Page 1

THE MINNESOTA DAILY · 2012 SURVIVAL GUIDE

160 LB

THE MINNESOTA DAILY’S 2012

survival guide


Survival Guide 2012

Free stuff on campus Oh, the places you’ll go! Who’s who at the U Students interests, goals to make campus connections Construction continues at the University Buying books is not a one-stop shop

2 8 10 11 12 19

How to survive Gophers athletics Sports review: WINTER Sports review: SPRING Sports review: FALL

21 24 27 31

Get off campus A guide to Minneapolis music Kickin’ it with Kaler

29 32 34

1


2

Survival Guide 2012

One Stop encourages students to take advantage of free services and activities on campus. BY REBECCA HARRINGTON rharrington@mndaily.com

E

verybody loves free stuff, and according to University of Minnesota data, students might need it now more than ever. The average University undergraduate student graduates with about $27,000 in student loan debt, according to the Office of Institutional Re-

search. To lessen this financial strain, One Stop Student Services is encouraging students to save by taking advantage of the free services and activities on campus. One Stop’s financial literacy campaign encourages students to “live like a student” now so they don’t have to later. “It’s one thing to eat ramen for dinner when you’re a sophomore in college, but when you’re 35 that’s

kind of sad,” said Michelle Overtoom, the manager of the campaign. Many of the things highlighted aren’t actually free but come from the student services fees that students seeking six or more credits pay each semester. Many of these services are partly funded by the student services fee. Last year, those fees totaled about $365. The fee helps fund University student groups and services like Boynton Health Service, the Recreation Center and Gophers After Dark. “Our goal is really to highlight that for students

CAMPUS SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES CAREER CENTERS*

UNIVERSITY SERVICES

ACTIVITIES

MUSEUM

BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

CSE & CBS SHEPHERD LABS

REC CENTER

UNIVERSITY RECREATION CENTER

CLA

SCIENCE TEACHING AND STUDENT SERVICES BUILDING

SMART LEARNING COMMONS WALTER LIBRARY

THE WHOLE COFFMAN UNION

STUDENT UNIONS & ACTIVITIES

FINANCIAL COUNSELING

COFFMAN UNION

BOYNTON HEALTH SERVICE- EAST BANK

MUSEUM CSOM

CARLSON SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

WEISMEN ART MUSEUM

BOYNTON

BOYNTON HEALTH SERVICEEAST BANK

VOLUNTEER TAX ASSISTANCE PROGRAM HANSON HALL

*CCE/CDes/CFANS career center is located in McNeal Hall on the St. Paul campus

SOURCE: PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

so they know that they don’t have to spend a lot of money to have fun,” Overtoom said. Financial Counseling Students can get free advice about budgeting, credit cards, loans and debt from Boynton Health Service financial counselors. Career Centers Each University college has a center dedicated to preparing students for entering the job market, from writing résumé to practicing interviews and looking for job openings. The University also runs the online job site GoldPASS, where s t u d e n t s c a n c re a t e profiles, and employers can search them or post openings. Boynton Health Service The on-campus health center has locations on the St. Paul campus and the East Bank. The Gopher Quick Clinic lets students walk in for treatment for minor illnesses. Most insurance plans, including the University’s Student Health Benefit Plan, cover Boynton visits. SMART Learning Commons Libraries host academic programming including

tutors, structured study groups and practice exams. Peer Research Consultants can also help with research papers and projects. Commons are located in Walter, Wilson and Magrath libraries. University Recreation Center Through the student service fees, students have access to both St. Paul and East Bank recreation centers. Student membership includes access to the facilities and discounts on fitness classes. Office of Information Technology Several campus locations offer discounted software and computer assistance to students. Tech Stop charges to fix computers — but advice is always free. Volunteer Tax Assistance Program Volunteers certified by the Internal Revenue Service prepare taxes for students and community members with incomes less than $49,000 for free. Student Unions and Activities Every weekend, Student Unions and Activities hosts Gophers After Dark, which offers free movies,

STUDENT SERVICES FEE BREAKDOWN $118.02 Boynton Health Service

$31.50 University Recreation Center

$365.90

TOTAL STUDENT SERVICES FEE PER SEMESTER $92.11 Other

$128.27 Student Unions & Activities

SOURCE: ONE STOP

games, food and activities at Coffman Union and the St. Paul Student Center. Museums Students can peruse modern art collections of the newly renovated Weisman Art Museum, next door to Coffman Union, for free every day except Monday. The Bell Museum of Natural History is full of dioramas showcasing Minnesota natural habitats with seasonal historical and scientific exhibits. The Whole Music Club SUA hosts inexpensive or free concerts from a range of genres in the basement of Coffman Union. The music club also hosts Making Music, a conversation series, and the Bits Variety Show, which features University performers.


Survival Guide 2012

3


4

Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

5


6

Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

7


8

Survival Guide 2012

BUSES THAT SERVICE THE UNIVERSITY Popular bus stops Como

3

COMO ZOO

Dinkytown 6 UPTOWN

35W

BY NICKALAS TABBERT ntabbert@mndaily.com

T

16 DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOILS FRANKLIN AVENUE AND RIVERSIDE AVENUE

2

94

ss ip

i

Light rail The light rail is another way students can get around the cities. The Hiawatha Line runs from Target Field to the Mall of America, with stops at Lake Street and the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Once Central Corridor lightrail construction is complete on campus in 2014, students will be able to ride all the way to St. Paul, Minneapolis or the mall.

East Bank West Bank

iss

MARK VANCLEAVE

Wayne Adermann drives his route 3 bus through Dinkytown.

tination. Route 6 starts near Stadium Village and goes through downtown Minneapolis to Uptown. Route 16 runs between Minneapolis and St. Paul, stopping on campus along the way. Routes 3, 6, 16 and 50 take you to downtown Minneapolis locations like the Metrodome, Target Field, Nicollet Mall and Block E.

M

he Twin Cities offers students without cars many ways to reach many off-campus attractions. With more than 200 bus routes in operation, there isn’t a place in the metro area you can’t reach. Bus routes 2, 3, 6, 16 and 50 come through campus. A sure place to catch a bus is at the JonesEddy Circle, between Jones and Eddy halls on the East Bank, or below Willey Hall on the West Bank.

Route 2 serves both banks on campus before heading down Riverside and Franklin avenues — a densely cultural area with many dining and shopping options. Route 3 runs from downtown Minneapolis through campus to the Southeast Como neighborhood and then on to St. Paul. Students living nor th of campus or wanting to reach the St. Paul campus often commute this way. Route 3 also goes near the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, a popular summer des-

55 MALL OF AMERICA

pi R

ive

94

r

SOURCE: METRO TRANSIT

One last way to get outside the campus and experience the city is through bike trails. There are more than 50 miles of paved trails around Minneapolis to destinations like the Stone Arch Bridge or Lake Calhoun in southwest Minneapolis. Information about bus and train schedules can be found at Coffman Union near Jamba Juice or online at metrotransit.org. At Coffman, you can find information on each

b u s ro u t e a s w e l l a s a map of the entire Metro Transit service area. Online, you can find the same infor mation and plan your next trip using an interactive map or see when a bus will next come to a stop nearby. The adult cost to ride the bus or light rail is $1.75 except during rush hours, when the fare is $2.25. Buses do not give change when paying fares. If you are planning to transfer

buses at all during your trip, the bus driver can provide a transfer after you pay. There are multiple options for paying your fare. A popular option for student riders is a U-Pass. For $97, a student has unlimited rides on buses or light rails for the entire semester. They are available at Coffman. Another option is a Go-To Card, a pre-loaded card with a balance that you can fill up as necessary.


Survival Guide 2012

9


10 Survival Guide 2012

Who’s who at the U BY EMMA NELSON enelson1@mndaily.com

Even those who don’t plan to get involved with campus leadership will likely come in contact with a few University administrators during their time as a student. These are the people who make decisions about the University’s budget, academics, housing and everything related to the University’s mission and function. The Daily has compiled a list of key administrators and their roles at the University.

ERIC KALER Eric Kaler replaced Robert Bruininks as the University’s president in July 2011. He governs the University’s Board of Regents and also has an executive support team consisting of senior vice presidents, vice presidents, chancellors at each of the University’s four coordinate campuses, the athletics director and the president of the University of Minnesota Foundation.

MOIRA DUCHARME, DAILY FILE PHOTO Tom Sullivan speaks at a Board of Regents meeting at the McNamara Alumni Center, as President Eric Kaler and regent board Chair Linda Cohen look on from behind. Sullivan stepped down from his position as senior vice president and provost and was officially recognized by the board during the meeting, where the regents discussed topics like finance and research.

Kaler recently proposed his first annual budget for the upcoming fiscal year, which will raise tuition 3.5% for undergraduates — the lowest increase in 12 years. He’s also one of only three Big Ten university presidents on Twitter (@PrezKaler).

KAREN HANSON

THE BOARD OF REGENTS The Board of Regents consists of 12 members elected by the Minnesota state Legislature. Four of them represent the state as a whole, while the other eight members each represent a single congressional district. The board meets once a month — with the exception of August and January — to discuss and vote on issues like the University’s budget, new construction projects, the administration’s relationship with students and other aspects of University relations. Regent Linda Cohen, elected to the board in 2007, currently serves as its chair.

Karen Hanson is senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. She was appointed by Kaler in late 2011 and took office in early 2012. Hanson manages academics at the University, which includes issues that affect students and faculty, such as tenure, undergraduate and graduate education and interdisciplinary collaboration.

ROBERT JONES

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS Robert Jones is senior vice president for Academic Administration for the University of Minnesota System. He is responsible for a variety of programs ranging from the state level to the international level, which support University academics.

Steven Goldstein is president and CEO of the University of Minnesota Foundation. The foundation seeks private donations and manages the University’s endowment.

KATHLEEN O’BRIEN

Jason Rohloff is special assistant to the president for community and government relations. He handles University relations with local, state and federal governments.

Vice President for University Services Kathleen O’Brien manages campus operations, which includes everything from Housing and Residential Life and the University police to parking services and bookstores. She has a lot of contact with students and is responsible for the frequent campus news emails they receive.

NORWOOD TEAGUE

Vice President for Human Resources Kathryn Brown helps manage issues relating to University faculty and staff — from hiring and training to labor negotiations and employee benefits.

JASON ROHLOFF

Scott Studham was named University vice president and chief information officer in early 2012. He oversees information technology, including both academic and administrative systems. He is also responsible for strategizing the future of IT at the University.

STEVEN GOLDSTEIN

Tim Mulcahy is currently the vice president for research but will be retiring in December. Kaler underscored the importance of this position at the only research institution in the state as he appointed a 14-member board to search for Mulcahy’s successor.

SCOTT STUDHAM

TIM MULCAHY

Aaron Friedman is vice president for health sciences and the dean of the Medical School. Friedman has worked as a pediatrician for most of his career and was Pediatrician-in-Chief of Amplatz Children’s Hospital. He was appointed by Bruininks in 2010.

KATHRYN BROWN

RICHARD PFUTZENREUTER

Richard (Fitz) Pfutzenreuter is vice president of and chief financial officer for the University. In 2010, he was named one of the best CFO’s in the area by the Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal.

AARON FRIEDMAN

VICE PRESIDENTS

Norwood Teague was recently selected to replace Joel Maturi as athletics director and will begin on July 1. At Virginia Commonwealth University, Teague led major fundraising efforts, increasing VCU’s athletic annual fund by more than 119 percent since his arrival in 2006. He also helped the school reach its first men’s basketball Final Four in 2011, build a $10 million basketball practice facility and led a $4 million stadium renovation.


Survival Guide 2012

11

STUDENTS USE INTERESTS, GOALS TO MAKE CAMPUS CONNECTIONS BY AMANDA BANKSTON abankston@mndaily.com

W

ith one of the largest university campuses in the U.S. and a total enrollment of nearly 65,000 students, navigating the University of Minnesota’s vast social scene can seem intimidating to freshmen. But the Minnesota Daily surveyed a few upperclassmen who say there are many opportunities to discover lasting friendships and make the most of campus life. They all found some of their best friends by using their passions, responsibilities and goals to connect with other students and offer their stories as examples of how to make friends on campus. Senior psychology student Clare Gawronski said taking advantage of University programming and staying true to herself was essential to finding her place on campus. “Don’t think you have to have the same college experience as everyone else,” she said.

Upperclassmen share their secrets to finding friends on campus. Study groups Eric Muziga didn’t know a single person when he came to the University. But the Rwandan international student used his focus on academics to connect with like-minded students. Through study groups in his electrical engineering courses, he found a core group of friends to help shape his University experience both in and out of the classroom. “When you get an assignment, just find somebody to work on it with,” he said, to encourage new students to reach out to classmates. According to him, this can be the key to both lasting friendships and better grades. Student groups Gawronski needed to know there was a place where she could fit in on the large University campus before enrolling as a freshman four years ago.

She went online to wade through the more than 850 student groups on campus to find the one that has defined much of her experience at the University: the Minnesota Equestrian Team. Though she knew a few incoming students from her high school, she said finding students who shared her passion through a student organization was key to making the most of her undergraduate experience. Graduating senior Anthony Jacobs agrees. As a member of the Gophers football team, he said he met most of his friends through practicing, playing and attending athletic events with fellow Gopher athletes. He said all incoming students should use what they love to find friends with similar interests and “remember to have fun while you’re here.” Through the Student Unions and Activities website, students can search for a specific student group — greek organizations, cultural groups, interest and hobby groups — to suit their needs. If none of them stand out, SUA encourages stu-

dents to start their own through a simple process outlined on their website. On-campus jobs For Stephanie Schultz, working on campus as a student activities assistant is more than a way to make money — it’s a way to make friends. She said many new students see work as something that could take them away from an active social life, but it has supplemented hers. “It’s a way to connect with others and meet other people on campus,” she said. Students can use the University of Minnesota Job Center and online employment system to search and apply for on-campus jobs. First-year orientation programs Foday Momoh said he would have never guessed that his freshman orientation would be the start to the brotherhood that has defined his college experience. At orientation, he met a student with a similar background and sparked up a conversation.

“I felt so distant from a lot of the other students at first,” he said. “But knowing that we had things in common let me know that I’m not alone.” The two kept in touch and hung out during the Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence Kick-off event and Welcome Week where they met four more young men from similar African backgrounds. Soon, they had a visible bond that earned the group a name — Team Africa. Momoh and his friends are not alone. Recent graduate Prachi Mishra said many of her friends can trace their closest relationships back to their very first moments on campus. “It’s funny because when we were at [the Multicultural KickOff] they told us some of the people we would meet there were going to be our friends for the rest of our college careers,” Mishra said. “I never believed it.” But Momoh and Mishra said it’s true — Welcome Week, freshman orientation and other introductory programs can be the foundation for many students’ social lives.


12 Survival Guide 2012

Construction projects at the University, such as the Central Corridor lightrail line, are all scheduled for completion in 2014.

BY DINA ELRASHIDY delrashidy@mndaily.com

T

he construction projects underway on campus might alarm incoming freshmen. Five University of Minnesota buildings are either being built, expanded or reconstructed. Fortunately, all of these projects are scheduled for completion by 2014 or sooner, so current freshmen will be able to experience the new facilities and updated campus. The most obvious project on campus is the construction of the Central Corridor light rail. Upon completion in 2014, the line will connect riders from Union Depot station in downtown St. Paul to Target Field station in downtown Minneapolis, with stops, among others, in Stadium Village and on the East and West banks. Throughout the summer, crews will continue building near campus on parts of both Washington and University avenues southeast. In

mid-May, the Metropolitan Council announced construction was halfway complete and on track to be 75 percent done by year’s end. After that, crews will install the electrical and signaling systems and test train operations. Despite the construction disruption, Laura Baenen, spokeswoman for the project, said the payoff will be worth it for students. “It gives everyone another option for getting to campus,” she said. “It increases the options for where students can live off campus.” Metro Transit is currently working on adding bus lines to bring people to the Central Corridor line, making access to the line — and to campus — quicker and more convenient, Baenen said. In the meantime, Baenen said, transportation through campus is possible. “There is a way to get around and a way to get through. Things are accessible,” she said. “University Avenue and Fourth Street are open, and that’s your route to get in and out of campus. Baenen said the best way to plan your route is to go to centralcorridor. org and look at the construction updates each week. The website includes maps of current construction, planned completion dates and detour options for vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA CONSTRUCTION

Fou

2

rth

1 3

1 2 3

Northrup Auditorium Building Will house the University Honors Program, Institute for Advanced Study and Innovation by Design Lab. New auditorium space featuring 2,800 seats, improved acoustics and theater technologies. New café and study and lounge area.

4

4

Fourth Street Student Residence Hall and Dining Facility More housing for incoming freshmen and first-year transfer students. Energy efficient equipment and plumbing.

Physics and Nanotechnology Building New labs, offices and collaborative spaces for physics faculty, staff and students.

5

Stre

5

et S

E

Wa sh

ing

ton

Ave

nue

SE

University Recreation and Wellness Center expansion Four levels of exercise equipment New climbing center with 33-foot wall Over 1,000 square foot of bouldering Seven group fitness rooms New café with expanded menu An elevated track Multi-activity court Wellness Resource Center

UMN Biomedical Discovery District (Phase II) State-of-the-art chemistry and biology labs, a large vivarium and Cancer and Cardiovascular Research.

SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA CAPITAL PLANNING AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT


Survival Guide 2012

Oa ty

E 7

Av eS

St S

E

Oa

ive rsi

6th

kS tS E

kS tS

Un

E 18

14

rd Av eS

E

1

23

Un

ive rsi

ty

Av eS

E

12

9 6

17

13

Washington Ave SE 4

3

10

Delaware St SE

Food and Bars

Entertainment

Apartments

15

1. Buffalo Wild Wings 2. Caribou Coffee 3. Chipotle 4. Erbert & Gerbert’s 5. Espresso Expose 6. Hong Kong Noodles 7. Mariucci Arena 8. Noodles & Company 9. Oak Street Textbooks 10. Punch Pizza

Ontario St SE

11

Oak St SE

8

Washington Ave SE Walnut St SE

18

Harvard St SE

5

2

11. Sally’s Saloon 12. Stadium Village Books 13. Stub & Herbs 14. TCF Bank Stadium 15. University Village 16. Value Liquors 17. Village Wok 18. Williams Arena

STADIUM VILLAGE

13


14 Survival Guide 2012

Oa ty

Oa kS tS

ive rsi

6th

E

kS tS

Un

E 7

Av eS

E

St S

E

18 14

rd Av eS

E

1

23

Un

ive rsi

ty

Av eS

E

12

9 6

17

13

Washington Ave SE 4

3

10

Delaware St SE

Food and Bars

Entertainment

Apartments

15

1. Buffalo Wild Wings 2. Caribou Coffee 3. Chipotle 4. Erbert & Gerbert’s 5. Espresso Expose 6. Hong Kong Noodles 7. Mariucci Arena 8. Noodles & Company 9. Oak Street Textbooks 10. Punch Pizza

Ontario St SE

11

Oak St SE

8

Washington Ave SE Walnut St SE

18

Harvard St SE

5

2

11. Sally’s Saloon 12. Stadium Village Books 13. Stub & Herbs 14. TCF Bank Stadium 15. University Village 16. Value Liquors 17. Village Wok 18. Williams Arena

STADIUM VILLAGE


Survival Guide 2012

Ri

10

E 7

2

14

1

1

5

3

Un

ive rsi ty Ri Av ve eS rs E id e Av e12 S

11

8

14

Food and Food Bars and Bars

Entertainment Entertainment

Apartments Apartments

9

6

17

13 4

6th St

S

Av e 4

2

Washington Ave SE 11

gt on

3

10

Delaware St SE

15

20th Av eS

18

Harvard St SE

5

S

Oak St SE

Washington Ave SE

C dar Walnut SteSE Ave S

5th St

hin

21

8

16 12

W as

E

9

15

S ve nA

18

E

19t hA ve S

7

E

17

St S

gto

Av eS

6th

rd Av eS

13E

S

6

23

kS tS

Oa kS tS

ty

Oa

S

ive rsi

Av e

n shi Wa

Un

Cedar Ave

id e

Ontario St SE

ve rs

6th St

S

1. Buffalo Wild Wings 11. Sally’s Saloon Mountaineering 1. 400 Bar 10. Midwest 2. Caribou Coffee 12. Stadium Village Books 2. The Acadia 11. Nomad World Pub 3. Chipotle Herbs Pub 3. Cedar Cultural Center 13. Stub 12.&Palmer’s 4. 4. Erbert & Gerbert’s 14. TCF Bank Grand Marc 13. RedStadium Sea Bar 5. Espresso Expose 15. University Village 5. Hard Times Cafe 14. Triple Rock Social Club 6. Hong Kong Noodles 16. Value 6. Jewel of India 15.Liquors Town Hall Brewery 7. Mariucci ArenaCafe 17. Village Wok 7. Kilimanjaro 16. The Weinery 8. Noodles & Company 18. Williams Arena 8. Lucky Dragon 17. The Grill Room 9. Oak StreetCoffee Textbooks 9. Mapp’s and Teas 18. Chipotle 10. Punch Pizza

STADIUM WEST VILLAGE BANK

15


16 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

17


18 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

BY MEGAN GOSCH mgosch@mndaily.com

F

or most new students, buying books is not exactly a top priority when arriving on campus. With the chaos of trying to set up a dorm room, locating classes and navigating through construction, buying books can become a chore that is avoided. The official University Bookstore, located on the lower level of Coffman

Union, is one of the more convenient options for students buying books this fall. With its central location, the bookstore is easy to find for students new to the University. The bookstore offers a variety of resources to benefit University students specifically, including a personalized list of books needed for students based on the classes they’re enrolled in. University students can also use their

U Cards to charge books to their student accounts rather than paying cash or credit up front. But at the University’s bookstore, books are usually grabbed early, leaving the students who buy later a new book rather than the cheaper used version. Another option, Amazon.com, is a popular resource for books. There, students can search one of the largest online selections of books and consis-

tently find some of the lowest prices. Students also often turn to Amazon for used books that have sold out at the bookstore. Students should be aware, however, that when buying books from Amazon, they often buy from different sources. This can affect shipping rates and cost more overall than buying from other sources. Bob Crabb, director of University bookstores, said it’s common for students

who buy their books elsewhere, like online, to buy the wrong edition or to receive a book in worse condition than was originally described. Additional options include on-campus book stores like Oak Street Textbooks in Stadium Village. Although Oak Street is a popular destination for students to sell back their books at the end of the semester, students can also buy used books in-store or

19

on Amazon. A list of books available for rent is also available to students at the store. At Chegg.com, students can rent books. Chegg provides a wide variety of books to rent and has a return policy for students who may have ordered the wrong book. With so many different options available, the most important thing is to shop around and try different ways of getting books.


20 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

TOP FIVE TEAMS

RANKING SUCCESS: HOW EACH SPORT FINISHED THE 2011-12 SEASON

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

WOMEN’S HOCKEY NCAA champions

WRESTLING

Big Ten champions, NCAA runner-up

MEN’S HOCKEY NCAA semifinals

WOMEN’S SWIM/DIVE 1st in Big Ten, 11th at NCAAs

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (INDOOR)

2nd in Big Ten, 18th at NCAAs

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 19 21 22 23 24 25 TIED

T-3rd in Big Ten, 16th at NCAAs

MEN’S GYMNASTICS 4th in Big Ten, made NCAAs

VOLLEYBALL

NCAA Sweet 16

MEN’S SWIM/DIVE 4th in Big Ten, 24th at NCAAs

MEN’S TENNIS NCAA 1st round

WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS 3rd in Big Ten

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

5th in Big Ten, 27th at NCAAs

TIED

SOCCER

Big Ten semifinals

WOMEN’S TENNIS NCAA 1st round

HOW TO SURVIVE GOPHERS ATHLETICS

MEN’S BASKETBALL NIT runner-up

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL WBI champions

BASEBALL

29-27 record (11-13 Big Ten)

SOFTBALL

31-22 record (10-14 Big Ten)

MEN’S GOLF 7th in Big Ten

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (OUTDOOR)* 7th in Big Ten ROWING

5th in Big Ten

WOMEN’S GOLF 8th in Big Ten

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (OUTDOOR)* 9th in Big Ten

FOOTBALL

3-9 record (2-6 Big Ten)

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (INDOOR) 11th in Big Ten

*Season concluded at NCAA championships June 6-9 SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

BY CHARLIE ARMITZ carmitz@mndaily.com

Being a fan of Gophers athletics doesn’t always involve logic. The football team, for example, finished tied for 10th in the 12-team Big Ten conference last season, yet it drew more fans on average than the University of Minnesota’s other 24 sports combined. The men’s basketball team, which drew the second-most fans, also finished 10th and had many supporters calling for its head coach to be fired. For the University’s three revenue sports — football, men’s basketball and men’s hockey — the last 10 years have been rough. For its 22 nonrevenue sports, they’ve been a relatively smooth ride.

ATTENDANCE AVERAGES FOR GOPHERS SPORTS* FOOTBALL- 47,713 MEN’S BASKETBALL- 11,794 MEN’S HOCKEY- 9,539 VOLLEYBALL- 3,608 WRESTLING- 3,024 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL- 2,835 WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS- 1,684 WOMEN’S HOCKEY- 1,308 SOCCER- 926 BASEBALL- 531 MEN’S GYMNASTICS- 442 SOFTBALL- 204

21

*Not all University sports track attendance SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

Following successful nonrevenue sports like volleyball, wrestling and cross country provides a satisfying fan experience that won’t be found by cheering in the student section at football games. It requires little initiative, comes at little to no cost and gives fans the chance to see the best of Gophers athletics. Tickets to regular season games of the women’s hockey team, which won the national title last season, are free for University students. Seating is excellent, the quality of play is high, and fans are almost guaranteed to see a victory — the Gophers are 34-5-3 at Ridder Arena since 2010. The men’s hockey team made the Frozen Four last season, but its recent history has been riddled with inconsistency and unrest within its devoted fan base. The team has failed to live up to expectations since winning back-to-back national titles in 2002 and 2003. Longtime head coach Don Lucia’s contract extension last October was met with skepticism despite his early success. The men’s basketball team faces similar issues with far less success. Head coach Tubby Smith, who won a national title with Kentucky in 1998, has yet to win a single NCAA tournament game

with the Gophers. In the past two seasons, his team finished a combined 12-24 in the Big Ten while battling through legal issues, players transferring out of the program and decreases in attendance. The football team, which plays at TCF Bank Stadium on campus, has fired two head coaches in the past six years and hasn’t won a bowl game since 2004. Last season, the Gophers lost four games by more than 25 points and finished 2-6 in the Big Ten. Win or lose, many fans enjoy the tradition of attending Gophers football, basketball and hockey games. But if winning’s your thing, don’t be afraid to start your own tradition. Many fans have done that already. Both the wrestling and volleyball teams average more than 3,000 fans per match, and the two sports have finished in the top-four nationally a combined nine times since 2000. Last season, the wrestlers finished second at the NCAA championships after winning the regular season Big Ten title. The volleyball team made the Sweet 16. Ten of the other 19 nonrevenue sports at the University finished in the top half of their conference last season. The

men’s cross country, men’s gymnastics, women’s swimming and diving and men’s indoor track and field teams all finished in the top-20 at the NCAA championships. W i t h n o n re v e n u e sports, consistency is a given. With revenue sports, it’s a lost cause. As Norwood Teague prepares to replace Joel Maturi as athletics director this summer, the mood on campus regarding Gophers athletics has shifted from pessimism to optimism. Don’t let false hope fool you. While each revenue sport has the potential to be successful, they have done little collectively in the last 10 years to break the spell of mediocrity. There’s nothing wrong with hope, but there’s also nothing wrong with enjoying the successes of unpopular sports. The sports themselves are, for the most part, entertaining. The athletes are well-rounded, competitive and personable. The accommodation is often free, if not luxurious. Best of all, there are 22 to choose from. You only have three revenue sports, and odds are they’re going to disappoint you more often than not. College offers enough stress as it is. Don’t add Gophers athletics to the list.


22 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

23


24 Survival Guide 2012

WINTER SPORTS RECAP BY DAILY SPORTS STAFF

MEN’S BASKETBALL MEN’S BASKETBALL NIT runner-up Lost in Big Ten quarterfinals Overall: 23-15 Conference: 6-12 (T-9th)

The 2011-12 men’s basketball season was supposed to be the last stand for seniors Trevor Mbakwe and Ralph Sampson III to lead the Gophers back to the NCAA tournament.

That vision ended seven games into the season when Mbakwe, the team’s leading scorer and rebounder, went down with a seasonending ACL tear. After finishing 6-12 in conference under head coach Tubby Smith for a second straight year, Minnesota made the best of its misfortune in the National Invitation Tournament, where it won four games before being blown out by Stanford in the final. A month later, the

NCAA granted Mbakwe a sixth year to compete. Mbakwe, whose name has been mentioned in NBA draft discussions, announced less than a month later that he’d return for the 2012-13 season. Mbakwe will join senior forward Rodney Williams and freshman guard Andre Hollins as the Gophers’ top returners. Both players excelled in the NIT and in the Big Ten tournament, where Minnesota upset Northwestern before falling to Michigan.

The Gophers showed promise in the regular season, too, especially after upsetting then-No. 7 Indiana on Jan. 12. But the Hoosiers blew out the Gophers at Williams Arena a month and a half later. After starting 10-0 at the Barn in nonconference play, Minnesota lost six of nine conference home games. Talks of renovating the 84-year-old Williams Arena or building a practice facility heated up amid the team’s struggles. Smith has been vocal in

recent years about his concerns with the Gophers’ lack of facilities. Incoming athletics director Norwood Teague has said he’ll emphasize the development of facilities at Minnesota. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL WBI champions Lost in Big Ten quarterfinals Overall: 19-17 Conference: 6-10 (8th)

Following a dismal couple of years for Gophers women's basketball, Minnesota managed to end its 2011 season with a tournament win in March — albeit a small one. Minnesota won the Women’s Basketball Invitational and salvaged a record above .500 for the first time under head coach Pam Borton since 2008-09. Led by Big Ten Freshman of the Year Rachel Banham’s 26 points, the u See WINTER Page 25


Survival Guide 2012

Winter u from Page 24

second-seeded Gophers defeated No. 7 Northern Iowa in the WBI final at Williams Arena. While Minnesota won 13 games outside of conference play, it finished just 6-10 in the Big Ten. Senior Kiara Buford, who became one of seven players in program history to reach 1,500 points, showed few improvements from her junior year while Banham started all 36 games alongside her. Inconsistency, turnovers and a lack of frontcourt depth doomed the team during the middle of the Big Ten season after a promising start. Minnesota still recorded several signature victories, including a 76-65 win against then-No. 9 Ohio State in late January. But for the most part, the Gophers struggled to close out good teams. After trouncing Wisconsin 81-49 in the first round of the Big Ten tournament, Minnesota blew a 13-point lead to Penn State in the second round and lost 78-74. In addition to returning Banham, Minnesota will add 6-foot-5-inch Swedish center Amanda Zahui B. to its 2012 roster. MEN’S HOCKEY MEN’S HOCKEY Lost in NCAA semifinals WHCA champions Overall: 28-14-1 Conference: 20-8-0 (1st)

Minnesota’s men’s hockey team took a step in the right direction in 2012, winning the WCHA’s regular-season title and advancing to the NCAA Frozen Four. The Gophers battled through an inconsistent regular season to win the MacNaughton Cup outright for the first time since 2007. Three weeks later, they advanced to their first Final Four since 2005 before losing 6-1 to eventual champion Boston College. M i n n e s o t a ’s i n e x perience showed. The Gophers’ Frozen Four hopes looked grim after it blew a three-goal lead to North Dakota in the Final Five of the WCHA tournament, losing 6-3. But they got revenge in the NCAA tour nament’s second round, beating the Sioux 5-2 to advance to the Frozen Four. Senior goalie Kent Patterson anchored the Gophers’ defense with seven shutouts — the most in program history — and a 2.32 goalsagainst average. Sophomore forward Nick Bjugstad scored 25 goals to lead a balanced offensive attack. An NHL talent, Bjugstad has the option of returning to the Gophers in 2012-13 or going pro. Backup goaltender Mike Shibrowski will battle incoming freshman Adam Wilcox for the spot behind the crease this season. Minnesota graduated

seven players, but its top four point scorers return this season. WOMEN’S HOCKEY WOMEN’S HOCKEY NCAA champion WHCA tournament champion Overall: 34-5-2 Conference: 21-5-2 (2nd)

The Gophers women’s hockey team won its third national championship last season, adding to the list of successful women’s sports in Minnesota in recent years. The women defeated regular-season WCHA champion Wisconsin in the NCAA title game, and goalie Noora Räty was named the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player. The Gophers ended the season with eight straight wins, including four in the WCHA tournament. Räty allowed just one goal in four games, capped off by a 2-0 shutout of MinnesotaDuluth in the title game. Räty finished the year with a 1.35 goals-against average and 10 shutouts. Offensively, Minnesota was equally dominant. Led by explosive playmakers Amanda Kessel (80 points) Jen Schoullis (64) and Sarah Erickson (49), the Gophers averaged more than four goals per game. Redshirt senior Emily West, who had 44 points, scored the game-winning goal in the NCAA

title game on a penalty shot. The team will graduate seven players, including Schoullis, Erickson and West, but Kessel and Räty will be back. The Gophers will be among the early favorites to win another national championship in 2012-13. WRESTLING

to then-No. 5 Iowa in January. Zach Sanders (125 pounds), Chris Dardanes (133), Dylan Ness (149), Logan Storley (174), Kevin Steinhaus (184) and Sonny Yohn (197) joined Nelson as All-Americans. MEN’S GYMNASTICS MEN’S GYMNASTICS Finished 4th in Big Ten Made NCAA tournament

WRESTLING Big Ten champions NCAA runner-up Overall: 14-3 Conference: 7-1 (T-1st)

One year after receiving a five-year contract extension, longtime head wrestling coach J Robinson led the Gophers to a Big Ten title and a second-place finish at the NCAA championships. The Gophers sported seven All-Americans — more than any other team in the nation in 2011-12 — including national heavyweight champion Tony Nelson. Robinson was named the Dan Gable Coach of the Year for the third time in his career. He also won the award in 1998 and 2001. After tying Penn State for the Big Ten crown, the Gophers fell 25 points short of the Nittany Lions at the NCAAs. Minnesota defeated Penn State during the regular season and lost j u s t o n e c o n f e re n c e match — a 19-17 defeat

While the men’s gymnastics team’s regular season started with promise, it ended with disappointment. The team’s main goal at the Big Ten championships was to finish on the podium. The Gophers failed to achieve that standard by one place. Minnesota finished fourth behind four-time defending champion Illinois. I n d i v i d u a l l y, Z a c k Chase was the only gymnast to crack the top three. He earned second place on vault, one spot away from defending his title. Minnesota finished its NCAA championships quickly. The Gophers failed to qualify for the team finals after placing fourth again in the preliminary session. A topthree place would have advanced the team. Several individual gymnasts attempted to qualify for the event finals but none succeeded. The closest was Russell Dabritz, whose 11th place on parallel bars was just one

25

away from advancing. WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS Finished 3rd in Big Ten

The women’s gymnastics team struggled the entire season to match up with its intense conference competition. Although the regular season left a lot to be desired, the Gophers wrapped up the postseason with surprisingly high finishes. At the Big Ten championships, the team placed third. Amber Hammerschmidt’s third-place performance on the balance beam led the team to the bronze. Minnesota needed a top-two finish at its NCAA regional for the team to advance to the NCAA championships. The Gophers placed third, but they sent two gymnasts to compete in the all-around individual competition. Sophomores Kayla Slechta and Dusti Russell represented Minnesota on the national stage, but neither made the event finals. MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING MEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING

Finished 4th in Big Ten Finished 24th at NCAAs

After

graduating

u See WINTER Page 26


26 Survival Guide 2012

Winter u from Page 25

several dominant seniors the previous year, the Gophers swimming and diving team entered 2011-12 with a young roster and tempered expectations. But they managed to retain their fourth place finish at the Big Ten championships from 2010-11. Their lone champion was diver Kristoffer Jorgensen. The senior claimed platform diving with a program-record score of 430.65. Minnesota’s run of 20 consecutive top-15 finishes at the NCAA championships ended when the team placed 24th in 201112. Seven of Minnesota’s eight athletes at the cham-

pionships earned AllAmerica honors. WOMEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING

Big Ten champions Finished 11th at NCAAs

The seniors on the women’s swimming and diving team had a chip on their shoulders entering their final season. For three straight years, Minnesota finished second at the Big Ten championships to Indiana. The roles reversed in 2012, though, when the Gophers seized the top spot. Five swimmers claimed the title of Big Ten champion. Ashley

Steenvoorden won the 500-yard freestyle; Tess Behrens won both the 100 and 200 backstrokes; Haley Spencer won the 200 breaststroke, and Hannah Whitehead won the 200 freestyle. Men’s and women’s head coach Kelly Kremer earned Big Ten Swimming Coach of the Year honors after the women’s team’s performance. The women’s momentum came to a halt at the NCAA championships, where they fell short of improving on their ninth place from 2010-11. The Gophers finished 11th and didn’t tally any national champions. Spencer aimed to retain her 200 breaststroke national title but had to settle for second.


Survival Guide 2012

27

SPRING SPORTS REVIEW BY DAILY SPORTS STAFF

BASEBALL

BASEBALL Overall: 28-25* Conference: 10-11 (7th) *Through May 16

The Gophers baseball team’s 2012 season lacked the success of previous years, but it didn’t fall short in terms of story lines. Poor conditions at 41-year home Siebert Field on campus has had the team bouncing from the University of Minnesota to the Metrodome to Target Field for years. Minnesota played home games at all three fields again last season. Gophers baseball played its final game at Siebert Field on May 1, defeating St. Thomas 9-2. The game was played as a memorial, as the University’s Board of Regents has approved the construction of a new field in the same area. The board is expected to approve a $7.5 million funding project for the first phase of construction at its June meeting. Akin to previous years, the team had to play most of its homestands at the Metrodome in 2012.

Ranked No. 1 in the Big Ten preseason coaches' poll just two seasons ago, the Gophers finished the 2012 Bi g Te n s e a s o n ti e d for sixth place. A lone bright spot was pitching ace TJ Oakes, a junior who ranked among the leaders in the Big Ten in innings pitched, ERA and strikeouts. The 6-foot-5-inch, 225-pound right-hander was drafted by the Minnesota Twins a season ago, but he opted to stay with the Gophers. While the 2012 MLB First-Year Player Draft is in June, Oakes said last season that he hadn’t thought much about p l a y i n g p ro f e s s i o n a l baseball. Head coach John Anderson, the Big Ten’s winningest coach who is in his 31st season with the Gophers, will return this season after signing an extension this year that will keep him through 2016.

ished 10th in the Big Ten with a 10-14 record last season. Minnesota lost seven of its last 10 games — five by one run and three in extra innings — after holding a .500 record midway through the season. The Gophers relied heavily on sophomore ace Sara Moulton, who ranked among the conference’s leaders with a 1.52 ERA and had a 2514 record. Minnesota’s second pitcher, Alissa Koch, was 6-8 with a 4.88 ERA. Freshman third baseman Kaitlyn Richardson shined on offense, posting big numbers in most major offensive categories. She batted .338 with 10 home runs and 38 RBIs. M i n n e s o t a re t u r n s most of its key players in 2013 and will be in good position to improve its record for the third consecutive season. MEN’S TENNIS

SOFTBALL SOFTBALL Overall: 31-22 Conference: 10-14 (10th)

Despite showing improvements for the second consecutive year under head coach Jessica Allister, the Gophers softball team fin-

MEN’S TENNIS Lost in NCAA first round Lost in Big Ten quarterfinals Overall: 13-8 Conference: 8-3 (T-3rd)

A poor start and finish to the season overshadowed the Gophers m e n ’s t e n n i s t e a m ’s 8-3 conference record,

which was good enough to tie for third place in the Big Ten. Minnesota fell 4-2 in the first round of the NCAA tour nament to Tulsa. A week earlier, it was upset 4-3 by Indiana in the second round of the Big Ten tournament. During the conference’s regular season, the Gophers upset Indiana 4-3 and competed well against other top opponents. But their national ranking hovered between 30 and 50 after they lost three of their first four nonconference matches. Leandro Toledo won Big Ten Freshman of the Year after winning 12 of 20 matches at the second and third singles positions.

zona in the first round. After a 12-1 star t, the Gophers lost three consecutive conference matches to top-25 opponents. They finished sixth in the conference and lost in the second round of the Big Ten tournament to Illinois. Freshmen Jul i a C o u r t e r, Te r e z a Brichacova and Aria Lambert helped Minnesota double its win total from 2010, when it went 8-16. All three freshmen won in the Gophers’ win against Iowa in the first round of the Big Ten tournament. Minnesota graduates just one player — doubles specialist Magdalena Wiecha — and returns its three freshmen, five sophomores and two juniors this season.

WOMEN’S TENNIS

MEN’S GOLF

WOMEN’S TENNIS Lost in NCAA first round Lost in Big Ten quarterfinals Overall: 16-9 Conference: 5-6 (6th)

E a r l y - s e a s o n f i re works sparked optimism for the Gophers women’s tennis team in 2012, but postseason struggles fizzled its attempt at national relevance. Minnesota made the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2003 but lost 4-1 to Ari-

MEN’S GOLF Finished 7th in Big Ten

The men's golf team finished seventh at the Big Ten championships last season, but it will look to keep tapping the talent of junior Erik Van Rooyen next year. Van Rooyen, a South African native, was selected to the NCAA championships for the second consecutive time this spring and finished 19th out of more

than 70 golfers. He placed seventh in the Big Ten Championships, which is also his second consecutive top-10 finish, and he was by far the Gophers’ most successful golfer in 2011-12. WOMEN’S GOLF WOMEN’S GOLF Finished 8th in Big Ten

The women's team placed eighth at the Big Ten Championships with a young crew following four departures from the 2011 season. Minnesota took only a junior, a sophomore and three freshmen to the championships. Junior Jackie Shepherd had the most consistent tournament for Minnesota and tied for seventh place individually. The team had a dismal first round, but it made progress in the following two. Head coach Michele Redman said that's a reason to be optimistic about next year, as she expects her young group to use this experience and grow during the offseason. MEN’S TRACK & FIELD T h e m e n ’s t r a c k and field team enjoyed a successful indoor u See SPRING Page 33


28 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

Explore the city with some of A&E’s favorite off-campus destinations.

BY TONY WAGNER awagner1@mndaily.com

T

here’s a lot to do on campus at the University of Minnesota, but you’d be remiss if you didn’t take advantage of all the theaters, restaurants, clubs, and more available in the Twin Cities. I t ’s h a rd f o r n e w students to venture off campus, usually because they’re not quite sure where to go, what to do when they get there or how to navigate the city bus system. Here are just a few of the countless entertainment destinations in Minneapolis, with directions on how to get there: Mixed Blood Theater 1501 S. Fourth St. Why it’s worth the trip: Minneapolis is known for its robust theater scene, and Mixed Blood is a Twin Cities institution, and the per fect place to start your adventures

off campus. A stone’s throw from campus, Mixed Blood is known for putting on shows that are simultaneously fun and socially conscious. And thanks to their new “Radical Hospitality” initiative, all Mixed Blood shows are free on a first come-first seated basis. How to get there: The theater is within walking distance from West Bank, just look for their neon sign over Washington Avenue. Otherwise, you can take the 2 from East Bank to Cedar Avenue and Third Street. Also in the area: See a concert at the Cedar Cultural Center, try any of the Somali restaurants along Cedar Avenue or grab a late night cup of coffee at the student favorite Hard Times Café. The Red Stag Supperclub 509 First Ave. NE Why it’s worth the trip: Anyone will tell you that the best place for a fancy date in Dinkytown is Loring Pasta Bar, and they aren’t wrong. But if you want to impress your boo with something off campus, you can’t go wrong with the Red Stag. Chef Brian Hauke puts a moder n spin

29

on supper club favorites in a setting that’s rustic but stylish. Take your date there and you might find yourself looking for a good breakfast place, if you know what I mean. How to get there: Take the 6 or the 2 from Dinkytown to East Hennepin Avenue, or walk down University Avenue. A l s o i n t h e a re a : Walk down Hennepin to historic Main Street, home to scenic river trails, the Stone Arch Bridge and St. Anthony Main Theater, which has $6 student tickets all day. First Avenue 701 N. First Ave. Why it’s worth the trip: If you’re going to a concert or a dance night in the Twin Cities there’s a good chance it’s going to be at the legendary First Avenue Mainroom, and for good reason. It’s one of the best-run venues not just in the Twin Cities, but the nation. Best known as the site of Prince’s “Purple Rain,” the club is full of history and attracts a variety of acts year in and year out. How to get there: First Ave is in the heart u See FUN Page 33


30 Survival Guide 2012


Survival Guide 2012

FALL SPORTS REVIEW BY DAILY SPORTS STAFF

FOOTBALL FOOTBALL Overall: 3-9 Conference: 2-6 (T-10th)

The only way to go is up for Gophers football in 2012. Following a 3-9 season, second-year head coach Jerry Kill will have his first full offseason and recruiting class behind him when the Gophers travel to Las Vegas to play UNLV on Aug. 30. A two-point loss at football powerhouse USC had the Gophers in high spirits to begin the 2011 season. However, their spirits dulled in the next game — a home-opening loss to New Mexico State — when Kill collapsed from a seizure on the field in the waning seconds. The 50-year-old coach had multiple seizure episodes in the days following, but he did not miss a game. The Gophers brought a 1-3 nonconference record into the Big Ten schedule following a loss to Division I-AA program and regional rival North Dakota State at TCF Bank Stadium. Minnesota was humiliated in its confer-

ence opener at Michigan, 58-0. The Gophers weren't competitive until their fourth Big Ten tilt against Iowa, as they beat the Hawkeyes for the second consecutive year at home. After they recovered an onside kick, quarterback Marqueis Gray ran for the game-winning touchdown on fourth down from the 3-yard line. Minnesota capped off the season with a 27-7 home victory over Illinois. Entering 2012, Kill lacks much player experience outside of senior Gray. Minnesota has a particularly young rotation in the secondary, where it lost seven p l a y e r s f ro m a y e a r ago. However, Kill managed to recruit seven of Minnesota's top nine high school prospects, including two top national recruits — a resource previous coaching staffs failed to utilize. The Gophers will face UNLV, New Hampshire, Wester n Michigan and Syracuse in nonconference play this season. They will open their Big Ten season in Iowa City, Iowa, against the Hawkeyes on Sept. 29. VOLLEYBALL Another season of inconsistency for the Go-

VOLLEYBALL Lost in NCAA Sweet 16 Overall: 20-12 Conference: 11-9 (5th)

phers volleyball team ended with a run to the Sweet 16 in the NCAA tournament. Assistant coach Laura Bush led the team in the interim while it waited for newly hired head coach Hugh McCutcheon to complete his stretch with the 2012 U.S. women’s Olympic v o l l e y b a l l t e a m . M cCutcheon will assume a full-time role with the Gophers in September. Under Bush, Minnesota posted an 18-11 regular-season record last season and upset several elite teams. The Gophers won five of their 12 matches against top-15 opponents. They defeated their highest-ranked opponent ever in late October, crushing thenNo. 3 and eventual NCAA runner-up Illinois in straight sets. Minnesota struggled to find consistency throughout the season, especially at the setter position. Junior Mia Tabberson and freshman Kellie McNeil battled for the role of starting setter throughout the season. Tabberson led Minnesota to its most dramatic victory of the

season in the second round of the NCAA tournament against Washington. The Gophers dropped the first two sets with McNeil setting and won the next three after Tabberson replaced her. Minnesota fell in four sets at home to Iowa State in the Sweet 16 — its second consecutive loss in the NCAA tournament’s third round. The Gophers’ 2012 roster features eight new players and seven returners. Steffi Sooter, who was expected to be the starting libero, left the program after the season and is no longer with the team.

ended with a 3-1 loss to top seed Penn State. Offensively, Uhl was the lone bright spot on a Gophers squad that averaged just 1.52 goals. She scored a team-high 34 points, and Shari Eckstrom ranked second with 13 points. Minnesota graduates five of the 18 players from its 2011 roster and retur ns star ting goalkeeper Cat Parkhill. Head coach Mikki Denney Wright resigned in May, and Minnesota will conduct a national search for its next head coach this summer. MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

SOCCER MEN’SFOOTBALL CROSS COUNTRY SOCCER Lost in Big Ten semifinals Overall: 9-10-2 Conference: 5-4-2 (T-5th)

Ta y l o r U h l h i g h lighted a down year for Gophers soccer by winning Big Ten Freshman of the Year honors. Minnesota finished tied for fifth in the conference in 2011 and lost in the second round of the Big Ten tournament. Uhl ranked fifth in the Big Ten in goals (15), including five gamew i nner s. S he scored two of the Gophers’ three goals in the Big Ten tournament, which

Finished3-9 Overall: T-3rd in Big Ten Conference: Finished 16th2-6 at (T-10th) NCAAs

Star distance runner Hassan Mead ran his last cross country season in 2011. The senior had been a staple on both the cross country and track and field teams at Minnesota for several years. Mead led the Gophers to a third-place tie with Michigan at the Big Ten championships in October. Individually, he crossed the line in fourth place — a subpar performance by his standards. Mead bounced back by winning the NCAA

31

Midwest regional. Minnesota finished fourth at the meet, good enough for it to earn an at-large bid to the NCAA championships. At the NCAAs, the Gophers placed 16th out of 31 teams. Mead captured his fourth cross country All-America honor with a 34th-place finish. WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

Finished 5th in Big Ten Finished 27th at NCAAs

Just as Mead spearheaded the men’s team, Steph Price led the women’s through an upand-down 2011 season. Price finished fifth at the Big Ten championships — the same place as her team. At the NCAA Midw e s t re g i o n a l , P r i c e could not defend her title from last season, as she crossed the line s i x t h . Ye t M i n n e s o t a finished the meet in third place and earned an at-large bid to the NCAA championships, The championships proved disappointing for the women, who placed 27th out of 31 teams. Price was t h e f a s t e s t f i n i s h e r, but she placed only 61st, missing out on All-America honors.


32 Survival Guide 2012

Explore the city with some of A&E’s favorite off-campus destinations. BY RAGHAV MEHTA rmehta@mndaily.com

I

t’s recently been suggested that the Twin Cities music scene is in a golden age. The cynical observer would be adamant on pointing out that this conversation happens every few years; a sort of self-congratulatory assessment from a city that can’t stop loving itself. However, regardless of where you might stand on the matter, it’s hard to argue with history. From 80s juggernauts like Prince and The Replacements to the more recent meteoric rise of underground hip-hop –

à la Rhymesayers – and indie darlings like Low and Tapes ‘n’ Tapes, the Twin Cities music scene doesn’t seem to suffer from many creative dry spells. 2012 is no exception. However, a scene as thriving and over-saturated as ours can be intimidating and keeping up can feel like a bit of a chore – especially if you’re new. But don’t fret, children. A&E is here to give you the lowdown on some of the best and most promising acts our bustling metropolis has to offer. (Note: This list is not a ranking of local acts, but rather a sort of starter kit. So, let’s not get too defensive about this, musos). MaLLy By the end of this last decade, it seemed as if the

Rhymesayers’ – the local indie rap empire that features powerhouse names like Atmosphere, Brother Ali and P.O.S. – monstrous popularity had reached an apex. But leave it up to a St. Thomas graduate to prove that you don’t need to ride on the coattails of Rhymesayers to make a name for yourself in the local hip-hop scene. With an already voluminous catalog of work, MaLLy (Malik Watkins) boasts a certain level of lyrical prowess and whipsmartness that makes him sound more like a seasoned vet and less of a hip-hop newcomer. And his laborious attitude is finally paying off. Just last year he was lucky enough to tag along on a nationwide tour with Atmosphere and his newly released LP “The Last Great. . . ” is already making waves with much critical acclaim. Keep your eye on this one because it sounds like he’s only just getting started. Notable tracks: “Shine,” “My Time”

JOE MICHAUD-SCORZA, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minneapolis hip-hop artist MaLLy is already making waves with much critical acclaim.

Dial-Up Originally a duo, DialUp is the four-man brainchild of local rocker Andrew Jansen of Crimes and the now-defunct folk-punk trio A Paper

Cup Band. Jansen’s latest project reaffirms his inherent knack for simple 90sesque melodies. It’s a digital dose of lo-fi electro-pop that’s catchy, accessible and sometimes even reminiscent of the soundtrack of your favorite childhood Nintendo game. While the quartet might not enjoy as much widespread appeal as local headliners like Night Moves and Poliça, their new LP “Landlines” shines with stellar production and top-tier songwriting, making it a worthy contender for “album of the year” acclaim. CHRISTOPHER SELLECK, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Notable tracks: “Metal,” “Want to Die”

Aila O’Loughlin, left, Andrew Jansen, center and Elliott Snyder make up Dial-Up.

Howler Earlier this year, Howler became the subject of much scorn and ridicule after a particularly candid interview with a British radio station wherein frontman (and Julian Casablancas wannabe) Jordan Gatesmith derided the Minneapolis music scene for what he — in a nutshell — described as incessant navel-gazing. The interview generated plenty of local hullabaloo, and it almost seemed as if a small legion of local scenesters were ready to declare a

fatwah against Gatesmith and his cohorts. As snotty as Gatesmith might be, Howler still stands out as one of the most promising acts to emerge from Minneapolis in recent years. After landing a record deal with the UK’s premiere indie label Rough Trade last fall, the band rose to prominence and just wrapped up an international tour that coincided with the release of their aptly-titled debut album “America Give Up.” While the group hasn’t gained as much traction on the home front as they

have across the pond, their buoyant snot-nosed garage rock is reminiscent of acts like T. Rex and Jonathan Richman. Notable tracks: “Told You Once,” “Beach Sluts” More Bands to Check Out: -Night Moves -Prissy Clerks -Elite Gymnastics -I Self Divine -Carnage the Executioner -Teenage Moods -Buffalo, Buffalo, Buffalo -Hollow Boys -Bloodnstuff


Survival Guide 2012

Fun

Spring

u from Page 29

u from Page 27

A l s o i n t h e a re a : I f First Ave’s offerings on any given night aren’t doing it for you, there are a number of other clubs and music venues within walking distance, including Epic, the 7th Street Entry, the Brick, and the Gay 90s. Bryant-Lake Bowl 810 W. Lake St. W h y i t ’s w o r t h t h e trip: Lower those eyeb ro w s ! T h i s i s n ’t y o u r average bowling alley. The BLB has eight gorgeous historic lanes and includes a full restaurant and a cabaret theater with unique entertainment every night. They also have a special offer for couples Monday nights, which works great for a cheap double date. How to get there: Take the 6 from the McDonald’s in Dinkytown t o Ly n - L a k e a n d t h e n walk a few blocks down Lake Street. Also in the area: T h e re a re l o a d s o f i n teresting thrift stores and big name shops just a few blocks away in the Calhoun Square area of Uptown, and the nearby Lagoon and Uptown movie theaters have art house films and deliriously fun midnight screenings you won’t find anywhere else.

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (INDOOR)

Finished 2nd in Big Ten Finished 18th at NCAAs

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (OUTDOOR)

Finished 7th in Big Ten

season, but it took a step back during the outdoor season. Tr a c k s t a r s H a run Abda and Hassan Mead impressed at the Big Ten indoor championships. Abda won the 400-meter dash and 600, setting a Big Ten record in the latter. The Big Te n n a m e d A b d a i t s Tr a c k A t h l e t e o f t h e Ye a r a n d Tr a c k A t hlete of the Championships, while the USTFCCCA named him its Midwest region Track Athlete of the Year. Mead championed the 5,000 meters at the conference meet while thrower Micah Hegerle won the w e i g h t t h r o w. T h e team as a whole finished four points shy of first place. The Gophers sent seven athletes to the NCAA indoor champ i o n s h i p s i n M a rc h , including all three B i g Te n c h a m p i o n s . Six returned with AllAmerican honors. As a team, the men finished in a four-way tie for 18th.

The outdoor season started off slowly as many of the NCAA indoor competitors rested the first few weeks of competition. A t t h e B i g Te n o u t door championships, Quentin Mege was the Gophers’ lone champion. He broke the school record in the hammer throw with a toss of 67.08 meters. Minnesota placed seventh as a team, a marked decline from l a s t y e a r ’s s e c o n d place. The Gophers qualified 23 athletes for the NCAA outdoor preliminary round May 24-26 in Austin, Texas. The top 12 finishers in each event competed at the finals in Des Moines, Iowa, on June 6-9. WOMEN’S TRACK &

FIELD WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (OUTDOOR)

Finished 9th in Big Ten

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD (INDOOR)

Finished 11th in Big Ten

The women’s track and field team struggled during the indoor and outdoor season. The already young team suffered several injuries t o s t a r s l i k e To d e a Kay Willis and Alena Brooks. Months of disappointing meets culminated in an unsatisfactory indoor postseason. The Gophers finished last out of 11 teams at the Big Ten indoor championships in February. Minnesota failed to

qualify any athletes for the NCAA indoor championships. The outdoor season provided a clean slate for the women, especially with the re t u r n o f W i l l i s a n d Brooks. Willis dominated the long jump throughout the regular season with as many wins as attempts. Her perfect record lasted until the Big Ten outdoor championships in May, when she finished second. The Gophers placed ninth at the outdoor conference meet. Minnesota qualified 16 athletes — including Willis a n d B ro o k s — i n 1 3 events for the NCAA o u t d o o r p re l i m i n a r y round. The top 12 finishers competed in the finals.

33

ROWING ROWING Finished 5th in Big Ten

Minnesota’s rowing team lacks the experience to compete with national powerhouses like Michigan and Ohio State, and it showed last season. The Gophers finished fifth at the Big Ten championships out of seven teams for the third consecutive season. They also struggled during a regular season against ranked opponents like Wisconsin, Virginia and Cornell. Injuries plagued Minnesota throughout the season, but it was still able to produce two All-Big Ten honorees — senior Molly Kalmoe and junior Ali Haws.

MARK VANCLEAVE, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota’s first varsity four rows against Wisconsin on a Sunday morning on Lake Phalen in St. Paul, Minn.


34 Survival Guide 2012

Say hello to Eric W. Kaler, class of 2016. He’s the president of your university. BY SARAH HARPER sharper@mndaily.com

Reporters from the Minnesota Daily regularly check in with University President Eric Kaler in a feature called “Kickin’ it with Kaler.” There’s a lot to talk about: Kaler, the current president of your future alma mater, wears a tall stack of hats. Among many other things, he’s a spokesperson, decision maker, morale booster and active tweeter (see: @PrezKaler.) For you, class of 2016, we’ve done an extra special edition of “Kickin’ it with Kaler.” The Arts and Entertainment section of the Daily grilled the president on everything from his poor culinary chops to his favorite movie, “Pulp Fiction.” Spoiler alert: He’d rather you watch “The Hangover” than the Tarantino classic. So this is for freshmen, but there’s no need to try and impress the kids, or whatever. What kind of music do you listen to?

I listen to both kinds of music — country and western. Who’s your favorite country artist? I have several, actually. I like Reba McEntire, for sure. I went to see her at the State Fair last year when she was here. Most Willie Nelson I like. Most Merle Haggard I like. There’s a guy who doesn’t get played on the radio much named Bobby Pinson who sings some really lovely ballads. And I like some of the more, kind of, outlaw country stuff that’s a little more rock ‘n’ roll-ish but still pretty country. I like to be able to understand the words to the song. Have you always been a country listener? No. When I was a kid, because my father liked country-western music, of course I couldn’t like country-western music. You know, youthful rebellion. So I listened to rock ‘n’ roll, but that moved into the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac in college, and that kept moving to country music. Do you ever revisit those? I still like the Eagles. The Eagles hits from the

MARK VANCLEAVE, DAILY FILE PHOTO

University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler reflected on his first academic year on the job. “It’s been a hectic year, a very interesting year. But I’m pretty pleased with where we are.”

late ’70s are still pretty good, like “Hotel California.” Do you listen on an MP3 player or do you have a record player? I have an “i” everything. If Apple makes it, I have at least one of them. So I have two or three iPods — an iPod nano and a regular iPod. And then nowadays, you can just listen on the phone. So that’s where all my stuff is. And then satellite ra-

dio and Radio K in the car. I don’t listen to much at home — usually when I’m traveling or in the car. Are you at all in touch with the local music scene? I haven’t really had the chance. I don’t get a lot of nights off. Understandable. What about pop music on the radio? Do you ever catch that? I generally will change the station. I

like to hear the words. Hip-hop and rap and that kind of stuff, it just doesn’t float my boat a bit. Sorry. It’s okay. Let’s move on. What was the last thing you read for fun? Probably the latest John Sandford book. He’s a crime writer in the Twin Cities. He writes the “Prey” novels. I forget what the last one was called, but it was set in Minneapolis. He’s probably written twenty

of these by now. I’d like to meet him. … They’re Minnesota-based crime mysteries … usually well written and very entertaining. Do you have a favorite book? You know, I’m not sure that I have a favorite book of fiction. There’s a ton I like. I like James Bond novels, 007 novels. I like quick reads with a lot of action. There’s a ton I have


Survival Guide 2012

to read for business or work, that when I’m reading for fun, I usually like to read something that’s more escapist. Where do you like to eat in the Twin Cities? I like Vincent A and Capital Grille. Those are probably the two standb y s . A n d m y w i f e ’s kitchen, I like to eat there. What’s your favorite home-cooked meal? My wife makes a really good risotto. I really like that. You know, that risotto and a good glass of wine top my list. Do you have any specialties that you like to make?

Oh, I’m an awful cook. I am awful. To me, boiling an egg and cooking some toast for breakfast — that is the pinnacle of my food preparation ladder. And that’s it. I do the dishes. I clean up really well. But I’m not a cook. Do you like to watch movies? You know, yes, I do like to watch movies. We don’t have time to watch a ton of them. I like a wide range of movies. I like ones that move along, like adventure movies. I love comedies. I saw a flyer for “Men in Black 3,” and I can’t wait for that. Those guys

are seriously funny. Karen, my wife, likes more serious movies. Occasionally, I will go along. But I’m more into action-comedy. Do you keep up with any blogs? I’m going to start writing one for The Huffington Post. We’ll see how that goes. But normally, unless somebody sends me the link, I rely more on conventional newspapers. So The New York Times and the local papers are my sources. How about magazines? I’ll read Sports Illustrated when I’m traveling, but that’s the only one. I’ll occasionally pick

up The New Yorker or the Atlantic magazine. But I don’t get a lot of time to sit around at home. When you are sitting around at home, what’s your go-to activity? I’ll watch a ball game, or I’ll read. What teams do you cheer for? Well, you’ve got to like the Gophers and pretty much everything they do. I’m a big Gophers fan. I like the Twins. I’m a big baseball fan, so I enjoy the Twins. And I particularly like to go to the Twins games — that’s a nice evening out. I’m getting to know the Vi-

kings. Oh, I didn’t ask you. What’s your favorite movie? Favorite movie… H a ve yo u e ve r se e n “Pulp Fiction”? Yeah. I like “Pulp Fiction.” That’s an edgy kind of movie. Ye a h , i t ’s k i n d o f creepy. It is creepy. In a good way. But kind of creepy, yeah. Do you recommend it for freshmen? I think I’d recommend freshmen go see “The Hangover” before they go see “Pulp Fiction.”

35

What other recommendations do you have for freshmen, in terms of art and culture? Dive in and experience the Twin Cities. Go to a lot of museums. Go to a play. Go to dance. Go to theater. It will broaden your horizons. There are lots more to do in the Twin Cities than there probably was to do in your hometown. So get out and experience it. Whether it’s alternative music or theater or conventional orchestra, there’s a lot to do. How about general advice? I think the best bit of advice is to have fun, but not too much.


36 Survival Guide 2012

Survival Guide 2012  

The Minnesota Daily's Survival Guide 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you