Page 1

APRIL 2018

The Science of Awe

page 12

Minnesota’s role in the Civil War page 14

Historic

Red Wing page 18

Sue Moores is changing kids’ ideas about fresh food — and themselves — with her unique nonprofit organization page 24

Take our

FINANCIAL LITERACY QUIZ! page 17


Contents

18

HISTORIC RED WING Take a day trip or even an overnight to this charming Mississippi River town.

APRIL GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

8 It's hard not to cheer for a go-getter like Sue Moores!

MY TURN

10 I’m learning to accept help from others with grace and humility.

MEMORIES

12 Awesome — as a word — is overused, but awe’s effect on us can be tremendous.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

14 Minnesota was the first state to offer men for the Union fight during the Civil War. ⊳⊳ Though it's most famous for durable boots and pottery, Red Wing also boasts a rich history, a fun food scene and great sights.

24

ON THE COVER It's a hit! Meet Sue Moores, a nutritionist and lifelong baseball fan, who founded Roots for the Home Team, an organization designed to help local kids. Photos by Tracy Walsh

→→Correction The Word Search in the March 2018 edition of Minnesota Good Age contained errors that made finding some of the solutions confusing. For a corrected version of the Word Search, please go to tinyurl.com/ga-word-0318

6 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING

16 Baby Boomers face a greater risk of becoming so-called ‘elder orphans.’

GOOD LIVING FINANCE

17 Test your financial literacy with a fascinating quiz for retirees.

HOUSING

22 Check out an acclaimed community in Oakdale, celebrating its 20th year.

30 32 BRAIN TEASERS

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FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 4 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Larry Kellevig Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck Tricia Theurer, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2018 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $18 per year.

8 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

One salad at a time BY SARAH JACKSON

S

ome people, especially when they smile, just glow. When a person’s energy and passion are so strong and positive, you can’t help but notice their shine! Such is the case, I think, with Sue Moores, this month’s vibrant — and inspiring — Good Age Cover Star. She’s the founder and executive director of Roots for the Home Team, a one-of-a-kind nonprofit that helps local youth learn new skills through training in urban agriculture, culinary arts and entrepreneurship. Moores, whose day job is being a nutritionist for Kowalski’s Markets, helps teenagers bring signature Photo by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com salads — made with local ingredients the kids grow themselves — to the masses at Target Field. Yes, right at the Gate 34 entrance to the Minnesota Twins’ major-league ballpark, you’ll spot Sue and the kids marketing healthy salads with names like Kickin’ It Filipino, Lakota Wojapi Manoomin and Purple Rain. “When you tell someone a food is ‘healthy,’ most people, especially young people, assume that it tastes horrible,” she said. “But fresh fruits and vegetables really do taste delicious, if you’ll give them a chance.” Since 2012, Roots has served 227 kids, who have created 43 salad recipes and sold 6,375 salads, including some sold at select Twin Cities retail outlets, plus some Minneapolis Public Schools salad bars. What a brilliant idea and a homerun for kids! But this isn’t just about Moores doing a nice thing: She’s made it all possible by bringing together a community of key partners, including a team of career ambassadors, who mentor the kids; several corporate sponsors, who contribute not just funds but oodles of in-kind donations and services; and urban youth gardens, which provide fertile spaces for harvests. It’s kind of amazing. When I met Moores, during a chilly photoshoot at a snow-covered Target Field, her energy was incredible. She’s seen so much success among the kids involved that she’s hoping to see similar programs at stadiums everywhere, and not just baseball venues. “I think the next logical step for our program would be to have a presence at Minnesota Lynx games,” she said. “They and their fan base are terrific. And I’d love other communities to use our template in stadiums across the country.” On May 19, salad sales will kick off at weekend home games for the Twins. And I’m so excited to try the culinary creations from Roots for the Home Team, especially now that I know the wonderful story behind them.


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MY TURN

Finding grace in accepting help BY DAVE NIMMER

I

n this month — when Good Age is highlighting the topic of volunteering — I got to thinking about how easy and satisfying it is to be a volunteer, and how difficult it’s sometimes been for me to accept the reverse role of recipient. It’s probably my false pride, but I’m slowly learning to shed it, like a hair shirt, and enjoy the relief and rewards.

Among friends It begins with welcoming my former students from the University of St. Thomas to take ME out to dinner. In the past few years, two groups of them have been calling and arranging dinner dates. They pick a date and restaurant, make the reservation and sometimes even offer to pick me up. At first, I felt kind of embarrassed, thinking maybe they felt I was lacking for company and conversation. Then I got my head straight and 10 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

realized they were simply being grateful and anxious to trade in old memories and new stories. It turns out the dinners are lively and quite lovely. I get to see pictures of their kids, hear stories of their work and trade opinions about the state of politics in America. It’s a different group than the seniors I have coffee with and I like to kid my senior friends about my efforts to recruit younger friends. The truth is, those dinners give me renewed energy and enthusiasm — and the conversation doesn’t revolve around health issues or replacement parts.

On the shore Something I’m not planning on replacing is my little fishing boat. But, for the first time this year, I — and my old fishing buddies, Jim Shoop and Bob Whereatt — got help in putting the craft up for the

winter. For the past 15 years, the three of us have dragged the boat to shore, turned it over and put it on blocks. This fall after watching the three of us toddle down the stairs to the lake, the homeowner, who graciously allows us to keep the boat at his dock, came down to see how we were doing. I thought you boys might need a little help, he said. No, we’re fine. The three of us dragged the boat to shore, pulled mightily and moved it about 5 feet. Then the homeowner grabbed the bow and pulled. The boat slid 15 feet onto shore. As I recall, he flipped it over himself. We thanked him, collected the gear and went for a cup of coffee. We sat, sipped and satisfied ourselves with the idea that we could’ve done it on our own, but having help did make it easier, especially for the two of us with hernia repairs.


Let me help you, sir, says the clerk. I hand over my card, smile and wait for the receipt. At the grocery store

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Others who sense I might need help are the clerks at Target and Cub, who volunteer to help as I approach the selfservice checkout aisle with my few items — credit card in hand, staring intently at the screen and looking quizzically at my bag of Honeycrisp apples, which presents a whole new challenge. The resolution is usually quick — and welcome. Let me help you, Sir, says the clerk. I hand over my card, smile and wait for the receipt. I really believe I could figure out how to weigh the produce, identify the species and enter the proper code. Then I rationalize how useful I might make the clerks feel and how absolutely grateful I am. Maybe I just made their day. The truth is I actually welcome volunteer help on more and more occasions. When I return to the St. Thomas campus for a visit with old friends, I’m perfectly comfortable letting some college kid step ahead of me as I’m about to enter the library and hold the door. Yep, I look back and say thank you, amazed that she can do that without taking the cell phone from her ear or stopping talking. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 11


MEMORIES

The science of awe BY CAROL HALL

B

ack in my airline stewardess days, while working a night flight out of Anchorage, the captain invited me into the cockpit for a better view — actually my first view — of the Northern Lights. The display of brilliant color against the black sky was electrifying, tingling, awesome. Really awesome! The word awesome has become trivialized from overuse, its real meaning obscured. Awe is a feeling of reverence. It’s dramatic. It’s a positive moment in time that transcends the ordinary, that connects you with something much larger than yourself. My first glimpse of the Arizona desert — again from an airplane — elicited the same feeling. There, so far removed from my familiar Minnesota greenery, 12 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

lay this vast expanse of sand and succulent plants, with mountains off in the distance. It was jaw dropping, even a little frightening … awesome! And I tingled once again, recently, while holding the youngest member of my family, who was 9 months old, in my lap. His 5-year-old sister began waving her hands in his face. He loved it, and laughed and giggled. It was a moment that seemed magical, almost transformational. I began thinking: How was I so lucky to be a part of these beautiful beloved children — to share their DNA? Their very existence is as awesome to me as any amazing vista I’ve ever seen. Surely, awe is a good thing. It uplifts the soul. Social scientists are studying awe. Can it improve our mental state? Can it

have healing potential? Does it make us happier? Can it make us more cooperative? These are the questions being asked. Studies suggest that levels of cytokines, a marker of inflammation that’s linked to depression, are reduced while experiencing awe, particularly while connecting with nature. The stress levels of veterans with PTSD dropped significantly after whitewater rafting on one of the Sierra Club’s Great Outdoors Lab wilderness trips. Unlike other emotions, awe generates a stop-and-step-back feeling that helps us see things in a new way. It boosts creativity: “Little me/Sitting in a tree/Contemplating thee,” is a poem I wrote about a boy I liked during my grade-school tree-climbing days — another of my awesome experiences, wherein I felt at one with the tree!


Awe is a feeling of reverence. It’s dramatic. It’s a positive moment in time that transcends the ordinary, that connects you with something much larger than yourself. Not surprisingly, astronauts experience awe in the extreme. In what they call the “overview perspective,” they report a far-out state of oneness with humanity when looking back at Earth. Awe shocks us into realizing how we’re such a small part of something much, much larger — how we must all collaborate to survive. This in turn can cause us to be nicer to one another, happier within ourselves. And yes, it seems the jaw does drop when experiencing awe. People also often raise their eyebrows, widen their eyes, open their mouths and breathe in, just as I did on Jan. 14 watching the Minnesota Vikings’ Stefon Diggs famously execute the Minneapolis Miracle! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 13


MINNESOTA HISTORY

Sacrifice and the Civil War BY LAUREN PECK

W

hen the Civil War began with the surrender of Fort Sumter on April 13, 1861, Minnesota made history by becoming the first state to offer men to fight for the Union cause. Gov. Alexander Ramsey happened to be in Washington, D.C., when news of Fort Sumter spread, and he quickly offered the U.S. Secretary of War 1,000 Minnesota soldiers. Men from across the state began signing up to fight, gathering at Fort Snelling to train. Some traveled by wagon, boat and even on foot to reach the fort, like Newton Brown who reported walking barefoot for 65 miles from Watertown to St. Paul to enlist. The military had decommissioned and sold Fort Snelling in 1858, so Minnesotans worked to return the neglected fort to military operations again, including repairing the original buildings and constructing additional stockyards, stables, barracks and more. Within a few weeks, 1,009 men had mustered for service at Fort Snelling, becoming the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

Bull Run and Antietam By July 21, the First Minnesota fought in one of war’s earliest battles, the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia, losing 42 men with more than 100 wounded and 30 missing. Even though the Confederates forced the Union side to retreat with an esti14 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Minnesota soldiers of the Civil War reunited at Fort Snelling in June 1902. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

mated 3,000 casualties, Christopher Heffelfinger, a member of the First Minnesota, wrote to his sister, “The men fought like tigers.” The First Minnesota spent much of the next six months on picket duty guarding Union forces while at Camp Stone near Edward’s Ferry, Maryland. In March 1862, the First Minnesota forces took possession of Berryville, Virginia, including memorably using the local newspaper office to create a few issues of their own newspaper for the regiment. Sgt. William Lochren wrote: “It was filled with a rollicking mixture of humor and patriotism, jibes upon the runaway editor … and fleeing ‘secesh,’ and good advice to the inhabitants, which they

were unlikely to profit by.” (Secesh was short for secessionist, a supporter of the Confederacy.) By September 1862, the First Minnesota found themselves in the bloodiest battle of the entire Civil War — The Battle of Antietam in Maryland. More than 22,000 men on both sides died or were wounded — and the Minnesota force was no exception. Of the 435 men fighting at Antietam, more than one in four of the First Minnesota died, were injured or were reported missing by the battle’s end. “If the horrors of war cannot be seen on this battlefield, they can’t be seen anywhere,” wrote Charles Goddard of Winona, one of the survivors, in a letter to his mother.


Gettysburg The First Minnesota is most well-known for its stand at the Battle of Gettysburg in early July 1863. The unit helped hold the Union line — even though they were outnumbered three or four to one — and helped repel Pickett’s Charge, which effectively ended the battle. During the fighting, St. Paul’s Marshall Sherman captured a Confederate battle flag of the 28th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment and was awarded the Medal of Honor as a result. The flag is part of Minnesota Historical Society’s collections today. The First Minnesota, however, also suffered heavy losses with hundreds dead or wounded, and the unit was nearly destroyed. “What was left of the regiment — 47 men who had not been hit,” wrote James A. Wright, an orderly sergeant. “There were a flood of inquiries about the missing ones. The answers left no doubts in our minds of the awful calamity that had befallen the regiment.” The remaining First Minnesota soldiers participated in a few more battles, but in early February 1864, the men’s three-year enlistment was up. Records show that 309 men and 16 officers returned to Minnesota, and their homecoming was greeted by celebrations in towns like Winona, Hastings and Red Wing. They also received a huge reception in St. Paul. The St. Paul Pioneer newspaper wrote: “The windows all along the way were occupied by ladies whose waving handkerchiefs looked like broad lines of white down the streets. The procession itself was half hidden in floating flags and banners.” The regiment was officially dismissed from service at Fort Snelling on April 28, 1864, and some of the men went on to reenlist and continue fighting for the Union.

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▲ Civil War soldier Marshall Sherman of St. Paul captured this Confederate flag during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.

By the end of the Civil War, about 25,000 soldiers from Minnesota had fought in 21 military units. Today Historic Fort Snelling is a Minnesota Historical Society historic site where visitors can learn 10,000 years of history at the confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers, including the area’s military history spanning from the 1820s through World War II. Learn more at historicfortsnelling.org. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 15 Rileys Travel GA 0418 V4.indd 1

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CAREGIVING

Generational differences in caregiving BY TRICIA THEURER

R

osalynn Carter, former First Lady, famously said: “There are only four kinds of people in this world. Those who have been caregivers, those who are caregivers, those who will be caregivers, and those who will need caregivers.” While it’s true that we’ll all be involved in caregiving in some way, caregiving has changed, thanks to the baby boomers and the changing social norms they’ve ushered in. For example, when women in the Greatest Generation were younger, the societal understanding was that women wouldn’t work outside the home and could serve as caregivers for children and elders. Many women today still identify as caregivers, but they’re more likely to hold other, competing roles, such as sole breadwinner or head of household. These shifts in caregiving seem de rigueur for baby boomers, who are known for questioning authority and challenging the traditional family values, including gender roles held by the Greatest Generation. Indeed, caregiving is an area in which significant differences between the generations are playing out.

Elder orphans Experts predict that as baby boomers age, our country will see an increase in the number of older Americans who don’t have family members to serve as informal (non-health-related) caregivers to help them age in place and remain independent. 16 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Such men and women are often referred to as “elder orphans.” Carina Storrs warned in her CNN.com article, The ‘Elder Orphans’ of the Baby Boom Generation: “Nearly a quarter of Americans 65 and older could become ‘elder orphans’ with no family to help care for them.” Part of the reason for this increase in elder orphans is the social and family differences that are associated with boomers. Compared to the Greatest Generation, they’re more likely to be single as they approach older age and are less likely to have children (or may have fewer children), making them especially vulnerable. While some families have resources to afford paid elder care, the country’s declining workforce means there’s already a scramble to fill paid caregiving positions. There’s also a noticeable gap between baby boomers and the previous generation when it comes to saving money for retirement: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, just 11 percent of baby boomers reported that they had retirement savings, compared to 47 percent of those age 71 and older. These scenarios, combined with the fact that Americans are living longer, could have dire implications for our country.

Housing expectations Caregiving in senior living facilities is another arena where differences between the generations are starting to unfold.

While most residents in senior communities are age 80 or older, that’s expected to change as baby boomers retire and downsize. Along with their belongings, boomers will bring their consumer savvy and preferences for individualized, engaging programming and activities. Generally, boomers conduct more research on purchases than their parents and this affects how they approach housing and health care. Marla Durben Hirsch wrote in the article Human Management in Healthcare: Hiring Right to Meet the Demands of Healthcare Reform that “Boomers are savvier, more discerning consumers than previous generations of seniors,” and they “desire to be active and maintain their well-being throughout retirement.” Lindsay Brown, assistant executive director of Yorkshire of Edina, sees that in her daily work in the senior living community. “Baby boomers are much more interested in the extra amenities like massage and more options for meals,” Brown said, adding that older seniors “aren’t used to spending money on themselves and enjoying the little extras, whereas their adult children can’t wait to move in.” Tricia Theurer is a home care consultant for Home Instead Senior Care and the outreach manager for Nokomis Healthy Seniors in Minneapolis. She recently completed a master’s program in gerontology.


FINANCE

Test your financial literacy BY LARRY KALLEVIG

W

hen it comes to personal finances, do you think you’re in good shape or do you know it? April is Financial Literacy Month, which means it’s time to put your financial knowledge to the test.

Can you answer the following four questions about retirement planning?

1

How much should the average couple expect to spend on health care in retirement? a. $200,000 b. $250,000

2

c. $275,000 d. $350,000

True or false: Age 65 is the full retirement age (FRA) to claim Social Security benefits.

3

If you retire at age 65, how many years should you be prepared to live in retirement?

a. 15 b. 20

4

c. 30 d. 50

True or false: If I have a will, my finances will be covered after I pass away.

How do you think you did? Let’s go through the answers:

1: Health care is one of the biggest expenses for retirees, not to mention one of the most unpredictable, yet people often overlook it. According to research from Fidelity, the average 65-year-old couple

should expect to pay $275,000 out of pocket for medical expenses throughout retirement. That doesn’t include longterm care, which is also getting more expensive. I recommend couples consider longterm care insurance to help them pay for expenses such as assisted living facilities, nursing homes and hospice.

A lot of people just stick with what they know when it comes to financial planning, but that can cost you.

2: This was a trick question! The answer

plan, but you’re not covered with a will alone. Consider creating a living will, which outlines what medical procedures you do and don’t want to have, like when to resuscitate or discontinue life support, as well as what happens after you die. You may also want to name a financial power of attorney, who you can appoint to pay bills and make financial decisions if you’re unable to do so, and a healthcare power of attorney, which would come into play if you’re incapacitated and unable to make medical decisions.

is: It depends. Your full retirement age (FRA) is calculated based on the year you were born. For many years, it was age 65. However, FRA gradually increases for people born in 1938 or later. FRA continues increasing until it reaches age 67 for anyone born after 1959. You can file for Social Security benefits as early as age 62, but your benefit will be permanently reduced by as much as 25 percent. There’s a big bonus for delaying your claim beyond your full retirement age: Your benefit will grow by as much as 8 percent each year from your full retirement age up until age 70. There’s no benefit to waiting past age 70 to file.

3: Life expectancy for American men is 78.6 years, and it’s 81.1 years for women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, many people who are 65 today will live to be age 95 or older. That means you could spend 30 years in retirement! I recommend planning to live longer than you expect. It’s better to leave money to family or charity than to realize you will outlive your savings.

4: A will is the cornerstone of your estate

A lot of people just stick with what they know when it comes to financial planning, but that can cost you. That’s why I’m passionate about educating my clients on how smart financial decisions can help them live comfortably during their retirement years. I hope you learned something today! Larry Kallevig is the owner of Haven Financial Group in Burnsville. For more than 15 years, Larry has been helping his clients create financial plans that ensure a dependable and comfortable retirement income. Learn more at havenfinancialgroup.com. Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 17


TRAVEL

Red Wing

The World's Largest Boot, at the Red Wing Store and Outlet Center


Here’s your guide to exploring the history, food and fun of this charming river-bluff town By Carla Waldemar

R

ed Wing — one of our region’s prettiest showpieces of beauty, both natural and man-made — sits close. From the Twin Cities, head about an hour southeast by car and you’re there, ready to party like it’s 1875. That’s the year the historic redbrick St. James Hotel debuted to serve travelers along the bustling Mississippi, the interstate of its day. Or fast-forward to 1905, when Red Wing’s charming railroad station opened, which today still serves visitors from the Twin Cities with Amtrak stops daily. Today it’s also home of the Red Wing Visitor & Convention Bureau, where you can pick up self-guiding maps (and podcasts) of walking tours throughout the historical neighborhoods where brick facades of businesses front gracious homes of myriad architectural persuasions — Italianate, Victorian, Queen Anne. This is the romance of small-town Minnesota at its finest. Some of those mansions now serve as B&Bs in this town of 16,000, such as Moondance Inn, glowing with ornate antiques and a Tiffany chandelier amid an old-time sense of hospitality that results in wine gatherings in late afternoons and bounteous, three-course breakfasts every morning. The railroad station also serves as home to Red Wing Arts, representing regional artworks to view or purchase. It’s also a prominent stop on the levee’s half-mile riverside hiking/biking trail that curves under bluffs, where eagles perch and take in views of Wisconsin across the water. At the turn of the century, Red Wing was a hot spot for entertainment, with the opening of the gorgeous Sheldon Theater in 1904 — a grain baron’s gift to his city. Sparing nothing, it’s a marvel of Renaissance Revival style, flaunting ornate plasterwork, Italian marble columns and gold-leaf stencil — fun to tour and even better to experience

as a performance space for local or traveling talent (closed for renovation June through September this year). Along Central Park, a wedge of greenery leading from the river to a fringe of woodsy hills, one can linger near the park’s bandstand (free concerts on Wednesdays in summer) and count the spires of half a dozen graceful, vintage churches.

Shopping options Patrol Main Street, and stretching just behind it, Third Street, to shop in a town where old-time friendliness still abides as neighbors hold the door for others and greet strangers with a smile along the sidewalks. Discover ladies’ cosmo clothes at 17 Street and classy, comfy menswear at Josephson’s. Uffda is the source for all things Scando, from crystal to Christmas ornaments, from cozy knits to Wilkommen mats. Thunder Clan Trading Post is crammed with drums, beadwork, jewelry and sweet grass from nearby tribes. Fair Trade Books poses as the bookstore of your dreams with its woodplank floors and old-time tin ceilings. Bonus: First-time shoppers are given a free book.

History highlights Luya showcases high-style shoes, while the Red Wing Store and Outlet Center houses a free museum detailing the bootmaker’s history and process along with The World’s Largest Boot — the biggest “ever witnessed by the civilized public” — “fit for a 12-story human giant.” Red Wing Shoes still sells 2.2 million iconic pairs a year (180 styles, sizes 4B to 20D). Red Wing Stoneware, on the town’s outskirts, does the same via a museum, demos and a sales gallery of its famed pottery. Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 19


Plan your trip! Start exploring at redwing.org

Mississippi riverfront in Red Wing

And don’t miss the tiny Aliveo War Museum (open Fridays and Saturdays), an under-the-radar treasury of amazing artifacts, including local soldiers’ wartime souvenirs — a Japanese flag from Okinawa; a Nazi Stormtrooper’s cap with its scary skull emblem; a 1936 first edition of Mein Kampf; and a vintage World War I soldiers’ handbook for occupying Paris (How to Parlay Voo). Amid newspaper headlines from the times, artifacts from Nazi armbands and medals, Viet Cong flags and scarves, Civil War rifles and Confederate currency return to life.

deviled with blue cheese, garlic aioli and bacon; a classic beef tartare; chicken pate; salmon cakes; and the best Brussels sprouts of a lifetime in a warm salad with bacon, poached egg and maple-Dijon vinaigrette. Evening entrees range from bouillabaisse to pork loin, duck breast to braised beef. Linger for live music on weekends. Staghead’s neighbor, Oliver’s, is a wine bar that matches tapas and entrees to the grapes. Nibble on bacon-wrapped dates plump with blue cheese or artichoke dip; then proceed to flatbreads or pasta. Oh, you want hot dish? It’s on the menu, too.

The chef at The Port, the dining star of the St. James Hotel, is Adam Frederickson, an alum of St. Paul’s late Heartland, who knows how to please with apps such as mussels in coconut curry, ahi tuna with ginger-wasabi aioli and lovely raw oysters. The Port’s Caesar is a real gem — pork belly and a poached egg lounging on leaves of romaine. Scallops, says Frederickson, are a best seller. But so’s the osso buco, I’d bet, after devouring a plateful of his pork version. You’ll find swell cocktails, too.

Treats, eats, drinks Some of those vets, I’m betting, will be sitting right next to you in Bev’s Café, lunching on the Blue Plate special. On most mornings, Hanisch Bakery is THE meeting place — every seat filled with seniors clasping their coffee mugs and one of those doughnuts voted “Best in the Midwest.” Mandy’s is the polar opposite — a trendy coffeehouse designed to satisfy your latte addiction alongside with wraps and panini. The most adventurous menu in town is found at Staghead, a vintage storefront where its namesake hangs above the bar. Assemble a feast of small plates, ranging from cheese and sausage platters to eggs 20 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ LaGrange Park in downtown Red Wing features an outdoor fountain staircase.

St James Hotel


Wanna get outside?

Booth Manor

South St. Paul HRA

Old West Main Street is the kick-off Residence point for the popular Cannon Valley • 50+ Community For Seniors 62+ Trail, which travels 20 paved miles up to • Income Based Rent • 1 Bedrooms Cannon Falls. Rated as one of the best • Based on Income • All Utilities Paid trails in the U.S., it affords gorgeous views • Utilities Included • Newly Remodeled • Service Coordinator of the Cannon River, plus bluffs, farm• Elevators • Resident Activities & Programs land, meadows and more. • Community Room • Controlled Entries On the outskirts of Red Wing lies • Smoke-Free Building • On Site Caretaker Falconer Vineyards & Winery in a scenic 1421 Yale Place, Mpls Call for an appointment 651-554-3270 612-338-6313 valley that spreads out before visitors sprawled on the deck, enjoying vino and pizza, plus live music. Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1 12/6/13 10:14 SouthAM St Paul HRA GA 0218 12.indd 1 1/22/18 12:11 PM About 10 minutes away, find the home of Hobgoblin Music and Stoney End harps — housed in a huge restored former cattle barn. Visitors are invited to inspect Stoney End’s antique instrument museum and workshops to see where the fabled harps are made amid the smell of fresh-cut wood and, sometimes, live performances in the hayloft. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 21


HOUSING

An acclaimed community BY SARAH JACKSON

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ak Meadows Senior Living is celebrating 20 years this month. For two decades now, the independent, not-for-profit senior housing community — just east of the 694/94 interchange in Oakdale — has played host to ages 62 and older in independent and assisted living units (as well as memory care). It’s also been winning numerous awards: Oak Meadows was named one of the top 25 assisted-living facility operators by the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal in 2011. Since 2001, it’s been named best assisted living facility every year in a local reader poll by Lillie Suburban Newspapers. And that’s not to mention awards from the City of Oakdale, Woodbury Area Chamber of Commerce, RetirementHomes.com, Care Providers of Minnesota and LeadingAge Minnesota. Why so much acclaim? “What truly sets us apart is our relationships — with other staff, community organizations and especially the tenants, families and volunteers,” said Kim Utecht Prayfrock, Oak Meadow’s longtime director of community relations. “We

22 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

have often heard first-time visitors saying, ‘This place feels so homey and friendly.’” Part of that feeling comes from the fact that some of the staff have been on board since the facility opened (including Prayfrock and an executive director, Connie Dow, who recently retired), plus many others who’ve been around for 10, 15 or more years. Residents at Oak Meadows — which is affiliated with the MN Conference of United Church of Christ — enjoy a surprising number of opportunities to get involved in community outreach. Last summer, Skyview Elementary students and Oak Meadows residents teamed up for an art project to create painted peace posts for both the school and retirement community campuses. Other activities have included filling boxes for Operation Christmas Child and gathering Easter baskets for Solid Ground, a transitional housing agency based in White Bear Lake. Oak Meadows also has established longtime relationships with Mounds Park Academy and Nativity of Our Lord School, both in St. Paul.

“We teach first- and second-grade students what it is like to ‘age,’” Prayfrock said. “Then the classes visit Oak Meadows.” Another attraction is the garden area and gazebo at Oak Meadows. “It is known throughout the community,” Prayfrock said. “and we have many school, scout and church groups volunteer in the summer to help make it beautiful.”

▲ Oak Meadows boasts a greeneryfilled campus with walkable gardens, benches, a gazebo and decorative peace poles created by the residents and local school children.


Amenities ⊲⊲ 24-hour receptionist ⊲⊲ 24/7 resident assistants ⊲⊲ Nurses on site seven days a week ⊲⊲ Home-care services contracted with Ebenezer, plus partnerships with HealthPartners and Allina Health ⊲⊲ Full-time chaplain

OAK MEADOWS WHERE: 8131–8133 Fourth St. N, Oakdale OPENING DATE: April 1, 1998, remodeled in 2012 OPENINGS: There’s a waiting list for independent and memory care units and immediate openings in assisted living. AGES: 62 and older NUMBER OF UNITS: 62 independent living units, including one-bedrooms

⊲⊲ Full-time activities staff

and two-bedrooms (plus den options); 48 assisted-living units, including studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms; and 12 memory care units, including studios and one-bedrooms.

⊲⊲ Private bus for scheduled trips

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: Independent living: $1,323–$2,288

⊲⊲ Restaurant-style dining

⊲⊲ Patios, gazebo, gardens and walking paths ⊲⊲ Complimentary laundry on each floor ⊲⊲ Complimentary senior satellite TV and wifi ⊲⊲ Heated, underground parking (for an extra fee) ⊲⊲ Convenience store open every day

a month (plus phone and electricity); assisted living: $2,516–$3,754 a month, plus phone and a minimum of $325 for home care; memory care: $2,829–$3,623, plus phone and a minimum of $2,360 for home care.

PROPERTY OWNER: Oak Meadows is a stand-alone, not-for-profit community, governed by a board of directors and affiliated with the MN Conference of the United Church of Christ.

INFO: 651-578-0676, oak-meadows.org CHECK IT OUT: Oak Meadows will celebrate 20 years with an open house from 4 to 8 p.m. June 14, featuring music, food, a photo booth, vendor tables, caricaturists and prizes.

⊲⊲ Theater ⊲⊲ Beauty/barber shop

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⊲⊲ Within a mile of golf course, shopping, theaters and schools ⊲⊲ Weekly church services, Bible study and devotions ⊲⊲ Weekly programming from MacPhail’s Music for Life program for memory care residents.

MAJOR BRANDS! Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.

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Photo by Tracy Walsh


Rooting for kids

Sue Moores is changing kids’ ideas about fresh food — and themselves — with her unique nonprofit organization By Julie Kendrick

I

t can be fun to look back on a person’s life and see how each step led to another, and how the intersections of interests and opportunities might have created the life that person is leading now. For Sue Moores, age 59, there have been recurring themes — a love of baseball, an appreciation for delicious food, a desire to give back to the community and a concern about the national viewpoint on nutrition, especially among young people. Mix all those themes together, toss gently and voila! — you arrive at a life’s purpose that’s as vibrant and satisfying as a freshly made garden salad. As it turns out, Moores knows a thing or two about the art of salad making — and also about community-building, youth development, entrepreneurship and volunteerism. As the founder and executive director of nonprofit Roots for the Home Team, she works with Twin Cities’ youth in local community gardens, helping them dream up tasty salad recipes for the fresh produce they grow. The young gardener-chefs become budding entrepreneurs when they sell those delicious salads — with names like Mediterranean East Side, Kickin’ It Filipino, Lakota Wojapi Manoomin and Purple Rain — at Minnesota Twins’ games Target Field. Last year, kids in the program grew 580 pounds of organic vegetables and sold 700 salads.

Finding her calling How did Moores — whose day job includes working with Kowalski’s Markets as a nutritionist — come to be heading up the nation’s only youth entrepreneurial salad business in a major sports venue? It’s the brainchild of her lived experience and her observations of our local landscape, especially as it relates to food. “When you tell someone a food is ‘healthy,’ most people, especially young people, assume that it tastes horrible,” she said. “But fresh fruits and vegetables really do taste delicious, if you’ll give them a chance.” As Moores was growing increasingly concerned about this issue, a seemingly unrelated bit of local news popped up: The Minnesota Twins were going to be moving to a new home in the yet-to-be-built Target Field. (They played their first game there in 2010.) Her two thoughts — getting young people interested in trying fresh, nutritious food at the same time our baseball team was getting a fresh start in a new location — came together in Moores’ mind, and Roots for the Home Team was born. Now all Moores had to do was establish a brand-new nonprofit, arrange partnerships with youth-focused community gardens, find corporate sponsors and convince the Twins to welcome her project at Target Field.

Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 25


Stop and buy a salad. Ask the kids about how they grew the ingredients and created the recipe. They love to tell their stories. — Sue Moores, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Roots for the Home Team

If that seems like an absurdly difficult and dauntingly complex task — too much for a mere mortal — then you haven’t met Sue Moores, who has enough energy and optimism to field a nine-person team all on her own.

Persistence pays off Moores began reaching out to members of the Twins’ organization — and reaching, and reaching and reaching. “I was an unknown entity, pitching a never-been-done-before idea,” she said. Finally, in May 2012, an agreement was in place, and Roots youth sold their first salads during a weekend home game. Moores remains deeply grateful to the Twins for allowing her to sell locally grown salads alongside the stadium’s other food vendors. Dave St. Peter, the Minnesota Twins’ president and CEO, describes Moores as one of the most persistent people he’s ever met. Moores said with a laugh: “I embraced that and took it as a compliment, even if I’m not sure he saw it as an entirely positive thing.” St. Peter, however, had only good things to say about Moores and the organization she created: “Roots for the Home Team is a groundbreaking program and a vital part of the Target Field experience,” he said. “We applaud Sue Moores for her vision, commitment and passion for pioneering this wonderful program.” 26 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

In addition to the Twins ball club and the team’s Community Fund, the organization also receives support from Land O’ Lakes, Just Bare Chicken, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, Deluxe Corporation, the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation, Kowalski’s Markets and Apple Autos. Moores has also expanded the program beyond the stadium. Roots salads are also sold seasonally in area Kowalski’s Markets, Breaking Bread Cafe in Minneapolis and at some Minneapolis Public Schools.

Rooting for the Cubbies Learning a bit more about Moores’ background offers some clues about her ability to combine nutritious eating and baseball games in such an original way. While growing up in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park, her father often took her to Cubs games. “I had two sisters, but I was a tomboy who really liked sports, and I think I was the biggest baseball fan among the kids,” she said. “I still have an Ernie Banks autographed baseball that I won by entering a Jay’s Potato Chips contest. (She had to say why she liked the Cubs in 25 words or less.) When Moores was younger, what appealed to her was performance: “What I really wanted was to be a drummer or backup singer in a rock band, but I had no musical or singing talent.”


Unsure of what she wanted to do for an actual career, she let her mother direct her major. “I certainly loved to eat, so my mom said I ought to study nutrition,” Moores said. “I didn’t have a better idea, so I did.” She earned a bachelor’s in nutrition and food science from Iowa State University and a master’s in nutrition from the University of Wisconsin–Stout. She was working a summer job at the Roseville Professional Center when she noticed a cute guy who kept walking by her office. “Finally he came in and asked me, ‘Are you as bored as you look?’ When I said yes, he took me out to lunch,” she said. That guy, Mark, is her husband of 34 years. Moores said their secret to a successful relationship is simple: “Mark has a great sense of humor, and I guess I do too, although it depends on the day.” The couple, longtime Mahtomedi residents, have three children — Jack, 30, who lives locally and works with his father in their insurance brokerage firm; Clare, 27, who lives in Denver and works in health care; and Eileen, 25, who lives in New York and works in the menswear industry.

Help out Look for the “Garden Goodies” cart with the bright orange carrot near Gate 34 (by the flagpole), beginning May 19 at Twins weekend home games. “Stop and buy a salad,” urged Sue Moores, the founder and executive director of the nonprofit Roots for the Home Team. “Ask the kids about how they grew the ingredients and created the recipe. They love to tell their stories.” Ask for the Home Run Super Crunch Salad — featuring pickled veggies, greens, beans, chopped pecans and a creamy yogurt dressing — the most popular salad last season. (Find the recipe with this article at mngoodage.com.) You can also buy Roots for the Home Team salads at Breaking Bread Café in Minneapolis and Kowalski’s Markets in the Twin Cities. Hoping to volunteer? Contact Roots about becoming a volunteer career ambassador. “We’re always looking for role models in food, business and sports to share an hour or a day to help our kids grow their appetite for vocational

Shut up and listen Now that her children are grown and launched, Moores maintains youthful energy and enthusiasm by spending time with the young people, ages 14 to 18, who participate in Roots for the Home Team through their community garden programs, including Appetite for Change, Dream of Wild Health, Urban Ventures and Urban Roots. “They teach me so much,” she said. “If I give them space, they fill with it good stuff. They are so capable. I just have to remember that if I shut up and listen, I’ll learn from them.” Many of the young participants lack sufficient opportunities to fully explore career options, so Moores is excited about how culinary and entrepreneurial experiences can help them expand outside of their communities and discover their own potential. “Founding this organization has offered me a greater sense of purpose on things I’m incredibly passionate about — finding opportunities for kids and creating a happy perception about healthy food,” she said. “I feel such a sense of gratitude.”

success,” Moores said. If you would like to donate goods or services, the organization’s in-kind wish list includes compostable bowls, lids, sample cups, forks and spoons; photography/videography; printing/ screen printing; social media marketing and public relations.

Learn more at rootsforthehometeam.org

Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 27


We applaud Sue Moores for her vision, commitment and passion for pioneering this wonderful program. — Dave St. Peter, Minnesota Twins president and CEO

Photo by Tracy Walsh 28 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


After the Twins’ home opener on April 5, Moores will be ramping up for her busy season. On May 19, salad sales will kick off at weekend home games. “It’s a seven- to eight-hour shift when I’m there, plus I need to pick up and deliver the harvested produce in advance,” she said. “We’re a small organization, but we’re mighty.” Does she ever get a chance to watch the game? “Not really, but that’s OK,” she said. “I try to get to some games during the week, because I still love baseball.”

Beyond Target Field Moores dreams of expanding her St. Paulbased Roots program locally and nationally. “I think the next logical step for our program would be to have a presence at Minnesota Lynx games,” she said. “They and their fan base are terrific. And I’d love other communities to use our template in stadiums across the country.” Her passion and conviction are an inspiration to many, including Nathan Sartain, a culinary arts instructor at St. Paul College. He opens his school’s kitchen every year for a Roots for the Home Team recipe-development day with area chefs. “Anyone who knows Sue has noticed that every time she talks about Roots, she starts to cry,” he said. “She wears her heart on her sleeve, and she gives a damn. Whenever you talk to her, you can feel the authenticity.” Moore looks forward to watching new kids come into the program, too. “I have no plans to retire,” Moores said. “I want to keep growing the program and allowing it to continue to evolve.”

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Julie Kendrick writes about food, nonprofits and other topics for local and national publications. Follow her @KendrickWorks on Twitter. Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 29


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR APRIL

Photo by Joan Marcus

JERSEY BOYS

→ This 2006 Tony, Grammy and Olivier award-winning production tells the true story of four blue-collar kids who became one of the greatest successes in pop-music history — The Four Seasons with hit songs like Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Rag Doll, Oh What a Night and Can’t Take My Eyes Off You. When: April 24–29 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $39–$155 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

ONGOING

APRIL 8

→ Minneapolis Central Library and Westminster Presbyterian Church have joined forces to expand the hours and programming of the Magnet Senior Center, which opened last summer in response to the closing of the Skyway Senior Center in downtown Minneapolis. Individuals age 50 and older of all faiths are welcome at both locations.

→ The spirit of Sir Simon Canterville has haunted his English mansion for more than 500 years. But when Americans invade his home in this Oscar Wilde production, he becomes determined to scare them out.

MAGNET SENIOR CENTER

When/Where: Mondays and Wednesdays: 9 a.m.–noon at the Westminster Presbyterian Church (Heller Commons, 1200 Marquette Ave). Tuesdays and Thursdays: 9 a.m.–noon at the Minneapolis Central Library (300 Nicollet Mall). Cost: FREE Info: westminstermpls.org 30 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

THE CANTERVILLE GHOST

When: Through April 8 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: theatreintheround.org

APRIL 10

LET IT BE → Jam-packed with more than 40 of The Beatles’ greatest hits, this international

sensation has been seen by more than 2 million people worldwide. When: April 10 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $27–$89 Info: ordway.org

APRIL 12

OLDER ADULT JOB FAIR → Martin Luther Senior Living hosts a variety of area businesses looking to hire seniors and retirees, including full-time, part-time, seasonal and even volunteer positions. When: 10 a.m.–2 p.m. April 12 Where: Martin Luther Campus, Bloomington Cost: FREE Info: martinluthercampus.com/seniorjobfair


APRIL 12–28

MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL → Minnesota’s largest film event — and one of the longest running film festivals in the country — presents more than 250 works from new and veteran filmmakers from around the globe.

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Located in Oakdale, MN

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

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CELEBRATING 20 YEARS!

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When: April 12–28 Where: Various Cost: Various Info: mspfilm.org

APRIL 12–14

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

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→ From donation day on April 12 — when hundreds of people drop off donations at the University of Minnesota ReUse Program Warehouse — to the big sale on April 14, mountains of fabric, yarn, tools, books, notions and more will change hands, raising more than $60,000 to support education programs at Textile Center, a national center for fiber art based in Minneapolis. When: April 12–14 Where: University of MN, Minneapolis Cost: $3 per person for the main sale on April 14; $30 in advance or $35 at the door for the preview sale on April 13 Info: textilecentermn.org

APRIL 27–29

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ST PAUL ART CRAWL → Visit more than 400 artists at dozens of locations as they open their studios and galleries at this twice-annual event every April and October. When: April 27–29 Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: stpaulartcrawl.org

MUCH MORE ONLINE! Find many more local events in our newly-expanded calendar at mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / April 2018 / 31


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Pitch in

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PHILANTHROPY POLITICS SERVICE SYNAGOGUE TAXES TEACHING VETERANS

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32 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA 1. John F. Kennedy

Source: Eden Sher


TRIVIA Helping out 1. What president founded the Peace Corps and then put his brother-in-law, Sargent Shriver, in charge of it? 2. What clown character lent his name to a nonprofit that provides housing for families with hospitalized children? 3. What charity, founded during the Civil War by Clara Barton, is the largest humanitarian organization in the world?

2018



2018

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Crossword

70 Otherwise 71 Oozes 72 “Don’t go” 73 Actress Cannon

DOWN

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1 Bird’s crop 5 Pols with a donkey symbol 9 Specialized, committee-wise 14 Operate with a beam 15 Natural burn soother 16 Set of beliefs 17 “__ That a Shame” 18 “Hold your horses!” 19 Cybercommerce 20 *Begin preparing an evening meal 23 Nov. 11 honoree 24 Capital of Minn. 25 Taxi driver 27 Many a ’50s pompadour sporter 30 Catastrophic 2017 hurricane 33 “The fresh air is delightful!” 36 Suffix with Jumbo 34 / April 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

37 Spreads apart, as one’s fingers 39 Hunt like a cat 41 Internet connectivity delay 43 “The Waste Land” poet T.S. 44 Tennis great Gibson 46 Starlet’s goal 48 Org. with Bulls and Bucks 49 Bonkers 50 Tart plant stalk diced for pie filling 53 A : Z :: alpha : __ 55 Originate (from) 59 Arctic toymaker 61 Two-couple outings ... and what the answers to starred clues are? 64 Civilian attire 66 Wordsmith Webster 67 Hertz fleet 68 Spring for a meal 69 Fish in some cat food

1 Yearbook section 2 Grammy winner Bonnie 3 “It’s __”: “No problem” 4 Counter-wiping aid 5 Procrastinator 6 Pre-college, briefly 7 Cow’s hurdle, in rhyme 8 Mystical gathering 9 Severe, as criticism 10 “__ & the Women”: 2000 Gere film 11 *Downpour 12 “Garfield” dog 13 Future stallion 21 Slowpoke in a shell 22 Body parts that may be pierced 26 List of charges 28 Big name in ISPs 29 Chaotic mess 31 “Butt out,” for short 32 Dog in old whodunits 33 “C’mon, be __!”: “Little help, please!” 34 Woody’s son 35 *Steaming morning mugful 38 Looked closely 40 “To __ it may concern” 42 Yak it up 45 2012 Affleck thriller 47 Seized the opportunity 51 Favorite hangouts 52 Prepared (oneself), as for a jolt 54 Does film splicing, say 56 Lombardy’s land 57 Vice __ 58 German steel town 59 Rescue squad VIPs 60 Light, to a moth 62 Match in a ring 63 Singer Del Rey 65 Bojangles’ dance genre


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