Sven’s Bluff. On this knockout of a overlook, you’ll spy just some of the lake’s 34 islands bobbing in the endless blue where sea meets sky. And, while you’re at it, don’t miss the trail to Eagle Bluff lighthouse.

Wine and cheese If vino’s your thing, eight wineries offer tours and sips (for free). At Door 44 Winery, proprietor Steve Johnson pours flutes of bubbly. “Sparkling wine is the future of Wisconsin wine,” he declares, then adds a caveat: “Wisconsin drinkers like sweet wine.” Orchard Country Winery & Market not only produces wines from the winter-hardy grape varietals you may recognize from Minnesota, but also markets juice from the acres of cherries blanketing the property. Denny Stapleton at Harbor Ridge Winery in Egg Harbor turned a coffeehouse into a winery after wine won him over. His best seller? Cherry Crush. Purchase a bottle for a picnic on his deck, which conveniently adjoins the Wisconsin Cheese Masters shop, where proprietor Jim Pienkoski stocks 50 artisanal varieties, including the bestselling Snowfields Aged Butterkase. What makes it so tasty? “Wisconsin winters are good for cows, making their milk heavy with butterfat. Plus,” he instructs, “Wisconsin has the

lock on good grass in the U.S. There are two ways to make cheese — fast and cheap, or slow and artisanal.” For a caffeine chaser, head to Door County Coffee & Tea Co., a café-cum-roastery, which toasts 3,000 pounds of beans a day, said proprietor Vicki Wilson, who’s equally proud of her famous egg bake, gleaned from a church cookbook. Dilemma: That egg bake or the cream cheese-and-cherrystuffed French toast at The White Gull Inn, which won Good Morning America’s Best Breakfast award. Warning: Split an order. The full plate is enough to feed a block party. Chase it with a glass of cherry juice.

Galleries and potters

▲▲Orchard Country Winery & Market in Door County, established in 1985, resides in a restored dairy barn. Photo by Jon Jarosh

Brake for art before you break for lunch or dinner. Hands On Art Studio, in Fish Creek, vows to “make art fun” by letting you make your own. Drop-in Picassos can choose between lessons in wood, metal, glass and painting (pottery or canvas). At Plum Bottom Pottery & Gallery, Chad Luberger invites spectators to watch him at the wheel, turning out — not those clay pots of art fairs — but fine porcelain, the way he learned from master artists in China.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 21


EXPL RE DOOR COUNTY

▲▲Chad Luberger is a porcelain pottery artist at Plum Bottom Pottery & Gallery in Door County. Photo by John Nienhuis

“Potters don’t want to work in porcelain,” the young man defends his favorite medium, “because you have to work fast or it turns to mush. It’s very tricky to work with, but I love it.” Edgewood Orchard Galleries in Fish Creek boasts something for every taste and budget. Stroll its woodland sculpture garden for an eyeful.

Culinary arts At Chives, in Baileys Harbor, the setting’s country-chic to match a forager-forward menu, exciting foodies to summon plates of house-made ramp-and-morel sausage paired with local cheeses;

▲▲The Old Post Office Restaurant in Ephraim offers nightly fish boils that begin outdoors over an open fire. 22 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

beef cheeks with spaetzle; maple-glazed pork belly; pappardelle with wild leek pesto; whitefish with fiddleheads; and homemade ice cream, including chocolate-cherry. At The English Inn in Fish Creek, where you’re greeted with olde-tyme suits of armor, the specialty is almost as Medieval — beef (or chicken) Wellington, complete with a slab of rich pate beneath its pastry crust. Start with the kitchen’s legendary spinach salad and finish with homemade pies, if you’re still standing. Wilson’s Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor offers a more informal “walk down memory lane” with jukeboxes and memorabilia, old-fashioned ice cream sodas (flavor of the day: cherry) and homemade root beer, plus burger and fish baskets for folks looking for hot eats.

Wait, there’s more! Speaking of fish, you’re not allowed out of the county until you’ve experienced an only-in-Wisconsin fish boil. The Old Post Office Restaurant in Ephraim provides this dinneras-theater experience nightly, where its boilmaster walks the talk, heaving logs under a boiling black cauldron while tossing in potatoes, onions, Lake Michigan whitefish and (I’m not kidding) a quart of kerosene, which (cameras ready) he ignites with a flash, just the way loggers and fishermen have done for hundreds of years. The performance continues indoors as guests line up to fill their plates and grab a slice of cherry pie. At Sweetie Pies, cherry’s the bestseller, of course. The tiny kitchen, housed in a 100-year-old homestead, turns out 11,000 pies a year. Point at your choice from the display, which ranges from apple to forest berry and plenty more, then cart it to the outdoor picnic tables. And buy another one for the journey home, too. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.


Good Living / Housing / By Karen Telleen-Lawton

UPSIZING? → Use your vision of an ideal retirement when choosing your next home

Q: Should we buy at our age? Just when our friends are considering downsizing or moving into retirement complexes, we may buy our first house, or maybe a condo. With both of us earning teacher salaries all these years, we weren’t able to afford buying in our high-priced city previously. Recently, my wife’s mother passed away. She left us a small inheritance that makes home ownership possible. We’ve lived in the same rental house for years and have few problems with it. Of course we’ve sometimes resented not being able to do what we want or get things fixed when we want. Thinking of our own little home puts smiles on our faces. And yet, we’re fine where we are. What’s your advice?

A: Maybe. It does seem ironic to be considering this biggest of moves when your friends are moving the opposite way. Perhaps you’ve held up this dream for so long that you’re unsure what to do now that it’s attainable. You’re right that there’s no obvious answer. What I can offer you are the advantages and disadvantages of home ownership, information about a special deal for first-time homebuyers and perhaps some insight into how to evaluate these factors. The main advantages touted for home ownership are privacy, investment potential, stability, more control in housing costs, community pride and tax incentives.

Privacy Owning a home allows you more privacy because there’s no landlord. If you end up buying a condominium, however, you could end up with less privacy from neighbors than you currently enjoy in your rental house.

Investment Over the long haul, a house is often a good investment, but usually only if you’re there long enough to weather economic cycles and average out major repairs. For better and worse, you would be in charge of all maintenance. Some people enjoy tinkering and fixing things, as well as the money they can save doing repairs themselves. If you haven’t been doing fix-it jobs all along, though, it could prove frustrating to start now. It could be even more frustrating to be shelling out cash for professional repairs when they’ve been free for decades. If you own a home long enough, appreciation may provide a larger estate for your inheritors, or more money toward your next housing option if you move again. The cost is the flexibility you’ve had up until now to leave at will.

Community pride Neighborhoods with homes that are owner-occupied are generally thought of as more stable and higher in community pride. As long-time residents, though, you’ve likely developed pride in your community. It would be your call whether you could improve on what you have.

Tax advantages Believing owned homes to be better for society, the federal government is fond of rewarding homeowners. Here are the main points to consider: ⊲ The Federal Housing Administration offers low-interest mortgages. ⊲ Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government agencies that now guarantee most home loans in the 24 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


U.S., repurchase and guarantee mortgages, which helps hold down interest rates. ⊲ You can take a mortgage-interest deduction on your tax return. ⊲ There are also property-tax write-offs. A recent addition to this suite of goodies by the federal government is to allow first-time homebuyers to put down just 3 percent instead of the normal 10 or 20 percent. But the Center for Economic and Policy Research has found that the default rate for a mortgagee who pays 3 to 10 percent down is almost 50 percent higher than for those who put down more than 10 percent. And that’s definitely a disadvantage. If you were my client, I would encourage you to consider your ideal last living situation. Where would you like to be living when you hit your 90th birthdays? If it’s a retirement home, then you might be well served by renting until you’re ready for that. Check out your local ones to see how they’ve changed from what you might imagine. If you see yourselves in rocking chairs on the front porch of a little cottage together, with family members or a visiting nurse stopping in to check on you, then it’s probably time to make that dream a reality. Bottom line: Go with your heart, but bring your brain along, too.

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DENTURES

7/14/16 10:35 AM

The University of Minnesota, School of Dentistry, is seeking patients who already have NO NATURAL TEETH and complete upper and complete lower dentures. This program offers a new set of complete upper and lower dentures, and the lower denture will be converted to attach to contain two mandibular implants. The total cost of this program is $1,500.00. The program will begin in September, and last until the procedure is completed. Patients will be required to attend a weekly appointment at the School of Dentistry. If you have an interest in possible participation, please contact Dee Blomster at 612-301-1310 to schedule a screening appointment beginning May 10. Thanks for your interest.

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Karen Telleen-Lawton serves seniors and pre-seniors as a financial advisor in Santa Barbara, Calif. Learn more about her practice at decisivepath.com.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 25


Good Living / Finance / By Skip Johnson

FINANCIAL LITERACY → Don’t assume that moving into old age will bring you financial wisdom

You’d think that as we get older we get better with our money, but, unfortunately, research is showing it’s actually the opposite. Financial literacy declines as we reach retirement age. The timing couldn’t be worse for seniors, as pensions give way to 401(k)s, and the burden of retirement planning continues to shift from companies to the retirees themselves. In a recent study, researchers found average financial literacy scores fell by half for people between age 65 and 85. The decline corresponds with memory loss and trouble with problem-solving abilities later in life. Making matters worse, seniors aren’t aware of the change. Much like older drivers aren’t aware that their skills are diminishing, they don’t realize their financial ability is slipping. This leaves retirees vulnerable to elder financial abuse. Seniors in the U.S. lose about $36 billion per year to various types of financial abuse. They’re targeted by scammers because of their declining financial literacy and because they come from a more trusting generation. Seniors (and everyone for that matter) should take the following steps to protect themselves:

Be wary of calls and emails Don’t ever give out your Social Security number or any other personal information to someone you don’t know who initiates contact with you by phone, email or even in person. For example, if you receive an email that claims you must provide personal information to claim a

26 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

refund from the IRS, it’s a scam. The IRS doesn’t request information from taxpayers by email.

Check your credit report Take advantage of the free credit report that you’re entitled to once a year. If you notice any problems, act quickly. You can contact the credit bureaus and ask them to put a fraud alert or credit freeze on your accounts. See consumer.ftc.gov.

Keep information private Avoid sharing your personal information on the Internet. Thieves can predict Social Security numbers based on publicly available information, including your birthday, age and place of birth. The Social Security Administration began assigning randomized number series on June 25, 2011, to help protect individual Social Security numbers. Anyone born before then will have a more predictable Social Security number.

Take action after a scam If you believe you’ve fallen for a scam, take action right away! Some people are hesitant to report a scam because they’re embarrassed or they’re concerned family members may see this as a sign they’re unable to handle their own finances. Stop the communication right away if you believe you’ve responded to a potential scammer. You may have to go as far as to change your phone number or deactivate your email address to


IS LEG DISCOMFORT DURING WALKING HOLDING YOU BACK? cut off communication. If you’ve gone a step further and given a potential fraudster bank account information, credit or debit card information or personal information like your Social Security number — call your bank, credit card company or one of the three credit bureaus right away. They can help close accounts or suggest ways to protect your credit file. There are a number of consumer groups that offer help, such as the Better Business Bureau and the National Consumers League.

ARE YOU OVER THE AGE OF 50? DO YOU HAVE A HISTORY OF DIABETES, HYPERTENSION OR SMOKING? You could have Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), where the arteries that carry blood to the legs become clogged. Participate in a research study that may improve your walking ability and reduce difficulty with walking! If eligible you may receive: An exercise coach, an activity monitor and transportation assistance. For more information call or email:

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Enlist helpers You may want to consider financialmonitoring services, which can help you identify any strange or suspicious activity. There are also tools to help keep track of day-to-day finances. Some charge a fee, but it may be worth it. You can also enlist the help of family members who can give you a second opinion if you’re unsure if you’re dealing with a scammer. Bottom line: Stay vigilant to protect your life’s savings. Seniors have worked too hard and too long to have anyone cheat them out of their money in their golden years. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial in New Hope, a financial planning firm and Minnesota insurance agency. Skip also offers investment advisory services through AdvisorNet Wealth Management, a registered investment advisor. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.

Has a doctor told you that you have high blood pressure? Are you interested in taking part in a study investigating a new device-based system for high blood pressure? If you are between the ages of 18 and 75 years, have healthy kidneys as far as you know, would be willing to change your blood pressure medications for several weeks and make frequent hospital visits to have your blood pressure checked (possibly more than 10 visits in a year), then you may be a suitable candidate for this new device study. Contact Rose Peterson at 612-863-6051 or at Rose.Peterson@allina.com For further information visit: mplsheart.org/radiance-htn/ MPLS Heart Institute Foundation GA 0816 H4.indd 1

7/18/16 3:11/PM Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 27


Good Living / In the Kitchen ⊲ Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. ⊲ Grease two loaf pans (or a single Bundt pan) with oil. ⊲ Whisk together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon. ⊲ Beat the eggs with an electric mixer in a second, larger bowl until the mixture is a pale yellow. ⊲ Add the sugar and beat until well combined. ⊲ Mix in the oil, vanilla and orange zest, beating until well combined. ⊲ Stir in the zucchini and beat thoroughly. ⊲ Add half of the flour mixture to the wet mixture and beat until combined. Add the second half, beating again. ⊲ Fold the blueberries into the batter using a spoon or rubber spatula. ⊲ Pour the batter into loaf pans (or a Bundt pan).

QUICK BREAD Easy to make and surprisingly delicious, this recipe features two staples of a Minnesota summer — blueberries and zucchini! Whole wheat flour gives the bread a rich, nutty flavor, and orange zest adds a bright citrus twist. Try it with all types of summer squash. This recipe makes two loaves of bread. We used a single Bundt pan, greased with olive oil, for a little Minnesota touch.

⊲ Bake for 50 to 60 minutes. Start checking the bread after 45 minutes. When it’s done, the bread will be medium brown. When you test the bread with a toothpick or sharp knife, the toothpick or knife will come out clean with no wet batter sticking to it. ⊲ Let the bread cool for about 10 minutes and transfer it to a wire rack. ⊲ Slice the bread while it’s still warm, if desired, and serve. Makes two loaves or a single Bundt-cake loaf

BLUEBERRY ZUCCHINI BREAD 1 ½ cups white flour 1 ½ cups whole wheat flour ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 eggs 2 cups white sugar 1 cup vegetable oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Source: See grist.org/article/zucchini_bread for the full blog post about this recipe. 28 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

1 teaspoon orange zest 2 cups grated zucchini (or any other summer squash) 1 ¼ cups blueberries (fresh or frozen)


Photos by Tracy Walsh / tracywalshphoto.com


The

Sweet life

Meet Minnesota State Fair icon Martha Rossini Olson

— the woman behind

Sweet Martha’s cookies!

By Jen Wittes

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 31


The sweet life

You

could easily argue that fresh, straight-from-the-oven, homemade chocolate chip cookies are our national comfort food — the perfect snack at Grandma’s house, a pick-me-up baking project on a cold January day, and the ultimate offering to Santa — neatly arranged on a plate with a tall glass of milk beside a colorfully crayoned note on Christmas Eve. Sweet, salty. Chewy, gooey. Classic. Timeless. Wholesome. Love. All hail the beloved chocolate chip cookie. And all hail the undisputed Queen of the chocolate chip cookie, Martha Rossini Olson — or as we know her in Minnesota, Sweet Martha. Olson, 65, is a St. Paul native. Growing up on the east side of Como Lake, just a stone’s throw from the state fairgrounds, Olson attended the Great Minnesota Get Together several times per season. It was a summer ritual for her family. Today, Olson can scarcely fathom her own status a State Fair phenomenon. “You sort of don’t believe it,” she said. “When you’re a kid you think, ‘Wouldn’t it just be the best to have a stand here?’ And one day I did. And it grew and grew.” Though many Minnesotans look forward to attending the state fair, we don’t all actually dream of owning a stand there, as young Martha did. That level of fair enthusiasm takes a certain type of person, 12 days of superhuman energy and — as Olson is quick to point out — a strong team of quality people.

How did it all start? Though Olson happened to become the brand name, and therefore the face, of Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar early on, the business is truly run by a team of four partners — Martha, her husband, Gary, and their longtime friends, Neil and Brenda O’Leary. Generally speaking, the women each run one stand by day and their husbands take over by night. But all four owners basically survive on about five hours of sleep a night during those unofficial last days of summer. Beginning in the late 1970s, the Olsons owned a frozen yogurt stand in Minneapolis, when frozen yogurt was (for the first time) all the rage. Their initial pitch to the State Fair was a yogurt stand. 32 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


“They said they wanted cookies,” she said. “We accepted because we just wanted to be at the fair.” It all came on rather suddenly. “We basically found out we’d be making cookies about three weeks before the fair started,” Olson said.

Creating a super-cookie Immediately, the team started pulling together recipes. They asked all the moms they knew for their best cookie recipes. Then they baked and tested and sought expert advice from the vendors they’d worked with over the years at the yogurt shop. “We tried chocolate chips from all over before settling on bittersweet,” Olson said. “We knew we wanted fresh out the oven; we knew we had to have the best ingredients. Luckily, we had access to the

best through our vendors. There were so many decisions in that first year — a lot of scrambling.” The now-famous Sweet Martha recipe is actually a combination of all those recipes they tried before opening for business for the first time. The brand’s cookies are often proclaimed “better than Mom’s” because they actually took the best ideas from several moms’ recipes and combined them into one super-cookie — unapologetically traditional and, some folks argue, undeniably perfect.

▲▲Sweet Martha’s “State Fair Deal” cone of cookies comes with a choice of milk or coffee for $9.

Like Mom used to make New fairgoers are prone to asking, “What’s the big deal? They’re just cookies.” This was the initial challenge Olson and the gang faced during their inaugural year at the fair. Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 33


The sweet life With the state fair offering so many weird foods, things on a stick and deep-fried delicacies — considered socially acceptable really only once a year — why would fairgoers buy something they could surely make at home at any time? All it took to answer that question was a simple taste. “We gave away a lot of free samples that first year,” Olson said “Once they tasted the cookies, they wanted more.” They were fresh-mixed, fresh-baked, hot out of the oven and made with the finest ingredients — the real deal, like Mom used to make. What seemed to keep people coming back to Sweet Martha’s — originally a 9-by-11-foot stand — is what keeps them coming back today: Chocolate chip cookies are one of life’s simple pleasures. It’s what the fair’s all about — timeless traditions, time with family.

Keeping the machine going Over the years, the cookie stand has become a true family affair. Martha and Gary Olson’s children — Jen, 30, and Dave, 33 — have been a part of the operation since day one, when they were school-aged kids.

Minnesota State Fair The Great Minnesota Get-Together is one of the largest and bestattended expositions in the world, attracting nearly 1.8 million visitors every year, showcasing Minnesota’s finest agriculture, horticulture, art and industry, plus carnival rides, games, live music and food vendors aplenty. When: Aug. 25–Sept. 5. Seniors & Kids Day is Aug. 29 with gate admission reduced to $8 for ages 65 and older and ages 5 to 12. Seniors Day is Sept. 1 with $8 admission for age 65 and up at the gate. Look online for information about library, military and other discount days. Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: Advanced tickets start at $10. Daily gate admission is $13 for ages 13–64; $11 for ages 5–12 and 65 and older; and free for ages 4 and younger. Info: mnstatefair.org 34 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

They’ll be taking a more active role than ever before this year as Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar opens a third stand on the north end of the fairgrounds, an area Olson still refers to as “Machinery Hill.” While Dave basically helps with the family business year round, Jen — who lives in New York City and works in the fashion industry — comes in for those last two weeks before Labor Day. Whenever she receives a new position within a new company, getting time off for the fair is an absolute must in her list of negotiations. Also part of the yearly crew are the O’Leary’s son, Charlie, dozens of nieces and nephews and many dear friends. When it comes to hiring additional staff a team of about 450 in all — the Sweet Martha team does things a bit differently than some of the other vendors. “We basically let our employees pick their hours,” Olson said. “It’s the end of summer; many of the kids have begun fall sports. We want them to be able to have their lives and also be a part of the booth. That’s how we get such good caliber people: They don’t have to give up everything to do this.” That said, some of her employees do put life on hold to work at the fair — particularly the adults, who are her managers. They hold tight to a sustaining mantra: “You can do anything for 12 days.”

No. 1 seller The perfect recipe, the unwavering adherence to quality, a high-energy staff and genius branding have put Sweet Martha at the top of the sales chart for food vendors, year after year, at the fair. The cookies beat the competition by a landslide: In 2014, according to Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal, Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar topped the sales charts with $2,902,825 in gross revenue, miles ahead of the No. 2 vendor, which came in at $1,037,272. And let’s explore who was at No. 2 — the Midwest Dairy Association with its all-you-can-drink milk bar. Coincidence? Probably not. It’s become a tradition of some fairgoers to pick up Martha’s famous cookie bucket and grab a picnic


Cookie by cookie Here’s a look at what goes into running Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar at the Minnesota State Fair:

40 50 35 tons of flour

tons of sugar

tons of chocolate chips

306,672

1 million+

$2.9

450

eggs

million

in gross revenue in 2014

cookies baked daily during the fair.

employees during the fair

Learn more — including where to buy Sweet Martha’s cookie dough year-round — at sweetmarthas.com.

table at the milk bar with a group of friends. Though Martha’s “State Fair Deal” cone of cookies comes with choice of milk or coffee for $9, it’s the take-home pail of cookies that’s the bestseller for $16. Containing at least four-dozen cookies — though you have to eat a dozen before you can even close the lid — the signature pail is street marketing at its best: You see plenty of the thousands of people at the fair carrying the pails — and you start to want one, too! And, after waiting in sometimes long, long lines for the cookies, fairgoers like to stock up, maybe even taking some home to the freezer to preserve a bit of state fair flavor for later. For some cookie fans, the pilgrimage to Martha’s has become as essential to the state fair as nightly fireworks, oversized stuffed animals and the phrase “on a stick.”

A nearly year-round deal It might sound like a dream come true — show up at the fair, make yummy cookies and sell millions of them to happy fairgoers. And it is, Olson said.

But it’s also a ton of work. Though Olson and her team begin preparing for the fair in earnest in May, they start receiving letters in February from cookie-booth hopefuls looking for work. There’s set up, of course, and throughout the fair it’s really round-the-clock action: To make things run smoothly, team members must keep meticulous inventory records and place frequent orders with suppliers. (Yes, the cookie ingredients are delivered fresh daily.) Then, after the fair, cleanup begins. It takes 90 people and goes on for about two weeks. There’s a huge payroll to complete, followed by an employee party for the cookie booth staff, who happily come to celebrate and pick up their checks. As things settle down, Olson continues doing bookkeeping — and doesn’t really call the fair “over” until October. Up until five years ago, Olson was an elementary art teacher at Highland Catholic School in St. Paul — so all of this would transpire around her day job, Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 35


with the first day of school falling the morning after the last day at the fair. Though she sorely misses teaching, retirement has allowed Sweet Martha to expand the cookie empire. Throughout the year she does demos. And Sweet Martha’s has launched a frozen line — available in grocery stores such as Lunds & Byerlys and Cub — including five flavors (original, gourmet chocolate chunk, peanut butter chocolate chunk, oatmeal chocolate chunk and macadamia nut white chocolate chunk). Meanwhile, Sweet Martha’s sometimes sells cookies at other events held at the fairgrounds, such as the Back to the 50s car show and, new this year, the Soundset music festival. Olson is enjoying getting a third location going. “There’s a lot of preparation in ordering equipment, getting things squared away with the Health Department and such, but there’s a lot less anxiety,” she said. “We’ve done this all before.”

Sweet relief What does Olson do when the work is finally done, in the brief breath before they start thinking about the next year? 36 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

“In October, we hope to have a family trip,” Olson said. “In October, it’s safe to say we can stop thinking about the fair for a while.” Olson also loves to read, garden and restore old houses. Miraculously — though every new person she meets expects her to have them on hand and every potluck host expects her to bring them — she’s not sick of cookies yet. Cookies, after all, have provided her a pretty sweet life and eternal status as a Minnesota State Fair icon. So what’s Martha’s favorite state fair food — other than her ubiquitous cookies? When she finds a few minutes to sneak away from the cookie booths, Olson heads for the fresh fruit stands and the purveyors of fruit smoothies. Her health, after all, must be stable throughout those two weeks. “I love, love, love the fair. Loved it since I was a child,” she said. “Now I get in at 7 a.m. and basically don’t see anything but the cookie booth, but I still truly love it.” Jen Wittes is a freelance writer who lives in St. Paul. Learn more about her work at jenwittes.com.

▲▲Martha Rossini Olson runs Sweet Martha’s Cookie Jar booths at the state fair along with many family members and friends, including her son, David Olson, and her nephew, Vincent Anderson. Her daughter, Jen, comes home from her job in New York to work at the cookie stands, too.


August

Photo by Tracy Martin

Can’t-Miss Calendar

Paint Your Wagon

→ Twin Cities audiences will be among the first in the world to experience this updated saga of the mythic West, featuring some of the most beloved songs ever written for the stage.w When: Aug. 9–21

Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul

Cost: Tickets start at $37.

ONGOING

The Lion King → This hugely popular Disney production — based on the 1994 Disney animated film of the same name with music by Elton John — is Broadway’s most successful musical of all time, featuring incredible costumes, rich vocal performances and a dash of slapstick humor. This touring performance, appropriate for ages 6 and older, lasts two and a half hours, including an intermission. When: Through Aug. 7 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $49. Info: lionking.com

Big Pants and Botox → Ditch the romance and fluff for a hilarious and emotional evening that one critic called “a funny, moving and ultimately uplifting story of one woman’s refusal to slide gently into middle age.” When: Through Aug. 14 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Music in the Gardens → Enjoy live music at the arboretum with a series of performances by local bands and ensembles. When: Select Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons through Aug. 21 Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: Included with admission ($12 for ages 13 and older) Info: arboretum.umn.edu

Info: ordway.org

St. Paul Walking Tours → Landmark Center guides will lead a variety of free tours highlighting the history of St. Paul.

When: 10 a.m. on a rotating schedule of Wednesdays through September with themes such as Heart of the City, Rice Park and The Great River. Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE. Reservations are required. Info: landmarkcenter.org

Up and Down: The H.H.H. Metrodome Portfolio → As the Minnesota Vikings and football fans celebrate the opening of U.S. Bank Stadium this summer, this exhibit by photographer Mark E. Jensen chronicles the Metrodome’s life — and 30 years of change in downtown Minneapolis.

When: July 26–Nov. 6 Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: Located in the museum’s Mill Commons, the exhibit is free and open to the public during regular museum hours. Info: millcitymuseum.org

Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 37


Can’t-Miss Calendar Aug. 4–14

Aug. 14

Minnesota Fringe Festival

Legends of Jazz: 1929–1970

→→The Midwest’s largest performing-arts festival will host hundreds of performances. When: Aug. 4–14 Where: Venues in Minneapolis Cost: Day passes will be $16 on the weekdays, $22 on the weekends. Info: fringefestival.org

Aug. 5–7

Uptown Art Fair →→This popular award-winning three-day fine-arts festival features professional and youth artists, live performances, family-friendly activities, plus festival-style food and beverages. When: Aug. 5–7 Where: Uptown Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: uptownartfair.com

Aug. 7

The Beach Boys →→America’s iconic chart-toppers perform as part of their 50 Years of Good Vibrations tour. When: 7 p.m. Aug. 7 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $49.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

Aug. 12–14

Irish Fair of Minnesota →→The nation’s largest free Irish fair is held outdoors at St. Paul’s Harriet Island. Check out traditional music and music lessons, Irish dance, Gaelic sports, a children’s tent, Irish movies, native Irish dogs, a Best Legs in a Kilt Contest, a tearoom, a speaker’s tent, a variety of Irish shopping and an array of food and beverage options. When: Aug. 12–14 Where: Harriet Island, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: irishfair.com

Twin Cities Polish Festival →→Learn about Polish culture and traditions through folk-dance exhibitions, live music, food, beverages, arts and crafts, cultural exhibits and a petting area featuring cuddly Polish sheepdogs.   When: Aug. 12–14 Where: Along the Mississippi River on Old Main Street in northeast Minneapolis, across from St. Anthony Main Cost: FREE Info: tcpolishfestival.org

Aug. 13

Lake Minnetonka BBQ & Beer Fest →→This inaugural event — sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society — will feature 36 teams of professional pitmasters alongside beer from more than 25 craft breweries and wineries, plus food vendors, booths and live music. When: 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Aug. 13 Where: Manitou Park, Tonka Bay Cost: Admission is free. Beer fest tickets are $45 ($35 in advance). Info: excelsior-lakeminnetonkachamber.com

38 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

→→Acclaimed film historian Bob DeFlores hosts an afternoon spotlighting jazz legends Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, George Shearing, Gerry Mulligan, Count Basie, Miles Davis and others. When: 3 p.m. Aug. 14, followed by an optional dinner at 4:30 p.m Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $12 ($15 additional for the optional dinner) Info: chanhassendt.com

Opening Aug. 17

Rise Up, O Men →→This brand-new musical comedy — the sixth production in the locally developed Church Basement Ladies series — features the men of the church, who unintentionally disrupt the order of the kitchen.

When: Aug. 17–Nov. 13 and Jan. 5–April 8 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Aug. 20–Oct. 2

Renaissance Festival →→King Henry and his court invite one and all to his immersive 16thcentury European village, featuring 12 stages of musicians, magicians, jugglers and mimes, including more than 500 engaging memorable characters. More than 250 artisans fill the festival marketplace to create a unique shopping experience, now in its 46th year. Themed weekends include Oktoberfest, Shamrocks & Shenanigans, Highland Fling and more.

When: Weekends Aug. 20–Oct. 2, plus Monday, Sept. 5 (Labor Day) Where: Seven miles south of Shakopee. The festival will move to a new home in 2020. Cost: $23.95; $14.95 for ages 5 to 12, $21.95 for ages 62 and older. Starting Aug. 8, buy tickets online or at local stores to save money and avoid lines at the event. Info: renaissancefest.com


Can’t-Miss Calendar When: 1–3 p.m. Aug. 27 Where: Maplewood Nature Center, Maplewood Cost: FREE Info: maplewoodnaturecenter.com

COMING UP

The Power of Purpose

Photo by TyD Photography

IndiaFest

→→Organized by the India Association of Minnesota, this 43nd-annual event includes parades, cultural exhibits, Indian cuisine from local restaurants, a bazaar, internationally acclaimed classical dance groups based in Minnesota as well as live Bollywood music. When: Aug. 20 Where: State Capitol Grounds, St. Paul

Cost: FREE Info: iamn.org

Aug. 21

Japanese Lantern Lighting Festival →→This annual event honors Japanese traditions through music, dance, crafts, martial arts and lanterns, including a traditional lantern-lighting ceremony at dusk. When: Aug. 21 Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: $5 for ages 13 and older, $3 for ages 3–12 Info: comozooconservatory.org

Aug. 25–Sept. 5

Minnesota State Fair →→The Great Minnesota Get-Together is one of the largest and best-attended expositions in the world, attracting nearly 1.8 million visitors every year, showcasing Minnesota’s finest agriculture, horticulture, art and industry, plus carnival rides, games, live music and food vendors aplenty.

When: Aug. 25–Sept. 5. Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: Advanced tickets start at $10. Daily gate admission is $13 for ages 13–64; $11 for ages 5–12 and 65 and older; and free for ages 4 and younger. Seniors & Kids Day is Aug. 29 with gate admission reduced to $8 for ages 65 and older and ages 5 to 12. Seniors Day is Sept. 1 with $8 admission for ages 65 and older at the gate. Look online for information about library, military and other discount days. Info: mnstatefair.org

Aug. 27

Monarch Open House →→Find out why and how monarchs are tagged, learn about their magnificent migration and see them in their lifecycle stages at this free, all-ages, drop-in program. There will be crafts for kids and butterfly gardening information for adults, too.

→→Join Richard Leider as he discusses the importance of identifying individual purpose in life. Leider, known as The Purpose Coach, is a bestselling author and international speaker. This is the fourth-annual speaker event organized by the local Lifetime of Learning Task Force.

When: 7 p.m. Sept. 15 Where: Armstrong High School, Plymouth Cost: FREE. Donations of new hygiene products accepted for Kody’s Closet. See kodyscloset.org for more information. Info: alifetimeoflearning.org

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions →→This nationally touring event will showcase gymnasts from the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games plus local gymnasts. When: 5 p.m. Oct. 9 Where: Target Center, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $36. Info: kelloggstour.com

Music & Movies in the Parks →→Both St. Paul and Minneapolis are offering outdoor summer concert and film series at local parks. When: Ongoing Where: Parks in Minneapolis and St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: stpaul.gov/musicintheparks and tinyurl.com/music-movies-2016

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search LIFELONG LEARNING NOTES SCHOLARS SCIENCE SEMESTERS STUDYING TRAVEL VITAL

CURRICULUM EMERITUS EXPLORATION GRADUATION HISTORY INTERESTS KNOWLEDGE

ACADEMICS ARCHITECTURE ART BOOKS BUSINESS COURSES CULTURES U

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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TRIVIA

Answers 40 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Trivia IT’S NEVER TOO LATE 1. How many different courses are offered by The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Minnesota each year?

2. How many years has the average life expectancy in the U.S. has increased since 1900?

OUR NEW WEBSITE IS LIVE! Join the conversation at mngoodage.com and at facebook.com/mngoodage

3. What age was Laura Ingalls Wilder when her first Little House on the Prairie book was published?

SUDOKU Desist, Tissue, Suited

WORD SCRAMBLE CROSSWORD

Answers Minnesota Good Age / August 2016 / 41

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword 55 Some RPI grads 56 Fitting place for sneaks DOWN 1 Maker of TBONZ treats 2 Run well 3 Minute part of a minute, for short 4 ID with a photo 5 iPhone movie purchase 6 Garb named for an island 7 Cation’s opposite 8 Costa __ 9 Art form offering plenty of kicks? 10 Puts into groups 11 Informal talk 12 Wedding planner’s nightmare 13 City near the Great Salt Lake 14 Many Beliebers 22 Plane lane 24 Sisyphus’ stone, e.g. 25 Morse “H” quartet 26 Go __ great length 27 Changing places ACROSS

30 Takeout order?

28 They may be thin

1 One not to upset?

33 Poolroom powder

30 Stirred things up

10 Title from the Aramaic for “father”

34 Capital of South Africa

31 “And?”

15 Subject of the 2015 Erik Larson nonfiction bestseller “Dead Wake”

35 Fizz flavoring

32 Realizes 34 First female attorney general

16 Hurricane peril

36 Used in an undignified way 38 Test on the air

37 Pub orders

39 Hags

38 Minor matches

40 Pained reactions

40 Best Supporting Actress two years before Cloris

17 Perilous situation 18 Water park attraction 19 Saruman soldier in “The Lord of the Rings” 20 Guttural utterance 21 Bygone 22 Similar 23 Goes downhill 25 Flat-bottomed boats 28 19th-century dancer Lola 29 Still 42 / August 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

41 Four-time Depp role 43 Either 2010 “True Grit” director 44 Musical instruction 45 Even slightly 47 Justice Fortas 50 Indicator of a private thought 51 Riddick portrayer 53 __ house 54 They often precede garage sales

41 Disgrace 42 Fibonacci or Galileo 43 Poem division 46 Mrs. Addams, to Gomez 47 Concerning 48 37-Down, e.g. 49 Besides that 52 Parental encouragement


August 2016  
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