Page 1

JANUARY 2018

r a t s r e p u S Ho

A RAILROAD TO REMEMBER PAGE 14

ot nnes i M w

a’s Ma

Baus ureen

ch ros

THE NETHERLANDS’ ENDLESS CHARMS PAGE 20

me Super e to beco

B o w l LII’s MVP

POWER UP YOUR PIZZA PAGE 34

PAGE 36

FINDING A SENSE OF PURPOSE IN HOPKINS PAGE 10


Contents

JANUARY

20

GO DUTCH! Picturesque urban escapes and quaint rural villages beckon amid canals and world-class art in the Netherlands — including 70 museums in Amsterdam alone, plus remarkably preseved windmills in Holland's peaceful countryside.

⊳ Amsterdam, also known as Venice of the North, has 165 canals offering more than 30 miles of waterways that pass under 1,281 bridges.

GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

8 Minnesota is getting a new 'Bold North' identity along with Super Bowl LII.

MY TURN

10 The Men's Shed in Hopkins has given new purpose to a group of local guys.

MEMORIES

12 Check out a variety of surprising health insights from a layman's point of view.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

14 James J. Hill and his son, Louis, used natural wonders of the West to promote their railroad from St. Paul to Seattle.

GOOD HEALTH WELLNESS

16 What you think you can do may actually determine what your body is able to do.

36

CAREGIVING

18 There's great power in thinking of self-care as a decision-making mindset when caring for loved ones.

ON THE COVER Queen of the North: Marketing guru Maureen Bausch, a former Mall of America executive, is the woman leading the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee. Photos by Tracy Walsh

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

28 Minneapolis-based Circle of Life offers culturally sensitive home care for American Indians across the U.S.

FINANCE

30

HOUSING RESOURCES

44

6 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

BRAIN TEASERS

48

32 It's a myth that only the super wealthy need help with estate-planning decisions.

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

IN THE KITCHEN

34 Light and tasty, this healthy take on flatbread pizza is ready in 15 minutes.


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 1 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Victor Block, Ed Dykhuizen, Melissa Gibbs Carol Hall, Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick Shannon Keough, Jessica Kohen Joslyn Neiderer, Dave Nimmer Parichay Rudina, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

DESIGN INTERN Victoria Hein

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Touchdown! BY SARAH JACKSON

I

’m not a big football gal. Sure, it’s amazing to see modern-day gladiators, completing superhuman feats of athleticism. But I find it hard not to bristle at the culture of the NFL, the injuries the players suffer and the billions spent on the sport, including our new stadium. However, the Super Bowl coming to town? Well, that’s different for me. I can’t help but get caught up in the excitement of our own wonderful state of Minnesota taking a national — if not international — stage. Photo by Tracy Walsh Did you know we have an entire host tracywalshphoto.com committee working to showcase our state, recently branded as the #boldnorth? Our Minnesota story, crafted by the committee, goes like this: “We are the Bold North! We’re a collection of innovators and idealists, scientists and risk takers, explorers, and storytellers. From arts and industry to music and medicine, we throw caution to the wind-chill.” I mean, honestly, that just sounds cool. (Maybe it’s time we left our reputation for passive-aggressive niceness behind?) And who’s the woman behind all this boldness? It’s our Cover Star — marketing guru Maureen Bausch, the CEO of the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee. Not only has she spent the past three years working to make the most of this enormous event (last seen here in 1992), she has her own bold story to tell. Bausch, after all, is the woman who sold the idea of Minnesota as a mega shopping destination before the Mall of America became what it is today — a draw for 40 million people every year, not to mention a generator of $2 billion in revenue annually. And that’s just part of Bausch’s fascinating biography found in this issue. Not going to the game? Me neither, of course. But you can get in on Super Bowl LIVE, a 10-day pregame extravaganza, including tons of free concerts (including a sing-along of Prince’s Purple Rain), a life-size snow globe you can climb inside and other quintessentially Minnesota activities (including Native American drumming every night). This is our time to shine — yes, in February. Game on!


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MY TURN

Meet the Men’s Shed BY DAVE NIMMER

I

’ve always felt blessed to have good male friends — and a few good women friends — in my life, knowing they’d become even more important when I retired. We get together regularly for morning coffee and conversation — not only about political issues, but also about personal matters. We talk of soulful stuff — health scares, recent deaths and unexpected pleasures. Now a group of guys, who meet regularly at the Hopkins Activity Center, have done us one better. They’re not only about talk, but also about tasks. In the year since the Hopkins Area Men’s Shed got started, these boys of summer have varnished benches, painted pipes, planted gardens and adopted city parks to look after. They call themselves the Men’s Shed, and they meet every Thursday. Depending on the month, attendance ranges from five to 10 men. The group is patterned after an organization that started in Australia to provide a constructive, creative and compassionate outlet for retired men.

An international movement Currently, there are 1,100 Men’s Sheds in 11 countries, including three in the U.S. (Minnesota, Michigan and Hawaii), with a fourth to come soon. The Hopkins group includes a farmer, an engineer and a public relations man, among others. Phil Johnson, 68, has been in the 10 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Members of the Hopkins Area Men’s Shed have taken on a variety of tasks during the past year — free of charge — to benefit the community and to create social opportunities for themselves. Photos courtesy of the Hopkins Area Men’s Shed

Hopkins group since it began and is now one of the Men’s Shed U.S. directors. “What I get out of this,” he said, “is friendships with other guys and getting to meet new people. You know, we’re all nice to each other and that’s real. And at the end of a lot of days, we can look at what we’ve accomplished.” That includes scraping and painting a large pipe at the city’s water plant, refinishing wood benches at the activity center, staining a fence adjacent to a fire station and planting flowers and weeding the garden. “This gets me out of the house,” said Joe Holasek, 74, a retired technician and former supervisor at Honeywell. “When I retired at 70, I didn’t have the contact

with people that I used to have. Now I’ve got that contact AND I get to accomplish something.” Joe’s wife, Nancy, couldn’t be happier with his new group. “Joe and I have activities outside of the house,” she said. “But the Men’s Shed has

GET INVOLVED Learn more about all the programs at the Hopkins Activity Center by visiting hopkinsmn.com/ activitycenter or by calling 952-939-1333. Read about the international Men’s Shed movement — including how to start your own — at usmenssheds.org.


added another dimension. When we get back together, we have lots more to talk about. Overall, this is a good thing for the guys and wives as well. There’s a real sense of purpose here.”

Getting men in the door Susan Newville, who has been with the activity center for 37 years and is now its coordinator, is delighted with the group. “In the past, it’s been hard to get men in the door. The Men’s Shed brings them in — and they come from different backgrounds,” Newville said. “Their enthusiasm is catching.” That energy is as obvious in the oldest as well as the youngest in the group. At 86, Chuck Claude, who worked for 14 years for Schwan’s, looks forward to the weekly get-togethers. “This gives you a whole new social life,” he said. “That’s important when some of your old friends — and even your enemies — have died. And we can put our skills to good use.” From what I observed, the men are doing just that. They seem to have a genuine affection for each other and don’t let talk of politics and religion get in the

This gives you a whole new social life. That’s important when some of your old friends — and even your enemies — have died. — Chuck Claude, 86, Childrens Theatre Co GA 0118 12.indd Hopkins Area Men’s Shed

way. Watching them sitting around a table, I would’ve guessed they’d known each other for many years, not months. They looked and sounded like the guys I hang around with — and we’ve had decades to fashion our friendship. Again, I’m reminded this part of life is a spiritual journey. And the stepping stones are relationships that provide honest talk, hearty laughs and good company.

1

12/19/17 5:42 PM

Climb aboard & take a trip of a lifetime!

Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 11

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MEMORIES

A layman's view of health BY CAROL HALL

U

pon being accepted into medical school and almost graduating from pharmacy school in the late-1960s, my good friend Ron Kenmir dramatically switched career paths and became an airline pilot. Now long retired from flying, Ron’s passion for medicine is still intact. He frequents many lectures on the subject, particularly on issues of aging. Carol: Can you share some of what you’ve learned with Good Age readers, Ron? Ron: Well, arthritis, memory loss and cancer seem to be the most prevalent health concerns for us retirees. However, we have far more control over dealing with each of these conditions than is popularly assumed. C: OK, start with arthritis, something I know you’ve done much research on. R: I’ve discovered we can often totally alleviate arthritis pain through exercise, such as walking, strength building, etcetera — especially walking! This is relatively new thinking. In the past, people mostly just lived with the pain, some winding up in wheelchairs unable to walk, and now, more commonly, having joint-replacement surgery. C: Haven’t you personally proved this walking theory to work? R: Yes. Three years ago, I felt the slow onset of sharp right hip pain that left me limping and unable to do stairs. My 12 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


cartilage research revealed it wouldn’t hurt to exercise, so I began walking three miles a day and climbing stairs. It was really painful at first, but after several weeks, the pain went away and hasn’t come back. I now regularly walk three miles daily and haven’t needed hip-replacement surgery. C: That’s pretty impressive. Now what are the latest findings on memory loss? R: Keeping your body healthy and your mind passionately active both play a gigantic role in staving off mental decline — the passion part is critical. Also, when you sleep, your brain cleanses itself with pulsations and a newly discovered lymph drainage system. It follows that good sleep is important in preventing memory loss. And lastly, I’ve heard complete remission of memory loss has been achieved with vitamin B12 injections. C: Now for the big one: Cancer. R: The leading cause of most cancers used to be something of a mystery. But according to recent U of M Masonic Cancer Center research, compromised lifestyle factors, like smoking, stress and trauma, seem to account for up to about half the reasons people get cancer today. Genetics and even some bacterial/viral infections can play a role, as well.

Also, cancer often appears 1 to 1½ years after a major life loss, such as the death of a spouse or diagnosis of a cataclysmic disease. I found it especially interesting that we all get many tumors each year, which are handled by the immune system; you don’t even know you have them unless you scrutinize those areas at the wrong time.

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C: Any comments about mental health during retirement — particularly the loss of identity and sense of purpose that come with stopping work? R: Delve into something you feel passionate about. Studying medicine is made to order for me. C: And for me, it’s writing this wonderful column! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

A railway to remember BY JESSICA KOHEN

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n Jan. 6, 1893, near the town of Scenic, Washington, the final spike was driven to complete the Great Northern Railway’s transcontinental route — connecting St. Paul to Seattle. The Great Northern Railway was the vision of James J. Hill, known as the “Empire Builder” for his work extending the rail lines and the resulting towns, industry and tourist destinations that sprang up along the route. In 1912, upon retiring, Hill said, “Most men who have really lived have had, in some shape, their great adventure. This railway is mine.”

Crossing the Rockies Hill began his rail career in 1866 as an agent with the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad, the first company to lay track and operate regular trains in Minnesota. Hill made a fortune in railroad investments and in 1889, he changed the name 14 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

of the Minneapolis & St. Cloud Railway — which he had acquired years earlier — to the Great Northern Railway Co. Under this new name, the railway took over the highly successful St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Co., and by the end of 1890, the Great Northern Railway Co. was operating 3,260 miles of track.

All that was left to do to create a completely transcontinental railroad was to find a place to cross the Rocky Mountains. Great Northern Railway engineer John F. Stevens located the perfect spot at Marias Pass in Montana. At 5,215 feet, it was the highest point on the line above sea level. By January 1893, the final work was completed and by summer the West and the East were linked by regular service.

Most men who have really lived have had, in some shape, their great adventure. This railway is mine. — James J. Hill of St. Paul

The ‘ultimate American experience’ Hill enjoyed great success with his railroad and was able to move his family to a new mansion at 240 Summit Ave. in St. Paul. Completed in 1891, the mansion became the largest and most expensive home in Minnesota — at 36,500 square feet, including 13 bathrooms, 22 fireplaces, 16 cut-glass chandeliers, a large art gallery and a staff of 14. Part of Hill’s success was that he didn’t


⊳⊳ This scene of Glacier National Park — painted by John C. Fery in 1900 — was one of many used to promote the new destination on the Great Northern Railway line. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

just build rail lines: He also established towns along the routes and sent agents to Europe to encourage immigrants to populate them. He invested in industries like wheat, iron ore and lumber to help drive a demand for rail use. He funded research into livestock and crops that would yield the most income for farmers along the line. When his son, Louis, took over as Great Northern Railway president, he too invested in businesses that would drive rail traffic. Louis focused on passengers instead of cargo and used tourism to promote the line. In 1908, Congress established Glacier National Park, and Louis Hill jumped into action, building a vision for the park

DELVE INTO HISTORY This month visitors can learn about the James J. Hill family’s involvement with the St. Paul Winter Carnival through a special tour, Winter on the Hill, offered Jan. 27–28 and Feb. 3–4, along with a new exhibit — Parades, Palaces, and People: St. Paul Celebrates Winter — opening Jan. 28, all at the James J. Hill House (above, right) in St. Paul. Visitors can also learn about the man behind the Great Northern Railroad through guided tours and special events year round. Learn more at mnhs.org/hillhouse

that he could market to train riders. Louis oversaw the creation of hiking trails, roads and an elegant hotel — Glacier Park Lodge — which still hosts visitors today with much of its history remarkably preserved. He based his vision for the park on a Swiss chalet theme, but he promoted the park and taking the train to get there as the “ultimate American experience.” Louis’ Glacier Park marketing campaign used the slogan “See America First,” and an image of a white Rocky Mountain goat was emblazoned on Great Northern railcars. He enlisted the Blackfeet Indians as park ambassadors and hired professional artists

and writers to capture the scenery and people of Glacier. Hundreds of works of art depicting Glacier adorned the walls of the Glacier Park Lodge, offices and depots of the Great Northern Railway, and banks and clubs across the country. The campaign proved successful, and the Great Northern logo became one of the most well-known images in all of American advertising. Today the line from St. Paul to Seattle is operated by Amtrak and is called the “Empire Builder.” Jessica Kohen is the media relations manager for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 15


WELLNESS

What you think matters BY JOSLYN NEIDERER

O

steoarthritis patients who are more confident in their abilities in the morning go on to be more physically active throughout the day, according to new research by Penn State. In the study published in the journal Health Psychology, the participants each wore a device throughout the day which measured the intensity of their physical activity and how many steps they took. The findings? What you think you can do matters. “If you feel more confident, you’re more likely to be physically active that day,” said Ruixue Zhaoyang, the lead author of the study. “And if you feel more confident than yesterday, you are more likely to be more active than yesterday.”

Overcoming pain Self-efficacy — a person’s confidence in his or her ability to do something — influences physical activity independent from other factors such as pain, mood and even support from a spouse. Researchers said the study could give insight into how to better design physicalactivity interventions. Zhaoyang, a postdoctoral fellow in Penn State’s Center for Healthy Aging, said that although earlier research has found physical activity to be one of the best ways to reduce and manage symptoms of osteoarthritis, pain often prevents patients from being as physically active as they should be.

16 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

As a result, stiffness tends to worsen and muscle strength can continue to deteriorate. While previous studies have examined physical activity among people with other chronic conditions, researchers have yet to explore the psychological aspect of activity in people with osteoarthritis. “Osteoarthritis is a common condition, and we wanted to look at how we can help people who suffer from it improve their activity levels,” Zhaoyang said. “Self-efficacy is a very strong predictor of people’s physical activity, and we wanted to see how it specifically affects this population.” Over the 22 days of the study, 135 participants recorded their self-efficacy each morning by answering such questions such as, “How confident are you that you can be physically active today despite pain?”

They also answered questions about their mood and how much pain they were feeling. Participants then wore accelerometers throughout the day, which measured the intensity of their physical activity and how many steps they took.

It’s personal, but fleeting, too Zhaoyang said one of the interesting aspects of the study was that it compared not only self-efficacy from person to person, but also day to day within the same person. This gave the researchers a better idea about how daily fluctuations in self-efficacy influence a person’s activity. Researchers determined that even if a person’s self-efficacy was lower than another participant’s, it still resulted in


Self-efficacy influences physical activity independent from other factors such as pain, mood and even support from a spouse. more physical activity as long as it was higher for them personally. “It’s not about your confidence compared to other people, it’s about comparing it within yourself. If you feel more confident than yesterday, you are more likely to be more active than yesterday,” Zhaoyang said. They also found the effect to be ephemeral: A bump in self-efficacy failed to carry over to the following day. “So for someone who’s trying to help someone become more active, if you boost their confidence today but don’t do it tomorrow, the effect will disappear,” she said. Lynn Martire, a professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies who also worked on the study, said mobile technologies such as smartphones and FitBit devices might help with interventions, thanks to the many comparisons they provide over time. “With the effect of self-efficacy only lasting a single day,” she said, “the timing of motivational messaging is key.” Joslyn Neiderer is a writer and editor with Penn State’s strategic communications department.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 17


CAREGIVING

Adopting a self-care mindset BY MELISSA GIBBS AND PARICHAY RUDINA

S

ome of the most common advice you hear when taking care of a family member or friend is to practice “self-care.” But when you’re busy and overwhelmed by the needs of the person you’re caring for, self-care can seem like a luxury you don’t have the time or money for — or it can feel like one more thing to add to your ever-growing to-do list. Instead of thinking about self-care as something separate and distinct, it may be helpful to think of self-care as a lens for decision-making. The choices and decisions we make impact our health, well-being and ability to take care of others. Every day we make thousands of decisions, whether or not we’re really conscious of them. Making decisions about self-care doesn’t have to be another thing added to your to-do list. It can be a simple awareness of the daily choices we make and being mindful of the impact of those choices. It can be embracing and celebrating what you already do: Perhaps you start the day with a healthy breakfast — or maybe it’s that you make sure to get a good night’s sleep or make an effort to move your body a little extra throughout the day.

Building community Self-care can be self-defined by what’s most important to you. You don’t have to go it alone. Some-

18 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

times knowing where to start can be the hardest step. In the Living Well With Chronic Conditions community class organized by the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, selfmanagement of health is the focus. Individuals in similar situations come together to focus on managing their health and well-being. This class builds on health and wellness practices you may already be doing — or have been trying to do. Being in a group, sharing ideas, thoughts, struggles and triumphs with others, however, can be empowering and can hold you accountable to your goals through ups and downs. Another way to get support for making decisions with self-care in mind is through Powerful Tools for Caregivers, a

six-week class offered throughout Minnesota that helps people manage caregiving strategies that work for them. While building a supportive network with other caregivers, participants develop tools to reduce stress, communicate needs to family members (and the rest of the care team), work through difficult feelings and make tough caregiving decisions.

Action planning If self-care seems to be a practice that’s eluded you so far, there are tools available. The classes mentioned above discuss a variety of tools, including the process of “action planning.” This strategic process helps people break down an overall goal into smaller, more manageable steps.


Instead of thinking about self-care as something separate and distinct, it may be helpful to think of self-care as a lens for decision-making. Step one is to identify the first step you need to take to achieve a goal. The second part is to answer these questions: ⊲ What do I want to do? ⊲ When can I expect to complete this action? Will it be in one day, one week? (Giving yourself a specific time-line can help tremendously.) ⊲ Who can I share this with? Who will help hold me accountable to my plan? ⊲ What are some of the barriers that might come up that will prevent me from completing this action? If those do come up, what I can do to overcome those? Sometimes using new tools takes practice, so be kind to yourself, knowing that you’re trying something new.

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Whatever you do to practice self-care is important for you and the person you’re caring for day after day. To learn more about these classes, call the Wilder Foundation’s CARE line at 651-280-2273 to find a class happening in your area. Melissa Gibbs and Parichay Rudina work at the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation’s Community Services for Aging. Learn more by visiting the Caregiving Resource Center program page at wilder.org.

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7/6/162018 10:25/AM Minnesota Good Age / January 19


TRAVEL

Neth

ZAANSE SCHANS , ZAANDIJK , NETHERLANDS :

a popular destination for tourists, thanks to its collection of well-preserved historic windmills and houses


herlands! Picturesque urban escapes and quaint rural villages beckon amid canals and world-class art in the Netherlands

by Victor Block

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 21


Netherlands!

E

steemed museums stand shoulder-to-shoulder with flower markets festooned by rainbows of color. People crowded into cafes and pubs chat, sip coffee and other beverages and watch the passing traffic, which consists of as many bicycles as automobiles. This is the setting in one of the greatest small cities in the world — and the capital of one of the smallest countries in Europe — Amsterdam. But anything that the Netherlands (only about half the size of Maine) may lack in dimension, it more than makes up for in diversity. First-time visitors soon understand why the name Netherlands, which means “lower countries,” fits. Much of the land has been reclaimed from the North Sea and lakes, and more than one-quarter of the pancake-flat area is

Unique roof lines preside over the Amstel River in Amsterdam, which is known for its many picturesque canals.

beneath sea level. It’s protected by an elaborate drainage system of canals, dikes and pumping stations. Windmills, which pump water back over the dikes, are also used for milling flour and other grains.

Amsterdam’s city life Indeed, Amsterdam offers attractions that would make a much larger metropolis proud. Elegant homes that were built by wealthy residents during the Golden Age in the 17th century overlook cobblestone streets and a network of canals that crisscross the city. Because of the many canals, boat tours are a popular way to take in many sights. Belying Amsterdam’s modest size are more than 70 museums, ranging from world-class to intimate.


▲▲The Netherlands' many rural villages offer a taste of slower-paced Dutch culture as well as rich history.

The Rijksmuseum, the country’s national showplace, which houses the most extensive collection of Dutch paintings in the world, includes nearly two dozen Rembrandts. A priceless collection of works by Rembrandt also resides in the Rembrandt Huis, where the artist lived from 1639 to 1658. My favorite was the View of Amsterdam, which was painted in 1640 and depicts a row of windmills lined up like soldiers in formation. The Van Gogh Museum contains the largest number of masterpieces by that renowned artist, including about 200 paintings and 500 drawings. Much smaller, yet certainly as well known, is the Anne Frank Huis. In this narrow townhouse, the young Jewish girl hid with her family for more than two years during the German occupation of the Netherlands during World War II. Among the items on view at the biographical museum are Anne’s hand-written diaries. Her observations and memories, some heartening, others chilling, have been translated into more than 50 languages.

Rural appeal Even with the many reasons to enjoy what Amsterdam has to offer, there are just as many reasons to visit several of the country’s rural villages. Their tranquil charms and laid-back personality present a different — yet equally as appealing — experience of The Netherlands. Delft once was the world center for production of graceful Royal Delft Pottery with 32 factories there that produced ceramics with the distinctive blue and white colors. While only one factory remains, the town also boasts buildings dating from as early as the 13th century along with museums, markets and other destinations. The area around IJsselmeer lake is dotted with inviting old towns — the fishing villages of Monnickendam, Marken and Volendam, the cheese town Edam and the historic burgs of Hoorn, Enkhuizen and Stavoren.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 23


PLAN YOUR TRIP!

For more information, see holland.com

â–˛ Top: Delft, a canal-ringed city about an hour southwest of Amsterdam, is home to a stunning Renaissance-style city hall. Above left: The cheese market in Edam, The Netherlands, is famous for its waxed wheels of semi-hard, pale yellow Dutch cheese. Above right: Authentic wooden clogs have been handmade in The Netherlands since at least the 13th century. 24 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


The mediumsized city of Maastricht (left and below) at the southernmost tip of the Netherlands mixes elements of Dutch, French and Belgian cultures.

A different experience awaits visitors in Giethoorn — a mostly car-free village northeast of Amsterdam. Locals traverse its four miles of canals in small flat-bottom boats, and many farmhouses boast thatched roofs dating back to the 18th century.

Amazing Maastricht A contrasting atmosphere is encountered in Maastricht, a city of about 120,000 residents at the southernmost tip of the Netherlands. It combines some of the best features of the country with touches from France and Belgium. The result is an enticing amalgam of history, sightseeing and activities. The people exhibit the characteristic Dutch friendliness and dry sense of humor. The joie de vivre of the French is evident in crowded cafes, tempting patisseries and boutiques displaying the latest Paris fashions. Even the surrounding countryside provides a different touch. It resembles the

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 25


Netherlands!

▲ Amsterdam — with its charming architecture, picturesque canals, bicycle culture and a whopping 70 museums — is a must-see destination in The Netherlands.

A different experience awaits visitors to Giethoorn, a village that’s reached by water and prohibits the use of cars.

26 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

rolling hills of nearby Belgium more than the flat lowlands characteristic of the Netherlands. Residents revel in their city’s reputation as a place for fun and frivolity. They’re quick to point out the statue of the Spirit of Maas, a dancing sprite sporting a look of joy with a hint of naughtiness. They also note that their town contains a church for every week of the year, but a bar for every day. At the same time, locals take pride in their city’s history and reminders of its past. It has some 1,450 historic buildings and monuments. Most are crowded into the town center. The mid-17th century Stadhuis (city hall) includes an interesting interior decorated with Brussels tapestries and painted ceilings.

The medieval Basilica of St. Servatius was begun in the sixth century, making it the oldest house of worship in the Netherlands. Of particular interest are the ancient crypts and largest bell in the country, a 150,000-pound clanger affectionately called Grameer (Grandmother). Even a local hotel, the Derlon, has its claim to fame with an archeological area in the basement spanning several centuries. On view are sections of a pre-Roman cobblestone road, part of a second-century Roman square and the remains of a wall and gate from the fourth century. Victor Block is a veteran travel writer and has contributed to numerous national publications.


HOUSING

Culturally sensitive care BY SHANNON KEOUGH

M

innesota seniors have a wide range of options when it comes to getting help with aging in place, including a variety of home-care services that cater to all levels of need, ranging from brief visits to 24-hour nursing. Less common, however, are culturally sensitive services — for example, care that’s specifically designed for Minnesota’s Native American communities. Enter Circle of Life Home Care Anishinaabe, a Minneapolis-based company committed to providing culturally sensitive, compassionate care to the Native American population, both on 28 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

and off reservations, across all ethnicities and cultures. Circle of Life is unique in that it was created by and for Native Americans. Patricia Yager, an Ojibwe from rural northern Minnesota, is intimately familiar with native communities — including the unique challenges faced by Native people as they grow older. Noticing there was a lack of culturally appropriate home-care options for Native people, she decided she could bring about positive change. So in 2005, Yager, who goes by Pat, launched Circle of Life on a shoestring budget, working out of the trunk of her

car and using matchbooks as makeshift business cards. “I decided it was my responsibility to help make a change within my own community,” Yager said on the company website. “While I knew our health issues were severe, I just did not realize the extent. Indian people are seven times more likely than any other populace in the United States to have something major go wrong with their health. This company has progressed only because of our great need.” Today Circle of Life has grown into one of the largest non-franchise-owned


CIRCLE OF LIFE HOME CARE FOUNDED: 2005 HEADQUARTERS:

1433 E. Franklin Ave. Suite 16, Minneapolis

WHERE: Minnesota locations include the Twin Cities, Moorhead, Mahnomen, Bemidji, Cass Lake and Deer River (Anishinaabe). Dakota locations include Fort Yates, North Dakota, and Pine Ridge and Rosebud, South Dakota (Kola); plus sites in Billings, Montana and Denver, Colorado; and five locations in Arizona and three locations in New Mexico (Soaring Eagle). AGES SERVED: All ages, primarily focused on serving elderly clients and people with disabilities, including children. Client ages have ranged from 3 months old (a prematurely born child) to elders in their late 90s. SERVICES OFFERED: Primarily

personal care attendant (PCA) and homemaking services — designed to help seniors live independently at home in comfort and with dignity, including household cleaning, home management and more. Other services include registered-nurse supervision, respite care and Native American-advocacy services.

COSTS: Circle of Life primarily

works with clients enrolled in Medicaid, but the organization is exploring options for private pay, due to increasing interest and the ability to pay among potential clients. Prices vary by state, but in Minneapolis, the rate is $23 per hour.

INFORMATION: 888-871-2474 or circleoflifehc.com

home-care service providers in the country, serving primarily individuals enrolled in Medicaid. Services include personal care attendant (PCA) help and homemaking, designed to help seniors live independently at home — in comfort and with dignity. Other services include registered-nurse supervision, respite and,aan invaluButcare selling home shouldn’t be. able resource forWe many areclients, here Native to help you & your American advocacy services. family with your next move. In addition to serving thousands of clients in Minnesota and six other states (with 19 locations), the company is committed to making tangible social and economic differences in communities across the U.S. Check your current home value and how Circle of Life currently employs more it compares to your neighborhood. than 1,500 people. Over the years, the edinapropertysource.smarthomeprice.com company has created jobs in some of the most economically challenged areas of the country. Yager said she never planned on expanding to the West and Southwest. “I found myself in Gallup, New Mexico, and through a series of coincidences, we began to serve the Navajo Reservation,” she said. “Today, we have several other offices in the region in Arizona and New Mexico and are serving the Navajo, Apache, Zuni and Hopi tribes and other reservations as well.” Guided by the philosophy to “Honor Those We Serve,” Circle of Life works to manifest the Lakota phrase "Mitakuye Oyasin" — a message of oneness and harmony that reflects a world view of interconnectedness, roughly translated as, “All my relatives.”

Where does your home stand in today’s market?

Shannon Keough is a freelance writer who lives in St. Paul. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.

Mary Frances Miller mfmiller@cbburnet.com

952-300-7874

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HOUSING RESOURCES

•MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW CONSTRUCTION

AUGUSTANA CARE OF MINNEAPOLIS ••••

COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES ••

CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION •

LYNGBLOMSTEN •••

Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurantstyle dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St, Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N, South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

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CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave, St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and long-term care, and community services and resources. 1415 Almond Ave, St. Paul 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

NOKOMIS SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. 5015 35th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

SALVATION ARMY BOOTH MANOR •

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 one-bedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place, Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor


62+ Independent Living ADVERTISER LISTINGS

5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis www.NokomisSquare.com

We’re ideally located in a comfortable Minneapolis neighborhood.

ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY •••

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it's simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN 960 19th St S Sartell 320-654-2352 chateauwaters.com St. Cloud: 1810 Minnesota Blvd SE St. Cloud 320-203-2747 centracare.com/sbsc Monticello: 1301 E 7th St Monticello 763-295-4051 centracare.com/sbscmont

Call to schedule your tour today!

612.721.5077

Booth Manor Residence For Seniors 62+ • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

Equal Housing Opportunity

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Thriving Community Companionship you love and crave. Women who want to live their purpose as they age.

12/6/13 10:14 AM

Concierge Service From reservations for the best dining in the Twin Cities to private transportation, we have it covered. What would you like to do today?

Urban Home Setting

Opportunities to Grow

The character of city living with the comfort of an intimate neighborhood. Every room has a view of Lake Nokomis.

As a member of Vibrante, you can continue learning more about the issues and volunteering for the causes that matter most to you.

vibranteliving.com | Call Roxanne at 612.816.6940

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11/21/17 3:19/PM Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 31


FINANCE

New Year’s finance goals BY SKIP JOHNSON

T

he New Year is a time to celebrate. For many of us, it can also be a time to start over, reevaluate and overhaul life for the better. Of course, a lot of people already do this with resolutions, so I’m suggesting that this year, you vow to develop better financial habits as part of your New Year’s goals. While we all know resolutions are notoriously hard to uphold, sticking to your financial goals can reap big rewards. Here are a few items to get you started and set you on the right path this year:

Review your portfolio How long has it been since you reviewed your investments and insurance coverage? Are they still on track for your needs? Time flies. Life changes. And that makes it extremely important to periodically review all of your investment strategies to make sure they’re in line with your goals and lifestyle. 32 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

It’s also important to check your insurance policies to see if they’re up to date — and that you’re capitalizing on the best rates and coverage.

members on items such as health-care directives, powers of attorney, designated beneficiaries and, in some cases, designating a guardian for children.

Draft an estate plan

Don’t get emotional

Getting an estate in order is a vital piece to a setting up a sound financial foundation. It’s also excellent for peace of mind. Unfortunately, according to a 2016 Estate Planning Awareness Survey, nearly half of Americans believe estate planning is only for the ultra-wealthy. Sadly, this misinformation creates problems for far too many people at or near retirement. Drafting a will and creating an estate plan can address how to transfer assets from one generation to another. (You might be surprised how many important assets you have!) Having an estate plan in place also can help remove the guessing game for family

Too often we see nest eggs get crushed when investors make choices based on sentimentality rather than through a calculated plan based on goals and risk tolerance. By carving out a diversified plan with a financial professional and then sticking to it, you can let your financial needs and goals drive your plan, rather than kneejerk reactions or emotional attachments to individual holdings.

Eliminate debt According to a 2016 Gallup Poll, nearly half of all Americans carry credit card debt. This can be especially dangerous for pre-retirees and retirees. Debt can be a drag on your assets.


Half of Americans (wrongly) believe estate planning is only for the ultra-wealthy.

HELP US BRING JOY TO ISOLATED SENIORS WITH YOUR GIFT!

To help you manage debt, consider tackling the debt with the highest interest rate first. You may also shop for lower rates, negotiate with existing credit companies and/or cut back on expenses (wherever you can) to pay off balances faster.

Make a budget Not sure where all your money is going? You’re not alone. When was the last time you sat down and made a detailed financial budget? Start by taking a cold, hard look how much money you have coming into your accounts, versus what’s going out. This can be particularly important as you transition from a steady paycheck into retirement. Setting a budget can be an essential building block to maintaining a comfortable lifestyle throughout retirement. Make 2018 a year of change by working to achieve your financial goals. You and your loved ones will sleep better at night knowing you’re headed down the right path — and preparing for your future. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financial planning firm with offices in Minneapolis, Richfield, Minnetonka, White Bear Lake and Duluth, providing comprehensive financial planning and strategic retirement solutions to pre-retirees and retirees. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners – people like you.

HOW TO HELP Host a Gift Barrel • Organize a Gift Drive Individual Shopping • Find us on AmazonSmile

GIFT IDEAS Cardigans • Slacks • Shirts • Blouses • Sweats • Fleece Nightwear • Robes • Socks • No-skid slippers • Hats • Scarves Mittens • Towel sets • Small appliances • Clocks (big numbers) Sheet sets • Blankets • Pillows • Dishes • Flatware CD or DVD players • Books • Music • Movies • Puzzles Personal care sets • Grocery gift cards • Cash donations Feel free to use this list for shopping ideas! We only accept new, unwrapped gift items.

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IN THE KITCHEN

Flatout

HEALTHY!

Sometimes the best dinner is the one you can get ready fast. This super-simple pizza recipe is easy to customize for one — or more — and it’s a bit healthier because it uses flatbread. We recommend Flatout Light wraps, which have 9 grams of protein, 8 grams of fiber, 14 carbs and only 90 calories per Flatout. (Traditional white-dough pizza crust has just 3 grams of protein, 2 grams of fiber, 24 carbs and 120 calories.)

34 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


PEPPERONI FLATBREAD PIZZA INGREDIENTS 1 flatbread from Flatout 1�4 cup chunky red sauce 1�2 cup mozzarella, shredded, or more to taste 15 mini pepperoni slices

DIRECTIONS ⊲ Preheat a grill or oven to 375 degrees.   ⊲ Prebake flatbread for two minutes (optional) on a cookie sheet or — for a crispier crust — a pizza pan or stone. ⊲ Layer on sauce, cheese and pepperoni or other toppings. ⊲ Bake or grill for 4 minutes more or until the cheese melts.

Flatout breads are sold at most Target and Cub Foods stores. Find retailers and recipes at flatoutbread.com. Photo courtesy of Flatout Flatbread


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SHE’S GOT GAME

How Maureen Bausch became Super Bowl LII’s MVP — Most Valuable Promoter BY JULIE KENDRICK

As CEO of the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee, Maureen Bausch is in charge of branding the state of Minnesota as well as promoting a week of Super Bowl festivities. Photo by Tracy Walsh


SHE’S GOT GAME

▲▲U.S. Bank Stadium sparkles outside Maureen Bausch’s office at the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee headquarters on South Fifth Street in downtown Minneapolis. Photos by Tracy Walsh

If

you’ve ever hosted a big, important event, you know the stress that’s involved: Have I made all the right preparations? Is there anything I forgot? Will everyone have fun? Now multiply your guest list by about a million and you’ll have a better understanding of Maureen Bausch’s position. The Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee CEO is expecting an estimated 1 million visitors to the Twin Cities area for the event, plus coverage from 5,000 sports and lifestyle media outlets. If Super Bowl LII is as successful as her committee hopes, it could help pump $400 million into the local economy. While the extent of Bausch’s previous football experience was a stint on the Stillwater Area High School Chevals dance line team during halftime shows, the class of 1972 alumnae is now leading a charge down the field for statewide victory on Feb. 4, when the world’s marquee sporting event will be played in Minnesota’s new 66,000-seat stadium.

38 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


Hooley’s to Cub Bausch comes from a long line of savvy and visionary marketers. “My family has lived in the Stillwater area for more than 100 years, and my great-great grandfather owned our first market, Hooley’s Meats & Provisions, in the days when lumber camps lined the St. Croix River banks,” she said. Growing up, Bausch worked in the family-owned Hooley’s Supermarket as a cashier. The business grew, and Bausch’s father, Charles Hooley, went on to co-found Cub Foods. After graduating with an elementary-education degree from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, Bausch had a brief stint in teaching (fourth grade for Mesa Public Schools in Arizona), then returned to Minnesota to staff Stillwater-based Cub Foods’ new advertising department, where she remained for 13 years. “The company grew so quickly,” she said. “We had only four stores when I started.” Eventually, Bausch began to wonder if she needed a change. “When you’re working for your family, it can sometimes be difficult for people to realize you’re also qualified to do other things. In some ways, it felt like a stigma that I’d worked for my family for so long, even though we’d expanded to 85 stores in 14 markets, many outside Minnesota.” In search of her next chapter, Bausch went back to school and earned a master’s degree in marketing and journalism from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in 1985.

From the MOA to the NFL In 1990, the developers of a big new idea — which many in the state thought would never take off — approached her with an opportunity. She interviewed for a director of marketing job at the then-unbuilt Mall of America. “They eventually hired someone else for the position,” Bausch said. But Bausch persisted.

SUPER BOWL LIVE You don’t have to go to the game to get in on Super Bowl LII festivities, thanks to this 10-day festival, which is free and open to the public, including live concerts by local and national acts. Check out food vendors, explore photo opportunities with larger-than-life snow globes, ice sculptures and more, and get a glimpse of national broadcasts, including ESPN in the IDS Center’s Crystal Court. Each night, a Drum Down the Sun ceremony will honor American Indian culture in Minnesota. On Jan. 26, Tony Award-winning icon Idina Menzel will perform Let It Go, from the Disney movie Frozen. On Jan. 29 (Prince Night) acts will include The Revolution, Sheila E. and Morris Day and the Time, plus a community sing-along of Prince’s legendary song, Purple Rain. Other acts will include Bob Mould,  Cobi, Dessa, Esera Tuaolo (The Voice), The Jayhawks,  The Jets, Mint Condition, New Power Generation, New Power Soul, Soul Asylum, Sounds of Blackness, The Steeles,  Stokley Williams, The Suburbs  and VocalEssence, among others.

WHEN: Jan. 26–Feb. 4 WHERE: Nicollet Mall — from South

Maureen Bausch holds a football emblazoned with the official Super Bowl LII logo.

12th Street to South 6th Street — in downtown Minneapolis COST: FREE INFO: mnsuperbowl.com Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 39


SHE’S GOT GAME “After a few months, I found out that person hadn’t worked out and had left, so I called them and said, ‘I’m still available.’” Bausch started work two years before the Mall’s opening in 1992. “My job was to convince people we were going to become a top destination for shoppers from around the world. It was a hard sell for an area previously best known for woods and water, not fashion or shopping,” Bausch said. “I would talk to any group that would listen, and I did a lot of presentations for small audiences at Kiwanis and Rotary clubs. People didn’t always believe me.” Bausch and the Mall of America team, of course, proved the naysayers wrong.

▲▲A Justin Timberlake bobblehead adorns Maureen Bausch’s office window overlooking U.S. Bank Stadium. Timberlake will return to the Super Bowl halftime show on Feb. 4, more than a decade after his infamous performance with Janet Jackson. Photo by Tracy Walsh 40 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

“On our opening day, we had 150,000 attendees, and the numbers grew from there,” Bausch said. The MOA now attracts more than 40 million people — and generates more than $2 billion in revenue — each year. During her 25 years at the mall, Bausch moved up the ranks and was eventually named the Executive Vice President of Business Development. Then came an opportunity with Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee — a 501(c)6 nonprofit corporation tasked with welcoming the world to Minnesota for Super Bowl LII. From the promotional packages she’d helped arrange between the mall and the Vikings organization, Bausch knew the power of the NFL and the Vikings brand. “I was intrigued by the challenge of taking on a three-year project that would culminate in such an important event for our state,” Bausch said. “Even better, I was able to create our own startup, building a staff of top talent, who willingly jumped on board, even when they all knew exactly when their last day on the job would be.” Wendy Williams Blackshaw, the host committee’s senior vice president of marketing and sales, said Bausch is the person who’s most influenced her own exceptional marketing career, including nine years with Sun Country Airlines and seven years at the Mall of America. “I have learned more from Maureen than anyone else I know,” Blackshaw said. As CEO of the host committee, Bausch is responsible for strategic planning and executing all the elements of the weeklong pre-event celebration as well as engaging the community and showcasing the region to an international audience. Her committee’s duties include security, wayfinding, snow removal, traffic and Super Bowl LIVE events and concerts. More than 10,000 volunteers — dubbed Crew 52 — will be providing support. The pace is intense, Bausch said, but she loves the variety: “In the course of one day, I might have a meeting on hotel bookings, then one on progress with the snowmaking equipment for the (forthcoming) Birke Bridge on Nicollet Mall, then a session on preventing human trafficking or showcasing Minnesota music. I bounce from fun things to serious subjects all day long.” One thing Bausch misses about her Mall of America job is the built-in exercise opportunity right outside her office door. “Once around the building was one mile, and I would usually walk three miles in the course of an average a day,”


The late Pat Fallon, founder and CEO of Fallon advertising agency, used to say that the word ‘amazing’ is not used enough when describing Minnesota. So I hope that ‘amazing’ becomes the new word people use to describe us.

Photo by Tracy Walsh

— Maureen Bausch, Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee CEO

Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 41


SHE’S GOT GAME she said. “I’m more deskbound in this position, so I do miss having a ‘natural’ way to exercise.”

Family life The oldest of six, Bausch grew up in a family that remains close and mostly in state. “My parents are still with us and very active,” she said. “My dad is 88 and my mom is a youthful 80-something, and they live independently in Stillwater.” Bausch is a mother of three — Heidi, 32, Ellie, 23 and Charles, 22. After she and her first husband divorced, she was a single mother for 13 years.

“She always has had a way of making occasions uniquely meaningful,” said her oldest, Heidi, a Mendota Heights resident who is pursuing a doctorate in counseling psychology. “She was proud of our Irish roots, and every St. Patrick’s Day we would wake to a fun and festive table with green milk, green butter and ‘pots of gold’ chocolates,” she said. But it wasn’t all fun and games growing up, as Heidi explains when describing the positive influence her mother has had on her life. “Her humility and care for others are enduring qualities that have been instilled in me,” she said. “Though her career soared over the years, she rarely boasted or self-promoted. She attributes her successes to the teams she works with.” Single for many years, Bausch’s life changed when she met Bill Marzolf, president and CEO of the medical equipment distributor Anodyne, Inc. “Three different sets of friends set us up,” she said. “We dated for 18 months and will celebrate our second wedding anniversary in April.” The couple lives in a house on Summit Avenue in St. Paul, on which Marzolf had begun construction shortly before he met Bausch. “Bill was instrumental in my decision to take the Super Bowl job,” Bausch said. “He told me he’d support me throughout it, and he’s been true to his word.” Marzolf has watched in wonder. “The breadth and scope of this project is mammoth, and I cannot imagine anyone else who is more capable and qualified to undertake it than Maureen,” he said. “Of her many outstanding qualities, one that makes her visibly successful is that she is ‘other’ focused. It’s not about her, it’s about others — and she is quick to shower them with praise and accolades whenever she can.” And it’s not just loved ones who endorse Bausch. Selection committee co-chair Doug Baker, CEO of Ecolab, said: “She brings the skills necessary to successfully lead this effort and to showcase this vibrant, engaged community on an international stage. We have no doubt Maureen will help set the bar high for future Super Bowls.”

Countdown to victory ▲▲Volunteers and others involved with Super Bowl LII will enjoy free gear, specially branded with colors and graphics from the event’s host committee. Photo by Tracy Walsh 42 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

As that crucial Feb. 4 date draws nearer, Bausch says she’s especially looking forward to the pre-event weeks when NFL representatives, media and production companies are beginning to arrive in town.


“We are the conduit to them having a great experience here, and we want to make it easy for them to get the answers and help they need,” she said. And while there will be some unavoidable stress in the days ahead, Bausch insists that she likes a challenge. “I also like it when things go well, and I’m sure that’s what’s going to happen,” she said. One major uncontrollable factor is the weather. “I’m hoping it snows, because people who are coming here want to experience a real wintertime atmosphere,” she said. “We aren’t pretending to be Florida, so I want to show them our winter season at its best. I just hope it’s a manageable enough amount that it’s still easy to get around.”

‘Amazing’ Minnesota Once the big day has come and gone, Bausch hopes the world will know more about Minnesota — branded “the Bold North” by the host committee, which is driving home the moniker with #boldnorth hashtags on social media. “We want them to understand that we’re progressive, sophisticated, artistic and innovative,” she said. “The late Pat Fallon, founder and CEO of Fallon advertising agency, used to say that the word ‘amazing’ is not used enough when describing Minne-

▲▲Minnesota marketing guru Maureen Bausch gave up her longtime job at the Mall of America to build a team of more than 30 folks tasked with hosting Super Bowl LII and the 10day festival leading up to game day, Feb. 4. Photo courtesy of Uzoma Obasi / Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee

sota. So I hope that ‘amazing’ becomes the new word people use to describe us.” And what will she do when all the hullabaloo finally quiets down? “I know I’ll be bored stiff when the phone stops ringing,” she said. “I want to make sure all the people on our staff safely land in new positions, so I’ll be making introductions and smoothing their way through those transitions.” Then some rest and relaxation might be in order. “Once the bills are all paid, and it’s time to turn out the lights, I have this vision of renting a villa in the south of France and going there for a month,” she said. “I could just have all my friends and relatives come to stay.” But Bausch will eventually have to get back to work. “This job has been absolutely wonderful,” she said, “But I’m sure I’ll find some other way to be of use to another group.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks. Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 43


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Treat Yourself

ANESTHESIA ANTIBIOTICS APPENDECTOMY BIOPSY CHEMOTHERAPY CHIROPRACTIC DIET

EXAMINATION EXERCISE HOSPITAL IMMUNOTHERAPY MEDICATION MEDITATION SUPPLEMENT

SURGERY TRANSFUSION TRANSPLANT ULTRASOUND VITAMIN VACCINATION YOGA

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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44 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA The Body 1. Until the 19th century, Western doctors believed the condition of hysteria was caused by what organ wandering around within the body? 2. The Greek prefix “osteo” relates to what? 3. There are five main types of taste — salty, sweet, bitter, sour and what else? Sources: wired.com, dictionary.com, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Eczema, Asthma, Kidney CROSSWORD

ANSWERS Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 45

CRYTPOGRAM Good health is not something we can buy. However, it can be an extremely valuable savings account.


Crossword

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1 Green gem 5 Actress Greta 10 Ponzi scheme, for one 14 Boy in “The Kite Runner” 15 Toward the back 16 When tripled, a 1970 WWII film 17 Spanish “nothing” 18 Free, in France 19 Reddish-brown horse 20 Israeli submachine gun 21 Admit to wrongdoing in court 23 Embark from a dock 25 Spaniel’s welcome 26 Indian-born storekeeper on “The Simpsons” 27 Bening of “American Beauty” 31 Location-based smartphone game release of 2016 35 Half a bray 46 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

36 Radio knob 37 1998 biopic about model Carangi 38 Travelocity ad figure 40 Ctrl-__-Delete: PC reboot combo 41 Similar set of individuals 43 Reveal 46 Help 47 Negative connection 48 Climbing plant 52 Inland sea between Iran and Saudi Arabia 57 Dockworkers’ gp. 58 Soothing plant extract 59 Pageant headgear 60 Prefix with lateral 61 Arctic seabird 62 No __ sight 63 Bugs Bunny adversary Elmer 64 Smartphone message 65 Gave medicine to 66 Golf ball supports

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR JANUARY

Photo by A.J. Mellor

ICE CASTLES

→ Stillwater will once again host this manmade fortress of ice and snow, featuring frozen waterfalls, ice caves, tunnels and towering archways. When: Opening day is expected in late December. Where: Lowell Park, Stillwater

ONGOING

TRIPLE ESPRESSO → This highly caffeinated comedy tells the story of three guys whose bid for showbiz fame and fortune ends in four minutes of magnificent failure on national television. When: Through Feb. 15 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $41–$48 Info: tripleespresso.com  

JAN. 5–MARCH 1

OMNIFEST 2018 → This annual giant-screen film festival will feature five films running in rotation on a 90foot domed screen, including Jane Goodall’s Wild Chimpanzees, a Science Museum of 48 / January 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Cost: Online tickets will be $9.95–$13.95 for ages 12 and older, $6.95–$8.95 for ages 4 to 11, and free for ages 3 and younger; standby tickets will cost $10–$18 at the door. Info: icecastles.com

Minnesota original production; Journey Into Amazing Caves; The Magic of Flight; Rocky Mountain Express and Wolves. When: Jan. 5–March 1 Where: Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Cost: $9.95 ($8.95 for ages 4 to 12 and 60 and older) Info: smm.org  

JAN. 7

MINNESOTA BOYCHOIR → The annual Sundays at Landmark series of cultural and arts events continues with two free concerts by the state’s esteemed choir for boys, focused on inspirational music. When: 1 and 3:30 p.m. Jan. 7 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul

Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

JAN. 10–FEB. 15

TEA 101

→ Explore the many different types of teas — black, oolong, yellow, green and white tea, among others — with instruction and samples provided by TeaSource, a local tea importer. When: Jan. 10 (Hamline Midway Library), Jan. 24 (Dayton’s Bluff Library) and Feb. 15 (St. Anthony Park Library) Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: sppl.org/winterwellness


JAN. 13

MLK SATURDAY → Take inspiration from the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and explore The 1968 Exhibit during this opening celebration. Create screen-printed activist posters; join in a spoken word activity; pack hygiene kits for the Dorothy Day Center; and enjoy performances by students at the Walker West Music Academy, a learning community rooted in the African-American experience. When: Jan. 13 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: Included with museum admission of $6–$12, free for ages 4 and younger Info: mnhs.org

JAN. 13, 27 AND FEB. 3

SCIENTIFIC AMERICANS → Discover the inspiring careers and contributions of local scientists from three important groups with three different days of exhibits and activities — African Americans in Science on Jan. 13, American Indians in Science on Jan. 27, and Asian Americans in Science on Feb. 3.

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When: Jan. 13, 27 and Feb. 3 Where: Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Cost: $12.95–$18.95; kids can attend for free with a paid adult admission. Info: smm.org

JAN. 13–FEB. 17

LAUGHTER YOGA → Invite more joy, play and wellbeing into your life with instruction from Katy Taylor, a certified Laughter Yoga leader and Holistic Life Coach. This type of yoga doesn’t include any physical postures and can be practiced by anyone who’s willing to be a little silly. When: Jan. 13 (Riverview Library), Jan. 16 (Rice Street Library), Feb. 17 (Hayden Heights Library) Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: sppl.org/winterwellness Minnesota Good Age / January 2018 / 49


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

ISHMAEL

→ Drawing from Herman Melville’s classic novel, Moby Dick, Twin Citiesbased actor-singer-songwriter Jack Weston plays all 12 characters with the help from the local bluegrass band Pert Near Sandstone. When: Jan. 13–Feb. 4 Where: Jungle Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $37–$47 Info: jungletheater.com

JAN. 18–FEB. 4

THE UNDERPANTS → In Steve Martin’s adaptation of a time-honored German play, a woman’s underpants fall down and her husband is convinced it’s the end of his career. When: Jan. 18–Feb. 4 Where: Lakeshore Players Theatre, White Bear Lake Cost: $19–$25 Info: lakeshoreplayers.org  

JAN 25

THURSDAY MORNING SERIES → Presented since 1892, this annual series features some of the best local musicians, performing a variety of works by clasSletten Law Office Estate Planning, Probate, & Trust Law

sical composers on select Thursdays in the intimate recital setting of MacPhail’s Antonello Hall. When: Upcoming performances include Jan. 25, Feb. 8 and 22, March 8 and 22, April 12 and 26. Where: MacPhail Center for Music, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets, all sold at the door, are $15 (or $10 for groups or eight of more). Info: thursdaymusical.org

JAN. 25–FEB. 10

ST. PAUL WINTER CARNIVAL → This multi-faceted festival is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation, with more than 75 events and nearly 1,000

volunteers. Check out ice carving, snow sculpting, skiing, dogsledding, a torchlight parade and more. When: Jan. 25–Feb. 10 Where: St. Paul Cost: Most events are FREE. Info: wintercarnival.com

MORE ONLINE! Find more events on the Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com.

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