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AUGUST 2019

The lilac effect: A caregiver’s epiphany

Incredible

INDIA!

Putting an end to

elder abuse

A camping trip for seniors

Mr. Tea

Bill Waddington serves up culture, history and tradition — all in a delicious cup of tea


Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 3


Contents 22

AN INSIDER'S LOOK AT INDIA See the subcontinent like few others have — on a guided tour of its ‘wild’ side.

AUGUST GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR 6 Wine and beer are fine, but tea is actually good for you!

MY TURN 8 Older adults in Minneapolis have created their own vibrant group.

MEMORIES 10 It turns out, money isn’t the secret to true happiness.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

28

REAL AGING Minnesota’s newest assistedliving law is a good start for preventing elder abuse. But there’s more work to do.

12 Discover a Minnesota town you’ve likely never heard of.

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING 14 Our senses can still stir powerful memories during dementia.

GOOD LIVING FINANCE

30

ON THE COVER A world-renowned tea expert — Bill Waddington of TeaSource — is living among us in the Twin Cities and he has 200 teas for you to try! Photos by Tracy Walsh 4 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

16 You’ll need these five ingredients for a solid retirement recipe.

IN THE KITCHEN 18 This low-sugar breakfast was a hit in our test kitchen.

HOUSING 20 A Burnsville community is taking summer fun to the next level with a senior camping trip.

38 40 BRAIN TEASERS

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR


5

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Volume 38 / Issue 8

FROM THE EDITOR

Cheers to tea! PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Nate Cannon, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer Lauren Peck, Brenda Taylor, Deb Taylor Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brenda Taylor

AD COORDINATOR

Hannah Dittberner / 612-436-4389 hdittberner@mngoodage.com

OFFICE MANAGER

Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

6 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

BY SARAH JACKSON

I love wine, beer and cocktails. Don’t worry. I drink responsibly. But I enjoy the experience of discovering all the new — locally produced — flavors we can find right here in the Twin Cities. And that’s not to mention all the incredible foods we can pair with those Minnesota-born beverages. So you might find it a bit odd that for our annual Food & Drink Issue, I'd choose a cover star associated with none of the above, but instead settle on a master of tea! Bill Waddington is the founder of TeaSource, a beloved institution among tea drinkers with shops in St. Paul, St. Anthony and Eden Prairie. The thing is, as much as I love wine, beer and spirits, as I get older, I can drink only so much. Tea, on the other hand, contains no calories and won’t get you tipsy. And its caffeine levels are half that of coffee — zero if you drink herbal teas. Teas, especially green teas, may even be good for your health, according to numerous studies. Best of all, tea is just as wildly diverse and fascinating as the world of alcoholic beverages. On a visit to Waddington’s Eden Prairie shop — featuring 200 teas for sale, plus tea flights and free samples, too — I learned so much. Tea’s many forms — black, green, white, dark/puer, yellow, oolong — reminded me of the varietals, appellations and nuances of wine. Like wines, teas of the world can be studied, experienced and, in the end, deeply appreciated with a new world view. Waddington, a playful spirit and a true delight as a tea guide, can hook you up with whatever flavors you like, thanks to his passion for tea. Not sure what you like? Before going into a store, you can take a tea quiz on the TeaSource website to find the right blends for your palate. (There’s also a Tea of the Month Club!) No matter what you try, you’ll be only scratching the surface of what’s out there: In Waddington’s shops alone, the array of flavors is truly astonishing. My favorite part was getting to see and smell the loose-leaf teas in their canisters when deciding if a tea was right for me. TeaSource’s Minnesota N’ice Tea — a blend of black tea, jasmine green tea, lemongrass, rose petals, cornflower — is a fruity and delicious top seller, and can be served hot or iced. (For a gal who grew up with Lipton as the only iced tea option, it is heaven.) But it’s TeaSource’s beautiful, bright Red Berries herbal tea that will keep me coming back for more. I think I’ll have a glass of it — iced, of course — right now!


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MY TURN

Good neighbors, unite! BY DAVE NIMMER

F

or seniors living near the heart of downtown Minneapolis — amid all the concrete and steel, traffic and transients, high rises and security systems — it’s a challenge to feel like a part of a true neighborhood in which people care about, and look after, one another. That’s where Mill City Commons (MCC) comes in, a membership organization for those age 55 and older who live in the city’s central riverfront district and North Loop neighborhood. Since the organization formed 10 years ago, members have gathered for coffee, met for drinks, toured the neighborhood, published a weekly newsletter, delivered Meals on Wheels, organized a food drive and bought groceries for shut-ins. It’s all part of their mission to build “meaningful connections to people, activities and resources” to maintain vibrant lives. Today 90 percent of MCC members, whose median age is 76, live in 30 build-

8 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

ings near the Mississippi River, from I-35W to the Plymouth Avenue Bridge and from Washington Avenue to Fourth Street, including Nicollet Island. One of MCC’s early supporters and first board president is Marcia Townley, who moved back to Minneapolis from New York City after her husband died and she retired. She bought a place downtown. “I knew I wanted more of a community in Minneapolis,” she said. “We got started with 35 members. We wanted dues at a level where we could have a small, parttime staff.” For most members, dues cost $650 a year, and the staff now includes an executive director, a program manager and a member services administrator. “In our first years, our priorities were to provide support for one another,” Townley said, “bringing people meals, taking them to the doctor’s office and just running errands.”

Now the agenda includes exercise classes, a meditation circle, birding walks, an evening book club and even a monthly foreign policy discussion. MCC makes a point to reach out to men who sometimes find it difficult to establish and maintain friendships after they retire. The Men’s Coffee and Conversation Group meets biweekly at Elsie’s in Northeast Minneapolis and anywhere from 25 to 40 guys gather to talk, eat and listen. “It’s a great way to socialize,” said Bob Callahan, the current board chairman for MCC. “It’s a chance to make friends in an informal setting.” Callahan and his wife, Carol Jordan, were both retired and had been living downtown since 2007 when they joined


⊳ Carol Jordan and Bob Callahan enjoy a happy hour at an event organized by the Mill City Commons. Below, Mill City Commons events include happy hours, a book club, exercise classes, regular foreign policy discussions, outings such as birding walks and volunteer activities, too. Photos courtesy of Mill City Commons

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Mill City Commons in 2010, shortly after it organized. “We hadn’t yet found a way to connect with others in our age group and saw this as an opportunity,” Jordan said. “Now MCC is very important to us. We’re involved in its connections or activities two to four times a week, in addition to family, neighbors and volunteering elsewhere.” I’ve always thought it special to live near the Mississippi, the historic ribbon of water separating the Twin Cities. What’s special about MCC is the opportunity to make it a shared experience among good neighbors. Belonging to MCC comes with a price tag, so that the staff can ensure that events and activities are well-planned, organized and operated. But the friendship and fellowship, according to its members, are quite spontaneous and freely given. “I have a strong feeling that I live in a community that knows and cares about me,” said Townley. “Every time I go to Lunds, I see someone I know and it's the same when I walk across the Stone Arch Bridge. It all helps keep me energized, active and engaged.” And it helps make Minneapolis less of a big city and more of a good neighborhood. Learn more at millcitycommons.org.

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Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 9


MEMORIES

Don’t worry, be happy! BY CAROL HALL

I

laughed so hard at The Flintstones movie that other theater patrons turned around and stared at me. That was back in 1994. But “Yabba-dabba-doo!” tickles me still today, as does, “a little song, a little dance, a little seltzer in your pants” from the famous 1975 Mary Tyler Moore Show episode, featuring Chuckles the Clown’s funeral. I don’t know why I break up over this silly stuff, but I do know it’s a good thing. Research has shown laughter reduces stress hormones and boosts the body’s immune function. It can lower your anxiety level and help you relax. Some health-care facilities are even adopting group laughter as a therapy. All of this got me thinking of exactly what makes me laugh. A certain male friend uses bad words in his humor and also tells some pretty graphic jokes that — coming from another person — would offend me. But coming from him, they make me howl!

Research has shown laughter reduces stress hormones and boosts the body’s immune function. 10 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Some people, relating cute things their dogs do, become a bit too precious. But I find those about Gracie, my good friend Fay’s little bichon, hilarious: “Gracie had a good day today. She got to ride in the car, and when we went to the drive-in bank, the teller gave her a doggie treat. This made up for yesterday. Gracie was much put out that I bought her a new red leash instead of the pink one she wanted.” And then there are the grade schoollevel jokes that set me off: Did you hear about the peanut in Central Park? It was a salted. What all this is leading up to is the state of mind that laughter evokes, which is, of course, happiness. Specifically, studies are being conducted today on what makes people happy. Positive psychology, as this science is called, delves into the factors that produce upbeat emotions and a sense of purpose. Most surprising is that — with the exception of people in extreme poverty — having a lot of money isn’t one of them. Purchasing material things offers only temporary happiness. It’s what we do in life that matters in the long run. People who claim to be happy have developed strong social connections.


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Exercise and laughter appear to be the best medicine when it comes to wellness, according to recent studies. Exercise: Read the results of a 2018 University of Michigan study of peer reviewed journal articles, Get moving to get happier, at tinyurl.com/get-moving-mn. Laughter: An ABC News story, Laughing Makes Your Brain Work Better, reports that a 2014 study out of Loma Linda University in Southern California found laughing at funny videos for 20 minutes can improve short-term memory and lower stress levels. Learn more at tinyurl.com/laugh-mn.

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This involves working together, being helpful and cooperative and also being there for someone who matters when that person needs help. And in a slightly different sense, this means being there for yourself. A recent University of Michigan study titled Get moving to get happier suggests there’s a relationship between physical activity and happiness. Having previously played tennis and bicycled, and now walking two miles a day, I can personally attest to that: My exercise routine has always provided a sense of accomplishment and well-being, ergo happiness. And so, I guess I’ll keep hitting the trail, and also yukking it up: In God we trust. All others pay cash. … Remember, happiness can’t buy money … Yabba-dabba-doo! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

The men of Forestville, Minnesota, pose for a photo, circa 1890. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

A ghost town turned history site BY LAUREN PECK

T

he Minnesota Historical Society cares for 26 historic sites around the state, including an entire former town: Historic Forestville, located in southeastern Minnesota on the Root River. A growing community in the mid1800s, it had become a virtual ghost town by the end of the 19th century. Before Forestville existed, Native Americans lived in and traveled through southeastern Minnesota for thousands of years. When Europeans arrived in the late 1600s, the Dakota people controlled much of the area with several other Native communi-

ties also moving through the region, such as the Ho-Chunk, Ioway, Meswaki and Fox. Forestville’s founding was the direct result of the 1851 Treaties of Traverse des Sioux and Mendota between several Dakota bands and the U.S. government. At the time, the Dakota were struggling to support their people through hunting and trade, and some groups felt that selling their land was a way to gain resources to sustain their communities. As a result, the U.S. gained control of most of southern and western Minnesota and opened 24 million acres to settler-colonists. ⊳ Visitors hear stories of the Meighen general store in Historic Forestville, Minnesota. Photo by Rebecca Slater / Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

12 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Robert Foster and friends Within a decade, more than 100,000 people had moved to the area, which today is about an hour’s drive south of Rochester and located inside the scenic Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park. Forestville traces its start to the summer of 1853 when Robert Foster traveled to the area on foot from Decorah, Iowa. There he staked land claims on the Root River for himself, his brother and two brothers-inlaw, William and Felix Meighen. Foster and Felix Meighen quickly decided to open a store together on the new property. They traveled to Galena, Illinois, to buy $700 in goods to stock the store — the equivalent of about $20,000 today — and then brought the goods up the Mississippi by steamboat and then another 50 miles by oxcart to the Forestville site. In its first few years, the general store drew customers from up to 50 miles away. Soon, other businesses started cropping up in Forestville. According to an 1857 census, the young town included six carpenters, two cabinetmakers, a blacksmith and a brickmaker, indicating that construction was ongoing in the new town.


A stagecoach stop

Making do without a railroad

By 1860, Forestville had formed a township government with more than 150 inhabitants and 20 houses. Area farmers would come to town to purchase goods, sell produce and send their children to school. The town also saw regular out-oftown travelers on the stagecoach route between St. Paul and Dubuque, Iowa. Throughout the 1860s, a new form of transportation crept closer to Forestville: the railroad. Several communities were surveyed for a potential route through southeastern Minnesota. In 1868, the Southern Minnesota Railroad opted to bypass Forestville and run its route north through Wykoff and Spring Valley. Losing out on a railroad stop proved a turning point for the town. Some residents moved away to the new railroad centers, and local markets shifted away from Forestville. Plus, new rail travel decreased the number of stagecoaches coming through town. The town’s population fell to 68 people by 1870, and slipped to 55 in 1880. Foster left his store partnership with Felix Meighen to pursue farming full time, and William Meighen moved a few miles away to Carimona Township.

Felix Meighen and his family stayed in • 50+ Community Forestville, however, and soon began • Income Based Rent expanding their property. Farmers would • All Utilities Paid frequently purchase goods from the fami• Newly Remodeled ly’s store on credit, and if they couldn’t pay their debts, the Meighens would • Elevators grant a loan with high interest, secured • Controlled Entries by a mortgage on the farmer’s property. • On Site Caretaker If farmers defaulted, the Meighens could Call for an appointment 651-288-8159 foreclose on the land. By 1889, due to those foreclosures and 3 3/8/19 10:45 AM Booth Manor cheap and available land left behind by South St Paul HRA GA 0419 12.indd Residence departing settlers, the Meighens came For Seniors 62+ to own the entire town of Forestville. • 1 Bedrooms It became a company town with a large • Based on Income farming operation, with the Meighens • Utilities Included hiring men to work in the fields and • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs women to work in the family home. • Community Room Workers could rent homes in Forestville • Smoke-Free Building and were paid in credit at the general store. 1421 Yale Place, Mpls Felix died in 1896, and his only son, 612-338-6313 Thomas, took over the family operations. But Thomas was increasingly involved Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1 12/6/13 10:14 AM in work outside of town, including local politics and serving as president of the First National Bank in Preston. By 1905, he and his family had moved to Preston. MINI GOLF IN RICHFIELD The Meighen store had also ceased to be profitable, and it closed its doors in 1910.

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Visitors to Historic Forestville can explore the site, including the original Meighen house, barn and general store — complete with original merchandise left on the shelves — to learn about the many people who called the area home. They can also explore the scenic beauty of the Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park with cave tours, scenic tours, hiking, horseback riding, camping and more. Learn more at mnhs.org/ forestville and at dnr.state. mn.us/mystery_cave.

Leaving a legacy

ice

The town of Forestville no longer existed after the store’s closure, but various families continued to live and farm in the area. When Thomas died in 1936, he hoped his former home could become a state park. He got his wish: In 1963, the state of Minnesota established what’s now Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park. In 1978, the Minnesota Historical Society took over management of the Forestville site. Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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CAREGIVING

The lilac effect O

ur long-term memories are amazing things. Much like music, even in the throes of advanced dementia, a certain smell, unique and identifiable in its essence, can trigger memories long since stowed away in the crevices of our minds. Our noses can detect 50,000 distinct scents, but it’s our brains that truly make the connections. They can forge pathways between the present and past in ways that take us back to our roots — or that bring trauma to the surface. In my work in memory care, I grew close to a woman named Betty. Betty often would ask me if I was still in school or if I had a girlfriend. At one point, she suggested she and I return to her room alone and see where things went.

14 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

BY NATE CANNON

Our noses can detect 50,000 distinct scents, but it’s our brains that truly make the connections.

Of course, I blushingly declined the saucy offer from my 85-year-old friend, knowing it was the illness of dementia causing her to repeat questions in a short time period, to lose sight of socially appropriate boundaries and to struggle with her cognitive organization. But memories, those long past and perhaps seemingly forgotten, could still come to life through scent, I soon found. As Betty neared her end stages, she became wheelchair bound, propped up with a pillow in what was essentially a high-back recliner on four wheels. It had all the tilts and adjustments possible, and though it drove like a boat, it was navigable. This meant she was mobile, and free to get outside on a nice day, despite her condition.

I took her to the courtyard to enjoy a beautiful May day, remembering she had a lilac bush at the house she owned for around 40 years. She was mute and barely responsive. But I talked to her in a warm voice as the impact of each bump on the concrete path seemed to shoot right through the rolling recliner into her weakening muscles. “You had a lilac bush in your backyard, didn’t you, Betty?” Her senses seemed engaged. I continued: “The smell of lilacs is so unique.” I held the flower close to her nose and then traced it along the back of her hand. She opened her eyes. “It’s a beautiful May day,” I said “The lilacs are in full bloom. Does that smell take you anywhere?”


A woman of fewer words over time, a pattern of decline common in dementia, she stayed silent. Just as I started to continue my dialogue, a sound mumbled from her lips. Her grey hair, still curled and permed as she liked it, cradled her round, inviting eyes, now fixed on mine. With well over a dozen grandkids and great-grandkids, she was the typical “grandma.” As a result, I felt connected to her, just as I had with seniors and anyone else with dementia. We shared a sense of trust. Respect. Patience. I stopped speaking and listened, awaiting her words of wisdom. She shifted her head position with the pace of an aged, rigid turtle. Out from her poured words. Beautiful words. Words doused with memories untouched in the tangles of a mind stricken by degeneration for years, with vivid descriptions of her by-then deceased husband, who she lived with in the home with the lilac bush. Stories, brief stories, bounced through her brain and fueled by the miracle of her senses, emerged coherent, logical, complete. My soul seemed to join her in the process of catharsis. The release of the memory, by way of speaking, seemed to set her free. A week later, Betty died. I attended her funeral and shared with her daughter the story of our visit to the courtyard. Tears, not of sadness, but of joy, swelled in her daughter’s eyes, despite her urge to suppress any emotion and remain stoic. Tears. Beautiful tears. Tears doused with memories, from the untangled neurons of a healthy brain, streaked down her face as she embraced me in a hug. But, unlike for her mom that day in the courtyard, the words themselves seemed more difficult to find.

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7/25/192019 12:31/PM Minnesota Good Age / August 15


FINANCE

A recipe for retirement

BY SKIP JOHNSON

Your financial plan must have five key ingredients for a successful retirement.

W

hen it comes to baking, the recipe can make or break a sweet treat. While professional bakers are able to whip up a delicious cookie without referencing a single recipe card, the rest of us often need step-by-step directions to ensure we successfully create a delicious, melt-in-your-mouth dessert. Retirement planning works the same way: Your financial plan must have five key ingredients for a successful retirement.

The flour: An income plan An income plan plays a huge role in your retirement readiness and success. It’s a major ingredient that simply can’t be ignored. As you approach retirement, you may have accumulated quite a few different retirement savings vehicles. It’s crucial that you eventually consolidate these accounts and implement a single strategic plan for how to use them. It’s also important to understand if any of your retirement plans are subject to 16 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

required minimum distributions (RMDs) and, if they are, determine when you must make those withdrawals. Failing to do this can result in costly and unnecessary penalties. Another factor you should take into account is your Social Security income. For many retirees, one of the biggest questions to answer is when to begin taking your benefits. For some people, retirement accounts may provide enough of an income stream that delaying benefits is a strategic decision that ensures larger payouts later in life. Others may find it beneficial to begin taking their benefits as soon as they’re eligible. Making these decisions in advance can help you make the most of all your assets and have a reliable stream of income.

The sugar: Investments Investments, like sugar, are a key ingredient in a successful financial plan, but too much of a good thing can quickly ruin your financial future.

That’s why it’s good to evaluate and update your investment approach as you near retirement. For many people, this means reevaluating risk tolerance and updating investment allocations accordingly. Typically, as you approach retirement, you’ll want to reduce your investment risk. However, it’s also important that your investment plan takes inflation into account and provides you with the opportunity to keep up with the rising cost of living as you age.

The eggs: An estate plan In baking, eggs play an essential role in helping keep your finished product together. In financial planning, your estate plan plays a similar role, ensuring that your hard-earned money is distributed among your beneficiaries properly and efficiently. Without an estate plan, your heirs can see their inheritance quickly evaporate due to taxes, legal fees or even poor decisions on how to handle newfound wealth.


a Mutual of Omaha Bank Company An estate plan can not only ensure your wishes are executed properly, but it can also protect and prevent things like costly estate taxes, probate and even bad decisions by beneficiaries.

The salt: Taxes Often an overlooked part of a financial plan, a tax plan may not seem important, but with the right strategy, it can go a long way in protecting your savings from Uncle Sam. From considering a transition to a Roth IRA to understanding how your RMDs impact your tax bill, proactive tax planning can help you avoid unnecessarily high tax bills in retirement.

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Whether it’s chocolate chips, oatmeal, raisins or peanut butter, the varying ingredients in your cookie baking can make all the difference in your final product. Insurance products can do the same thing. With an endless amount of insurance products available, there are a number of different options you can add to your financial plan based on your individual needs. From life insurance to long-term care policies to annuities, many products can help fill any gaps after accounting for all of the other ingredients in your financial plan.

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By mixing these five key ingredients, you’re on your way to creating a sound retirement plan. But just like any recipe, it may need some adjusting to perfect it. Working with a financial professional can ensure you create a retirement plan that best fits your unique needs. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financial-planning firm and insurance agency with locations in the Twin Cities and Duluth. Learn more at greatwatersfinancial.com. Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 17


IN THE KITCHEN

Oatmeal

Reinvented This naturally sweetened, baked oatmeal recipe features blueberries, wholesome oats, nuts and warming spices. And it makes a big batch: You can bake some now and enjoy oatmeal for the rest of the week! Text and photos by Brenda Taylor

BAKED BLUEBERRY OATMEAL OATMEAL 2 cups old-fashioned oats ⅔ cup roughly chopped pecans 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 18 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

¼ cup packed brown sugar 1¾ cups milk of choice (almond, coconut and oat milks work, too) ⅓ cup maple syrup or honey 2 large eggs or egg substitute such as flax eggs 3 tablespoons melted butter or coconut oil, divided 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 12 ounces or 1 pint fresh or frozen blueberries 2 teaspoons sugar

CRUNCH TOPPING 2 tablespoons butter 1�4 cup packed brown sugar 1�2 cup old-fashioned oats (pulsed a few times in a food processor) 1�4 cup almond meal or whole wheat flour 1�2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 pinch of salt 2 tablespoons roughly chopped pecans


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⊲ Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and grease a 9-inch-square baking dish.

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⊲ Whisk together the oats, nuts, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, nutmeg and brown sugar in a medium mixing bowl. ⊲ Combine the milk, maple syrup, eggs, vanilla, and half of the butter in another bowl and whisk until blended.

Manhattans * Martinis Gimlets * Old Fashioneds etc ...

⊲ Reserve about 1�4 cup of the berries for topping; then arrange the remaining berries evenly over the bottom of the baking dish. Cover the fruit with the dry oat mixture; then drizzle the wet ingredients over the oats. ⊲ Jiggle the baking dish to make sure the milk moves down through the oats, then gently pat down any dry oats resting on top. Let this rest while making the crunch topping. ⊲ Mix butter, brown sugar, oats, almond meal/flour, cinnamon, salt and chopped pecans until a crumbly mixture forms. ⊲ Crumble topping over the oatmeal mixture in the baking dish; then scatter the remaining berries across the top. Sprinkle a tablespoon of sugar on top for some extra sweetness and crunch. ⊲ Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until the top is golden. ⊲ Let cool and drizzle with melted butter, milk and/or maple syrup before serving with yogurt, whipped cream or additional fresh fruit. It rewarms easily in the microwave or you can serve it chilled as well.

Brenda Taylor is a graphic designer for Minnesota Good Age. She adapted this recipe from the Cookie & Kate blog. Find gluten-free, vegan & nut-free variations at cookieandkate.com/baked-oatmeal-recipe.

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7/8/19 2:29/PM Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 19


HOUSING

You’re never too old to head ‘up North’ BY SARAH JACKSON

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ne of the many important factors in deciding whether to “age in place” at home or to move into a community especially designed for seniors is the range of activities senior housing communities offer. Movie nights, happy hours, craft projects, guest speakers and regular outings to museums, botanical gardens and theaters are often part of the draw. But have you ever heard of a three-day, two-night summer camping trip for seniors offered by a senior-living community? At the Ebenezer Ridges campus in Burnsville, staff have been offering this next-level experience going on eight years now. It all started in 2012 at the Ebenezer Ridges Care Center in Burnsville with a single resident’s dream: Maxine Dix, who was 95 at the time, often reminisced about the annual trips she used to take to her family’s cabin on Clearwater Lake near Annandale, Minnesota. Staff at Ebenezer Ridges saw a unique opportunity to provide this experience again 20 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

for Dix — and all other residents — and began planning a camping adventure. They found the perfect place, Camp Friendship in Annandale, a conference and retreat center 60 miles north of the metro area on the shores of Clearwater Lake. In addition to cabins and lodges, the center offers recreation activities such as pontoon rides, fishing, hiking, campfire songs, s’mores, games, arts and crafts, including tie-dyeing a commemorative T-shirt, and woodworking projects.

The laughter around the campfire is infectious and seeing the joy on their faces is why we continue to plan this trip each year. — Jill Acosta, Ebenezer Ridges


⊳⊳ Ebenezer Ridges and Ridge Point residents have been taking overnight trips to Clearwater Lake near Annandale, Minnesota, for eight years now to partake in pontoon rides, fishing, hiking, campfire songs, roasted s’mores, games, arts and crafts and more. Photos courtesy of Ebenezer Ridges

Dix, who suffered a stroke shortly before her move to Ebenezer Ridges, was thrilled. “I never dreamed I would be able to make the trip back to Clearwater Lake,” she said. “Tears come to my eyes thinking about the experience the staff at Ebenezer Ridges Care Center created for me — and the other residents.” This month, residents of the Ebenezer Ridges communities will head up north for the community’s eighth-annual trip. “Camping is a Minnesota tradition and we didn’t want these fun experiences to end just because someone ages,” said Jill Acosta, Ebenezer Ridges’ campus administrator. “We often ask our residents to talk about their favorite pastimes, hobbies and memories. Being able to help our residents relive their past with this camping trip is invaluable. They get to experience Minnesota’s northern woods and take a vacation again.” Residents from the community’s skillednursing, assisted-living, memory-care and adult-day programs are invited to join the trip along with residents from Ebenezer’s independent-living community, Ridge Point Apartments in Burnsville. Willie Ihli, 80, a Ridge Point resident, said he enjoyed the quiet of his early morning walks at Camp Friendship, as well as playing Yahtzee and other games

with his camp mates, which brought out a special camaraderie. “We have lots of laughs,” he said. “The kidding and jokes were really fun.” Ridge Point resident Roger Hanson, 85, said he traveled all over North America in his younger years, including hunting and fishing trips in the Canadian wilderness. His trip to Clearwater Lake helped him reconnect with the outdoors. “The mornings were bright and clear. The dew was on the grass and the morning sun made the lake look like millions of diamonds sparkling,” he said. Hanson enjoys the break from his regular routine, too. “Every so often we need to recharge our batteries. One of the better ways to do this is to change our location and surroundings. I’ve always been a nature boy at heart.” Acosta said there’s just something special about connecting with friends in the great outdoors. “The laughter around the campfire is infectious,” she said. “And seeing the joy on their faces is why we continue to plan this trip each year.” Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good story? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 21 Riley's Travel GA 0819 V3.indd 1

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22 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


Photos by Sudhakar Selwyn

Look beyond the monuments of the subcontinent to explore mountain villages, tea plantations, beautiful festivals, colorful markets and even city slums

Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 23


’d toured India before — five times — but never like this: no visits to the Taj Mahal, the holy Ganges River, the Red Fort. Instead, this three-week expedition introduced us to the people who invigorate this special land: the hard-laboring tea pickers, rice planters, rickshaw drivers, samosa vendors and tribal populations who enliven the vast subcontinent. That’s the mission of tour organizer Sudhakar (Sudha) Selwyn, whose passion is connecting with people, not merely visiting monuments.

KOLKATA Fresh off our flight, we began our introduction to Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) with a 6 a.m. trek through a nearby outdoor market, already bustling with water sellers balancing their buckets, guys on bikes to which dozens of complaining chickens were attached, skinny men hoisting 120-pound sacks of potatoes, fish sellers spreading their wares on a plastic-covered bit of pavement and sweepers attacking the tsunami of trash. We stopped for a quick breakfast of chapatis, lentils, spicy potatoes and richly sauced liver, along with a cup from a tea vendor (5 cents), before unpacking. Then, we were off to see the city.

While Delhi is India’s government center and Mumbai its economic hub, Kolkata lives up to its nickname: City of Joy. We gawked at men merrily bathing at a public spigot (BYO soap) not far from folks brushing teeth, getting haircuts and even defecating publicly (right on the sidewalk). We barged into a hut, no bigger than a closet, of an untouchable-caste barber, his mother and wife, who cooks on the pavement for passers-by. We played with toddler orphans at Mother Teresa’s establishment. We made our way through a jasminescented labyrinth of flower sellers, emerging at a riverbank where the devout dipped into holy, murky waters. Crossing a mighty bridge, along with what seemed like half of the city’s 17 million residents, we entered the iconic Hooghly railroad station, where homeless folks camped out amid the chaos. Then, we took a clattering tram to the booksellers’ quarter, stopping at the venerable India Coffee House, a hipsters’ hangout, for steaming cups served by elderly waiters in frilly white caps. Throughout our trip, we took steps to avoid gastrointestinal mishaps, including sanitizing our hands and utensils, requesting food be heated up hot to order and avoiding fresh salads or alreadypeeled fruits, which allowed us to eat lots of oranges and bananas. We always opted

for bottled water or, better, beer. (I’ve never had an issue on any of my six trips.) We feasted in an elegant Bengali restaurant, in a modest Muslim café — biryani, lamb with mint, rice pudding — and in steamy street stalls plying sizzling samosas. We explored the temple of the bloodthirsty goddess Kali — incense, bells, crowds — and witnessed goat sacrifices via flashing scimitars in her honor. We followed Sudha as he barged, unannounced yet again — and yet always welcome — into a nearby slum tenement, snaking through dusky corridors into many a family’s one-room hovel, clean as a whistle, boasting TVs but no water. Life is anything but easy in Kolkata. But smiles, a communal spirit and, yes, joy, indeed, prevail.

THE WILD FRONTIER Soon, however, we were on to the real purpose of our journey — to explore the tribal way of life in the far northeast, India’s unvisited “wild frontier.” A short flight dropped us into the midst of tea-plantation country, where we lodged in modest guest houses and even more modest hotels (elusive electricity, rare hot water). In the mountains, we followed the path of the powerful Brahmaputra River — driving


across on a bridge lined with fish sellers from whom we bought what would become dinner. On foot, we traversed skimpy, swaying bamboo bridges and continued to a tribal village where we spent the day and night. They were ready for us: The ringleader, a spirited woman of a certain age, organized her peers to dance for us, then indicated we should do the same. What? Now? We hurriedly decided on the hokey pokey, which made a big hit. The tribal ladies giggled as they put their whole selves in. Followed by a growing herd of children, Pied Piper-style, we visited their homes and joined in a communal lunch of rice, chicken and egg pudding cooked in hollow bamboo logs over an open fire, accompanied by rice beer — a decidedly acquired taste. We later supped on rice and spinach aside the open fire, and then bedded on the floor at sunset, to be awakened by rowdy chickens at 5 a.m. The tribes had no written language and spoke no Hindi — the sorta-universal tongue of India — yet sported polished toenails and trendy torn jeans (for the teens). They’re ardent animists. We joined their worship service of chant-and-response on a sunny Sunday. Hitting the hairpin-turn highway through the jungle, we stopped for a couple of elephants and their construction-worker mahoots (drivers) and at roadside stands selling local mandarins and bananas, admiring the babies of the bread-winning moms. Their husbands, we later discovered, had adjourned to the local outdoor bingo parlor for an afternoon of gambling (a winner got a coveted Harley). As we drove, we watched Army troops learning to raft in the mighty river, and then braked to chat with teenagers headed to town to deliver smoked meat to their

elders. Oh, what kind of meat, asked Sudha: “Show us.” Songbirds. Mice on a skewer. In Pasighat, our town for the night, we ambled through market stalls, admiring exotic fruits and veggies, and then encountered one of India’s wandering ascetics — a young man given by his parents at age 5 to the religious life of begging for food and sleeping in temples. He joined us in another round of samosas.

TEA AND COOKIES In Assam, we invited ourselves yet again into the city’s slums, where everyone smilingly posed for photos, let us hold their babies and invited us into their colorful rooms. On the banks of the river, we saw women maneuvering a huge net

attached to 2-by-4s to catch what looked like minnows for their lunch. Passing one of the many aged trucks — decorated in tinsel, Christmas lights and portraits of gods galore — we came upon crowds streaming into a huge pavilion, all in their best shirts and saris. What’s going on, we asked? It was the annual tribal political-social gathering, we were told by the officials, who whisked us (again unannounced) straight to the VIP tent for tea and cookies. We were then ushered to front-row seats for a dance performed gracefully by 200 sari-clad teenagers. Phone cameras clicked — we were now used to the constant demand for selfies — as we were presented with ceremonial shawls. A teenage boy whispered in awe, “You are my first foreigner!” Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 25


We were everybody’s first. This region receives few tourists — Indian or foreign — so we were treated like royalty. We visited a vast rice paddy to talk to the women whose back-breaking job it is to pluck the stalks and put them into sacks. We shook their rough, scarred hands, posed for more selfies, and then stopped at a tea stand down the road — which, of course, caused cars and scooters to stop and ogle the white-skinned visitors. Nearby stood a schoolyard, so we strolled in to take a peek. Immediately, waving kids filled the windows, and then burst out the doors, followed by their equally excited teachers. The middleschoolers danced for us and tested their English (“Nice to meet you.”), followed by more tea and cookies and again a ceremonial scarf from the teachers, plus hugs and kisses as we departed.

HOSPITALITY AND HARDSHIP That night, we stayed at the Victorian home of a former British plantation bigwig and dined on tasty cauliflower, mutton, paneer (a wonderful soft cheese, often served with spinach) eggplant, squash, potatoes, those tiny river minnows and — yes! — ice cream. The next morning, we were off to Nagaland, which made the earlier part of our journey appear tame. We drove higher, higher, on the always-winding and supremely bumpy roads until we reached a guest house in — surprise — a Baptist village, where the locals were converted by British missionaries long ago and now are building a 5,000-person church. Journeying on to Sivasagar — Lord Shiva’s Town — we visited the god’s

temple to watch priestly rituals and receive blessings before we wandered the grounds (more selfie requests). The middle-class homes that lined the road were painted with an Indian’s delight in color: saffron with bright orange, lavender accents on royal blue, candycotton pink paired with mint green. The lower classes meanwhile occupied, as always, plain bamboo shacks. In Nagaland, we were quick to sense a difference in lifestyle and in attitude. The children had a dull, glazed demeanor; 5-year-old girls tended babies strapped to their backs. Grownups, too, failed to smile and converse. We were merely tolerated. The reason? Opium. We entered the building owned by the tribal king, whose brother was occupied smoking opium. We watched, mesmerized, but didn’t accept his invitation to join in. The headhunter tribe we visited — no longer naked and no longer hunting heads — displayed the feathered headdresses and the chest tattoos that boasted of their former prowess. There was a distinct Mongolian cast to their faces, their land so close to Myanmar, which we entered just to say we did. The Army post had a “No Photos” sign, but the soldiers inspecting our van brought out their phones.

A SAFARI AND A FESTIVAL Retracing the route to our village, we encountered the only scary moment of the trip: the billowing smoke and crackling flames of a forest fire quickly speeding toward us. Sudha’s quick thinking saved the day as we retreated, and then made a dash along the smoldering road.


Next, we were off to Kaziranga National Park, a 200-square-mile preserve, where we rode elephants at dawn to observe thousands of rhinos, deer, wild boar, wild buffalo, monkeys, lizards and birds. Though 120 tigers are also protected in the reserve (despite the efforts of poachers), we failed to spot a single one. Last stop: Guwahati, a town known for its ebullient celebration of Holi, “the festival of colors.” Colors mean paint, water-pistol-sprayed or plastered onto anyone and everyone around. We donned old clothes for the experience, and then made our way through the families gathered at the temple (another goat sacrifice to observe — or not), as our faces, hair and garments turned bright green, purple and beyond. After a final round of selfies, it

⊳ Our guide: Sudhakar "Sudha" Selwyn

was time to fly home, laden with experiences we’ll always remember. To do the same, learn more on Sudha’s website, indiabeckons.in or just write him at sudhakar@indiabeckons.in. Then get going. Lucky you! Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

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7/26/192019 10:22/AM Minnesota Good Age / August 27


REAL AGING

1 in 10

That’s the number of people over age 60 who are victims of elder abuse.

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orld Elder Abuse Awareness Day, as designated by the United Nations, was June 15. While it’s good to have a day to be especially mindful of the reality of this abuse, it’s more important to remember that millions of older adults are forced to endure abuse daily. Because such acts — the physical or sexual abuse of a vulnerable senior — are unimaginable for most people, it can be easy to think of them as isolated incidents, heinous things you hear about on the news occasionally, things that happen to other people (and certainly not very many). But according to the National Institute of Justice, 10 percent of people over age 60 are victims of elder abuse. That includes physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse as well as neglect and abandonment. That’s 1 out of 10 of our parents, grandparents, neighbors, mentors and friends. Sadly, the Minnesota Department of Health alone receives about 400 reports of elder abuse and neglect every single week. And, unfortunately, that’s only part of the picture: Experts believe that for every case of elder abuse or neglect reported, as many as 23 cases go unreported.

And that’s not even counting the crippling isolation that many older adults face every day due to abandonment. Less-visible acts of abuse are emotional and financial. An older person can endure these types of abuse for years on end, as they tend to be more nuanced rather than a single traumatic experience: Financial abuse can involve manipulating a person’s funds or assets. Emotional abuse can mean mistreating a person while also leading them to believe they’re dependent on the abuser for their survival. Such treatment may happen so slowly or subtly that victims don’t even realize they’re being abused until their emotional, physical, mental or financial health is left in utter disarray.

So what can we do? Up until this year, Minnesota was the only state to not have a licensing system for assisted living facilities. Fortunately, the Minnesota legislature changed that fact in May — and simultaneously passed legislation to strengthen protections for older and vulnerable adults in long-term care facilities. Signed by Gov. Tim Walz in June, the bill, according to the Pioneer Press, includes two levels of licensure, separating assisted living facilities from facilities with dementia-care services. It also provides protections for residents against retaliation; funding for the Office of the Ombudsman of Long-Term Care; a new task force to recommend improvements for safety and quality of care in long-term services; more state regulatory authority over assisted living facilities; and even a legal right for residents to install in-room cameras without immediately notifying the facility. The bill’s licensing requirements, which go into effect Aug. 1, 2021, are strong, and establish high standards to ensure that residents, including those with dementia, receive the care they need and deserve. While legislation is an important step toward the prevention of elder


How can you recognize elder abuse?

Preventing elder abuse means being open and having conversations about it. We need to share the reality of its frequency.

You may see signs of physical abuse or neglect when you visit an older person at home or in an eldercare facility. Don’t mistake the problems as part of the aging process, dementia or medication side effects. According to the National Institute on Aging, you may notice the person: • Has trouble sleeping • Seems depressed or confused • Loses weight for no reason • Displays signs of trauma, such as rocking back and forth

abuse, addressing abuse still requires vigilance and empathy from us as individuals. We need to know — and educate each other on — the warning signs of abuse, including unexplained injuries, emotional withdrawal and sudden changes in finances, appetite and hygiene. Preventing elder abuse means being open and having conversations about it. We need to share the reality of its frequency. We have to directly address individual cases while also recognizing that there may be a sense of shame or embarrassment on the part of the abused. We need to respect the victims’ concerns about maintaining their autonomy and dignity while also knowing when professional intervention is needed. There are solutions and resources available. If you’re concerned that someone is being abused, report your concerns to the Minnesota Adult Abuse Reporting Center at 1-844-880-1574. No one deserves trauma or dehumanization. No one deserves to feel unsafe or hopeless in their own homes or communities. When we feel unsafe, overwhelmed or scared, our homes, neighborhoods, families and communities should be places we can turn to — not havens for abuse. We need to be each other’s protectors and advocates, especially for those who are vulnerable. If we’re lucky, we will all grow old one day, but if we can’t secure a future in which we’re supported and protected against inhumane treatment, why would we want to? Deb Taylor is the CEO of Senior Community Services, a Twin Cities-based nonprofit that helps older adults and caregivers navigate aging to maintain independence and quality of life. Learn more at seniorcommunity.org.

• Acts agitated or violent • Becomes withdrawn • Stops taking part in activities he or she enjoys • Has unexplained bruises, burns or scars • Looks messy, with unwashed hair or dirty clothes • Develops bed sores or other preventable conditions Learn more at nia.nih.gov/health/elder-abuse.

What can you do? If you think someone you know is being abused — physically, emotionally or financially — talk with him or her when the two of you are alone. You could say you think something is wrong and you’re worried. Offer to take him or her to get help from the local authorities. Elder abuse will not stop on its own. Someone else needs to step in and help. Many older people are ashamed to report mistreatment, or they’re afraid their report will get back to the abuser and make the situation worse. Remember, abuse can come from another resident, not just from someone who works in their senior-care facility.

Who can you call? The Minnesota Adult Abuse Reporting Center (MAARC) provides a toll-free number, 1-844-880-1574, the public can call to report suspected maltreatment of vulnerable adults. If you're reporting an emergency that requires immediate assistance, call 911, then call the MAARC.

LEARN MORE

The Star Tribune, in November 2017, published an awardwinning five-part series — Left to suffer — about elder abuse in Minnesota, showing that hundreds of Minnesotans are beaten, sexually assaulted or robbed in senior-care homes every year. The heartbreaking — at times haunting — report found that the abused adults’ cases were seldom even investigated, leaving families completely unaware that anything was wrong, including cases in which a roommate was the abuser. The series’ fifth and final installment details a radically different approach to stopping elder abuse in California. Read the report at tinyurl.com/left-to-suffer-mn. Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 29


MISTER TEA Bill Waddington, the award-winning founder of TeaSource, travels the world to bring delicious international teas to Minnesota By Julie Kendrick | Photos by Tracy Walsh

Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 31


another beautiful day among the tea leaves, and Bill Waddington, founder and president of the Minnesota-based TeaSource specialty tea company, is doing what he loves best — walking the fields of another tea plantation. With his distinctive greying beard and glasses perched on the top of his head, Waddington, 65, is clearly far from home, but he is also very much in his element. Visiting tea growers in person, he believes, is the best way of getting a ground-level view of the leaves that will go into some the of the finest teas in the world. These are teas that win international tea competitions, and they can cost $300 per pound or more — way more — or far less. “I often meet with people whose families have been teamakers for four generations on my trips,” Waddington said. “Tea is a perennial plant, so many of the plants that are harvested today were planted by growers’ great-grandfathers. When you’re drinking tea made from those plants, you’re enjoying a beverage steeped in history.” TeaSource, the company Waddington founded 21 years ago, has three retail locations in the Twin Cities (St. Paul, St. Anthony and Eden Prairie), plus a thriving online sales division. TeaSource typically carries more than 200 teas at its physical locations, and new varieties arrive each month from locations

Bill Waddington was recently named Best Tea Educator at the World Tea Expo. 32 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

all over the world, including many that are specifically sold as “direct sourced,” thanks to Waddington’s travels. TeaSource is a well-known destination among locals who are established tea drinkers, those who drink tea for its many health benefits and foodies who love tea’s taste, aroma and exalted culinary status. Customers can shop for bulk tea to take home (as well as tea pots and more). But they can also sit down for a perfectly brewed (or iced) cup (or take one to go).

The gracious world of tea What many Minnesotans may not realize is that Waddington has an international reputation as an educator and ambassador for the tea-drinking life.

I had no grand plan of opening a company. It was just that the more I learned, the more I got interested.


Waddington was honored this past spring for his hard work and dedication in the business by the World Tea Expo, which named him Best Tea Educator, and his business, TeaSource, Best Specialty Tea Brand. “This is the world’s largest international tea trade show,” Waddington said. “And the winners of these awards are chosen by attendees of the expo — in other words peers, colleagues, competitors and customers.” Waddington has made it his mission to travel the globe learning more about tea, a beverage that’s older than wine, beer and coffee. His tea quests have taken him to the top tea-producing lands of the world, including China, India, Japan, Sri Lanka and Taiwan. He visits plantations, gives workshops, teaches classes and conducts tastings. “I’ve taught hundreds of workshops and classes on specialty tea, both for the general public and tea professionals, in places including New York, Las Vegas, Hamburg and Beijing,” he said. Waddington clearly loves everything to do with tea — not just its flavor, but its production, origins, culture and close-knit community. “Tea people,” he said, “are incredibly gracious, and I’ve discovered that the world of tea is bigger than the world of wine.”

From ‘hobo’ to tea expert Waddington’s current status as a tea mastermind is wellestablished, but his journey into this world was a long time coming. Currently a resident of Northeast Minneapolis, he was born and grew up in Chicago. After graduating from the University of Illinois at Chicago with degrees in history, education and physics, he held a number of jobs, including teaching social studies at a small parochial school and working in the library of Northwestern University. “I worked many jobs in my 20s and 30s, and I know I must have driven my mother crazy with my refusal to choose a career,” he said. “For almost two years, I was a hobo. I rode freight trains, hitchhiked, worked and walked all over the American West. I was looking for something to be passionate about, and eventually I found it in my family and in tea.” Waddington’s love of tea began early, when he was 18. “I hated coffee, even the supposedly ‘good’ stuff,” he said.

What is tea? With the exception of herbal teas (known as tisanes), which are made from a wide variety of plants and herbs, all tea types (including the oh-sotrendy matcha) are made from the same tea plant, Camellia sinensis, a long-lived, broadleaf evergreen that puts out new leaves every year like a perennial. Though it can be grown in many temperate areas, tea thrives in the cool, high mountain regions of central China and Japan and the moist, tropical climates of Northeast India and the Szechuan and Yunnan provinces of China. What makes a tea black, green, white, dark/puer, yellow or oolong depends on how it’s harvested and processed. Processing can include various degrees of withering and oxidation. Black tea, for example, undergoes full oxidation, while green tea is oxidized only briefly. Some teamakers treat their processing techniques as highly valuable, guarded secrets. Variations in tea styles within each tea category come from where and how it’s grown, including differences in elevation, climate, soil and each year’s weather, similar to the concept of terroir in wine. Read a full description of how each category of tea is made at teasource.com.

What about caffeine, calories and cost? Caffeine: Though herbal teas are typically caffeine free, true tea contains caffeine, typically 50% to 65% of the caffeine content of coffee for black tea and 10% to 30% for green tea. You can modulate the amount of caffeine by adjusting temperature and steep time: Hotter water or longer steep times delivers more caffeine, while lower temperatures or less steep time equates to less caffeine. Calories: Teas, herbal and regular, are calorie free (well, technically, tea has 2.4 calories per cup)! Exceptions would include any tea preparations with added sugar, such as certain matcha and chai drinks. Cost: Loose-leaf teas are exceptionally beautiful to look at and handle, but they aren’t necessarily more expensive than tea-bag teas. At TeaSource, prices start at about $4.50 for enough tea to make 20 cups (2 ounces), which comes out to about 25 cents a cup. Buy 4 ounces, and the price goes down to 18 cents a cup, roughly the same price as a Tazo teabag. (Of course, you can spend more on rarer teas.) Before buying, you can sample a few teas and the staff will let you smell some of the store’s 200 teas in their containers to see if they might appeal to your palate.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 33


Tea is a perennial plant, so many of the plants that are harvested today were planted by growers’ great-grandfathers. When you’re drinking tea made from those plants, you’re enjoying a beverage steeped in history.

Cold-brewed iced tea recipe This tea doesn’t even require you to boil water. It steeps while you sleep! Perfect for the dog days of summer, this overnight technique allows you to cold-brew a big batch of refreshing tea with minimal effort. The night before you want to enjoy your tea, place eight to 10 rounded teaspoons of loose leaf tea (or 4–5 bags of tea) in a gallon jug. Fill the jug with cold water. Let it steep overnight, at least eight hours, in the fridge. Strain the tea leaves and serve the tea over ice. Store in the refrigerator for up to four days.

Try these iced! Any tea can be served iced, but these varieties come highly recommended by TeaSource. • Black teas: Lumbini FBOP, Organic Iyerpadi BOP • Flavored black teas: Minnesota N’ice Tea, Mango Tango, Pomegranate Black, Raspberry Beret • Flavored green teas: Green Mandarin Orange, Green Mango, Sweet Ginger Green • Herbal: Red Berries, Hibiscus Punch, Lemon Sunset • Oolong: Cucumber Lime Oolong, Strawberry Oolong • White teas: White Mango Ginger, Honeydew You Love Me Read all about these teas — and take a tea quiz to see which teas you might like most — at teasource.com 34 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

“To me, it tastes like roasted dung.” Needing something to help him stay awake during his college studying sessions, he turned to standard grocery store tea. Then his interest grew, and he started conducting research. “Early on, the research I did was just to satisfy my own personal curiosity,” he said. “I would read articles about tea experts, find their addresses and write them letters — the kind on paper, mailed with stamps.” He’d write to Germany or India or wherever he could find someone to answer his questions, and he gradually started building relationships in the world of tea. “But I had no grand plan of opening a company,” Waddington said. “It was just that the more I learned, the more I got interested. People would send me samples of special teas they made just for themselves, and they’d connect me to their friends. They were thrilled to find a young American who was interested in real, good tea. It tickled them.”

Taking the leap Fast forward from that eager 18-year-old to the middle-aged version of Bill Waddington. By his 40s, he was living in La Crosse, Wisconsin, working as a corporate trainer for the grocery wholesaler SuperValu. When he began experiencing what his wife of 27 years, Liz, called a midlife crisis, he decided that he wanted to “do something I really loved — as opposed to something that was


‘OK.’” Deciding it was time to “fish or cut bait,” he started TeaSource out of the spare bedroom of his house, working two jobs for about a year. Then he decided to quit and open his first retail location on Cleveland Avenue in St. Paul. “I knew one thing for sure — that I wouldn’t get braver as I got older,” he said. Waddington’s long and varied job history gave him courage: “I thought that if the store failed, I could drive a cab, drive a truck or work a forklift, because I’d done all those jobs before.”

And baby makes three With the full support of Liz, who is a vocal performer and music teacher, Waddington opened the store. Six months later, he and Liz traveled to China to adopt their daughter, Maggy, who is now a student at Arizona State University. “She’s from Jiangxi, which is known for its watermelons, but is a pretty good tea region, too,” he said. Maggy grew up in the Highland store, Waddington said. “I had her crib in my office, and she spent those first few years being carried on my back in a baby carrier,” Waddington said. “I didn’t want to be a dad who was gone 40 to 60 hours a week, away from his family, so she spent a lot of time at the store with me.” When Maggy was 6, she asked for a job at TeaSource, and Waddington required her to interview with the store manager. “Children love developing responsibility, having tasks to do and taking direction,” he said. “It’s something they’re often missing out on in our world.” Last year, she went on a Chinese buying trip and served as her father’s interpreter. “It was one of the best trips of my life,” he said.

Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 35


Tea people are incredibly gracious, and I’ve discovered that the world of tea is bigger than the world of wine. TeaSource founder Bill Waddington never liked coffee, so he turned to tea and became enchanted with the artistry of teas from around the world. Below, a TeaSource display shows the diversity of tea (left to right) with Silver Needles white tea, Gyokuro green tea, Fragrant Honey Oolong, Red Berries herbal and Puer dark tea.

Sharing his passion Jim Pfau became friends with Waddington about 25 years ago, connecting through a shared interest in traditional folk music. “Bill has always had strong opinions about community and right versus wrong,” Pfau said. “Tea is a passion for him. But he’s also conscious of being profitable. Part of what motivated him to open TeaSource is his belief that he could provide jobs for the

36 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


community and provide what sociologists call a ‘third place’ that’s neither home nor work for the community. This was long before the brewpub/taproom boom.” Donna Fellman is the director of online education at the World Tea Academy. “Looking back on my many years spent in the tea industry, Bill’s friendship is a highlight of my professional career,” she said. Fellman co-taught many classes with Waddington and delighted in the way he could reference everything from The Pirates of the Caribbean to the Kardashians. “He made teaching a real joy for his students and co-instructors,” she said, adding that it’s not just his peers who respect him. His employees value him and the world of tea. “In an industry known for its rapid turnover, he has employees whose tenure at his company is measured in years, not months,” Fellman said.

His favorite blend? It’s no surprise that Waddington starts his day with a cup of tea. “I drink black tea first thing, then move to oolongs or green teas later in the day,” he said. Right now the tea he described as his “desert-island beverage” is Burning Sun, a breakfast blend from Ceylon. “It’s very full bodied, with a tremendous aroma and dark stone-fruit notes. It can take milk and sugar, but it’s not bitter, so you really don’t need it,” he said. “It’s one of the most well-made teas out there, and it’s so satisfying for starting the day.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks. Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 37


AUG. 3–4

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR AUGUST

POWDERHORN ART FAIR → Shop hundreds of local and regional artists on Powderhorn Lake, taste foods from food trucks and explore the local community. When: Aug. 3–4 Where: Powderhorn Park, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: ppna.org/powderhorn-art-fair

Photo by Jen Wittes

AUGUST 8

MINNESOTA STATE FAIR → Celebrate the end of summer with a Minnesota tradition — 12 days of exhibits, food, music and fun with 2 million of your closest friends. When: Aug. 22–Sept. 2 Where: Falcon Heights Info: mnstatefair.org Cost: Gate admission will be $15 for ages 13–64, $13 for age 65 and older and ages 5–12, and free for ages 4 and younger. You can buy $12 tickets — through Aug. 21 — at mnstatefair.org and select stores, such as Cub. Discount days include $10 gate admission for seniors on Aug. 26 and 29.

AUG. 1

MOVIE NIGHT AT THE BALLPARK → AARP Minnesota will be hosting a screening of A League of Their Own, rated PG. When: Aug. 1 Where: CHS Field, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: local.aarp.org

AUG. 1–SEPT. 15

A RETROSPECTIVE OF 25 YEARS OF POSTER ART → Celebrate a quarter century of the Saint Paul Classic Bike Tour with an exhibit including ride guides, T-shirts, buttons and a giant free-standing banner suitable for selfies, plus classic posters from Minnesota’s most beloved artists and illustrators — 38 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Adam Turman, Roberta Avidor, David Mataya, Stuart Loughridge and Chank Diesel. When: Aug. 1–Sept. 15 Where: North Gallery, Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

AUG. 2–4

UPTOWN ART FAIR → More than 380,000 people are expected to converge on this showcase of 350 artists from around the country, making it the second most-attended event in Minnesota, behind only the State Fair. When: Aug. 2–4 Where: Lake St. and Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: uptownminneapolis.com

HOPE, HEALTH AND HUMOR → Designed to promote hope and discovery for women’s heart health, this event includes food, drinks, educational presentations and socializing/network opportunities. When: Aug. 8 Where: 212 SE Second St., Minneapolis Event Centers Cost: $40 Info: mplsheart.org

AUG. 9–11

TWIN CITIES POLISH FESTIVAL → This annual event features two stages — a polka stage and a cultural stage — to showcase Polish music, dance and more, alongside food and beverage vendors and a variety of children’s activities. When: Aug. 9–11 Where: 43 S.E. Main St., on the Mississippi Riverfront in Northeast Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: tcpolishfestival.org

IRISH FAIR OF MINNESOTA → Listen to music, see dance performances and watch demonstrations at this annual festival celebrating all things Eire. When: Aug. 9–11 Where: Harriet Island, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: irishfair.com

AUG. 17

SUMMER BEER DABBLER → More than 140 breweries will provide


samples of 450 beers, alongside live music and food from CHS vendors.

MINNESOTA BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL

When: Aug. 17 Where: CHS Field, St. Paul Cost: $20–$65 Info: beerdabbler.com

→ Formerly known as the Minnesota Bluegrass & Old-Time Music Festival, this 40th-annual celebration will be headlined by Ricky Skaggs and his band Kentucky Thunder.

THROUGH AUG. 18

FOOTLOOSE

→ Based on the beloved 1984 film, this musical features all the songs that made it famous.

When: Aug. 8–11 Where: El Rancho Mañana Campground, Richmond Cost: $95–$105 in advance, $120 at the gate; free for ages 12 and younger; tickets for ages 13-19 are $10 a day. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

When: Through Aug. 18 Where: Schneider Theater, Bloomington Center for the Arts Cost: $17–$46 Info: artistrymn.org/footloose

AUG. 22, SEPT. 18

MURDER ON THE MISSISSIPPI → Cruise down the Mississippi River while enjoying a beverage, taking in the scenery and helping solve a murder mystery staged by Fearless Comedy Productions. When: Aug. 22, Sept. 18 Where: Jonathan Padelford Riverboats, Harriet Island, St. Paul Cost: $25 Info: parkconnection.org/ murderonmississippi

AUG. 31

THROUGH AUG. 25

LABOR HISTORY TOUR

AGATHA CHRISTIE’S RULE OF THUMB → This show is comprised of three one-act murder mysteries — The Wasp’s Nest, The Rats and The Patient — all penned by the most-read mystery writer of all time. When: Through Aug. 25 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $25–$60 Info: parksquaretheatre.org

→ During Labor Day weekend, enjoy tours highlighting the rich labor history of James J. Hill’s world. When: Aug. 31 Where: James J. Hill House, St. Paul Cost: Included with site admission of $6–10 Info: mnhs.org

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Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information.

4/17/18 2:14 PM

Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 39

In the Heart of the Beast MNP 2016 2.325x3.48 filler.indd 17/25/19 6:13 PM


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH MMM … MINNESOTA!

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PAJARITO PARLOUR PAZZALUNA RAINBOW REVIVAL SALONICA TRAVAIL

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WORD SCRAMBLE

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40 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA: 1. W.A. Frost 2. Barbette, Bread & Pickle, Pat’s Tap, Red Stag Supperclub, The Bird, Tiny Diner, Book Club, Trapeze and Gigi’s Cafe 3. The Ju(i)cy Lucy.

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ANSWERS

Source: J.R.R. Tolkien


1. What Cathedral Hill restaurant, known for its beautiful outdoor patio, is housed in the 130-year-old Dacotah Building in St. Paul?

CRYTPOGRAM If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.

TRUE NORTH FOR FOOD LOVERS

WORD SCRAMBLE Bistro, Drinks, Foodie

TRIVIA

2. Name one of the nine restaurants in Kim Bartmann’s local-dining empire. 3. Matt’s Bar and the 5-8 Club in Minneapolis are best known for what unusual Minnesota entree?

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

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Sources: citypages.com, bartmanngroup.com, tripsavvy.com

LUXURY THREE WEEKENDS AUGUST 2–4, AUGUST 9–11, & AUGUST 16–18

Tickets available at: Menards - $15 LuxuryHomeTour.net - $20 At the Door - $25 Minnesota Good Age / August 2019 / 41


Crossword

64 Football lineman 65 Prerequisites 66 “Communist Manifesto” co-author with Marx

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Former NFL running back Jennings who won “Dancing With the Stars” in 2017 7 Cuban dance 12 Govt. Rx watchdog 15 Give in (to) 16 Thorny plant 17 Belonging to us 18 Invisible impediment in the workplace 20 The Pac-12’s Trojans 21 Solar phenomena 22 Kooky traits 24 Flub it 25 Able to speak easily, as a language 27 Badly mistaken 31 Average schlub 34 53-Down noise 35 Not worth debating 42 / August 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

36 Is in the red 37 Civil suit cause 38 Predators in pool halls 40 Designer Jacobs 41 Set in stone, say 42 Benevolent 43 Hägar’s wife 44 Paul Newman caper film 46 Comedian Elayne 48 Full of moxie 49 Theater segment 50 “Reservoir Dogs” co-star Harvey 52 Find at a dig 57 Blackjack eleven 58 Invisible impediment in the sky 61 Twitter guffaw 62 Chose (to) 63 Bit of ramen

1 Garb for many a Dickens waif 2 Rights-defending org. 3 Read quickly 4 Gas brand with toy trucks 5 Marketing jargon 6 Interior designs 7 Grand slam quartet, in baseball shorthand 8 Internet address letters 9 1002, in old Rome 10 Regal meals 11 Participates in a debate 12 Invisible impediment in the theater 13 Nightfall 14 Curved sections 19 French “to be” 23 Workers’ earnings 25 Scandinavian cruise sight 26 “Please understand ... ” 27 Eight-member ensemble 28 Suds 29 Invisible impediment in science fiction 30 Packaged buy including shower curtain, towels, etc. 32 Join the flow of traffic 33 Basketball Hall of Famer Robertson 35 Like some stray mutts 38 Slalom setting 39 Clue 43 Producer of curls 45 Attaches with rope 46 Cutting remark 47 Number on a pump 50 Curly leafy green 51 Micro or macro subj. 52 Tacks on 53 Pond critter 54 Staff helper 55 Phone in a pocket 56 “__ chic!” 59 Sporty truck, briefly 60 Nancy Drew’s beau


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