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’ S R E M O NEWC GUIDE 2017


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ocial and political forces are changing Minneapolis forever. P.J. Fleck is ushering in a new era of Gophers athletics. The University of Minnesota is attempting to become a national university. The Minnesota Daily will be here to cover it all. As a freshman, the largest school in Minnesota and one of the largest in the Big Ten can be overwhelming. The University enrolls over 50,000 students with around 35,000 undergraduates. For years and years, these students have been making news and the Daily has been there to chronicle it. Just this past year, Rep. Illhan Omar, the state representative for the University’s district, became the first Somali-American state legislator, the Gophers football team staged a boycott after ten players were suspended in relation to an al-

leged sexual assault and protests erupted during the 2016 Presidential election along with the murals on the Washington Avenue Bridge being defaced. The Daily had extensive coverage of each event, keeping the student body informed. The Daily is entirely student-run and independent from the University. Some college newspapers may be subjected to prior review from the University, but the Daily has complete editorial independence. Our alumni have worked at some of the best publications across the country, including the Star Tribune, The New York Times, The Washington Post and ESPN. Over the past 10 years, the Daily has been consistently ranked as one of the best college newspapers across the country with everything being produced by students in your classes. The Minnesota Daily published for the first

time over a century ago. On Sept. 5, the Daily will enter its 118th year of serving the student body with the best news resource about the University of Minnesota. The Newcomers’ Guide will get you started on knowing what goes on at the University, but you will learn more about your school by reading the Daily throughout the year. We hope you pick up that paper on Sept. 5, and every subsequent paper on Mondays and Thursdays throughout the school year. Read the Daily and know your campus.

’ S R E M O C W NE GUIDE

Mike Hendrickson Co-Publisher and Editor-in-Chief

2017

Kathryn Chlystek Co-Publisher and Business Operations Officer

Wednesday, August 31, 2017 Vol. 117 No. 68

An Independent Student Newspaper, Founded in 1900. 2221 University Ave. SE, Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55414 Phone: (612) 627-4080 Fax: (612) 435-5865 Copyright © 2017 The Minnesota Daily This newspaper, its design and its contents are copyrighted. OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHER Mike Hendrickson Editor-in-Chief mhendrickson@mndaily.com (612) 435-1575 Kathryn Chlystek Business Operations Officer kchlystek@mndaily.com (612) 435-2761 NEWS STAFF Nick Wicker Managing Editor nwicker@mndaily.com Allison Dohnalek Managing Production Editor adohnalek@mndaily.com Jack White Sports Editor jwhite@mndaily.com Sophia Vilensky A&E Editor svilensky@mndaily.com Alex Tuthill-Preus Multimedia Editor atuthill-preus@mndaily.com Sheridan Swee Copy Desk Chief sswee@mndaily.com Christine Ha Assistant Copy Desk Chief cha@mndaily.com Harry Steffenhagen Visuals Editor hsteffenhagen@mndaily.com Cedar Thomas Chief Page Designer cthomas@mndaily.com David Clarey Campus Editor dclarey@mndaily.com Raju Chaduvula City Editor rchaduvula@mndaily.com =

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Essential apps for college students

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Do’s and don’ts of the dining hall

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The biggest UMN sports stories

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Saving money and staying involved on campus

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What you’ll find on the St. Paul Campus

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The best jogging and biking trails on campus

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Best sports experience at UMN: The Sports Pavilion

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Guide to mental health resources

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The Fashionista is in: back to school

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Your guide to UMN libaries

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A coffee shop for everyone

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EDITORIAL STAFF Anant Naik Editorials & Opinions Editor anaik@mndaily.com Aleezeh Hasan Editorial Board Member ahasan@mndaily.com BUSINESS Genevieve Locke Sales Manager glocke@mndaily.com Leah Dahlgren Creative Director ldahlgren@mndaily.com


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Essential apps for college students You may not think you need them, but you do.

BY MARAYA KING mking@mndaily.com

College is expensive, regardless of where you go or what you study. Here are a few apps to help you cut corners and save money to help ease the burden of expenses. First up is Pocket Points, the unsung hero of the modern college student. You e ss e nt ia lly g e t paid to stay of f your phone during class. All you have to do is open the app, lock your phone, and wait for the points to star t rolling in. For ever y five minutes your phone is locked, you earn a pocket point. Yo u c a n u s e y o u r p o i n t s f o r a free tall cof fee at Starbucks,

discounted appetizers at Applebee’s and in the bookstore at Cof fman Memorial Union. Pocket Points tracks your location to ensure you’re in a campus building to earn points, and provides deals that are nearest. Pocket Points covers ever ything fr om your favorite sandwich shop, thrifted clothing or hammock brands. If you’ll be sitting in class anyway, you may as well rake in the deals while you’re at it. Seldom mentioned but highly beneficial, is our next app: Cupanion. Cupanion is specifically for University of Minnesota students and helps reduce waste and pollution while of fering deals around campus. During Welcome Week you will come across at least one Cupanion booth

giving out stickers with barcodes – do not pass this up. The barcode sticker goes on your water bottle and each time you r efill it, you open the Cupanion app and scan your bar code, giving you 10 points. For ever y 1,000 points ear ned, you get two dollars of f at an on-campus restaurant. The app lets you scan up to 10 times a day, allowing you to gain up to 100 points daily. The app is essential for the frugal college student and offers a unique twist on saving money while also benefitting our planet and reducing plastic consumption. Pocket Points and Cupanion ar e cer tainly nice to have, but they also give you an excuse to eat out – which is dangerous.

Here are a few apps to help you cut corners and save money to help ease the burden of expenses. That’s where RedLaser comes in. RedLaser is an app that lets you scan barcodes in any retail store and pull up the exact product in surrounding stores to compare prices. It may seem tedious and unnecessar y, but you could find yourself saving on ever yday items you didn’t even know you were over paying for. With the help of these apps and a conscious spending ef for t, you can feel a slight sense of comfort when it comes to your spending habits.


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Do’s and don’ts of the dining hall Here’s how to get the most out of hit-or-miss campus cafes. BY MARAYA KING mking@mndaily.com

Dining halls can either make or break you, but if you make conscious decisions and keep some semblance of self-restraint, you will be fine. Your dining hall pass was expensive. Use it. Even if you are just filling up your travel mug with coffee on the way to class, it still beats a five-dollar mocha and 15-minute wait at Starbucks. The dining halls have rotating menus

throughout the week, but there are always a few vital selections available, like the salad bar. Take advantage of the salad bar. Even if vegetables are not your forte, starting each meal with a small salad will help to balance out your diet while also avoiding the freshman fifteen. By filling up on greens, you are less likely to engorge yourself on pizza and pasta. Everything is good in moderation; this is especially true when it comes to Tijuana Taco Night in the dining halls. The opportunity for “authentic” Mexican food can be tempting, but save yourself the trouble and set a reasonable limit before you

go back for seconds. Late Night dining will be your patron saint. Whether used as a study break, social hour or for midnight Lucky Charms, late night is almost always a good idea. The limitless soft ser ve ice cream becomes old news after the first month, but doit-yourself milkshakes never get old. You can add peanut butter, cereal or brownie chunks to your ice cream with a splash of milk for a homemade milkshake. These can be a great choice for a late-night dessert in Centennial Hall or even as motivation to get through your afternoon classes.

With these sweet treats around, it is also important to remember to incorporate the rest of the food pyramid into your diet. In all dining halls across campus there will be a variety of fruit available and these can be a great snack to grab as you’re exiting the dining hall to eat later. Even if a banana doesn’t sound appetizing at the time, once your stomach starts growling mid-lecture, you’ll be thankful you snagged one. The dining halls can be just as exciting as they are risky, but learning to navigate them and take care of yourself is all an essential part of the college experience.

The biggest UMN sports stories First year coach P.J. Fleck reenergized the football program that already won nine games. BY DREW COVE dcove@mndaily.com

The Gophers have a lot of fall sports, and it’s hard to keep track of them all, but never fear: this is the go-to guide. Minnesota is fielding nine spor ts this fall, and here is what each student should know. Fleck enters first year In his first season as the head coach of the Gophers, P.J. Fleck inherited a team that won nine games last season, and won the Holiday Bowl under former head coach Tracy Claeys. Claeys was fired shor tly after the team’s December boycott, and athletics director Mark Coyle hired Fleck from Western Michigan. Fleck inherits a team with a fierce competition at quar terback and a steady defense, which had been the hallmark of the team under Claeys’ time as head coach. Volleyball looks to go back to Final Four The Gophers have experienced plenty

of success in the last two years, making it to the NCAA Final Four in both 2015 and 2016. Although the Gophers haven’t won a national championship, the energy in the Spor ts Pavilion has been high in recent years. Head coach Hugh McCutcheon has built a steady program, but saw the departure of key players such as Paige Tapp, Hannah Tapp, and the NCAA player of the year, Sarah Wilhite. While these players were integral to the recent success, the team has a chance at making it three consecutive years to the Final Four. Soccer looks to repeat regular season success The soccer team is coming of f a successful year, winning the Big Ten regular season and tournament titles. While the team had the most lethal of fense in the Big Ten last season, two key players to that of fense graduated, Simone Kolander and Josee Stiever. Goaltending will be a position to notice as well, with former goaltender Tarah Hobbs having graduated. She was named to the All-Big Ten Second team her senior season.

CHRIS DANG, DAILY

Head coach P.J. Fleck fields questions from the media during the Big Ten media days event July 25 at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago.

Men’s golf relies on young talent The Gophers finished 10th in the Big Ten last season. The season was marked by some impressive outings from sophomore Thomas Longbella, including a round score of 63, lowest of anyone on the team all season for 18. The Gophers were also able to land a freshman recruit out of England for this season, Angus Flanagan, and he joins

three other freshmen on the young squad. Ciskowski, Gar rison lead women’s golf This Gophers squad remains largely intact, with only one senior departing the program, Emie Peronnin. The team is led by senior Heather Ciskowski, who had impr essive u See SPORTS Page 6


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tour naments, including a season personal best when she tied for third at the Minnesota Invite. Senior Sabrine Gar rison also enters her final year with the team. Garrison competed in ever y tour nament for the team, finishing third in scoring average overall. Senior duo leads tennis team Seniors Felix Cor win and Matic Spec will be heavily relied on for the first doubles position, and often the two are both in either the first or second singles spot. Head coach Geof f Young has seen his team battle through some tough matches and enters his 10th year with the Gophers. Women’s tennis moves for ward with new coach Last season, the Gophers lost former head coach Chuck Merzbacher, who left to initially retire, then accepted a job from the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. The new coach is Catrina Thompson, a Notre Dame alum. The team is relatively older, which will demonstrate their experience, especially seniors Mehvish Safdar and Caroline Ryba. Strandemo enters final year with women’s cross countr y Madeline Strandemo was a walk-on when she came to Minnesota but will look to go back to the NCAA Championships after an 11-year streak was snapped for the women’s cross country team. Ali looks to capitalize of f past success for men’s cross countr y For the men’s cross country team, they finished in seventh place last season and the Midwest regional. They have a promising season with a freshmen class that was impressive in their last years of high school. Obsa Ali, after finishing NCAA All-Region, will look to take the Gophers further than a season ago.

People view James Rosenquist’s mural “World’s Fair Mural” at Weisman Art Museum on April 12.

COURTNEY DEUTZ, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Saving money and staying involved on campus No money? No problem. BY MARAYA KING mking@mndaily.com

The Twin Cities are known for their selection of activities and this reputation is especially true of the University of Minnesota. While it can be tempting to splurge on Vikings tickets or spend the whole weekend at the Walker Ar t Center, there are cheaper, and even free, alternatives on campus. The Whole Music Club is one of the most exciting places on campus with a packed set list and, often, free admission. The Whole is the setting for entertainment ranging from concer ts to poetr y slams. Decorated in chalkboard walls, tinted red lighting and a main stage, the Whole is a campus favorite.

Just next door to the Whole lies Goldy’s Gameroom, another busy location on campus. Goldy’s Gameroom of fers bowling, board games and an assor tment of food options, all of which can be paid for using FlexDine. Goldy’s Gameroom also of fers an underrated weeknight pastime: bingo and trivia. Ever y Wednesday night, free bingo is held in the basement of Cof fman where surprisingly good prizes are awarded to the winners. Bingo only lasts an hour and half and can be a great way to get out of the dorms on a weeknight and even score free stuff. But tensions rise in Goldy’s Gameroom Thursday nights when teams assemble for trivia night. There is no sign up needed or even a mandator y number of members for each team. Weekly questions follow a theme,

like “May the Fourth” or “Rocks N’ Roll.” Prizes are awarded to the top three scoring teams, with first place taking home the heavyweight prize such as Nickelodeon Universe passes or Twins tickets for each team member. On Friday night, there is always a recently released movie showing in the theater at Coffman – for free. This can be a great way to start of f the weekend with friends without breaking the bank. Students also have the opportunity to explore the Weisman Art Museum on campus. The museum is free for students and displays incredible works and interactive exhibits throughout the school year. The Weisman also has a seating section that overlooks the Washington Avenue Bridge onto West Bank that makes for a peaceful and rarely occupied study space.


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MADDY FOX, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Gladdie the bald eagle sits on display in a habitat at the Raptor Center on the St. Paul campus on Nov. 23, 2015.

What you’ll find on the St. Paul campus St. Paul campus houses some of the University’s most interesting attractions. BY TAYLOR VRANEY tvraney@mndaily.com

The University of Minnesota St. Paul campus is a quieter locale due to its distance from the other areas most students visit. Still, its remoteness is not for lack of accessibility or beauty. Here are five areas of the St. Paul campus every student should visit before graduation. Goldstein Museum of Design An idea that originated from sisters Harriet and Vetta Goldstein, the Goldstein Museum of Design showcases art to the community for free. Currently, the museum is holding the Inside Her Clothes exhibit, showing the process behind how clothing is created and used. The Dair y and Meat Salesroom Located in the Andrew Boss Laboratory of Meat Science is a market that sells dairy and meat products produced by students, faculty and staff to the public. Among the commodities are Nuworld Cheese, invented at the University, and ice cream. The

items are sold Wednesdays from 2 p.m to 5 p.m. Gabbert Raptor Center Free to all students is the University’s own raptor center. Open Tuesday through Sunday, the center holds tours featuring the multiple birds the facility hosts. With birds like Maxime the eagle, the center aims to not only educate the public about the birds, but also to train veterinar y students. Cornercopia Student Organic Farm Another gem made by students is the certified organic farm that lets students become a part of a farming process that yields more than 100 products a semester. The fruits and vegetables grown by students are sold to the community right outside the Dairy and Meat Salesroom. The Bronze and Bull Sculpture On the expanse of the lawn tucked into the southeast corner are a trio of grazing bronze-cast bulls. The animals stay there year-round for students to interact with and admire. The artwork is a part of the Weisman Art Museum’s Public Art 25, an interactive tour of 25 pieces of public artwork that were added to the museum’s collection in 25 years.


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Pedestrians cross the Stone Arch Bridge on Nov. 10, 2015.

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MADDY FOX, DAILY FILE PHOTO

The best jogging and biking trails on campus BY JACK WARRICK jwarrick@mndaily.com

The University of Minnesota offers spectacular views, peaceful scenery and miles of pavement for students interested in jogging. Though you could go down any sidewalk in the city, there are some places especially suited for jogging. East River Parkway The East River Parkway runs along the Mississippi River on the south side of campus. This trail is convenient for freshmen as it runs right up to Superblock. The East River Parkway trail has a large, wellmarked sidewalk, perfect for bikers, walkers and joggers. It provides great views of the river and the bridges on the Mississippi. The road is off the main area and is not as busy as roads like University Avenue. The trail spans for miles, heading south on the Mississippi, allowing runners to continue as long as they’d like. The road is a perfect trail for anyone looking to take in the scenery on a bike, blades or sneakers. Washington Avenue It’s probably best to wait until after classes to run so you don’t have to deal with crowds, but Washington Avenue is a great place to jog if you want to take in the sights in the heart of campus. You can run from West Bank to East Bank on Washington, taking in all the sights along the

way including the Weisman Art Museum, the construction of new buildings along the strip, and, of course, the view on top of the Washington Avenue Bridge overlooking the Mississippi River with downtown to the west and West Bank on the east. The Como Neighborhood The Como neighborhood is directly north of campus. Just follow 15th Avenue North past the Bierman Athletic Facility, go under the railroad bridge, and there it is. Van Cleve Park is one particular section of the neighborhood that is a fantastic place to run. It is close to campus but out of the way enough to not be troubled by all of the stoplights and traffic in the heart of campus. The Stone Arch Bridge A bit out of the way but worth the distance — the Stone Arch Bridge is a historic and beautiful place to go for a run. The 134-year-old bridge provides a great running platform over the Mississippi river with views of the Saint Anthony Falls Dam, downtown Minneapolis and the ruins of the old Pillsbury mill. It also provides a fantastic setting for people watching. Dinkytown Greenway A short trail running through Dinkytown alongside the railroad track, the trail runs over the Mississippi River at the Northern Pacific Bridge No. 9 — a bridge only for pedestrians.


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Best sports experience at UMN: The Sports Pavilion The Sports Pavilion presents an experience unique to other facilities on campus. BY JACK WHITE jwhite@mndaily.com

As the school year begins, students will pile into TCF Bank Stadium for football games, and later, the Williams Arena for men’s and women’s basketball games. However, a different sports facility takes the cake for best on-campus athletic experience. The Joel Maturi University Sports Pavilion — which will be the arena’s formal name on Sept. 2 — also known as “The Pav,” presents students with more personal, unique events than the other larger stadiums at the University, holding just 5,080 students. Once called the Sports Pavilion, the stadium was recently renamed the Joel Maturi

University Sports Pavilion, in honor of the University’s former athletic director. The name will become official on Sept. 2 before Minnesota volleyball plays Tennessee. The words “Maturi Pavilion” will be imprinted on the front of the historic stadium. The facility is located next to Williams Arena, right off University Ave. SE. The Sports Pavilion became the facility for volleyball, wrestling and men’s and women’s gymnastics after reopening in 1994. The Minnesota volleyball team was one of the original teams to compete in the Sports Pavilion after it reopened. Gophers volleyball has its first home game of the 2017 season on Sept. 1, where the team competes in the Diet Coke Classic. The team is coming off two consecutive final four berths, but didn’t win the National Championship in the two appearances. u See PAVILION Page 11

ALEX TUTHILL-PREUS, DAILY FILE PHOTO

The Gophers volleyball team celebrates its sweep of UCLA, their fourth-straight NCAA win, in the Sports Pavilion on Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016.


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ELLEN SCHMIDT, DAILY

Rachel Culter competes on the balance beam during a meet at the Sports Pavilion on Feb. 11.

Pavilion u from Page 10

Students can also attend gymnastics meets at the stadium, where the team initiates a slow clap when the Gophers compete in the vault. The event builds suspense and gives the team an advantage at home. “As a competitor, it really gives you a little bit of extra motivation and fire,” said men’s gymnastics athlete Joel Gagnon on March 21. “It’s fun to have the whole [Pavilion] behind you.” The Gophers men’s gymnastics team ended its season ranking No. 2 in the vault, via

roadtonationals.com, and the women’s team ranked No. 24 at the conclusion of the season. Men’s gymnastics finished fifth in the NCAA Championships, while the women’s team did not qualify for the event, but finished fourth in the Big Ten Championship. In the winter, Minnesota’s wrestling team competes at the facility. The team has its first home meet of the year against Fresno State on Dec. 10. A season ago, the Gophers finished 7-5 in its duals. Overall, the Gophers finished seventh in the NCCA tournament. For a more personal experience than most sporting events, all the teams’ athletes hold autograph sessions at the conclusion of competing.


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ELLEN SCHMIDT, DAILY

​ ony Coutinho, Julio Myjak and Roshanak Gonzalez pet Jackson at Boynton Health Services S on Thursday, June 15.

Guide to campus mental health resources BY TAYLOR VRANEY tvraney@mndaily.com

Many stressors affect college students in a myriad of ways. Due to the amount of mental distress that can occur throughout the year, it is important to note the services provided through the University of Minnesota and campus that anyone can access. Student Groups At the University, there are multiple student groups whose purpose is to serve the student population with a focus on their mental health. From clubs like Active Minds to the Underserved Mental Health Association, students work with others to talk mental health and help each other get the assistance they need. Every group is open to the community. University Resources The University is aware of the mental health problems that students can incur while attending classes. From the University Crisis Connection, a number that provides 24-hour phone counseling, to student counseling services, which provides walk-in crisis counseling, the University continues its mission to offer resources for the mental health of its students. Soothing Activities The University, clubs and other organizations provide several activities for

students that focus on creating a stress-free environment and promote positivity. One reoccurring event is PAWS, Pet Away Worry and Stress. Featuring therapy animals ranging from Tilly the chicken to Bailey the dog, Boynton Health provides a place where students can meet and interact with therapy animals on a weekly basis. Counseling Conversing with a professional about the problems a student might face is a resource that the campus and University provide. Boynton Health and Student Health Services both provide individual and group counseling services for free, although it is important to note that Boynton only provides 11 free counseling visits over the span of a year. An alternative option is online therapy, a program created in collaboration with University programs that is utilized by researches for a study Online Resources There are also organizations that provide a range of assistance tailored to a person’s comfort zone. From online chat rooms, like Healthfulchat, to the names of organizations and informational centers listed by the American College Health Association, the internet can connect you to the resources an individual feels will benefit them the most. An additional number that the University of Minnesota and others advertise is the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a free 24-hour support line.


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The Fashionista is in: back to school What’s hot? Shower shoes. What’s not? Self doubt. BY SOPHIA VILENSKY svilensky@mndaily.com

The summer before freshman year, I devised that I’d be known as the ‘girl with the leopard rain boots’ — no one would know I’d just bought the shoes a month before school started. Fall came, as did the first rain. I slipped on my new booties and set off to the dining hall — ready to unveil my new sartorial identity to my peers. No one cared. They liked my shoes, I suppose, but in the end, I realized it’s more about what you’re truly happy and comfortable in. The rest followed. Looking back, I didn’t base my first opinions on people’s footwear either — except the girl with the really cool pink Timberlands. Now, she’s my best friend. Here are some first year fashion tips. Remember dolls: It’s your duty to cement 2017 fashion; those styles will come in handy when you’re thinking of par ty themes in 2027. Borrow, borrow, borrow. Friends with similar taste are a godsend — cut costs by figuring out a joint custody plan for trendy items. Yah, I’ll say it — my roommate and I share a matte lipstick collection. Street fashion on campus: We’re taking the cues from you, too. Street style is awesome on campus, but remember that ever yone is on campus is on the hunt for fresh new takes on trends. Help others out, and don’t sacrifice your personal aesthetic by buying the hackeneyed Longchamp Le Pliage tote. Those weird patterned tights you bought on a whim sophomore year but were too scared to wear in high school? This is your time, and ever yone else’s time,

Here are some first year fashion tips. Remember dolls: It’s your duty to cement 2017 fashion; those styles will come in handy when you’re thinking of party themes in 2027. for that matter. Themed parties: Don’t buy the devil horns. Yes, the picture will be cute, but a onenight, themed soirée is not worth wasting your first free Uber ride on a trip to the Roseville Party City — unless the theme has been chosen by Anna Wintour, and it’s the first Monday in May (cue in the red carpet for the MET gala). Save that previous closet space for your favorite cozy sweater — someone down the hall will have a Hawaiian shirt for you to borrow. I promise everyone will be wearing a jersey anyway. Comfy shoes. Always. Wow, those chunky-heeled Steve Maddens sure are cute! Guess what though? Your blisters won’t be. There’s no way around it — at some point you’ll have to make the trek from East Bank to Blegen Hall, so be wise and just grab your tennis shoes. This is also important for weekend nights — suede loafers will not survive unmarred. In a pinch, dorm bathroom lighting is fine for a haircut. Your friend who goes to Aveda is an important ally, especially as you navigate your freshman experience. You think this dress would look better with bangs? Go for it. Now is the time to experiment, after all. Just please, for ever yone’s sake, clean up after yourself. Gopheralls are an investment. Well? They’re comfy, and game day certainly is not.

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Your guide to UMN libraries You won’t believe these five campus libraries near you. BY RAJU CHADUVULA rchaduvula@mndaily.com

Aside from the fun and excitement of college, school comes down to studying and doing well with classes. For that, a plethora of options are available: cafés, study rooms and of course, libraries. Here are five libraries on the University of Minnesota campus with some of the best spots to study and do work. Walter Librar y Walter Librar y — by far the most extravagant of all the libraries — is located on the East Bank campus on the mall. The Roman Renaissance style

architecture, or nate and intricate styling of walls and ceilings only add to the studying experience here. There’s a café in the basement, along with several areas with tables and study areas for students to find. The librar y mostly houses science and mathematics books and resources, but is accessible to anyone and is one of the most popular libraries on campus. Wilson Librar y This librar y, located on the West Bank campus, is home to the liberal ar ts resources. Five levels and four separate smaller libraries within, Wilson of fers students many areas to study. The librar y houses an extensive collection of books in multiple languages, as well as conference and single

study rooms. Wilson also has a café in the basement. Ames Librar y of South Asia Located in the basement of Wilson, the Ames Librar y is a quaint addition tucked away in a quiet corner of Wilson. The librar y contains a broad collection of literature focused on South Asia. Some of the books are kept in their original language. The librar y has seating areas with tables to study. While it’s not heavily used, the librar y is a perfect spot to grind out a few hours of studying. Mathematics Librar y T h i s h e a v i l y t r a f f i c k e d l i b r a r y, housed on the third floor of V incent Hall, is usually full of students finishing up the rest of their calculus homework 15 minutes before class star ts. The librar y is a great resource for students looking to get extra help and information for math and science classes. The librar y itself isn’t furnished like Walter or spacious like W ilson, but it gets the job done when it comes to strapping down for a few hours of studying. Bio-Medical Librar y Far down in the back of Moos Tower and the Philip-Wagenstein building is the Bio-Medical Librar y. The one-level librar y is a popular spot, especially for science students doing research and homework. The librar y is open until 3 a.m. on school days, meaning it’s a great destination for late night study sessions before tests and finals. Like the Mathematics librar y, the Bio-Med librar y is sparsely decorated, but has many study spaces and contains a lot of computer stations to work at. So grab that cup of cof fee, a charger, a pair of headphones, your laptop and textbooks and head down to one of these libraries to get that studying done.

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A coffee shop for everyone Starbucks isn’t for everyone, but there are some other options for new Gophers. BY DAVID CLAREY dclarey@mndaily.com

While there’s nothing wrong with heading to your closest Starbucks or Caribou Coffee for a latte, there are plenty of local shops worth exploring near the University of Minnesota’s campus. Whether you’re looking for a place to cram for an exam, or you just need a cup of joe to star t your day, here’s an introduction to some of the best small coffee shops. On the University’s West Bank, you’ll find one of the most unique shops in the area, Hard Times Cafe. If you want to embrace your inner

hippy or just stick-it-the-man, then this is the place for you. Open ever yday from 6 a.m. to 4 a.m., this cash-only shop offers a full kitchen with vegan and vegetarian options — along with a great cup of coffee. In the historic DInkytown area, you can find a few other coffee shops that all offer something unique. Espresso Royale is a part of a chain of Midwest coffee shops with three different locations in the Twin Cities area — the others locations are in St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis. Royale of fers all your regular cof feefare, along with daily specials — including a two-dollar latte day. They also offer a wide selection of pastries, and I’ll swear by their blueberry muffin — it’s the best I’ve ever had. If you’re a literar y type, Royale also

has an expansive range of books to look at, curated by Book House, a Dinkytown bookstore. Off University Avenue, in Dinkytown, is The Purple Onion Café. This café is great for coordinating group projects with large tables set-aside specifically for that purpose. Like many of the others, it exhibits work from local artists, and has a full kitchen that’s open most days until early afternoon. While these shops are wor th checking out, there are so many others to stop by, too. There’s Mapps Cof fee of f West Bank if Hard Times isn’t your thing, or Border town, which was at one time a greek house. And hey, maybe you just want a more orthodox caffeine fix, and in that case, there are plenty of Starbucks locations that you can frequent.

Wednesday, August 31, 2017

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Wednesday, August 31, 2017

Newcomers' Guide 2017  

Newcomers' Guide 2017

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