Page 1

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SUES UNIVERSITY PAGE 3 MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

EARLY WEEK

THE ACTION STEMS FROM U MORE PARK CONTROVERSY

MNDAILY.COM

ART

VOLLEYBALL

Minnesota’s season ends with sweep The 3-0 loss to USC marks the end of a season where 3 players earned All-Region honors. BY OWEN MAGEAU omageau@mndaily.com

EASTON GREEN, DAILY

Aerosol artist Rock Martinez poses for a portrait with the mural he created in honor of Prince inside the Weisman Art Museum during the preview party for the “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition on Friday, Dec. 8. Martinez has painted large scale murals for over 15 years.

Everything purple at WAM A new exhibit, titled “Prince of Minneapolis,” premiered Friday at the campus museum. BY KATE DRAKULIC kdrakulic@mndaily.com

The next gallery was much livelier than the first. Purple dove decals lined the floor and led from the Carlson Gallery to the

be heard from the entryway as a towering mural of the icon came into sight.

Museum Friday night to see the preview of the new exhibition

“When I moved to Minneapolis, everyone kind of had a Prince

“Prince from Minneapolis.” The party, which quickly sold out, of-

story, and now I have one. It’s pretty amazing. It kind of makes

fered fancy foods and drinks, a lavish lounge, a professional pho-

me a part of Minneapolis, and I feel fortunate for that,” said Rock

to booth and Prince inspired DJs. Visitors sipped on wine as they

Martinez, graffiti artist and creator of the mural.

squeezed through the crowd, circled the galleries and got down on the dance floor.

Martinez was approached by WAM Senior Curator Diane Mullin after she saw his street art portrait of Prince located on 26th

The exhibition features two different sets of work. In the Carlson Gallery, 24 photographs belonging to four photographers feature Prince in his early years and during his rise to fame. There

Street and Hennepin Avenue. The mural is comprised of six eightby-eight foot canvases and was commissioned by WAM. Another notable highlight of “Fanning It!” was Seattle-based

was a sense of respect and remembrance as people quietly scanned the photographs.

u See PRINCE Page 5

HIGHER ED

International graduate student numbers lag The U is tracking international graduate enrollment carefully in light of the political climate. BY HELEN SABROWSKY hsabrowsky@mndaily.com

Though numbers of international graduate students at the University of Minnesota are increasing, the school still lags behind the national average for international grad student enrollment. University officials worry the current political climate could reverse the trend of growth at the University and other institutions. Some say existing burdens on international students — like challenges in their job hunts — combined with current events like tax reform could also threaten international student enrollment. International students make up about 25 percent of the University’s graduate student population this year, up 5 percent from 2007,

u See VOLLEYBALL Page 4

Target Studio where “Fanning It!” a collection of art inspired by Prince, was displayed. Audible gasps and shrill screams could

Hundreds of Prince fanatics arrived at the Weisman Art

The Gophers came into the NCAA tournament with a lower seed than it had in season’s past — seventh in the bracket compared to the two seed the past two years. The Gophers were looking to make it to their third consecutive Final Four over the weekend, but USC proved on Friday that a different kind of Minnesota team does not lead to postseason success. USC eliminated Minnesota from the NCAA tournament by sweeping the team in the Sweet 16 in Gainesville, Florida to end its season. The Trojans won 3-0 — 25-23, 28-26, 25-16. “I would like to congratulate USC on a great performance tonight,” Gophers’ head coach Hugh McCutcheon told reporters. “I certainly wish them well as they advance in the tournament. We are disappointed not to be playing tomorrow, but sometimes it happens. It is an occupational hazard, sometimes you win and sometimes you don’t.” A reason for Minnesota’s defeat was the amount of service errors they made. The Gophers had four on the night compared to USC’s one. Also, USC bested the Gophers in

according to the Office for Institutional Research. Nationwide, about 30 percent of all graduate students at universities with research activity comparable to the University of Minnesota’s were international students in 2015, according to most recent available data from the Council of Graduate Schools and the Graduate Record Examinations Board. The number of international students applying to U.S. graduate schools dropped significantly after 9/11, but has recovered steadily since, said Dean Tsantir, director of graduate admissions at the University. As of Dec. 4, University graduate school applications were down 6 percent compared to last year, Tsantir said. Some universities are worried that the Trump administration’s position on immigration might impact their international student populations. u See INTERNATIONAL Page 2

UMN PERCENTAGE OF INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS IN COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 60.14%

47.38%

47.83%

FALL 2013

FALL 2014

49.93%

50.55%

49.98%

FALL 2015

FALL 2016

FALL 2017

NATL % OF GRAD STUDENTS IN ENGINEERING, MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

SOURCE: CGS/GRE SURVEY

TRANSPORTATION

UMN considers new bus route to St. Paul area The University of Minnesota Transitway now sits near the Stadium Village light rail stop. BY KELLY BUSCHE kbusche@mndaily.com

The University of Minnesota Transitway – connecting East Bank to the St. Paul campus – may be relocated. The University of Minnesota and the Prospect Park Association have held conversations in support of moving the roadway to allow further development in the neighborhood. PPA included the relocation in the planning framework that it will submit by the end of the year for the Minneapolis 2040 Plan — the City’s outline for projects for the upcoming years. Under PPA’s plan, the transitway would move two blocks north and run along the railroad tracks. John Wall, president of The Wall Companies, said he would like to see the transitway moved to improve access to his Malcolm Yards development. Malcolm Yards, a proposed office, retail and housing space, would be separated from the Prospect Park neighborhood by the transitway. “I think [it’s] a fantastic idea, but ... we’re going to do our development anyway, whether we move the transitway or don’t move the transitway,” Wall said. While the idea of moving the transitway has been discussed before, Wall said u See TRANSITWAY Page 2

CAMPUS

Disability Resource Center faces strain as more students request test help The center offers changes for some students like added time and quiet space to complete tests. BY NATALIE RADEMACHER nrademacher@mndaily.com

The University of Minnesota Disability Resource Center is seeking faculty help to support growing numbers of students using testing accommodations on campus. With the existing test-taking facility filled over capacity for the last several years, the DRC has resorted to using spaces like offices and even using a hotel to accommodate students. DRC leadership says if the University doesn’t allocate more resources to testing accommodations, they won’t be able to serve all the students who need them. In the 2017 fiscal year, the DRC administered 9,681 tests — over twice as many as in 2012, according to DRC data. Accommodations like quiet spaces, private rooms and extra time on exams are available to eligible students with disabilities who register with the DRC.

While professors are typically supposed to administer these exams and use the DRC as a resource if they can’t provide the accommodations, many students and faculty go straight to the DRC for testing accommodations, said DRC Director Donna Johnson. “We are a service to faculty [that administers] tests when they are not able to,” said DRC Associate Director Scott Marshall. “The exams we administer — these are situations where faculty have either said, ‘I can’t accommodate this student taking this test,’ or they never thought it was their responsibility to accommodate that student.” While finding another testing room would temporarily solve the space shortage, Johnson said she hopes to develop long-term solutions that will increase accessibility for students. As part of their efforts to engage faculty on this issue, Johnson and Marshall have been speaking at University Senate governance meetings for the last year. “This is a shared responsibility between us and the University,” Johnson said. During midterms and finals, the u See RESOURCE CENTER Page 2

COURTNEY DEUTZ, DAILY

A private testing space in the Disability Resource Center is seen on Tuesday, Dec. 5 at the McNamara Alumni Center. The DRC is seeking faculty help to support growing numbers of students using testing accommodations on campus, having administered 9,681 tests over the 2017 fiscal year.

VOLUME 118 ISSUE 28


2

MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

MN DAILY

EXTENDED WEATHER FORECAST MONDAY TUESDAY HIGH 34° HIGH 23° LOW 13° LOW 18° Snow

Daily Review

MNDAILY.COM

Partly cloudy

WEDNESDAY HIGH 30° LOW 19° Cloudy

THURSDAY HIGH 25° LOW 21° Cloudy

Monday, December 11, 2017

FRIDAY HIGH 32° LOW 26°

Vol. 118 No. 28

An Independent Student Newspaper, Founded in 1900. 2221 University Ave. SE, Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55414 Phone: (612) 627-4080 Fax: (612) 435-5865

Cloudy

THIS DAY IN HISTORY

Copyright © 2017 The Minnesota Daily This newspaper, its design and its contents are copyrighted.

1936 After ruling for less than one year, Edward VIII becomes the first English monarch to voluntarily abdicate the throne. HISTORYCHANNEL.COM/TDIH

OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHER Mike Hendrickson Editor-in-Chief mhendrickson@mndaily.com (612) 435-1575 Kathryn Chlystek Business Operations Officer kchlystek@mndaily.com (612) 435-2761 NEWS STAFF Nick Wicker Managing Editor nwicker@mndaily.com Cedar Thomas Managing Production Editor cthomas@mndaily.com Jack White Sports Editor jwhite@mndaily.com Gunthar Reising A&E Editor greising@mndaily.com Alex Tuthill-Preus Multimedia Editor atuthill-preus@mndaily.com Maddy Fox Assistant Multimedia Editor mfox@mndaily.com Sheridan Swee Copy Desk Chief sswee@mndaily.com Christine Ha Assistant Copy Desk Chief cha@mndaily.com Harry Steffenhagen Visuals Editor hsteffenhagen@mndaily.com Jane Borstad Visuals Editor jborstad@mndaily.com Desmond Kamas Chief Page Designer dkamas@mndaily.com Rilyn Eischens Campus Editor reischens@mndaily.com Olivia Johnson Campus Editor ojohnson@mndaily.com Ryan Faircloth City Editor rfaircloth@mndaily.com David Clarey Features Editor dclarey@mndaily.com =

=

=

=

=

One of the semi-private testing spaces in the Disability Resource Center is seen on Tuesday, Dec. 5 at the McNamara Alumni Center.

COURTNEY DEUTZ DAILY

=

=

Resource Center u from Page 1

DRC rents out space at the Graduate Hotel on Washington Avenue because the center’s testing facility isn’t big enough to meet student needs, but this strategy isn’t sustainable, Johnson said. “We have been getting creative about how we can do this,” Marshall said. “People in the DRC have given up office spaces for students, sometimes students wear earplugs.” DRC employees and faculty have proposed a range

of ideas to address the increased demand for accommodations, including using proctors to monitor student testing on the department level. Mark Bergen, a marketing professor in the Carlson School of Management, suggested using technology like online proctorial exams to meet student needs at a November faculty governance committee meeting. In recent years, certain classes at the University started using proctorial exam software, which lets students take online exams anywhere and monitors

their movements during the test.The DRC is considering this as an option, Marshall said. The center is also looking to cross-college collaborations to address the space shortage. Amy Kampsen, College of Education and Human Development’s director for student services, said CEHD and the DRC are in the early stages of a partnership seeking to meet student testing needs. The project may include a pi lo t e xa m pro gr a m , Marshall said. Other universities nationwide are also searching

UMN considers new bus route to St. Paul campus

MADDY FOX, DAILY

Campus connectors travel between Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses via the University’s Transitway on Sunday, Dec. 10.

Transitway u from Page 1

increased development in Prospect Park has drawn a need for more roadways. Although the University is not submitting a 2040 Plan, it will comment on the City’s 2040 plan in early 2018 in support of moving the transitway, said Leslie Krueger, chief of staff for University Services. But funding for the relocation would have to come from Prospect Park developers and the City, said Michael Berthelsen, vice president of University Services.

“We are open to ideas about a new transitway location,” Berthelsen said. “But that would have to be part of something that the City would … advance.” The new transitway would also have to be similar for the University to support the relocation, Berthelsen said. “There still needs to be that same kind of connection between campuses that is safe, secure and speedy,” Berthelsen. The University has collaborated with the Towerside Business Alliance and the University District Alliance on its comments.

“We recognize just generally that the success of the neighborhoods around campus… really impact the University’s success,” Krueger said. Ultimately, Krueger said the relocation will likely be part of an entire recreation of the transportation grid in Prospect Park. “The entire area around there is lacking a transportation grid,” Krueger said. “This would be in the context of a larger… system that supports development in the area.” “We’re open to it, and engaging with all of the partners to how that could be achieved,” Berthelsen said.

for resources to support the increasing numbers of students using testing accommodations. Recently, the University of Kentucky Disability Resource Center has seen a sharp rise in the number of tests they administer annually, said David Beach, director of the University of Kentucky DRC. “During peak times, our seats aren’t enough. We have talked about this issue, but we have not figured out what we are going to do,” he said, adding that they often have to use classroom space during midterms and finals.

International u from Page 1

Many international students at the University said they no longer felt wanted in the U.S. after President Donald Trump enacted an immigration ban affecting seven countries in February. Some were making plans to return home or find jobs in other countries they perceived as more welcoming. Similarly, international graduate students at the University of WisconsinMadison — which has similar university-wide international graduate student enrollment — are becoming increasingly concerned about attitudes toward noncitizens because of the national political climate around immigration, Tina Hatch, University of Wisconsin-Madison interim associate director of International Student Services, said in an email. International student enrollment at the school remains steady, but it’s hard to predict whether that will change, Hatch said. At the University of Minnesota, officials are tracking international applications and enrollment statistics closely in response to the

TESTS ADMINISTERED BY THE DRC 9681

8296

6278 5660 4671

2012

4921

2013

2014

2015

2016

LOS ANGELES — A flare-up on the western edge of Southern California’s largest and most destructive wildfire sent residents fleeing Sunday, as wind-fanned flames churned through canyons and down hillsides toward coastal towns. Crews with help from water-dropping aircraft saved several homes as unpredictable gusts sent the blaze churning deeper into

EDITORIAL BOARD Anant Naik Editorials & Opinions Editor anaik@mndaily.com Aleezeh Hasan Editorial Board Member ahasan@mndaily.com Ray Weishan Editorial Board Member rweishan@mndaily.com Mike Hendrickson Editor-in-Chief mhendrickson@mndaily.com

2017

*fiscal year

SOURCE: UMN DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER

current administration’s rhetoric and stance on immigration, Tsantir said. In addition to the political climate, some say there are a number of burdens on international students in the U.S. that may deter students from applying to American schools. Sean Chen, an international graduate student studying chemistry at the University, said the tax bill moving through Congress that would increase graduate students’ out-of-pocket costs is adding to international students’ worries, since they already pay more than American students in tuition. Plus, Hatch said international students face challenges in their job hunts after graduation, as there is more pressure around post-completion employment due to their student visa status. Student visa requirements also make it more difficult to transfer schools or programs once an international student is attending a school in the U.S., she said. International students also face language and cultural barriers, Chen said. The American education system is different than other countries, making the adjustment even more difficult for international graduate students, he said.

SoCal fires cause evacuations BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

=

foothill areas northwest of Los Angeles that haven’t burned in decades. New evacuations were ordered in Carpinteria, a seaside city in Santa Barbara County that has been under fire threat for days. “The winds are kind of squirrely right now,” said county fire spokesman Mike Eliason. “Some places the smoke is going straight up in the air, and others it’s blowing sideways. Depends on what canyon we’re in.”

BUSINESS Genevieve Locke Sales Manager glocke@mndaily.com David Keane Controller dkeane@mndaily.com Corrections The Minnesota Daily strives for complete accuracy and corrects its errors immediately. Corrections and clarifications will always be printed in this space. If you believe the Daily has printed a factual error, please call the readers’ representative at (612) 627–4070, extension 3057, or email errors@mndaily.com immediately. THE MINNESOTA DAILY is a legally independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization and is a student-written and student-managed newspaper for the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus. The Daily’s mission is: 1) to provide coverage of news and events affecting the University community; 2) to provide a forum for the communication and exchange of ideas for the University community; 3) to provide educational training and experience to University students in all areas of newspaper operations; and 4) to operate a fiscally responsible organization to ensure its ability to serve the University in the future. The Daily is a member of the Minnesota News Council, the Minnesota Associated Press, the Associated Collegiate Press, The Minnesota Newspaper Association and other organizations. The Daily is published Monday and Thursday during the regular school year and weekly during the summer, and it is printed by ECM Publishers in Princeton, Minn. Midwest News Service distributes the 13,000 issues daily. All Minnesota Daily inserts are recyclable within the University of Minnesota program and are at least 6 percent consumer waste. U.S. Postal Service: 351–480.w


Monday, December 11, 2017

3

Compost program planned for dorms

ANANYA MISHRA, DAILY

Environmental sciences, policy and management junior, Claudia Althoen, poses for portraits with an organics recycling bin at the Yudof Hall Club Room on Friday, Dec. 8. She started the organics recycling pilot program at Yudof Hall in collaboration with Dana Donatucci and Shane Stennes

MSA and campus recycling groups unveiled plans for the residence halls. BY CLEO KREJCI ckrejci@mndaily.com

Organics recycling will be a full-time part of University of Minnesota residential halls in fall 2018. Approved on Dec. 4, the new composting program is based on a successful organics recycling pilot in Yudof Hall last spring. Housing and Residential Life, the Minnesota Student Association and the Uni-

versity of Minnesota Recycling Program worked with Claudia Althoen, MSA student project lead for organics recycling. Althoen led the pilot in her apartment-style student housing from Mar. 13 to Apr. 25. A junior in environmental sciences policy and management, Althoen said the idea stemmed from her hope to improve sustainability on campus. “It’s surprising to see the results for the pilot … went better than expected,” Althoen said. The program allows students to dispose of food waste and other biodegradable materials that will be

composted into soil. Dana Donatucci, University of Minnesota Recycling Supervisor, said the shift to organics will generate an estimated 20 percent reduction in residence hall waste costs. He added that based on past work, outgoing waste from residence halls is about 25 percent compostable material, all of which is currently burned for disposal instead of being composted. MSA and HRL are working on a survey for spring 2018 residence halls to work out details of the organics program. A secondary pilot in a traditional residence hall will take place in the spring before final

Federal government files counter-suit against UMN This lawsuit was filed in response to the U’s complaint over contamination. BY MICHAEL ACHTERLING machterling@mndaily.com

The federal government has filed a counter-suit against the University of Minnesota over contamination at a school-owned property in Rosemount. The U.S. Department of Justice and DuPont filed arguments in the U.S. District Court of Minnesota on Nov. 17 against the University of Minnesota for liability and cleanup costs associated with the school’s Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park. The DOJ is counter-suing the University for $1.6 million, citing a breach of contract involving the World War II land sale. The $1.6 million would recoup site inspection costs performed by the Army Corps of Engineers in the 2000s. The DOJ argues the University acknowledged the contamination in the 1948 land sale documents, which stated the University must assume “all liability and responsibility which may arise out of the said contaminated condition.”

The 1948 contract of sale, signed by the University, also stated the school would pay for any decontamination costs on the property. “As expected, the United States and DuPont filed separate answers to the University’s lawsuit,” said University spokesperson Evan Lapiska. The University filed its original $3 million lawsuit against the U.S. government and DuPont on Aug. 11, seeking reimbursement for cleanup costs from soil contamination of UMore Park. The property was previously operated by DuPont through an agreement with the federal government during WWII, and manufactured around 29 million pounds of smokeless gunpowder and associated chemicals on the property. The University responded to the DOJ’s counter-suit on Friday, denying the government’s allegations. “I would stress that we are at the very preliminary stage of the litigation,” Lapiska said. “These things take time and it is unlikely there will be a quick resolution of this matter.” A remedial investigation of UMore Park released by the University in May identified multiple sites of concern at the property. These included sites

with soil containing lead, mercury, arsenic and other chemicals above screening criteria. Brad Karkkainen, a University law professor specializing in environmental, landuse and property law, said the federal government has been found liable for property costs in previous cases across the country. “There are a number of cases around the country where there have been government-owned facilities that have subsequently passed into other people’s hands, where about the current owner and federal government have been found to be liable,” he said. Still, Karkkainen said the University may be able to recover damages without proving negligence. “It certainly is possible in cases like this that there could be a contractual agreement between the parties as to who assumes liability that otherwise would fall to the other party,” said Karkkainen. “Those kinds of contractual agreements are perfectly legal and can be enforceable.” All three parties will meet for a pre-trial conference to discuss the future schedule of the litigation in March. Lawyers representing the DOJ and DuPont declined comment for this story.

Shelby votes against Moore THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — In his sternest rebuke yet, Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said repeatedly Sunday his state can “do better” than electing fellow Republican Roy Moore to the U.S. Senate, making clear that a write-in candidate was far preferable to a man accused of sexual misconduct.

Days before the pivotal race, Shelby, who is Alabama’s senior senator, said he had already cast an absentee ballot for another, unspecified Republican, even as other prominent state Republicans fell in line behind Moore. Moore faces Democrat Doug Jones in the special election Tuesday to replace Jeff Sessions, now the U.S. attorney general.

“I couldn’t vote for Roy Moore. I didn’t vote for Roy Moore. But I wrote in a distinguished Republican name. And I think a lot of people could do that,” Shelby told CNN’s “State of the Union.” “The state of Alabama deserves better,” he said. “There’s a lot of smoke,” Shelby said of Moore and his accusers. “Got to be some fire somewhere.”

implementation in fall 2018. Talk of organics recycling has been in the works for a couple of years, said Daniel Elliott, associate director of facilities with HRL at the University. “It was great last year when Claudia had approached the department … that was sort of the catalyst, you know, to ... get us moving it forward,” Elliott said. Will Macheel, director for MSA’s Sustainability Committee and applied economics sophomore, said organics recycling is one of the most common topics students bring to his attention. He added that implementing organics recycling

around the residential halls sends a positive message about environmental sustainability to the campus community. Macheel added that he hopes to educate students about the environmental benefits of organics recycling, including how the process reduces methane production, a greenhouse gas more environmentally harmful than CO2. “We’re excited to see not only just what happens with the residence halls, but … the overall plans for campus expansion, as those are kind of being developed right now within the campus administration,” Macheel said.

Donatucci said it will take at least two years before organics recycling is added to all waste stations around campus. Tauby Yonah Mintz, Yudof resident and junior pursuing a bachelor of individualized studies degree, said she started composting as soon as she learned of the pilot in Yudof, though she has noticed that some students are wary of participating. “I think students can really benefit from it, a n d a l s o t h e e n v i ro n ment can really benefit from it,” Mintz said. “I feel like I’m making a difference.”


4

Sports

MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

MN DAILY

MNDAILY.COM

VOLLEYBALL

Senior libero Dalianliz Rosado readies to hit the ball during a match against the Bruins at Maturi Pavilion on Dec. 10, 2016.

ALEX TUTHILL-PREUS, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota ends season in Sweet 16

Volleyball u from Page 1

kills, 54-43. The Trojans needed more than 25 points to beat the Gophers in the second set. USC led 24-22, but Minnesota tied the set at 24, which led to the Trojans calling a timeout.

The Gophers and Trojans exchanged points until USC pulled away to take the set 28-25. The Trojans followed that up with a 25-16 victory in the third and final set. Seniors Molly Lohman and Dalianliz Rosado performed well in their final match as Gophers. Lohman had six kills and six block

assists, while Rosado continued her strong defense with 17 digs. “Obviously, it has been an amazing journey,” Lohman told reporters. “I can’t really put it into words.” Minnesota ends its season with a 28-6 record. The Gophers finished the nonconference slate undefeated,

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

but the team’s 15-5 conference record is the worst they have finished in the Big Ten since the 201415 season. Alexis Hart, Stephanie Samedy and Samantha Seliger-Swenson earned All-Big Ten accolades for the season. They will all return to the team next season.

McCutcheon was disappointed with the loss, but proud of his team’s performance this season. “We are very proud of our team for our body of work,” McCutcheon told reporters. “Really proud of our team, but obviously still upset with the result. We’ll get some lessons learned and

VOLLEYBALL RESULTS

FRIDAY 1 2 3 FINAL Minnesota 23 26 16 0 Southern California 25 28 25 3 SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

come back next year and have another crack at it.”

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

After blowing 3-1 lead in game one, U routs Duluth in second game of series The Gophers tied the Bulldogs in the first game, but had a 5-0 win later on. BY MAX BIEGERT mbiegert@mndaily.com

COURTNEY DEUTZ, DAILY

Grace Zumwinkle keeps the puck away from a Minnesota-Duluth player on Friday, Dec. 8 at Ridder Arena.

Freshman duo thrives vs. UMD Grace Zumwinkle and Taylor Wente combined for nine points in the series. BY ERIK NELSON enelson2@mndaily.com

Forwards Taylor Wente and Grace Zumwinkle are roommates at Minnesota and former teammates on the U-18 National team. The duo’s chemistry showed in the Gophers’ series versus the Bulldogs. Wente and Zumwinkle combined for nine points in the two-game series versus Minnesota-Duluth. Wente said she and Zumwinkle read each other well. “I’ve known her forever, so I know what she does and how she plays. I can feed off of her and she can feed off of me,” Wente said. “When we both use our speed, it definitely makes us hard to defend.” No. 6 Minnesota (155-2, 10-4-2-0 WCHA) tied Minnesota-Duluth (9-11-1, 5-8-1-1 WCHA) on Friday night 3-3 before the Bulldogs won in a shootout. Minnesota won on Saturday 5-0.

Zumwinkle scored with 8.7 seconds left in the second period on Saturday and also recorded an assist. She was named the game’s second star and scored five points Friday and Saturday. The two started the scoring in the series when Zumwinkle and Wente got out to a breakaway. The forwards exchanged passes until Zumwinkle found Wente right by the net. Wente shot it past goaltender Jessica Convery for the goal and the 1-0 lead. On Friday night, Zumwinkle scored at the 3:31 mark of the third period after Wente passed the puck through two defenders and towards Zumwinkle. This time, it was Zumwinkle’s turn to shoot, as she netted the goal diving towards the front of the net. “That was finishing off rebounds [and] getting to the net because that’s where a lot of goals are scored,” Zumwinkle said. Head coach Brad Frost said on Friday the two play off each other well. “They played a lot together in their USA high school hockey days,” Frost said. “I

thought they did a nice job.” The line of Nicole Schammel, Wente and Zumwinkle played in Minnesota’s series against the Bulldogs and two previous series against Lindenwood and Bemidji State. Schammel said her line was motivated to do well against Minnesota-Duluth. Zumwinkle and Schammel are tied for first on the team in goals, each with 11. Wente is close behind with eight goals on the season, which ranks tied for second. “We were kind of frustrated that we weren’t scoring on some of our chances. We capitalized on our chances this weekend,” Schammel said. Wente scored the first goal for Minnesota in both games. She recorded four points over the weekend. In both games, she scored one goal and assisted on another. Zumwinkle finished the first game with two assists and a score. Wente said one of Zumwinkle’s strengths is her shot, which makes it special to play with her. “When it does hit the net, it creates rebounds and helps our team be successful,” Wente said.

Grace Zumwinkle rushed down the middle of the ice, put a move past the Bulldogs’ goaltender Jessica Convery and scored a goal with under 10 seconds left in the second period. The score made it a fivegoal deficit for MinnesotaDuluth, and the Gophers kept it that way. The Gophers (15-5-2, 104-2 WCHA) beat MinnesotaDuluth (9-11-1, 5-8-1-1 WCHA) 5-0 in the second game of the weekend series. The Gophers were led by Nicole Schammel who had two goals. Taylor Wente, Sophie Skarzysnki and Zumwinkle all scored as well. The Bulldogs scored two unanswered goals, which led to a tie, in the third period of the first game. Head coach Brad Frost said he liked the way his team responded on Saturday. “They took last night pretty personally,” Frost said. “They approached this game like it was their last game, and that is how we have to approach every game.” Wente scored her eighth goal of the year with 5:15 to play in the first period. Schammel, 41 seconds later, put the puck in the net. The period ended with Skarzynski getting a pass from Caitlin Reilly and beating Convery with a wrist shot. Players celebrating the goal fell to the ground as the Gophers led 3-0 after the first period. The second period saw the Gophers extend the lead. Three minutes into the period, Schammel scored her second goal of the game and 11th goal of the season after a scramble in front of the net. The play was reviewed, but ruled as a good goal.

COURTNEY DEUTZ, DAILY

Redshirt junior forward Nicole Schammel skates with the puck on Friday, Dec. 8 at Ridder Arena.

The Gophers registered two shots on goal in third period. Sidney Peters ended the game saving 18 shots that night en route to her second shutout of the season. Throughout the two games, the line of Schammel, Zumwinkle and Wente scored 14 points. “I think we [Zumwinkle and Wente] read each [other] well, she has a really good shot and I see her on the ice, we both have strengths and we use them very well,” Wente said. “We are also roommates so we have a good connection that way.” Gophers with ‘bad tie’ in first game The No. 6 Gophers looked poised to win with eight minutes left in the third period, until the Bulldogs climbed back to steal a shootout victory in game one of the weekend series. The Gophers lost in a shootout to their rivals from Duluth after the game ended in a 3-3 tie Friday night in overtime. Wente, Zumwinkle and Reilly all scored goals for Minnesota. “Being up two goals twice in the third you got to find a way to win that hockey game,” Frost said. “There are good ties and bad ties… Tonight, you don’t feel real

WOMEN’S HOCKEY RESULTS

FRIDAY UMD Minnesota

SATURDAY UMD Minnesota

1 2 3 OT FINAL 0 0 3 0 3 1 0 2 0 3 *UMD wins in shootout 2-1 1 0 3

2 0 2

3 0 0

FINAL 0 5

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

good about this tie.” Zumwinkle sent it past the goaltender with 16:32 to go in the period to give the Gophers the first of their two-goal leads. MinnesotaDuluth’s Katerina Mrazova answered Zumwinkle’s goal after battling in front of the net. Reilly would net her goal after Zumwinkle powered a shot at net that trickled down to Reilly’s stick. That would be it for Minnesota’s scoring, however, because the next two goals came from the Bulldogs’ Ashton Bell, who led the comeback. She scored her two goals in the last eight minutes to send the game to overtime. “Going forward, we have to continue to build on the momentum we create earlier in games,” Zumwinkle said. In overtime, neither team could get anything good on net and the game went to a shootout. Duluth won the shootout 2-1 after five rounds.


5

MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

MN DAILY

MNDAILY.COM

ART

Prince u from Page 1

EASTON GREEN, DAILY

TOP: Shirin Saadat, left, and Kim Tsujimoto get their first glimpse of Rock Martinez’s larger-than-life mural of Prince during the preview party for the Weisman Art Museum’s “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition on Friday, Dec. 8. BOTTOM LEFT: Attendees of the preview party for the “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition look on photos created by Troy Gua. BOTTOM RIGHT: Elizabeth Wolkoff, left, and Vivian Wolkoff look on at a portrait of Prince created by Lillian Cotton the preview party for the “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition.

STYLE

Street Style: Prince and purple everything The Weisman’s “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition party inspired all to dress to impress. BY KATE DRAKULIC kdrakulic@mndaily.com

B

ased on a fashion and style-icon, the Weisman Art Museum’s “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition preview party on Friday night was sure to bring memorable and outstanding outfits. From fan merchandise, to Princeinspired couture, to purple, purple and more purple, here are the night’s best looks. Daphne Timmons, Lab Assistant What she wore: Prince hoodie, Michael Kors purse, Ugg sneakers and Prince pins. “This sweatshirt is a birthday gift all the way from Japan,” she said. “My coworker got it for me.” When asked when she got into Prince, Timmons didn’t miss a beat. “‘Since ‘1999,’ so since the 80’s,” she said. Shirin Saadat, Technical Director at 3M What she wore: Black velvet jumpsuit, purple velvet coat and a black fur wrap. Whether it was her presence, her outfit or both, Saadat stood out from the rest as she floated around the galleries. “My outfit is all from one place. It’s called Carlisle,” she said. “The jumpsuit pants are black, the bustier is velvet and strapless, and then this matching velvet three-quarters length coat,” she said as she described her outfit.

EASTON GREEN, DAILY

From left, Michael Kreher, Kim Tsujimoto, Shirin Saadat, and Lorraine Lassig pose for portraits during the preview party for the Weisman Art Museum’s “Prince from Minneapolis” exhibition.

Lorraine Lassig, Retail Worker / “Purple girl full-time” What she wore: Purple snow boots, purple sweater, purple dress, purple leggings, purple Prince earrings and a necklace from Etsy. “I saw ‘Purple Rain,’ a couple of years ago at the Riverview Theater in Minneapolis, and that’s how I got into Prince,” Lassig said. Kim Tsujimoto, Manager at 3M What she wore: Thigh high purple suede boots, sequin purple and blue skirt from the kid department at Target, leather jacket from the adult department at Nordstrom and a choker. “I got these purple suede boots online. They were super cheap, and I thought even if I only wear them once I have to get them,” she said. “The ’80s was my era. That’s when I went to

school. I moved here like 25 years ago and you can’t not love Prince when you’re in the Twin Cities right? It’s like it’s in the air.” Michael Kreher, Building and Technical Operations Assistant at the Weisman What he wore: Tallia Orange button up shirt and jacket, his friend’s girlfriend’s skinny jeans, John Fluevog wing tipped shoes. “I grew up listening to some Prince from my parents. That was kind of their generation and what they were really into. He was a huge icon in their LGBT community in San Francisco. Prince was just this person that everyone knew of and looked up to and felt super positive about,” Kreher said. “When I first came to First Ave, I was like, ‘Ah. So, this is the place where it all happened.’”

artist Troy Gua’s “Le Petit Prince.” Gua’s photos reveal surreal images of a handcrafted miniature sculpture of Prince. “At the end of the year, after making other work, I decided I wanted to make something really fun for myself and I made little Prince… I’m working through his life and career chronologically, and I’m doing around four to six images per year,” Gua said. Inspired by Gerry Anderson’s marionette characters who have oversized eyes and heads, Gua’s “Le Petit Prince” character has similar traits. Gua makes every article of clothing, accessory and item visible in the photographs by hand. He releases one photo every Saturday on his Instagram. “[Prince] changed my life at 13. I saw him on MTV. My sister took me to ‘Purple Rain’ and that was it,” Gua said. “I’m just really honored and grateful to be included in this show.” The exhibition originated when associate geography professor Arun Saldanha came to WAM with the idea. “He came and said, ‘I’m applying for this big faculty grant, and I really think we need to do a Prince symposium, and I think we need to give him an honorary doctorate.’ That was a few years before [Prince] died,” Mullin said. “We batted it around here at the Weisman for a while… and then decided we should do this,” Mullin said. The party stretched late into the evening and ended with a heartfelt “Purple Rain.” In January, the Weisman will be hosting “Prince in Perspective,” featuring photographer Terry Gydesen to talk about her experience working with Prince. In April, an international conference will be held investigating Prince’s relation to Minneapolis and Minnesota.


Monday, December 11, 2017

3

Compost program planned for dorms

ANANYA MISHRA, DAILY

Environmental sciences, policy and management junior, Claudia Althoen, poses for portraits with an organics recycling bin at the Yudof Hall Club Room on Friday, Dec. 8. She started the organics recycling pilot program at Yudof Hall in collaboration with Dana Donatucci and Shane Stennes

MSA and campus recycling groups unveiled plans for the residence halls. BY CLEO KREJCI ckrejci@mndaily.com

Organics recycling will be a full-time part of University of Minnesota residential halls in fall 2018. Approved on Dec. 4, the new composting program is based on a successful organics recycling pilot in Yudof Hall last spring. Housing and Residential Life, the Minnesota Student Association and the Uni-

versity of Minnesota Recycling Program worked with Claudia Althoen, MSA student project lead for organics recycling. Althoen led the pilot in her apartment-style student housing from Mar. 13 to Apr. 25. A junior in environmental sciences policy and management, Althoen said the idea stemmed from her hope to improve sustainability on campus. “It’s surprising to see the results for the pilot … went better than expected,” Althoen said. The program allows students to dispose of food waste and other biodegradable materials that will be

composted into soil. Dana Donatucci, University of Minnesota Recycling Supervisor, said the shift to organics will generate an estimated 20 percent reduction in residence hall waste costs. He added that based on past work, outgoing waste from residence halls is about 25 percent compostable material, all of which is currently burned for disposal instead of being composted. MSA and HRL are working on a survey for spring 2018 residence halls to work out details of the organics program. A secondary pilot in a traditional residence hall will take place in the spring before final

Federal government files counter-suit against UMN This lawsuit was filed in response to the U’s complaint over contamination. BY MICHAEL ACHTERLING machterling@mndaily.com

The federal government has filed a counter-suit against the University of Minnesota over contamination at a school-owned property in Rosemount. The U.S. Department of Justice and DuPont filed arguments in the U.S. District Court of Minnesota on Nov. 17 against the University of Minnesota for liability and cleanup costs associated with the school’s Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park. The DOJ is counter-suing the University for $1.6 million, citing a breach of contract involving the World War II land sale. The $1.6 million would recoup site inspection costs performed by the Army Corps of Engineers in the 2000s. The DOJ argues the University acknowledged the contamination in the 1948 land sale documents, which stated the University must assume “all liability and responsibility which may arise out of the said contaminated condition.”

The 1948 contract of sale, signed by the University, also stated the school would pay for any decontamination costs on the property. “As expected, the United States and DuPont filed separate answers to the University’s lawsuit,” said University spokesperson Evan Lapiska. The University filed its original $3 million lawsuit against the U.S. government and DuPont on Aug. 11, seeking reimbursement for cleanup costs from soil contamination of UMore Park. The property was previously operated by DuPont through an agreement with the federal government during WWII, and manufactured around 29 million pounds of smokeless gunpowder and associated chemicals on the property. The University responded to the DOJ’s counter-suit on Friday, denying the government’s allegations. “I would stress that we are at the very preliminary stage of the litigation,” Lapiska said. “These things take time and it is unlikely there will be a quick resolution of this matter.” A remedial investigation of UMore Park released by the University in May identified multiple sites of concern at the property. These included sites

with soil containing lead, mercury, arsenic and other chemicals above screening criteria. Brad Karkkainen, a University law professor specializing in environmental, landuse and property law, said the federal government has been found liable for property costs in previous cases across the country. “There are a number of cases around the country where there have been government-owned facilities that have subsequently passed into other people’s hands, where about the current owner and federal government have been found to be liable,” he said. Still, Karkkainen said the University may be able to recover damages without proving negligence. “It certainly is possible in cases like this that there could be a contractual agreement between the parties as to who assumes liability that otherwise would fall to the other party,” said Karkkainen. “Those kinds of contractual agreements are perfectly legal and can be enforceable.” All three parties will meet for a pre-trial conference to discuss the future schedule of the litigation in March. Lawyers representing the DOJ and DuPont declined comment for this story.

Shelby votes against Moore THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — In his sternest rebuke yet, Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said repeatedly Sunday his state can “do better” than electing fellow Republican Roy Moore to the U.S. Senate, making clear that a write-in candidate was far preferable to a man accused of sexual misconduct.

Days before the pivotal race, Shelby, who is Alabama’s senior senator, said he had already cast an absentee ballot for another, unspecified Republican, even as other prominent state Republicans fell in line behind Moore. Moore faces Democrat Doug Jones in the special election Tuesday to replace Jeff Sessions, now the U.S. attorney general.

“I couldn’t vote for Roy Moore. I didn’t vote for Roy Moore. But I wrote in a distinguished Republican name. And I think a lot of people could do that,” Shelby told CNN’s “State of the Union.” “The state of Alabama deserves better,” he said. “There’s a lot of smoke,” Shelby said of Moore and his accusers. “Got to be some fire somewhere.”

implementation in fall 2018. Talk of organics recycling has been in the works for a couple of years, said Daniel Elliott, associate director of facilities with HRL at the University. “It was great last year when Claudia had approached the department … that was sort of the catalyst, you know, to ... get us moving it forward,” Elliott said. Will Macheel, director for MSA’s Sustainability Committee and applied economics sophomore, said organics recycling is one of the most common topics students bring to his attention. He added that implementing organics recycling

around the residential halls sends a positive message about environmental sustainability to the campus community. Macheel added that he hopes to educate students about the environmental benefits of organics recycling, including how the process reduces methane production, a greenhouse gas more environmentally harmful than CO2. “We’re excited to see not only just what happens with the residence halls, but … the overall plans for campus expansion, as those are kind of being developed right now within the campus administration,” Macheel said.

Donatucci said it will take at least two years before organics recycling is added to all waste stations around campus. Tauby Yonah Mintz, Yudof resident and junior pursuing a bachelor of individualized studies degree, said she started composting as soon as she learned of the pilot in Yudof, though she has noticed that some students are wary of participating. “I think students can really benefit from it, a n d a l s o t h e e n v i ro n ment can really benefit from it,” Mintz said. “I feel like I’m making a difference.”


7

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017

MN DAILY

MNDAILY.COM FOR RELEASE DECEMBER 11, 2017

HOROSCOPES Today’s Birthday (12/11): Meditate on a long-term vision this year. Realize carefully laid plans. Profit through self-discipline and persistence. Shifting routes this winter lead to expanding creative connections.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Written by Nancy Black

Aries (3/21 - 4/19): Today is an 8 — You and your partner are on the same page. Support each other to grow stronger and more skillful. Make beautiful music together.

Libra (9/23 - 10/22): Today is a 9 — You’re especially irresistible today and tomorrow. Pamper yourself, dress for success and try a new style. Focus on what you love.

Taurus (4/20 - 5/20): Today is a 9 — Put love into your work, and it grows to new levels. The beauty lies in the details. Exercise energizes you; so does nature and art.

Scorpio (10/23 - 11/21): Today is a 6 — Indulge a craving for peaceful privacy. Contemplate eternal questions and ponder your own spirit’s path. Rest, relax and speculate.

Gemini (5/21 - 6/21): Today is an 8 — Pursue recreation and romance. Love suffuses the air; share it with someone sweet. Enjoy beloved people, games, pastimes and places.

Sagittarius (11/22 - 12/21): Today is an 8 — Get into a two-day party phase. Savor laughter, deliciousness and good times with friends. Community efforts flower and propagate.

Cancer (6/22 - 7/22): Today is a 7 — Beautify your home today and tomorrow. Fill it with tantalizing fragrances, flavors and music. Share something delicious with family and friends.

Capricorn (12/22 - 1/19): Today is an 8 — Your influence is on the rise over the next two days. Put love into your work, and impress someone important. An opportunity beckons.

Leo (7/23 - 8/22): Today is a 9 — Your creative muses harmonize with you. Connect and network with others who share your enthusiasm. Invite participation.

Aquarius (1/20 - 2/18): Today is an 8 —Your journey through tomorrow presents incredible beauty. Follow your heart, and it leads you to what you didn’t know you were looking for.

Virgo (8/23 - 9/22): Today is a 9 — Your touch is especially golden over the next few days. Focus on making and saving money. Put love into your work. Visualize immense success.

Pisces (2/19 - 3/20): Today is a 9 — Track shared finances over the next few days. Lucrative opportunities become available. Add an artistic touch to your presentation.

CLASSIFIEDS The Minnesota Daily must approve all ad copy and reserves the right to request text changes, reject or re-classify an ad. Advertisers are responsible for the truthfulness of their ads. Advertisers are also subject to credit ap- proval. Corrections are accepted until 2 p.m., Mon.-Fri., by calling 612- 627-4080. To cancel an ad, call 612-6274080.

To place a Classified linage ad, call: 612-627-4080 or email: nationalsales@mndaily.com or go online to www.mndaily.com/ page/classifieds To place a display ad, call: 612-435-5772. For billing and all other questions, call: 612-627-4080.

PRINT RATE: $2.70 PER LINE/DAY ONLINE RATE: $20 PER 15 DAYS

ACROSS 1 Cushions for gymnasts 5 Guard’s shout 9 Rectangular Apple 13 Tons 14 Student’s repetitive cry with a raised hand 15 Sports page news 16 Gift-wrapping need 18 Country singer Steve 19 Rowdy crowds 20 “Mr. November,” for Derek Jeter, e.g. 22 Put pen to paper 24 Rep.’s campaign rival 25 Title for a knight 26 Home for a pride 28 Genesis paradise 30 Exile island for Napoleon 31 Dance for which “it takes two” 33 JPEG relative 36 Quotable boxer 37 Hipster 39 Duffer’s dream 40 Air circulator 41 Capital of Yemen 42 Large First Nations tribe 43 “__ does it!” 45 Meddling type of “driver” who’s not actually driving 48 “Never heard of them” 49 Golf great Ernie 51 “Don’t sweat it!” 52 “Is that really your opinion?” 54 Not wavering in the least 55 TV host Lake 56 Garment fittingly represented by this puzzle’s circles 61 Signed in pen 62 Leisurely gait 63 Doing nothing 64 Bird’s snack 65 Drinks slowly 66 Dragged to court DOWN 1 Apple computer 2 Every bit

HELP WANTED Horse Stable Hand Horse Farm in west metro looking to fill various PT positions. Weekends mainly but some additional weekday hours also available. Must have prior horse stable experience. Email ldalefarms@aol.com

12/11/17

By C.C. Burnikel

3 Little piggy 4 Staying power 5 Place of rapid growth 6 Light-bulb moments 7 Prune, as a branch 8 Unifying idea 9 Aggressive poker table words 10 Outdoor lot for cars 11 “Inferiority complex” coiner Alfred 12 Doe or stag 15 Half a score 17 Goes bad 21 Last Greek letter 22 “O Pioneers!” author Cather 23 “Blurred Lines” singer 24 Paternity test sites 26 One of many that fall in the fall 27 School near Windsor 29 Tiny speck 32 Final Four org. 34 Mountaineer’s tool 35 Thirds of a yard

Last Issue’sPuzzle PuzzleSolved Solved Saturday’s

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

37 Civil War side: Abbr. 38 Hall’s pop music partner 42 Narnia creator 44 Tooted one’s horn 46 Salad oil bottles 47 Deborah of “The King and I” 48 Complain with self-pity 50 Ransacks

12/11/17

52 “Divergent” films heroine 53 Baby goat 54 “Enough!” 57 School in the smallest U.S. state 58 End of a school address 59 Malt beverage 60 Color of most pomegranate seeds

SUDOKU

DR. DATE Dr. Date,

I met this guy on Tinder over the weekend, and we exchanged numbers and Facebook information. We’ve been chatting pretty consistently the last few days, but I’m not really the type of person who gets to know someone via instant messenger. I asked him out for drinks (my favorite hobby), and he fessed up and told me he’s actually 19, not 21 like his profile says. It was a major blow, but I’m not sure how much I should worry about it. Though the lie is a major turnoff, I still appreciate his sense of humor, kindness and willingness to get to know me. Should I let this one slide, or does it just mean that there are

probably more dishonest things that he’s telling me?

—Minor Incident

One White Lie,

Let it slide! My cousin just turned 17, but her Facebook says she’s 28. (I worry about her, but that doesn’t mean she’s a bad person.) What I’m saying is that people don’t take their Facebook or online age seriously, at least in my experience. And hey, if he thought this was a huge lie and decided that he needed to do a big ole confession, I think it’s safe to say that the magnitude of anything he’s lying about isn’t larger than little cupcakesized bumps you two can easily get over.

—Dr. Date

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve sudoku, visit sudoku.org.uk. 12/11/2017

Last issue’s solution

© 2017 Michael Mepham. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


8

Monday, December 11, 2017

Minneapolis’ $15 min wage brought to court City officials and business leaders made arguments in court on Dec. 1. BY MADELINE DENINGER mdeninger@mndailly.com

Minneapolis officials and business leaders have brought their clash over a $15 minimum wage to a Hennepin County judge. The Minnesota Chamber of Commerce is suing the city of Minneapolis over its minimum wage ordinance, saying the policy violates state law. The ordinance, passed by the Minneapolis City Council in June, is set to go into effect Jan. 1 for businesses with over 100 employees, and July 1 for businesses with fewer than 100 employees. The citywide wage will increase incrementally each year until it reaches $15 per hour. “When laws artificially require employers to pay, in this case up to $15 an hour,

employers are going to buy less labor,” said Cam Winton, director of energy and labor-management policy for the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. “On the legal front, different states handle things in different ways. But in Minnesota, on our law books, there is one minimum wage.” The chamber filed the lawsuit in Hennepin County District Court on Nov. 10. Arguments from both the chamber and the city were heard in court on Dec. 1, with a decision still to be announced. Winton said the ordinance is problematic at both a policy and legal level. He said a $15 minimum wage will make the market less competitive for low-wage workers. The wage ordinance states that it shouldn’t be interpreted or applied to conflict with federal or state law. The ordinance maintains that the city “has broad authority through its police powers to enact

regulation to further the public health, safety and general welfare.” Tyler Vasseur, an officer of University of Minnesota Socialist Students and member of Socialist Alternative, said he thinks businesses are suing the city over the wage ordinance to maximize profits. “They already make insane amounts of money, meanwhile the lowest wage workers are barely getting by. So they see this as a threat to their profits,” he said. Local business owners have mixed feelings on whether the ordinance should go into effect. Pete Jacobson, co-owner of Land’s End Pasty Company in Dinkytown, said he believes the ordinance will burden small businesses and startups. “When a lot of businesses first start up, they don’t make any money at all,” Jacobson said. “A $15 minimum wage makes things even more difficult.”

David Hathaway, owner of Mesa Pizza, said though the ordinance could pose a challenge, it’s important for low-wage workers. “It’s tough for low-wage workers to be able to pay for bills, so I support it,” Hathaway said. “As a business owner you always worry about expenses, but sometimes the worth of something outweighs the worry.” If the ordinance is upheld in court, the chamber will appeal, Winton said. Mayor-elect and current Ward 3 City Council Member Jacob Frey, who was one of the authors of the ordinance, said a potential appeal doesn’t concern him. “We as the city will staunchly defend our minimum wage ordinance,” Frey said. “We have faith in our attorneys and our judicial system to do the right thing.” Minnesota’s state minimum wage will climb to $9.65 per hour for large employers, and $7.87 for small businesses on Jan. 1.

Trump speech on civil rights draws protests BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSON, Miss — President Donald Trump has honored figures of the civil rights movement, some famous, some not, at a ceremony that exposed stark divisions among Americans about his commitment to that legacy. Trump on Saturday toured the new Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the adjacent Museum of Mississippi, both in Jackson. Outside, demonstrators protested his presence, some holding signs that said “Make America Civil Again” and “Lock Him Up” and others shouting “No Trump, no hate, no KKK in the USA.” During the opening ceremony, about 25 people stood silently with Confederate battle flag stickers covering their mouths. Trump spent about 30 minutes at the museums, gave a 10-minute speech to select guests inside and flew back to his Florida estate, skipping the dedication ceremony held outside on a chilly day. He spent more time getting to Jackson

than he did on the ground. In a deliberate voice and rarely diverting from his prepared words, the president sought to honor the famous and the anonymous for their efforts on behalf of freedom and equality. He did not acknowledge the anger his participation had sparked leading up to the dedication. “The civil rights museum records the oppression, cruelty and injustice inflicted on the African-American community, the fight to bring down Jim Crow and end segregation, to gain the right to vote and to achieve the sacred birthright of equality,” he said. “And it’s big stuff. That’s big stuff.” Trump has been accused of harboring racial animosity, and critics cite his blaming of “both sides” for deadly violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the summer. Trump has also relentlessly criticized NFL players for kneeling during the national anthem to protest racism and police brutality largely directed at AfricanAmerican males.

December 11th, 2017  
December 11th, 2017  
Advertisement