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Contents 18 HEAD SOUTH

Modern Atlanta — often one of the most affordable places to fly from MSP — offers a wealth of fun for visitors.

MAY GOOD START

⊳ The annual Atlanta Jazz Festival is set for May 25–26 in Piedmont Park.

FROM THE EDITOR

6 Prevention is our cover star’s preferred type of health care. Gene Phillips / ACVB & AtlantaPhotos.com

MY TURN

32

ON THE COVER

8 Can we bring dignity and humor to the 2020 election?

MEMORIES

10 Stewardess life in the ’60s was glamorous — at first.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

12 Prince and First Ave came into their own in the 1980s.

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING

14 Don’t delay researching assisted living options.

WELLNESS

Dr. Arti Prasad’s path to Minnesota started in India and arrived in the Twin Cities via Albuquerque, New Mexico.

16 Which drugs should you take with food?

Photos by Tracy Walsh

22 Cute cottages in Scandia allow for independent living.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

FINANCE

26 Should you pay off your mortgage before retirement?

IN THE KITCHEN

24

HOUSING LISTINGS

38

4 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

40

28 Take your lemonade to a new a level with lavender.

BRAIN TEASERS

NANA & MAMA

30 Coping when one parent is out of commission requires support!


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FROM THE EDITOR

Integrating medicine S

BY SARAH JACKSON

Volume 38 / Issue 5 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Suzy Cohen, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Larry Kallevig Jessica Kohen, Julie Kendrick, Grace Lundquist Dave Nimmer, Mary Rose Remington Karen Ritz, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brenda Taylor

AD COORDINATOR

Hannah Dittberner / 612-436-4389 hdittberner@mngoodage.com

OFFICE MANAGER

Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

6 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

ometimes it feels like our health-care system is completely broken. I mostly feel that way when I open up medical bills: Though I’m a relatively healthy, middle-aged person, I’m still saddled (like so many folks I know) with thousands of dollars in medical balances this year. Why does medical care (that feels so quick and simple at the doctor’s office) seem to cost an arm and a leg? And why does one insurance company cover a drug for $8 a month while another has a $4,000 deductible for any medication at all? And why are the very people providing care — bless them: doctors and nurses — so often unaware of the costs of the tests, procedures and drugs they prescribe? And then there’s the idea of prevention. Our over-worked, stressed-out, foodobsessed culture doesn’t really lend itself to healthy choices and self-care, does it? It can make a person feel utterly hopeless, especially if you’re “middle-aging” and you know your health-care and housing costs are likely to go up — way up. But I am not hopeless. And part of why I’m feeling that way is because of Dr. Arti Prasad, our shining Good Age cover star this month. As the new chief of internal medicine for Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis, Prasad — a brilliant leader and physician by all accounts — is working to bring a bigger-picture mindset to the health-care space. Though she can’t sort out our medical bills, she is working to see that patients ultimately need less medical care in the long run. Her specialty — integrative medicine — emphasizes treating the whole person rather than, for example, one organ system. Integrative medicine goes beyond traditional Western medicine and addresses the emotional, functional, spiritual and social/community aspects of a patient’s well-being. Given the number of suicides among older adults — including that of a high-profile Minnesotan, Irwin Jacobs, just last month — it’s clear that health issues affect not just our physical bodies, but also our mental well-being, as we age and illnesses mount. The Jacobs family’s tragic story reminded me of two men I’ve lost in my life due to health-related suicides, including one recently whose medical troubles just wouldn’t stop, and another who survived cancer only to take his own life when, gutted by endless treatments, he reached remission. Prasad, whose sub-specialty is integrative oncology, acknowledges that survivors of acute cancer treatments often still have whole-body-mind-spirit healing left to do — long after the cancer is gone. “I work with them to address gaps in cancer care,” Prasad said. “That’s the healing work I do.” Well, welcome, Arti, we’re glad you’re here.


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MY TURN

My recipe for a better campaign

H

ard to believe, but the 2020 race for the presidency has started — and I’m desperately hoping it

proves to be more satisfying and less vilifying than the fracas four years ago. Both races included good men and

BY DAVE NIMMER

public was $16 trillion and government

enough to know she’s quick with a quip

holdings an additional $6 trillion, for a total

and ready with a rejoinder.

national debt of $22 trillion. That ought to be a cautionary note for any candidate. Amy Klobuchar needs to elucidate

At a roast some years ago for retiring anchorman Don Shelby, Klobuchar shared the dais with Norm Coleman,

her foreign-policy objectives and her

Al Franken and Pat Miles. She was the

women (serious, savvy and smart), but

attitudes about how to deal with Russia,

quickest and funniest of all.

the contest looked and sounded more like

North Korea and China. It also wouldn’t

a food fight than a presidential debate.

hurt if she’d address the criticism that

presidential debates, I didn’t see many

she’s bullied her staff in the past. That’s

smiles or hear a lot of laughs. What I did

And I believe they can start, easily and

not the most important issue around, but

hear were tirades and taunts and it got

simply, with a few do’s and don’ts:

it’s good to know how a person reacts

worse as the weeks went by. I believe this

when angry and disappointed.

is the year a candidate for President of the

I hope the Democrats live and learn.

Quit name-calling

Elizabeth Warren ought to tell me how

Three years ago in the Republican

United States can do better by occasionally

No more Lyin’ Ted Cruz or Little Marco

she’d get her Accountable Capitalism Act —

Rubio. Democrats will have their opportu-

requiring 40 percent of a company’s board

nities for some cheap shots and nicknames:

of directors be elected by its workers —

campaign as a public affair, rather than an

Klobuchar the Cautious, Sanders the

approved by a Republican-controlled Senate.

athletic contest. We don’t need minute-by-

And all the Democrats ought to address

minute, quarter-by-quarter, poll-after-poll

Socialist, Warren the Wacky or O’Rourke

showing a sly grin or using a gentle jab. I hope the media covers the ensuing

the Opportunist. Let ideas define the

the question raised in a recent issue of

accounts; we’re better served by thoughtful

candidates, not taglines or tweets.

The Atlantic — how to repair the broken

comparisons and analyses.

Don’t make it all about Trump We’ve had enough time, and Lord knows enough media coverage, to form our opinions and attitudes about his administration. I want to know more about

relationship between the elite, white liberals in the party and the nation’s white

contest will inspire us to think better of

working class, including many who voted

politics. One of the advantages, I believe,

for Donald Trump after, I suspect, Hillary

is the number of women running. A

Clinton’s “basket of deplorables” comment.

smaller testosterone trail could produce

the Democrats’ positions and policies.

Come with a sense of humor

Bernie Sanders needs to tell me how he’d

A little levity could enhance civility,

pay for universal health care and free

promote tolerance and increase under-

college tuition, especially in light of the

standing — of the candidates for each

burgeoning national debt.

other and the voters who must to listen

At the end of last year, debt held by the 8 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Maybe this primary presidential

to them. I’ve been around Klobuchar

a bigger intelligence index. What a welcome change that would be. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.


MEMORIES

Thank you, Mary Pat Laffey! BY CAROL HALL

O

f course, I had to see Stewardess! when it premiered at St. Paul’s History Theatre in February. Fact is, I lived the plot. Northwest Orient Airlines hired 21-yearold Mary Pat Laffey as a stewardess in 1958, a time when her male counterparts were paid more simply because of their gender. Goaded by the unfairness, Laffey soon set out to initiate change. The play, which chronicles her David-versus-Goliath struggle with corporate giant Northwest Airlines, happened during my career, as I began as a Northwest stewardess just a couple years later in 1960. Like Laffey, I was thrilled just to get hired. During that era, lured by the prospect of glamour and travel, women flooded the airlines with applications. Many gladly left behind other professions. But unlike Laffey, sex discrimination was the last thing on my mind. I was excited 10 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

about my new job. The times then were such that men held most positions of power. Because they “had families to support,” they were entitled to the higher salary. Stewardesses were golden. We were on a par with models and movie stars, so of course our supervisors were strict concerning weight, grooming, etc. Glasses would have ruined the image; being older and married, as well. Hence we had to resign at age 32 or if we got married. These rules didn’t apply to the men, but I didn’t care. I loved the job. Little, small-towngirl me — I was out there, seeing the world. My social life was phenomenal; men were eager to date a “stew.” Comedian Shelley Berman gleefully wondered if the plural of stewardess was stewardii? The best part was that I worked trips with an assortment of intelligent, interesting women. Although I’d never met Laffey until the night of the play (which

Nearing the termination age of 32, I fully realized just how unfair Northwest’s rules were, and also how they had a part in creating the image of stewardesses as sex symbols. she attended), she typified my excellent coworkers. Actress Tracey Maloney beautifully captured Laffey as she is today — unassuming, charming and polite.


⊳ Tracey Maloney (far left) played Mary Pat Laffey, a Northwest Orient Airlines stewardess and civil rights activist, in the recent production of Stewardess! at the History Theatre in St. Paul. Photo courtesy of the History Theatre / Scott Pakudaitis

Come the mid-1960s, change was in the air. Women’s cries of equal pay for equal work were sounded in other professions. Ms. magazine emerged and took up the cause. Black people were launching their struggle for equality, too. My rosy attitude began to sour. Nearing the termination age of 32, I fully realized just how unfair Northwest’s rules were — and also how they had a part in creating the image of stewardesses as sex symbols. Our once-prestigious job was trashed in the demeaning book, Coffee, Tea or Me? Actual change finally was set into motion when President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII of the law barred employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race or religion. And, as they say … the rest is history. In 1970, Laffey and other stewardesses (now generically renamed flight attendants) filed a federal class-action suit challenging airline rules that applied only to women. After slogging through the courts for 15 years, Northwest was ordered to pay them $59 million and give women equal footing with male flight attendants. I kept my job. I received my share of the back pay. I wore glasses. I even got married! I left the profession at age 51 after putting in 28 years in the air. And so I say: Thank you, Mary Pat Laffey. Thank you! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer and a University of Minnesota graduate. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

Remembering Prince at First Avenue BY JESSICA KOHEN

Prince first played at Sam’s on March 9, 1981. Wearing a trenchcoat and shimmering bodysuit, he brought the crowd along for an energetic 95-minute set. One New Years Eve — Dec. 31, 1981 — Sam’s was renamed First Avenue and a legend was born.

The making of a music scene

▲ The First Avenue exterior in 1990. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

O

n May 16, 1984, Prince released When Doves Cry, the first single from the movie soundtrack for Purple Rain and his first No. 1 hit. The movie opened in July of that year, propelling Prince into further stardom, and bringing the Minneapolis music club First Avenue along for the ride. The movie was shot in the winter of 1983 and the club became as much a part of the cast as Prince, Apollonia, Wendy & Lisa, and Morris Day and the Time. First Avenue opened in a former Greyhound Bus terminal in downtown Minneapolis on April 3, 1970. Originally called The Depot, the club brought in 12 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

prominent national acts beginning with Joe Cocker on opening night. After a stint as a disco club called Uncle Sam’s, and then Sam’s in the mid- to late-1970s, live music returned to center stage. Acts such as the Ramones, Pat Benatar, Bo Diddley, U2 and many others performed at the reborn rock venue.

Prince found a home at First Avenue. He liked the venue because of its edgy reputation and its excellent acoustics. It was also one of the only clubs in downtown Minneapolis that would host AfricanAmerican musicians. Manager Steve McClellan regularly booked R&B acts in both the First Avenue mainroom and the adjoining 7th Street Entry, and he was pleased with the diverse crowds Prince drew to the club. Over the years, Prince played nine concerts there, plus a handful of unannounced jam sessions and appearances with other artists. During this time, he tried out new music, new band members and new

VIEW THIS OUTFIT UP CLOSE! Visitors can see the Prince suit worn in the movie Purple Rain in person — and learn more about the storied history of First Avenue — in the new exhibit First Avenue: Stories of Minnesota’s Mainroom, opening May 4 at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul


styles, working the crowd and giving them

⊳⊳ Prince at First Avenue in the 1980s. Photo by Daniel Corrigan

a hometown superstar to call their own.

A mecca for fans By the fall of 1983, when movie producers approached First Avenue about renting the venue for the filming of Purple Rain, Prince was already a huge star. The club was closed for 25 days from late November to late December, and the movie crew installed new lights and built a new stage, which is still in place today. But it was the way First Avenue was featured on screen that returned the most value. After the movie opened in July 1984, fans and news outlets descended on the venue to see where Prince reigned. Even after the news crews left, fans from around the world made their way to the Minneapolis music club, and they continue to do so today. The venue had been struggling financially in the 1980s and according to Chris Riemenschneider in his book, First Avenue: Minnesota’s Mainroom, “First Avenue likely would not be here today without the influx of revenue that Prince mania brought to the club beginning in 1984.”

Depicting real life The filming itself was also memorable. That winter was particularly cold, and call times were early. Following months of rehearsals, including dancing and acting lessons, the band performed flawlessly in front of the cameras. Even though they were lip-syncing, it was hard work and the practice paid off: The performance scenes took only 10 days to shoot instead of the three weeks budgeted. Lots of locals made it into the movie, too. As many as 500 extras were cast, and First Avenue staff were hired in production roles. In the end, regulars said the movie’s depiction of the club mirrored real life.

The film opened on July 27, 1984, to sold-out audiences, and within two weeks it hit No. 1 in box office sales, ousting the summer blockbuster Ghostbusters.

A living legacy Back in Minneapolis, Prince was preparing for a national tour with his band, The Revolution, but before heading out, they made an unannounced last-minute appearance at First Avenue on August 14, 1984, as a way of offering thanks. The following winter, Purple Rain won an Academy Award for Best Original Song Score. The purple suit Prince wore in the film made its way to the Minnesota Historical Society, a gift of Prince, on display this month as part of First Avenue: Stories of Minnesota’s Mainroom, a new exhibit opening May 4 at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. Prince fans can also explore behindthe-scenes, candid and casual shots of the artist in the new book Prince: Before the Rain by Allen Beaulieu, Prince’s personal photographer from the late 1970s into the early 1980s. Jessica Kohen is the media relations manager for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 13


CAREGIVING

Thinking ahead to assisted living

The question around moving should actually be: What information do I need to make this decision?

BY GRACE LUNDQUIST

I

s assisted living right for me? This is one of the most difficult questions for older adults. Assisted living is geared toward older adults who don’t need nursing care, but who may need help on an as-needed basis. Though the goal of assisted living is continued self-sufficiency, assisted living facilities provide stable housing and easy access to consistent meals, personal care and support, social activities, 24-hour supervision and, in many cases, healthrelated services. A move into assisted living is a decision that’s unique to every individual and, unfortunately, one that’s often prompted by an unforeseen event such as a sudden health change. In my experience working with seniors, I find that the consideration of independent or supported housing is often avoided or delayed. Understandably, folks are reluctant to talk about the selling of a family

14 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

home, the potential sacrifice of independence or even the stigma surrounding independent or assisted living facilities. So the question around moving should actually be geared toward learning more: What information do you need to make this decision? Here are four things to consider when deciding what’s right for you and your family: Assisted living can be expensive: The average cost to live in assisted living in Minnesota ranges from $2,900 to $4,060 per month, depending on the facility and its location, with memory care units costing significantly more. While there are some state programs to assist with the cost of rent in assisted living, such as GRH (Group Residential Housing), many facilities require you pay privately for two years prior to relying upon assistance, which is one reason to consider a move sooner rather than later.

The cost of services is typically separate: Services in a facility are usually charged separately from the cost of rent, and most often are offered in an a la carte style. It might cost $280 to have all of your meals provided for the month, with medication setup being an extra charge. And if you happen to have more medications than most, you’re likely to be charged a higher rate. Each additional service, such as laundry, housekeeping and assistance with the activities of daily living, has its own associated cost. Again, there are government-funded programs to assist with these costs. If you’re eligible for medical assistance, you’re also a candidate for an Elderly Waiver (EW), which is an option when financially strained. But, as with GRH, you may be required to pay privately for two years before utilizing this benefit.


It pays to have seniority: Many facilities have a waitlist for coveted apartments, such as those with a balcony or two bedrooms. If you’re already a resident at the facility, you would usually receive preference in the event of a vacancy. Additionally, when experiencing an unforeseen medical event that requires either temporary or long-term support, you would already be familiar with staff at the facility and could start services more easily than if you were an outsider, scrambling to find care at the end of a hospitalization or transitional-care stay.

4

Accessibility may matter: During the aging process, we become more susceptible to falls, joint pain and fractures. If your home has stairs inside or outside, recovering from a knee or hip injury might make it nearly impossible to navigate your home. Any assisted living facility is regulated by the state, accessible and won’t require any structural changes to ensure your safety. If you’re thinking a move might be right for you, remember to tour various facilities and ask questions about staff turnover, staff ratios, activities, diet considerations and financial options. Bring a loved one to be your advocate and to ask questions you might not have thought of, so you’re not alone in making such a big decision. While making the move can be a saving grace for many, others have found a way to make their homes just as safe. The important things when making a final decision for yourself or for a loved one are safety, comfort and overall quality of life. Grace Lundquist is a licensed social worker and a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. She has 11 years of experience in the aging/ health-care field and currently works as the UCare program manager at Jewish Family Service in St. Paul. She also facilitates a caregiver support group at Sholom Home East. Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 15


WELLNESS

Which meds should be taken with food? BY SUZY COHEN

T

here’s much confusion about when to take herbal supplements, vitamins and medications. Do you take them on an empty stomach or with food? No matter what you take, you should be drinking a full glass of water to make sure the pill doesn’t linger in your esophagus and cause irritation. 

When a dietary supplement, enzyme or medication states the directive to “take with food,” it usually means to take while you’re eating or a few minutes beforehand. But since you have food in your gastrointestinal tract for a little while, it would be fine to take the item right after you eat.

Supplements Multivitamins: There are so many constituents in these supplements that it’s best to take them with food to minimize stomach upset and nausea. Fish oil: Some people take fish oil to help with cholesterol, triglycerides, depression and/or joint health. Taking fish oil supplements (EPA, DHA or both) with food or fatty meals is ideal because it boosts the absorption. Vitamin D: You can take this without regard to meals, according to the newest research. However most of the older scientific literature says to take it with food since it’s a fat-soluble vitamin. CoQ10: Some people take this powerful antioxidant to support heart, pancreas, liver and/or brain health. CoQ10 (ubiquinone) should be taken with food — or a fatty meal — to speed absorption. Selenium: Typically taken for thyroid, bone, prostate and/or immune support, this element should be ingested with food.  Magnesium: Some people take this supplement for depression, regularity, reduction of leg cramps and/or blood pressure support. Taking minerals like this one with a snack can minimize diarrhea and stomach discomfort.  Ashwagandha: This popular adaptogen should be thought of a little bit like food because it’s an herb. All herbs should be taken with a snack or a meal to amplify the benefits and reduce nausea. 

16 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


Antacids: These help with heartburn or reflux. They should always be taken with food so they can neutralize the acid that’s secreted while you’re eating. Medications Antacids: These help with heartburn or reflux. They should always be taken with food so they can neutralize the acid that’s secreted while you’re eating.  Amoxicillin: This popular antibiotic, often prescribed for children, should be given to toddlers and teens with food to help reduce indigestion, nausea and vomiting. Corticosteroids: These are used for pain, allergic reactions, rashes and overactive immune systems and should always be taken with food or milk. Some examples include prednisone, hydrocortisone and dexamethasone. Aspirin and ibuprofen: Take these pain relievers with food when possible to prevent upset stomach. Metformin: Taken for diabetes, this medication is best taken around meal time to reduce blood sugar levels after eating.  Enzyme supplements/medications: Some people can’t digest food normally, so they take enzyme supplements, which break down the starch, fat and protein in a meal. Take these with meals. If a medication such as Creon is required to restore pancreatic function, it also must be taken with meals.  Suzy Cohen has been a licensed pharmacist for more than 25 years. Send questions to info@pharmacist.com. Como By the Lake GA 0519 H4.indd 1

4/19/192019 12:19/PM Minnesota Good Age / May 17


TRAVEL

MODERN

KNOCK A DOZEN ITEMS OFF YOUR BUCKET LIST WIT

I

’M IN ATLANTA, channeling my inner Scarlett. But remember that scene in Gone with the Wind where the city goes up in flames?

— is a decidedly modern destination. Though the city hosted the Super Bowl earlier this year, it was the Olympics in 1996 that helped shape the town as we

True story. So, as history would have it,

know it today, including Centennial

all that’s left here to fully bring back the era

Olympic Park, a grassy outdoor play-

is the home of the tale’s notorious author,

ground hosting five of the city’s must-see

Peggy Mitchell (the Margaret Mitchell

attractions amid the towers of downtown

House) — and a café called Pittypat’s

as well as the iconic SkyView ferris wheel

dolphins far more graceful than the penguins that shuffle about like circus clowns. 2: Who doesn’t want to tour the World of Coca-Cola? Step up to the vault that allegedly contains the Secret Recipe (photo op), then slurp free samples as you watch commercials for the product in languages from Urdu to Ukrainian and ad campaigns through the ages: Remember

Porch, an homage to all things antebellum,

($12.50 for ages 65 and up):

including rocking chairs, mint juleps and

1: The Georgia Aquarium — largest in

traditional Southern dining.

North America — beguiles visitors with

3: At the Chick-fil-A College Football

These days the city of Atlanta — often

beluga whales as big as submarines, sharks

Hall of Fame, enter your alma mater and

one of the cheapest places to fly from MSP

smiling through rows of spiky teeth and

your visitor’s badge will call up its foot-

18 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Santa’s treat on Christmas Eve?


Gene Phillips / ACVB & AtlantaPhotos.com

ATLANTA

by Carla Waldemar

TH A DIRECT FLIGHT TO THIS WARM SOUTHERN CITY. ball lore at every interactive display. You

standing escalator in the world — at 196

you’re invited, if you dare, to don head-

can “run” with your team onto the field;

feet — as part of the 50-minute guided

phones spouting obscene diatribes. Blend

recruit players (weighing skill against

studio tour. (Save money on this and

into the life-size montage of the march

travel and bonus expenses); and record

other attractions with a special package

across the Selma bridge.

the game’s play-by-play as an “announcer.”

at citypass.com/atlanta.)

Go on: Belt “Minnesota, Hats off to Thee” into a karaoke mic. Then leap onto the turf to try to kick an actual field goal,

5: The park’s fifth site is the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. In

Continue the story in Sweet Auburn, the historic home of the city’s black middle class, where the Martin Luther

this city that birthed the movement, you’ll

King Jr. National Historical Park

start by taking in vicious quotes from

recounts the life of the peaceful resistance

4: Next tour CNN Center, where you’re

segregationists. You’ll proceed through

leader. Across the street stands Ebenezer

greeted by the news headquarters’ motto:

films and broadcasts of historic events,

Baptist Church, where you can hear

“Facts are facts. They are indisputable.”

from braver-than-brave Freedom Riders

King preach (via a recording); then visit

Here you can also check off your

to kids pioneering school integration.

his boyhood home and tomb nearby.

bucket list item of riding the longest free-

Experience lunch counter sit-ins, where

throw a touchdown or catch a pass.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 19


Kevin C. Rose / ACVB & AtlantaPhotos.com

The High Museum of Art, featuring the installation of Roy Lichtenstein's 'House III'

Shutterstock.com / Sean Pavone

The ferris wheel in Centennial Olympic Park

20 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

GREEN SPACES Speaking of goodwill toward men: Peace is also the theme at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum, where visitors can trace the man’s rise from humble peanut farmer to governor, then President, and see his dedication (which continues in his retirement) to getting enemies like Israel and Egypt to sit down and talk instead of fight. Atlanta’s skyline looks toward tomorrow — shiny towers that rise as the New South. But beneath those polished turrets, the city’s new Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail invites folks to trade the fast lane for a hike or bike ride on the wild(er) side as the paved path winds its way from Ponce City Market, the city’s social magnet for eats and entertainment. Along the route, you’ll spot cheeky murals brightening underpasses as you wander past the brew pubs, indie boutiques, baseball diamonds and skate parks sprouting up amid the wild flowers and pines. Speaking of DIY art, the Outsider collection at the venerable High Museum of Art is as good as it gets. Its photo gallery also salutes visionaries like Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman. And its contemporary café elevates Southern classics like deviled eggs and fried green tomatoes to high art alongside classy cocktails.


Shutterstock.com / melissamn

The Waffle House

FOODIE FINDS Atlanta’s perimeter hosts the DeKalb Farmers Market, an alias for a covered marketplace roughly the size of the Pentagon, featuring spices from sumac to mango powder, 12 kinds of squash and two long aisles devoted solely to potatoes. The market roasts its own coffee, makes its own sausages, pasta and bagels, and offers a cafeteria for primo people-watching. Find more eats at Matthews Cafeteria, in the nearby town of Tucker, whose third-generation owner proclaims, “Welcome to the New South. But our change is not to change — not hopping on a trend.” Thus, it’s famous for the best fried chicken in the county. Here’s the recipe, unaltered since 1955 — bird, flour, salt and pepper, fried at 326 degrees (“not 325, not 327”). The Food Terminal, in a strip mall anchoring the small town of Chamblee, conjures the street-food scene of East Asia in a menu thick as a magazine. It’s high on Atlanta magazine’s “best new restaurants” list. Atlanta gave birth to the Waffle House chain, so it’s only fitting that the site of the original breakfast haven of 1955 serves as a time-warp museum. Across the street rises The Odd’s End, an antiques shop where you can snag a ventriloquist’s Charlie McCarthy puppet, false teeth, a billy club or a stuffed frog. Enticed? For more info, visit atlanta.net.

ANTEBELLUM BELLES Not all Georgia towns were scorched by William Tecumseh Sherman. Madison, about an hour west of downtown Atlanta, gleams with stately mansions saved from the Civil War general’s torch. Today its historic district boasts over 50 antebellum homes (a self-tour app is available), leading off with Heritage Hall, erected in 1811 by a fellow who became the town’s doctor after completing one year of medical school (they call that “practicing medicine”). Madison-Morgan Cultural Center, built in 1895 as a grade school, now opens its stunning auditorium for cultural events. In Milledgeville, Sherman destroyed venues of commerce, but spared the graceful antebellum mansions of the city, which once served as Georgia’s capital. A trolley tour through the historic district stops for visitors to explore several antebellum sites, such as Rose Hill, a whitecolumned Greek Revival home of 1852 (pictured below); the Old State Capitol, where Georgia seceded from the Union; and the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House, built in 1825 as a hotel and café, where Southern author Flannery O’Connor was a frequent patron. Other historic sites include the Old Governor’s Mansion, occupied by Sherman during his march to the sea — and Andalusia, a cotton plantation where author O’Connor lived and managed the farm’s precarious operations. More authors called Eatonton home — in fact, the tiny town is home to the Georgia Writers Museum, which honors, among others, its literary trinity — O’Connor, Alice Walker (The Color Purple), who will return to celebrate her 75th birthday in July 2019, and Joel Chandler Harris, author of the folksy Uncle Remus stories (brought to life in the Joel Chandler Harris Museum, housed in former slaves’ quarters). Eatonton also hosts the Plaza Arts Center, a former schoolhouse now serving as a historical museum, tracing from earlier Creek Indian beginnings to the reign of King Cotton and black sharecroppers. Learn more about this Historic Heartland region of Georgia at exploregeorgia.org.

Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 21


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

Cottage living in Scandia W

hat if city traffic and skyways just aren’t your thing, and a monthly activities calendar sounds exhausting? And would you rather grab a coffee at the Scandia Café than a Starbucks? Could you be tempted to volunteer at the open air Swedish Gammelgarden Museum (practically in your backyard)? Maybe you’d find inspiration in the Washington County Barn Quilt Trail installations on your way to the store? Would you enjoy quiet landscapes and, on occasion, hikes through the William O’Brien State Park or other nearby trails? Nestled among rolling hills and many beautiful lakes, the city of Scandia — about 10 miles east of Forest Lake — was the site of the first Swedish settlement in Minnesota. Residents of Scandia have done little to alter the character of the community, and residents enjoy reminders of mid-19th-century pioneer

days and the rural town atmosphere. Tucked into the center of it all is an independent-living development of 40 cottages for ages 55 and up — Oakhill Cottages — built in little clusters of five units each in the 1980s and ’90s. Each unit has its own well-lit walkway, entrance and back patio and is equipped with a stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer. There are 20 units with central air, 20 units with wallunit air conditioning, and all homes have their own furnaces. Residents are responsible for heat, electricity and phone bills. Water, sewer and trash are included in the rent. There are handicap-accessible units, too. The price? $676–$773 a month (704– 900 square feet), plus $35 a month for a single detached garage (optional). Not surprisingly, these units are in incredibly high demand, which means management offers an “interested parties

BY KAREN RITZ

list,” rather than a waitlist. Interested parties are contacted if an opening arises, but they aren’t guaranteed dibs on the place if another party inquires, ready with a deposit, when an opening occurs. In fact, some folks call the property every day to inquire. The same goes for the 30 cottages at John Jergens Estates in Forest Lake, which opened in 1990. The Minnetonka-based Shelter Corporation, which runs more than 30 properties in Minnesota, Texas and Florida, operates the property. In July, the company is set to open The Glen at Valley Creek, a new independent living property for ages 62 and older in Woodbury. Karen Ritz lives in St. Paul and is actively thinking about housing alternatives — especially when she’s shoveling snow or trying to start the mower. She’s also an involved grandmother and the creator of grandycamp.info, an online community for Twin Cities grandparents.


OAKHILL COTTAGES

Booth Manor Residence

WHERE: 14261 Oakhill Court N., Scandia

For Seniors 62+ • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

OPENED IN: 1988 with 20 more

units added in 1995

OPENINGS? You can be put on an “interested parties list,” but rentals are granted on a “first come, first serve” basis.

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

AGES: 55 and older NUMBER OF UNITS (AND SIZE OPTIONS): 40 cottages

(one and two-bedroom units), all pet-free and smoke-free

COST: $676 for a 704-squarefoot unit and $773 for a 900-square-foot unit. Onebedrooms are 12x14 feet with a spacious closet; two-bedroom units have slightly smaller bedrooms, but more closet space. Living/dining areas in both unit types measure 14x25 feet with 5x10-foot kitchens.

612-338-6313

G TIN A R ! EB RS CEL21 YEA

8131 4th St N Oakdale, MN

In this age where everything moves so quickly, isn’t it nice to know that Oak Meadows’ has many staff who have been here over 15 years? KATIE, 16 YEARS

MEGAN, 11 YEARS

LET US CARE FOR YOU, OR YOUR LOVED ONE. Give Kim a call at 651-578-0676 or visit oak-meadows.org

PROPERTY OWNER:

Shelter Corporation — at 1600 Hopkins Crossroad, Minnetonka, 952-358-5100 — is affiliated with The Waters Senior Living, which has properties in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.

Oak Meadows GA 0519 6.indd 1

4/11/19 2:33 PM

INFO: sheltercorp.com/

oakhill-cottages, 651-578-2380

Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 23


HOUSING RESOURCES •MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW CONSTRUCTION CARVER COUNTY CDA •

Offers affordable independent living for adults 55 and better throughout Carver County including Chanhassen, Chaska, Waconia, and Norwood Young America. We offer Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. All properties are smoke free. Chaska • 952-448-7715 carvercda.org

CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. South St. Paul • 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of

24 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. St. Paul • 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

COVENANT VILLAGE OF GOLDEN VALLEY ••••

Residents and non-residents alike can enjoy the peace of mind that comes with access to our on-site continuum of health care services. At Covenant Village of Golden Valley, we focus on you, your specific needs and personalized care. Golden Valley • 877-473-6903 covenantvillageofgoldenvalley.org

LYNGBLOMSTEN •••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and long-term care, and community services and resources. St. Paul • 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

NOKOMIS SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. Minneapolis • 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

SALVATION ARMY BOOTH MANOR •

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 onebedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. Minneapolis • 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/ community/booth-manor


Affordable independent living for adults 55 and better ADVERTISER LISTINGS

carvercda.org • 952-448-7715

All CDA communities are smoke FREE!

ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY •••

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it's simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell • 320-654-2352 St. Cloud • 320-203-2747 Monticello • 763-295-4051 centracare.com/sbscmont

THE WELLINGTON SENIOR LIVING •••

The Wellington team is dedicated to providing a homelike environment. We offer a variety of services including dining, social activities and more. With a combined 80 years of experience, our dedicated staff is proud to meet our residents' needs. St. Paul • 651-699-2664 wellingtonresidence.com

Carver County CDA 55 and Better Rental Properties: Oak Grove Senior Residence in Norwood Young America 952-373-2200 • oakgrovesr.com

Inquire about Waybury Apartments, Carver County CDA’s HUD subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. Waybury Apartments in Chaska 952-448-5022 • waybury@carvercda.org

The Crossings at Town Centre in Waconia 952-442-8232 • crossingsapt.com Centennial Hill in Chanhassen 952-474-4060 • centennialhillapts.com All 55 and Better Properties Offer: In-Unit Washers/Dryers • Underground Heated Parking Beauty Salon • Community Room • Heat included Guest Suite • Smoke-Free • Affordable Rents

Waybury Apartments Offers: One and Two-Bedroom Apartments • Heat Included Community Room with Full Kitchen and TV • Library Individual Garages & Decks • Controlled Access Entry

LEARN ABOUT

Income limits Reverse apply. Residents pay 30% from Mortgages of their adjusted gross income for rent.

Retirement Funding Solutions,

The Carver County Community Development Agency Provides Housing Opportunities a Mutual of Omaha Bank Company and Fosters Economic Development in Carver County. Carver County CDA GA 0916 S3.indd 1

8/5/16 2:15 PM

LEARN ABOUT

Reverse Mortgage from Retirement Funding Solutions, a Mutual of Omaha Bank Company

Member FDIC

Separate the facts from fiction with your local, licensed specialist.

Available to Homeowners age 62 and better • No required monthly mortgage payments* • Improve cash-flow by accessing housing wealth • Flexible disbursement options of your loan proceeds • Eliminate existing mortgage payments or purchase a new home • FHA insured loan and retained ownership of your property**

Alina Passarelli, NMLS #525407

Certified Reverse Mortgage Professional

Direct: 612 . 396. 6802 Email: APassarelli @ rfslends.com 7400 Metro Blvd, Edina MN 55435 www.rfslends.com/Alina-Passarelli *A maturity or default event is defined as the death of the last homeowner, sale of the property, a borrower no longer living in the home as the primary resident, or non-payment of property taxes, insurances or other property charges. **Principle loan balance (includes borrowed funds, accrued interest, premiums and fees) must be repaid. All remaining equity in the home is retained by the homeowner or heirs.

A Mutual of Omaha Bank Company

Receive benefit illustrations, information on qualifying and the National Council on Aging booklet “Use Your Home to Stay at Home” to share with loved ones and your trusted advisors. Understanding the facts can help you determine if accessing your housing wealth makes sense within your retirement plan.

MY APPROACH IS SIMPLE: • Begin by listening—to understand the unique retirement goals & legacy wishes of each client. • Treat clients as I would treat my own family—with the same level of care, education and service that I would provide my own.

Synergy One Lending Inc. d/b/a Retirement Funding Solutions, NMLS 1025894. 3131 Camino Del Rio N 190, San Diego, CA 92108. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act – California License 4131356. These materials are not from HUD or FHA. www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org

Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 25


FINANCE

Should you pay off your mortgage early? BY LARRY KALLEVIG s we prepare for retirement, debt is

pre-retirement income goes to your

stock market. If you aren’t comfortable

an important topic to discuss: How

mortgage payment.

with risk later in life, this might be some-

much debt do you have, and how

In retirement, that expense will need to

thing to consider.

much of it can be eliminated before you

be worked into your monthly spending

And speaking of your comfort, we

leave the workforce?

plan. By eliminating this expense now,

all know the financial benefits of being

you’ll be able to free up money for other

debt-free, but have you considered the

wants and needs in retirement.

psychological benefits? Debt and stress

If you don’t tackle your debt during your working years, those payments will need to be factored into your retirement plan, meaning you might be withdrawing more money from your savings each month. Your mortgage is likely your largest

CON

often go hand-in-hand. The peace of mind that comes with eliminating your

Potential cash crunch now: To work

largest debt may ease the stress of living

toward becoming mortgage-free, you’ll

on a fixed income in retirement.

debt. In fact, there’s more than $10 tril-

likely need to start making additional

lion in mortgage debt for family homes

payments now. Dedicating more money

held at financial institutions in America.

to your mortgage payment during your

That’s 10 times greater than U.S. credit

Losing a tax deduction: Paying off

working years will likely require adjust-

card debt! Tackling your mortgage debt

your mortgage in full could have

ments to your monthly budget, which

before retirement will put more money in

potential tax implications both now

may alter your lifestyle.

and in retirement. If you itemize

your pocket each month. When deciding whether to pay off your

It’s also important to note where this

CON

deductions on your tax return, your

extra money is coming from in your

mortgage before retirement, consider the

mortgage interest is tax-deductible.

budget. If you have to tap into your 401(k),

pros and cons:

Generally speaking, the higher your

emergency fund or other retirement savings

tax bracket, the more potential benefit

to put additional money toward your mort-

there is to having a mortgage.

PRO Increased cash flow during retirement: Eliminating your monthly mortgage

gage debt, it might not be a good idea.

PRO

If you find yourself in a lower tax bracket once you enter retirement, the mortgage deduction may no longer

payment and the interest you’re paying

Peace of mind: Owning your home

be working in your favor. Crunch the

on that loan will free up your cash flow

is a fairly risk-free use of your money

numbers to determine the impact of being

each month. Typically, 25% of your

compared to investing that money in the

mortgage-free both now and in retirement.

26 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


We all know the financial benefits of being debt-free, but have you considered the psychological benefits? The downsizing decision While these are just a few things to consider when deciding if you want to own your home free and clear in retirement, you might also consider downsizing to a smaller home, townhome or condo. The first few years of retirement are usually quite active. You might be travelling often, visiting friends and family, and/or volunteering. If your kids are grown, you’ll likely no longer need the extra space. On the other hand, if you want space for visiting grandchildren, you may want that space. Depending on the size and sale price of your current home — and how much you decide to downsize — you may be able to pay for your new home in cash. And you’ll spend less time on upkeep, which may mean more time for fun in your golden years. Larry Kallevig, owner of Haven Financial Group in Burnsville, helps clients create financial plans that ensure dependable and comfortable income in retirement. Learn more at havenfinancialgroup.com.

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners – people like you.

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info@giftsforseniors.org Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 27


IN THE KITCHEN

Flower Power

We love lavender lemonade! This floral spin on a classic summer drink tastes lovely, but it also lets you practice a bit of kitchen alchemy: You start by making lavender tea—a liquid that starts out as an unappetizing grey-purple —but by adding the magic of lemon juice, the mixture turns a beautiful, pale pink.

LAVENDER LEMONADE 2 cups boiling water 1�4 cup lavender flowers (or more to taste)* 2 cups cold water 1 cup ice 1 cup lemon juice 1 cup sugar 1 lemon sliced into wheels or wedges for garnish (optional) *Find culinary lavender at Penzeys Spices in Minneapolis, St. Paul and Lakeville or at thespicehouse.com. ⊲ Pour the boiling water over the lavender in a glass pitcher. ⊲ Cover and allow to steep 10 minutes. ⊲ Strain and discard the lavender from the water and return the lavender tea to the pitcher. ⊲ Add the cold water, ice, lemon juice and sugar to the pitcher and stir until the sugar dissolves. ⊲ Chill until serving, with a slice of lemon for garnish. Source: Adapted from allrecipes.com 28 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


AAfull fullcontinuum continuumofofcare, care,

when whenyou youneed needit.it.

Residential Residential Living Living • Assisted • Assisted Living Living • Memory • Memory Care Care • Skilled • Skilled Nursing Nursing Residents Residents andand non-residents non-residents alike alike cancan enjoy enjoy the the peace peace of mind of mind thatthat comes comes withwith access access to our to our on-site on-site continuum continuum of health of health carecare services. services. At Covenant At Covenant Village Village of Golden of Golden Valley, Valley, we focus we focus on you, on you, youryour specific specific needs needs andand personalized personalized care.care.

7777 ToTo learn learn more, more, call call 1-81-8 -473-6903 -473-6903 oror visit visit www.CovenantVillageOfGoldenValley.org www.CovenantVillageOfGoldenValley.org COV ENANTVILLAGE COV ENANTVILLAGE "" OFOF GOGO LDENVALLEY LDENVALLEY

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58005800 St. Croix St. Croix Avenue Avenue North North j Golden j Golden Valley, Valley, MNMN 55422 55422

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Covenant Covenant Retirement Retirement Communities Communities does not does not discriminate discriminate pursuant pursuant to theto federal the federal Fair Housing Fair Housing Act. Act. 0 All0 faiths All faiths and beliefs and beliefs are welcome. are welcome. 'S�\:"J 'S�\:"J LIKE USON LIKE USON

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NANA & MAMA

When one parent is out of commission BY LAURA GROENJES MITCHELL & MARY ROSE REMINGTON

MAMA: As full-time working moms

Say yes to (specific) help

wife had surgery. We agreed to have them

— of a toddler and newborn — my wife and I were just hitting our stride, feeling like skilled multitaskers, who handled the challenges of day-to-day life pretty well, all things considered.

When folks say, “Let me know how I can help,” take their offer seriously and try to get a specific commitment right then and there: “Actually, we could really use help with X on X day. Would that work for you? Thanks so much for your help!” Services like mealtrain.com are handy for organizing meals. You can set it up yourself or have someone else do it for you.

work on it during the day, but after he had

However, when my wife needed to have surgery — that required an intense recovery period — we were reminded how hard life can be when one parent is out of commission. In fact, the weeks that followed her surgery were the hardest of both of our lives. But we survived — with a ton of help from our family/friends, some creative problem solving and patience. Here are my tips for making it through the tough days when a two-parent household is down to one.

Plan ahead, if possible ⊲ Prep freezer meals and stock the pantry with essentials and favorites. ⊲ Rearrange furniture/sleeping accommodations (if needed). ⊲ Buy a couple of new high-interest toys to help keep kids entertained. ⊲ Schedule times you’ll need help with kids, including weekend playdates for toddlers. ⊲ Write down reminders for yourself about things you need to do — a lot can fall by the wayside when you suddenly become responsible for everything around the house.

30 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Adjust expectations This is NOT a time to take on more stress (at work or at home) or to try to achieve perfection. Our daycare wanted to start our toddler on potty training the same week my

an accident on the couch the first night at home, we decided he’d stay in pull-ups until we were in a better place to support him. We eased up our rule on screen time a bit as it was helpful to keep the toddler entertained when the baby was fussy or needed to be put down to bed. (Tip: There are lots of kid-friendly educational apps available for iPads/Kindles.)

Find time for yourself You won’t be able to keep up with the demands if your cup is empty, so be sure to do things that help you recharge, too.


Nap when the kids nap, go to sleep earlier at night, treat yourself to your favorite coffee, take a bath, go for a walk and/or meet up with friends.

NANA: Hats off to the military families who march on when one spouse is sent off to serve, and credit to all the single parents out there juggling daily demands. You are unsung heroes and heroines, for sure! My time to be brave came in 2011 when my husband was diagnosed with a life-threatening disease. First we shared the news with our kids, who were all young adults. Each one took it a little differently. Once the shock wore off, I moved into action. Preparing for the worst, I called our life insurance agent to check on our policies: We’d be OK. I went online daily and researched the disease. At times this made me feel worse, not better. Work schedules were altered, as we had doctor’s appointments and treatment sessions to attend. My husband may have been a little annoyed (I know his doctor was) when I asked three times as many questions as he did. My quest for knowledge was based on my struggle to hang onto hope. Due in part to my husband’s positive attitude and stoic constitution, he didn’t miss a day of work! And while he was technically functining day to day, more often than not, his disease — and the uncertainty it brought — was the hardest thing we’ve ever faced. Here’s what helped: ⊲ Seeing a therapist; ⊲ Using family medical leave to reduce my hours at work; ⊲ Letting my close circle of friends and family know what was going on and communicating with them frequently; ⊲ Saying yes when people offered to bring over meals; ⊲ Letting our nearly grown kids take the lead on how much they wanted to know;

⊲ Recognizing that everyone deals with news like this differently. Some people were frightened and stayed • 50+ Community away, while others rallied by our side; • Income Based Rent ⊲ Friends and family who would ask • All Utilities Paid about my husband and then add, • Newly Remodeled “And how are YOU doing?” • Elevators ⊲ Taking things off my plate that • Controlled Entries weren’t crucial; • On Site Caretaker ⊲ Self-care, including massages, exerCall for an appointment 651-288-8159 cise and my daily mantra “This too shall pass.” ⊲ And when it got too much, having South St Paul HRA GA 0519 12.indd 3 4/11/19 2:54 PM a good cry alone in my car. 5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis

South St. Paul HRA

62+ Independent Living

Suggestions for helpers

www.NokomisSquare.com

We’re ideally located in a comfortable

⊲ Instead of “Let me know if you need Minneapolis neighborhood. anything,” offer something tangible like, “I have Saturday off. Can I take Call to schedule the kids to a movie that day?” your tour today! ⊲ Call ahead before hospital or home visits to see if everyone feels up for visitors. Equal Housing Opportunity Keep visits short (think 30 minutes). ⊲ Sanitize your hands when visiting Nokomis Square GA 0214 12.indd 1 1/15/14 4:37 PM • CONES and, at the hospital, KNOCK • SUNDAES before entering! • COFFEES ⊲ Don’t stay away, fearing you’re • BAKES invading their privacy. Help is the priority now. ⊲ Don’t worry if you can’t cook. Offer to grab takeout from a favorite place. ⊲ Don’t forget essentials. Offer to go shopLa La Homemade Ice cream ping and, if you can afford it, cover it. 3146 Hennepin, Minneapolis • Tue–sun 1–9 It all equals out in the circle of life. lalahomemadeicecream.com

612.721.5077

At the risk of sounding sappy, miracles happen! Seven years later, my husband is still here, doing great and we both have a deeper appreciation for this gift called life. Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer grandmother living in Minneapolis, is documenting her journey in this occasional series with her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, a millennial mother of two who lives in Denver now, but is moving to the Twin Cities soon.

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

261 Ruth Street North St. Paul (651) 738-2102 Will: $40 PoWer of Attorney: $30 HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70 Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 31


Photo by Tracy Walsh


C H A N G E A G E N T Dr. Arti Prasad, the new chief of internal medicine for Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis, hopes to take integrative health to the next level in Minnesota By Julie Kendrick

How does a little girl decide she wants to be a doctor when she grows up? For Arti Prasad, it all started in the garden. Born in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, she grew up in a subtropical climate that was rich with plant life. She loved helping her mother in the family garden. As she worked, she talked. “I would say to the plants, ‘How are you doing? Yesterday you were a little bud, but today you are flowering. Make sure you flower well. Do you need any water? I love you,’” she would say. Of course, with all that love and attention, her plants grew beautifully. It also makes sense that a little girl — who was so deeply invested in the health of the natural world around her — would grow into a physician with a keen interest in the growing field of integrative medicine.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 33


Arti and Sudhakar Prasad, who wed more than 30 years ago, pose with their daughters, Kriti, 23 (left), and Pritha, 29 (right), at a wedding in Michigan.

Today, Prasad is 56, lives in Edina and is the new chief of the including acupuncture, body work/massage, meditation, stress Department of Internal Medicine for Hennepin Healthcare, management, herbal medicines and dietary changes. which includes the Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) Prasad knew there was one factor that might make a move in downtown Minneapolis; a network of clinics, including the to Minnesota a non-starter: It meant leaving a place where the new Clinic & Specialty Center right across the street from the average January high temperature was 49 degrees (Albuquerque) hospital; plus an outpatient division offering home care, hospice for a region with an average January high of 22 degrees, not to and more throughout Hennepin County. mention an average monthly snowfall of 12 inches. Prasad, who started in her post last fall, is also a professor of “I decided to ignore the cold,” she said. “I asked myself, internal medicine and vice chair of the ‘What do you want to do with the Department of Medicine at the Univernext 10 years of your life? Can you sity of Minnesota. take this on?’ And decided I could.” She came to Minneapolis from the University of New Mexico (UNM), EARLY ENCOURAGEMENT where she was on staff for 22 years, Prasad’s career path of becoming a most recently as chief of general doctor was at least partly inspired by internal, geriatrics and integrative her supportive family. medicine. She also founded the univer“We are a family of engineers,” she sity’s Center for Life, which is focused said. “My two brothers are engineers, on holistic and integrative medicine. as was my father, and my sister is a Prasad’s appointment to her professor of geography. My mother only Hennepin Healthcare post is remarkcompleted high school, but she had able: She’s one of only a handful of a vision for all her children to be well women heading an internal medicine Arti Prasad, shown in a educated. She wanted a physician in the department at a major teaching/research childhood picture, grew family, so she encouraged me to think institution. Rarer still is her specialty up in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, where she about medicine as a career.” practice in integrative health, which remembers tending plants in Her mother also taught them English incorporates other methods of healing, the family garden. 34 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


grammar, which she had learned from her father, who had worked as a personal assistant for the chairman of the British India Corporation. Prasad said her mother was her earliest role model. “Leadership was my mother’s gift to me. She didn’t have much formal education, but she was a leader at home, in the community, for my family and for my extended family,” Prasad said. “She was a super organizer, and she believed in doing the right thing.”

THE JOURNEY BEGINS With a medical career that began 8,000 miles away at the Ghandi Medical College in Bhopal, India, Prasad has traveled far to reach her current position — literally and figuratively. Her early training to be a doctor was based on the British system of medical education. She had recently completed her schooling and internship when, in the second year of her residency, she agreed to an arranged marriage with Sudhakar Prasad, who was a professor of physics at the University of New Mexico. They met in June 1988 and married that November at the Himalayan Institute in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, where their spiritual teacher lived. Yes, an arranged marriage — Prasad knows her Western friends often find that a challenging concept to grasp. “It’s arranged, not blindfolded,” she said. “Marriages in India happen between families, not individuals. My family had been working to arrange a match for me, and every week my mother and I would sit down and she would show me the prospects. When I saw Sudhakar’s picture, I said, ‘Mother, I think this is going to be the one.’” He and his family arrived for a visit, and by the time they left, a few hours later, they had agreed to an engagement ceremony. “You have to have a lot of trust in yourself, your intended partner and your families,” she said. “You must work hard. It’s called love after marriage.” Her husband is now an emeritus professor at UNM and a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches physics and conducts research in optical imaging. After 30 years of marriage, it might be safe to call this particular match a success. “He’s my role model and my biggest fan,” Prasad said. The couple have two daughters: Pritha, 29, is completing a Ph.D. in rhetoric, composition and literacy studies at Ohio State and recently accepted a job offer for a tenure-track

What is Hennepin Healthcare? Hennepin Healthcare is an integrated system of care that includes: ⊲⊲ HCMC — a 484-bed academic medical center/acute-care hospital, which includes a nationally recognized Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center; ⊲⊲ A clinic system with primary-care clinics in Minneapolis and across Hennepin County, including a new outpatient Clinic & Specialty Center (above) that opened across the street from the hospital in 2018, featuring 26 primary and specialty care clinics under one roof; ⊲⊲ A large psychiatric program; ⊲⊲ Home care and hospice programs; ⊲⊲ A research institute (hhrinstitute.org); ⊲⊲ And a philanthropic foundation. The system is home to many physicians who teach at the University of Minnesota Medical School and serves as a major accredited education and training institution for graduates, residency students and fellowship recipients. Operated by Hennepin Healthcare System, Inc. (a subsidiary corporation of Hennepin County), Hennepin Healthcare is open to anyone, including low-income, uninsured and vulnerable residents. Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 35


faculty position at a major university; Kriti, 23, graduated from Washington University in St. Louis and will be attending medical school in the fall. Family is clearly very important to Prasad, who said, “My daughters are real teachers. They have taught us so much in our lives.”

THE WORK AHEAD Prasad wasn’t looking for a move when a headhunter called her about the position at Hennepin Healthcare, but she was interested right away. “I asked, ‘Why do you need me?’ and found they were looking for a leader and a change agent,” she said. “I’m a well-prepared, thoughtful person.” And — some might say — if ever something needs to be changed or reformed, it’s our current system of health care.

Prasad, undeterred, has big goals: “I want to take integrative health to the next level, to make integrative medicine invisible and ‘infused’ throughout the system,” she said. “We need to keep people out of the hospital as much as possible, and to do that, all our systems need to work together.” Her aim is to stop disease before it starts. “I’m very focused on prevention,” she said. “We don’t just need early detection of diseases, which the screening tests do, but we need true prevention before the disease has started to show up, and that means we need to learn how to eat well, live well more naturally and practice self-care.”

I want to take integrative health to the next level, to make integrative medicine invisible and ‘infused’ throughout the system. — Dr. Arti Prasad

Dr. Arti Prasad stops for a portrait at Hennepin Healthcare’s new Clinic & Specialty Center, which opened in March 2018 in downtown Minneapolis to bring 26 primary and specialty care clinics under one roof. Photo by Tracy Walsh


BEDSIDE MANNER It’s clear that Prasad’s passion for integrative care extends to all areas of her work. Michelle Hale, who worked with Prasad at Center for Life for many years, said she has a special way of providing health care. “She is amazingly focused on her patients, really listens to and empathizes with them, and empowers them with the information and tools they need to engage in their own self-healing,” Hale said. “She is an amazing physician.” Twenty years ago, Prasad attended the same medical conference as Dr. Kathleen Burke, a family medicine doctor in Las Cruces, New Mexico. When it was time to pick up the boxed lunches, Burke took the last vegetarian meal. When Prasad asked her to share, Burke agreed to split her lunch with her fellow vegetarian, and a friendship was made. “She quickly brought out the best in me,” Burke said. Burke said Prasad made the University of New Mexico a better place. “Arti is a force to be reckoned with,” she said. “She’s a strong,

solid woman with good ideas and fervent beliefs. She wants what’s best for the system — for the patients, staff, fellow professionals, administration and the community as a whole. And she will work hard to build that system.” Prasad’s focus on integrated medicine emphasizes treating the whole person rather than, for example, one organ system, and might even include addressing the emotional, functional, spiritual, social/community aspects of a patient’s well-being. Within the integrative medicine space, integrative oncology is one of Prasad’s areas of specialty. It involves helping not just cancer patients but also survivors of acute cancer treatments, who often still have whole-body-mind-spirit healing left to do — long after the cancer is gone. “I work with them to address gaps in cancer care,” Prasad said, standing with pride in front of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Hennepin Healthcare’s new Clinic & Specialty Center. “That’s the healing work I do. I love it.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks.

Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder. Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information. Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 37


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR MAY

audience members from scene to scene, featuring sets built around 40 vintage and unique cars. Intimate groups depart every 10 minutes for a 90-minute experience, winding through the path of an environmental thriller — hearing the scenes through ear buds — as they follow the story of Gabby, a techno-nerd teen who seeks to avenge her father. When: May 9–12 Where: RiverCentre, St. Paul Cost: $35 Info: mixedblood.com

MAY 11–12

WORDPLAY

THE VIKINGS BEGIN

→ This extraordinary new exhibition features dozens of early Viking artifacts from boat graves, organized by Uppsala University in Sweden and its museum, Gustavianum, which is home to one of the world’s finest collections of Viking and pre-Viking objects, dating back more than 1,400 years. When: May 17–Oct. 27 Where: American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis Cost: $6–$12, free for ages 5 and younger Info: asimn.org

ONGOING

MAY 2, 16, 23

→ It’s the age of artificial intelligence and 85-year-old Marjorie is living with her adult daughter and son-in-law, but also has a handsome new companion who’s programmed to feed the story of her life back to her.

→ Created exclusively for people with early dementia and their care partners, these sessions — led by UMN Extension Master Gardeners — include all necessary materials.

MARJORIE PRIME

When: Through May 19 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $20–$60 Info: primeprods.org

RED HOT AND COLE → This mixture of biography and song celebrates the great American songwriter Cole Porter. When: Through May 19 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $20–$25 Info: theatreintheround.org 38 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

GROWING CONNECTIONS

When: 10 a.m.–noon or 1–3 p.m. May 2 (hydroponic gardening), May 16 (outdoor container gardening) and May 23 (a tour of the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum) Where: Hopkins Activity Center Cost: FREE Info: hennepinmastergardeners.org

MAY 9–12

AUTONOMY → Part amusement park ride, part auto show and part drive-in theater, this 70,000-squarefoot theatrical extravaganza moves its

→ More than 10,000 book lovers are expected to attend this inaugural festival by The Loft literary center, featuring more than 100 local and world-renowned authors, including Stephen King, Dave Barry and Amy Tan. When: May 11–12 Where: Mill City neighborhood of Minneapolis Cost: $10 for adults, which includes a $5 voucher to spend at the festival; FREE for ages 17 and younger Info: loftwordplay.com

MAY 11

THE BEACH BOYS → Led by Mike Love, the band will play hits such as California Girls, Wouldn’t It Be Nice, Surfin’ USA, Good Vibrations and many more at PACER’s annual benefit to further the organization’s work serving families of children with disabilities and students who are bullied. When: May 11 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center Cost: Tickets start at $75. Info: pacer.org/benefit

MAY 18–19

DOORS OPEN MINNEAPOLIS → This weekend-long event allows the public free, behind-the-scenes access to dozens of buildings in Minneapolis that are architecturally, culturally or socially significant, including The Bakken Museum, The Basilica of St. Mary, Suburban World Theater and more.


When: May 18–19 Where: Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: doorsopenminneapolis.org

MAY 21–JUNE 9

MUSEUM OF THE MOON → A 23-foot, internally lit, spherical sculpture of Earth’s Moon will be on view day and night, suspended from the ceiling in the new Bell Museum, in honor of the anniversary of NASA’s Apollo 10 mission, which orbited the Moon in May 1969.

Annual Spring

PLANT SALE WEST 7TH STORE

Friday, May 3–Monday, May 27 8:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m. | Daily 1500 WEST 7TH, SAINT PAUL 55106 msmarket.coop

When: May 21–June 9 Where: The Bell Museum, St. Paul Cost: $9–$12 Info: bellmuseum.umn.edu

MAY 27

MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION → Mark the 151st Memorial Day at Minneapolis’ oldest existing cemetery. Bring a lawn chair, if possible (and bring service animals only). When: May 27 Where: Pioneers & Soldiers Memorial Cemetery, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: friendsofthecemetery.org

MAY 28–JUNE 9

DEAR EVAN HANSEN → This story of a teenager with social anxiety opened to rave reviews in 2016 and has broken box office records and won six Tony Awards, including Best Musical. When: May 28–June 9 Where: Orpheum Theater, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $74. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

MAY 31, JUNE 1–2

EDINA ART FAIR → See the work of more than 250 artists alongside live entertainment, a kids zone, craft beer gardens, gourmet food and more. When: May 31, June 1–2 Where: France Avenue and 50th Street Cost: FREE Info: edinaartfair.com Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 39


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Every Dog Has Its Day

BASENJI BLOODHOUND BULLDOG BULLMASTIFF CHIHUAHUA DACHSHUND DALMATIAN

GREYHOUND MALAMUTE NEWFOUNDLAND PAPILLON PINSCHER POINTER POMERANIAN

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40 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA 1. Visit outer space (also, travel around Earth) 2. Rin Tin Tin 3. Labrador retriever

Source: Konrad Lorenz


TRIVIA

WORD SCRAMBLE Beagle, Setter, Poodle

The Dog Ate My Homework

2. What dog became a huge film star in the 1920s and 1930s, leading to a boom in German Shepherd adoptions?

CRYTPOGRAM There is no faith which has never yet been broken, except that of a truly faithful dog.

1. In 1957, a Russian dog named Laika was the first to do what?

3. What is the most popular breed of dog in the United States?

SUDOKU

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

Sources: space.com, imdb.com and akc.org

Do you live in a multigenerational home? Share your story!

SEEKING RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS for a study on grandparent-parent relationships in 3-generation households

Eligibility: • grandparent-parent pairs who currently live in a 3-generation household • parent is over the age of 18 • English speaking • both the grandparent and parent agree and are able to participate in the study Compensation will be given to each participant upon completion of the interview. For more information contact

Tanya Rand

Doctoral Candidate • Saint Mary’s University

651-373-6397 | tjrand10@smumn.edu Minnesota Good Age / May 2019 / 41


Crossword

66 Poolroom powder 67 Drop the ball

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Punk rock subgenre 4 Catches red-handed 8 Medieval stringed instruments 14 GoPro product, briefly 15 Many a homecoming attendee 16 Covent Garden offerings 17 All-Star pitcher 18 Controversial excavation method 20 Beach house? 22 Little biter 23 Bible book between Daniel and Joel 24 Biblical pronoun 25 Nursery cry 26 Form 1040 agcy. 28 Permanent sites? 30 Sounds of contentment 33 __ Fables 42 / May 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

37 Criticize harshly 38 Beachfront property, often 41 Org. for netmen 42 “Barney Miller” star Hal 43 Linear 44 Biathlon weapons 46 __ Bund: Swiss newspaper 48 Skelton’s Kadiddlehopper 49 Merit badge org. 52 Tut-tutted 56 Scottish family 57 Breed of Tonto’s Scout 59 Handyman’s work suggested by the starts of 18-, 20-, 38- and 57-Across 61 Shortest surname in Cooperstown 62 Kin of jujitsu 63 Yours, to Yves 64 Once known as 65 Planted a red herring, say

1 Cybermoney 2 Chinese gambling mecca 3 Forebodings 4 Sprint Cup org. 5 Utah ski resort 6 Break open 7 Word for word? 8 Tiber River capital 9 Center starter 10 Cincinnati player 11 “Happy Days” actress 12 Inhabitant of ancient Palestine 13 NCO rank 19 Work at, as a trade 21 Reason-based faith 25 Easter liturgy 27 One-piece dresses 28 Go through 29 Floored it 30 On __ with 31 Constitution section that creates the executive branch 32 On-the-sly alcohol containers 34 Poetic time 35 Downcast 36 Bullfight cheer 39 K thru 6 40 Upper body 45 Soup legume 47 Cultural, as cuisine 49 Sheep’s cry 50 Occupy, as a desk 51 Santa __ racetrack 53 Scandinavian coin 54 Fragrant compound 55 Discourage 56 Pull an all-nighter 57 Urge 58 Item in a kit 60 “__ to My Right Knee”: Rita Dove poem


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