Page 1

MARCH MARCH2019 2019

HOOP DREAMS KATE MORTENSON

The CEO of the Final Four local organizing committee is ready for victory, no matter which team wins.

PLUS: A new app helps stir lost memories!

Fabulous Philly! History comes alive in this fascinating city

Budget-savvy vacation tips What not to do before a trip

Traveling toward gratitude Feeling blessed even in a TSA security line

The magic of chair yoga Learn the power of balance


Contents 18

FIND FREEDOM Explore the birthplace of our nation — rich with history, art and fine food (and not just cheesesteaks).

⊳⊳ Life-sized statues of the 39 signers of the Constitution surround visitors at the National Constitution Center.

MARCH GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR 6 How long will the benefits of the Final Four last?

MY TURN 8 From Denver to MSP: Our airport travels gave us faith in humanity.

MEMORIES G. Widman for Visit Philadelphia

10 A captain and a stewardess look back on their careers.

24

MINNESOTA HISTORY 12 In 1969, students demanded better representation of black people at the University of Minnesota.

GOOD HEALTH ON THE COVER Kate Mortenson brings her unique communitybuilding skills to the NCAA Final Four organizing committee. Photos by Tracy Walsh

4 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

→→Correction In the February 2019 issue of Minnesota Good Age — in the article Making my peace with money — Mother Teresa’s name was spelled incorrectly. Mother Teresa was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in Macedonia in 1910. She took the name Sister Mary Teresa shortly after she became a nun in Ireland in 1928. In 2016, she was canonized as Saint Teresa of Calcutta.

CAREGIVING 14 A new app with a local tie helps stir memories.

WELLNESS 16 Chair yoga offers many benefits and is adaptable for all ages.

GOOD LIVING FINANCE 22 Be smart and strategic when it comes to planning a vacation.

30 32

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR BRAIN TEASERS


FROM THE EDITOR

A third path BY SARAH JACKSON

Volume 38 / Issue 3 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Skip Johnson Larry Kallevig, Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer Lauren Peck, Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brenda Taylor

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson / 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

6 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

W

hoever hired Kate Mortenson to be the president and CEO of the 2019 Final Four Minneapolis Local Organizing Committee was a very insightful person indeed. On the surface, she might seem like a curious choice: Mortenson, a longtime philanthropist and consultant focused on nonprofits, wasn’t necessarily the most likely pick for such a sporty, commerce-driven role. “Usually, it’s someone from the world of athletics or someone with a background in travel and tourism,” Mortenson, our Cover Star this month, said. “Going with me was a third path — choosing someone whose roots are in community development.” But think about it: What better mindset could there be when bringing a huge NCAA event to town? Don’t we, in fact, need someone who has an eye for the greater good? After all, the publicly funded Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority will spend an estimated $10 million on the event, quite a bit more than the $627,000 it spent to host the Super Bowl in 2018. The tax-paying public — especially those who don’t follow college basketball — might be asking: What’s in it for us? Well, of course, there’s our role in the national tourism economy. What else? Well, beyond that impact — which even the Star Tribune editorial board has declared “worth it” — there’s a bevy of community events, including 3,000 free basketballs and T-shirts for kids, free concerts and even free viewings of the teams’ final practices. But the two, somewhat unsung, signature pieces of all of this — the things that have Mortenson’s name written all over them — are far more community minded: There’s the year-long, statewide initiative called Read to the Final Four in which students from 250 schools have read more than 4 million minutes! If that weren’t enough, the local organizing committee under Mortenson’s leadership has also coordinated a renovation of the North Commons Rec Center in North Minneapolis, which will involve upgrades to the park’s indoor basketball facilities. Dubbed the Men’s Final Four Legacy Project, the refurbished center will be unveiled just prior to the Final Four. And that’s something that will live on long after the final buzzer rings. Though Mortenson is only 52 — and admittedly on the younger end of our Good Age spectrum — it’s exciting to see her career move into its second act. After she’s had a bit of a rest, I wonder what she’ll do next!


Building Stable Homes, Strong Futures and Vibrant Communities Since 1971.

NORTHWEST SUBURBS

GREATER MINNESOTA

NORTHERN SUBURBS

ARBOR LAKES COMMONS Maple Grove • (763) 416-0369

DELANO COMMONS Delano • (763) 972-2930

CENTURY TRAILS Maplewood • (651) 288-9162

BASSETT CREEK COMMONS Plymouth • (763) 543-2457

GOLDENDALE HOMES Annandale • (320) 274-5871

CONCORDIA ARMS Maplewood • (651) 280-4680

BOULEVARD GARDENS Minnetonka • (952) 542-9338

ST. MICHAEL’S HOUSING New Ulm • (507) 794-9631

EAST SHORE PLACE Mahtomedi • (651) 770-7964

MAPLE TERRACE Maple Plain • (763) 479-1131

TOWNE CLUB SENIOR HOUSING Rochester • (507) 424-1671

GARDEN TERRACE Little Canada • (651) 481-9028

NORTH GABLES Blaine • (763) 786-0232

WELLSTONE COMMONS Northfield • (507) 645-4146

GARDEN TERRACE COMMONS Little Canada • (651) 481-9028

NORWOOD SQUARE Fridley • (763) 574-2187

MINNEAPOLIS

SILVER LAKE POINTE Mounds View • (763) 785-4771

PLEASANT PLACE Rogers • (763) 428-4494

BII DI GAIN DASH ANWEBI (612) 843-5391

SOUTHERN SUBURBS

ROBBINS WAY Robbinsdale • (763) 537-6868

THE COOPERAGE SENIOR HOUSING (651) 290-6228

FAIRFIELD TERRACE Lakeville • (952) 469-1414

WESTERN SUBURBS

RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS (612) 843-5885

MOUNT CARMEL MANOR West St. Paul • (651) 451-0030

SOUTH HAVEN Edina • (952) 831-3372

ST. ANNE’S (612) 588-4663

OAK RIDGE MANOR Hastings • (651) 437-1367

SOUTH SHORE PARK Excelsior • (952) 474-9036

SEWARD TOWER EAST (612) 339-1711

OAK TERRACE Oakdale • (651) 730-6440

SUMMIT POINT Edina • (952) 920-6113

SEWARD TOWER WEST (612) 333-7472

RED ROCK MANOR Newport • (651) 459-2786

WESTONKA ESTATES Mound • (952) 472-4952

SHINGLE CREEK COMMONS (612) 588-2303

SPRUCE PLACE Farmington • (651) 463-2511

INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING… WAIT LIST OPEN OAK RIDGE MANOR • (651) 437-1367 1199 Bahls Drive, Hastings, MN 55033

AFFORDABLE RENTS… WAIT LIST OPEN ARBOR LAKES COMMONS • (763) 416-0369 8100 Main Street, Maple Grove, MN 55369

• Seniors 62+

• Seniors 62+

• Controlled Access Entry

• Controlled Access Entry

• Rent is 30% of Monthly Income for Qualified Households • On-Site Laundry • Pets Allowed

• Smoke-free building

• Rent is 30% of Monthly Income for Qualified Households • On-Site Laundry • Pets Allowed

• Smoke-free building

CALL US AT: (651) 291-1750 OR VISIT US AT: WWW.COMMONBOND.ORG/FINDHOUSING


MY TURN

Traveling toward gratitude BY DAVE NIMMER

I

’ve never been an intrepid traveler and, quite frankly, travelling frequently leaves me bothered and bewildered. However, on this last Christmas holiday, on one of the busiest travel days of the year, I had an experience that left me believing in a civil society and human nature. My friend and partner, Cindy Lamont, and I were travelling from Colorado back to the Twin Cities. Along the way we encountered drivers, agents, clerks and fellow passengers who were uniformly cheerful, helpful and thoughtful. They made for one of my best Christmas presents.

A ride to the airport It started with the driver for Epic Mountain Express, who picked us up in Vail to take us to the Denver airport. He was slated to arrive at 8:58 a.m. At 8:57 he showed up at the front door with a smile and pair of hands to grab our bags. He said he’d get us to DIA by noon. At 11:55, he pulled up to the Southwest Airlines door. As he unloaded our bags, he noted we had the same first name. “Dave,” he said, “from one to another, Happy New Year.”

Checking in As Cindy and I searched for the Southwest ticket counter, a man wearing a yellow vest (an airport employee, I suspect) spotted us and asked if he could help. Southwest, we said. Follow me, he replied, and led us to the airline kiosk where we got our boarding passes and checked our bags. 8 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Security lines Then we headed for the security checkpoint and the line was long. More than a million passengers circulate through DIA over the Christmas holiday. Nevertheless, the first TSA agent, to whom I handed my boarding pass and driver’s license, wished me a good flight. The second agent politely asked me to remove my wristband, I suppose to see if I had any forbidden substance hidden underneath. I took it off, he thanked me and then said he was going to pat my shoulders and back. He waited for my nodding approval, made his moves and again thanked me for my cooperation. What made all of this

She ran my credit card, handed me the customer copy and then completely surprised me: ‘David,’ she said, ‘please sign this.’


more impressive was both of these guys were working without pay during the shutdown of the federal government. I also noticed that when anyone in a wheelchair was pushed toward the TSA agents, the other passengers stepped aside to let the chairs through; and they did it without being asked.

Preflight food By the time Cindy and I got to the departure gate, we were hungry, so I went to one of those generic airport sandwich shops. I ordered a couple of chicken salad sandwiches, a bag of chips and a bottle of water from the busy clerk. She ran my credit card, handed me the customer copy and then completely surprised me: “David,” she said, “please sign this.” Suddenly I was more than the old, tired traveler in a sweatshirt. I was a human being with a first name, one she’d noticed and noted. I looked at the badge on her apron and returned the favor. (I now, however, have forgotten her first name.) Before I get too carried away, I’m obligated to report the sandwiches were kind of soggy — too much mayo and not enough chicken. And, with the water and chips, they cost about $25.

In-flight snacks They didn’t serve any food on the Southwest flight back to Minneapolis/St. Paul. The plane was full. I was squeezed in the middle seat next to a guy who said he was from Chanhassen. When the flight attendant came around with the free bags of pretzels, he asked me if I wanted his. I took it — one last sign of generosity on a day that could have been an ordeal, but turned out to be ideal. Dave Nimmer is a retired writer living in Woodbury. Send comments to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 9


MEMORIES

Flying as a way of life BY CAROL HALL

C

arol Hall: Ron, back in the day, when we were much younger, you were a captain and I was a stewardess for Northwest Airlines. We worked crazy hours, missed scads of family holidays and spent an inordinate amount of time on layovers far from home. What does this say about each of us? Ron Kenmir: That we were gypsies? Vagabonds? Just plain crazy? CH: Yes, maybe all three. Crewing an airliner is a job like none other, and certainly isn’t for everyone. One thing that made it right for me is that I’ve always been adventurous.

We worked crazy hours, missed scads of family holidays and spent an inordinate amount of time on layovers far from home. 10 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

RK: Same here. I never entertained — even for an instant — that I would be working in a cubicle or entertaining clients at an office lunch. I had more in mind chasing the sunset to Honolulu at nearly the speed of sound or enjoying the magnificent northern lights upon climb-out from Anchorage! CH: Each of us also needed a great deal of self-confidence. You couldn’t possibly take the controls of an airliner if you didn’t believe in your ability to complete your career with a perfect safety record. I, likewise, couldn’t routinely direct a large bunch of people to follow airline emergency rules, or get them out of a burning airplane, if I were timid. RK: We also had to have confidence in the abilities of our many co-workers on the ground. I’m talking about the Northwest meteorologists and mechanics as well as folks in the airport control towers and air route traffic control centers, who determined our compass headings, airspeeds and altitudes. CH: And I can’t stress enough the importance of being flexible. RK: Right. A person who requires rigid control of their work environment would never make it in our business. Remember all the flights with the “creeping” delays? Remember being blizzarded in a place like Fargo, unable to go anywhere until

▲ Carol Hall (top), Ron Kenmir (bottom)


STEWARDESS! Learn more about the lifestyle of flight attendants back in the 1960s with this theatrical production, set against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement, the birth of feminism and Northwest Orient Airlines.

WHEN: Through March 3 WHERE: History Theatre, St. Paul COST: $15–$42 INFO: historytheatre.com

the weather lifted? I recall having checked in for a flight to Anchorage, only to be told it had been cancelled and I was being sent instead to Miami. CH: There was the “glamour factor” for us stewardesses, which was OK with me. A woman who was averse to wearing makeup, nail polish, heels — and, yes, a girdle — likely would never get hired. RK: It didn’t hurt to be firstborn or an only child for us pilots. When our instructor discovered this was the case with two-thirds of our class, he smiled and said, “Just as I thought!” Apparently, a great many pilots fall into either category. (I’m an only child.) CH: So, given the built-in irregularities and the sometimes discombobulation of being a pilot or stewardess, would you agree that crewing an airliner is more a way of life than a job? RK: Yes — a unique way of life. You serving dinner in the cabin while traveling 600 mph above a flashing thunderstorm over the Everglades on Christmas Eve, and I in the cockpit “turning kerosene into smoke and noise” was all in a day’s work! Carol Hall is a longtime freelance writer and University of Minnesota graduate. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

O LEARN ABOUT Reverse Mortgages from Retirement Funding Solutions, a Mutual of Omaha Bank Company

All faiths or beliefs are welcome.

LEARN ABOUT

Reverse Mortgage from Retirement Funding Solutions, a Mutual of Omaha Bank Company

Member FDIC

Separate the facts from fiction with your local, licensed specialist.

Available to Homeowners age 62 and better • No required monthly mortgage payments* • Improve cash-flow by accessing housing wealth • Flexible disbursement options of your loan proceeds • Eliminate existing mortgage payments or purchase a new home • FHA insured loan and retained ownership of your property**

Alina Passarelli, NMLS #525407

Certified Reverse Mortgage Professional

Direct: 612 . 396. 6802 Email: APassarelli @ rfslends.com 7400 Metro Blvd, Edina MN 55435 www.rfslends.com/Alina-Passarelli *A maturity or default event is defined as the death of the last homeowner, sale of the property, a borrower no longer living in the home as the primary resident, or non-payment of property taxes, insurances or other property charges. **Principle loan balance (includes borrowed funds, accrued interest, premiums and fees) must be repaid. All remaining equity in the home is retained by the homeowner or heirs.

A Mutual of Omaha Bank Company

Receive benefit illustrations, information on qualifying and the National Council on Aging booklet “Use Your Home to Stay at Home” to share with loved ones and your trusted advisors. Understanding the facts can help you determine if accessing your housing wealth makes sense within your retirement plan.

MY APPROACH IS SIMPLE: • Begin by listening—to understand the unique retirement goals & legacy wishes of each client. • Treat clients as I would treat my own family—with the same level of care, education and service that I would provide my own.

Synergy One Lending Inc. d/b/a Retirement Funding Solutions, NMLS 1025894. 3131 Camino Del Rio N 190, San Diego, CA 92108. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act – California License 4131356. These materials are not from HUD or FHA. www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org

Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 11


MINNESOTA HISTORY

A protest that changed the U of M BY LAUREN PECK

F

ifty years ago on Jan. 14, 1969, frustrated African-American students at the University of Minnesota decided to occupy Morrill Hall on the East Bank of campus to protest racism at the university. What resulted was a significant turning point in the school’s history, including the creation of the Department of African American & African Studies, one of the first of its kind in the U.S. The Morrill Hall takeover’s roots trace back to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968. King’s death resulted in an outpouring of grief around the country, and at the U of M, the Minnesota Student Association quickly announced an MLK memorial fund to support low-income students; the administration, meanwhile, formed a human rights task force to address issues such as race relations on campus.

Underrepresented A week after the assassination, the AfroAmerican Action Committee (AAAC), 12 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

a black student organization, presented the task force with a list of demands, including better recruitment and scholarships for black students and the creation of an African-American studies curriculum at the university. At the time, the U of M had an estimated 100 black students on campus, despite some 40,000 students overall, and its curriculum on African-American experiences was sorely lacking. Horace Huntley, secretary of the AAAC, recalled an American history class where the professor spent only 10 minutes covering all of African-American history. When Huntley asked if the course would cover any more African-American content, the professor replied, “Well, is there more?” After the AAAC presented its demands to the administration, the students waited, but by January 1969, they were frustrated by a lack of movement. On Jan. 13, the group presented three demands to President Malcolm Moos: Establish an African-American studies program by fall 1969, transfer manage-

ment of the MLK scholarship fund to a black community organization and provide financial support from the university for a black student conference on campus.

Building barricades The next day, about 70 black students met with President Moos about their concerns. But after the conversation wasn’t productive, the students decided to stage a protest in the funding and records office in Morrill Hall. The AAAC allowed staff to leave, but prevented anyone from entering the building by securing doors with coat hangers and eventually piling up desks as barricades. Soon a crowd began to form outside the building to witness the takeover and, after nightfall, some 60 white students from the organization Students for a Democratic Society joined the protest in Morrill Hall’s outer lobby. The takeover had detractors, too. Angry white students threw snowballs and rocks, shouted derogatory remarks and discussed storming the building. But other than a


single student who bruised his back after being pushed away from entering Morrill Hall, the takeover stayed peaceful.

Victory and repercussions Throughout the protest, the AAAC and administration negotiated, and after 24 hours, the two sides came to an agreement to end the takeover, with the U of M accepting most of the students’ demands. To avoid the gathered crowds, student protesters used underground tunnels to leave Morrill Hall. In the aftermath of the takeover, some Minnesota state legislators were eager to rebuke the student protesters. Bills were introduced to deny state scholarship money to student demonstrators and punish demonstrators who caused injury or damage to public property.

The Morrill Hall takeover’s roots trace back to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968. In March, a Hennepin County grand jury indicted three AAAC students — Huntley; AAAC president Rose Mary Freeman; and Warren Tucker Jr. — on charges of aggravated criminal damage to property, rioting and unlawful assembly. When the trial began in October, nearly 1,000 people, mostly students, marched to support the Morrill Hall Three. Ultimately, Tucker was acquitted of all charges while Freeman and Huntley were convicted on the charge of unlawful assembly. They were each given a 90-day suspended sentence and one year of probation.

Honoring the past

▲▲Activists Rose Mary Freeman and Horace Huntley during student protests in Morrill Hall. Opposite, students rallied outside Morrill Hall during the takeover in 1969. Photos courtesy of University of Minnesota Archives

The AAAC students weren’t acting in a vacuum at the U of M. In Minnesota and across the country, black student activists were fighting for change on college campuses in the 1960s. Today the U of M is home to Huntley Hall, a learning community for black men on campus. Horace Huntley is now a retired professor from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. In 2019, the University of Minnesota’s African American & African Studies department celebrates its 50th anniversary and includes among its faculty Dr. John Wright, who participated in the AAAC takeover in 1969. Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 13


CAREGIVING

A new app uses images to trigger memories BY SARAH JACKSON

T

he human mind is an amazing thing. Yes, even when it’s plagued by the neural plaques and tangles of dementia, the brain has the ability to tap deep into long-held memories. But just what is it that jogs our memories? Music has been shown to trigger recollections. But guess what else works? Images of everyday objects and historic events can also do the trick. And now, thanks to a new dementiaawareness program made possible by the Minnesota Historical Society, older adults struggling with memory loss and their caregivers have a new, award-winning tool. The My House of Memories app — originally developed by National Museums Liverpool in the U.K. — shows archival images from the 1920s–1980s to help people with dementia draw on their own memories to create personal connections with family, friends and caregivers.   Maren Levad, access manager for the Minnesota Historical Society, said the U.K. version of the app was first of its kind in the world. “We redesigned the app for U.S. audiences using items from our collection that were curated by people living with dementia and their caregivers,” Levad said. You might be wondering: Why exactly are museums getting involved in the dementia/caregiving arena?

14 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Well, museums specialize in artifacts and stories, too, of course. And those objects and histories can be powerful drivers for stimulating memory and conversation. Vintage toys, hair curlers, a rotary phone, a pristine 1950s kitchen, a Beatles Christmas record, a black and white photo of an old ride at the Minnesota State Fair, a Santa Bear from Dayton’s — they all might spark a memory or a story. Carol Rogers, executive director for education and visitors at National Museums Liverpool, said museums can be fantastic resources for helping unlock memories, which can lead to improved communication between caregivers and people with dementia. “Person-centered care is at the heart of our training and acknowledges that an ind-

ividual’s personal history and memory are of huge importance,” Rogers said. “We’re excited to see how the U.S. version of the My House of Memories app will help Americans.” When users download the free app, they can simply choose the U.S. version with images relevant to Americans, including inspirational objects. Users can create themed sets of objects such as “sports,” “work and family life” and “music and entertainment.” Sound effects and videos bring objects to life to provide a rich, multi-sensory experience, including a music-box function that can play music by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. Helpful hints prompt users to remind them of objects’ names. There’s also a readaloud option for people who prefer to listen.


TAKE A FREE TRAINING

The Minnesota Historical Society is hosting free trainings to help friend/family caregivers — and professional care staff — learn how to use museum resources to encourage memory sharing and help people live well with dementia. The workshops, held at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul, focuses on objects, photographs, ephemera and stories in the society’s collections. Caregivers will learn what types of memory activities and resources are available and how to use them to communicate with people living with dementia, including the free My House of Memories app. Workshops are free with registration. Professional Caregiver Trainings: 9 a.m.–noon or 1–4 p.m. March 25 Friends & Family Caregiver Trainings: 10 a.m.–2 p.m. March 26, 27 or 28 

Aging-in-Place Specialists

STAIRLIFTS • CUSTOM RAMPS • SAFETY RAILS AUTOMATIC DOORS • BATHROOM MODIFICATIONS

Maintain your independence by making your home safe & accessible

Slightly-used stairlifts available Guaranteed buyback program

651.403.3038 BC590012

OcelBuilders.com

Learn more at mnhs.org/ houseofmemories.

If you want to take this kind of memory care to the next level, you can export a loved one’s favorite objects to create a memory tree, box or timeline to share with others. (To bolster the power of the app, the historical society is also offering free trainings and workshops for families — and professionals — later this month as part of its House of Memories program.) To learn more about the My House of Memories groundbreaking new digital app — designed for, and with, people living with dementia and their caregivers — go to mnhs.org/houseofmemories. The app is available in the iTunes and Google Play app stores. Sarah Jackson is the editor of Minnesota Good Age. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 15


WELLNESS

The magic of chair yoga BY JULIE KENDRICK

I

f you’ve ever come across photos of people doing yoga, you may have wondered how it was possible for the human body to get itself twisted into such incredible, pretzel-like shapes. But there’s more to yoga than fancypants poses. There’s also chair yoga. Yes, it’s possible to do in the comfort of your own chair. Granted, you have to get out of the Lazy Boy for a few minutes and move to a metal folding chair (or similar chair), but other than that, you don’t need to bring anything else but your breath, your body and an open mind.

A good workout Is it possible to get anything like a good workout while sitting down? Many experts, including yoga teachers based right here in the Twin Cities, say “yes.” “Balance is power,” said Jessica Rosenberg, a certified yoga teacher and the founder of Strong Spirits Mindfulness & Movement chair yoga program. She teaches throughout the Twin Cities, including regular classes at senior care centers, senior independent living apartments, and assisted living and memory care communities. She conducts education and teacher trainings across the country, is the author of the Chair Yoga Training Manual, available on Apple Books ($14.99) and is the force behind The Adventures of Super Stretch children’s yoga program, too. “Chair yoga is a gentle form of yoga that can be done sitting on a chair or standing while using the chair for 16 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

support,” Rosenberg said. “It not only helps you gain that balance, but also strength and flexibility, from doing just two to three sessions a week, either in a class or on your own.”

Mind and body benefits Doing chair yoga can help improve physical flexibility and reduce fall risks, Rosenberg said. “And there are other, less tangible benefits that class participants have experienced,” she said, “such as elevated mood, a more grateful attitude and decreased stress and anxiety.” According to the Mayo Clinic, “Chair yoga poses can help seniors and people with chronic pain improve their quality of life, lower their blood pressure, improve their sleep patterns and manage depression.” In most chair yoga classes, students sit in a circle. Class often begins with some time for centering and breathing. Then the teacher will conduct series of warmups, followed by deeper stretches, all done while sitting on chairs or standing behind them. Props might include hula hoops, straps, weights, scarves or exercise balls. Participants learn to bend and twist with a stable base, lift the lower body while using support and create strength and flexibility while using props. At the end of class, the teacher often leads a group relaxation exercise. ▲▲Jessica Rosenberg, a Twin Citiesbased yoga teacher, demonstrates chair yoga. Photos by Armour Photography / armourphoto.com


LEARN MORE

Jessica Rosenberg jesrosenberg.com International Chair Yoga Association icya.yoga

TAKE A CLASS

YMCA tinyurl.com/ymca-chair-yoga Hennepin County Library tinyurl.com/hc-chair-yoga TRIA tinyurl.com/tria-chair-yoga Common Ground Meditation Center tinyurl.com/common-chair-yoga

What others say Rosenberg teaches a class at Birchwood Senior Living in Forest Lake. She recently asked her students for some thoughts about the class. “It’s good and good for you,” said one male resident. A female participant said: “I just feel so much better after I do the movement and breathing exercises.” Rachel Trelstad-Porter, director of integrative health and wellness at the St. Paul-based Senior Care Communities, said the benefits go even beyond that: “Jes specializes in getting people to move and breathe, and that helps people arrive at a deeper place where health and healing happen.” Brett Collins, an active life director at Providence Place in Minneapolis, appreciates the chair yoga program at the active adult community. “The classes strengthen and stretch our residents’ bodies,” he said. “We caregivers can see how the cognitive benefits of breathwork and mindfulness help people here seem more relaxed and in a better mood.” Julie Kendrick is a frequent contributor to Minnesota Good Age.

Seeking Peace Of Mind? Visit our website to discover how you can enroll in prearrangement services which will handle every aspect of the process. Find out why we’ve been in business for more than 60 years and have become Minnesota’s leading provider of cremation and funeral services—visit us online at:

www.CremationSocietyOfMN.com

Minneapolis Chapel 4343 Nicollet Avenue South

(612) 825-2435 Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 17


Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

WALKING THROUGH

A sculpture of John Barry — a famed Naval officer during the American Revolutionary War — stands outside Independence Hall in Philadelphia.


t io a n r ou f o e l ac — p d h t o r o i f eb ne h fi t , d y l an h il t P r a e r , Explo h history teaks! ses wit e h e c h i c r st u j t o an d n BY C

P

hiladelphia is known as The City of Brotherly Love, as founder William Penn so famously penned. It’s also the city where 13 wrangling colonies ironed out their differences and united to fight the English king to eventually create the USA. It’s an upstart kind of energy you can still feel to this day: My heart pumped and tears filled my eyes as I surveyed the sites where the action played out in the 1700s.

Historic District Begin your visit in the very spot where the United States became united, in Philly’s red-brick Historic District. Normally, you’d start with a tour of Independence Hall, but during my visit, it was closed due to the government shutdown. Nearby — enshrined indoors — hangs the Liberty Bell. Its building was closed, too, but we visitors spied it through a picture window, murmuring in Spanish, Chinese and French while gazing at the symbol of our nation. Nearby, the National Museum of Jewish History, pays homage to escapes from European pogroms and life in the Land of Liberty.

AR

n,

A LDE LA W

MAR

Across the parkland, stand the skeletal remains of The President’s House, an indoor-outdoor museum that commemorates the lives of nine enslaved Africans at the site of the nation’s first executive mansion (yes that of George Washington himself), one of so many paradoxes that emerge in this great city.

Alexander Hamilton And then there’s that other statesman we’ve been hearing so much about as of late — Alexander Hamilton. Yes, fans of the blockbuster musical Hamilton who visit Philly can not only see the famed show on its threemonth run later this year (Aug. 27–Nov. 17), but they can also go beyond the Broadway story to follow in Hamilton’s footsteps at sites throughout the Historic District. Fans will find an exhibit at the National Constitution Center highlighting the competing ideals of Hamilton and his rivals. At benches in the district, Once Upon A Nation storytellers reenact the legendary Hamilton-Washington bromance and the Hamilton-Burr rivalry. The Museum of the American Revolution currently includes a Hamilton Was Here interactive playscape for kids (open through March 17) Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 19


about how Philadelphia and Hamilton combined forces to found the nation. (Find an official Guide to Alexander Hamilton’s Philadelphia, featuring 14 ways to retrace Hamilton’s steps in the city, at visitphilly.com.)

Building a new nation All Hamilton hoopla aside, the Museum of the American Revolution really does help you experience the chaotic drama of breaking ties with England: Vivid films and interactive displays immerse visitors in General Washington’s challenges — a ragtag, undisciplined army; frigid weather; no funds. See housewives’ boycott of English goods following the Stamp Act — “no taxation without representation.” And imagine Paul Revere’s ride, plus — who knew? — his political posters and cartoons. The museum then asks, “Now what?” After gaining freedom, how do you set about launching a government from scratch? The aforementioned National Constitution Center has a few of the answers: You start with a Bill of Rights. Turned out, women, black people and Native Americans weren't covered, so amendments were added later. Thanks to interactive exhibits, you can become a Supreme Court

G. Widman for Visit Philadelphia

justice and register your opinions on the timely questions of today, or vote in fantasy elections, such as Eisenhower vs. Roosevelt or Obama vs. Reagan. Freedom is again the theme at the National Liberty Museum, which leads off with Moses as a freedom leader, continuing with the Pilgrims’ quest and immigrants at Ellis Island. Peer into facsimiles of Nelson Mandela’s cell and the hideout of Anne Frank. Peruse accounts of those who aided others on 9/11 and also at the collapse of our own 35W bridge in Minneapolis. The tiny house where seamstress Betsy Ross stitched the famous flag is yours to tour, too. It stands near Elfreth’s Alley, dating back to 1702 — the nation’s oldest continuously inhabited residential street, still vibrant with 32 bright-shuttered brick homes (with tours on weekends). It’s mere steps from the antique edifices lining Arch Street, today the city’s Soho, lush with art galleries, wine bars, bookstores and designer boutiques.

The city has more to lure visitors than the history that happened here.

Art central But the city has more to lure visitors than the history that happened here. There’s art. Hoof it along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, called the "Champs Elysees of Philly," until it dead-ends at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, fronted by those iconic steps that Rocky pounded. It’s a veritable lexicon of painting, from Fra Angelico’s cherubs and Botticelli’s beauties to a sunny Matisse and misty Monet. Treasures of The National Constitution Center architec-tural beauty abound, too — an ancient Indian temple, a Japanese tea house and a Chinese palace hall. Rest your feet at the museum’s fine café or that of another museum just down the Parkway: The Barnes Foundation is a treasury of all things Impressionist. See 81 Renoirs, 65 Cezannes, 59 Matisses and more, displayed in salon style. The nearby Rodin Museum features some of the world’s most renowned masterpieces of sculpture.


R. Kennedy for Visit Philadelphia

The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Next, head to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts — the oldest in the country — where Early American painters reign — Gilbert Stuart, Benjamin West, Thomas Eakins, the family of Peales. Outside, Claes Oldenburg’s tall glass Paintbrush beckons from the street, while inside, those famous portraits of George Washington face that of his foe across the pond, King George III.

Now: Eat!

G. Widman for Visit Philadelphia

Soul sated, it’s time to feed the body. You crave a Philly cheesesteak? Well, me too. I found mine at the legendary Reading Terminal Market, featuring 80 vendors boasting take-home treats from Amish loaves to whole lobsters as well as hot sandwiches. New American fare is the forte at Fork, which one patron described as “reliably excellent, but not flashy” (and also in the historic district). You can’t go wrong with starters such as venison tartare spangled with crunchy hazelnuts, or crab salad jiving with daikon radishes and jalapenos. Move next to a lush mushroom risotto, then a succulent quail stuffed with orange-scented spelt bread. Next door stands the more informal High Street, boasting “the best grilled cheese ever” (thanks to local cheddar), or you might gobble up the avocado toast, erected upon A Philly cheesesteak at the oven’s celebrated bread. Reading Terminal Market

Talulah’s Daily — in addition to being open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. — also offers The Secret Supper Club near Washington Square, which serves changing prix-fixe menus every night (except Mondays). January’s edition led off with a rustic apple-quinoa salad, then cheesy tortellini in broth; tender beef in Bordelaise sauce; a trio of Canadian cheeses; and a wicked-good sticky toffee pudding, sided with Earl Grey ice cream. Finally, have dinner — rather, a foodie immersion — in the rich cuisine of Israel, at James Beard winner Zahav. First, try a sextet of tasty vegetable salads, then your choice of small plates such as roasted cauliflower; broccoli with feta and almonds; and Brussels sprouts atop baba ghanouj. Hummus and flatbread, steaming from the oven, next vie for your favor. Move on to grilled meats (and eggplant), including duck with walnuts and pomegranates or hanger steak brightened with harissa. Reservations are as hard to come by as a ticket to the Super Bowl, so set your phone to speeddial. Then, while you’re on hold, check on visitphilly.com to plan the rest of your visit. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 21


FINANCE

Budget-savvy vacation tips BY LARRY KALLEVIG

W

hether March comes in like a lion or a lamb, by now most Minnesotans are feeling a little spring fever. But before you book that warm-weather getaway, make sure you’ve packed some financial wisdom. Nearly three-quarters of Americans have gone into debt to pay for a vacation. On average, that debt adds up to about $1,100 per trip, according to a 2017 study by LearnVest. And yet, no one wants to come home from vacation to face a pile of bills! Start taking steps now to reduce the cost — and the stress of paying it off.

at a hotel or resort, so pack them and bring them with you.

Don’t splurge before you go

Create a daily allowance

Sometimes we feel like we need a whole new wardrobe before we go on a trip, but we can probably get away with what we already have in our closets. Taking away this expense can free up more money to spend on your travels! However, necessities like sunscreen or an umbrella will be more expensive

Set a daily budget for your vacation— and be realistic. Figure out what you expect to spend on food, drink, activities and shopping and then inflate the number by 10 to 15 percent. That will serve as a cushion for “the unexpected.” A great way to stick with your budget is to use cash and keep credit cards for

22 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Sometimes we feel like we need a whole new wardrobe before we go on a trip, but we can probably get away with what we already have in our closets.

emergencies only. Each day, carry only the amount you’ve allotted to spend. When the cash is gone, you’re done spending for the day!

Avoid fees Don’t pay more than you have to for your bags. You may be able to avoid checked bag fees by using an airline’s credit card. It’s also a smart idea to literally pack light. Oversized or heavy bags can rack up additional fees. Depending on your style, you may be open to packing some additional items in a photographer’s vest with multiple pockets (a handy accessory when sightseeing).

Stick with your plan Making changes after you’ve booked is another common way to rack up fees. Airlines may charge you for switching or cancelling your flight. Make sure you’re aware of potential fees before you commit.


Don’t get scammed If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Scammers are constantly coming up with new ways to try to get your money online. They’ll post photos of properties that aren’t for rent — or that don’t exist — to try to get your credit card information. Follow these tips to avoid falling for a travel scam: ⊲ Always use a reputable company and/or website to book your trip. ⊲ Look critically at deals on social media and sites like Craigslist. ⊲ Search for reviews (and complaints) before booking. ⊲ Ask for references before renting a vacation home. ⊲ Check out companies with the Better Business Bureau. ⊲ Never wire money to someone you don’t know.

Scale it back If your choice is between going into debt or not going on vacation at all, I suggest you don’t go. If money is tight, consider a “staycation” instead. Minnesota has hundreds of great places to visit, and you can save on airfare and accommodations while you’re at it.

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

A Home for every Aging HeArt

JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law

261 Ruth Street North St. Paul (651) 738-2102 Will: $40 PoWer of Attorney: $30 HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70

Seniors Adopting Senior Dogs: Finding loving and permanent homes for senior rescue dogs

www.topdogfoundation.org 952‑353‑2122 Top Dog Foundation GA 2013 Filler 12.indd 1

6/28/13 9:02 AM

NOTICE: OPENING ON THE 1 BEDROOM WAIT LIST CONCORDIA ARMS • 651-280-4680 2030 Lydia Avenue East, Maplewood, MN 55109 Seniors 62 years and older, rent based on income for qualified applicants.

Applications may be downloaded at www.commonbond.org from 9am March 1, 2019 until 4pm March 31st or picked up Monday-Friday from 10am-3pm at the Management office. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY MAIL OR DROPPED OFF MONDAY-FRIDAY 10AM-3PM ON OR BEFORE MARCH 31ST 2019. All qualified Applicants will be placed on the Waiting List in the order they are received.

Do big-picture planning As you plan for retirement, make sure to factor in vacations. If you want to travel often, you need to plan for it! Talk it over with your family and your financial advisor to figure out how much you’ll need to save during your working years so you can have the retirement of your dreams. Larry Kallevig, owner of Haven Financial Group in Burnsville, helps clients create financial plans that ensure dependable and comfortable income in retirement. Learn more at havenfinancialgroup.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 23


WE CAN ACHIEVE MORE AND DO MORE. I ALWAYS WANT TO BE PUSHING THE BOUNDARY OF WHAT’S POSSIBLE. Kate Mortenson, CEO for the Minneapolis 2019 NCAA Final Four local organizing committee. Photo by Tracy Walsh

24 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


Shooting STARS for the

T

KATE MORTENSON IS WORKING TO CREATE A LASTING IMPACT ON THE TWIN CITIES — LONG AFTER MARCH MADNESS IS OVER.

he athletes athletesplaying playing in next month’s NCAA Final Four tournament have by Julie Kendrick been working for years to get to these games. They’ve dribbled, they’ve sprinted, they’ve taken countless shots, run through motion offenses — and they’ve practiced, practiced and practiced a little bit more. They’ve kept on going when things got tough and a chance at victory seemed far away. In early April, when those same superstars take to the ultimate national stage at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, it will be the fulfillment of many of their lifelong dreams. It will also be the culmination of a major journey for a woman who was instrumental in bidding for — and the organizing of — the entire event, starting back in 2014: Kate Mortenson, a 52-year-old southwest Minneapolis resident, has been the face, voice and heart of an event expected to bring 94,000 people to the region, along with an estimated $142 million in tournament-related revenue. In many ways, Mortenson — as President and CEO of the 2019 Final Four Minneapolis Local Organizing Committee — has been gathering the skills and experience needed for a flawlessly executed national event just like this one. She studied broadcast journalism at Boston University, became a Peace Corps volunteer in the Comoros Islands off the southeast coast of Africa, and then worked as a managing editor for Hubbard Broadcasting. Next she spent two decades raising her family and working as a community organizer and independent consultant focused on nonprofit organizations. To some, Mortenson might seem an unlikely ambassador for an event like the Final Four, even if the organizing committee is officially a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. “Usually, it’s someone from the world of athletics or someone with a background in travel and tourism. Going with me was a third path — choosing someone whose roots are in community development,” she said. “We are designing this great event around the impact we want to see in our communities.”


Mortenson has a proven history of building strong relationships in philanthropy circles and change at the community level, especially in the Twin Cities. In 2012, Mortensen received the Engaged Philanthropist Award from Social Venture Partners Minnesota and Minnesota Community Foundation for her work for the Northside Achievement Zone / Friends of the Future program in Minneapolis. The honor “recognizes individual philanthropists who invest not only their money, but also their time and talents in the nonprofit organizations they support.” “My heart is in community engagement,” Mortenson said.

WE ARE DESIGNING THIS GREAT EVENT AROUND THE IMPACT WE WANT TO SEE IN OUR COMMUNITIES. — KATE MORTENSON

So why the Final Four? And then there’s basketball. While Mortenson’s didn’t grow up as an athlete, she says she “married into” basketball fandom when she and her husband, David — chairman of the Minneapolisbased construction empire M.A. Mortenson Co. — were married 23 years ago. “I’m surrounded by ardent college hoops fans, and one of my favorite memories is spending spring break afternoons indoors, watching games during March Madness,” she said. “The idea of student and amateur athletics is very dear to me.” Now Mortenson is determined to make this NCAA event as community-focused as possible: “The Final Four is a signature sporting event that has something for everyone in our community.” Indeed, events for the public will include Reese’s

Kate Mortenson kicked off the Read to the Final Four initiative at Phalen Lake Elementary School in St. Paul in May with U of M University Associate Karen Kaler and other local dignitaries.

26 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


Mon Apr 8 2019

NCAA 2019 Final Four

Sec D Seat 23

Tracy Walsh

Though tickets to the Final Four games at U.S. Bank Stadium start at about $200, there are tons of free and affordable events for locals who want to be near the action — and even see the players — April 5–8. Learn more about all these events at ncaa.com/final-four.

SCHEDULE Apr. 5: Reese’s Final Four Friday

Final Four Friday festivities at the stadium on April 5 — a free event in which fans can watch players practice — and the Final Four Fan Fest at the Minneapolis Convention Center (free for ages 12 and younger) April 5–8. And that’s in addition to oodles of free indoor and outdoor concerts, activities and events like the Final Four Dribble, an April 7 parade of 3,000 kids, who will get free basketballs and T-shirts. Meanwhile, one of the most lasting impacts of the Final Four on the Twin Cities will be from a renovation of the North Commons Rec Center in Minneapolis, which will involve upgrades to the park’s indoor basketball facilities, including a refurbished court, new backboards and rims, safety straps and wall padding, a new wireless sound system and LED lighting, new paint and a youth-inspired mural. Dubbed the Men’s Final Four Legacy Project — made possible with a sponsorship from Dove Men+Care — the refurbished center will be unveiled during the first week of April just prior to the Final Four.

Better than ever Minneapolis has hosted the Final Four three times before — at Williams Arena in 1951 and at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in 1992 and 2001. This is the first time the tournament will be held in U.S. Bank Stadium, the site of Super Bowl LII in February 2018.

This year’s event will involve the community in unprecedented and inclusive ways, with a focus on youth and a celebration of the state’s growing diversity. Communities all over the state have already participated in Fan Jam events that included opportunities to take practice shots, snap selfies with the National Championship trophy (pictured above), win giveaways, enter ticket sweepstakes and learn more about special Final Four programs.

U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis See the Final Four players up close for free in their final open practices before the semifinals, followed by the Reese’s College All-Star Game in the afternoon.

Apr. 5–8: Final Four Fan Fest

Minneapolis Convention Center Celebrate a variety of sports with interactive games, special celebrity and athlete appearances, autograph signings, a home run derby, free cheer clinics, a climbing wall and a chance to snap a selfie with the Final Four championship trophy. Admission will be $4–$10 for ages 13 and up, free for ages 12 and younger.

Apr. 5–7: March Madness Music Fest The Armory, Minneapolis Attend a free music series with multiples stages, including national acts such as Maroon 5, Imagine Dragons and Jason Aldean. Though the event is free, tickets will be required for admission.

Apr. 5–8: Tip-Off Tailgate

In another initiative that’s dear to Mortenson’s heart, the Minneapolis Final Four organizing committee and the NCAA have teamed up to promote and inspire reading through a year-long, statewide initiative, Read to the Final Four, focused on  third-graders. More than 250 schools statewide have joined the program and so far kids have read nearly 4 million minutes with the program. Modeled in name after the expression

Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis This four-day tailgating party will feature free interactive activities and live entertainment in the heart of the city.

Apr. 7: Final Four Dribble

Minneapolis Convention Center Three thousand children — who will get a free shirt and a special new basketball — will dribble, parade style, through the streets of downtown Minneapolis. Participation is free, but advanced registration is required and is limited to ages 18 and younger.

2019 NCAA Final Four

U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis Two semifinal games will be played April 6, followed by the championship on Monday, April 8.

“Road to the Final Four,” the program also includes a tournament-style reading competition — complete with brackets — for Minnesota elementary school children. The “Final Four” third-grade classes with the most average minutes read will be crowned reading champions and celebrated at Fan Fest during Final Four weekend.

MONDAY APRIL 8 2019 Section D Seat: 23


Numerous public figures helped launch Read to the Final Four in St. Paul, including Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, Bert Colianni (Pohlad Companies), St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, Ed Graff (Minneapolis Public Schools), Katrice Albert (NCAA), Joseph Gothard (Saint Paul Public Schools), Karen Kaler (University of Minnesota) and Kate Mortenson (Minneapolis Local Organizing Committee).

‘The Minnesota Way’ The Final Four tournament build-up hasn’t escaped scrutiny, of course. The publicly funded Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority will spend an estimated $10 million on the event, quite a bit more than the $627,000 it spent to host the Super Bowl in 2018, due in large part to the blackout curtains and panels required by the NCAA at an estimated cost of more than $5 million. But, as proponents have pointed out, the lightblocking systems will allow the stadium to host other events in the years to come. In a recent Star Tribune editorial, meanwhile, the paper argued there’s “no doubt” the Final Four will be “worth the cost,” due to the major off-season tourism boost and reputation-building effects of the event for the city. Mortenson pointed out that there are only about 10 places in the U.S. that meet the requirements for a Final Four event. She believes creating a successful event now could pay dividends in future years. “We could be on the list for hosting a Final Four every seven to nine years, and we could become a trusted host city partner for the NCAA,” she said. (Already the NCAA Women’s Final Four is set for the Target Center in Minneapolis in 2022.) While acknowledging that the stakes for the men’s event this year are high, Mortenson said she’s committed to setting new expectations for the social and civic good that can come from — KATE MORTENSON such a major athletic event.

I PREDICT WE WILL SEE A POWERFUL OUTCOME FOR OUR REGION, AND THAT OTHER REGIONS WILL BEGIN TO MODEL THEIR EVENTS AFTER ‘THE MINNESOTA WAY.’

28 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

“I predict we will see a powerful outcome for our region, and that other regions will begin to model their events after ‘The Minnesota Way,’” she said. How will Mortenson know if this year’s big event is a success? “First, we have to deliver an excellent experience for the athletes, guests, visitors and fans. That’s table stakes for anything else,” she said, citing secondary goals of “legacy projects, such as sustainability, anti-trafficking, small business participation and a commitment to youth and education.” “The third goal, of equal importance,” she said, “is developing inclusion strategies with intention, ensuring that diverse groups feel welcome as part of the event.”

Grounded and relatable In the five years since the bid and awarding of the Final Four to Minneapolis, many leaders in the community have had an opportunity to see Mortenson in action. That includes Jonathan Weinhagen, President and CEO of the Minneapolis Regional Chamber. “Kate is such an impressive and grounded individual,” he said. “Not only is she so relatable, but she’s one of the most


energetic, vibrant community leaders I’ve ever had the opportunity to work with. When I think about some of the big issues we’re tackling as a region — like early childhood education, community development and philanthropy — Kate seems to be a part of all of them. What she’s doing will accelerate this region.” Melvin Tennant is President and CEO of Meet Minneapolis and Executive Director of Sports Minneapolis. He’s been working with Mortenson since the bid process began in 2014. “Everyone who works with her sees she’s extremely passionate about the impact she wants to have on the community,” he said. Tennant said he’s impressed with the way Mortenson has achieved her goals

through tangible actions, including her idea to create a Future Stars Interns program to hire paid youth interns from diverse backgrounds to work for the organizing committee. “They seem empowered to do their work,” Tennant said of the interns. “And it’s clear they enjoy working for her.” When the interview for this story was conducted, Mortenson reported that her team was comprised of 60 percent diverse employees and 60 percent female employees. And, Mortenson added, “More than half our vendor service contracts have been awarded to diverse businesses.” Despite those achievements — a nd incredibly long hours with the Final Four committee — Mortenson has remained active on several boards, including the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Business Journal’s Women’s Leadership Council, Minnesota Women’s Economic Roundtable, Greater Twin Cities United Way, Minnesota Public Radio and the Mortenson Family Foundation.

A secret sauce

Minneapolis resident Kate Mortenson has been working to develop the 2019 NCAA Final Four events since she served as bid director in 2014. Tracy Walsh

Mortenson’s days are always full, and occasionally hectic, and they’re getting moreso with each day that moves closer to the first Final Four tournament games, set for April 6 and 8. Depending on the schedule, her first meeting of the day can begin as early as 7 a.m. “Every day is different, which is something that I absolutely love,” she said. “I toggle between short-term immediate work and long-term, strategic vision. I tell my team my role is to be responsible for the conditions that will create success.” While this may seem like a monumental effort, Mortenson remains undaunted. “I think there are artificial limitations that we can put on ourselves in almost any situation, so I try not to do that,” she said.

“Just because something hasn’t been done in a particular way before, that doesn’t mean that it can’t be.” Describing the secret sauce behind her success, she broke it down this way: “I guess I have some idealism mixed with stubbornness — and, ambition, too; throw a little of that in there — and those combine to keep me saying ‘We can do better.’ We can achieve more and do more. I always want to be pushing the boundary of what’s possible.”

Family and private life Mortenson is a mother of three — Jack, 22, a senior at Colgate University, his father’s alma mater; Norah, 21, an art and design student at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn; and Charles, 17, a senior at The Blake School in Minneapolis. This year will be a pivotal one for the family, she said: “Our oldest is graduating from college, our youngest is graduating from high school, and I’ll be graduating from the Final Four.” Ever the efficient planner, she’s even got a game plan for what will happen once the event is over: “David and I are planning to take a sabbatical vacation for four to six weeks,” she said. They plan to start with a trip to Greece and Turkey. “I visited Turkey at the end of my years in the Peace Corps, and I’ve always thought I’d love to go back someday,” Mortenson said. Mortenson said she and her husband have curtailed vacation time to keep her focus tightly on the basketball tournament’s finale in Minneapolis. “It’s been quite a while since we’ve been completely unplugged,” she said. “The Final Four has been with me all the time, the way a turtle carries its shell.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 29


MARCH 10

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR MARCH

SEED SAVERS EXCHANGE

Photo courtesy of Illusion Theater

→ Learn about gardening with heirloom plants from a seed-saving expert, followed by a seed exchange, featuring rare seeds. Participants can — but don’t need to — bring their own seeds to participate in this 37th-annual event.

MY ANTONIA

→ After taking its show on the road to Nebraska, the Illusion Theater brings its adaptation of Willa Cather’s 100-year-old novel home to Minneapolis to tell the story of European immigrants who came to the prairies of Nebraska in the 1880s. When: March 1–24 Where: Illusion Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $25–$45 Info: illusiontheater.org

ONGOING

MIRRORED MOSAICS → This exhibit — subtitled Artists’ Reflections on Being Muslim in Minnesota — celebrates the work of local artists with connections to the Muslim community. When: Through March 29 Where: Art Works, Eagan Cost: FREE Info: awe.mn

THROUGH APRIL 10

FREE TAX FILING ASSISTANCE → Trained and certified AARP Tax Aide volunteers will work with taxpayers to prepare and electronically file federal and state income tax returns. 30 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays through April 10 Where: Community Thread, Stillwater Cost: FREE; call 651-439-7434 between 9 a.m.–4 p.m. to make an appointment. Info: CommunityThreadMN.org

When: March 10 Where: Oliver Kelley Farm, Elk River Cost: FREE Info: mnhs.org/event/6843

MARCH 16

HATS, HORSES AND HIGH TEA → This annual event showcases the perfect hats for the Kentucky Derby, a polo match, Easter or upcoming weddings. Staff will serve tea and other beverages as well as finger sandwiches, cake and scones with clotted cream. When: March 16 Where: Scarborough Fair, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: scarboroughfairshop.com

MARCH 16–17

IRISH HERITAGE WEEKEND → Enjoy a tour with favorite Irish songs and stories of the Hills and their servants, many of them Irish, to explore the history of Irish Americans in Minnesota. When: March 16–17 Where: James J. Hill House, St. Paul Cost: Included with admission of $6–10 Info: mnhs.org/event/6573

MARCH 1–JUNE 8

ST. PATRICK’S DAY IRISH CELEBRATION

→ The Rosemary Clooney Musical features many of the performer’s signature songs, including Come On-A My House, Tenderly and Straighten Up and Fly Right, while also following her successes on film, radio and TV as well as the struggles in her personal life.

→ The Irish Music & Dance Association hosts regional and local Irish entertainment, dance and cuisine, plus Celtic vendors, pipe bands and children’s crafts on March 16. The March 17 program will be devoted entirely to dance performances.

TENDERLY

When: March 1–June 8 Where: Old Log Theatre, Excelsior Cost: $30–$40 Info: oldlog.com

When: March 16–17 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: $5–$7 Info: landmarkcenter.org


MARCH 17

THE BEST OF JAZZ AT THE JUNGLE →→Connie Evingson will perform highlights from the past decade’s shows, including the music of Peggy Lee, Duke Ellington, The Beatles, Ella Fitzgerald and more. When: 4 p.m. March 17 Where: Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $30 Info: jungletheater.com

MARCH 23

APRIL 5–8

→→Classic Albums Live presents the proficient musicians’ best albums live on stage, note for note, cut for cut.

→→Celebrate a variety of sports with interactive games, special celebrity and athlete appearances, autograph signings, a home run derby, free cheer clinics, a climbing wall and a chance to snap a selfie with the Final Four championship trophy. (See the cover story in this issue for more Final Four events.)

THE BEATLES’ ABBEY ROAD

When: March 23 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $34–$57 Info: ordway.org

MARCH 27–28

MARCH 21–24

LEGALLY BLONDE: THE MUSICAL

→→Leonard Bernstein’s classic operetta brings together Theater Latte Da, a full orchestra, the VocalEssence Ensemble Singers and members of the VocalEssence Chorus.

→→Based on the hit 2001 film, this production follows the transformation of Elle Woods as she tackles stereotypes, sexism, snobbery and scandal in pursuit of her dreams.

CANDIDE

When: March 21–24 Where: Cowles Center for Dance and the Performing Arts, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$45 Info: vocalessence.org

When: March 27–28 Where: The Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $40–$85 Info: ames-center.com

FINAL FOUR FAN FEST

When: April 5–8 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center Cost: $4–$10 for ages 13 and up, free for ages 12 and younger Info: ncaa.com

MORE ONLINE! Find more events for all ages on the Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-miss-calendar.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 31


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH MINNESOTA'S BEST BALLERS

AUGUSTUS BORTON BREUER BUTLER FOWLES GARNETT HUDSON

HUMPHRIES LOVE MCCARVILLE MIKAN MOORE MIKKELSON PITINO

RUBIO SAUNDERS SZCZERBIAK SPREWELL THOMPSON TUCKER WIGGINS

D

S

B

O

G

A

R

N

E

T

T

J

A

I

K

C

G

N

H

G

E

V

G

L

R

H

Y

X

I

P

R

E

L

T

U

B

S

E

L

W O

F

T

E

O

U

O

Y

E

B

H

M

A

I

J

M O

B

I

N

E

A

R

T

P

C W

F

V

F

P

I

M

D W

J

B

N

L

L

E

W

E

R

P

S

Y

I

Q

L

V

M

B

O

R

T

O

N

A

Z

O

V

X

U

C

T

A

S

V

S

W

X

T

C

G

N

V

F

G

L

H

T

R

E

E

L

O

Z

C

K

I

P

Z

I

R

CRYPTOGRAM

R

U

E

N

I

S

E

T

M

U

T

N

G

X

M

Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

F

C

D

Z

H

R

O

K

J

O

I

U W O

Z

T

K

N

S

B

J

H

V

K

A

P

M O M

T

J

E

U

I

O

T

L

P

W

I

G

G

I

N

S

T

R

A

V

D

N

D

I

M

L

M

K

B

H W

S

K

S

S

U

T

S

U

G

U

A

S

U

O

E

S

E

C

D

M M

R

A

G

N

H W

R

P

M

I S Q

. N G L B Q .

Q A Z

Q Z T K

' Q A T Q ' B

H A T Q

K O .

F T F

T C H T O B

Q T S M A Q .

B A T L Z

Q A Z

E L Z F G Q . .

Q T R Z

Q A Z

J C T K Z .

32 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

WORD SCRAMBLE Complete the following words using each given letter once.

K Z .

W

H

LE

R

E

O M

V C

S P

O L

HE G

A

ANSWERS

T C H T O B

Clue: Q = T

TRIVIA: 1. The Minneapolis Lakers, now the L.A. Lakers. 2. Williams Arena (1951) and the Metrodome (1992 and 2001) 3. Four (2011, 2013, 2015, 2017)

Source: Lindsay Whalen


South St. Paul HRA • 50+ Community • Income Based Rent • All Utilities Paid

TRIVIA

• Newly Remodeled • Elevators

SHOOT SOME HOOPS? 1. What was the full name of Minnesota’s primary professional basketball team from 1948 to 1960?

• Controlled Entries • On Site Caretaker Call for an appointment 651-288-8159

2. The NCAA Final Four will be at U.S. Bank South St Paul HRA GA 0319 12.indd Stadium this April. What other Minneapolis locations have hosted Final Fours? 3. How many WNBA titles have the Lynx won in the past decade?

1

Booth Manor Residence For Seniors 62+ • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

2/12/19 11:38 AM

Celebrate this spring with fresh, local foods.

Sources: basketball-reference.com, Minnesota Good Age, lynx.wnba.com Asparagus

3 SAINT PAUL LOCATIONS | msmarket.coop

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE McHale, Wolves, Gopher Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder. If you are interested in an art residency for your school or organization, visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information. Minnesota Good Age / March 2019 / 33

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM Always put the team first. That’s what my dad always taught me. Share the credit. Take the blame.


Crossword

64 Youngster of an awkward age 65 Bullring bravos

DOWN

1 Kitchen topper 2 Release violently 3 Shortstop alongside Robinson 4 Keats or Yeats 5 Brainpower 6 1492 sailer 7 Lodging provider 8 Sense 9 Jimi Hendrix classic 10 Point in the right direction 11 Missing watch? 12 Nimrod 13 Arcade trademark word 18 Vile 22 Nick at __ 25 Intangible quality responsible for four puzzle answers 27 Passports, e.g. 29 “Star Wars” hero 30 Velocity, e.g. 31 At any time 32 “Give me __ and nothing but”: Tom Lehrer lyric 37 Church service ACROSS 33 Sunset obscurer 38 Zany 1 College Park Big Ten athlete 34 Change in China? 39 Ballet move 5 Smarten (up) 35 Actor LeBlanc 40 Weapon in some action flicks 10 Cutlass, e.g. 38 It includes reds 41 Potsdam “please” 14 Big name in the cookie aisle 39 Lively dance 42 Social gathering 15 “Rebel Without a Cause” actor 41 Small meal 43 Rip verbally 16 Castle 42 Sierra __ 45 Fall back 17 Addition at the palace? 44 Mixed martial artist Ronda 46 Acknowledge 19 Dot on a globe, perhaps 45 Heavy 20 Surprising and sometimes annoying success 47 Woodwind musician’s piece 48 Beethoven dedicatee 49 CPR pro 21 Felicity’s “Desperate Housewives” role 49 Inbox message 52 Gasses up 23 Somme summer 50 Prepare, as garlic 55 University of Wyoming city 24 Pringles alternative 51 __ Pete: hot sauce brand 57 PC addresses 26 Trap fluff 52 Massages 58 Mole in the cat food factory? 27 “__ about time!” 53 Creator of Perry and Della 60 Down 28 Reason for road service 61 Egbert __, aptly named W.C. Fields character 54 Winter coat 32 Disreputable 56 Magazine contents 62 Countertop material 35 “All in the Family” spinoff 36 Dallas NBAer 59 Go after, in a way 63 Alluring 34 / March 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


T T M M S S N N U U X X M M

P P F F E E E E A A J J L L

Z Z A A I I A A B B Y Y J J

J J L L R R H H N N R R K K

H H S S O O Q Q L L T T E E

H H S S M M U U Z Z P P F F

G G D D E E N N U U A A R R

U U P P M M E E Q Q H H I I

T T E E V V T T G G U U E E

E E O O S S I I H H G G N N

L L U U U U P P X X D D D D

D D P P S S S S K K F F S S

Z Z A A U U W W S S K K H H

X X E E N N H H N N K K I I

Z Z Q Q S S C C N N U U P P

E E A A H H E E I I T T V V

I I J J I I Y Y B B N N V V

W W T T N N N N Q Q J J G G

A A O O E E O O L L B B H H

H H E E A A L L T T H H Y Y

I I V V K K U U A A L L U U

Profile for Minnesota Good Age

March 2019  

March 2019  

Profile for mngoodage
Advertisement