Page 1

MAY 2017

LEMON POPPY SEED PANCAKES! PAGE 32

LIFE G N O M A S T N A I G

n,’ chronicles a rm e th a e W e h ‘T , Barr y ZeVan a new memoir in s rn tu d n a ts is his life’s tw PAGE 36

The many adventures of father-son pilots

The Japanese linguists of World War II

Louisville’s bourbon, biscuits and art scene

A ‘Golden Girls’ home in Minneapolis

Do’s and don’ts of downsizing

PAGE 14

PAGE 16

PAGE 22

PAGE 28

PAGE 30


Contents

A sculpture of a satyr named Randy graces the bar at Proof on Main, the restaurant inside the artsy 21c Hotel in downtown Louisville. Photo courtesy of the Greater Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau

22

36

→ On the cover Barry ZeVan, The Weatherman: He’s back with a new memoir, chronicling his years on TV and all the interesting people he’s met along the way. Photos by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com

Louisville This Southern food mecca is just a two-hour flight from MSP.

Subscribe! Want to receive Good Age at your home? Our magazine is free at more than 1,000 rack sites around the Twin Cities, including most senior centers, libraries and metro-area Walgreens. But if you'd like to get the magazine mailed to your home, send a $12 check for a one-year subscription to Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55403. Write “Good Age magazine” on the memo line.

43 Housing Resources 48 Brain Teasers 6 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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Contents Good Start From the Editor 10 Age really is just a number when it comes to these amazing Minnesotans.

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My Turn 12 Linda Goynes waited her whole life to buy her own house in Minneapolis. Memories 14 Meet a father-son pilot team who flew together for 12 years on Northwest Airlines. This Month in MN History 16 During World War II, Japanese-Americans trained in linguistics at Fort Snelling.

Good Health Wellness 18 Indulgent, tasty cashews offer surprising health benefits to seniors.

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Caregiving 20 Senior housing staff can be part of a team effort in caring for your loved one, especially if you feel burned out.

Good Living Housing 28 A former social worker has created a Golden Girls-style house near Lake Nokomis and is now seeking members. Finance 30 When considering selling, buying and renting, keep in mind these do’s and don'ts during retirement. In the Kitchen 32 Move over, muffins: Check out this recipe for poppy seed pancakes. Nana and Mama 34 Be sure to discuss labor and delivery updates before the water breaks.

44 Can’t-Miss Calendar


Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 36 / Issue 5 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Wendell Fowler Matt Gulbranson, Carol Hall Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Tina Mortimer Dave Nimmer, Sam Patet, Lauren Peck Mary Rose Remington Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh Creative Director Sarah Karnas Senior Graphic Designer Valerie Moe Graphic Designer Dani Cunningham Contributing Designer Kaitlin Ungs Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

10 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Surprising stories Well, look at that: It’s Barry ZeVan,

The Weatherman! Would you ever guess our fascinating Cover Star — a longtime Minnesota resident — is nearly 80? Most locals know ZeVan from his TV days at KSTP Channel 5 and KARE 11. His broadcasts were groundbreaking at the time for their wit and humor. Indeed, ZeVan was one of the first broadcasters to really have fun on the air with his trademark grin and wacky sense of humor. (As you can see, he still has that twinkle in his eye today.) Photo by Tracy Walsh Now — after a lifetime of adventures behind him tracywalshphoto.com — ZeVan is ready for a comeback of sorts. Though the Golden Valley resident is currently working full-time as a marketing and public relations consultant, he’s somehow still found time to write and self-publish a book. In Barry ZeVan: My Life Among the Giants, A Memoir, ZeVan chronicles his lessthan-ideal childhood, his dizzying rise to TV fame and his subsequent fall from grace — as well as the many careers and interesting connections he’s made along the way. He wrote the book “to pay homage to all the amazing people I’ve had the pleasure of knowing in my life — many of whom I’m guessing had no idea just how important they were to me.” It’s hard to imagine the extraordinary adventures ZeVan’s had over the years, including meet-and-greets and on-air interactions with American icons and even dignitaries such as President Harry Truman, Gen. Colin Powell and the Rev. Jesse Jackson. I hope you enjoy his story! Inside this month’s magazine, you’ll also find a variety of stories about an issue close to our hearts at Good Age — senior housing — in honor of our May issue’s Housing theme, including articles about the do’s and don’ts of downsizing, the implications senior housing can have for caregivers and a Golden Girls home in Minneapolis, seeking female residents in need of friendly housemates. And, as usual, our lead columnist, Dave Nimmer, has provided a special story related to our Housing theme, this time about one Linda Goynes, a miraculous Minneapolis woman buying her own home for the first time — at age 64. I’d argue that Goynes and ZeVan are proof: Age really is just a number.


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

selling their houses, downsizing to a townhome or heading to assisted living, 64-yearold Linda Goynes just bought her first house in December on Newton Avenue in North Minneapolis. “I looked at three other houses,” she said, “but when I came to the one on Newton Avenue, I dropped to my knees. I did. I said, ‘Thank God. This is the house.’ For one reason or another, it just felt like home.” The one-story house was built in 1918 and features two bedrooms, a dining room, living room, kitchen and bathroom. Goynes admitted the real selling point was the sun porch. She’s also got a washer, dryer, snow blower and room for a small garden. Being a happy homeowner wasn’t in the cards for Goynes 25 years ago. She’d been divorced, battled a cocaine addiction and lapsed into a coma, following a heart attack. Doctors told her she’d die if she continued to use the drug. So she made a bargain with God, promising she’d change her ways if she recovered. And she did.

husband was using drugs and, occasionally, selling them, too. “I never knew what was going to happen. One day I’d be on the ground in handcuffs after a police raid,” she said. “And another we’d be robbed by somebody looking for a drug stash or the money. But I always had the Sisters to talk to, and I never felt alone.” With help from the Visitation Sisters, Goynes ended up moving out of their rented house into an apartment in 2008; her husband died in 2015. He also loved the Sisters; he shoveled their walk, attended some of their neighborhood meetings and even put up their Christmas tree every year. But he couldn’t stay away from heroin. “Linda is one of the most courageous women I know,” said Sister Katherine Mullin. “She knew she had to leave him after all those years of his addiction. She made her decision, found an apartment and kept it together.”

Challenges along the way

Working and saving

The road to a complete recovery included a few more twists and turns for Goynes, however. In 1996, Goynes met her second husband. They moved into a house next door to the Sisters of the Visitation on Girard Avenue North. Goynes stayed clean, but her

Now Goynes has found not only a home, but also peace of mind. “After my struggles and trials, I’m grateful to have a house at this time in my life,” she said. “I was at rock bottom at one time, and here I am with a place to call my own.” Goynes had been saving for her own place for several years. She joined Ascension Catholic Church in 2010, has been working there as a pastor outreach assistant — organizing luncheons, setting up for funerals, arranging the food shelf, changing the candles and opening the church. In her spare time, she also helps the

Worth the wait →→After struggling for many years, a Minneapolis woman realizes the American Dream at age 64

At a time when most senior citizens are thinking about

⊳⊳ Linda Goynes just bought her first home in December in North Minneapolis.

12 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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Gratitude always I’ve had the opportunity to see Goynes at work, for the sisters and the church. What I’ve noticed is her steady demeanor. She’s helpful, hopeful, purposeful, soulful and joyful. For almost 20 years, I’ve asked her how she is. Her answer is always the same. “I’m blessed,” she says. She’s caused me to change my reply when someone asks me how I am. My standard answer was one I took from my father: “Always room for improvement,” he’d say. For the past couple of years, when someone asks the question, I now reply, “It’s a good day.” It’s an even better day when I get to see Linda Goynes. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall ⊳⊳ Longtime Northwest Airlines pilot Willy Kenmir taught his son, Ron, to fly, starting when he was 12 in a Beechcraft B-35 Bonanza (circa 1958).

Life with a view →→Like father, like son: Willy and Ron Kenmir experienced the glory years of flying together

Michael Douglas followed in father Kirk Douglas’ footsteps and made a

career of acting. Chris Long, son of former Oakland Raider Howie Long, plays professional football for the New England Patriots. And then, of course, there’s George H.W. Bush and W. But father and son airline pilots? Willy and Ron Kenmir were a father-son pilot team for Northwest Airlines for 12 years. Here’s a bit about their story, as told by Ron Kenmir: My dad, Willy Kenmir, was a captain for Northwest Airlines from 1943 to 1980. I flew for North Central Airlines from 1966 to 1968, and Northwest, 1968 to 2003. We both had 37-year careers in the cockpit, with dad pioneering the propeller aircraft and moving on into jets. I stepped in just as Northwest was switching its fleet to jets only. I ended my career as a Boeing 727 captain. Dad taught me to fly when I was 12 years old, and my feet barely stretched to the rudder pedals. His enchantment with the profession reached out to me. I’d overhear him telling Mom late at night about “thunderstorms over Lone Rock” (a Wisconsin check point for pilots). I wanted to share this bird’s-eye view of the weather. When I met Dad at the terminal, I was always thrilled, watching him horse

14 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

that gigantic flying machine to a stop at the gate. I could see his friendly face in the instrument panel lights: It was definitely my own father! Hey, I wanted to do that, too! I so enjoyed the fast and witty banter of the crews I met when Dad took me along on his trips. Was it awesome eventually flying with these same wonderful pilot characters my dad knew? Understatement! They soon began calling me “Willy’s boy,” and I felt the strange connection with them that all pilots share — a bond characterized by a touch of black humor. Following a trip, one of us occasionally would jokingly comment, “Well, we cheated death again!” Dad learned to fly before WWII while serving in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corp (ROTC) at the University of North Dakota. The first NWA airliner he piloted was the Douglas DC-3; the last, the Boeing 747. I told him once, “You got in on the glory years of flying.” He said, “Yes, but the last half — flying jets — was the best.” So much for pioneering! Maybe that applies to life, too? I, also like the jets better, even with losing the romance of the big engines and


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During my stewardess tenure — from 1960 to 1988 — I flew trips with both these gentleman. I can tell you the apple never falls very far from the tree. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ During World War II, Fort Snelling in St. Paul became home to the Military Intelligence Service Language School, created to train translators in Japanese language and culture. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Language lessons →→Many Japanese-Americans took linguistics training in Minnesota to help during the war

In May 1942, less than a year after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, a group of budding Japanese linguists moved to Minnesota. The men were students at the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS), which the U.S. military created to train translators during World War II.

How it all began The MISLS got its start in San Francisco after two U.S. military officers recognized a need for servicemen who knew the Japanese language and culture, with tensions escalating between Japan and the U.S. The War Department reluctantly agreed to fund the project with $2,000, and the officers recruited Japanese-Americans — particularly Nisei, the children of Japanese immigrants — as students. In November 1941, 60 students began classes in an old airplane hanger. A month later, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, catapulting the U.S. into World War II, creating an intense need for linguists. Students focused on learning Japanese and also studied Japan’s military and politics, interrogation techniques and geography. As the U.S. entered into war with Japan, however, the MISLS’ ability to stay in California waned. In February 1942, President Roosevelt issued an executive order relocating hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans on the West Coast to incarceration camps. 16 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

The school decided to search for a new home, but several states refused to accept the Nisei students. Finally, Gov. Harold Stassen offered a location in Minnesota, whose residents were fairly accepting of the idea. The school moved to Savage to a site that had formerly served as a Civilian Conservation Corps camp. Camp Savage’s first class included 200 students and 18 instructors, and classes kept growing with the military’s increased demand for linguists. The government began adding Japanese-American students from incarceration camps, Hawaii and elsewhere in the military to join the language school. In a MNHS oral history, Toshio Abe described how he was reassigned to the classified intelligence school from a Texas army base in 1942.

→→Learn more Visitors can learn about the MISLS in Minnesota at Historic Fort Snelling, which opens for its summer season on May 27. For many years, the fort and its surrounding area have been at the forefront of Minnesota’s often-complicated history. The Minnesota Historical Society is working to revitalize the historic site and share its stories with future generations. Learn more at mnhs.org/hfs2020.


South St. Paul HRA “They wouldn’t even tell us where we were going when they put us on a train from Texas,” he said.

Moving to Fort Snelling The MISLS soon outgrew the space at Camp Savage, and the school moved to Fort Snelling in St. Paul in August 1944. Classes were demanding, running some 10 hours a day, and students also participated in military training and drills. The men still found time to enjoy sports, venture to the Mun Hing Cafeteria on Hennepin Avenue and contribute to the fort’s newsletter. Abe said students, who were mostly from the West Coast, weren’t always prepared for Minnesota’s cold weather: “Many of us suffered frostbite on our feet and hands and ears,” he said. After Germany’s surrender in April 1945, work at the MISLS kept increasing as the war in the Pacific continued. Students graduated more quickly, and the military sent intercepted messages and documents from the front straight to Fort Snelling for translation. The fort even used a short-wave radio station to directly intercept and translate broadcasts from Tokyo. Graduates went to work in the Pacific and Chinese-Burma-India theaters, where they did everything from translating in negotiations to interrogating Japanese prisoners of war. When Japan surrendered and World War II ended in September 1945, the MISLS provided linguists for the occupation of Japan. The school also added Korean and Chinese classes and even created a Women’s Army Corp detachment.

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Saving lives, dollars In June 1946, the MISLS had 307 graduating students. By then, more than 6,000 graduates had gone through the school since 1941. Maj. Gen. Charles Willoughby, chief of staff for military intelligence for Gen. Douglas MacArthur, noted, “The Nisei shortened the Pacific War by two years and saved possibly a million American lives and saved probably billions of dollars.” In 1946, the school moved back to California, closing its operations in Minnesota. Today the MISLS still exists in the form of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, which trains linguists for the military, government and law enforcement in two-dozen languages.

Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 17


Good Health / Wellness / By Wendell Fowler

▲▲Cashews are actually seeds that develop on colorful fruits known as cashew apples.

Do you cashew? →→These indulgent nuts offer a surprising array of health benefits for seniors

Yes, I’m that guy who stealthily bogarts all the cashews in the party mix.

I can’t resist their seductive, sweet creaminess. I recently discovered my instinctive magnetism to the tasty tree nut is actually enriching my health and creating a feel-good vibe. Eating two handfuls of cashews, it turns out, can be as effective as Prozac and other anti-depressants in maintaining a positive mood. You see, cashews contain the amino acid known as L-tryptophan. Dr. Andrew Saul, a therapeutic nutritionist and the editor-in-chief of Orthomolecular Medicine News Service said: “The body turns tryptophan into serotonin, a major contributor to feelings of sexual desire, good mood and good sleep.” Prozac, Paxil and similar antidepressants usually either mimic serotonin or artificially keep the body’s own serotonin levels high. Delicately flavored cashew nuts are also rich in vitamin C, protein, niacin, iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, copper and zinc. Cashews make some superfoods lists for their concentration of protein, fiber, minerals and antioxidants. They also contain proanthocyanidins, which actually work to starve tumors and stop cancer cells from dividing. (Studies have also shown that cashews can reduce colon cancer risk.) Cashews are high in heart-healthy good fat — in the form of oleic acid, the same monounsaturated fat in olive oil. Studies show oleic acid reduces high triglyceride levels. Though most seeds and nuts are higher in fat per serving than many other snacks, many studies have shown that people who eat nuts are actually less likely to suffer from obesity.

18 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Cashews are also rich in magnesium, which is necessary for strong bones. (Most of the magnesium in the body is found in the bones.) Fun fact: The cashew tree — a tropical, broadleaf evergreen — bears edible pearshaped fruits called cashew apples. Cashews are produced at the tips of the apples (and are technically considered seeds). Native to Brazil’s Amazon rain forest, cashew trees are in the same plant family as mangos and pistachios as well as poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. (The toxic exterior of the cashew contains a resin related to the irritants found in its notoriously poisonous relatives.) Cashew trees were spread all over the planet by Portuguese explorers, and today cashews are commercially cultivated in Brazil, Vietnam, India and many African countries. At the grocery store, you can find raw, salted, sweetened or candied cashews. Buy nuts that are a bright, cream-white color, and are compact, uniform and feel heavy in the hand. Ditch the salted, sweetened, artificially flavored varieties. You will see raw cashews in the super-


Eating two handfuls of cashews can be as effective as Prozac and other anti-depressants in maintaining a positive mood. market. However, all cashews undergo some heat to remove the shell and its caustic exterior coating. Cashews sold as roasted have been cooked twice, once during the shelling process and then again during roasting, which deepens their color and flavor. Sometimes excessive salt is added during roasting, too. Rui Hai Liu, a professor of food science at Cornell University, told the New York Times: “No research has specifically addressed how roasting nuts may change their nutritional value. I predict you will get health benefits from consuming either raw or roasted nuts.” Asian and Indian cuisines regularly include whole or chopped cashews as a stir-fry ingredient and curries. Sprinkle them on salads or other side dishes; use them on top of breakfast cereals. Read labels. If added oil is listed, pass. There should be only two ingredients — nuts and salt. I prefer raw over roasted, but that’s just me — that nutty guy who is nuts about nuts. Chef Wendell Fowler is a syndicated food columnist and the author of Eat Right Now: The End of Mindless Eating.

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Good Health / Caregiving / By Sam Patet

Care partners →→Senior housing staff can help ease the burden on caregivers without cutting them out of the picture

‘I’m just burned out.’

If you’re providing care to an older adult who’s still living in his or her own home, you’ve likely thought this at some point during your caregiving journey. While you may cherish being able to help, you may also recognize that caregiving is taking a toll on your life — physically, emotionally and socially. Thankfully, there are many options to help you and other adult caregivers regain balance in your lives. If you’ve been caregiving for a while and have reached the point of burnout, or you just can’t add any more tasks to your plate, you might consider senior housing as a partner on your journey.

What is senior housing? Senior housing is an umbrella term that refers to any housing community that provides living accommodations to older adults. There are many different types, including independent living, assisted living, congregate housing, residential-care homes and more. While states define these terms differently, what ultimately distinguishes them is the types and levels of services they offer to residents as part of their contracts. In addition to the services available through the housing provider, most communities allow residents to contract with outside agencies for whatever services they want.

A team approach So why might your loved ones want to consider a senior housing community? To start with, they won’t have to worry about tasks that come with being a homeowner, such as yardwork and home repairs.They’ll also be surrounded by peers and have opportunities for socialization, which can help combat loneliness and isolation. But arguably the greatest benefit is having access to as much, or as little, help as 20 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

they might want or need. Health-care aides, nurses, social workers and other trained professionals can assist with tasks such as household chores, grocery shopping, medication management and other personal care. As a caregiver, you’ll benefit by being able to collaborate with housing and home-care staff. You can help with as many caregiving tasks as you want, such as making meals to heat up in the microwave or folding a basket of laundry. This team approach can help you interact with your loved one as you once did — as a son, daughter or spouse.

Tour tips If you and the person you’re assisting decide to tour a housing community, here are some things to look for: ⊲⊲ Interactions between staff and residents. Observe how staff members interact with residents.

→→Resources For Twin Cities residents, the Senior Housing Guidebook (published by Care Options Network) is an excellent resource. It contains lists of many different senior housing communities and includes information on pricing, types of rooms, amenities and services and contact information. You can learn more at careoptionsnetwork.org/ guidebook. Another resource is the Senior LinkAge Line (800-333-2433). Representatives are available weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and can provide you with a list of senior housing communities in your area.


The wide range of services and care options at The Residence at North Ridge is one of the reasons we’re considered one of the best senior housing facilities in the community.

This team approach can help you interact with your loved one as you once did — as a son, daughter or spouse. Do they greet residents and know them by name? Are they friendly and helpful, or distracted and busy? ⊲ Cleanliness and upkeep. Your loved one deserves to live in a home that’s clean and not falling apart. Take note of anything that suggests the building isn’t being kept in tip-top shape. ⊲ Community size. Some communities are small — housing a dozen or so residents — while others have room for several hundred. As you tour, note how your loved one reacts to the size and layout of the community. Does he or she appear relaxed and engaged, or nervous and out of place?

Assisted Living Independent Living • Adult Day Program • Comprehensive Rehab Program

Outpatient Therapy Rehab On-site Child Care Program • Assisted Living Memory Care available in 2017

To learn more about how The Residence at North Ridge’s commitment to best practices and quality care can benefit you or your loved one, give us a call at 763-592-3000. 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope, MN 55428 Licensed by the state of Minnesota as a Housing with Services establishment and a Comprehensive Home Care agency. Residence at North Ridge GA 0516 H6.indd 1

4/21/16 2:38 PM

Community + Connection + Independence = Vibrante

If you’re age 55 or older and want to enjoy the company of like-minded women in a private, home environment, Vibrante is the place for you.

Join us for coffee &n conversatio ays 10am Tuesd ! g n ri this sp y RSVP Toda

Engaged Living. Thriving Women. | vibranteliving.com Vibrante Living GA 0417 H4.indd 1

Vibrante is a shared living community where women don’t have to age alone: staying vibrant, healthy, engaged... contributing to the greater good.

Call Roxanne at 612.816.6940 to explore living in this luxurious, newly-remodeled four-bedroom home with Lake Nokomis views, complete with concierge services.

3/21/17 3:15 PM

No matter what you decide, you can know that you’re not alone in your caregiving journey. Sam Patet is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides healthcare, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. Learn more at lyngblomsten.org and caregivercollaborative.org. Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 21


Good Living / Travel

v s i u Lo L A WA BY CAR

L DE M A R


e l l i v

Southern food, unique art, horse racing and intriguing history shine in this Kentucky town

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 23


Louisville

Thank the limestone.

Louisville — Kentucky’s cultural showcase on the Ohio River — is where “the horses are fast and the pour is slow.” That’s how locals boast about the town built on Derby Day and bourbon. Limestone makes the beloved liquor’s water pure and the horses’ bones the strongest in those bluegrass pastures. Maybe it also stiffens the spines of those citizens who lobby: “Keep Louisville Weird.”

Weird is wonderful

Weird, as in the hats on Derby Day. And the Outsider Art at the Speed Art Museum, newly reopened after doubling in size; the cutting-edge premieres at Actors Theater and its annual festival of new plays; the scene at Wagner’s restaurant and general store — a people-watching paradise aside Churchill Downs racetrack, selling both healing liniments and biscuits with sausage gravy to the track’s trainers and their fans since 1922. Weird, as in a golden, three-story riff on Michelangelo’s David flashing passers-by outside Main Street’s 21C Hotel, which boast more out-there art (and food) inside.

24 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Towering 120 feet into the sky at the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory, The Big Bat is an exact-scale replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch Louisville Slugger. Copyright Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory

→ Plan your trip See churchilldowns.com and gotolouisville.com. If you’re traveling this fall, check out live bluegrass music, offered with “a side of bourbon and savory barbecue” at the Kentucky Bluegrass & Bourbon Experience Sept. 2–3, held at Water Tower Park, Louisville.


Then there’s the equally humongous Louisville Slugger outside the baseball bat factory-turned-museum and try-your-skill attraction nearby. Downtown’s Museum Row on Main continues with the Kentucky Museum of Art & Craft and yet another museum devoted to the life of local son Muhammad Ali — boxing champ and Vietnam War protester. (You can visit his grave in Cave Hill Cemetery, not far from that of another hometown hero, Col. Sanders, whose Kentucky Fried lives on.)

Exploring it all

Louisville was founded just steps from Main Street’s redbrick sidewalks and iron-pillar facades when George Rogers Clark set foot on land in 1778. Nowadays, the inviting city of 750,000 — the state’s largest, a mere two-hour flight from MSP — sports a circle of distinct neighborhoods worth a wander, aided by the free ZeroBus system that patrols the core. It’s just as well, for downtown’s Whiskey Row now boasts half a dozen distilleries open to tour and sip. Old Louisville is eye candy for fans of super-glam Victorian mansions — the largest such enclave in the entire country, centering around Central Park (designed by Olmsted, who did another one somewhere). The Highlands — sliced by Bardstown Road, aka restaurant row — boasts plenty of unique shopping ops. NuLu is the newly gentrified base for Bohos who live to eat, shop and gawk at galleries. Here, Please & Thank You sells coffee, cookies and vinyl records. Joe Ley has turned an entire redbrick schoolhouse into an eponymous trove of tempting antiques. Muth’s Candies has turned out Bourbon balls since 1921, while Revelry is new at the game of selling handmade local giftware. Butchertown claims honors as the ’hood on the rise, winning points for side-by-side establishments Hi-Five (doughnuts to die for), Stag + Doe (home accessories) and Louabull — sassy gifts like soaps dedicated to the Pope (“wash your sins away”) and Lady Macbeth (cleans damn spots). Butchertown Market is a near-zipcode-size cache of jewelry, accessories and chocolate. Downtown’s Fourth Street Live area sizzles with a marathon of bars we’re all too old for. Instead, head to bars like Check’s Café in Germantown, since 1944 serving fried bologna sandwiches, fried oysters, fried chicken livers and other winners. Or head to Lola’s, a spacious lounge for cosmo cocktails (mine: Lady Midnight). Or Mr. Lee’s — an intimate club with no sign on the door and lighting so low you might not recognize your spouse.

▲▲Gralehaus chef Andy Myers poses with some of his signature dishes. Photo courtesy of Greater Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau

Local delicacies

The national travel magazines are finally touting what I knew about Louisville all along: It’s the dining Mecca of the South. Think classic comfort food with a splash of bourbon and you get the idea. In fact, there’s an Urban Bourbon Trail, with designated stops for such restaurants, and another official crawl for those addicted to the city’s famous sandwich, the Hot Brown — turkey, bacon, tomato and cheese sauce on toast. (Both lists are available at the visitor center.) At Corner Bar in the new Aloft Hotel, we pigged out on pulled pork bourbon tacos. At Goss Avenue Bar in Germantown, it’s burgoo — a traditional beef stew with a shot of heat. Gralehaus, off Bardstown Road, touts Southern icons including a pimiento cheese and sweet-pickle sandwich, plus biscuits with duck-sausage gravy and maple syrup, duck cracklings and a sunny egg. And the best grits for miles around. Proof on Main, in the 21C, also markets killer grits, dolled up with bleu and Gouda, pickled peanuts and jalapenos. Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 25


Louisville

Fat Lamb earns its fame with Chef Dallas McGarity’s lamb ragu, along with fried oysters and shrimp and grits, cooked like he learned in South Carolina. Butchertown Grocery also does some mean shrimp and grits, as well as chicken ‘n’ waffles and a benedict that favors porchetta and kale on a mega-biscuit. Or you can slip off the beaten track and join longtime local fans at Le Relais, housed in a former terminal aside a small airfield, where the chef/patron puts a French spin on whatever comes from the farms around him.

The Kentucky Derby ▲▲Churchill Downs racetrack in Louisville hosts a variety of races, including the hat-happy Kentucky Derby on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week long Kentucky Derby Festival. Top photo by Thomas Kelley / Shutterstock.com. Bottom photo by Dan Dry & Associates. 26 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Derby Day, the first Saturday in May ever since 1875, is hailed as “the greatest two minutes in sports.” Actually, the Kentucky Derby (May 6 this year) is the 12th of 14 races on that day, and the momentum starts building at dawn, when those with tickets to the grounds of Churchill Downs begin to party.


Derby season actually kicks off in late April with Thunder Over Louisville — the biggest fireworks display in the North America, lighting up the Ohio River. Throughout Derby week, Dawn at the Downs offers spectators a chance to watch the horses work out on the world-famous track. And the Kentucky Oaks race draws in folks before Derby Day, too. Never mind aspiring for a seat in the grandstand; they’re long gone and priced for princes. Most folks mill around (last year’s attendance: 158,000), watching TV monitors, placing bets and adjusting the tilt of this year’s bonnets (selfies mandatory). Churchill Downs (just a few bucks admission outside of derby season) hosts races for three and a half months each year on the 1⅓-mile track. Daily behindthe-scenes tours include the stables, Millionaire’s Row in the stands (where Queen Elizabeth reigned on a Derby Day not long ago) and admission to the fascinating Kentucky Derby Museum. Here you can learn what makes a superior thoroughbred; salute every past winner; study the life and training of a jockey, trainer, hot walker and vet — and ogle a wall of famous Derby chapeaux. The tour includes a surround-screen filming of Derby Day, climaxing in a song more dear to a local’s heart than the national anthem — My Old Kentucky Home. Not an eye was dry, including mine. And I’m from Minnesota. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

A Home for Your Life! Saturday, May 20th

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Bring Friends & Family and Enjoy the Festivities!

Pay Tribute No matter which location or service you choose, you will always find an exceptional level of professionalism and care. Our experience, coupled with our perspective on the importance of ceremony, will help you discover ways to pay tribute. Whether traditional or unique, these tributes allow us to love, laugh, and live well again.

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10:10/ AM Minnesota Good Age /12/21/16 May 2017 27


Good Living / Housing / By Sarah Jackson

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

→ Vibrante Where: 5455 Woodlawn Blvd., Minneapolis ▲ This 1941 home was remodeled to include four rooms with ensuite bathrooms to create a Golden Girls-style living environment. Photos courtesy of Vibrante

Opened: November 2016

ROOM FOR RENT

Ages: 55 and older

→ A Golden Girls -concept home will encourage women to age together near Lake Nokomis

Aging in place is the intended path for many seniors, who want to stay in

the homes they’ve known, sometimes, for decades. But aging in place, especially after retirement or the death of a spouse, can come with serious downsides, too, including a lack of social engagement. Giant retirement communities, on the other hand, despite offering numerous activities, can sometimes leave seniors lost in the shuffle, especially if they’re introverts. Roxanne Cornell of Minneapolis, a longtime clinical social worker, has seen firsthand the loneliness and isolation older adults experience with aging. “I was struck by how few choices were available,” Cornell said. “They could either live alone in their own homes, or they could move into an independent- or assistedliving environment.” Cornell also watched her father age alone in his own home with paid help. “He was very lonely and isolated in the end, especially since some of us lived across the country,” Cornell said. 28 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Openings: 4 Number of units: 4 private, one-bedroom suites with en-suite baths. Each suite is unique; one includes a private deck overlooking the downtown Minneapolis skyline, another includes a private sitting room with a fireplace. Cost range for a single member: Rent is $2,700 to $4,450 (depending on the suite), plus a monthly membership fee of $350, which includes concierge services, social activities, twice-monthly housekeeping and professional property management. Property owner: Vibrante is owned and managed by Roxanne Cornell of Minneapolis, who lives in the neighborhood, but not on site. Info: 612-816-6940 or vibranteliving.com


62+ Independent Living

▲ Newly remodeled common areas feature contemporary furnishings.

And so Vibrante was born. Cornell’s dream is to bring together a small group of like-minded women to live in a newly remodeled 1941 home situated on a corner lot in Minneapolis with views of Lake Nokomis. She bought the home, a private residence, in February 2016 for the purpose of creating a shared-living community. She added a private bathroom to each bedroom and decorated the common areas. It’s her modern take on The Golden Girls, the famous 1980s TV series, featuring four dynamic females, living out their golden years together in a shared space. Cornell — who also spent five years as the owner of a small homeimprovement business — hopes to provide a sense of camaraderie as well as concierge services that cater to each member’s interests. And she’ll use her knowledge of social work to help members gain access to the services and activities

they need — all as they age near the southeastern shores of Lake Nokomis. If the concept takes off, Cornell hopes to duplicate the success with other local properties. “What mattered most to the people I knew was active involvement in the community, companionship, opportunities to grow and remain active, and the ability to pursue a meaningful and joyful life,” Cornell said. “I decided to dedicate the next stage of my life to helping other women remain engaged, connected and vibrant as they grow older.”

Amenities ⊲ Almost every room in the house offers views of Lake Nokomis ⊲ Each suite is a blank canvas for members to furnish as they wish ⊲ Common spaces are fully furnished, including original artwork ⊲ New window treatments throughout ⊲ Living-room fireplace ⊲ Library ⊲ Sunroom ⊲ Patio and plenty of space for gardening ⊲ Large two-car garage, plus ample off-street parking ⊲ Wireless Internet, cable and other utilities are included ⊲ Walking and biking paths just across the street ⊲ Restaurants, coffee shop, shopping and library within walking distance. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line HOUSING SPOTLIGHT.

5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis www.NokomisSquare.com

We’re ideally located in a comfortable Minneapolis neighborhood.

Call to schedule your tour today!

612.721.5077 Equal Housing Opportunity

Nokomis Square GA 0214 12.indd 1

1/15/14 4:37 PM

Transitions can be difficult. We are here to help you and your family with your next move whether it be your first or last home.

Mary Frances Miller mfmiller@cbburnet.com

952-300-7874

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 29

Miller M Frances GA 0417 V4.indd 1

3/23/17 2:56 PM


Good Living / Finance / By Matt Gulbransen

DOWNSIZING DON’TS → Avoid these pitfalls when making the tough decision to stay, rent or buy in retirement

Do you have an empty nest?

like a new roof or mechanical repairs. Even small maintenance projects can add up if you don’t budget properly.

Don’t ignore renting

Don’t rush to downsize if you’re not yet certain what the future holds. You wouldn’t want to relocate to Florida only to realize you’re needed back home in Minnesota. Think about your retirement plans, as well as your family’s situation. Is there an adult child who may want to move back home or an aging parent you’ll need to take care of? If there are some decisions left to be made, it may be too early to move.

Renting has its advantages. You may be able to save money, and you won’t be responsible for maintenance like lawn care and snow removal. Another benefit is your housing costs will be more predictable because you won’t be responsible for home repairs. Renting is also a good option if you still aren’t sure where you’ll end up in the long run. However, it isn’t right for everyone. And you could get hit with rising rent or be asked to move.

Don’t move too late

Don’t make it emotional

Take into account your health and your spouse’s health. Will the stairs make it difficult to get around? How will you keep up with mowing and shoveling as you age? Also, take into consideration your financial picture. If you’re struggling to make ends meet, you may want to move to a smaller home and a smaller mortgage payment before you retire so you can free up some of your income in retirement.

Your current home may be the place where your kids took their first steps, said their first words and where their first dates picked them up. It can be difficult, but I encourage couples to put the emotional components aside and look at downsizing as a financial decision. Don’t forget, you have an opportunity to create new memories at your new home!

If you’re like the majority of Americans, you may be looking for a smaller space after the little ones have flown the coop. In fact, almost 40 percent of retirees will make a move during their retirement years, according to the Demand Institute. There’s a lot of good advice to follow when it’s time to make a move. On the other hand, there are several mistakes to avoid. Keep in mind these downsizing don’ts:

Don’t move too early

Don’t overlook hidden costs ⊲ Closing: A down payment isn’t the only cash you need to buy a home. You’ll also need an additional 2 to 5 percent of the purchase price to cover closing costs, which include your loan origination fee, underwriting fees and title insurance. ⊲ Moving: Even if your home is paid off, it will still cost you money to sell it. Talk with your Realtor about how much it will cost to sell your current home. Then there’s the cost of packing and moving your stuff, which can cost thousands when you add it all up. You may want to reconsider downsizing if these costs take a significant chunk out of the money you’re expecting to save. ⊲ Maintenance: You’ve spent years taking care of your current home, but a new home may come with surprise maintenance costs. Homeowners can expect to spend 1 to 4 percent of a home’s value each year on maintenance and repairs, depending on a home’s age. Some years, you may spend a couple hundred dollars on paint. Other years, you could be spending a few thousand on improvements 30 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Matt Gulbransen is the president of Callahan Financial Planning in Woodbury and holds an Accredited Wealth Management Advisor designation. For more than a decade, he’s been helping his clients create financial plans that ensure a dependable and comfortable retirement income. Learn more at cfpcorp.net.


Good Living / In the Kitchen

s e k a c n Pa ! p o p t a th

32 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


If you’ve always used boxed pancake mix, it might seem fussy to make pancakes from scratch. But once you’ve done it, you’ll see (like we did) how surprisingly easy — and tasty — it can be! You’ll likely save money — and you’ll open the door to all kinds of experimentation, too. When you’re ready to break out of the box rut, try this delicious concoction.

Lemon Poppy Seed Pancakes 3�4 cup all-purpose flour 1�4 cup whole wheat flour 3 tablespoons sugar 1 1�2 teaspoon baking powder 1�2 teaspoon baking soda 1�4 teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk* Zest of 1 or 2 lemons (optional) 1�4 cup fresh lemon juice (from 1 to 2 lemons) 3 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled slightly 1 egg 1 1�2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1�3 cup poppy seeds *Don’t want to buy buttermilk? Try one of many DIY suitable substitutes at tinyurl.com/buttermilk-subs.

DIRECTIONS ⊲ Whisk together the dry ingredients. ⊲ Blend the wet ingredients together in a separate bowl, and fold in the poppy seeds. ⊲ Add the wet ingredients to the dry and stir just until combined. ⊲ Cook on a lightly greased griddle until lightly golden on both sides. ⊲ Serve hot with maple syrup.

Recipe and photo by The View from Great Island blog. Read the full recipe at tinyurl.com/poppy-pancakes.


Good Living / Nana & Mama / By Mary Rose Remington & Laura Groenjes Mitchell ⊳⊳ Mary Rose Remington and her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, pose with Mitchell’s son, Kellan, photographed at 7 months old.

BEFORE THE BIRTH →→Grandparents-to-be? It’s best to discuss the timing of labor updates ahead of time

Mama: After the excitement of the positive pregnancy test wore off a bit, my

partner (Galen) and I began talking through what was ahead, including when and how we’d tell our friends and family about the pregnancy, which parenting classes we’d take and, of course, how we’d handle communication around the birth of our little one.

34 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Because my parents live 1,000 miles away (in Minnesota), their visit to us (in Colorado) wouldn’t be as easy as texting, “We’re ready for visitors now.” Our plan was simple: As soon as I was checked into the hospital and it was confirmed that I was really in labor, Galen would text both sets of grandparents-to-be and let them know. Starting at about 37 weeks, though, my mom started sending almost daily check-in texts. I’m no fool: I knew her “How’s your day?” was really “How’s your birth canal?” But we kept up the guise for a few weeks. By the time I hit 39 weeks, her general check-ins became much more frequent and specific: “Anything happening? Any changes?” During one of our text exchanges, I finally assured my mom that if ANYTHING changed, I would let her know. Late one night, my water broke. As soon as I got off the phone with a nurse, who confirmed that I should get to the hospital as soon as I could, I texted my mom. “Water just broke. Headed to the hospital now.” Once we got to the hospital and got checked in, Galen sent another update to both sets of grandparents, letting them know we were settling in for the night and we’d keep them updated. In Galen’s mind, that meant “As soon as Baby is here, we’ll let you know.” Clearly, my mom wasn’t on the same page, because several hours later, as my


Nana: I was ecstatic to hear we’d

▲▲Laura Groenjes Mitchell poses with her newborn son, Kellan, whose grandmother was excited to meet him.

contractions were beginning to pick up, our labor nurse came in to check on me. While she was in our room, she received a page: “You have a call on line 2. It’s the mom of your patient in Room 408 (our room). She’s wanting an update on her daughter.” In the moment, I was equal parts mortified and impressed that my mom had figured out a way to get the update she needed. Looking back, I learned a lot. Here’s what I recommend for other parents/ grandparents-to-be: ⊲⊲ Be honest about the type and frequency of communication both sides need. ⊲⊲ Revisit these agreements frequently. (Your needs might change!) ⊲⊲ Don’t be afraid to reach out for what you need if you’re not getting it (like calling the hospital directly).

soon become grandparents, and took great delight in the communications that followed — a picture from the first ultrasound (I bawled!), news of the sex (It’s a boy!), measurements (right on target). But the closer Laura got to her due date, the more I found myself hovering, despite the miles that separated us. I began sending check-in texts, and strove to limit myself to one a day. (Sometimes I met my goal.) Because I work at a hospital, I’m reminded every day of things that can go wrong medically — and the daily checkins helped keep my anxiety at bay. My approach was to embrace statistics that favored a healthy, normal delivery for mom and baby, then hold that intention daily. My husband and I began discussing details regarding our visit and — due to the inherent uncertainty of birth dates — we decided to drive, not fly. My three goals for the trip were: ⊲⊲ Meet, cuddle and start developing our relationship with our new grandson; ⊲⊲ Provide help to the little family: Make meals, run errands, do laundry, whatever they needed; ⊲⊲ Not overstay our welcome. Finally, THE text came: Baby was coming! After I shared the exciting news with my husband — that Laura was in labor — he went to bed. I, meanwhile, started my nervous vigil on the couch, awaiting updates from Galen. Around 11 p.m., one came, stating Laura was doing well.

I’m no fool: I knew her ‘How’s your day?’ was really ‘How’s your birth canal?’ — Laura

As I fell in and out of restless sleep, I checked my phone incessantly. Nothing. Around 5 a.m., I reached my limit and texted Galen: “Any updates?” After 15 minutes with no response, I called the hospital, explained who I was, and within minutes had received a brief synopsis of the birth progress from their nurse. She compassionately assured me mom and baby were progressing and doing well. I knew I’d crossed an invisible boundary when I made that call; and I understood there would be criticism and teasing to follow. But know this: Mama bear will always do whatever she needs to do to ensure her cubs are OK. Moral: Communicate with both mom and her partner before labor begins, and discuss frequency of birth updates that will work for all. Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer and new grandmother, lives in Minneapolis. Her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell — a millennial first-time mom — lives in Denver. They’ll be documenting their generational differences with this occasional series in both Minnesota Good Age and its sister publication, Minnesota Parent.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 35


Life

among the giants BY TINA MORTIMER Âť PHOTOS BY TRACY WALSH

Barry ZeVan holds his new book and a Telly Award, bestowed on him in 2006 for executive producing the documentary American Indian Homelands: Matters of Truth, Honor and Dignity Immemorial, narrated by former news anchor Sam Donaldson.


M

BARRY ZEVAN ‘THE WEATHERMAN’ CHRONICLES HIS LIFE’S TWISTS AND TURNS — INCLUDING FAME AND MANY FAMOUS FRIENDS — IN A NEW MEMOIR

ost people choose a single career or find a type of job they do well enough, and then stick to it until they retire — or die. Most people have a small circle of close friends — none of whom are famous — that shrinks as they age. But Barry ZeVan — aka 'The Weatherman' — is not most people.

During his nearly 80 years on the planet, ZeVan has been a meteorologist, weatherman, world traveler, actor, singer, TV producer, documentary filmmaker, journalist, writer and media consultant. All that, of course, is to say nothing of the most constant role in his life — of trusted friend, colleague and confidant to some of the world’s most celebrated people. And now anyone can read all about the colorful life of the veteran television personality — who also happens to be a Minnesota resident — in Barry ZeVan: My Life Among the Giants, A Memoir. Minnesotans probably remember ZeVan best for his zany weather segments on KSTP Channel 5 and KARE 11, which were ground-breaking at the time for their wit and humor. But the man’s worn all of the aforementioned hats — and more — over the years, all chronicled in his self-published book.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 37


Life

among the giants

I was always drawn to singing and performing, something that came naturally for me from an early age, but I never thought of, nor cared about, fame. — Barry ZeVan

38 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

A rising star Ask ZeVan why he decided to write a book, and he’ll tell you he did it because his longtime friend, Jerry Stiller (who, incidentally, included ZeVan in the acknowledgements of his own autobiography, Married to Laughter), encouraged him to do so. And why not? He has a lot to tell. More important, ZeVan has the talent to tell it. ZeVan has a photographic memory, with the uncanny ability to vividly recall the smallest details, such as the name of the organist (Aneurin Bodycombe) who played during ZeVan’s first audition in 1943. The try-out was for a role singing on the radio show Starlets on Parade on KDKA, Pittsburgh, the world’s first commercial radio station. ZeVan was 5½. “I was literally born into broadcasting and show business and only cared about knowledgeably delivering both lighthearted and serious communication from almost day one,” he said. “The events of my life are so cemented in my head, I knew I could write about them, and in chronological order.” ZeVan wrote the book, he said, “to pay homage to all the amazing people I’ve had the pleasure of knowing in my life — many of whom I’m guessing had no idea just how important they were to me.” In ZeVan’s early years — before he became a famous weatherman — he was a regular weekly cast member on the


classic television series Mister Peepers and The Perry Como Show. ZeVan recognizes more than 300 “giants” in his memoir’s acknowledgements; many of these giants make appearances later in ZeVan’s life story. “For some reason, people have always liked me,” he said. “I think it’s because I always brought personality, as well as knowledge, to meteorology.” From his unique childhood to his roller coaster career and famous friendships — there’s rarely a dull moment in the tale. But there are a few devastating ones. (Lest you think ZeVan had an easy go of it — his father went out to get the paper when ZeVan was 16 months old and never returned.) The book, available on Amazon.com, also includes photos, 32 pages’ worth, featuring ZeVan with familiar faces, such as President Harry Truman, Jerry Stiller, Woody Allen, Sammy Davis Jr., Gregory Peck, Henry Kissinger, Colin Powell and Ted Koppel, among others. “From very humble beginnings, I’m in awe of having had the privilege to be more than a passing part of the lives of the most powerful icons in entertainment, broadcasting and politics,” ZeVan said.

Around the world ZeVan worked as a weatherman in Missoula, Idaho Falls, Honolulu, Las Vegas, the Twin Cities, Washington, D.C., Detroit and Stamford, Conn., on ABC’s international satellite news channels.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 39


Life

among the giants

⊳ At his home in Golden Valley, Barry ZeVan has created a gallery of photos from his career in television.

mother, Selma, who he describes as his greatest influence and inspiration in life. “When I was very young, my mother instilled in me a deep appreciation for the finer things — the arts, music, literature,” he said. “She also taught me how to treat people. Because of her, The Golden Rule’s admonition has stuck with me throughout my life. She was my saint.”

Weathering the storms

He’s visited most continents. (He hasn’t been to Australia or Antarctica yet.) He adores Singapore. He swears he could be happy working as a janitor in Cape Town. But the place he’s always come back to? Minnesota. Despite his life among the rich and famous, ZeVan himself lives modestly with his wife, Ellen, in the same Golden Valley rambler he’s called home for 34 years. (They have two daughters, four grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, living all around the U.S.) ZeVan is adamant he didn’t get into the broadcasting business for the money or the recognition. “I was always drawn to singing and performing, something that came naturally for me from an early age, but I never thought of, nor cared about, fame,” he said. ZeVan learned the value of hard work from his single, working 40 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

ZeVan experienced quite a few ups and downs during his more than 30-year career as a weatherman — a profession he entered after receiving weather training in the U.S. Air Force. He describes leaving the Twin Cities as a major misstep. “They treated me better than family at KSTP,” he said. “Someone once told me that if I had stayed on, I would have eventually been offered Good Morning America. It was the biggest mistake of my life. But sometimes things don’t go the way we envision. I’m still grateful every day I wake up.” After delivering his final weather forecast in 1987 on KARE 11, ZeVan went on to host several TV specials and worked on a number of award-winning documentaries, including one with Sam Donaldson that earned him a Telly award for producing in 2006. His signature baritone voice has graced numerous radio programs, commercials and documentary films, too. But there were hard times in the mix as well. “I’ve washed dishes, driven taxi cabs,” he said. “I made bad career decisions, and had many low points. I even considered suicide. But in the end, those low points helped me discover that I was much stronger than I thought I was.” Less Heen, a former KARE 11 producer and friend and colleague of ZeVan’s since 1984, said he doesn’t think ZeVan gives himself enough credit for all that he’s accomplished. Heen recalls being fascinated by ZeVan’s work long before he met him. “Barry is not just among giants, he is a giant,” Heen said. “He’s always had very high standards for his work — from his use of the language to his delivery — I learned a lot from him.” Because of ZeVan, Heen had the opportunity to audition for a Stanley Kubrick film. “Barry heard about a casting call for Full Metal Jacket,” he said. “So he decided to do a story on how to audition for a movie. We made a tape of my audition and sent it in. I didn’t get a part, but thanks to Barry, I can say I auditioned for Stanley Kubrick.”


Barry ZeVan’s memoir chronicles the many celebrities and dignitaries he met over the years, including (left to right, top to bottom) Walter Mondale, Woody Allen, Olympic ski champion Billy Kidd, President Harry Truman, Gen. Colin Powell, Gregory Peck, Jimmy Durante, Jesse Jackson, Henry Kissinger, Sammy Davis Jr. and Shirley Jones. Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 41


Life

among the giants

Can’t stop, won’t stop After years of career ups and downs, ZeVan said he found a renewed sense of purpose in his 70s, serving as a marketing and public relations consultant from his home base in Golden Valley. He still works more than 40 hours a week. Even cancer couldn’t slow him down. On the contrary, ZeVan said he felt oddly energized by the chemotherapy he underwent to treat his lymphocytic leukemia. “Chemo was a blessing for me,” he said. ZeVan’s cancer is now in remission, and most days he can’t wait to get up in the morning. ZeVan, who turns 80 in August, has no plans of fully retiring anytime soon. His passion for his work — and life — simply won’t allow it. On the desk in his office, a small decorative sign reads: “Enjoy the little things in life. For someday you will realize they were

42 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ President Harry Truman was among the many famous folks Barry ZeVan met during his heyday in TV acting, producing and broadcasting.

the big things.” “People don’t realize that there are people like me who still have so much energy and life left,” he said. “I intend to use my talents to the fullest until my last breath.” ZeVan doesn’t have any big plans for his 80th birthday — yet. “I definitely won’t be sitting in my armchair,” he said. “I won’t be jumping out of a plane like George H.W. Bush either.” Tina Mortimer is a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in White Bear Lake with her husband and two children. Follow her work at tinamortimer.contently.com.


Housing resources • Memory care

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Abiitan Mill City A distinctly different 55+ luxury community for active adults searching for a unique lifestyle that only Minneapolis’ Mill City neighborhood offers. 428 S 2nd St, Minneapolis 612-378-0020 abiitan.org

Augustana Care of Minneapolis •••• Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurant-style dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St, Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

Carver County CDA •

Offers affordable independent living for adults 55 and better throughout Carver County including Chanhassen, Chaska, Waconia, and Norwood Young America. We offer Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. All properties are smoke free. 705 N Walnut St, Chaska 952-448-7715 carvercda.org

City of South St. Paul, Housing Division •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N, South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

• Independent housing

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CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave, St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

Lyngblomsten•••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and longterm care, and community services and resources. 1415 Almond Ave, St. Paul 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

Nokomis Square Cooperative•

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, wellkept environment. 5015 35th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

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We offer the perfect mix of care, services and living options to ensure wellness and enrichment. Assisted Living, Independent Living, Adult Day Programs, Comprehensive Rehab Programs, Outpatient Rehab Therapy, On-site Child Care Program. Memory Care coming in early 2017. To learn more, please give us a call! 5500 Boone Ave N, New Hope 763-592-3000 theresidenceatnorthridge.com

Salvation Army Booth Manor•

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 onebedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place, Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor

St. Benedict’s Senior Community••• Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it’s simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN   960 19th St S, Sartell   320-654-2352   chateauwaters.com St. Cloud:   1810 Minnesota Blvd SE, St. Cloud   320-203-2747   centracare.com/sbsc Monticello:   1301 East 7th St, Monticello   763-295-4051   centracare.com/sbscmont

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 43


May

Can’t-Miss Calendar

Oliver Kelley Farm Grand Opening → Celebrate this historical farm’s new facilities and expanded programming with a weekend full of activities, including live musical performances (the Roe Family Singers on May 6 and The OK Factor on May 7), farm animals, chef demos, games, crafts, seed planting, an antique steam-engine tractor and plenty of time for kids to play outside. When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. May 6–7 Where: 15788 Kelley Farm Road, 2.5 miles southeast of downtown Elk River Cost: $12 for adults ($10 for ages 65 and older), $6 for ages 5 to 17, free for ages 4 and younger; limited-income pricing info is available online; the Curbside Chicken food truck will offer food for purchase. Info: mnhs.org/kelleyfarm

ONGOING

May 5–21

110 in the Shade

Little Wars

→ Based on the popular play The Rainmaker, this simple, poignant musical features a lively score from the creators of The Fantasticks. Lizzie Curry struggles alongside her father and brothers to keep their cattle ranch going in droughtridden Texas in the 1930s. Despite their troubles, the men’s chief concern is finding a beau for Lizzie. Then Bill Starbuck strides into town, promising to make rain for $100 and turns the town — and Lizzie’s world — upside down.

→ PRIME Productions, a new professional theater company in the Twin Cities (featured in the April issue of Good Age), presents its full theatrical debut, written by Steven Carl McCasland. Focused on a fictional meeting of Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Lillian Hellman, Dorothy Parker, Agatha Christie — and a mysterious American woman who ties them all together — this 90-minute regional premiere features an intriguing evening of dinner-party “what ifs.”

When: Through May 21 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $24 Info: theatreintheround.org

May 4–7

Festival of Nations → This indoor cultural celebration includes ethnic foods, music, demonstrations, exhibits and dance from more than 90 ethnic groups. Founded in 1932, the festival is one of the longest-running multicultural events in the Midwest. When: May 4–7 Where: RiverCentre, St. Paul Cost: $11 for adults, $8 for ages 5–17, free for ages 5 and younger with a paying adult Info: festivalofnations.com

44 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

When: May 5–21; the playwright will attend and participate in a postshow discussion for the May 12 performance. Where: Mixed Blood Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: General admission is $25. Reserve seats at Brown Paper Tickets at tinyurl.com/little-wars-prime. Discounts are available for seniors. Info: primeprods.org


Can’t-Miss Calendar May 6

Union Depot Train Days → Celebrate trains and transportation at this annual event, highlighting the history and future of passenger train travel with free activities, train equipment, musical entertainment, special events, vendors and more. When: May 6 Where: Union Depot, St. Paul Cost: Most activities are FREE. Info: uniondepot.org/traindays

Bingo & Burgers by the Bay → Enjoy fun, food and music to support the July 4th Fireworks in Excelsior and other local causes as this fifth-annual fundraiser by the Lake Minnetonka Excelsior Rotary Club.

When: 3–7 p.m. May 6, followed by live music by Free and Easy until 10 p.m. Where: Lake and Water streets in downtown Excelsior Cost: 50 cents per game of bingo, plus food and beverages available for purchase Info: rotarybingo.com

MPR Open House → In celebration of its 50th anniversary, Minnesota Public Radio is inviting the public to tour its headquarters in downtown St. Paul. The event will include many opportunities for listeners to meet and greet with MPR show hosts, plus a chance to see inside their broadcast studios. Since its beginning as a college station at Saint John’s University, MPR has grown to a 45-station network — including MPR News, Classical MPR and The Current — serving 1 million Minnesotans and more than 20

million listeners every week nationwide. Where: MPR / Kling Public Media Center, St. Paul When: 11 a.m.–3 p.m. May 6 Cost: FREE. RSVP at mpr50.org. Info: mpr50.org

May 7

MayDay Parade and Festival → Enormous puppets parade down the street. Dancers, musicians and actors join together in beautiful costumes for an arts and community festival like none other. Southside Community Health Services will offer free health screenings, education and resources in partnership with nearly two dozen community organizations at a “health village” as part of the concluding celebration at 3 p.m. at Powderhorn Park. When: May 7; the parade begins at noon. Where: Minneapolis; the parade begins at the corner of 25th Street and Bloomington Avenue South, and travels south on Bloomington to

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 45


Can’t-Miss Calendar May 14

In Flanders Fields →→The Saint Paul Civic Symphony presents a World War I remembrance concert on Mother’s Day as part of Sundays at the Landmark. When: 1 p.m. May 14 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org and spcsmusic.org

May 27–Sept. 4

Kangaroo Crossing →→Live kangaroos, emus and wallabies will be at the heart of this new, walkthrough Australian-themed exhibit.

Anniversary Plant Sale

→→The Men’s and Women’s Garden Club of Minneapolis’ 75th Anniversary Plant Sale will feature new/unusual annuals/perennials and container plants not typically seen at local nurseries. Experts will be on hand to answer gardening questions and to provide information on growing native and pollinator-friendly landscapes. When: 2–6 p.m. May 9 Where: St. Mary’s Greek Orthodox Church, Minneapolis Cost: Admittance is free. Info: Click on “Events” at mwgcm.org.

34th Street, where the parade turns west towards Powderhorn Park. Cost: FREE Info: hobt.org/mayday

May 12–14

Coppelia Nouveau →→Twin Cities Ballet of Minnesota is working to make ballet more approachable with an original production set in 1920s Paris, following a ballet company that’s staging the classic ballet, Coppelia. Actors and actresses move between “real life” company scenes and performance selections from Coppelia, giving the audience the feeling of watching a ballet within a ballet. When: 7 p.m. May 12; 2 and 7 p.m. May 13; and 2 p.m. May 14 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $18–$36 Info: twincitiesballet.org

May 12–June 4

Amy’s View →→David Hare’s acclaimed romantic drama chronicles the lifelong tension between a strong mother and her loving daughter, mixing the concepts of love, mortality and the theater to show how even the smallest events can set in motion chain reactions that dramatically change lives forever. When: May 12–June 4 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $27–$60 ($5 discount for ages 62 and older) Info: parksquaretheatre.org

46 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

When: May 27–Sept. 4 Where: Minnesota Zoo, Apple Valley Cost: Free with zoo admission of $12 for ages 3–12 and 65 and older, $18 for ages 13–64 Info: mnzoo.org

June 2–3, 8–10

Covers: A Pop Concert →→The local Cantus vocal ensemble shows off a different side of its repertoire with its annual pops concert, featuring The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album in its entirety. The four-time Grammy Award-winning album turns 50 this year. When: 7:30 p.m. June 2–3, 8–10 Where: Cowles Center for Dance & The Performing Arts, Minneapolis Cost: $25–35 Info: cantussings.org

June 2–4

Edina Art Fair →→More than 300 fine artists and crafters from around Minnesota, the U.S. and Canada will share and sell their work alongside local and regional musicians, fashion shows, cooking and lifestyle demonstrations, food and a kid zone. When: June 2–4 Where: 50th & France neighborhood of Edina Cost: FREE Info: edinaartfair.com


Can’t-Miss Calendar COMING UP

Musical Theater Series

June 3–4

Flint Hills International Children’s Festival →→Local, regional and international professional artists will represent more than 25 countries on various stages, indoors and out at this popular annual event.

When: Family weekend is June 3–4. Where: In and around the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul. Cost: All outdoor performances and activities are free. This year, tickets to all indoor shows will be “pay what you can,” with tickets available the day of the performances on a first-come, firstserved basis; $8 tickets can be purchased online for guaranteed admission. Info: ordway.org/festival

→→The Ordway Center for the Performing Arts’ 2017-2018 musical series will feature three Ordwayproduced shows and one Broadway tour (Kinky Boots) to illuminate a variety of diverse musical styles and universal themes.

When: Jesus Christ Superstar (July 18–23), In the Heights (Sept. 12–17), Annie (Dec. 7­–31) and Kinky Boots (April 3–8, 2018) Where: The Ordway, St. Paul Cost: Subscription packages for the series start at $130. Info: ordway.org

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 47


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search WHERE YOU LIVE RANCH SHAKER SINGLE SMALL TOWNHOUSE TUDOR

DUPLEX FRENCH GREEK HIGHRISE MIDCENTURY MOBILE PRAIRIE

APARTMENT ARTDECO BUNGALOW CABIN CAPECOD COLONIAL CRAFTSMAN R

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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Clue: G = E

3. Pennsylvania

TRIVIA

Answers 48 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Trivia HOUSING 1. According to a 2016 study, retired Americans spend how much on housing per month?

2. Where’s the best country in which to retire as of 2017? Hint: It’s in Europe.

3. In which state is the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home known as Fallingwater located?

Sources: motleyfool.com, internationalliving.com, fallingwater.org

SUDOKU Splice, Climbs, Divide

WORD SCRAMBLE CROSSWORD

Answers Minnesota Good Age / May 2017 / 49

Where we love is home, home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword 70 Wide-spouted pitcher

ACROSS 1 Sacrificial __ 5 Paintball impact sound 10 “__ of Green Gables” 14 Geometry calculation 15 Largest city in North Africa 16 Yule song 17 Some toy dogs, for short 18 Llama habitat 19 Weekend-starting letters 20 Bygone airplane area 23 Subsided 24 Statutes 25 Electric car brand 29 Apple music players 33 Home for mil. jets 36 Line up 39 Be concerned 41 “Cut corners” or “slash prices” 50 / May 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

42 Landlocked African republic 43 Position behind the steering wheel 46 Part of a relay race 47 Coffee lightener 48 “Rubber Duckie” singer on Sesame Street 50 Mocking remark 53 Works with a needle 57 “Exactly!” ... and a hint to where 20-, 36- and 43-Across’ ending words may be found 62 Mop, as decks 63 “Fingers crossed” 64 “Drinks are __!” 65 Unit seized by a narc 66 Some surrealist paintings 67 Info 68 Composer Stravinsky 69 Pass, as a law

DOWN 1 Forgetful moment 2 Cinnamon roll lure 3 Notes to staff 4 Slam dunk or lay-up 5 Read electronically 6 Twinge of hunger 7 Tupperware covers 8 Staggering 9 Puccini opera 10 Designed to minimize junk email 11 Scrubbed, as a NASA mission 12 Nuremberg no 13 North Pole worker 21 “Beware the __ of March” 22 Bed size 26 Mix 27 Chaps 28 Licorice-flavored seed 30 Spoken 31 Big name in pineapples 32 Big gulp 33 Band with a voltage symbol in its logo 34 Jamie of “M*A*S*H” 35 Soft French cheese 37 Not just a talker 38 “__ idiot!”: “Doh!” 40 “Green Acres” co-star 44 Radiate 45 Word with bar or torch 49 Make cryptic 51 Back of a hit 45 record 52 Patriot Allen 54 “No need to tell me” 55 Phoenix suburb 56 Take the wheel 57 Bird’s nest component 58 Symbol of sanctity 59 Mexican “Hi!” 60 Grand-scale film 61 Experiment 62 Schuss or slalom


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