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JANUARY 2017

THE FATEFUL FLIGHT IN

'SULLY' PAGE 12

A WISH LIST FOR

TRUMP

TRAVEL

PAGE 10

MARTIN LUTHER'S

GERMANY

Camelot

PAGE 18

THE KING OF

Longtime thespian Keith Rice takes on his 41st production at Chanhassen Dinner Theatres PAGE 30


Contents Visitors can tour The Luther Room of Wartburg Castle in the town of Eisenach, Germany. Takashi Images / Shutterstock.com

18 30

→→On the cover King of Camelot: Longtime local thespian Keith Rice celebrates his 41st production at Chanhassen with a starring role in Camelot. Photos by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com

Luther’s Germany The Thuringia region is set to celebrate the Reformation’s 500-year annivesary.

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37 38 40 Housing Resources Can’t-Miss Calendar Brain Teasers 6 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


January Good Start From the Editor 8 Meet a local career actor who’s thriving on stage and off at age 60. My Turn 10 Let’s quit with the politics and get on with governing, Mr. President.

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Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 36 / Issue 1 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall Julie Kendrick, Mike Kojonen Lauren Peck, Dave Nimmer Dr. Michael Spilane, Deb Taylor Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh Creative Director Sarah Karnas Senior Graphic Designer Valerie Moe Graphic Designer Dani Cunningham Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Living his dream Just look at our Cover Star, Keith Rice!

How can this man — a longtime local thespian and a local treasure — be 60? What is his secret? Naps. He swears by them. And he stretches every day and usually runs on a treadmill for three miles every other day. He lifts weights — not just at home, but also at his primary workplace, Chanhassen Dinner Theaters, where he practices a regular ab-strengthening routine, too. Rice also credits his good health to weekly Photo by Tracy Walsh sauna sessions and supplements such as fish oil, tracywalshphoto.com lecithin, magnesium powder and probiotics — plus plenty of liquids. Keeping a positive attitude is also important to Rice. That makes sense to me. This man, who I recently saw perform as the lead in Camelot — a whimsical, passionate King Arthur — isn’t just charismatic, energetic and a theatrical all-star. He radiates joy ­— that positive attitude. Rice is miraculously on his 41st production at Chanhassen, not an easy feat for a stage actor, even in a theater town like Minneapolis/St Paul. Humility has also been a value for the Champlin husband and father. “He’s deeply committed to being a working actor, and that means he’ll do whatever role he’s asked to do and will do it happily,” said Kris Howland, Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ public relations director. Indeed, this spring, Rice will return to the Chanhassen stage in a relatively small role in Grease, which opens March 3. “I’m going from being a king to being a smarmy DJ,” Rice quipped. With Camelot, however, Rice is realizing a lifelong dream. He was 7 years old, growing up in Long Island, N.Y., when his mother came home with the original cast album for Camelot. “I was transfixed from the moment I heard the first notes of the overture. And when I heard Robert Goulet singing C’est Moi, I said; ‘I want to do that.’” See Rice for yourself in Camelot, showing through Feb. 25.


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

A wish list for Trump →→I’ll accept our 45th president, but I’d like to offer a few suggestions for the next four years

The presidential term of Donald Trump begins this month and, frankly, I’m relieved the election — and the season of meanness — is behind us. However, I suspect the anger and angst, the rancor and recriminations still linger. I’ve been as guilty as anyone of hanging on to the resentments of the past six months. At one point, I was thinking I didn’t want to get together for dinner with a couple who didn’t vote the way I did in the presidential election. What would we talk about? How would we behave in the aftermath? I realized it would all be fine if I managed to act like a grownup. We’re good people. We share common values. We generally respect each other. We all care about this country. It’s time for me and all good citizens — including those in Washington — to let the resentments go. May President Trump and his allies forgo the gloating and focus on the business of governing that lies ahead. That’s going to require some new moves in this dance of democracy. The November election, and the primaries that preceded it, were as much about punishing career politicians as choosing a president, as much about “throwing the rascals out” as bringing The Donald in … to the White House. I hope President Trump understands that and will act accordingly. To that end, I’ve got a few suggestions, a wish list, that falls somewhere between Pollyannaish and apocalyptic.

Thoughtfulness Willingness to make a deal ought to be one of the defining values of the Trump Administration, from the man who wrote the book (The Art of the Deal). Folks will quickly tire of the angry and aggressive Trump, the bluster and the bully. They could use more of the hopeful, insightful and thoughtful version.

Experienced staff I hope President Trump appoints experienced government bureaucrats to oversee at least some of the agencies. Government experience is extremely helpful in making sure things work. Medicare works. The Social Security Administration works. FEMA now works, thanks to the dismissal of its disastrous director, Michael D. Brown, following the agency’s slow response to Hurricane Katrina. President George W. Bush learned the hard way that appointing an outsider like Brown — the former commissioner of the Arabian Horse Association — didn’t necessarily qualify him to run a federal emergency-response organization. A little bit of government experience “ain’t” so bad.

Infrastructure, jobs President Trump can get started by making a deal with his infrastructure plan to rebuild America’s highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools and hospitals. He thinks private investors can be persuaded to foot the bill, without government spending, in return for tax credits. I believe Democrats will roll their eyes over the financing. But they must like the idea of creating jobs — higher-paying 10 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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ROUGH, RED SPOTS? construction jobs — in their backyards. A compromise ought to be found somewhere in the middle ground between Capitol Hill and the White House.

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Forward movement Several million Americans, I’m willing to bet, would tell him they like Obamacare’s provision preventing insurers from refusing coverage to those with preexisting conditions. Mr. President, Tinker, trim and deal. Don’t repeal. When I was younger, I was more certain in my beliefs. The issue was black or white. I thought you stuck to your guns, come hell or high water. Now, at twice that age, I’m not as certain I possess the ultimate answer to anything. I’m more interested in getting something done than going under with my self-righteousness intact. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

‘Sully’ felt too real

▲▲Tom Hanks plays US Airways Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger in the film Sully, based on a true story.

ardess/steward trainees were taught to launch rubber life rafts into the water and evacuate passengers during a “ditching,” or water landing. Seeing it actually “happen” in the recent movie, Sully, was jarring. I shivered as the huge airliner went down, and “felt” the hard, hard landing on the Hudson River. Tears came to my eyes and streamed down my cheeks as the cabin crew waded through knee-deep water and herded terrified passengers, including a small child, into the rafts and onto the wings. It could have been me. Directed by Clint Eastwood, with Tom Hanks in the starring role of Sully, the movie is based on an actual incident. On Jan. 15, 2009, US Airways Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger was forced to make an emergency landing on the Hudson River after a flock of Canada geese disabled both engines of the commuter airliner he was piloting just after takeoff from LaGuardia Airport in New York.

a tour of duty in the 1990s during the Gulf War in Saudi Arabia, and a landing would’ve been made on the Indian Ocean, not the Hudson. Bill Marchessault is still flying. Marchessault, who flew 35 years for Northwest, today works lead on domestic routes for Delta Air Lines. He chooses to work exclusively on the Sully aircraft, the A-320 Airbus. “The evacuation scene really hit home,” he said. “I could relate to what was going on, and wondered how I would have directed the passengers. Would I have handled things the same way?” All 155 passengers and the crew survived with only minor injuries. The headlines screamed: “Miracle on the Hudson.”

I wasn’t alone

Was it the right choice?

I soon discovered several other stewardess friends also cried during the ditching scene when they watched the film, including Gail Dierks. Having flown military charters much

Sullenberger became a national hero. Even so, the National Transportation Safety

→→Local aviation folks react to a film about a miracle landing and a grueling evacuation

Back in my day, it was called Air-Sea Rescue. We Northwest Airlines stew-

of her career, Dierks’ passengers likely would have been troops returning home from 12 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

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The left engine was still running at idle, which theoretically could have provided enough power for him to fly the plane to LaGuardia or to Teterboro Airport. Retired Northwest Airlines Boeing 727 Capt. Ron Kenmir debunked that theory: “On takeoff from Kansas City on a cold winter morning some years ago, our engines ingested massive ice from the top of the cabin, not unlike a flock of geese. All thrust on the No. 2 engine was lost, but it was still technically running, so I didn’t secure it. Sully may have had a running engine, but no thrust. The river was a better choice than the New Jersey swamps or the buildings of New York City. Great job! Bravo!” Kenmir added, “The ‘real’ copilot on Sully’s flight, Jeff Skiles, told a friend of mine the movie was pretty accurate. He’d know. He was there!” And, in essence, so was I. As Sully ended and the long list of credits began, Tierney Sutton sang the movie’s lovely theme song, We’re All Flying Home, I cried all over again.

Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ Oxen are part of the Oliver Kelley Farm, a historic site in Elk River. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Self-taught farmer →→Oliver H. Kelley served as an advocate for agriculture throughout his career

On Jan. 7, 1826, Oliver Hudson Kelley was born in Boston, the fifth

child of a tailor. By the end of his life at age 87 in 1913, Kelley had made agricultural history in Minnesota and far beyond. At age 21, Kelley left New England and ventured West. After stints in Illinois and Iowa, he arrived in St. Paul in the newly created Minnesota territory in June 1849. He carried a letter of introduction to territorial Gov. Alexander Ramsey from a mutual friend, who noted that Kelley “possesses ample business capacity, with active mind, and is anxious for steady employment.” Within a few months, Kelley was made a messenger of the territory’s House of Representatives and an aide to Gov. Ramsey.

A ‘book farmer’ After less than a year after Kelley arrived in St. Paul, word spread that the legislature was attempting to make the new town of Itasca, near present-day Elk River, 14 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

the territory’s capital. Speculators, including Kelley, rushed to stake a claim to land in Itasca. The town didn’t become the capital, but Kelley began to explore farming and agriculture there. He was a “book farmer” and was eager to experiment with different methods and new technology and share information with his fellow farmers. Over the years, he tried his hand at growing a wide range of crops from asparagus to melons. He was reported to be the first farmer in Minnesota to own a mechanical reaper and the first to sow Timothy hay.

Beyond agriculture Kelley also helped found Minnesota’s first county agricultural society in Benton County in 1852. A year later, he was involved in forming the Minnesota Territorial Agricultural Society.

→→Tour a local historic site Today Oliver Kelley Farm in Elk River is a Minnesota Historical Society site and a National Historic Landmark. Beginning in April 2017, the working 1860s farm will offer brand-new visitor experiences to illustrate farming and agricultural history, including a new visitor center, learning kitchen, an outdoor exhibit trail and more. Visit mnhs.org/kelleyfarm for more information.


Your ticket to Twin Cities Culture ⊳⊳ Oliver H. Kelley helped create the country’s first nationwide farm organization known as The Grange in 1867.

As corresponding secretary of the Benton County Agricultural Society, he wrote to farm journals about Minnesota’s agricultural progress and ran a regular column on agriculture in the Sauk Rapids Frontiersman. Minnesota’s population was booming: Between 1855 and 1857, some 700 new towns were surveyed and platted. Kelley and his brother, Charles, were eager to speculate during the boom, so in 1855, they bought 270 acres on the Mississippi in Wright County, formerly home to the Winnebago people, who the government had recently moved to a reservation. The brothers founded the town of Northwood, and Kelley started a logging company and brickyard there. A steamboat started making regular stops at Northwood on its way between St. Anthony and Sauk Rapids, connecting the area to major markets. But the panic of 1857 devastated the Kelleys’ real estate speculation scheme, leaving them with virtually worthless land, and they defaulted on their mortgages.

A national post In 1864, Kelley’s luck improved when the U.S. Commissioner of Agriculture Isaac Newton offered him a clerkship,

thanks to a recommendation from Alexander Ramsey. Kelley moved to Washington, D.C., and began working on agricultural issues, including touring the South in 1866 to aid immigration and agricultural reconstruction after the Civil War. Kelley, a Mason, noted how fellow Masons welcomed him in the South, despite post-Civil War tensions. He began to imagine a similar brotherhood for farmers around the country. In December 1867, Kelley and six other men created the National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, the country’s first nationwide farm organization. The Grange served as both a social and advocacy group for farmers, and within two years, Minnesota had 40 Grange chapters and a state organization. By 1873, with farmers battling falling crop prices and rising railroad shipping costs, the U.S. had around 9,000 chapters with nearly 700,000 members. The National Grange was the first national organization to require leadership roles for women: At least four of its 16 elected positions had to be held by women. Over the years, members fought for many issues, such as railroad regulations, farm loans and universal suffrage. The National Grange, which still exists today, will celebrate its 150th birthday in December 2017. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

Good fat, bad fat →→Avoid saturated and trans fats, and instead opt for natural, unsaturated fat sources

Perhaps you’ve heard that eating lots of fat is a bad thing. Perhaps

you’ve heard this a thousand times. I hesitate to be the bearer of the thousand-and-first message, but my hope is to simplify the fat thing and make it all more understandable. This is not an easy task, since the subject of dietary fat is burdened by confusing terms. There’s saturated and unsaturated; hydrogenated, partially hydrogenated and not hydrogenated; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated; trans fat and cholesterol fat. I prefer to just call them bad fat and good fat.

Where we find fats Excess consumption of bad fat can lead to vascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke and plugging of vessels to the legs. Consumption of good fat is OK, and maybe even helpful if consumed in moderation. All you really need to know is that the good stuff is unsaturated fat (such as olive and canola oils). The bad stuff is saturated fat (such as lard and butter) and trans fat (hydrogenated fat). Trans fat is actually a naturally occurring unsaturated fat that’s been artificially hydrogenated (saturated) to make it taste better and last longer on the shelves — a process that takes a good fat and turns it into a very bad fat. Trans fat (commercially hydrogenated fat) is commonly found in oily products we buy at the store, and in the fried foods we eat at restaurants. Its use in food preparation is a major problem. Most of the saturated fat in our diet comes from animal products — meat, milk, butter, cream, eggs and lard. Foods from our animal friends aren’t inherently bad — it’s the saturated fat in these foods that’s bad, and then only if we consume too much of them. The problem is that people in developed countries consume far too much meat and whole dairy products. 16 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

What to do ⊲⊲ Choose a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fiber. ⊲⊲ Decrease your total fat intake, and make sure what you do consume comes mostly from sources of unsaturated fats such as fish, nuts, seeds and nonhydrogenated vegetable oils. ⊲⊲ Look at the labels. Avoid foods with lots of saturated fat or trans fats. ⊲⊲ Cut back on consumption of meat. Choose fish a couple of days a week and restrict meat consumption to a total of six ounces on the other days. Poultry (the white parts with the skin removed) is a better choice than red meat. ⊲⊲ Be careful with dairy products. Use 1 percent or skim milk (yes, you can learn to enjoy it), select cheese and cottage cheese labeled as low fat, restrict egg yolks to two per week (the white part of the egg is fine), and consider cream and ice cream to be special rather than daily treats. Use soft-tub type margarine rather than butter. Most soft, tubtype margarine today is made without hydrogenated or trans fats and is instead made of unsaturated vegetable oils. ⊲⊲ Fry with unsaturated fat such as olive or corn oil. Don’t fry with butter or hydrogenated


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Good Living / Travel

Luther la BY CARLA WALDEMAR

Germany’s Thuringia region will celebrate the rebellious monk this year, along with other beloved historical figures

Merchants Bridge — built over the river in Erfurt, Germany in 1325 — is lined with picturesque homes and shops. 18 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


and O

n a map of Germany, Thuringia is the region in the center. And it’s definitely been an epicenter of creativity. Within just a few miles of each other lived and worked an artistic vanguard — the writer Goethe, the poet Friedrich von Schiller, the composer J.S. Bach, the famed painter Lucas Cranach the Elder and architect Walter Gropius, the father of the Bauhaus movement. And then there’s man who changed society’s ways forever — Martin Luther. Yes, the radical thinker launched the Protestant Reformation in 1517 — which brought about a revolution in thought and a schism in the Roman Catholic Church that helped shape the theology of modern Europe (and beyond). The towns within the state of Thuringia, where Luther studied, wrote and preached will celebrate the reformation’s 500th anniversary in 2017. And you’re invited to the party. Whatever your religious stance (I’m a devout unbeliever), it’s impossible not to marvel at the philosophical pioneer — a 34-year-old monk who came to believe that man’s relationship to God, and road to heaven, required no priestly middlemen. Luther translated the Latin Bible into the people’s spoken language — German — to make it accessible to all. He even wrote hymns so congregations could actively participate in a service (another first). And he got into a lot of trouble for all of the above.


Luther land

⊳⊳ Famed writers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich von Schiller stand in front of the German National Theater in Weimar, Germany.

homes and shops to peek into as you make your way to Erfurt Cathedral, where Luther was ordained (home of a Cranach painting, plus Jesus as a life-sized candlestick) aside the Church of St. Severus (Severikirche), its next-door rival. They’re separated by a vast staircase on which outdoor opera is performed. (I witnessed Tosca mysteriously ascend into heaven with a sword instead of her usual landing in the Tiber River.) Near a statue of Luther as The Great Reformer stands the church where Bach’s parents married. But long before that, Luther had enrolled in the university here, where he studied law, as Dad decreed, until encountering a terrible thunderstorm, which evoked a vow: “If I live, I promise to become a monk.” Tourists can visit the Augustinian Monastery to visit Luther’s humble, chilly room and a replica of his Bible with handwritten notes in the margins. Erfurt’s Anger Art Museum boasts an enchanting collection of apple-cheeked Medieval Madonnas — plucked eyebrows, brunette coiffures above high foreheads — and altarpieces of alert saints.

Meanwhile in Minnesota The Minneapolis Institute of Art’s current exhibit — Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation, open through Jan. 15 — transports viewers to this region’s 16th century with a mix of art, archeology and history, including the elaborate pulpit from which Luther preached his last sermon and a number of remarkably preserved Bibles from the period (and much more). With concurrent exhibitions in Atlanta and New York City, the show at Mia is one of three marking the 500th anniversary of a momentous year when Luther nailed his 95 Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences to a church door in Wittenberg (in the neighboring state of Saxony-Anhalt, where he grew up). The exhibit includes many objects that have never traveled outside Germany. They’ve temporarily been located to the U.S. in part so that German museums and historic sites — expecting a crush of visitors in 2017 — can make preparations.

Erfurt I began my trip in Erfurt, two and a half hours northeast of Frankfurt. Founded in 742, the town of 200,000 is still spliced today with cobblestone streets below half-timbered buildings. Its charming Merchants Bridge of 1325 (across a trickle) of a river is lined with 20 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Dark times You can roll back the clock even further as you explore the town’s Old Synagogue, traced from the 11th century. During a pogrom of 1349, Jews hid their precious gold beneath the floor, recently unearthed and displayed, along with early Bibles — including one from 1160 that’s the size of a coffee table. By the 1860s, Jews banished, the building served as a dance hall.

→→See an exhibit Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation — is showing at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) through Jan. 15. Read a story from our sister publication, Southwest Journal, at tinyurl. com/luther-mn, to learn more about the exhibit, which features new information about the early life of Martin Luther, discovered during a 2003 excavation of a refuse pit near his childhood home. Artifacts that were dated back to 1500 revealed a rather well-to-do Luther family, not a humble one as previously believed.


⊳⊳ Locals celebrate at the annual Baroque Festival at Friedenstein Castle in Gotha, Germany.

There were no such celebrations under the bleak days of East Germany (German Democratic Republic, 1945–89). A former Stasi prison today houses a museum depicting life (if you care to call it that) under the Soviets. These grim cells awaited many, after the dreaded middle-ofthe-night knock on the door: “You’re coming with us to clarify some facts.”

Weimar You can follow Luther west to Weimar, where he lodged in the Franciscan monastery attached to City Palace, HQ of the short-lived Weimar Republic between world wars. Today it’s a hothouse of medieval paintings. “The Cranachs?” asked the attendant as I rushed in. “Turn right.” And there they were — a desolate Christ, betrayed; Caritas, a sensuous young woman; and portraits of Luther. Like photographs enriched with understanding, they include an earnest youth with searching eyes; an older, pensive Luther; and the graying figure of later years. Another Cranach — his masterpiece altar — resides in the church of St. Peter and Paul, featuring a crucifixion scene witnessed, in the corner, by John the Baptist, Cranach himself and his pal Martin, who also preached here. Wander over to Market Square to spot Cranach’s house and the former abode of J.S. Bach, marked with a plaque. Weimar is a cauldron of creative talent. The homes of Goethe and Schiller — rival writers whose statues stand side-by-side in ⊳⊳ This 1500s portrait of Martin Luther, by famed German painter Lucas Cranach, is on display at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) through Jan. 15. © Deutsches Historisches Museum

front of the National Theater — are open to tour, as is the abode of composer Franz Liszt and the voluptuous Rococo library of patroness Anna Amalia, featuring Luther’s 1539 translation of the Bible. And the pulse goes on. Weimar is also the birthplace of the Bauhaus Movement in architecture and crafts founded by Walter Gropius in 1919 at Bauhaus University, later shut down by the Nazis, but today still alive with the work and spirit of artists Klee, Kandinsky and Feininger in a sleek, Art Deco-esque building. You can also tour the compact Bauhaus Museum, showcasing objects destined for everyday life — tea sets to furniture — designed to be “attractive, functional, cheerful and cheap.”

Gotha Hop the rails and head 30 miles east to Gotha, founded in 770, and today dominated by Friedenstein Castle, named Rock of Peace by Duke Ernst, who built it in the middle of the Thirty Years’ War. As the White House of its day, it housed both working and living quarters, gamboling stylistically from Baroque to Rococo to Classicism in its 365 rooms — including a ballroom, bedchambers, a library, an exquisite theater and a cache of precious paintings. The Herzogliches Museum across the street is home to many Cranachs (his house is found on the town’s Market Square), including the oh-so-human double portrait of Christ with Mary Magdalene and the tender Dutch work famously titled Gotha Lovers. Oh, but what about Luther? Yes, he paid frequent visits to preach here at the Augustinian Monastery where he held office. In his will, he declared his wish to be buried in Gotha (though it never happened).

Eisenach “My dear town,” is what Luther called Eisenach, 40 miles east of Gotha. It’s here, at age 14, his parents sent him to earn his keep as a choirboy in St. Nicholas church. In those days, the lads strolled, house-to-house, to literally sing for their supper. One kind family took him in. He lived in their half-timbered dwelling, now a museum called Lutherhaus — today a treasury of medieval art that also offers a look into his boyhood bedchamber. Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 21


Luther land

→→Plan your trip To meet Martin Luther and Thuringia’s other heroes on their home turf, go to visit-thuringia.com or germany.travel (no “.com” is needed). Condor Airlines flies nonstop from MSP to Frankfurt, featuring a Business Class menu that merits four stars. See condor.com.

▲▲Weimar’s City Palace houses the Castle Museum with a focus on painting from 1500 to 1900, including Germany’s most famous painter, Lucas Cranach the Elder. Martin Luther once lodged in the Franciscan monastery attached to the palace.

Newly refurbished, it tells the story of Luther and the Bible in interactive form, explaining the whys and hows of translating the work into German. Visitors can tour the Latin school he attended (along with his admirer, J.S. Bach) and St. Georgen church where, excommunicated and ostracized by now, Luther preached to standing-room-only crowds. (Bach was baptized here; four generations of his family occupied the organ bench, where Telemann and Pachelbel also played.) Above the town rises Wartburg Castle — perhaps Germany’s most iconic — where Luther was benignly incarcerated for a year while a hunted man. He used this time to translate the Bible. He also composed 30-some hymns — A Mighty Fortress the most famous — which Bach later adopted in

22 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

his cantatas. Head to the castle’s art gallery, where — surprise — more Cranachs bloom, including portraits of Luther’s parents. J.S. Bach was born in Eisenach, and his early home is now the Bachhaus, a museum depicting his life and, in a stunning new addition — his music, exploring questions like: What did he actually write? (many conflicting editions) Look like? (only one authenticated portrait) What is a fugue? Polyphony? Explore it all, plus enjoy live concerts hourly and recordings in surround-sound. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/ arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.


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Good Living / Housing / By Sarah Jackson

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT ▲▲St. Paul residents Cathy Daigle, RN, Kim Kirmeier and Jalane Mosley, RN, co-owners, opened ComForCare Home Care St. Paul in August.

ANOTHER OPTION →→Home-care companies, such as ComForCare, are helping families fill gaps in caregiving

Senior housing developments are popping up all over the Twin

Cities metro area, rising steadily along with the number of baby boomers entering old age. And yet, the vast majority of Minnesotans age 65 and older own their homes and don’t plan to leave anytime soon. But how are older adults, who often have special care needs, managing to age in place? Family and friends often help with caregiving. Another option is hiring out for home-care services — another business sector that’s growing along with the aging baby boomer population. Take, for example, ComForCare Home Care of St. Paul. It’s the fourth franchise of its kind to open in the Twin Cities as part of Michigan-based ComForCare, an international company that was founded in 1996 and began franchising in 2001. This past August, three St. Paul women combined their collective work experiences to open the new St. Paul franchise, including registered nurses, Cathy Daigle and Jalane Mosley, and Kim Kirmeier, a longtime business development strategist. Other ComForCare franchises include St. Paul East (Dakota County), which also opened this past August, West St. Paul (Washington County), which opened three years ago and Minnetonka, which has been operating for seven years. 24 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

→→ComForCare Where services are offered: Four ComForCare franchises serve the Twin Cities’ greater seven-county metro area. The new St. Paul franchise serves St. Paul and Minneapolis, as well as Arden Hills, Columbia Heights, Falcon Heights, Fridley, Hilltop, Lauderdale, Little Canada, Mounds View, New Brighton, Roseville, Spring Lake Park and St. Anthony. Cost: Care plans are tailored to clients’ needs and range from a $70 fee for roundtrip transportation to an appointment to $320 a day for around-theclock hands-on care. Monthly fees can range from weekly companion visits for $360 a month to 24/7 hands-on complex care for $12,000 a month. Headquarters: Bloomfield Hills, Mich.-based ComForCare has 172 franchises operating in nearly 200 territories in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Caregivers provide professional personal care and companionship services for individuals — due to illness, injury or aging — in many settings, including homes, independent living communities, nursing homes, hospitals or wherever clients reside. Info: comforcare.com or 651-237-7727


South St. Paul HRA ⊳⊳ Kim Kirmeier hands official homecare scrubs and a certificate to Maria Leitsch, a new ComForCare home-care professional, who recently completed training in DementiaWise best-care practices.

ComForCare, which specializes in senior care, bills itself as the only service of its kind to use a match-making methodology to identify health-care assistants or companions who meld well with individual clients. ComForCare also uses a 10-step hiring/screening process for caregivers, as well as ongoing training. Mosley and Kirmeier see themselves as part of the so-called sandwich generation, raising children while recognizing the needs of senior parents and friends who can require more assistance to remain in their homes. Mosley has 20 years’ experience as a registered nurse, including 15 as a clinic director. Daigle, who serves as director of nursing for the franchise, worked previously at the VA Hospital in Minneapolis. “Most baby boomers are active and prefer to age in their own homes, so our services will become very important as time goes on,” Kirmeier said, adding that the number of older adults will outnumber school-age children in Minnesota by 2025. “Another key consideration is the mobile nature of our society. Many families live in different geographic areas, so they are not able to take care of loved ones, so they will need to rely on home care services. That’s where we come in.”

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Sarah Jackson is the editor of Minnesota Good Age, write her at editor@mngoodage.com.

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Good Living / Finance / By Mike Kojonen

A HIGH PRICE TAG →→Eye-popping health-care expenses require thoughtful planning and strategic saving

A quarter of a million dollars.

A healthy retirement plan should have that much earmarked for health care in retirement, according to a report by Fidelity, which estimates that today’s average 65-year-old couple will need $260,000 to cover medical expenses throughout retirement. Health care is one of the biggest expenses for retirees, not to mention one of the most unpredictable; yet people often overlook it. I recommend pre-retirees and retirees look into these options to start planning for health-care expenses:

Long-term care That eye-popping $260,000 price tag doesn’t include long-term care, which could come into play for as many as 70 percent of Americans age 65 and older, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Assisted living costs about $40,000 a year per person and a nursing home can be nearly twice as expensive! And those costs are rising year over year, according to a 2016 report from Genworth. Long-term care insurance can cover those expenses. A typical policy can help pay for care in assisted-living, nursing-home and Alzheimer’s facilities as well as respite and hospice care. Fidelity recommends a 65-year-old couple plan to cover $130,000 in long-term care expenses.

Save your HSA A Health Savings Account (or HSA) is an effective tool to save money for health care in retirement, yet only 18 percent of employees who are contributing to HSAs are planning on using their investment for retirement, according to a survey by Price Waterhouse. You can contribute to an HSA on a pre-tax basis. Earnings and withdrawals are also federal tax-free as long as you’re using the funds to pay for qualified medical expenses. You can contribute to an HSA and allow it to grow from year to year. And you can take it with you when you leave your job.

Delay retirement The timing of your retirement can make a difference of tens of thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket health-care costs. The average retirement age is 62, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement. Staying on the job a few extra years will allow you to stay on your employer’s health-care plan until Medicare kicks in at age 65. Couples can also stagger their retirements, with one spouse retiring and the other remaining on the job. Before you go into retirement fulltime, why not go part-time? In addition to enjoying the extra income, you can take advantage of your employer’s benefits for part-time employees (where applicable).

Find your providers Do your research before you need to see a doctor. Look for health-care providers with good track records for quality, cost and safety. You’ll want to establish providers in four areas — a primary-care physician, a 26 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


The wide range of services and care options at The Residence at North Ridge is one of the reasons we’re considered one of the best senior housing facilities in the community.

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specialist (in some cases more than one) for any existing or expected conditions, an urgent-care provider and a hospital. Ask your doctor for a list of healthcare providers with the highest quality and safety standards, and ask your insurance company how to lower your out-of-pocket costs.

Look to the past — and the future Although you can’t see into the future, your family history can give you an indication of what kind of care you’ll need. Use that as a guide when determining what kind of coverage you want. And, of course, practice healthy habits to help prevent costly, chronic conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and an unhealthy weight. Mike Kojonen is a licensed insurance professional and the owner of Principal Preservation Services, a full-service financial planning firm with offices in Woodbury, Minn., and Hudson, Wis. Learn more at preserveyourdollars.com.

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12/15/16 2:52/PM Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 27


Good Living / In the Kitchen / By Sarah Jackson

Fresh Twist Citrus — when you live in Minnesota — is winter’s solace, a blast of sunshine in January. Clementines, satsumas, mandarins, Halos, Cuties, whatever you want to call them, they’re all in season now. Heavily marketed to parents and kids (usually in 5-pound bags or larger) they’re super sweet, mostly seedless, easily portable and usually easy to peel. Try this sensational snack-meets-dessert recipe the next time you buy too many!

→→What exactly are clementines? Go to tinyurl.com/tangerine-mn to find out — and to discover the fascinating story of how these orange cousins came to (almost) overtake sweet navel oranges in popularity in the U.S. during the past two decades.

28 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


CHOCOLATE-DIPPED CLEMENTINES 8 medium clementines 4 ounces dark chocolate, finely chopped Course-grain sea salt

⊲⊲Peel the clementines and carefully separate the slices, removing any stringy pulp. ⊲⊲Heat the chocolate in a small bowl in the microwave in 1-minute intervals until melted, stirring in between heating. ⊲⊲Dip the slices halfway into the chocolate. ⊲⊲Lay the slices on a parchment-lined cookie sheet. ⊲⊲Sprinkle immediately with sea salt before the chocolate begins to tool. (Take it easy on the salt and taste as you go. A little goes a long way.) ⊲⊲Place the slices in the freezer until the chocolate sets, about 5 to 10 minutes. ⊲⊲Serve at room temperature.

Source: This recipe text and photo were adapted from Lunds & Byerlys Good Taste blog at LandB.mn/ dipped-clementines.


Keith Rice plays King Arthur in Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ oldfashioned revival of the Lerner and Loewe musical Camelot, a musical Rice first fell in love with when he was 7 years old. Photo by Heidi Bohnenkamp


Stage presence Veteran thespian Keith Rice — now appearing as King Arthur in Camelot — has become a beloved and familiar actor in the Twin Cities’ theater scene BY JULIE KENDRICK

I

t’s a blessing to spend your life doing work you love. If you happen to be an actor, it’s also something of a miracle. But for Keith Rice, life as a working actor is his day-to-day reality. The 60-year-old mainstay of Chanhassen Dinner Theatres has been steadily performing for 25 years, most of that time as part of the Chanhassen company. Minnesotans have been cheering his charismatic performances for years, including his memorable turns as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof, King Triton in Disney’s The Little Mermaid, Gaston in Beauty and the Beast and Javert in Les Miserables. He’s currently working in his 41st production at the theater, appearing in eight shows a week as the idealistic and betrayed King Arthur in Lerner and Loewe’s Camelot. Rohan Preston, in his recent Camelot review for the Star Tribune, praised Rice for playing his role “magnetically,” adding that the “winning production is a reminder that fairy tales can have social value, and not serve merely as escapist fantasies. In times of trouble — which is to say any era in human history — such stories can serve as reminders of sweet dreams.”

Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 31


Stage presence

While Keith has done Broadway tours and national operas across the country, he is as humble as they come. — Kris Howland, Chanhassen Dinner Theatres

32 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


⊳⊳ Keith Rice plays Arthur and Helen Anker plays Guenevere in Camelot at Chanhassen Dinner Theatres through Feb. 25. Photo by Heidi Bohnenkamp

For Rice, there’s special meaning attached to this particular musical, since it’s the one that started him on his life in the theater. “I was 7 years old, growing up in Long Island, N.Y., and my mother came home with the original cast album for Camelot,” he said. “I was transfixed from the moment I heard the first notes of the overture. And when I heard Robert Goulet singing C’est Moi, I said; ‘I want to do that.’ It was the moment that solidified everything.” His mother arranged for him to begin working with a vocal coach. By the time he was 14, his tastes had expanded to include not just opera and Broadway, but also rock and roll. “I was in a band, Valhalla, for 10 years,” Rice said. “We released three albums, and worked major circuits in New York, but we really never really took off.” It was opera that provided Rice his first big break, when he was cast as Francois Villon in The Vagabond King for the Houston and San Francisco operas. “It was fantastic, one of the great experiences of my life,” Rice said. “I had four swordfights and eight songs, and I was up in the air 25 feet and swung down on a rope.”

An earthquake and a move Rice and his wife, Dena, married in 1984. They settled down in Los Angles. He was busy touring the country, and his travel schedule was intense. But in 1992, he happened to be at home when a major earthquake struck the area. He was shaken by the disaster and determined to spend more time with his family, including their sons, Luke and William. Then fate intervened. He received an invitation to star as the Phantom in Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ production of the Maury Yeston and Arthur Kopit version of Phantom of the Opera. Impressed with the company and spurred by his wife’s desire to move back home to her native Minnesota, Rice settled his family in Champlin and proceeded to appear in 40 more shows at the theater. If his voice sounds familiar, by the way, that’s because he’s the voiceover actor on the theater’s commercials, too: “I can do a great ‘voice of God,’” Rice said with a laugh.

No small parts, just small actors And he’s done it all with a maximum of hard work and a minimum of actorly ego, said Kris Howland, Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ public relations director. “While Keith has done Broadway tours and national operas across the country, he is as humble as they come,” Howland said. “He has a fantastic sense of humor, a deep, abiding love for his family and an unshakable

Photo by Bernadette Pollard

‘I want to do that’

→→Camelot Written by Frederick Loewe (music) and Alan Jay Lerner (who adapted the T. H. White novel, The Once and Future King), Camelot is based on the story of King Arthur and his knights. Originally starring Richard Burton as Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guinevere and Robert Goulet as Lancelot, it won four Tony Awards in 1961, including Best Score. Chanhassen’s resident artistic director Michael Brindisi said: “I love this play because it’s so emotionally packed. It’s about passion — Arthur’s passion for ideas, Guinevere and Lancelot’s passion for romance, and their shared passion for Arthur and his dreams.” Read the Star Tribune’s review of the show at tinyurl.com/camelot-review. When: Through Feb. 25. Evening performances are Tuesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. Matinees are on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 1 p.m., and Sundays at 6:30 p.m. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: Dinner-and-show ticket prices are $75 for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings; $65 for Wednesday matinees; $85 for Friday shows; $68 for Saturday matinees; $85 for Saturday-evening shows; and $80 for Sunday performances. Info: Call 952-934-1525 or see ChanhassenDT.com for tickets.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 33


Stage presence faith. He is a genuinely real and kind human being.” Howland said Rice is a rare find in that he doesn’t measure his success by the size of the roles he plays. “He’s deeply committed to being a working actor, and that means he’ll do whatever role he’s asked to do and will do it happily,” she said. Indeed, this spring, Rice will return to the Chanhassen stage in the relatively small role of Vince Fontaine in Grease, which opens March 3. He’ll play the host of the television dance show at Rydell High’s gym. “I’m going from being a king to being a smarmy DJ,” he said.

Power napping Playing a role as physically and emotionally demanding as King Arthur could take a toll on any actor, but Rice is known for his boundless energy. Aleks Knezevich, who appears as Lancelot in the show, said: “Keith is double my age, but I swear he has more energy than me. Watching him work with excitement, commitment and an open

mind is like being in a master class on how to create a character.” One of Rice’s healthy-living secrets? Naps. He swears by them. “It’s a great rejuvenation,” he said. “I always take a nap before the show, sometimes at the theater, but usually at home. I’ve always been a napper and I can fall right asleep.” Rice, who is buff beyond his years, stretches every day and usually runs on a treadmill for three miles every other day. He lifts weights not just at home, but also at the theater, where he practices a regular ab-strengthening routine, too. “I got the work out bug when I was 13 and never looked back,” he said. “It’s fun and I still enjoy it.” Rice also credits his good health to weekly sauna sessions and supplements such as fish oil, lecithin, magnesium powder and probiotics — plus plenty of liquids. Keeping a positive attitude is also important to Rice. “I’m grateful every day just for waking up and having a day ahead of me,” he said. “It’s one more day to enjoy life and to be with others. I try to move forward with a grateful heart.”

I’m grateful every day just for waking up and having a day ahead of me. It’s one more day to enjoy life and to be with others. — Keith Rice

▲▲David Anthony Brinkley plays King Pellinore (as well as Merlyn) — alongside Keith Rice as King Arthur — in Camelot. Photo by Heidi Bohnenkamp 34 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Keith Rice has played numerous characters at Chanhassen Dinner Theatres during the past 25 years, including Horace Vandergelder in Hello, Dolly! and King Triton in Disney’s The Little Mermaid, both in 2014, Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof in 2013, Pharaoh in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat in 2009 and Daddy Warbucks in Annie in 2004, to name a few. Photos by Heidi Bohnenkamp and Act One, Too

Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 35


Stage presence

▲▲Keith Rice runs on a treadmill for three miles every other day. He lifts weights not just at home, but also at the theater, where he practices a regular abstrengthening routine, too. “I got the work out bug when I was 13 and never looked back,” he said. “It’s fun and I still enjoy it.” Photo by Tracy Walsh

Man on the hill With a strong network of friends and colleagues in the Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ community, Rice is a mentor to many, who routinely cite his unique generosity of time, energy and spirit. Chanhassen Dinner Theatres’ resident artistic director Michael Brindisi recalled Rice’s generosity at a company picnic a couple years ago. “It was on a Monday, a day the actors have off,” Brindisi said. “Keith was playing Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof and was planning to take a rest day and skip the picnic. Then he heard that my 90-year-old father was visiting and was going to be there. “Keith drove in to the picnic from his home in Champlin. He sat on a hill with my dad, overlooking the softball game, and talked with him for a couple of hours before he went home for his one day of rest. Needless to say, I have a great deal of respect and love for Keith Rice.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in Minneapolis and blogs at kendrickworks.blogspot.com.

36 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Housing resources • Memory care

• Assisted living

Augustana Care of Minneapolis •••• Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurant-style dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St, Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

City of South St. Paul, Housing Division •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

Lyngblomsten •••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and long-term care, and community services and resources. 1415 Almond Ave St. Paul 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

• Independent housing

• Long term care

Nokomis Square Cooperative •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, wellkept environment. 5015 35th Ave S Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

Oak Meadows •••

Award winning Oak Meadows has an 18 year track record of providing excellent service and care to seniors and their families. We offer 48 assisted, 12 memory care and 62 independent apartments. Lifesprk provides 24/7 on-site homecare. 8131–8133 4th St N Oakdale 651-578-0676 oak-meadows.org

Salvation Army Booth Manor ••

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Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 onebedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor

• New construction

St. Benedict’s Senior Community •••

St. Benedict’s Senior Community is a leader in offering a wide range of housing options for those 55 and better. Whether speaking about the campus in St. Cloud, Monticello or Sartell, our philosophy remains the same; offer independence and choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN 960 19th St S Sartell 320-654-2352 chateauwaters.com St. Cloud Senior Housing: 1810 Minnesota Blvd SE St. Cloud 320-203-2747 centracare.com Monticello Senior Housing: 1301 East 7th St Monticello 763-295-4051 centracare.com

The Residence at North Ridge ••••

We offer the perfect mix of care, services and living options to ensure wellness and enrichment. Assisted Living, Independent Living, Adult Day Programs, Comprehensive Rehab Programs, Outpatient Rehab Therapy, On-site Child Care Program. Memory Care coming in early 2017. To learn more, please give us a call! 5500 Boone Ave N New Hope 763-592-3000 theresidenceatnorthridge.com

Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 37


January Capitol Tours

→→After more than three years of restoration work, the Minnesota State Capitol reopens this month with free tours. Guides will provide an overview of Capitol history, art, architecture and state government, and will highlight the massive restoration efforts, including murals and paintings returned to their original 1905 patterns and colors, cleaned and repaired exterior marble work and new public spaces in the basement, featuring exposed limestone-foundation walls. When: Guided 45-minute tours will return Jan. 3 on the hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 3 p.m. Sundays. Where: Minnesota State Capitol, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: mnhs.org/capitol

Ongoing

Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation →→Paintings, garments, gold artifacts, letters, coins, manuscripts, furniture and more from the days of Martin Luther — the man behind the Protestant Reformation — are visiting the U.S. for the first time, including the last pulpit the German monk used. When: Through Jan. 15 Where: Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia), Minneapolis Cost: $20 Info: artsmia.org

Wells Fargo WinterSkate →→Skate for free through early February, weather permitting.

When: Ongoing Where: Loring Park in Minneapolis and Landmark Plaza in St. Paul Cost: FREE. Skate rentals are $4 per person in St. Paul and complimentary in Minneapolis. Info: downtownmpls.com/winterskate, tinyurl.com/winterskate-stpaul

Jan. 1–March 5

Music Under Glass →→Beat the winter blahs by boogying to blues, bluegrass and ballads in the tropical two-acre Marjorie McNeely Conservatory. This free concert series showcases some of the Twin Cities’ finest musicians on select Sunday afternoons in winter. Beer, wine, soda and light snacks will be available for purchase. When: 4:30–6:30 p.m. Jan. 1, 8, 15, 22 and Feb. 5, 19, 26, March 5

38 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

Jan. 5–April 8

Rise Up, O Men →→This brand-new musical comedy — the sixth production in the locally developed Church Basement Ladies series — features the men of the church and the women who serve them. As these hard-working farmers discuss their scrap lumber piles and the benefits of weld versus solder, they unintentionally disrupt the order of the kitchen. When: Jan. 5–April 8 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Jan. 8 and 29

Sundays at Landmark →→This annual series of (mostly) free cultural and arts events is designed to

Photo courtesy of Minnesota State Capitol Restoration Project

Can’t-Miss Calendar


Can’t-Miss Calendar entertain, enrich and educate all ages.

When: Events start at 1 p.m. and are free, except where noted: 1 and 3:30 p.m. Jan. 8 (Minnesota Boychoir); 3 p.m. Jan. 29 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony); Feb. 19 (Carpathian Celebration, $4–$6); 11 a.m. March 19 (Day of Dance, $6); 11 a.m. April 1 (Scottish Ramble, $6); 3 p.m. May 7 (Rose Ensemble); and May 14 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony Mother’s Day Concert). Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: Various Info: landmarkcenter.org

Jan. 12

An Evening with Art Garfunkel →→The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer will perform Simon & Garfunkel hits, plus solo work and poetry. When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 12 Where: Pantages Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $58.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

Jan. 21

Adults Night Out →→Imagine going to the zoo without children around: That’s the joy of the zoo’s series of kid-free nights, held after normal zoo hours. Participants must be 18 to attend and 21 to drink.

When: 4:30 p.m. Jan. 21 with more monthly dates to be announced Where: Minnesota Zoo, Apple Valley Cost: Advanced tickets are required. Admission is reduced to $10 (free for members) and food and beverages will be available for purchase. Info: RSVP at mnzoo.org/adultnights.

Jan. 22–April 23

Urban Expedition →→Experience cultures from around the world — including music, dance, live animals, crafts and more — at the Landmark Center’s international event series, returning for its 13th season. When: 1 p.m. Jan. 22 (Denmark), Feb. 12 (Switzerland), March 12 (Colombia), April 9 (Togo) and 23 (Burma) Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE. Food representative of the featured countries will be available for purchase. Info: landmarkcenter.org

Jan. 26–Feb. 5

St. Paul Winter Carnival →→This multi-faceted festival is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation, with more than 75 events and nearly 1,000 volunteers. Check out ice carving, snow sculpting, skiing, dogsledding, a torchlight parade and more. When: Jan. 26–Feb. 5 Where: St. Paul Cost: Most events are FREE. Info: wintercarnival.com

Jan. 28

Winter Kite Festival →→Kites of all colors, sizes, shapes and themes will fly over Lake Harriet as part of this 15th-annual event. Activities in years’ past have included ice fishing, horse-drawn wagon rides, snowshoeing, a children’s medallion hunt and a marshmallow roast. When: Jan. 28 Where: Lake Harriet Bandshell, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: eastharriet.org

Flower Drum Song

→→Rodgers & Hammerstein’s classic musical — set in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the late ’50s — comes to the Proscenium Stage in this co-production with Mu Performing Arts of St. Paul. Exploring what it means to be an American, this fully revised version touches on the history of every person whose forbearers arrived as strangers to the United States. When: Jan. 20–Feb. 19 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $40. Preview seats start at $27. Info: parksquaretheatre.org

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / January 2017 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search ILLNESS INQUIRY ALZHEIMERS ANEMIA ARTHRITIS CANCER CATARACTS COLITIS DEMENTIA

Cryptogram Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

Source: Mahatma Gandhi

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Clue: D = I

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DEPRESSION DIABETES DIVERTICULITIS FYBROMYALGIA GLAUCOMA GOUT HYPERTENSION

INFECTION OSTEOARTHRITIS OSTEOPOROSIS PARKINSONS PNEUMONIA SEPSIS SHINGLES

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1. Swimming 2. Heart disease and cancer 3. Move, know your purpose, destress, eat less, eat less meat, drink in moderation, have faith, put family first and stay social. TRIVIA

Answers 40 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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2. What are the two leading causes of death in the U.S.?

3. What are the nine commandments of good health, according to The Blue Zones by Minneapolis author Dan Buettner?

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Crossword

ACROSS 1 Furtive summons 5 Closes with force 10 See 13-Down 14 “It’s __ you”: “Your call” 15 Sultan’s group 16 Carrier to Tel Aviv 17 React to a bad pun, perhaps 18 BP merger partner 19 Longfellow’s “The Bell of __” 20 Fabric with a slight sheen 23 Clay pigeon sport 24 Tee shots into the hole 25 Sophisticated-sounding hair treatment product 32 Slacks holder-upper 35 Baker’s verb 36 Like old apples 37 “Norma __” 42 / January 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

38 Fills with dismay 41 Word in a bride’s bio 42 The three monkeys’ taboos 44 Guernsey greeting 45 Completely, after “from” 46 Coffee sweetener 50 Apple or pear 51 “Spider-Man” actor Willem 55 Plowed ground for crop-raising 60 Classic clown 61 African country whose name is contained in the name of its southern neighbor 62 Internet destination 63 It’s a long story 64 Porthole view 65 Flair 66 Cubicle furnishing 67 Smells awful 68 Once-sacred snakes

DOWN 1 Tire inflators 2 Frighten, as a horse 3 Like old bread 4 Most stylish 5 Former Iranian despot 6 Unconvincing, excuse-wise 7 Ex-slugger and Fox Sports analyst, familiarly 8 Major tourist draws 9 Kiss 10 “I have no clue” 11 Voice above tenor 12 Rural building with big doors 13 With 10-Across, “Open sesame” sayer 21 Early Beatle Sutcliffe 22 Bears and Grizzlies 26 Sound system part 27 Bigwig 28 Tests of knowledge 29 Huff and puff 30 Butterlike spread 31 Command from a bailiff 32 Uncle Remus rabbit’s title 33 Nesting site, perhaps 34 Mariner Ericson 38 Often ___: about half the time 39 Singer Rawls 40 Nautical journal 43 Long kiss 45 Shrinking Asian lake 47 Key with one sharp 48 Plot mechanism 49 Say further 52 Totally tanks 53 Ready in the keg 54 Blissful regions 55 Deal with adversity 56 Commando weapons 57 “A Death in the Family” author James 58 Tropical hardwood 59 Sea eagles 60 Crib or cot


January 2017  
January 2017  
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