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→ On the cover Building bridges: CaringBridge founder Sona Mehring shares her first-person account of the highs and lows of caregiving. Photo courtesy of CaringBridge

36 Can’t-Miss Calendar 6 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

MSP upgrades The Twin Cities’ international airport is adding cool, new features.

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40 Brain Teasers


July Good Start From the Editor 8 Caregiving is a hugely important topic that increasingly affects us all. My Turn 10 Shouldn’t seniors be leading the way in efforts to save Mother Earth? Memories 12 Before First Avenue was a music venue, it was an iconic bus depot. This Month in MN History 14 The Mesabi Iron Range Strike was long, divisive and deadly.

Good Health House Call 16 See a doctor if you have a cough that lasts for more than two weeks. Caregiving 18 Respite care and caregiver consulting can give you time to rest.

Good Living Housing 24 Today’s retirement communities are like Disney Worlds for adults. Finance 26 Hooray! Getting older actually comes with some cool financial benefits. In the Kitchen 28 Paprika packs a punch in this flavorful, slow-cooker dish.

Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 7


Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 35 / Issue 7 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Liz Allen, Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall, Skip Johnson, Dave Nimmer, Sona Mehring, Sonny McFarren, Sam Patat Lauren Peck, Dr. Michael Spilane, Aleksandra Till Creative Director Dana Croatt Graphic Designers Valerie Moe Amanda Wadeson Client Services Zoe Gahan 612-436-4375 zgahan@mngoodage.com Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2016 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Relentless days Every month in this magazine, we publish an article about caregiving — provided by the good folks at the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. Caregiving — the act of providing unpaid help to family members or friends who have physical, psychological or developmental needs — is hugely important issue for prey much anyone living in the U.S. today. Why? Medical advances have helped us all live much longer. But older adults oen Photo by Tracy Walsh face challenging health conditions, such as tracywalshphoto.com Alzheimer’s, cancer and heart disease. And because health care and long-term care are extremely expensive, nearly all of us will be called to fill in the gaps at home. And it isn’t easy. Many caregivers are still raising children, so they’re forced to combine caring for their parents and their kids: Take for example our totally amazing Cover Star this month: Sona Mehring, the founder of the Minnesota-based nonprofit organization known as CaringBridge. While caring for her three school-age sons at home, working as a soware engineer and running a growing nonprofit organization, Mehring also found herself playing caregiver to her beloved mother at home during two lifethreatening illnesses, Stage IV breast cancer in 1998 and liver cancer in 2001. “The pressures to be a good mom and a good daughter were colliding, and I wasn’t living up to my personal expectations for either,” Mehring wrote. “I was squeezed at both ends. I look back on those relentless days and wish I had raised the white flag sooner — not for surrender, but for assistance.” I was already in awe of Mehring’s achievements in creating CaringBridge — a global organization based in Eagan that helps families set up free personal websites to share information quickly during any type of health event. But when I read her first-person perspective on the realities of caregiving, I was floored by her honesty. Her writing, I hope, will help caregivers feel they’re not alone and that there are steps they can take to make life work beer. (Anyone can use CaringBridge, including folks providing care for elders.) Thank you, Sona Mehring, for sharing your story with Good Age! Sarah Jackson, Editor


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

Let us be earth wise → Seniors shouldn’t sit back and relax as climate change marches on

July is a wonderful month

in Minnesota, with Mother Nature at her most beautiful and benign — green trees, blue lakes, blooming prairies and colorful sunsets. It’s also a month that reminds me of what we have to lose as the climate of this planet changes — and not so slowly, at that. The deniers of global warming are, according to those more learned than me, in the same category as those who doubt the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. The science is in: The globe is warming. Temperatures increase. Glaciers shrink. Oceans rise. Storms grow. And I could be doing more, ought to be doing more, to contribute to those who are trying to reduce dependence on fossil fuels, reduce carbon emissions, preserve old-growth forests and develop alternative energy sources.

Getting started, but wanting more I do a few smart things already. I drive a Honda Civic that gets 37 miles to the gallon. I switched to LED light bulbs in my townhome. I try to turn off the lights when I leave. I fish from a boat that uses only a trolling motor. I let the fish go. I rarely water my lawn. And I don’t flush the toilet as often. But that seems like a drop in the bucket. A few years ago, a homeowner suggested installing solar panels on a few of our townhomes. Along with other owners, I dismissed the idea as too risky in a climate like ours and in an association that fancies a uniform appearance. I might think twice about the idea now.

I might also think about inquiring of any candidate seeking my vote, and my money, how he or she stands on climate change — and I might withhold support from anyone who denies the science. I can contribute to at least one environmental non-profit. My ex-wife, who spent a career as a lawyer for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, left the bulk of her estate to the Nature Conservancy, a fitting tribute to the work she did and the life she lived. I am so proud of her.

Seniors ought to be leading the way We’re the ones closest to returning to this good earth: Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust. And we’re the ones smart enough, who’ve lived long enough to know that our spiritual life is dependent on a relationship with this earth. Pope Francis says as much in his encyclical letter, On Care for Our Common Home. “Environmental education seeks to restore the various levels of ecological equilibrium, establishing harmony within ourselves, with others, with nature and other living creatures, and with God,” the Pope wrote. “Environmental education should facilitate making the leap toward the transcendent, which gives ecological ethics its greatest meaning.” Don Henley, of the Eagles, in his CD Cass County, sings his message in


Praying for Rain, a common-sense homily for country folk like me. Something’s different. Something’s changed and I don’t know why. Even the old folks can’t recall when it’s ever been this hot and dry. I ain’t no wise man, but I ain’t no fool. And I believe Mother Nature is takin’ us to school. Maybe we just took too much and put too lile back. It isn’t knowledge, it’s humility we lack.

Beyond hurricanes It took a long time, but I’m now feeling that humility when it comes to our relationship with Mother Nature. Quite frankly, she can kick our butt. The beauty of tranquil lakes and golden sunsets is offset by torrential rains and withering droughts. The issue is about more than trying to reduce our exposure to natural disasters, however. It’s really about doing the right thing: Showing respect for Creation. Taking care of our home. Thinking about our children. And, if you believe as I do, nurturing our souls. Seniors should be heading up the charge. After all, we’re the ones who remember how things used to be. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

Leave the driving to us → In the 1950s, parades of farm girls made weekly pilgrimages home on Greyhound motor coaches

When I frequented First Avenue,

it wasn’t purple. It wasn’t a nightclub. And Prince was a royal title. Back then, the distinctively curved black building at 701 First Ave. N. housed the Minneapolis Greyhound Bus Depot. And I could be found there almost every Friday afternoon. As one of many small-town girls who had moved to Minneapolis for work after high school graduation, I didn’t own a car. None of us owned cars — or even thought of it then, in the late 1950s. Hence, we relied on the bus to bring us home on weekends to visit our families. The Friday afternoon drill was hectic, and always the same: Trudge through downtown, lugging a suitcase, heading for the bus depot. Stand in line at the ticket counter. Visit the ladies restroom (usually asking a perfect stranger to watch my bag until I came out). And, finally, file into the loading area with all the other passengers, board a sleek, blue and white motor coach and scramble for a window seat.

Making our way home As the driver navigated out into traffic, a soft whooshing sound came from the exhaust that somehow seemed comforting. Once we were beyond the loop, headed south and cruising down Wayzata Boulevard, I began to relax. The familiar Prudential “rock” Building appeared on the left, and farther down the road, McCarthy’s Supper Club. A sign for Tyrol Hills, a new housing development, was intriguing. Years later, I made a trip there and discovered an idyllic setting of charming small homes and sloping tree-filled yards. Shakopee was the first of eight stops along the 120-mile trip. About midway, I’d begin to get fidgety. 12 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

My office attire of skirt and blouse and nylon hose felt uncomfortable. I wondered if I kicked off my high heels, whether I could get them on again at trip’s end. But mostly, the bus ride home was pleasant. The seats were cushy an easy to recline. Fellow passengers usually were friendly. And at Christmas, everyone was in a festive mood. The overhead racks were packed with colorful wrapped gifts. Someone usually started a chorus of Jingle Bells, with everyone else joining in.

A parade of girls Good Age reader Barbara Slettedahl Gertsema, who regularly bussed home to Granite Falls, recounted another delightful aspect of these


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trips: “On any given Friday afternoon, there would be a parade of young farm girls, suitcase in one hand and empty egg cartons in the other, heading for the bus depot.” This “parade” became so familiar to the traffic cop at 7th and Nicollet, he would tease the girls, saying, “Bring back eggs!” “The depot was always busy,” Barbara continued. “The bus drivers were all smartly dressed in their uniforms, slim and trim and well mannered. We felt safe with this ‘Dad’ figure guiding our bus.” Parents then also felt secure about putting their young children on a bus, alone, for a long crossstate trip. In retrospect, the ’50s were the heyday of bus travel in America. A safe, comfortable ride — a Norman Rockwell image. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Writer her at chall@ mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 13


Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ The turn-of-the-century mining boom on Minnesota’s Iron Range attracted more than 100,000 people, including many Finnish, Slavic, Italian and Croatian immigrants. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Mining captains decided who mined where, and workers complained that captains were susceptible to bribes. Companies also deducted mining supplies like fuses and blasting caps from wages. Thus, miners might not have any idea what their paycheck would be until it arrived at the end of the month.

‘Murder’ and mayhem →→A century ago, Minnesota’s mining boom led to a huge strike, followed by violence and unrest

This year marks the 100th anniversary of one of the largest labor conflicts in Minnesota history — the Mesabi Iron Range Strike of 1916. By the strike’s end in September 1916, thousands of miners had walked off the job, three people were dead and hundreds had been arrested. In the early 20th century, the Iron Range was in the midst of a population boom. In 1885, fewer than 5,000 people lived there. But after iron ore started shipping in 1892, the area’s population soared, reaching more than 100,000 by 1920. Predominantly immigrants — Finns, Slovenes, Italians, Croatians and more — these new residents and made up 85 percent of the mining workforce. The 1916 strike started with one particular immigrant — Joe Greeni, an Italian miner at the Alpena mine in Virginia. On May 30, he received his monthly paycheck, which was much less than he’d anticipated. He suggested a strike to his fellow Alpena miners and also visited the St. James Mine in Aurora. Word quickly spread in the region, and within a week, around 8,000 miners, mostly immigrants, had joined the strike. At the root of the unrest was the contract system that governed miners’ wages. Instead of a set daily wage, workers’ pay was determined by the amount of ore they mined, regardless of how easy or difficult an area was to mine. 14 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Unionizing and violence At the same time, housing and rent on the range in 1916 were estimated to be 20 percent higher than in the Twin Cities, and food expenses were 50 to 100 percent more. The strikers’ demands included set daily wages for various working conditions, an eight-hour workday that included time entering and leaving the mines. They demanded an end to the contract system. By then, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) — a national labor organization that focused on groups like unskilled workers, women and immigrants — was lending its expertise to help organize the strike. But the mining companies refused to negotiate, including Oliver Iron Mining Company, a U.S. Steel subsidiary that controlled 75 percent of the Mesabi Range’s ore resources. The companies claimed the IWW was manipulating unsuspecting miners into striking and focused on breaking the strike. They hired more than a 1,000 private guards, reportedly to protect company


property and non-striking workers. Soon guards armed with firearms were present in many communities.

Fatal fighting On June 22, guards confronted a group of miners picketing on public property. Fighting and shots broke out. Croatian miner John Alar was killed, and some 3,000 people attended his funeral with a banner reading “Murdered by Oliver Gunmen.” Police responded by arresting two IWW organizers on charges of criminal libel. Minnesota Gov. Joseph A.A. Burnquist also got involved, instructing the St. Louis County sheriff to arrest anyone “participating in riots.” The sheriff soon deputized more than 400 private company guards, adding to his own force. Tension between the two sides continued to grow, and on July 3, several new deputies forced their way into a home in Biwabik, allegedly to arrest a miner for illegal liquor sales. A fight ensued between company guards and several miners, and two people — Deputy Sheriff James Myron and a Finnish soda pop distributor — were killed. All the miners on the scene were jailed for first-degree murder, and several IWW lead organizers were arrested on charges of inciting murder.

A turning tide Violence from angry miners only continued to erupt during the rest of the summer. They fired on vehicles carrying strikebreakers, threatened to blow up non-strikers’ homes and attempted to burn a railway bridge.

However, with many organizers in jail and financial resources draining, the miners’ ability to maintain the strike waned. Workers who had previously been supported by strike funds began drifting back to work, and by early September, half the closed mines were back in operation. A vote ultimately called off the strike on Sept. 17. Federal investigators later reported that they found no evidence that the IWW had stirred workers into a strike, as the companies claimed. Investigators also blamed much of the strike violence on the companies and their “private army of gunmen,” according to one U.S. Commission of Industrial Relations report. Within a few months of the strike’s end, the companies implemented wage increases as well as several reforms suggested by federal investigators, including prompt dismissal of captains who tried to exploit miners. In December, after months in jail for the accused, a deal was finally reached in the July 3 shootings. Three defendants pled guilty manslaughter in Myron’s death and the rest were freed.

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Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

A cough that won’t stop → See a doctor if it lasts more than two weeks

If you come down with a common viral respiratory infection, any cough associated with it usually goes away in a week or two. No big deal. But a cough that doesn’t go away is something else, and it can be a very big deal. The most common reason a cough persists for more than two weeks is because the person with the cough is a smoker. Smoking damages the lungs’ bronchial tubes and makes them less able to quickly fight off an acquired infection. A person who smokes has reason to worry about a persistent cough, especially if it’s not associated with sinus symptoms typical of a common viral infection. The initial symptom of a lung cancer is often a cough. A cough that produces sputum specked or streaked with blood demands a visit to a physician.

Sinuses and asthma Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common causes of a continuing cough in older adults. Secretions produced by the inflamed sinus membranes drain down the back of the throat and enter the passage to the lungs. The resulting irritation of the bronchial tubes leads to the typical irritative cough. The cough is usually dry, but secretions may be brought up after awakening in the morning. It abates only after successful treatment of the sinus condition. A persistent cough is sometimes present in those with allergic or perennial asthma. An asthmatic cough may be more troublesome for a person than shortness of breath or wheezing, and it may be the first symptom of the ailment. And yes, asthma can come on at any age.

Stomach issues Regurgitation of stomach fluids during sleep can be the cause of a cough that won’t go away. If the valve at the top of the stomach doesn’t function properly, stomach contractions can propel acidic secretions up the esophagus (swallowing tube). Bronchitis and cough develop when this fluid overflows into the airway tubes. The reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus often occurs silently at night when the sleeping position has eliminated the defense of gravity. If a correct diagnosis is made, treatment is highly effective. A cough can also be the result of swallowed food or fluid “going down the wrong pipe.” If this occurs on a regular basis, the cough will persist. Aspiration of swallowed food or fluid into the lung is unusual in healthy persons, but is common among the chronically ill and in those who are bedridden. Persons with impairment of the swallowing mechanism, such as those with strokes, Parkinson’s disease or advanced Alzheimer’s disease, are most susceptible. 16 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

ACE inhibitors An annoying and persistent dry cough is a potential side effect of a class of drugs called ACE inhibitors (for example, lisinopril, Prinivil and Accupril). These agents are commonly prescribed by physicians to treat hypertension, heart and kidney disease. About 10 percent of users develop the cough. It’s a dry, non-congested nuisance cough that resolves when the medication is stopped.

Other causes Some people cough for the same reason they bite their fingernails: It’s a habit. A habitual cough isn’t present during sleep. Other causes of a persistent cough include heart failure, an enlarged thyroid gland, tuberculosis, bronchial damage from previous pneumonia and rare ailments that cause formation of scar tissue in the lungs. Sometimes the best of doctors may not find a cause and reluctantly attribute the cough to simple degeneration of airway tissues. Anyone suffering from a persistent cough should see a physician. The medical history and physical examination often are sufficient to lead to the correct diagnosis, but a chest X-ray, a CT scan of the chest or a referral to a chest specialist may be needed. Dr. Michael Spilane, now retired, spent more than four decades practicing and teaching geriatric medicine in St. Paul. Send comments or questions to drspilane@ mngoodage.com.


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Good Health / Caregiving / By Sam Patet

Feeling stressed? → Try caregiver consulting or respite care

Are you caring for a loved one and feel like you’ve hit a brick wall? Have you been doing it on your own for years and now you feel like you can’t go on? If you answered yes to either question, then you could probably benefit from a helping hand. Whether you’re new to caregiving or have been doing it for awhile now, you may not be aware of the many resources that are available to help make your caregiving journey a little easier. Two such resources are caregiver consulting and respite care.

Caregiver consulting Caregiver consultants are trained professionals who help caregivers assess their situations and make plans for the future. Oftentimes they have degrees in social work or nursing. They help caregivers identify and develop their strengths and build confidence in areas for which they don’t have as much experience. Some caregiver consultants are trained in specialty areas, including: ⊲ REACH: Short for Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiver Health, this is a proven approach used by trained consultants to support family members and others who are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia. Caregivers learn how to reduce stress, solve problems, manage difficult behaviors, feel confident in the care they provide and improve their ability to cope. Four sessions are offered through the program with follow-up sessions as desired. ⊲ Family Memory Care: Used by trained caregiver consultants to support family members and others who are caring for someone experiencing memory loss, this approach involves six sessions with follow-up sessions as desired. Family members of the caregiver are required to attend some of the meetings. While this can be a challenge to coordinate, it can make for an in-depth assessment. Visit mnhealthyaging.org and search for “Family Memory Care.”

Respite care Even the most dedicated, loving caregivers will admit they need a break every once in a while. That’s where 18 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

respite care comes in. It provides caregivers much-needed time off to attend to matters other than caring for their loved ones — things like grocery shopping, calling a friend or even taking a nap. There are a variety of options, including in-home programs, adult-day services, group respite programs and even facility-based overnight programs. ⊲ In-home programs: This option involves trained volunteers or paid staff who come to an older adult’s home and provide services there. ⊲ Adult day services: Generally scheduled Monday through Friday during working hours, these services not only provide caregivers time off, but they also allow the older adult to develop new relationships with other participants and respite care staff. This socialization may reduce isolation and provide a better quality of life. You can find a listing of some adult day programs at leadingagemn.org.


DENTURES ⊲ Group respite programs: Scheduled one to several times a month, these are led by volunteers and feature activities and socialization. One example of this program is Lyngblomsten’s The Gathering, which typically involves five hours of care. ⊲ Facility-based overnight programs: These allow caregivers to take long vacations or to get a couple nights of uninterrupted sleep. Care can be scheduled for one night or up to several weeks. For information on any of these types of respite care programs, or for a listing of programs in your area, contact the Senior LinkAge Line at 800-333-2433 or mnaging.org/advisor/ SLL. Another resource to try is MNHelp.info. The best way to find out if a respite program will be a good fit for your loved one is to take a tour beforehand. You can meet staff, ask questions and see if your loved one feels comfortable. You may feel guilty about having another person care for your loved one, even for a couple of hours. Know, however, that if he or she is in good hands, both of you will benefit.

The University of Minnesota, School of Dentistry, is seeking patients who already have NO NATURAL TEETH and complete upper and complete lower dentures. This program offers a new set of complete upper and lower dentures, and the lower denture will be converted to attach to contain two mandibular implants. The total cost of this program is $1,500.00. The program will begin in September, and last until the procedure is completed. Patients will be required to attend a weekly appointment at the School of Dentistry. If you have an interest in possible participation, please contact Dee Blomster at 612-301-1310 to schedule a screening appointment beginning May 10. Thanks for your interest.

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Sam Patet is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides healthcare, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. Learn more at lyngblomsten.org and caregivercollaborative.org.

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Good Living / Travel

The

NEW PER

20 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


RKS MSP at

T

raveling by air this summer? Did you know that July and August are the busiest months of the year at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport? (Tuesdays and Wednesdays are the heaviest due to business commuters.) That can make for nearly full parking ramps — and passenger-clogged concourses, too. Fortunately, MSP — rather than cutting back on perks like so many airlines seem to be — is adding more features with a top-to-bottom refresh, said Metropolitan Airports Commission spokeswoman Phoebe Larson. Travelers can expect to see changes at both terminals — now through 2018 — affecting everything from the ticketing, security and baggage claim to the shops, restaurants and even restrooms, Larson said. Here’s a sampling of MSP’s newest features:

By Sarah Jackson

Though airlines may be cutting back when it comes to catering to passenger comforts, MSP is adding more traveler-friendly amenities

PGA–MSP This new-in-2015 12,000-square-foot golf facility at Terminal 1 — above Ike’s Food and Cocktails and the French Meadow Bakery — features a putting green, a pro shop, a restaurant (Champions’ Grille), a lounge and a golf simulator that can take you to 59 virtual golf courses, including Pebble Beach in California, TCP Sawgrass in Florida and St. Andrews in Scotland. The simulator costs $60 for 60 minutes or $40 for 30 minutes. There’s also a virtual driving range that costs $20 for 15 minutes or $25 for 30 minutes as well as golf lessons for $35 for a 15 minutes or $75 for 30 minutes with a tech. Lounge-only access costs $10 and includes business-class Wi-Fi. See pgamsp.com. Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 21


The NEW PERKS at MSP

ESCAPE LOUNGE Avoid the hustle and bustle of the terminal and await your departure in this new lounge for all airline passengers, located above the entrance to Concourse E, just inside the north Security Checkpoint in Terminal 1. For an entrance fee of $40 in advance ($30 per child) or $45 at the door ($38 per child), passengers gain access to a large selection of complementary beverages (including a full bar), a breakfast buffet of pastries, breakfast burritos and steelcut oats in the morning, plus snacks, soups, sandwiches and salads served all day. Food and drink upgrades are available for an additional charge. There’s also a business center, free high-speed Wi-Fi, plush chairs, a library of newsstand magazines and newspapers, complimentary tablet computers and sweeping views of the airfield.

Operated by the UK-based Manchester Airports Group, the 5,000-square-foot space includes separate areas for serious business travelers (who may require quieter spaces) and leisure travelers who are kicking off their vacations. Children age 23 months and younger can enter the lounge free of charge with advanced notice. Reviews so far on TripAdvisor are positive for the new $2 million lounge, which opened in December (and doesn’t require a membership with any airline club). Hours are 4 a.m. to 9 p.m. Learn more at escapelounges.com or call 844-413-7227.

QUICK RIDE RAMP

PLAY AREAS Bringing the grandkids? Let them burn off extra energy at aviation-themed playgrounds at Concourse C in Terminal 1 and at Gate H6 at Terminal 2. Each playground features a climbable mock airplane and an air traffic control tower, complete with slides. Adult seating areas nearby include easy-access electrical outlets. Learn more about family-friendly areas at MSP, including lactation and nursing rooms, at tinyurl.com/msp-mn-family. 22 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Located a mile from Terminal 1 off Highway 5 at the Post Road exit, this ramp opened in March 2015. It offers parking for $14 a day, compared to $24 a day for general parking at Terminal 1, also known as Lindbergh. Free shuttles run 24/7, offering five-minute rides to or from Terminal 1 only. Payment is credit card only. Larson said there are seven shuttles in the loop, so there’s no waiting on either end for your ride. “It is the easiest, fastest and least expensive way to park if you’re departing from Terminal 1,” she said. “Don’t let the park-and-ride aspect fool you.” Travelers can get real-time parking availability for the ramps at Terminal 1, Terminal 2 (Humphrey) and the Quick Ride Ramp at MSPairport.com or from the FlySmart mobile app or by calling 877-359-7275.


More than 50 new restaurants and retail stores are set to open as part of MSP’s next round of renovations. Republic — a gastro pub perhaps best known for it original location in the Seven Corners district of Minneapolis — is expected to open this fall in Concourse D. The restaurant will double as a live music venue with St. Paul’s McNally

Smith College of Music students offering free entertainment. Other new eateries expected in the coming years — in addition to new boutiques for shopping — include Red Cow, Black Sheep Pizza, Smack Shack, Holy Land Deli, Lolo American Kitchen, Salty Tart Bakery, Angel Food Bakery, Dunkin Donuts and Qdoba.

nordicfest.com

NEW RESTAURANTS, SHOPS

SECURITY ASSISTANCE Travelers with disabilities or medical conditions can request assistance during the security screening process by calling the TSA Cares helpline — 855-787-2227 — 72 hours in advance

of their departures. Learn more at tsa.gov/travel/passenger-support. Passengers age 75 and older can leave their shoes and light jackets on during screenings.

50th Anniversary!

JULY 28-30, 2016

Decorah

BEER EMPORIUM Stone Arch, a Minnesota craft-beer restaurant, is expected to open this fall in the former Chili’s space in the Airport Mall (near the entrance to Concourse F). (It was set to open this summer, but the date was recently pushed back.) Developed through a partnership with the nonprofit Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild, the venue will showcase a variety of the state’s beers, including many brews that are newly released or that haven’t yet seen wide distribution. In the Stone Arch Craft Lab, “a bar within the bar,” guests can take part in beer tastings and classes hosted by brew masters from around the state. Menu items will come from locally sourced, sustainable ingredients. An accompanying Craft Market will sell fresh-made sandwiches, salads and healthy snacks for travelers on the go, as well as retail merchandise from the local breweries represented in the bar.

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5/18/16 12:28 PM

AIRCRAFT VIEWING AREA Newly opened in 2015, this mini park, open from dawn to dusk in the heart of MSP’s airfield, provides spectacular views of takeoffs and landings from multiple runways, plus convenient parking, picnic tables, benches and newly planted landscaping. Get directions at tinyurl.com/msp-mn-view.

Sarah Jackson is the editor of Minnesota Good Age magazine. Send questions or comments to editor@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 23


Good Living / Housing / By Sunny McFarren

BEYOND BINGO →→Retirement communities today are geared toward longer stays filled with enriching activities

Today’s best retirement communities are like Disney Worlds for mature adults. They’ve come about in response to statistics like these: ⊲⊲ Retirement now lasts nearly 20 years for most Americans. ⊲⊲ Roughly 1 million Americans reside in senior-care facilities — a number that’s expected to double by 2030. ⊲⊲ People over age 65 make up more than 13 percent of the population in the U.S., today — and that percentage is expected to increase to 20 percent by 2050. ⊲⊲ Roughly 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, a trend that began in 2011. Seniors today are more highly educated and alert than any previous generation and they’re more driven to participate in activities. Here’s what many communities are offering to entice the growing Silver Tsunami of older adults:

Entertainment Today’s retirement communities are definitely not like your grandmother’s nursing home — where a single bingo game was often the only highlight of the week. Entertainment at today’s best communities includes screenings of top films, sing-a-longs, trips to local sports games, concerts and plays, picnics at local lakes or parks and more. Local music groups often provide entertainment at evening meals. Available games might include highly competitive Wii video games (such as golf), poker, bridge, bingo or canasta. Most communities offer numerous activities to help seniors stay fit, too, including exercise classes such as yoga, tai chi, chair exercises and dance (such as the Texas two-step).

Education You could compare today’s retirement communities to college campuses for seniors. Facilities usually include exercise rooms, game rooms and an abundance of free weekly classes that teach a surprising array of skills — such as crafts, foreign languages, meditation or how to write memoirs. Some facilities actually go way beyond what you would find at most colleges: Most have large, attractive dining rooms that offers gourmet food prepared by a chef (plus small kitchens in each living unit, too). Most facilities have beauty shops on campus. Some include workshops for woodworking enthusiasts. And many have movie rooms with special acoustics and 24 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

padded chairs. Outside grounds are apt to include putting greens, or shuffleboard or bocce ball areas. Some offer community garden plots, too!

Home services In addition to all this, retirement communities also appeal to many seniors because residents don’t have to do repairs: They don’t need to mow the lawn, clean their gutters or worry about adapting their spaces to any disabilities they might develop. At many facilities, trained nurses are on hand around the clock; some even boast health clinics that offer daily checkups. Many retirement communities offer light housekeeping — including laundering sheets and changing bed linens each week. Some communities organize their own choral, acting and walking groups. Almost all offer vans that take residents on free weekly trips to grocery stores, pharmacies or shopping centers.

Tours Doing preliminary research on most retirement communities, even ones that are far away from you, is reasonably easy these days if you’re computer literate. Most retirement communities are delighted to invite people in for a free meal, a tour or a special event; you may even know residents there who can give you pertinent information from their point of view. Some communities may offer to put you up overnight in one of their guest rooms for free. Here are a few things to look up if you’re considering a move out of town:


Collaborating with Families Sort with Empathy | Pack with Care Distribute with Efficiency | Place with Pride

You could compare today’s retirement communities to college campuses for seniors. ⊲ Check the town’s Chamber of Commerce site for a list of annual activities, general information about size and population of the town, plus photos taken in and around the area. You can also talk to the chamber about organizations such as Rotary, Kiwanis, AAUW chapters or particular churches or synagogues. ⊲ Climate matters to many seniors. Weatherbase.com shows average monthly high and low temperatures for most towns and cities in the U.S., and topozone.com shows natural features such as lakes, rivers and mountains. ⊲ Check out a community’s crime rate at neighborhoodscout.com. Finally if you’re interested in the possibility of retiring to another country, check out bankrate.com and internationalliving.com for articles such as Six Cheap Places to Retire Abroad, and information about up and coming communities where retirees can live on less than $2,000 a month. Sunny McFarren is a contributor to the Senior Wire News Service, which has been providing curated editorial content for older adults since 1990.

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Good Living / Finance / By Skip Johnson

MILESTONE BIRTHDAYS → Getting older brings real financial benefits

Happy birthday to you! What do birthdays mean as we get older? Well, if you aren’t a kid any more — and the years are really adding up — you might not feel like throwing a party. But I’m here to tell you, there’s reason to celebrate! Certain birthdays mark important milestones on the road to retirement. Let’s take a look at a few:

50 Turning 50 is an important birthday because you become eligible for catch-up contributions to retirement savings accounts. For 2016, 401(k) contributions are capped at $18,000 for younger workers, but those age 50 and older can contribute an additional $6,000. For IRAs, younger workers can contribute $5,500, while older workers can save an additional $1,000.

55 At age 55, you’re considered a senior citizen. While the fact may make you feel old, it’s actually a good thing. You’re eligible for many senior citizen discounts at restaurants, grocery stores and retailers. Also, if you leave your job in the calendar year you turn 55 or later, you can withdraw money from your 401(k) without having to pay a penalty. Keep in mind, however, that you’ll still have to pay taxes on the money you withdraw.

59 1/2 Age 59 1/2 is the standard age at which you can withdraw money from your retirement accounts without paying a penalty to the IRS, even if you’re still working. This includes 401(k)s and IRAs.

62 At age 62, you’re eligible to start collecting Social Security benefits. However, you might not want to. Your benefit will grow each year you wait to file until age 70 (more on that later).

65 This is your first year of Medicare eligibility. It’s also considered “full retirement age” by many employers (but not by Social Security). Start planning for Medicare before your birthday; you need to apply 26 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

If you leave your job in the calendar year you turn 55 or later, you can withdraw money from your 401(k) without having to pay a penalty. three months before you turn 65. Medicare is the primary source of health coverage for retirees. However, it won’t cover all of your medical expenses. You’ll likely still want to consider employer-sponsored plans, Medigap and/or long-term care insurance.

66 or 67 Depending on the year you were born, you’ll hit full retirement age for Social Security at age 66 or 67. Remember, though, your benefit will increase 8 percent each year you continue to wait until age 70. How do you know your full retirement age? If you were born between 1943 and 1955, your full retirement age is 66. If you were born


Stay in the home you love! between 1955 and 1960, your full retirement age is 66 plus an increasing number of months. If you were born after 1960, your full retirement age is 67. See ssa.gov/planners/retire for more details.

70 Once you’ve hit age 70, there’s no reason to delay claiming Social Security benefits. You can wait as long as you want, but your benefits won’t increase.

70 1/2 At age 70 1/2, you’re required to start taking distributions from your retirement accounts. Based on IRS life-expectancy tables, you can calculate how much you’ll need to withdraw at age 70 1/2 and each year beyond that. Those are your required minimum distributions or RMDs. They don’t apply to Roth IRAs or other Roth accounts. Not all of these ages are significant for every person. But every person should have a plan for key retirement milestones. I recommend sitting down with a trusted financial professional to figure out which ages are most important to you.

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Senior Partners Care Eliminates Medicare Out of Pocket Costs

5/17/16 5:27 PM

Senior Partners Care (SPC) is one of the best kept secrets in Minnesota. If you are currently enrolled in Medicare, or will be starting soon, please keep reading. Senior Partners Care is not insurance. It is a community based program that enables Minnesota Medicare recipients to access the medical care they need. This program bridges the financial gap between their medical bills and their Medicare coverage. SPC has partnered with most of the major metropolitan area hospitals and hundreds of clinics and providers statewide. These healthcare providers (SPC Partners) have agreed to accept Medicare as full payment for Medicare covered expenses. They waive the Medicare deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.

Senior Partners Care 2016 Financial Guidelines

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Persons in family/household

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Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financial planning firm and Minnesota insurance agency in New Hope. Skip also offers investment advisory services through AdvisorNet Wealth Management, a registered investment advisor.

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28 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Good Living / In the Kitchen / Recipe and photo by Aleksandra Till ⊲⊲Set a rack in the topmost position of the oven and turn the broiler to high. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Season both sides of the chicken with salt and pepper.

THE POWER OF PAPRIKA!

This recipe contains a lot of paprika, but the rich, sweet and spicy flavors in this rustic Hungarian chicken dish with a creamy pepper sauce
may pleasantly surprise you. If you can’t find Hungarian noodles, any egg noodle or spaetzle will work well.

SLOW COOKER CHICKEN PAPRIKASH WITH HUNGARIAN NOODLES

⊲⊲Place the chicken, skin-side up, on one end of the baking sheet. Spread the peppers, onion and mushrooms on the other end of the baking sheet. ⊲⊲Bake for about 10 minutes. Stir the vegetables every couple minutes and flip the chicken midway through. Take the tray out of the oven when the chicken skin is sizzling and the vegetables are soft and blackened in places. ⊲⊲Transfer the chicken, vegetables and any accumulated juices into a crockpot. Add the paprika, water, salt and 1 tablespoon of butter. Cover and turn on high for 4 to 6 hours or low for 8 to 10 hours. Before serving, carefully move the chicken to a cutting board to debone. Look carefully in the crockpot and remove any tiny bones from the stew. ⊲⊲Whisk together the sour cream and flour until there are no lumps of flour.

2 pounds of chicken drumsticks and thighs (3 hind quarters cut apart)
 Salt and black pepper 2 tablespoons butter, divided 1 large onion, sliced thinly
 1 large red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and chopped 1 cup mushrooms, washed, dried, sliced
 ¼ cup Hungarian paprika
 1 cup water
 ½ teaspoon salt
 ½ cup sour cream
 1 tablespoon flour 12 ounces Hungarian noodles

⊲⊲Boil the noodles in a pot of salted water. Drain. Toss with 1 tablespoon butter and set aside.

Serves 4

⊲⊲Place one or two pieces of chicken over a heap of noodles on each plate. Ladle sauce over top and serve.

⊲⊲Temper the sour cream by adding some of the chicken-cooking liquid, a spoonful at a time, to the cream mixture, stirring after each addition. You want to slowly raise the temperature of the sour cream until it’s very warm. Once the sour cream is tempered, you can pour it all back into the pot and stir to combine. Don’t let the sauce boil once you’ve added the sour cream mixture.

Aleksandra Till is the founder-owner of Homegrown Foods, a meal-planning, prep and delivery service, serving the Twin Cities. Learn more at eatgoodathome.com. Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 29


BUILDING

BRIDG Photo by Liz Allen of Liz Allen Photography 30 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


It

GES BY SONA MEHRING

CaringBridge founder Sona Mehring of Eagan gives a

first-person account of life in the — sometimes-beautiful — trenches of caregiving

feels like yesterday that I was shuttling my three boys in a mini-van bursting with school backpacks and the chlorine-scent of wet towels, with my mom, Bonnie, riding shotgun. Sometimes, the dog, too. Someone always needed to be somewhere — all at the same time, as I recall. Swim-team practice and Nintendo “play dates” for the guys; and the doctor for Mom. I was in constant motion, with a state of mind best described as perpetually frazzled. The pressures to be a good mom and a good daughter were colliding, and I wasn’t living up to my personal expectations for either. I was squeezed at both ends. My sons are grown now, and my sweet Mom is gone, after fighting Stage IV breast cancer, followed by liver cancer. I look back on those relentless days and wish I had raised the white flag sooner — not for surrender, but for assistance. Like many people, asking for help is not built into my DNA, but I realize now that reducing my carpool duties and tapping my brother for respite care before I’d reached a breaking point would have benefitted the boys, Mom, my brother — and me. So as the founder CaringBridge, where I have seen magnificent

Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 31


BUILDING BRIDGES acts of help, encouragement and giving — and receiving — during the past decade, I’m asking family caregivers to do more of what I say, and less of what I did!

Here’s why ⊲⊲ Research from sources including The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and PsychoOncology confirms that family caregivers with good social support positively affect their patient’s health as well as their own. ⊲⊲ A Forrester Research survey conducted on behalf of CaringBridge found that 88 percent of family caregivers and patients say connecting with family and friends has a positive impact on the healing process. There’s simply no doubt that taking care of caregivers is on equal footing with caring for patients. But it actually may be harder to do.

What does ‘help’ look like? Whether jolted from normal life into a crisis role as a family caregiver, or gradually assuming more responsibility for someone with declining health, the job of a caregiver is to “keep going.” There’s little pause for reflection or distraction from the tasks at hand. I remember once thinking that if I sat down, I would never get up. The feeling was very real at the time. For family caregivers, “taking care of yourself,” mostly falls off the never-ending list of things to do. It shouldn’t, but it does. The wistful imagining of coffee with a friend or hunkering down for a TV binge-watch gets displaced by the reality of someone needing something. A specialist’s appointment trumps a haircut, every time.

+

Watch an in-depth Fox 9 report about Sona Mehring at tinyurl.com/fox-mehring

32 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

A domino effect But the exhausting caregiver schedule can be considered in parallel to the desire of many loved ones who truly want to help. It’s just that family caregivers have little mind-share to articulate what help can look like. In my case, when I called my brother — in tears — for help with Mom, he was horrified. I’d fallen into the caregiver pattern of just doing things myself, because it was easier than asking for help. Only it wasn’t. Once my brother saw I was suffering, there was a domino effect. He was much more aware, and next time I didn’t have to ask for help. He was there.

Are you kidding me? While requesting help isn’t easy, tolerating such well intended — but unrealistic — directives as “Take a bubble bath,” “Get away for a day” or “Just say, ‘No.’” is harder. I believe the only way to pop the thought bubble above a caregiver’s head that says, “Are you kidding me?” is to define “helpful.” You have to start someplace; baby steps are OK. One step could be “leaning in” to the tougher emotions of caregiving. It’s entirely acceptable, and healthy, to confess to someone in your inner circle, “I want to run away.” Even if you don’t mean it — and on the day of my breakdown with my brother, I did — saying out loud that life is heavy may relieve a little pressure.

Accept that hug A second step: I personally give you permission to occasionally ignore the phone and doorbell. The person dropping off a casserole can leave it on the porch. Having been on the giving and receiving end of many casseroles, I know this to be true. And next time you receive one of those stiff-andawkward hugs for which Minnesotans are famous, I strongly recommend hugging back. Every caregiver, for one brief minute, should experience having care reflected back on them. It is powerful.


What is CaringBridge? CaringBridge is an Eaganbased nonprofit organization that helps families set up free personal websites to share important information quickly during any type of health event. People invite close family and friends to read about their journey on the sites. In return, family and friends can show their love and support by posting encouraging messages. How did it all start? In 1997, Sona Mehring’s good friends had a premature baby. When they asked her to let everyone know what was going on with the family and their child, she knew dozens of emotional — and timeconsuming — phone calls were ahead of her. “I decided to create a website,” said Mehring, a software engineer. That first CaringBridge website allowed friends and family to easily get updates and offer support and encouragement. Word spread, and others began to request their own similar sites. In 2002, CaringBridge became a nonprofit organization. In 2003, Mehring became the organization’s full-time CEO. Today, 1 in 9 people in the U.S. have used CaringBridge to rally support for a loved one during a health journey such as a surgery, hospitalization, cancer treatment or other health event. Indeed, CaringBridge is a household name with 4 million unique monthly visitors — roughly 300,000 people a day, who leave 850 messages for loved ones every hour. And they get to do it all for free — although donations are encouraged and happily accepted. Users have created more than half a million advertisement-free CaringBridge websites in the past 19 years with a reach that touches more than 200 countries and territories around the world. This past February, 54-year-old Mehring, after serving two decades as CEO, named CaringBridge COO, Liwanag Ojala, the new CEO. Mehring’s new role of chief ambassador will include spreading awareness about CaringBridge and the impact social networks can make on healing. Learn more at caringbridge.org.

Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 33


BUILDING BRIDGES

Five ways to be a caregiver’s cheerleader By Sona Mehring In 1998, my mother, Bonnie, was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer, and in 2001 she was stricken with liver cancer. As a nurse, my mother was the one providing care for others. She was even a caregiver for her mother, my Grandma Bessie, before she passed away in 1997 at age 94. But with her own cancer diagnosis, my mom was the one who needed a caregiver. She came to live with my family while she underwent surgery and treatment for both cancer battles. It was fantastic and a joy to have her right there with me — something I would never change — but it was also incredibly stressful, emotionally and physically draining and unnerving. Caregivers need their own unique support from family and friends. Here are what I consider to be the five best ways to be a caregiver’s cheerleader:

1. Build a support team. Caregiving can be relentless, exhausting and overwhelming. Every caregiver needs a short list of close friends and family they can lean on for help. Take the first step of helping them build a short list of cheerleaders and make sure your name is at the top of that list. Use the list of names and divvy up daily tasks and errands by creating a schedule. My loved ones consistently delivered meals, purchased groceries, spent time with my kids, walked the dog, helped with yard and housework, and had specific visit “Mom” times. Once it’s on a schedule, it’s less overwhelming. Resources like The Carry Crew Concept book and workbook (carrycrew.com) can equip you with the tools to build a team of cheerleaders who can provide this practical help.

34 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

2. Navigate the unknown. There’s never one right answer to anything. For most, the act of caregiving is uncharted territory, which for me was very unnerving — I like to have answers. Being a supportive sounding board can help any caregiver navigate important decisions and issues. There’s a wealth of information and resources online. However, sifting through all that information and researching the best resources can be daunting for a caregiver who most likely has a job and family of their own. Do the research for them and provide a list of the best information and tools that can help with their situation. The Caregiver Action Network (caregiveraction.org) is a good place to start.


3. Take the focus off physical care. Some of my favorite moments caring for my mother were when my friends got to know her. The shared stories, laughter and camaraderie between my friends and mother were so special. Those times weren’t about the physical care; they were about loving relationships. The connection between my friends and my mother made asking for help that much easier. It also became a wonderful shared experience between my mother and our cheerleaders. Today we often reminisce, with a smile, about the shared moments we had with my mother.

4. Find humor. Provide caregivers with some respite and help them step away to find the humor in life’s struggles. Regardless of how strong and positive caregivers try to be, daily life can involve sadness and suffering. Laughter truly is the best medicine. By taking time with friends, doing the things I enjoyed, I found myself laughing more, which in turn brought more laughter into caring for my mother. Laughter has also been found to reduce pain and stress, as well as release endorphins, which can bring positive changes to one’s mindset. There’s even an Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor (aath.org) that provides resources on how to practice and promote healthy humor and laughter.

5. Ignite the cheering section. Give caregivers the confidence to openly share their hopes and fears, joys and sorrows, and everything in between. Putting words around experiences and feelings isn’t always easy, but it’s cathartic. Opening up to those who care ignites a cheering section, creating a caring and supportive community. I’m not a writer. I’m a software engineer. But that didn’t stop me from relying on my mother’s CaringBridge website during both her illnesses. Taking a little time to record my feelings and connect with my friends and family gave me strength and hope. Now, thanks to hundreds of messages from family and friends still stored on the site, I have a permanent record of my time with my mother that captured the love we all had for her.

Sona Mehring is founder and chief ambassador of the global nonprofit organization CaringBridge.org, based in Eagan, and author of Hope Conquers All: Inspiring Stories of Love and Healing from CaringBridge (2013). Throughout her career, Mehring has received several honors and awards. Most recently, in 2015, Sona was named a Titan of Technology by the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal. She was recognized as one of 2011’s Most Influential Women in Technology by Fast Company. Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 35


July

Can’t-Miss Calendar

ONGOING

Le Switch → This clever, affectionate and timely comedy tackles what it means to be committed and in love in the era of marriage equality. When: Through July 31 Where: Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$48 Info: jungletheater.com

Big Pants and Botox → Ditch the romance and fluff for a hilarious and emotional evening that one critic called “a funny, moving and ultimately uplifting story of one woman’s refusal to slide gently into middle age.”

When: Through Aug. 14 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

St. Paul Walking Tours → Landmark Center guides will lead a variety of free tours highlighting the history of St. Paul. When: 10 a.m. on select Wednesdays through September with themes of Heart of the City, Rice Park and The Great River. Where: St. Paul Cost: Tours are free. Reservations are required. Info: landmarkcenter.org

Chanhassen Concert Series

Savage Gardens & Big Bugs

→ A new exhibit — Savage Gardens: The Real and Imaginary World of Carnivorous Plants — features live plant specimens, giant sculptures and interactive displays that show how different carnivorous plants lure their prey. Highlights include a 9-foot-tall Venus flytrap with controls that allow visitors to open and close the its traps. An insect-themed exhibit — David Rogers’ Big Bugs — will be open at the same time, featuring a 1,200-pound praying mantis, a larger-than-life 7-foot-high bee with a hive and a butterfly with a 5½-foot wingspan, all created by a Long Island artist who specializes in rustic designs and natural materials. When: Through Sept. 18 for Savage Gardens, through September for Big Bugs Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: Included with gate admission ($12 for ages 13 and older) Info: arboretum.umn.edu

36 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

→ Experienced a variety of tribute bands paying homage to Chicago (July 8–9), the Divas of Disco (July 22–23), Led Zeppelin (Aug. 12–13), the Andrews Sisters (Aug. 27), Johnny Cash (Sept. 9–10), MTV Unplugged (Sept. 17), the Eagles (Sept. 22–24), Frank Sinatra (Sept. 30–Oct. 1) and The Music of Martin Zellar of the Gear Daddies (Oct. 7–8). When: Dinner is at 6 p.m., followed by concerts at 8 p.m., except for Sunday events, which start earlier. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $40 per person and $15 more for dinner Info: chanhassendt.com

Music in the Zoo → See a wide variety of artists in an open-air atmosphere, including Blondie, The Mavericks, Indigo Girls, The Jayhawks, George Thorogood &


The Destroyers, The Willis Clan, Ziggy Marley, Buddy Guy and more.

When: Through Aug. 27. Check the website for artists and show times. Where: Weesner Family Amphitheater, Minnesota Zoo, Apple Valley Cost: Various. Enjoy free admission to the zoo beginning at 2 p.m. on the day of show with a concert ticket. Info: suemclean.com/zoo

Summer Flower Show → The Marjorie McNeely Conservatory’s annual show will feature a botanical color scheme of purple and lavender, including a new Oriental trumpet hybrid lily named Purple Prince. When: Through Oct. 2 Where: Como Park & Zoo and Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

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Quilting Art Today → View historic and contemporary quilts from local, national and international artists, including artists from Sweden. As part of the exhibit, expert quilters will demonstrate their craft, lead discussions, answer visitor questions and offer weekend trunk shows. A second part of the exhibition, The Nordic Quilts, will showcase quilts from Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland, displayed throughout the historic Turnblad Mansion. When: Both exhibits run through Oct. 23. Quilting Art Today is now open. The Nordic Quilts opens Aug. 20. Where: American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis Cost: Museum admission is $10 for adults, $7 ages 62 and older and $5 for ages 6-18. Info: asimn.org

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Puppet and Mask Theatre

Million Dollar Quartet → This Tony Award-winning musical is set on Dec. 4, 1956, when an extraordinary twist of fate brought Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley together. The resulting evening became known as one of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll jam sessions in history. Where: Old Log Theatre, Excelsior When: Through Jan. 21, 2017 Cost: $29–$40 Info: Reservations can be made for the show and dinner (optional) at the theater’s new restaurant, CAST & CRU, at oldlog.com and 952-767-9700.

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11:57/AM Minnesota Good Age / 8/27/14 July 2016 37


Can’t-Miss Calendar July 4

Red, White and Boom →→Celebrate Independence Day on the downtown Minneapolis riverfront with a 5K, half marathon and relay races, plus a movie, live music, food, family-friendly activities and a grand finale of fireworks. When: July 4 with families activities from 6–10 p.m. and fireworks at 10 p.m. Where: Downtown and Northeast Minneapolis Cost: FREE. Race registration fees apply. Info: mplsredwhiteboom.com

July 5–Aug. 7

The Lion King →→This hugely popular Disney production — based on the 1994 Disney animated film of the same name with music by Elton John — has become Broadway’s most successful musical of all time. When: July 5–Aug. 7 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $49. Info: lionking.com

July 6–31

Glensheen: The Musical →→This critically acclaimed dark comedy — focused on the murders at the famed Duluth mansion — is back for a second run. When: July 6–31 Where: History Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $25–$56 Info: historytheatre.com

July 7–10

Hamel Rodeo & Bull Ridin’ Bonanza →→Watch professional rodeo cowboys and cowgirls compete in this 36th annual event. When: July 7–10 with a special family matinee at 1 p.m. July 9. Where: Corcoran Lions Park, west of Maple Grove Cost: Matinee tickets are $9. Info: hamelrodeo.org

July 8–19

Discover Columbus’ Ships →→Two stunning replicas Christopher Columbus’ ships will visit Hudson for walkaboard, self-guided tours. Archaeology magazine called the Nina — built by hand and without the use of power tools — “the most historically correct Columbus replica ever built.” The Pinta, built in Brazil, was launched in 2005 to expand the mission of The Columbus Foundation’s floating museum, based in the British Virgin Islands. When: 9 a.m.–6 p.m. July 8–19 Where: City Docks on the St. Croix River, 90 Walnut St., Hudson, Wis. Cost: $8 for adults, $7 for seniors and $6 for ages 5–16, free for ages 4 and younger Info: ninapinta.org

July 8–31

Jeeves Intervenes →→In this tribute to the beloved comic characters of P.G. Wodehouse, Bertie — a wealthy, witty playboy — is being finagled into marriage by meddling relatives. And his old school chum, Eustace, may be shipped off to India. So the hapless 38 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

pair hatch a scheme to escape. Can their ever-faithful valet Jeeves rescue the two bumblers from themselves? When: Weekends July 8–31 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22; $18 for ages 62 and older on Fridays and Sundays only Info: theatreintheround.org

July 9–10

Dragon Festival →→Racing teams paddle in ornately designed boats representing the mythical creature of Chinese folklore. Other activities include martial arts demonstrations, vendors and a performance stage showcasing the arts of Asia with colorful costumes, traditional dances and music. When: July 9–10 Where: Lake Phalen Park, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: dragonfestival.org

July 12–16

Rondo Days →→This 33rd-annual event celebrates the best and brightest of Minnesota’s African-American stories, achievements and culture with live music, a senior dinner, a dance crew competition, a drum and drill team competition, a 5K walk/run, a grand parade, a familyfriendly festival (July 16) and more. When: July 12–16 Where: Venues throughout St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: rondoavenueinc.org

July 15–17

Highland Fest →→Join in a wide variety activities, including live music and art, a petting zoo, wiener-dog races, inflatables, games, a beer tent and food and beverage vendors, plus a community picnic, Zumba in the park, wine tastings, a movie in the park and more. When: July 15–17 Where: Highland Park neighborhood, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: highlandfest.com


Can’t-Miss Calendar Cost: Tickets start at $53.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

July 23

Lowertown Blues Festival

Calendar Girls

→→Deliciously witty and heartwarming, this regional-premiere production tells the story of Annie, whose husband dies of leukemia. She and her friends set out to raise funds for a local charity by posing for a calendar in the nude. Strategically positioned behind flower arrangements, cakes and knitting projects, the women discover the beauty within themselves and one another. When: Through July 24 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $40–$60 ($5 discounts for ages 62 and older); $21 for ages 30 and younger Info: parksquaretheatre.org

July 16

Eat Local Farm Tour →→Tour more than 30 farms in and outside of the Twin Cities, offering educational activities, tours, live music, products for sale, samples and demonstrations.

When: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. July 16 Where: Four farms, including an indoor culinary mushroom farm, are in the urban core, while the others are a bit further afield, including a butter creamery in Hope, an organic veggie farm in Stillwater, a goat farm in Scandia and many others within an hour’s drive of the Twin Cities. Cost: FREE Info: facebook.com/EatLocalFarmTour.coop

July 20–23

Minneapolis Aquatennial →→Entering its 77th year, this multi-day festival — the official civic celebration of the City of Minneapolis — features a wide variety of events, including a torchlight parade on July 20 and fireworks on July 23. When: July 20–23 Where: Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: aquatennial.com

July 22

Lyle Lovett and His Large Band →→The Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter and storyteller presents and evening of Americana music blended with country, jazz, folk, gospel and blues, springing from a career that spans 14 albums in more than three decades. When: 8 p.m. July 22 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis

→→Now in its third year, this free festival returns with blues and soul staples Booker T. Jones, the Bernard Allison Group, Corey Stevens, Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials and The Butanes Soul Revue on the main stage. A second stage, Juke Joint, will also feature the sounds of Kim Simmonds of Savoy, Joel Zoss and Hurricane Harold & Doug Otto. When: Noon–10 p.m. July 23 Where: Mears Park, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: lowertownbluesfestival.com

July 26–Nov. 6

Up and Down: The H.H.H. Metrodome Portfolio →→As the Minnesota Vikings and football fans await the opening of U.S. Bank Stadium this summer, this exhibit by photographer Mark E. Jensen lets locals take a look back at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, Home to the Vikings from 1982 to 2013. Jensen documented the Metrodome’s construction from 1980 to 1982 using a large-format camera patented in 1898. In 2014, he photographed the stadium’s demolition. The resulting pairs of black and white photographs chronicle the Metrodome’s life — and 30 years of change in downtown Minneapolis. When: July 26–Nov. 6 Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: Located in the museum’s Mill Commons, the exhibit is free and open to the public during regular museum hours. Info: millcitymuseum.org

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search CAREGIVING EXHAUSTING FAMILY FRAZZLED FRIENDS HEALING HELP HUGS

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KINDNESS LOVE MEDICATION PATIENCE STRESS SUPPORT UNDERSTANDING

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Answers 40 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Trivia BEDSIDE MANNER 1. In Minnesota, what percentage of long-term care is provided by family and friend caregivers?

2. How many adult children over the age of 50 are caring for their aging parents in the U.S.?Â

OUR NEW WEBSITE IS LIVE! Join the conversation at mngoodage.com and at facebook.com/mngoodage

3. What disease kills more people in the U.S. than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined?

SUDOKU Sprout, Sports, Stupor

WORD SCRAMBLE CROSSWORD

Answers Minnesota Good Age / July 2016 / 41

As I’ve said before, time is short, and life is precious.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword 69 Rides the breeze 70 Gas additive brand Down 1 Transportation network app 2 Ancient sorcerer 3 *With “The,” 1968 parody of dishonest Broadway financiers 4 Caprice 5 Email suffix 6 “Awesome!” 7 Paternity suit evidence, briefly 8 Longings 9 Cask outlets 10 Alaskan native 11 Allots, with “out” 12 Authority 14 Shakespearean nickname 18 TV princess played by Lucy Lawless 20 PC “oops” key 23 *With 25-Down, 1974 Western parody 24 Dental coverage, e.g. 25 See 23-Down 27 Address to a lady 28 Buffalo’s county and lake 30 Washed-out

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39 As if in shock

4 “Cheers” mixologist

41 Ambient music pioneer Brian

35 Born 6/28/1926, director of the answers to starred clues

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42 Suburb of Phoenix

36 Golden rule word

13 “Cheers” location

44 Remington 700s, e.g.

37 Saturn and Mars

14 Place for a queen

45 British “Inc.”

40 Like a fork in the road

15 Request

46 Journalist Chung

43 With keen perception

16 Alter __

48 Boxcar stowaways

47 Welcoming store window sign

17 *1977 Hitchcock parody

50 Amassed, as debts

49 Hockey great Bobby

19 Turn in for cash

53 Fast sports cars

50 Pine secretion

21 Smooth transitions

54 Incoming flight info: Abbr.

51 Island in “Jaws”

22 Laptop port letters

55 Hams it up

52 Strikeout king Ryan

23 Air gun shot

57 Green Giant’s “Little Green” buddy

56 Put in a hold

26 “Wrong!”

60 *1976 parody of pre-talkies

57 Transgressions

27 Muslim holy city

64 Tip jar bill

58 Mile or minute

29 Go for eagerly, as a chance

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31 “All bets __ off”

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32 Tanzania neighbor

67 Kipling’s young spy

62 Inaccurate

34 Self-satisfied

68 The Big Apple, in addresses

63 Boxer fixer

42 / July 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

33 Alert


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