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A.M. CLOUDS HIGH 39° LOW 22°

U OF M

MINNEAPOLIS

MONDAY

ST PAUL

APRIL 14, 2014

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES AT MNDAILY.COM

Gophers fall, fans riot

Police arrested 19 people in a Dinkytown melee Saturday night.

Top: Police arrest a man on 14th Avenue Southeast on Saturday evening during a riot in Dinkytown after the Gophers’ loss in the NCAA men’s hockey championship. Left: A police officer prepares to fire a nonlethal projectile into a crowd on 14th Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast on Saturday evening during a riot in Dinkytown. Right: Police detain a man outside Camdi Restaurant during a riot in Dinkytown on Saturday. Nineteen people were arrested Saturday night in relation to the Dinkytown riot. PHOTOS BY BRIDGET BENNETT AND AMANDA SNYDER

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STORY BY DAILY STAFF

riotous crowd filled Dinkytown for the second time in three days Saturday, following the Gophers’ loss in the NCAA Frozen Four final. Behavior was similar two nights before — when the Gophers men’s

hockey team beat North Dakota in the semifinal — but this time, instead of a jubilant crowd, many seemed like they were there to challenge police. Some threw bottles, others chanted “pigs go home,” and one student ran across the street to moon the line of police. He was quickly tackled and arrested. After police pushed the initial crowd of several hundred out of Dinkytown, what had escalated into a riot dispersed into skirmishes throughout University of Minnesota-

area neighborhoods. Dinkytown was clear by about 1 a.m. Police spent almost two months preparing for Thursday and Saturday night, recalling hockey riots in 2002 and 2003. In the 2002 hockey riots, police were criticized for being too aggressive and fueling riotous behavior. Yet, the next year — after deciding to refrain from force as long as possible — they were criticized for failing to keep things under control. In 2003, rioters lit fires, smashed

windows and flipped cars, wreaking havoc throughout Dinkytown and beyond. In that riot, Minneapolis police arrested nearly a dozen people and University police filed more than 40 crime reports and responded to nine arson calls. In comparison, Saturday was subdued. At least 19 people were arrested and there were two known arson incidents, according to Minneapolis police. u See RIOT Page 3

MEN’S HOCKEY

Minnesota stumbles in final The Gophers squandered their chance at a sixth NCAA title with a 7-4 loss to Union College. BY MEGAN RYAN mryan@mndaily.com

PHILADELPHIA — Gophers defenseman Brady Skjei was the first Minnesota player to kneel on the ice before the clock had even run out, Union players already clearing the bench. Minnesota senior captain Nate Condon skated aimlessly around the goal that Adam Wilcox had vacated in favor of hunching over against the boards near his team’s bench. In time, more players filtered out of the Gophers’ bench to join the hear tbreaking huddle. Some, like Skjei and Condon,

needed consoling while others, like juniors Ben Marshall and Kyle Rau, offered pats on the back and comforting words into their despondent teammates’ ears. Minnesota lost the NCAA championship 7-4 to Union on Saturday at Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Center, missing out on its sixth national title as Union won its first. It was a game marked by the classic “David and Goliath” disparities between the teams — a small underdog against a traditional national powerhouse. Though the Dutchmen proved Cinderella stories are cliché for a reason, Gophers head coach Don Lucia said the loss wasn’t because his team didn’t want the trophy enough — quite the opposite, in fact. “Our guys tried,” Lucia said. “Sometimes you want to win too hard, too bad. u See HOCKEY Page 8

Student services fees appeals released Regents: the U’s busiest volunteers u See PAGE 4

LISA PERSSON, DAILY

Minnesota defenseman Ben Marshall rests his hand on forward Nate Condon after the Gophers’ 7-4 loss to Union in the NCAA final Saturday evening in Philadelphia.

u See PAGE 5

Check out Spring Jam artists’ wish lists u See PAGE 14 VOLUME 115 ISSUE 102


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Daily Review

Monday, April 14, 2014

THIS DAY IN HISTORY

1865 John Wilkes Booth, an actor and Confederate sympathizer, fatally shoots President Abraham Lincoln at a play at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. HISTORYCHANNEL.COM/TDIH

MUSIC Vol. 115 Monday, April 14, 2014, No. 102

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Phantogram performes at the First Avenue Mainroom on Saturday evening. To read the show’s review, visit mndaily.com/ae.

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WORLD BRIEFING

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Combative prosecutor makes mark in Pistorius murder trial BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PRETORIA, South Africa — Prosecutor Gerrie Nel fired another tough question at murder suspect Oscar Pistorius. “Are you sure, Mr Pistorius, that Reeva did not scream after you fired the first shot?” asked Nel. The athlete, who earlier said he was tired and struggling under the relentless interrogation, leaned back in the witness box and remained silent. The woodlined cour troom in South Africa was hushed and expectant on Friday. Was Pistorius thinking through an answer, or was he on the verge of an emotional outburst, or was he reflecting on his predicament and Reeva Steenkamp, the girlfriend he killed in his home last year? After a tense pause, the Olympic athlete said he wished Steenkamp had let him know she was in the toilet cubicle where he shot her — by mistake, according to his account. He said

she did not scream, but also that his ears were ringing with the gunshot and he would not have heard screams. Pistorius often seemed worn down as the caustic prosecutor picked holes in parts of his stor y. The dramatic cross-examination has drawn attention to Nel, a prominent state prosecutor dubbed “pitbull” in local media and on social networks for his combative, often effective style. One of the highlights of his career came in 2010 when he secured the conviction on corruption charges of Jackie Selebi, a former national police commissioner and ex-president of Interpol — Nel got an international prosecutors’ award for his efforts in that case. Now Nel’s international profile is ascending further after three days of challenging and even ridiculing the claim by Pistorius, 27, that he accidentally killed Steenkamp, 29, by firing through a closed toilet door, mistaking her for an intruder in

his house before dawn on Feb. 14, 2013. The prosecution says the double-amputee runner is lying, and that he killed his girlfriend after an argument during which she fled into the toilet cubicle to seek refuge. Nel will continue questioning Pistorius on Monday. A radio station made a parody rap song about defense lawyer Barr y Roux, and now Nel has one too (“They call me Gerrie Nel/ And I am mad as hell.”) In The Times, a South African newspaper, car toonist Zapiro depicted Nel as a bullet, his head on the tip, speeding toward an alarmed Pistorius. He has a gentler side, according to Rapport newspaper. It reported that in his personal time, Nel teaches young children how to wrestle and that he is patient and never loses his temper with his students. Pistorius’ murder trial is being broadcast on television. While Pistorius is not shown on the screen during his testimony, viewers have

watched Nel browbeat the once globally admired figure who reached a pinnacle when he ran in the London Olympics in 2012. Pistorius, who has been free on bail for the last year, could be jailed for 25 years to life if convicted of premeditated murder and also faces three separate, gun-related charges. “You will blame anybody but yourself,” Nel told Pistorius last week in an attack on the character of the athlete. It was an attempt to shred the defense’s presentation of its client as humble, responsible and loving toward the woman he killed. At one point, Nel laughed derisively at one of a number of answers from Pistorius that he described as evasive or contradictory, or downright false, prompting Judge Thokozile Masipa to reprimand the prosecutor for the outburst. On another occasion, Masipa cautioned Nel to “mind your language” for accusing the athlete of lying.

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EDITORIAL STAFF Eric Best ebest@mndaily.com Editorials & Opinions Editor William Bornhoft wbornhoft@mndaily.com Senior Editorial Board Member =

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11 dead as fire hits Chile’s historic Valparaiso port BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VALPARAISO, Chile — A raging fire leaped from hilltop to hilltop in this colorful port city, killing at least 11 people and destroying more than 500 homes. More than 10,000 people were evacuated, including more than 200 female inmates at a prison. The fire began Saturday afternoon in a forested area above ramshackle housing on one of the city’s 42 hilltops, and spread quickly as high winds blowing seaward rained hot ash over wooden houses and narrow streets. Electricity failed as the fire grew, with towering, sparking flames turning the night sky orange over a darkening, destroyed horizon. Eventually, neighborhoods on six hilltops were reduced to ashes, including one hill just several blocks from Chile’s parliament building. “It’s a tremendous tragedy. This could be the worst fire in the city’s histor y,” President Michelle Bachelet said as firefighters contained most of the blazes, mobilizing 18 helicopters and planes to drop water on hotspots Sunday. Bachelet warned that the toll of death and damage would rise once authorities can enter the smoldering remains. Militar y Police Gen. Julio Pineda said 11 were killed. Earlier Sunday, he said 16 died, but it turned out one family had been counted twice. More than 500 people were treated at hospitals, mostly for smoke inhalation. Patricio Bustos, who directs the national forensics service, said DNA tests would be needed to identify some of the remains.

Pope poses for ‘selfies’ in St. Peter’s Square

HOW TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE DAILY

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

All submissions are welcome, but there is no guarantee of publication.

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis, marking Palm Sunday in a packed St. Peter’s Square, ignored his prepared homily and spoke entirely off-the-cuff in a remarkable departure from practice. Later, he continued to stray from the script by hopping off his popemobile to pose for “selfies” with young people and also sipping tea passed to him from the crowd. In his homily, Francis called on people, himself included, to look into their own hearts to see how they are living their lives. “Has my life fallen asleep?” Francis asked after listening to a Gospel account of how Jesus’ disciples fell asleep shortly before he was betrayed by Judas before his crucifixion. “Am I like Pontius Pilate, who, when he sees the situation is difficult, washes my hands?” He sounded tired, frequently pausing to catch his breath, as he spoke for about 15 minutes in his homily during Palm Sunday Mass, which solemnly opens Holy Week for the Roman Catholic Church. “Where is my heart?” the pope asked, pinpointing that as the “question which accompanies us” throughout Holy Week. Francis seemed to regain his wind after the 2 ½ hour ceremony. He shed his red vestments atop his plain white cassock, chatted amiably with cardinals dressed more formally than he at that point. Then he posed for “selfies” with young people from Rio de Janeiro who had carried a large cross in the square. He had barely climbed aboard his open-topped popemobile when he spotted Polish youths. They, too, were clamoring for a “selfie” with a pope, and he hopped off, not even waiting for the vehicle to fully stop, to oblige them.

EXTENDED WEATHER FORECAST TUESDAY HIGH 43° LOW 34°

Chance of rain

WEDNESDAY HIGH 54° LOW 25° Chance of rain

THURSDAY HIGH 46° LOW 37° Cloudy

FRIDAY HIGH 50° LOW 36° Sunny

Freelance audio/video: Contact Multimedia Editor Amanda Snyder at asnyder@mndaily.com. Letters to the editor: Email submissions to letters@mndaily.com Guest columns: Emails submissions to Editorials & Opinions Editor Eric Best at ebest@mndaily.com.

CORRECTIONS

A page 6A article, “Students get brewing down to a science,” in Thursday’s Daily incorrectly stated when the brewing seminar happened. It happened Friday. errors@mndaily.com The Minnesota Daily strives for complete accuracy and corrects its errors immediately. Corrections and clarifications will always be printed in this space. If you believe the Daily has printed a factual error, please call the readers’ representative at (612) 627–4070, extension 3057, or email errors@mndaily.com immediately. THE MINNESOTA DAILY is a legally independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization and is a student-written and student-managed newspaper for the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus. The Daily’s mission is: 1) to provide coverage of news and events affecting the University community; 2) to provide a forum for the communication and exchange of ideas for the University community; 3) to provide educational training and experience to University students in all areas of newspaper operations; and 4) to operate a fiscally responsible organization to ensure its ability to serve the University in the future. The Daily is a member of the Minnesota News Council, the Minnesota Associated Press, the Associated Collegiate Press, The Minnesota Newspaper Association and other organizations. The Daily is published Monday through Thursday during the regular school year and weekly during the summer, and it is printed by ECM Publishers in Princeton, Minn. Midwest News Service distributes the 22,000 issues daily. All Minnesota Daily inserts are recyclable within the University of Minnesota program and are at least 6 percent consumer waste. One (1) copy of The Minnesota Daily per person is free at newsstands in and around the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents each. U.S. Postal Service: 351–480.


Monday, April 14, 2014

3

SATURDAY’S TIMELINE OF EVENTS 9:19 P.M.*

Gophers fall 7-4 to the Union College Dutchmen. Hockey fans start leaving Dinkytown bars in groups.

9:30 P.M.

A mob starts to swell at 14th Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast in Dinkytown. About a hundred crowd members chant “USA!” and “Let’s go Gophers.” Two state patrol helicopters fly overhead.

9:45 P.M.

Officers declare an unlawful assembly in Dinkytown. Police sirens ring. The SWAT team rolls through Fourth Street.

9:50 P.M.

The commotion intensifies. People start jumping on cars and throwing beer.

9:55 P.M.

The first observed arrest is issued. Officers start forming a perimeter at the Fourth Street and 14th Avenue intersection.

9:58 P.M.

More people join the crowd and rally in the middle of the street, blocking cars trying to get through.

10:12 P.M.

Crowd members chant, “[Expletive] the cops.” BRIDGET BENNETT, DAILY

Police emerge from an alley near 14th Avenue Southeast and Sixth Street Southeast on Saturday evening after pushing riotous crowds away from Dinkytown.

Gophers fall, fans riot in Dinkytown

10:14 P.M.

A helicopter calls for the crowd to disperse. Many crowd members respond with middle fingers.

10:20 P.M.

While hoisted on a man’s shoulders, a woman flashes a crowd three times in the middle of the intersection.

10:28 P.M.

A rioter throws a bike seat at a stoplight. A man moons officers, and police arrest him.

10:35 P.M.

Officers issue another arrest outside Royal Cigar and Tobacco. Law enforcement officials secure the intersection with the perimeter.

10:40 P.M.

Officers move forward and create a barrier around the crowd. Mounted police clear the sidewalks, and bystanders are pushed up 14th Avenue, down Fifth Street and into residential areas.

11:00 P.M.

Protesters sit in the middle of the street outside of Tony’s Diner and chant, “We have the right to assemble.” Officers arrest at least one of the would-be protesters.

11:02 P.M.

Officers release tear gas in Mesa Pizza’s parking lot.

11:05 P.M.

Rioters and onlookers disperse into Marcy-Holmes, and the police follow. A chair is set on fire at Sixth Street Southeast, between 14th and 13th avenues southeast. The police line pushes out further to the intersection of Fourth Street and 13th Avenue.

11:17 P.M. BRIDGET BENNETT, DAILY

Making an obscene gesture to the crowd, a woman poses in front of police during a riot Saturday evening in Dinkytown following the Gophers’ NCAA championship loss.

The street fills The commotion began quietly Saturday, with a hodgepodge group of disappointed fans spilling out of Dinkytown bars after the Gophers’ 7-4 loss to Union College. They were met with news cameras and police, who had been milling around on horseback, bike and foot for hours. The buzz of a helicopter filled the air. Some businesses had already moved tables and chairs inside; Espresso Royale was set to close early in response to Thursday’s events. As the crowd grew, it seemed most were there to watch the action unfold. Some chanted “USA!” and “Let’s go Gophers!” They spilled into the street and dispersed a few times before managing to assemble a small crowd at the intersection of Fourth Street Southeast and 14th Avenue Southeast. At about 9:45 p.m., an unlawful assembly was declared, according to Minneapolis police spokesman Scott Seroka. Shor tly after, police in riot gear formed a perimeter along 15th Avenue Southeast, with an inner line of at least 45 officers on 14th Avenue Southeast. Some grasped fistfuls of zip ties, and others had nonlethal weapons in hand. They soon began firing into the crowd as a mounted

@OSA_UMN: If you are in dinkytown GO HOME. Take your friends with you. Please.

11:33 P.M.

The aftermath As the small skirmishes fizzled out in the neighborhoods, the core of Dinkytown also wound down. Typical Saturday night bar-goers trickled back in, with police dwindling by 1 a.m. Deliver y drivers struggled to get in and out of the perimeter throughout the night — Burrito Loco’s Ian Pengra waved a receipt out the window as proof but for

12:22 A.M.

Police presence decreases, and streets are mostly clear. Officers still restrict access to the main Dinkytown blocks.

1:05 A.M.

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The four core Dinkytown blocks open.

1:24 A.M.

SO

Greavu said. At about 11:30 p.m., police pushed the crowd away from Dinkytown and north into the Marcy-Holmes and Southeast Como neighborhoods. On side streets, some people lit furniture on fire and destroyed at least one car. Some bystanders were caught in the crowd and voiced confusion about how to get home, as police had blocked most major routes out of Dinkytown. Police armed with nonlethal weapons weaved in and out of alleyways, clearing clusters of people that had spread into the neighborhoods. Applied economics senior Jeff Westerhaus stood on his stoop watching police advance near Bierman Place Apartments as they repeatedly threw some type of explosive and shot nonlethal projectiles. “All the attention has heightened it,” he said. Sharon Marz stood next to him, smoking a cigarette. She has lived in Dinkytown for years. “You kids are great kids,” she said of students. “I just feel sad for the students that aren’t part of it that it’s a reflection on the University.”

SPREAD OF POLICE DURING SATURDAY’S RIOT

Street sweepers move through Dinkytown streets, and the area appears calm.

UE

Some attributed the comparatively minimal damage to police preparedness and quick action, while others argued the riot would not have happened — particularly with the Gophers’ loss — were it not for all the hype and intense police presence.

A sofa is set on fire at 13th Avenue and Seventh Street Southeast. Police declare an unlawful assembly outside of Bierman Place Apartments at Sixth Street and 14th Avenue.

HA VEN

u from Page 1

patrol unit advanced and helicopters circled overhead, directing the crowd to disperse. “They shot at me because they thought I threw something at them — both my hands were in the air, and they just shot at me,” recalled entrepreneurship junior Joe Hayes. “It was pretty bad.” Police would not specify what they were firing, though it’s possible there was a mix of nonlethal weaponr y. Multiple Minnesota Daily reporters were struck throughout the night. Even after police directed the crowd to disperse, some refused to leave. At one point, about a dozen people sat cross-legged in the street, chanting, “We have the right to assemble.” Police disagreed. After declaring the assembly unlawful — a label attached when three or more people gather with intent to disturb the peace or break laws — they could arrest anyone who was not dispersing. They quickly advanced down the main streets of Dinkytown, securing the fourblock core by about 11:15 p.m. Physics sophomores Ian Jaeger and John Greavu said police sprayed stinging agents into the lobby of the Chateau apartment complex after a group of about 20 onlookers crowded inside as police started climbing the patio stairs. “It hit the side of my face,” Jaeger said. “Oh my God, my face was on fire.” Both men credited the police with clearing Dinkytown efficiently. But they said they think the large police presence drew more people to the scene. “If you’re going to put a bunch of police out there and cameras in a college town right after a national championship loss, people are going to want to do stupid things,”

A man rinses his eyes with water after being sprayed during a riot Saturday evening in Dinkytown.

*all times are approximate

15T

Riot

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

FOU

RTH

UN

IVE

9 P.M.

10 P.M.

11 P.M.

the most part wasn’t able to get through. Mesa Pizza couldn’t do deliveries and closed early. As things cleared up at about 1 a.m., hungr y bar-goers pressed against the window in hopes of a slice. Laura Saxton, a manager at Mesa, said people seemed to have the mentality of, “It’s expected to riot, so we might as well do it.” University President Eric Kaler sent an email Friday warning “zero tolerance” for unruly behavior, and Minneapolis police sent a release with a similar message. Minneapolis police were joined by other law enforcement agencies, including University police, at least one state patrol helicopter and the Hennepin County’s sheriff’s office and emergency medical service, Seroka said. In a press release Sunday, the University thanked the law enforcement and “public safety agencies” involved for

STR

SOURCE: MN DAILY REPORTING

EET

RIOTS

SO

BY THE NUMBERS

UTH

EAS

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RSI

TY A VEN

UE

10 students TOTAL ARRESTED AFTER THE

GOPHERS’ SEMIFINAL VICTORY ON THURSDAY SO

UTH

EAS T SOURCE: MN DAILY REPORTING

keeping the University safe and managing crowds. Total cost of the extensive law enforcement and total property damage are still being calculated, Seroka said. University political science junior Brett Benkovics said he thought the extensive police presence may have contributed to Saturday’s raucousness. “They hyped it up,” he said. “They kind of caused it, I feel like.” But Jodi Patrick, who watched Thursday’s riot as an employee inside Insomnia Cookies, was glad to have law enforcement close by Saturday night. “W ithout the police, there would have been chaos,” he said. For the full experience, including more photos, an interactive map and a social media timeline, read the story on our projects space. MNDailyProjects.com/Riot

9/10 students

WERE ARRESTED FOR PARTICIPATING IN AN UNLAWFUL ASSEMBLY OR DISORDERLY CONDUCT.

1/10 students

WAS ARRESTED FOR MINOR IN CONSUMPTION AND PUBLIC URINATION

2 police officers

WENT TO HENNEPIN COUNTY MEDICAL CENTER FOR MEDICAL ATTENTION

19 arrests AFTER THE GOPHERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP LOSS ON SATURDAY.

2OF incidents ARSON WERE REPORTED. 11 students ARRESTED AFTER THE 2003

HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP WIN.

9OF incidents ARSON REPORTED. 12 calls CONCERNING DAMAGE TO PROPERTY.

12 arrests DURING THE 2009

SPRING JAM RIOTS. SOURCE: MN DAILY REPORTING


4

Monday, April 14, 2014

Student services fees appeals released CFACT and the Minnesota Daily were given more funding.

SSFC APPEALS COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS INITIAL RECOMMENDATION

BY KRISTOFFER TIGUE ktigue@mndaily.com

Minnesota’s first alternative teacher licensing program could begin as soon as June, pending Minnesota Board of Teaching approval of the University of Minnesota’s proposed partnership with Teach for America. The College of Education and Human Development presented the program to the state Friday, in hopes of getting the new program on the board’s May 9 agenda. Before then, the board and the University’s Office of Academic Affairs and Provost will look over the application and recommend board consideration. While proponents of the partnership claim it will address systematic problems in Minnesota schools, the partnership has received criticism from some University members and Minneapolis teachers, who say the program undermines traditional teaching pathways and won’t provide adequate training to would-be teachers. “We need alter native pathways because there are many people out there from all walks of life who may not have chosen to be a teacher as their first route,” said Deborah Dillon, CEHD associate dean for graduate, professional and international programs. “But ... they really want to dedicate themselves to working with young people in schools.” For students who go to college knowing they want to teach, she said, more

traditional methods make sense. But for those who are working as support staff or simply don’t have the time or money for traditional pathways, she said, the new program may be a good fit. But last summer, the partnership was met with harsh opposition, including a petition from University graduate students claiming TFA programs send underprepared teachers into communities that the state’s education system already marginalizes. The petition garnered nearly 300 signatures, mostly from students, staff and public school teachers. CEHD graduate student Karen Twyman said she holds three separate teaching licenses and is currently working as a language arts teacher for Minneapolis Public Schools. She signed the petition last year and said she still strongly opposes TFA programs. “I think they’re well intended,” she said. “But I just think you’re setting [the members] up to fail. It’s a frustration because they don’t have the experience.” The University’s proposed program consists of an eight-week summer training course, as opposed to TFA’s typical five-week national model. Participants would coteach with a licensed teacher at a school in Minneapolis’ Northside Achievement Zone while working toward their license through the University. After completing training, members would teach on their own but still get support and additional coursework

UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP WITH TFA

BY THE NUMBERS

May 9

THE PROGRAM IS BEING REVIEWED BY THE STATE BOARD AND INTERNAL PARTIES TO BE APPROVED BY THIS DATE.

June 2 DATE THE PROGRAM WILL BEGIN IF APPROVED.

8 weeks, 2 years

SUMMER TRAINING TAKES 8 WEEKS FOLLOWED BY 2 YEARS OF TEACHING WITH A LIMITED LICENSE.

5THEweeks STANDARD TRAINING

PERIOD FOR TFA’S NATIONAL MODEL.

30 NUMBER OF CREDITS THE

PROGRAM COUNTS TOWARD A MASTER’S OF EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY.

$16,000

THE PROGRAM’S COST FOR EACH MEMBER TO COMPLETE. SOURCE: COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

through their two-year contract with TFA. At the end of the training, members would have 30 University credits — six credits short of a master’s degree in education. Under state law, the teaching board must approve alternative teacher preparation programs — like this one — in which teachers receive licenses for a limited time while working toward a standard license. Dillon said that she believes the proposed program is a better alternative licensing model for the state than the national TFA

$497,425

$397,425

$383,529

$232,136

$232,136

$176,500

MN DAILY

SOURCE: SSFC

because, Sprangers said, the assembly submitted documents that weren’t considered a formal appeal. In addition, the appeals committee’s rationales said one student brought concerns to the committee that alleged financial mismanagement among GAPSA

U, TFA seek partnership approval The plan would create Minnesota’s first alternative teacher licensing program.

$392,115

GAPSA

$82,530

CFACT

APPEALS COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

$505,000

REQUESTED

FINAL RECOMMENDATION

$18,700

common courtesy type thing to not copy other groups,” he said. Next year, the SSFC plans to add guidelines that discourage groups from plagiarizing in the future, Sprangers said. The committee’s current policy makes these rules unclear. The appeals committee recommended that the Minnesota Daily receive additional funding due to a clerical error in the SSFC’s final recommendations, bringing the newspaper’s current fees allocation to $497,425 with a balance sweep of $100,000. Sprangers said the error was straightforward and the Daily didn’t need to schedule a meeting time to discuss the appeal. The Graduate and Professional Student Assembly’s appeal was one of five student group appeals that were rejected. GAPSA’s funding increased from the initial to final recommendations, but its appeal wasn’t accepted

$88,700

The Student Ser vices Fees Appeals Committee released its recommendations Sunday, granting two of seven appeals that student groups and administrative units requested for their funding next year. The committee gave Collegians for a Constructive Tomorrow about $82,500 for next academic year, more than four times what it was allocated in the SSFC’s final recommendations, citing “misconduct” and “misapplication of a rule” as reasons for the committee’s initial decision. The Minnesota Daily received an additional $100,000 to its recommendation because the SSFC said it made a clerical error in its previous recommendation. CFACT was originally going to receive a 91 percent cut to its $188,000 request

because the fees committee said the group plagiarized another group’s application. But the appeals committee granted a lesser cut because the original recommendation was “a bit harsh,” said appeals committee Chair Bradley Sprangers. The appeals committee also erred by not giving CFACT’s follow-up application materials enough consideration, its rationale said. CFACT’s plagiarism isn’t necessarily illegal, Sprangers said, so the appeals committee decided to keep the penalties consistent with those of other groups. Sprangers said CFACT claimed during its fees presentation that its application was “modeled” after another group, which CFACT said doesn’t fit the Office for Student Conduct and Academic Integrity’s definition for plagiarism. “The committee felt that it is more of a common sense or

$188,035

BY BLAIR EMERSON bemerson@mndaily.com

program, because it will provide more in-depth, localized training for aspiring Minnesota teachers. TFA Executive Director Crystal Brakke said their programming aims to add more teachers of color to schools that aren’t seeing much diversity in the workforce. Brakke said she consistently hears from schools that want teachers who can relate to their students ethnically, socio-economically and racially. Nationally, about a third of TFA teachers identify as people of color or come from a low-income background, she said. T wyman said she’s worked for several years gaining proper experience and knowledge to serve schools with marginalized communities, which she says have much different needs than more privileged schools. Five or eight weeks isn’t enough time to learn how to serve those communities properly, she said. She said the programs also take job opportunities from licensed teachers, who she believes have more experience and training for the job. CEHD Communications Director Steve Baker said the University has worked with TFA to make the new program as rigorous as possible, and the University wants to provide the best possible alternative training and support for students. “We will obviously be evaluating and re-evaluating as we do with all of our teacher education programs,” he said. “We’ve got some great partners here, and if the Board of Teaching approves us, we’ll see this as a significant first step.”

leadership. Sprangers said he and the appeals committee decided to consider these concerns but couldn’t justify further changes to the group’s budget without hard evidence. Other groups with rejected appeals were the AlMadinah Cultural Center, the

Campus Cr usaders for Christ, the Pokémon League and the American Medical Student Association-Pre Med. Written appeals to the final recommendations are due to Vice Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Danita Brown Young on Friday.

Window opens on secret camp in Guantanamo BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba — Attorney James Connell has visited his client inside the secret Guantanamo prison complex known as Camp 7 only once, taken in a van with covered windows on a circuitous trek to disguise the route on the scrub brushand-cactus covered military base. Connell is allowed to say virtually nothing about what he saw in the secret camp where the most notorious terror suspects in U.S. custody are held except that it is unlike any detention facility he’s encountered. “It’s much more isolating than any other facility that I have known,” the lawyer says. “I’ve done cases from the Virginia death row and Texas death row and these pretrial conditions are much more isolating.” The Camp 7 prison unit is so shrouded in secrecy that its location on the U.S. base in Cuba is classified and officials refuse to discuss it. Now, two separate but related events are forcing it into the limelight. In Washington, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted on April 3 to declassify a portion of a review of the U.S. detention and interrogation program in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, alQaida attack. The report, the release of which is opposed by the CIA, is expected to be sharply critical of the treatment of prisoners, including some now held in Camp 7. And on Monday, a judge in Guantanamo will open a hearing into the sanity of one

of those prisoners, Ramzi Binalshibh, whose courtroom outbursts about alleged mistreatment in Camp 7 have halted the already boggeddown effort to try five men in the Sept. 11 attacks, all of whom are held there. Both issues are deeply intertwined. Binalshibh has accused the government of making noises and vibrations inside Camp 7 to deliberately keep him awake, reminiscent of the intentional sleep deprivation, along with other forms of abuse, that his lawyers say he endured at the hands of the CIA from the time he was captured in Pakistan in September 2002 to when he was brought to Guantanamo four years later. Militar y of ficials deny doing anything intentional to disrupt his sleep. Prosecutors say his accusations are delusions, though they still believe he is mentally competent to stand trial. His lawyers say he is competent, but are not convinced officials have adequately investigated his complaints. His mental state is somewhat murky. Court records show Binalshibh has been treated while in Guantanamo with medications that are used for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, but he did not participate in a courtordered mental evaluation in January. The judge, Army Col. James Pohl, could decide to sever Binalshibh from the case against his codefendants, all of whom are being tried by militar y commission on charges that include terrorism and murder and face the death penalty if convicted.

Cedar-Riverside addresses crime, victims The Brian Coyle Center hosted a resource fair last Tuesday for National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. BY ETHAN NELSON enelson@mndaily.com

For the Somali community of Cedar-Riverside, the impact of misconceptions about crime hits home. Neighborhood residents met at the Brian Coyle Center on Tuesday to discuss crime and resources available to victims during National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, which ran April 6-12. Minnesota hasn’t observed National Crime Victims’ Rights Week in four years, said Carla Nielson, crime prevention specialist for Minneapolis police’s 1st Precinct, which covers the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood. Doing so this year is a way for police to interact with and hear the concerns of the immigrant community, she said. Amano Dube, director of the Brian Coyle Center, said that Cedar-Riverside has one of the lowest average incomes in Minneapolis, which can result in fewer or less accessible resources for crime victims. “Like in any other

neighborhood, we witness victims of crime, from the simplest to the worst,” Dube said. “We have come a long way … but this is something that exists every day.” About 50 people attended the meeting, many of whom were Somali women. “We want to bring awareness to the community,” said Miski Abdulle, the Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project programs manager at the Brian Coyle Center. Abdulle, who is Somali, oversaw a resource fair at Brian Coyle, where victims of crime could learn about services available. “Many immigrants, and especially those in CedarRiverside, have low incomes,” University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs professor and immigration exper t Katherine Fennelly said. “They don’t have many resources.” Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman spoke about recent crime in the neighborhood and said he was “concerned” with the number of juveniles charged with wrongdoing, which he

said numbered about 7,500 across Minneapolis last year. Freeman said he “was caught doing something stupid” when he was young and doesn’t want other young people to be jailed for petty crimes. But he said watchfulness for felonies is important, and it’s necessar y for community members to look out for crimes and tell police about them. Dube said he understands the merits of such surveillance but said it’s difficult for the neighborhood to monitor crime all the time. Often with increased scrutiny, Fennelly said, it’s easy for people to jump to conclusions. “If a report says a person had an accent or dresses differently, people will generalize an entire community,” she said. Alice White, a Minneapolis police officer and East African engagement liaison, also spoke at the event and encouraged the crowd to use Tip 411, the app that the Minneapolis Police Department launched in 2013 for anonymous tips. “If someone’s watching at all times for everything, even

minor crimes, people will know the community won’t tolerate that,” she said. A main topic of the night was bringing balance to the neighborhood by lowering crime levels and not blaming victims, speaker and resident Amira Hussein said. Contrar y to what some may think, Fennelly said, immigrants are less likely than non-immigrants to commit crimes. “These are the people who are the victims,” she said. “Immigrants are aspiring to a better life. They choose to come. They have more reason to keep their noses clean.” Despite the recent concern about crime in the University of Minnesota area, Cedar-Riverside crime has been steadily dropping in the past few years. The Cedar-Riverside/ West Bank Safety Center has operated in the neighborhood for two years. Nielsen said she hopes the center and events like the one T uesday will cause crime to continue to decrease. “Hopefully, we’ll have weeks like this annually,” she said. “We want to give voices to people we often forget.”


Monday, April 14, 2014

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Regents: the U’s busiest volunteers The board is tasked with supporting the U’s president while holding him accountable. BY MEGHAN HOLDEN mholden@mndaily.com

In just one day’s time, the University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents ate a pancake breakfast with state legislators, attended a mock medical school graduation, took part in a statue unveiling party and joined business leaders and campus deans for dinner. On the weeks that they have board meetings, the 12 regents sometimes devote more than 30 hours to their unpaid positions. They have the weighty job of overseeing the University’s five-campus system, mapping out the institution’s future and ensuring they’re upholding President Eric Kaler’s vision while still maintaining a critical eye. “We’re eyes and ears for the president,” said Richard Beeson, chair of the board. But aside from approving policies, a regent is always learning about the University’s inner workings and assessing their roles as key decision-makers — an important role some would like to make more attainable for applicants interested in serving.

A ‘rough process’ Becoming a regent isn’t a simple task. Some say it’s too political, forcing applicants to campaign — which may lead to some qualified individuals not having an equal chance at the position. Sen. Terri Bonoff, DFLMinnetonka, said she saw flaws in the regent election process last session and she wants to simplify the process. “I was appalled by what our regent candidates had to do,” said Bonof f, who chairs the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development committee.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA LEADERSHIP BOARD OF REGENTS Academic & Student Affairs Committee Audit Committee Facilities & Operations Committee Faculty & Staff Affairs Committee Finance Committee Litigation Review Committee Special Committee on Academic Medicine PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

In order to be successful, she said, candidates have to visit of fices for each of Minnesota’s 201 legislators and campaign for support. Bonof f said she wants to draft proposals to reform the process, but she won’t pursue the change this legislative session. Lawmakers in the House’s higher education committee didn’t see it as a priority this year, she said, and it would need their support. Regent Linda Cohen, who won re-election last year, agreed with Bonoff’s concerns. “It shouldn’t be quite as political as it is,” she said. A regent is elected to represent each of the state’s eight Congressional districts, and four others represent the state at large. Each regent ser ves six-year terms, and onethird of the 12 seats are up for election ever y two years, according to Minnesota law. The process is extensive and competitive. When Cohen first applied for her position in 2007, more than 140 people applied for four open seats. She inter viewed with the Regent Candidate Advisor y Council, which advises the Legislature in the election by

BRIDGET BENNETT, DAILY FILE PHOTO

The University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents meets Oct. 11, 2013, at the McNamara Alumni Center.

recommending two to four candidates. She then successfully sought for mal approval from former Gov. Tim Pawlenty — a step in the process that no longer exists. Legislators disputed the gover nor’s power in the election and pushed to eliminate it. Now, the joint legislative committee comprised of various members from both chambers nominates one candidate for each of the open slots, and the full Legislature votes on the position. Other public universities, like the University of Michigan and the University of Nebraska, have statewide or district elections for the board. And at some schools, like the University of Califor nia, the gover nor alone chooses regents. They may seem simpler on the surface, but Cohen said those systems aren’t any less political. Although it’s a “rough process,” Beeson said, it’s beneficial for regent candidates to spend time at

the state Capitol because it helps them understand the role better.

tion or family; it’s about communication,” Beeson said.

A balancing act

A full-time job

Some of the board’s main objectives are to support and hold the president accountable — a task that can be tricky at times. Regents need to share a vision with the president about the University’s future, said Brian Steeves, board executive director and corporate secretar y. If the two can’t agree, the University could suffer, he said. “It’s a delicate balance,” Steeves said. Regents said there is a good dynamic between the two under Kaler’s presidency. “A healthy relationship between the board and the president is essential for a healthy organization,” Kaler said. “It’s a really important role, and we work all the time to make sure they’re involved at the right level.” Beeson meets with Kaler at least once a month to discuss any concerns regents may have. “It’s like any organiza-

Regent Laura Brod beamed with pride while touring the University’s Masonic Cancer Center last month. Wearing a white doctor’s coat, she walked around the regent information session at the Academic Health Center where the board learned about the center and did rounds with physicians. During the of f-months when the board doesn’t meet, regents stay in the loop by meeting with University leaders and spending time on campus — attending lectures, Gophers games and other special events. “With any volunteer job, there has to be a level of passion around it,” Beeson said. While there isn’t an April board meeting, regents will attend a national conference where governing boards from institutions across the countr y will

discuss trends and problems that higher education systems face. Steeves said the board of fice has made an ef for t this year to include opportunities for regents to learn about different parts of the University. When Beeson began his regency in 2009, he spent a large amount of time going to “hundreds” of events around the T win Cities campus. Now, he said he attends fewer events because he has a better grasp of knowing about the school’s community. He said he spends more time thinking about big-picture ideas and the University as a whole, which he said is a 24/7 job. “I can’t turn the button off,” Beeson said. “The issues are still there.” It’s a big job, Steeves said, but regents have a strong passion for the institution that drives them forward. “Ever y single person who comes to the Board of Regents has an absolute love for the University,” he said.


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Editorials & Opinions www.mndaily.com/opinion

Monday, April 14, 2014 The Editorials & Opinions department is independent of the newsroom. The editorial board prepares the editorials labeled “EDITORIALS,” which are the opinion of the Minnesota Daily as an institution but not representative of Daily employees’ opinions. Columnists’ opinions are their own.

EDITORIALS

GOVERNMENT

Minnesota’s lawmakers need a space Shared blame for Dinky riots The state Legislature should approve plans to build a new Senate office building.

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par t from the recent minimum wage hike and anti-bullying legislation, the proposal to build a new Senate office building remains one of the most contentious issues in the Minnesota Legislature. Republicans have attacked the plan as a waste of money. If you ask a Minnesotan who reads the news, they are likely to be against it as well, arguing that they are still suffering from the lack of a strong economic recovery. Apar t from the political motivations of Republicans to attack this “wasteful spending” proposal — perhaps because Gov. Mark Dayton is up for re-election in November — concerns over appropriations are completely justified. However, when analyzing the facts surrounding the proposal, I find that the project is not only in the best interest of our local lawmakers, but it is beneficial to

RONALD DIXON columnist

Minnesotans as well. First, we should ask the rudimentar y question: Why do our senators need new office space in the first place? Well, a sizable number of senators have their of fices directly in the Capitol, and renovations will displace much of their of fice space, thereby necessitating a new location for senators to work and meet constituents. This leaves Minnesotans and lawmakers with a few options. The Legislature could plan a new building, as some lawmakers have proposed to do. The Senate Rules and Administration Committee recently approved the proposal. Lawmakers could also rent office space across the Twin Cities. The latter, unfortunately,

would present a multitude of problems. First, it would simply cost more money. Having one building would require less spending than purchasing office space from several venues in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Also, we must consider legislative access. If a constituent wished to speak to their representative and senator, should they have to travel from one point in the metro to another in order to meet with a number of politicians? If a group of advocates wanted to speak with dozens of gover nment of ficials, it would require far more coordination than the endeavor already does, given the busy schedules of each lawmaker. Having of fices spread out across the Twin Cities would only exacerbate these scheduling dilemmas, and it would therefore decrease citizens’ access to lawmakers. Many University students intern at the Capitol during the legislative session, and a sizable portion of them lack vehicles, so it would be ver y arduous for them to travel

DEATHS IN IRAQ: U.S. & COALITION TROOPS: 4,802 — IRAQI CIVILIANS: 122,625- PLUS DEATHS IN AFGHANISTAN: U.S. & COALITION TROOPS: 3,418 — AFGHAN CIVILIANS: UNKNOWN

between the Capitol building, their legislator’s of fice and the offices of other lawmakers and employees. Finally, should we have a state government that lacks infrastr uctural integrity? What does it say about how we value our local politicians if they must work in obscure locations across the metro, instead of on Capitol grounds? U n f o r t u n a t e l y, m a n y citizens are still going to perceive this proposal as a lavish waste of taxpayer dollars. Let us tr y to inform them of the benefits of the building and critique local Republicans for their par tisan attacks. While a new building may seem like a sizable direct cost to residents, Minnesotans have a lot more to lose from a lack of government access and organization. We build gigantic stadiums for our spor ts teams — can we not allow our lawmakers a fraction of that respect?

Ronald Dixon welcomes comments at rdixon@mndaily.com.

GUEST EDITORIAL

Be cautious with budget surplus Why it matters: The current enthusiasm for legislators to spend money seems prompted by a case of amnesia on past deficits.

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Maxwell Smith welcomes comments at msmith@mndaily.com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Ashamed about Dinkytown riots When the University of Minnesota men’s hockey team won, the air had already been buzzing with electricity. That same electricity was there when we lost. I am proud of how much love and identification my fellow students have to the University. Of course, it’s natural for there to be an outpouring of emotion and celebration when any beloved team triumphs or loses — and with less than a second to spare, the triumph Thursday could not have been more exciting, and our loss Saturday could not have been more crushing. What upsets me is the form that our emotions took. A riot in Dinkytown, albeit a mild one, is not how we should have celebrated. Snapping selfies in front of the riot police, climbing light poles, jumping on police cars, damaging public property, getting pepper sprayed or arrested really degrades our reputation. It is not entirely our fault, though. This is the example that we have been shown from university campuses across the country. Drunkenly rioting because our hockey team won a game is immature and totally indicative of the privilege and entitlement that our generation has. Just because we were proud of the accomplishments of our team does not give us the right to act uncivilized and drunkenly breach law and order in order to celebrate. For some reason, the idea of rioting has become cool. Why? In other places, riots are

not fun. People die in riots. Riots should be reserved for the absolute last thing that a movement should do to try to gain legitimacy, when there is nothing to lose but health and lives. Of course we weren’t trying to gain legitimacy — we were just trying to celebrate, right? Instead of losing our minds over a hockey game, let’s do it when it really matters. Let’s riot because of our rising student loan debt, which exceeds all credit card debt. Let’s riot because of Russia’s violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty. Let’s riot about the entire generation of children being killed and tortured in Syria, while the rest of the world sits back and ponders. Unfor tunately, none of those things will happen — we will continue to act ridiculous, find excuses to celebrate the mediocre and never change our status quo. Before Saturday night, I could have never said I was ashamed to be a student at the University. Unfortunately, that’s no longer the case. Go Gophers. Harold Melcher University student

An alumnus’ perspective on Dinkytown riots As proud as I was of the effort that the University of Minnesota’s hockey team put forth Thursday and again Saturday, the behavior displayed in Dinkytown after the games is embarrassing for alumni. Celebrating by destroying

property, setting fires and causing the police to use tear gas is completely inappropriate behavior for anyone, including student-lemmings following a crowd. Illegal behaviors warrant consequences, so with today’s technologies, the unruly ones from Thursday and Saturday nights can expect unprecedented efforts to identify them and hand down appropriate punishments. I am a frequent visitor to the University areas including Stadium Village and Dinkytown. I should not have to be concerned for my and my family’s personal safety because I happen to be passing through an area around the time an athletic event ends. A majority of University students reading this paper probably had nothing to do with the incidents in Dinkytown this past week, but your silence about the inappropriate behaviors of Thursday night’s riot contributed to the unruliness displayed Saturday night. It’s childish to use social media to spread the seeds of a riot, instead of pointing out the personal danger to would-be participants. The citizens of Minnesota support the University and provide opportunities for people to enhance their life experience through higher education. That does not include the right to riot after athletic events. This alumnus is extremely disappointed that these events took place in Dinkytown this week. Tim McDevitt University alumnus

innesota’s $1.2 billion surplus appears to have spurred a legislative budget euphoria like that brought by a spring day after a bitterly cold winter. But let’s not forget that winter remains a harsh reality in Minnesota, as does the threat of another fiscal blizzard when the economy turns south. So as Minnesotans, we should be ready to hunker down and have some provisions. We shouldn’t spend all of our surplus. Spending even half of the surplus seems to push fiscal prudence when bad times are still visible in the rearview mirror. Last Tuesday, the Minnesota Senate passed a budget bill that spent another $209 million of the surplus on education, prisons and raises for home health care workers. The House passed some additional tax relief in its “Tax Bill 2” but also spent $10 million on “economic development resources” for Greater Minnesota and set up a $25 million broadband grant program. All are probably worthy of funding, as Gov. Mark Dayton recently noted. But the requests are piling up, and our surplus is finite. Democrats in the House and Senate rightly refunded about $550 million of the surplus by halting scheduled tax increases and providing some relief from current taxes. They’ve designated $150 million to shore up our reserve fund. That doesn’t seem like enough, given that a bipartisan group has said our reserve fund was $1 billion short of what it should have been. The Senate also allocated $8.8 million in education for early learning scholarships and $11 million because our jails are getting crowded. Another $2 million would help nursing homes cover increases in the minimum wage they are likely to face. Dayton has vowed to work with his fellow party leaders in end-of-session negotiations on the budget. He hasn’t said whether he will use his line item veto power to reduce some of the spending driven by the euphoria. He should. Legislators should remember that most new spending has a tendency to become a permanent addition to the base of the state budget. That builds in spending that is usually more difficult to remove once it acquires a constituency. It’s easier to say no on the front end. So let’s temper the euphoria. We’re not out of the woods yet. The Mankato Free Press This editorial was originally published in the Mankato Free Press on April 11. Please send comments to letters@mndaily.com

Collective poor behavior and a few shameful choices resulted in riots.

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inkytown erupted in chaos Saturday after the University of Minnesota men’s hockey team advanced to the NCAA final but lost to Union College. While it may be easy to point fingers at students, Dinkytown residents and Gophers hockey fans, we should acknowledge that many others played parts in the riot. It’s important to realize that there wasn’t a large, determined group of University students causing trouble in Dinkytown on Saturday, but a small group of people that included students. After Thursday’s celebrations spiraled out of control, police were out in force during and just after the game. Officers traveled in groups, holding riot gear. Dozens of squad cars, buses full of police and even a SWAT truck were parked on curbs or rolling through University-area neighborhoods. This intimidating behavior did little to avoid an “us versus them” mentality, which fueled much of the rioting. Many bystanders converged in Dinkytown after the game to watch the anticipated riot, document the events on social media or hang out in Dinkytown. Some were passing through on their way home. When tensions between the few dozen rioters and the 300 police officers on the scene boiled over, those bystanders were swept up in violence they could have avoided if all involved hadn’t been anticipating another riot quite so fervently. After clearing Dinkytown’s main intersection, police cleared the neighborhood for several blocks around, weaving between houses and firing projectiles indiscriminately at any sign of aggression. While police likely kept people and property safe, they may have also made things much worse for bystanders swept up in the skirmishes outside of Dinkytown. The media are to blame, too. TV trucks, news crews and reporters descended on Dinkytown during the game, anticipating riots. News helicopters circled overhead. This kind of attention did nothing but further incite the rowdy crowd. The Minnesota Daily, which had several reporters and photographers on the scene, is implicated here, too. Multiple reporters were caught in nonlethal weapons fire, gaining bruises that illustrate the many sides of Saturday’s riot. Dinkytown is primarily a student community, and those students must face the ramifications of the riot in their own home. This weekend should be an embarrassment to the University community, but students cannot be the only ones held responsible.

Strategic plan must endure

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dministrators at large, public institutions such as the University of Minnesota have the task of creating new initiatives, programs, priorities and plans to improve the institution. The strategic plan University leaders are currently working on will likely leverage all of these tools in order to maintain and improve the school’s reputation as a worldclass higher learning and research institution. In addition to making sure that the school is moving forward, the administration will release a strategic plan this fall to re-establish goals to hold the administration accountable, the Minnesota Daily reported. The plan also ensures that everyone at the University is working toward similar goals. Other schools in Minnesota’s five-campus system create similar strategic plans. While drafting their own plan, officials at the Twin Cities campus should look to the Morris campus as a model for longevity, which has the oldest active plan. As the Daily reported, most strategic plans at the University come and go with the administrations that created them. Current and future administrations must work to end this practice. Long-term plans are useless if they last only a few years. University administrations have routinely unheeded this fact in the past. Officials can also render these plans toothless if they are overly vague or redundant. The strategic plan can be a useful reminder of the University’s priorities and mission, which it can lose sight of among athletics and research contracts, but without specific and substantial goals, it will be hard to keep the administration accountable. Kaler and his administration are clearly aware of the shortfalls of previous plans and appear to be making a sincere effort to make this year’s plan last. To do this, they should fill their plan with far more than platitudes and abstract goals.

LETTERS AND GUEST COLUMNS

The Minnesota Daily welcomes letters and guest columns from readers. All letters must include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification. The Daily reserves the right to edit all letters for style, space, libel and grammar. Letters to the editor should be no more than 600 words in length. Readers may also submit guest columns. Guest columns should be approximately 350 words. The Daily reserves the right to print any submission as a letter or guest column. Submission does not guarantee publication. letters@mndaily.com Fax: (612) 435-5865 Phone: (612) 435-1578 Letters and columns to the editor 2221 University Ave. SE Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55414

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF TONY WAGNER = EDITORIALS & OPINIONS EDITOR ERIC BEST = SENIOR EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER WILLIAM BORNHOFT = BOARD MEMBER CASSANDRA SUNDARAM


www.mndaily.com/opinion

Opinions STADIUM VILLAGE

What should be built in Stadium Village? Midwestern schools pitched ideas of what should go on the Days Inn property near campus.

developers, architects and bankers in a closed-door situation. After preliminar y judging, the top three teams — Marquette, W isconsin and Minnesota — presented their pitch a second time to a larger audience, and the judges chose an ultimate winner. So, what did the three teams pitch? As a member of the University’s group, I can say that each team had interesting and unique ideas that would likely bode well for the area.

LITERACY

A novel proposal The hype of America’s alleged illiteracy overlooks the realities of reading in the modern age.

The University’s horseshoe venture CHRIS IVERSON columnist

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e’re gonna need a bigger proposal.” This line, derived from the 1975 classic “Jaws,” also directly applies to the mass building expansion seen around campus these days. Yes, the boat is the available land in the area and the massive shark is the developers and construction sites, looking to devour and construct more and more blocks. Luckily for all humans involved, capturing and developing land is a little less horrifying than a shark tr ying to chomp at an afternoon snack. Still, the analogy remains true — as the demand for undeveloped land continues to grow, the proposals are getting bigger and bigger. One of the sites, car r ying large amounts in both land area and media attention, is the lot with the Days Inn Hotel and Tea House Chinese Restaurant on Stadium Village’s edge. The hotel and restaurant, as well as several parking lots, are located directly adjacent to the future Stadium Village Green Line lightrail train station and are ripe for a large development. A joint venture between United Proper ties and the University of Minnesota, 2407 Investments, recently purchased the site. In Febr uar y, the Minnesota Daily Editorial Board requested greater transparency in the University’s development role near campus, questioning the joint venture (“The University’s Stadium Village plans,” Feb. 3). In March, the Daily repor ted that the University wants more of a say in of f-campus development (“U wants a say in development,” March 11). Minneapolis City Councilman Andrew Johnson told the Daily that the city should tap into the school’s “wealth of talent” to lead development. Other than architectural exper tise, how could this joint venture specifically gather help from outside talent? Enter the NAIOP University Real Estate Challenge. Ever y year, the national commercial real estate development group, or NAIOP, hosts a challenge for students from regional colleges to pitch what they think would work on a specific site. The NAIOP selected the Days Inn Hotel for this year’s competition. Each team had to come up with a full financial plan and preliminar y design for the property. Six teams from St. Cloud State University, the University of St. Thomas, Marquette University, the University of Northern Iowa, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Minnesota pitched their bids to professional

The team from the University of Minnesota pitched a large-scale, mixed-use plan containing space for a hotel, grocer y store and restaurant; extra retail space; housing catered toward graduate students and visiting professors; and a 15-stor y of fice tower containing both University and other private tenants. Titled “The Granar y,” the horseshoeshaped design also contained a 392-stall underground parking ramp and two plazas facing the Green Line LR T station and inside the horseshoe. The team analyzed the 2011 Stadium Village Station Market Study and the 2009 University of Minnesota Master Plan and noted future demand for University of fices, because several current buildings on campus are slated for demolition in the near future.

Automated parking and hotel Marquette’s idea was both the most simple and most risky. Named “Aurum,” the project consisted of a dual-brand hotel containing 240 rooms catering both long-term and short-term stays, as well as several ground-floor restaurant and wine bar slots. The project also contained an innovative automated parking ramp, where vehicles would drive onto a platform that would move the car into the garage. The team’s design set the tall hotel directly adjacent to the light rail station, and it set the parking ramp on the opposite end of the lot near University Village.

Wisconsin’s phased ambition The team from our rivals to the southeast proposed an ambitious project called “University Station” featuring two separate phases, each containing a hotel. Phase one included a Hampton Inn hotel, several thousand square feet of of fice and retail space, and a day care center. Phase two included a Homewood Suites hotel, more retail space and a University of Minnesotaowned office building. The plan seemed to be the most encompassing and the most expensive, and the design created a miniature urban village within the block.

The selection In the end, Marquette’s hotel and parking structure plan won the challenge, with the scores for Wisconsin and the University not far behind. Interestingly, Marquette’s proposal was the only one that did not have University uses, such as expanded office space, within it. Since the judging panel did not include University officials, it is likely far from what will actually become a reality. All plans did give a good introduction for what the site could become in the future. Chris Iverson welcomes comments at civerson@mndaily.com.

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Monday, April 14, 2014

BRIAN REINKEN columnist

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omment threads erupted after National Public Radio published an April Fools’ Day article titled “Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?” Ironically, the article was a joke, a five-sentence story intended to reveal how many people would react without reading it first. Judging by the comments, the gag appears to have been moderately — and a bit dismayingly — successful. If the title of NPR’s article provoked outcry, it may be because so many studies find that Americans are reading less than ever before. The National Endowment for the Arts, the Pew Research Center and other organizations routinely examine the alleged downfall of literacy in modern America. The phenomenon’s severity varies depending on the source, but its outline is generally the same. For example, the NEA reports that average American reading scores rank 15th among those of 31 industrialized nations. It also reports that the average American between the ages of 15 and 24 spends two hours per day watching television but only seven minutes reading. Adjusted for inflation, moreover, the money that Americans spend annually on books dropped 14 percent between 1985 and 2005. However, such studies often overlook the changing realities of literacy. While it may be true that fewer people are sitting down and reading novels cover to cover, this doesn’t mean that people aren’t reading anything at all. Reports that examine traditional, novelcentered reading ignore the beneficial effects of texting, e-books and the Internet on literacy.

The digital triad We can’t restrict today’s literacy to reading novels. Instead, a broader definition of literacy could include any act of interpreting and composing written texts for the purpose of communication. From this perspective, new digital technologies don’t hamper literacy so much as they rejuvenate it. For example, numerous studies have found that texting does not diminish children’s ability to spell. On the contrary, children who frequently send text messages demonstrate a greater understanding of phonics than those who don’t. E-books, the second component of the digital triad, have wrought havoc on national bookstores such as Borders, which closed in 2011. While the closure of bookstores is upsetting, e-books aren’t all bad news. A recent study suggests that they stimulate young children’s brains by providing a more tactile experience than traditional paper

books. Because e-books more thoroughly engage the senses, readers stay attentive for longer periods of time. Finally, there is the alleged menace of the Internet. But rather than viewing the Internet as an intellectual void, we should understand that it, too, is an invaluable tool for reading. Thanks to the Inter net, the sheer amount of text in the world has ballooned to fantastic proportions. Today, people enjoy instant access to newspapers, magazines and articles of all kinds. Even the most “useless” or “dumb” websites typically require their users to navigate through webs of text in order to access any content. Moreover, while it’s undoubtedly true that some people do not use the Internet to read, it seems doubtful that these are the types of people who would spend much time reading even if the Internet didn’t exist. Avid readers, for their part, are unlikely to suddenly renounce their beloved words in favor of videos or computer games.

The role of reading Studies that decr y the loss of American literacy seem to presume that novels ser ve a function that other forms of written texts cannot satisfy. What, then, is the role of reading in society? Is it escapism? Enlightenment? Self-improvement? These things are not exclusive to “great” novels. If people are spending less time reading “Moby Dick,” it may be because many of them have discovered something that interests them more. Capital-L “Literature” has never been widely accessible or popular. As a University of Minnesota student and English major, I spend much of my time reading novels. That said, I did that even before I came to college — it’s just the type of person I am. At the end of the day, it’s difficult to force someone to enjoy reading, and it’s impossible to force everyone to enjoy “literature.” This, ultimately, is why the digital revolution is so important to literacy. New technology allows people of all ages and backgrounds to connect and engage with texts of their choosing. In this way, reading becomes a more positive, more personal experience and less of a chore. To be sure, novels have their place in society, and no newspaper or magazine article can replace a long book by Leo Tolstoy or Charles Dickens. To assume, however, that there is only one legitimate type of literacy is a grave mistake. In the digital age, we must learn to embrace literacy in every form it takes.

BOOK READING TRENDS OVER TIME NONE 1-5 BOOKS 6-10 BOOKS 11-50 BOOKS >50 BOOKS DON’T KNOW MEAN MEDIAN

GALLUP 1990 16% 32 15 27 7 3 11 6

GALLUP 2001 13% 38 16 23 8 1 14.5 5

PEW INTERNET 2011 19% 32 15 26 5 3 17 8

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Brian Reinken welcomes comments at breinken@mndaily.com.

TECHNOLOGY

The Internet is the source of a recent loss of religious belief The Internet may be changing our religious dedication.

TRENT M. KAYS columnist

N

o one doubts the prevalence of and proclivity for change that the Internet induces. The Internet has dramatically and fundamentally changed the lives of billions of humans across the world. Access to new knowledge, now readily available because of the Internet, has allowed humans to consider new perspectives, ideas and paths of happiness. This includes concepts of religion. According to a Cornell University study last month, the rise of Internet use correlates with a decline in religious affiliation in the United States. So American Internet users are losing their religion. The study’s author, Allen Downey, used data from the General Social Survey — a survey that has regularly measured people’s attitudes and demographics on various issues since 1972. Of course, there is one major flaw in

Downey’s argument: Correlation does not always equal causation. However, Downey addresses this issue, arguing: “Correlation does provide evidence in favor of causation, especially when we can eliminate alternative explanations or have reason to believe that they are less likely.” We understand correlation as inferring a conclusion, and as such, we can base our explanations on it. Still, the evidence to suggest that Americans are losing their religion due to the rise in Internet use is compelling. But what could it mean? If Internet users are losing their religion, it raises the question: Why was religion so easy to lose? Certainly, people have different reasons for identifying with or following a particular religion. In my hometown, we had several protestant churches, including a Mormon church, but we had no Catholic church. In high school, I vividly recall listening to the local military chaplain — a trim and unassuming U.S. Air Force captain. He told our group of students that he carried out several different services at the local base chapel; however, when he worshipped, he did so at the local Mormon church. The chaplain was Mormon, and he was my first introduction to Mormonism. It was an odd concept for me to know that a military chaplain provided Catholic services in his chapel but didn’t for one moment believe in Catholicism’s path toward Christian redemption. Needless to say, this and other experiences muddled my understanding of religion at this point in my life. Such muddling didn’t stop me. As with

most things in my life, I investigated various Christian denominations to better understand what I believed. I visited a different church every Sunday for months before I decided that Christianity wasn’t for me. Further Internet research confirmed that I didn’t like some of the ideas Christians brought into the world. The Internet was a key tool that helped me figure out how to define what I believed. Indeed, the Internet has always seemed to be a haven for atheists, agnostics and those in search of some type of understanding. While not explicitly a religion, my first introduction to Buddhism was only made possible by and through the Internet. I discovered that there were other people around the world who had similar thoughts to mine. According to 2012 data from the Pew Research Center Religion and Public Life Project, the number of Americans who do not identify with any religion has grown in recent years. About one-fifth of the public overall and onethird of adults under age 30 are religiously unaffiliated. In considering this statistic along with Downey’s, I actually don’t find the latter’s conclusion all that shocking. The generation of today is less religious than previous generations. Did the Internet have something to do with it? It appears so. The Internet has allowed people to explore radical and contrasting ideologies and philosophies for living compared to their parents’ religious beliefs. Finally, those who had to go to church every Sunday can now investigate a different point of view. Such access to oncelimited knowledge can be liberating.

Is it possible we could see an age without religion? Unlikely. Many people still need to believe in something greater than themselves, and this often is some type of god. However, if the past century has taught us anything, we may see a time when the morality of religion — specifically Abrahamic religions — does not rule much of the world. Great intellectuals of the past century have proven that morality does not need to be based in religious ideology. Intellectuals, like Christopher Hitchens, Gore Vidal and Richard Dawkins, have shown that one can be moral and not believe in God. The Internet has influenced many things, but most importantly, it has given us access to diversity of opinion and experience with which we can create a better future for ourselves. Perhaps that’s one of the great glories of the Internet: It has shown us that we don’t need to believe in a higher power in order to live. We don’t need to be alone or feel alone in a world torn apart by religious wars and edicts. In the end, it won’t matter if we worshipped one god or another, or none at all. All that will matter is if we were decent to and compassionate with the life that surrounds us. The Internet allows us to understand and work toward this goal because it connects us. The Dalai Lama once remarked, “My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.” That should be all the religion we need in the digital age, and let’s use the Internet to spread it. Trent M. Kays welcomes comments at tkays@mndaily.com.


8

Monday, April 14, 2014

Sports

@MNDAILYSPORTS

MEN’S HOCKEY

MINNESOTA FALLS TO UNION IN FINAL

The Gophers gave up four goals in the first period and never recovered.

WITH SAM GORDON

J

LISA PERSSON, DAILY

Union attempts a shot on Gophers goaltender Adam Wilcox on Saturday evening during the NCAA final in Philadelphia. The Gophers lost 7-4 to the Dutchmen.

Hockey u from Page 1

You wanted to chase rather than just play your position.” And with Union’s speed, the usually fast Gophers found themselves with the unfamiliar task of playing catchup for most of the game. Minnesota’s eight penalties to Union’s five didn’t help its cause. The Gophers struck first about three minutes into the first period on a goal by freshman forward Justin Kloos, but Union responded seven minutes later on a goal by Shayne Gostisbehere. Gophers junior forward Sam Warning put the Gophers ahead again about 40 seconds later, but that was Minnesota’s last lead. The Dutchmen scored three times in less than two minutes toward the end of the period. Mike Vecchione, Eli Lichtenwald and Daniel Ciampini netted goals after Union unleashed a barrage of shots onto a flailing Wilcox. “It just got away from us,” Kloos said. “We hung our goalie to dry. He’s been our best player all year, and for us to put him through that was kind of disappointing.” Minnesota cut Union’s lead to a single goal about a minute into the second period on a goal by freshman forward Taylor Cammarata and prevented Union from piling on any more goals heading into the third period. But five minutes into the final stanza, Max Novak re-

instated the Dutchmen’s twogoal lead. “We were expecting them to shove it right back in our face,” sophomore defenseman Mike Reilly said. “And they did.” A glimmer of hope came from freshman forward Hudson Fasching’s goal on the game’s only power-play score with four minutes to play. To the Gophers, it was the moment when ever ything could have changed. “We kind of had hope,” Fasching said. “There was four and a half minutes left. I was trying to get something going. Obviously it just wasn’t enough.”

in Gopher histor y,” Reilly said. “So I’m just proud of the guys and what they’ve accomplished.” Fasching said he was sad to see the season come up short but was pleased with his freshman class, which scored three of the Gophers’ four goals. As confetti rained down after the buzzer, Gophers players’ words all centered on thanks to seniors, excitement for the future and pride in each other. “We’re a family. We’re brothers,” senior for ward Tom Serratore said. “It’s sad to say goodbye to something. … You never want it to end.”

I certainly probably wouldn’t have thought we’d be here on the last day of the year. I told them in the locker room, ‘This is one of the most enjoyable years I’ve had in coaching.’ A great group of kids. Don Lucia head coach Union’s Kevin Sullivan dashed that hope by scoring with less than two minutes to go. Wilcox dropped his forehead to the ice and stayed there for a few beats after the puck slipped past him. An empty-net goal from Mat Bodie with 45 seconds left completed the Gophers’ nightmarish outcome. “We didn’t get the result we wanted, but we had a great year — one of the better years

Holl’s heroic strike

The Gophers got to the title game in the most dramatic way possible. Minnesota senior defenseman Justin Holl scored his first goal of the season shorthanded in the last second of the game to hand the team a 2-1 win over longtime rival North Dakota. Gophers players mobbed Holl in a huge dog pile at center ice — a stark contrast to

the reaction after the final seconds ticked away Saturday. Nor th Dakota players stood listless and lost as the final horn sounded, and though their eyes were noticeably puffy, remained stoic in the postgame press conference. “Disbelief. Straight disbelief,” North Dakota forward Mark MacMillan said. “I think all of us on the bench when it crossed the goal line said, ‘No way it went in before the buzzer.’ And unfortunately, that wasn’t the case.” Minnesota players were also fairly subdued in the postgame press conference — business as usual even after another SportsCenterworthy goal. “It’s a great feeling,” Holl said, “but it doesn’t mean anything if we don’t do well on Saturday.” Minnesota and Nor th Dakota, which Lucia called strikingly similar in roster and style, stayed scoreless for more than 50 minutes of play. North Dakota looked largely more offensive, but the Gophers struck first. War ning notched the breakthrough at 10:51 in the third period. But just more than 30 seconds later, North Dakota for ward Connor Gaarder pulled his team level again. Then came Holl’s improbable miracle goal. The Gophers took a penalty with less than two minutes to play and were seemingly just trying to kill the penalty and force overtime. Holl surprised everyone

MEN’S HOCKEY RESULTS SEMIFINAL 1 North Dakota 0 0 Minnesota

2 0 0

3 1 2

FINAL 1 2

CHAMPIONSHIP Union Minnesota

1 4 2

2 0 1

3 3 1

FINAL 7 4

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

with his goal amid traffic after Rau’s deflected shot fell to his skate. “I figured [I] might as well jump in,” Holl said. “And it went in.” Nor th Dakota outshot the Gophers 37-28. Lucia acknowledged that in the postseason, an unbelievable goal or fluky bounce of the puck can be the difference between a season’s end and a national title. While an unexpected goal sent them to the final, the Gophers couldn’t blame the same for their championship loss. They didn’t look as sharp as they had two weeks ago in the regionals, when they played the best they had all season. Still, whether or not they peaked too soon, Lucia said this year’s young team exceeded his expectations. “I cer tainly probably wouldn’t have thought we’d be here on the last day of the year,” Lucia said Saturday. “I told them in the locker room, ‘This is one of the most enjoyable years I’ve had in coaching.’ A great group of kids.”

ROWING

Gophers open Big Ten season, win one race

Minnesota went up against top-tier conference talent, and it showed. BY JACK SATZINGER jsatzinger@mndaily.com

The Gophers lost to Michigan and Michigan State over the weekend, winning just one event in the first varsity four against the Spartans. Those losses came to highly touted schools that may be even better than adver tised. Michigan entered the week as the No. 10-ranked team in the nation, and Michigan State fell just outside the NCAA rankings. “Michigan is really, really strong,” head coach

Wendy Davis said. “I think Michigan is going to end up much higher-ranked. I think they’re a top-five school.” Davis didn’t want to make excuses for losing to one of the nation’s top teams, but her team’s lineup saw some last-minute changes Saturday. Nicolette Marquardt of the first varsity eight traveled with the team to Ann Arbor, Mich., but was unable to race because of an illness. Her absence sent ripples to the rest of Minnesota’s boats, completely changing lineups. “When someone’s missing out of the first boat, then you take someone out of the second boat, and then you’ve got to take someone out of the first four,” Davis said. “It’s just a domino thing.” The Gophers struggled

to stay competitive against Michigan in the morning, and junior L ynn Hodnett said she wasn’t surprised by the results. Still, the Gophers aren’t dejected after a lessthan-ideal weekend. “We’re definitely not hanging our heads and giving up,” Hodnett said. Minnesota’s afternoon session went better and showed the Gophers what they need to improve on for the rest of the season. Hodnett said their improvement needs to center mainly on technical things, like rowing as a unit instead of as nine different people. If the team fixes those little problems, it could help the first varsity eight close the five-second gap that separated them from the Spartans on Saturday.

“We were within grasp of Michigan State,” Hodnett said. “I know we’re within grasp of Wisconsin.” The Badgers were the four th team in Michigan over the weekend, but the Gophers didn’t race against the rival school. Minnesota did get a good look at Wisconsin, though, which could help them prepare for an early May race against the Badgers in Minneapolis. “I thought they looked good and they’ve got some speed to them,” Davis said. “They look sharp, and they’re going to be a team to be reckoned with.” By the time May rolls around, the Gophers could be, too. They now have a bye week to fix some problems before facing Iowa on April 27.

ROWING RESULTS

MORNING RACES Michigan Minnesota

FINAL 48 24

AFTERNOON RACES Michigan State Minnesota

FINAL 43 26

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

Davis said all of Minnesota’s boats improved Saturday, but she’s looking for more dramatic improvement over the next month before the Big Ten championship. “We’ve got a month, my goodness,” she said. “We’ve got a lot of time to be working on things and get down what we need to get down.”

ustin Holl’s last-second goal Thursday night was without a doubt one of the most exhilarating moments in the last decade of Gophers sports. And Dinkytown went berserk. It seemed like a given after that — Minnesota was poised to win its first NCAA title since 2003 on Saturday night. Union — a tiny school with an enrollment of about 2,200 and even less of a hockey tradition — was the only thing blocking Minnesota’s path toward a sixth NCAA championship. The Gophers were the best-rounded team in the country for much of the season and consistently sat near the top of the college hockey rankings. A strong freshman class helped create balance across Minnesota’s four lines. The Gophers’ defense was the second-best in the country going into the national championship game. When it all went wrong, Adam Wilcox was between the pipes — the best goalie in the country could erase mistakes. None of that mattered Saturday, though, as Union dominated en route to a 7-4 win over Minnesota. A shocking upset on paper, but not a surprise to those who watched the game. The Dutchmen outplayed, out-gritted and out-toughed the Gophers for 60 minutes to win their first-ever NCAA championship. They slayed the college hockey Goliath. Union’s three-goal flurry midway through the first period sent Minnesota into a tizzy that it never recovered from. The Dutchmen controlled the puck for most of the game, peppering Wilcox from all angles. He made dozens of spectacular saves, but too often his teammates were out of place. Minnesota pulled within a goal multiple times, but it never felt like the team could complete the comeback. While a handful of guys on this year’s Gophers team played in the 2012 Frozen Four, the team was still relatively young. That might have been part of the problem. Minnesota head coach Don Lucia was consistent all year in reminding fans and media that his team wasn’t comprised of 20-something veterans like other college hockey teams. A veteran Union team never seemed rattled Saturday and instead played with control and chemistry. Union doesn’t lure elite recruits with NHL futures. It also doesn’t have guys leave the program for the pros every single year. Saturday’s game resembled last Monday’s NCAA men’s basketball championship game. Kentucky was loaded with NBA guys set to leave after one season, but upperclassmen led Connecticut to the title. It takes years to develop championship-caliber chemistry. That bodes well for the Gophers moving forward. On Saturday, though, they weren’t quite ready. Ya feel me? Sam Gordon welcomes comments at sgordon@mndaily.com or on Twitter.

@SamuelEGordon


Monday, April 14, 2014

MEN’S TENNIS

Gophers beat both Michigan schools at home Minnesota split its pair of matches on the women’s side over the weekend. BY JACE FREDERICK jfrederick@mndaily.com

Sunday marked the last time Juan Pablo Ramirez competitively took the cour t at the Baseline Tennis Center. The senior walked out a winner, topping Har r y Jadun of Michigan State in straight sets. Ramirez’s win added another tally to the Gophers’ 5-2 win over Michigan State, completing a weekend sweep after Minnesota topped Michigan by the same total Friday night. “I was really happy for him,” head coach Geof f Young said. “When the team can win and he can win, that’s fun.” Ramirez, like the team, went 2-0 on the weekend, and he appears to be shaping into top form as the Gophers make a final push toward the postseason. “I think hard work pays back,” he said. “I played well [this weekend], so it was a good feeling.” Ramirez’s contributions at the bottom of the lineup will be pivotal down the stretch as Minnesota makes its NCAA tour nament push. Young said the Gophers need to finish above .500 and in the top 45 of the ITA rankings to qualify for postseason play — a ver y attainable standard with one weekend left in the regular season. Minnesota junior Leandro Toledo will likely lead the Gophers’ charge. Toledo won two matches at No. 1 singles over the weekend — he’s now won six straight. Ramirez said the team tries not to think about the NCAA tournament, but it still does. The Gophers’ postseason aspirations motivate them to practice and compete harder ever y day, he said. “I think ever yone’s playing really well at this point, so we just need to stay positive,” he said. As for Ramirez’s last home match of his career, the thought hasn’t really crossed his mind yet. He’s caught up in this moment, in this team’s run toward the tournament. “It probably hasn’t hit me yet,” he said. “I’m go-

WOMEN’S TENNIS RESULTS

Gophers head coach Chuck Merzbacher said he felt like he was going to vomit. That’s how much pressure was on the No. 61 Gophers down the stretch Sunday in East Lansing, Mich. With Minnesota trailing 3-2 to the No. 60 Spartans, Julia Cour ter fought of f multiple match points at No. 4 singles before claiming the match in three sets.

“I think everyone’s playing really well at this point, so we just need to stay positive.” JUAN PABLO RAMIREZ Gophers senior

Then Maja Vujic sealed the match for the Gophers with her No. 6 singles victor y in another three-set thriller. “That was a great win,” Merzbacher said. “We all felt really good that we could pull it off. “We just had to do it, and we did.” The Gophers drew wins from No. 4 singles, No. 5 singles and No. 6 singles Sunday, something they’ve grown accustomed to at the bottom of their order. Still, after losing the doubles point to star t the match, they needed something more. That’s where senior Natallia Pintusava stepped in. Pintusava, who had dropped five consecutive matches, came away with an upset victor y at No. 2 singles. The Gophers’ win over Michigan State came just two days after they lost 7-0 to No. 14 Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Sunday marked the Gophers’ sixth Big Ten win of the season, the first time they’ve reached that plateau since 2003. “I’m r eally pr oud of these guys,” Merzbacher said. For Minnesota’s postseason hopes, Merzbacher said that Sunday was the biggest win of the season to date. “It’s a big win at this moment and time,” he said. “It’s a clutch win. It was huge.”

MEN’S TENNIS RESULTS

Doubles Brichacova/Mozia Pintusava/Courter Lambert/Otero

Doubles Hamburg/Froment Toledo/Frueh Sydow/Ramirez

Doubles Brichacova/Mozia Pintusava/Courter Lambert/Otero

L 8-3 W 8-4 L 8-6

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

Mannon wins NCAA title

Gophers women top Michigan State

MINNESOTA Singles Toledo Weber Hamburg Froment Frueh Ramirez

MINNESOTA 4, MICHIGAN STATE 3 Singles L 6-0, 7-6 Brichacova W 6-4, 7-5 Pintusava L 6-4, 6-4 Mozia W 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 Courter W 6-0, 6-1 Lambert W 7-6, 7-5, 6-3 Vujic

GYMNASTICS

ing to miss it, for sure, and I’m going to miss the team and the coaches.”

MICHIGAN 7, MINNESOTA 0 Singles L 6-4, 7-6 (4) Brichacova L 3-6, 6-2, 6-4 Pintusava L 6-1, 6-0 Mozia L 6-1, 6-2 Courter L 7-6, 5-7, 1-0 Lambert (7) L 7-6 (4), 6-1 Vujic L 8-2 L 8-2 unfinished

9

5, MICHIGAN 2 W W L W L W

7-5, 2-6, 6-4 6-3, 6-3 6-2, 6-4 6-2, 6-2 6-4, 6-4 6-2, 6-4

7-7, unfinished W 8-5 W 8-7 (2)

MINNESOTA 5, MICHIGAN STATE 2 Singles W 7-6 (4), 7-5 Toledo L 6-3, 7-6 (3) Weber W 7-6 (5), 6-4 Hamburg W 6-3, 6-4 Froment L 6-1, 6-4 Frueh W 6-4, 7-6 (3) Ramirez Doubles Hamburg/Froment Toledo/Frueh Sydow/Ramirez

W 8-2 W 8-2 L 8-1

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

Minnesota’s Ruben Weber plays a singles match against Michigan on Friday at Baseline Tennis Center.

BRIDGET BENNETT, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota’s Ellis Mannon competes on the pommel horse April 5, 2013, at the Sports Pavilion.

Minnesota didn’t qualify for the team portion of the NCAA meet. BY DAVID NELSON dnelson@mndaily.com

Ellis Mannon left little doubt as he dismounted the pommel horse Saturday night. His 15.425 score illuminated the scoreboard inside the Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich., and the junior gymnast knew he’d sealed the NCAA title. “It was a pretty great feeling,” Mannon said. “That’s what I trained for this whole year, my whole career, so to finally get there is pretty rewarding.” Mannon went last on the apparatus out of a group of 10 gymnasts. After many struggled, Gophers head coach Mike Bur ns said Mannon was fortunate to be the last to go. “There’s a lot of waiting around, so it’s a little bit nerve-racking,” Burns said. “But at the same time, you kind of know what you need to do to win.” Mannon is the first NCAA champion Burns has coached

during his decade-long tenure at Minnesota. “I couldn’t be more proud of Ellis’ efforts,” Burns said. “I think the whole staff … has been a big part of his development as well. It was a real team effort.” Burns referred to Mannon as the team’s “go-to guy” after the junior’s performance in the final home meet of the season. Mannon certainly lived up to those expectations on college gymnastics’ biggest stage. “I wouldn’t say he’s got ice water through his veins, but tonight it sure looked like he had ice water going through his veins,” Burns said. Minnesota also sent junior Steve Jaciuk, senior Matt Frey and senior Zach Chase to Saturday night’s individual competition. All three placed ninth. “I hit my best routine that I’ve ever hit before,” Jaciuk said of his performance on high bar Saturday night. “But the fact I didn’t stick [the landing] really hurt me. I think overall I’ve got to be pretty happy with my performance.” Those on a non-qualifying team needed to place third or higher in Thursday night’s

MEN’S GYMNASTICS RESULTS

PRELIMS

FINALS

TEAM RESULTS* Minnesota Nebraska Iowa California Air Force William and Mary

SCORE 429.550 426.350 425.950 425.700 418.200 415.350

TEAM RESULTS Michigan Oklahoma Stanford Illinois Ohio State Penn State

SCORE 445.050 441.650 436.300 435.350 433.500 429.800

MINNESOTA LEADERS Floor Pommel horse Rings Vault Parallel bars

SCORE Liebler, 14.750 Mannon, 15.050 Chase, 15.000 Chase, 15.000 Mannon, 15.150 Jaciuk, 15.150 Jaciuk, 14.850 Mannon, 86.550

INDIVIDUAL EVENTS Pommel horse All-around Vault Parallel bars High bar

PLACE Mannon, 1st Mannon, 11th Chase, 9th Frey, 9th Jaciuk, 9th

High bar All-around

*these teams did not advance to the final

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

qualifier and then place 10th or higher on their event Friday night. Even after two straight nights of gymnastics, Burns said he didn’t think fatigue played a role in Saturday night’s outcome. “They actually looked very good,” Burns said. “I don’t think fatigue [was] an issue at all.” Minnesota star ted its NCAA meet with the team qualifier Thursday night. A third-place finish would have catapulted the team into Friday night’s final, but the Gophers finished fourth, end-

ing their run. “It was obviously a disappointment because we felt we were capable [of advancing],” Burns said. “Still, I think one thing that was really incredible was how much these guys stuck to it. … They didn’t give up.” Minnesota wrapped up a fairly successful season Saturday night, while bidding adieu to eight seniors who provided the team’s foundation all season. “We’re going to be missing eight brothers,” Jaciuk said. “They were my influences — guys that I looked up to.”

TRACK & FIELD

Ellenson, Yedoni both win titles in Arizona The Gophers won four event crowns on the women’s side this weekend. BY DANE MIZUTANI dmizutani@mndaily.com

The Minnesota men’s track and field squad split up over the weekend, with some traveling to Tempe, Ariz., for the Sun Angel Track Classic, and others staying home to compete in the Holst Invitational in St. Paul. The Gophers faced much stif fer competition in the Cactus State but managed to take home two event titles courtesy of sophomore Wally Ellenson in the high jump and sophomore Trevor Yedoni in the long jump. Ellenson, a former Gophers basketball player known for his leaping ability on the hardwood, showed off similar skills on the track. He cleared a height of 2.20 meters to tie for the event victory in the high jump. “We all know he’s a great high jumper, so it was good to see him to do that,” sophomore middle distance runner Goaner Deng said. “We all enjoy him, and I think he enjoys track and field a lot, too.” Ellenson made the decision to leave the Gophers men’s basketball team in favor of a full-time track career a couple of months ago. Yedoni — who specializes in leaping horizontally, not vertically — was not to be outdone by his teammate. He soared 7.02 meters in the long jump to take home the second event victory for Minnesota. Yedoni has torn his ACL

AMANDA SNYDER, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota high jumper Wally Ellenson practices at Bierman Field on April 30, 2013.

two years in a row, Deng said, so the team is happy to have him back at full strength. “This year’s his first time being fully healthy, so it’s just great to see him come along,” Deng said. The Gophers got some key contributions in other events, including secondplace finishes in the 800-meter run, the discus and the hammer throw. Zach Siegmeier, the senior pole vaulter who has looked impressive this season, placed fifth at 5.21 meters. Minnesota kept a contingent of athletes near home over the weekend and took home four titles. Gophers freshman Austin Salargo, sophomore Michael Bolland, sophomore Ben Holcomb and junior Danny Schiller won in the 400-meter

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

SUN ANGEL TRACK CLASSIC

SPEC TOWNS INVITATIONAL

RESULTS

Ellenson Yedoni

EVENT CHAMPION High jump Long jump

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

run, the 800-meter run, the 110-meter hurdles and the high jump, respectively.

Gophers leave Georgia with four titles

The Minnesota women’s track and field team traveled to Athens, Ga., over the weekend and returned to the Twin Cities with four titles. Seniors Akuoma Omeoga and Megan Geyen, junior Jessica Waldvogel and freshman Erin Hawkins finished the 4x100-meter relay with

RESULTS

Conlin Bucknam Mincke TEAM

EVENT CHAMPION 400-meter hurdles 3,000-meter steeplechase 1,500-meter run 4x100-meter relay

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

a season-best time of 45.29 seconds to win the event. Gophers sophomor e Frances Conlin followed suit with a victory in the 400-meter hurdles, sophomore Kate Bucknam won the 3,000-meter steeplechase and senior Kaitlin Mincke won the 1,500-meter run. A group of Minnesota athletes also competed unattached at the Concordia St. Paul Invite over the weekend.


10

Monday, April 14, 2014

FOOTBALL

Gophers’ spring game displays growth Rodrick Williams scored the only touchdown during the spring game. BY JACK SATZINGER jsatzinger@mndaily.com

To fans expecting a show, Minnesota’s spring football game Saturday afternoon at TCF Bank Stadium likely came as a disappointment. W ith an announced crowd of 4,752 fans scattered throughout the 50,805-seat stadium and quarterbacks in green limited-contact jerseys, the atmosphere contrasted that of a normal game. But the Gophers have been working all spring to ensure that TCF Bank Stadium is packed to the max when the season opens in August. There were flashes of that Saturday, courtesy of running backs Berkley Edwards and Rodrick Williams. Edwards was responsible for the intra-squad scrimmage’s only touchdown, streaking down the left sideline for a 33-yard run. Edwards started the game on the wrong foot, dropping a screen pass and later fumbling a handoff he

recovered. His touchdown, however, affirmed the notion that he could give the team’s offense another dimension next year. Edwards finished with 46 rushing yards on 11 attempts. “I like his style of running. … His feet [are] ridiculous,” Williams said. “I’ve just got to work that much harder, though.” Williams had a solid game himself, leading the Gophers with 52 rushing yards. Edwards likes to go outside, but Williams makes his living running up the gut, using his 235-pound frame to bounce off defensive players. Williams showed he can be physical without the ball, too. At one point, he decked defensive lineman Ben Perry. “To me, it’s just football,” Williams said. Gophers quar terback Mitch Leidner is also known for being more physical at his position, but he was barely touched Saturday in his customary green jersey. While running is a big part of Leidner’s game — he rushed for seven touchdowns last season — he wasn’t able to get much going Saturday, gaining just six yards in as many attempts. Most of the plays were

whistled dead as defenders converged on the quarterback. “It can be tough at times,” Leidner said. “There’s times when you think you’ve got a first down, and then they mark you short.” Leidner threw the game’s only interception after Jalen Myrick broke a deep throw intended for Drew Wolitarsky. Still, the coaches didn’t seem too worried about the turnover. Gophers quar terbacks coach Jim Zebrowski said he thought it was a good throw, while head coach Jerry Kill gave Myrick credit for making a great play on the ball. Minnesota backup quarterback Chris Streveler also got significant tick in the game and finished 4-for-5 for 44 yards through the air. He added 11 yards on the ground. Streveler said he thought the offense performed well but noted that this is only the beginning for the team. “We’re just going to keep growing and getting better and better,” he said. Myrick was one of the game’s defensive stars, but with all the talent in the secondary next season, playing time could be hard for him

PATTY GROVER, DAILY

Gophers quarterback Chris Streveler runs with the ball during Minnesota’s spring football game Saturday at TCF Bank Stadium.

to find. “We’re really deep in the secondary,” Kill said. Myrick played plenty Saturday as the majority of the defense rested or nursed injuries. Briean Boddy-Calhoun and Derrick Wells are both trying to get stronger after missing much of the 2013 season with injuries. Cameron Botticelli didn’t play after recently breaking

BASEBALL

Minnesota loses three to Nebraska BASEBALL RESULTS

1

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3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R

H

E

Nebraska Minnesota

4

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

2

8

13

1

0

0

0

0

4

1

1

0

0

6

12

0

Nebraska Minnesota

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

1

2

5

8

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

4

1

Nebraska Minnesota

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

3

12

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

8

0

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM PATRICIA GROVER, DAILY

Gophers shortstop Michael Handel hits the ball during a game against Nebraska on Sunday afternoon at Siebert Field.

The Gophers scored only eight runs and have now lost four games in a row. BY NATE GOTLIEB ngotlieb@mndaily.com

Nebraska continued its Big Ten dominance over the Gophers this weekend, sweeping Minnesota with a 3-2 win in 10 innings Sunday at Siebert Field. Cornhuskers shortstop Steven Reveles hit a single that scored a run with two outs in the 10th inning, and

Nebraska reliever Josh Roeder held the Gophers scoreless in the bottom of the inning to pick up the save. The Gophers lost the first two games of the series and are just 1-10 against Nebraska (23-14, 7-2 Big Ten) since 2012. Minnesota (17-14, 5-7 Big Ten) has now lost four games in a row. “For me, it was the walks this weekend and our inabil-

ity to get better at-bats,” Gophers coach John Anderson said. “When the game’s that even, you play good competition, there’s not a lot of room for error.” Nebraska took a 1-0 lead on a sacrifice fly in the first inning Sunday, and the Gophers tied the game in the fifth inning on an RBI single by catcher Mark Tatera. Minnesota took a 2-1 lead later in the inning on an RBI double by third baseman Tony Skjefte, but Nebraska tied the game on a sacrifice fly in the seventh. Minnesota starter Ben Meyer gave up two runs in 6.2 innings Sunday, but the

Gophers managed just two hits over the final five innings. “When it came down to it, they executed when they needed to and we didn’t,” first baseman Dan Olinger said. “That’s how close the league is. That’s how you lose three pretty close ballgames in the weekend.”

Nebraska starts weekend with 8-6, 5-2 wins

Nebraska’s Jake Placzek scored the game-winning run on a wild pitch Friday as the Cornhuskers defeated Minnesota 8-6. The Gophers were in position to send the game into the bottom of the ninth inning tied 6-6, but as Dalton Sawyer attempted an intentional walk, he threw a wild pitch that allowed Placzek to score from third. Nebraska added another run later in the inning and held on, despite allowing Minnesota to climb back from a 5-0 deficit earlier in the game. “We obviously got in a hole, but I was proud of our guys that they kept fighting and kept battling,” Anderson said Friday. “It’s unfortunate the game ended like it did, but I’ve got no complaints about the effort that went on out here today.” Nebraska scored four first-inning runs, but the Gophers climbed back with four runs in the fifth inning. They tied the game in the seventh on a Michael Handel double but did not score again. Minnesota starting pitcher Alec Crawford seemed to settle in after a rocky first inning. In total, he allowed six runs on 10 hits over 6.2 innings, striking out seven. Handel, the shortstop and cleanup hitter, went 4-for-5 with the game-tying double in the seventh. Nebraska defeated the Gophers 5-2 on Saturday, thanks in part to a complete game four-hitter from pitcher Christian DeLeon. Minnesota jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the second inning Saturday on a home run from Bobby Juan, but the Cornhuskers scored three runs in the fourth inning and added two more in the ninth. Minnesota starting pitcher Jordan Jess lasted just 3.2 innings and fell to 0-6 on the season.

his left foot, but Kill expects him to be back in about five weeks. Though the defensive line appeared inexperienced with the absence of Botticelli and others, the group showed up to play, applying pressure that helped result in 12 tackles for loss. Saturday wasn’t pretty or exciting, and it lacked many of the Gophers’ top players.

But Kill and his staff said they’re comfortable with the team’s spring performance. If that’s any indication, the football games four months from now should be a heck of a lot more fun to watch. “I was a little bit worried going in, but they did a great job,” Kill said. “We need to look at some other people. That’s what you do in spring ball.”

SOFTBALL

Gophers take two of three in Big Ten set with Northwestern On Friday, Sara Moulton broke the school record for career strikeouts.

Minnesota senior Sara Moulton, described by head coach Jessica Allister as the team’s ace, owns the other. In the first game of the series, Moulton str uck out seven W ildcats and broke the Gophers’ record for career strikeouts. The first-team All-Big Ten honoree now holds program records for career strikeouts, wins, complete games and shutouts. She gave up 12 earned runs in that contest — the most she’s given up in a single game all season — and picked up her fifth loss of the year. In a stark contrast from the first two games, Sunday’s series finale star ted slowly for the offenses. Neither team recorded a hit until the bottom of the thir d, when junior infielder T yler Walker blasted her eighth home run of the year with a twor un shot that sailed over the scoreboard and big screen on top of the rightfield wall. Walker laughed about the hit and said it’s impor tant to remember there’s still room for improvement. “When I got back to the dugout, [pitching coach Piper] Ritter said, ‘You were out in front on that one,’ ” Walker said with a laugh. “I think the point is we all have some things to work on still.” While it may be important to continue working hard, Allister said that she was relieved the team came out and scored so much after having its bats quieted by Wisconsin last week. “We know hitting is a streaky thing,” she said. “That’s just the nature of the game of softball. It was nice to come out and put some r uns on the board this weekend.” Next week, the Go phers will have the opportunity to continue the momentum when they travel to Ann Arbor, Mich., for a three-game series against the four th-ranked Wolverines. Michigan owns the best record in the Big Ten.

BY JARED CHRISTENSEN jchristensen@mndaily.com

No. 14 Minnesota went 2-1 against Nor thwestern over the weekend, losing 13-9 on Friday before bouncing back with 13-5 and 3-1 victories Saturday and Sunday. The Gophers, plagued by of fensive woes a week ago, exploded on of fense against the Wildcats, scoring 25 r uns in the threegame set. Minnesota junior Hannah Granger led the charge and went 6-for9 with six RBIs over the course of the three games. Minnesota’s usually stout pitching staf f gave up 18 r uns in the first two games, but freshman pitcher Sara Groenewegen bounced back with a stellar nine-strikeout per formance in the third game Sunday. Granger said her big weekend was the result of extra preparation on the of fensive end at practice throughout the week. “It was all about preparation this week,” she said. “Then ever ybody was aggressive in the box, and I felt like I was just seeing the ball really well. It all came together for us.” Groenewegen continued her excellent freshman campaign, which has her ranked second nationally in strikeouts per innings pitched. She also ranks second on the Gophers with eight home runs. She said the wins this weekend had added value because Nor thwestern is so competitive in the Big Ten. “It means a lot,” she said. “Nor thwester n is a ver y good team, and this is huge for the Big Ten standings.” Groenewegen owns just one of the dominant arms in pitching staf f, though.

SOFTBALL RESULTS

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5

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7

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Northwestern Minnesota

2

0

3

3

1

1

3

13

17

1

2

1

0

2

1

0

3

9

9

3

Northwestern Minnesota

0

0

0

5

0

0

-

5

4

3

0

0

3

9

0

1

X

13

10

0

Northwestern Minnesota

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

5

0

0

0

2

0

0

1

X

3

2

1

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM


Monday, April 14, 2014

Classifieds

11

RATES PER LINE/DAY • PREPAID: $2.70, BILLED: $3.10, CREDIT CARD: $2.70 To place a Classified linage ad, call: 612-627-4080 or email: classifieds@mndaily.com To place a display ad, call: 612-435-5863 For billing questions, call: 612-627-4080 *$60 minimum billing Linage hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. E-mail address: classifieds@mndaily.com Classified Sales Manager: Brittany Swaine 612-435-2750

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ADOPTION ADOPTION A loving secure safe happy family home awaits your newborn baby. Lisa 866-7072572. Expenses Paid.

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HOUSING

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UPCOMING EVENTS WHAT: River Futures WHO: 4-7 p.m. Wednesday WHEN: 2:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m., Saturday WHERE: Best Buy Theater, Northrop PRICE: Free Students from all disciplines were invited to imagine the future of the Mississippi River in the Twin Cities and to create a work that responds to that imagined future. How will people gain access to the water? What wildlife will inhabit this corridor in the city? How will the region’s long history be evident? These are examples of the questions students are asking about this place. Projects will take the form of a proposed research project, a work of art (visual art, music, performance, etc.), audio/visual media or other means of expression.

WHAT: Southeast Asia Night Market WHO: Singapore Sudent Association WHEN: 6-9 p.m. Friday WHERE: Riverbend Plaza, Coffman Union PRICE: Free Join us as we recreate the breathtaking atmosphere of an SEA night market. Featuring sudent groups from the region, we’ll bring the tropics to you!

WHAT: “Venetian Twins” WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Friday WHERE: Arena Theater, Rarig Center, West Bank PRICE: Free Carlo Goldoni, one of the most famous commedia dell’arte writers, brings us this hilarious story of mistaken identity. In lines similar to Shakespeare’s “Comedy of Errors,” “Venetian Twins” tells the story of two twin brothers who were separated at birth and are unknowingly visiting Verona at the same time. Their respective love interests and friends alike begin confusing one with the other as the madness builds and hilarity ensues.

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12

Monday, April 14, 2014

BACKTALK

horoscopes

sudoku

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve sudoku, visit sudoku.org.uk.

4/14/2014

Thursday’s solution © 2013 Michael Mepham. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Today’s Birthday (4/14): This year’s mantra could be “party for a good cause.” Improved communications and organization at home add ease and peace. Springtime renovations set the stage for joyful gatherings.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Written By Linda C. Black

Aries (3/21 - 4/19): Today is a 7 — Pluto turns retrograde (until 9/23) and power struggles decrease. It’s still not a good time to argue.

Libra (9/23 - 10/22): Today is an 8 — Bossy overlords get distracted while Pluto’s retrograde (until 9/23). Savor creative freedom, and push your personal agenda.

Taurus (4/20 - 5/20): Today is a 7 — With Pluto retrograde for the next five months, political control issues ease. Pay bills. Do the research to craft a plan that fulfills a brilliant idea.

Scorpio (10/23 - 11/21): Today is a 7 — Love and spirituality soothe like balm. Nostalgia can be profitable, with Pluto’s retrograde (until 9/23). Don’t bet the farm, though.

Gemini (5/21 - 6/21): Today is a 7 — Listen, but don’t argue. Intuitively, you know which path to take. Don’t gamble or spend on treats for the kids. Push yourself recreationally.

Sagittarius (11/22 - 12/21): Today is a 7 — Over the next five months, reassess your resources. Include talents, affinities and connections. You have more than you think.

Cancer (6/22 - 7/22): Today is a 7 — Figure out how much you can afford to put away. With Pluto retrograde (until 9/23), authoritarian pressure eases, and you can relax and recharge.

Capricorn (12/22 - 1/19): Today is a 7 — The intensity lets up with Pluto retrograde for the next five months. Use this break to review strategies.

Leo (7/23 - 8/22): Today is a 7 — Don’t gamble with your reserves or buy stuff you don’t need. Over the next five months, strengthen relations with your community and partnerships.

Aquarius (1/20 - 2/18): Today is a 7 — With Pluto retrograde for the next five months, take time to review and reflect. Prepare a retrospective, dig into family history or write your memories.

Virgo (8/23 - 9/22): Today is a 7 — Discover family secrets from the past over the next five months. Take time for personal discovery, and capture it in words and images.

Pisces (2/19 - 3/20): Today is a 7 — Let love spur you to make or renew a commitment. New information could change options. A decision could get reversed.


Monday, April 14, 2014

crossword

from the archive

Wednesday, April 14, 2004

BACKTALK

15

FOR FOR RELEASE RELEASE APRIL APRIL 14, 11, 2014

DAILY CROSSWORD Los Angeles 1

From Calender_girl

Hello Network. Long time reader, first time writer. So, I’ve noticed it is rather depressing around here on mondays, which is understandable. That’s why I would like to propose Merry Mondays. Where clowns will parade around campus and give away balloons, or better yet balloons filled with money, now wouldn’t that inspire you to go to class and be happy. Net: Balloons full of Pawlenty’s entrails would make us happiest. Or perhaps, as I’m sure some of you may be afraid of clowns, we could have half-naked guys walk around with balloons full of money, and so I’m not sexist... there can be a few girls. We could call them Mouth Watering Mondays, which I think sounds pretty fantastic. Net: It would be even more fantastic if the Mouth Watering Mondays boys and girls were totally nude. One more thing, totally off the topic, but whatever happened to those shoes with the wheels, I would’ve thought they’d be popular around here, but I guess not. Later. Net: You mean those contraptions that all the idiots wear to zoom around and think they’re cool, but really they just look like proto-yuppie dorks? We’ve instructed our squad of vat-grown ninjas to spread special inline-skates-specific caltrops around campus.

From CrAcK

f-ing CrAcK! F-ING CRACK! How’s about you lick my f-ing crack buddy. You should read the NUTT they don’t print, its enough to make your mamma cry. Net: Particularly if she’s a copy editor. I forgive you Net I know you had no choice. It just upsets me that the Vagina Monologues makes front page yet the BFV is not allowed in print. Net: It’s more a question of what we and your psychologist feel is helpful for you to see in print. Now to all you none ganja smokers out there with a brain I challenge you. (this time I want an answer) what are the only HEY! SEND YOUR ENTRY, NAME & PHONE TO:

2 mammals that lay eggs. If you feel yourself wanting to say squirrel, squirrel is it a squirrel. No its not so just keep lookin, ass. If you need a hint just ask your local beer salesman. Net: Didn’t we already beat this dead echidna?

From bombs_over_Bigheads

So these two characters — Gindorrf and Edstrom; they want to allow weapons on campus. Which personally — I’m all for. We’ve got to be armed-to-theteeth (obviously ... after all, it is college), and be it pepper spray or be it mace, canned-weaponry is the only solution to reducing violence on campus. I don’t know if anyone has been on campus lately — but there is a whole lot of crime out there. Yeah — sure. Who are these guys anyways? A couple Bavarians hell-bent on creating a mini-army of pepper-spraying purse-police? Net: You fool! Now that you’ve exposed their plan, they’ll have to hunt you down and cut out your tongue. Personally, I’d like to see said conservatarianistocrats tighten up a little bit. Unless I’m mistaken — which I could be, but probably not — the paranoid pursuit of self-defense through an aerosol can is petty: think Repube-lickins, MAYBE, if you got elected, you could go all-out. Not only could you two allow little eye-watering-shower sprays, you could maybe get a few Mig jets, or maybe just a battalion of decommissioned Czech tanks. But I guess that would probably eliminate the militaristic-motive here; and God knows, we can’t have that. I for one am glad that these two armchair-armed-forces-addicts have the gall to play dress-up in George W.’s oversized pants ... it makes those late-night wars on the History channel look oh-so-justified — in that inflated-ego, nothing-better-to-shoot-than-people, gun-toting kind-of-way. Peace. Net: Here’s a question: Do paper cuts suffered in a combat zone warrant a Purple Heart?

NETWORK@MNDAILY.COM

5 10 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 23 26 27 30 31 32 34 38 42 43 44 45 48 50 53 54 56 60 61 64 65 66 67 68 69 1 2 3 4 5

Minnesota Daily Volume 105, Issue 130 April 14, 2004

ACROSS Campus quarters Dobbin is an Corporate Sean ACROSS symbols English teacher 1 Hitching aid at Self-satisfiedthe Community High 6 Journalist Paula Square School Vermont measure 10 Silo of occupant, Used a broom (CHSVT) briefly in St. Actress Turner Johnsbury. 14 Place to12 practice Lovable gonzo students journalist pliés worked on Thompson? today’s puzzle. Bone: pref. 15 Arab League ACROSS Way from the member 1 Steady look heart 16 __ Tea Latte: Confederate 5 Uneducated guess cry? Starbucks offering Muse of poets 9 Knife and fork 17 Cost to join the Class members separator, in a elite? setting Salad green place Norway capital 19 “Smoke Gets in Kaline and 14 Black cat, to some YouraEyes” Jolson 15 Like guru Mergansers composer Iodine source16 Long-eared 20 Pay for, hoppersin a way Raspy-voiced tattletale? 17 21 Hand Wonder VacWoman maker Vega's accessory constellation19 Haloed 22 messenger Stroke gently 6 Part of BYOB Al Capp's Lena 7 Square one Zodiac sign 20 25 Nocturnal Kindle download 8 Switchboard Keen on annoyance that’s too good to pers. Look-alikes 9 Shoulder bands Heretofore 21 Once in a while delete? 10 Dawdler Cable channel 23 Until now people some felonies 11 Pastoral Dull savage?27 Like groove of Kenya Indian corn 25 29 Road Seuss pond12 Prior to hrs. Ended 26 Bermuda ruling reptile 13 Some Place to shop 30 Special Ready for FedEx, Highlanders au naturel? 29 18 Badger Lottolike game “Jeopardy!” perhaps 22 Brynner of "The Goddess of 31 square Yahoo King and I" peace 36 Stir-fried 24 Summit Shakespearean 34 Only 20th-century 25 "Tommy" band king hodgepodge president whose 27 Satirist Mort Break sharply 38 Ad-lib comedy 28 Maneuver Inventor Nikola three distinct style 29 Danube feeder Harvard rival initials are in 30 Basketry 39 Hailed vehicle willows DOWN alphabetical order 40 Cavity filler’s 41 33 With what Early word from 35 letters, Origami or,tablet? said 46 motive? baby Common HDTV 35 __ Stanley Black-and- 39 another way, a Gardner white treat feature hint to 17-,lizard's 29-, 47 49 36 Lounge Bring up 41 49Basic water and 65-Across50 look Weasel's 37 Paid players cousin transport 42 Comedian Cook 39 Drizzle unit Baton Rouge 42 “The French royal 43 Real Slim 51 52 40 Clip sch.

45 Shady” California city on rapper 46 Big name inBay gloves Humboldt 49 reality series 48 A&E Certain allergy featuring the sufferer’s bane family 49 Robertson Expert on circular 51 Arid gaskets? 52 53 Past-tense Induced verb sounds like a 54 that Places for pews 55 number Places for 53 EMT technique sweaters? 55 discard 57 Squirrel’s Makes certain of 60 bank 58 Continental List of reversals? notes 62 Hauled Jeanneto __the 64 63 hoosegow Feigned 64 Computer Inventor Howe 65 65 component Fair 66 Speak Bellicose godmind 67 one’s 67 Good They may 68 earthbe hammered out 69 Peak 70 Moisten, as a lawn DOWN 71 Tolkien tree 1 creatures TV Guide abbr. 722 Ash WednesdayMcRae of the to-Easter ’70s-’80s time Royals

Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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dr. date Dr. Date,

I’m in love. This girl is perfect — beautiful, smart, funny, sweet. The problem is, she only speaks Spanish and I only speak English. I’m not imagining this connection (we’ve already slept together), but I’m a little worried about the language barrier. Is it something we can overcome? Love conquers all, right?

—Lost In Translation

Rosetta Needed,

I’d bet if I was completely incapable of speaking with a female and she was aesthetically attractive to me, I’d be pretty head over heels with the concept of loving her. Behind the wall of miscommunication lies a woman whose personality you can create to your own liking. I mean, if you’ve never spoken on a deeper level (or much at all), how can you say you’re in love with this woman? You’re falling in love with your own construction, your own idealized version of an individual. That’s troublesome. Don’t get me wrong — you can learn a lot about a person from their body language, actions and tone — but is it enough to say that you are 100 percent in love with them? I highly doubt it. Honestly, with the language barrier, I question your assessment of her humor, sweetness and intelligence, too. I am not a believer in love at first sight. I think it’s a bogus phrase used by people who clicked, developed a relationship and then applied the term in hindsight. I also don’t believe that love conquers all. That’s the sort of hackneyed phrase to be thrown around on Valentine’s Day and in banal, poor-performing rom-coms. History is full of broken promises and what-could-have-beens — don’t forget that.

Bottom line: You need to give yourself a reality check and figure out what’s actually making you feel this way.

—Dr. Date

Dr. Date,

My boyfriend has this really annoying habit of, um, adjusting himself in public. It happens CONSTANTLY, and I know other people notice. I think it’s gross and kind of rude. I mean, I don’t do that — why should he? Is there anything I can do to get him to stop?

—Anonymous

Concerned Friend,

All I can think of is that old “SNL” sketch where Matthew Broderick and cast wax on about the state of each other’s penises. Clearly this guy is enamored with his package, too. Is he particularly wellendowed? Does he have an STI? (Seriously, does he? Make sure about that one.) Does he aspire to a career in professional baseball? Is he actually playing with himself or just adjusting? Those are about the only things that I can think of that could even begin to describe your boy’s penchant for touching his genitals. Is he one of those guys who sits on the couch with his hand down his sweatpants as though resting it anywhere but his crotch would be unthinkable? Does he need a new underwear solution? Maybe give the dude some Gold Bond powder, and he’ll take the hint. But really, I’d just tell him to quit it. It’s like sucking your thumb as an adult. Tell him he’s embarrassing himself — and, by association, you. If he respects you, he’ll at least try. Your goal is to start seeing him reaching down south and then pulling his hand away after realizing that he was about to continue his disgusting habit.

—Dr. Date

Need relationship advice? Email Dr. Date at drdate@mndaily.com.

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Monday, April 14, 2014

DORITOS, TOWELS AND BROCCOLI: OH MY! BY ANNE MILLERBERND amillerbernd@mndaily.com

Spring Jam performers have historically made strange requests on their rider lists — items requested for onstage, in their dressing room or on their tour bus. From SpongeBob SquarePants fr uit snacks to organic broccoli florets, this year’s artists are no different. In addition to the tens of thousands of dollars that the University pays for the annual festival’s performers, Student Unions and Activities staff also make trips to the grocery store to buy food, drinks and other items to keep the artists happy.

REQUESTS MADE Of the eight Spring Jam artists with performance contracts, five have rider lists. SUA promises “best efforts” to meet the artists’ demands, according to the contracts. “Usually, there’s a list of items that they know they would enjoy, and I think venues do the best they can to provide that stuff,” said Erik Dussault, assistant director of student activities. Poliça, the Friday afternoon band, requested nine organic items, including nuts, fruits and sandwich meats and cheeses. Gloriana requires more than 20 items, including a bag of mini Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and a small bottle of balsamic vinaigrette for their bus stock. SUA Program Board marketing coordinator Ashley Herink said The Mowgli’s requested that in the event that Mila Kunis shows up at their concert, she must be let in. If an artist doesn’t include hospitality requests in their contract, as three artists didn’t, SUA may supply some items anyway, Dussault said.

REQUESTS DENIED The University satisfies requests as best as it can, but there are some things it can’t provide. Ever y performer who included a rider in their contract requested alcohol, but University policy states that the institution’s money can’t go toward alcohol. Poliça, Earl Sweatshirt and Mac Miller included Red Bull in their riders. But because the University has a contract with Coca-Cola, it can only supply performers with Coke products. Miller also requested tobacco products, which can’t be purchased with University funds. There are occasions when SUA staf f can’t find cer tain requested items, in which case they simply don’t provide them. Dussault said that isn’t usually a problem. “Performers don’t normally go through and check to see that ever ything on their rider was [supplied],” he said. “I mean, this is the same rider that goes along with contracts for a lot of different venues.”

MAC MILLER • 12 Sprites • 12 Diet Sprites • 12 Cokes • 12 Diet Cokes • 12 assorted Gatorades* • 4 sugar-free Red Bulls • 6 ginger ales (natural or spicy ginger ale preferred) • 1 Dole brand banana orange pineapple juice mix • 4 assorted Naked/ Odwalla smoothie drinks • 1 Simply Lemonade • 1 1/2 gallons of chocolate milk • 1 cranberry juice • 1 Hot Tea setup: throat coat, Tazo green tea, black tea and honey • 2 cases of water • 1 tub hummus • 1 pack of pita bread • 1 veggie tray with ranch dip • 1 tray of finger sandwiches (turkey and cheese only) • 1 cut fruit platter • 1 bunch of bananas • 1 box of cinnamon Pop Tarts • 1 box of apple Nutri-Grain bars • 1 box of Nature Valley granola bars • 4 boxes of SpongeBob fruit snacks • 1 bag of Hawaiian sweet onion potato chips • 2 tuna ready to-go lunch packs • 1 bag of Doritos

GLORIANA • 1 bag of Tostitos • 1 jar of medium salsa • 1 jar of queso dip • 1 box of chocolate chip muffins • 1 bag of peanut M&M’s • 12 bakery fresh chocolate chip cookies • 1 bag of pretzels • 2 bags of beef jerky • 2 packs of American Spirits Menthol Cigarettes (dark green box) • 1 pack of Newport box cigarettes • 1 three-pack of White Owl white grape cigarillos • Assorted plastic cutlery PRODUCTION OFFICE: • 12 Arizona Arnold Palmer Lite or Zero Ice Tea • 4-pack of Starbucks double shots • Sugar-free Red Bulls • 2 boxes of Nature Valley granola bars • 4 assorted Naked/ Odwalla smoothie drinks • 1 box of Little Debbie brownies with nuts • 1 bag of beef jerky • 1 bag of kettle-cooked chips • 6 assorted muffins (prefer Otis Spunkmeyer) • 1 box of Emergen-c • 2 packs of Parliament lights • 1 case of spring water • 24 pre-washed bath towels

EARL SWEATSHIRT ON STAGE: • 2 clean white towels • 2 clean black towels • 1 bottle of Jameson whiskey with glass and ice • 2 cans of Red Bull • 4 bottles of water (Evian or Fiji) DRESSING ROOM: • 4 clean black towels • 10 cans of Red Bull • 1 case of Perrier Water • 1 bottle of Captain Morgan Rum • 1 bottle of sake • 2 cases of beer - Stella

• 1 carton of orange juice • 1 carton of pineapple juice • 10 cans of different sodas (Coke, Sprite & ginger ale preferred) • 2 bottles of Simply Lemonade • Fruit: apples, bananas, mangos and avocado • Assorted candies: Sour Patch Kids, Starburst, Skittles and gummies • Snacks: chocolates, sandwiches, hummus, pita bread and chips

POLIÇA • 4 stage towels • 12-pack of beer • 1 bottle of liquor • 1 bottle of wine • 1 case of bottled water • 3 Kombucha • 3 Red Bulls • 2 coconut waters • 2 San Pellegrino or sparkling water • 1 Naked juice • Throat coat and green tea/honey/lemon • Coffee and coffee maker

• Hot water • 1 organic avocado • Rice cakes • Organic hummus • Organic veggies • Organic fruit • Organic broccoli florets • Organic tortilla chips and salsa • Organic sandwich bread • Organic sandwich meats, cheese and condiments • Organic almonds, mixed nuts or trail mix

*The items in red cannot be provided by the university. Riders from Mod Sun, Finish Ticket and Leagues did not include hospitality requests.

DRESSING ROOM: • 2 cases of natural spring water • 2 six-packs of Smart Water • 2 rolls of Bounty paper towels • 6 Canada Dry ginger ale cans • 6 Diet Mountain Dew cans • 6 Dr. Pepper cans • 1 box of Ritz crackers • 1 assorted cheese tray • 1 fruit tray (red and green quartered apples, grapes with caramel dip) BUS STOCK: • 40 lbs. of ice • 2 cases of natural spring water • 1 case of Smart Water • 6 O.N.E. 1-Liter Coconut Water • 1 half gallon skim milk • Individual deli meats and cheeses (ham, turkey, swiss, sharp cheddar, pepper jack) • 1 plastic container of mixed greens/spinach with cranberries and walnuts (pre-mixed in container)

NEGOTIATING CONTRACTS • Fresh fruit: bananas, Granny Smith apples, oranges • 1 box Nut Thins: Almond Sea Salt flavor • 1 large Vanilla Greek yogurt, non-fat • 1 bag of ground Starbucks house blend medium coffee • 1 bag of mini Reese’s cups • 1 small bottle of Balsamic Vinaigrette, fat-free or light • 1 large bag kettlecooked potato chips • 1 box of Kellogg’s granola cereal • 1 hummus dip in smoked paprika or red pepper flavor • 1 premium bottle of California Cabernet, Merlot or Pino • 1 large Coffee Mate LIQUID French Vanilla Sugar Free • 1 large Coffee Mate LIQUID Hazelnut Fat Free • 1 pack of PerfecTouch cups and lids

THE MOWGLI’S • 8 clean stage towels • 24-pack of bottled water • Plastic silverware and solo cups • 1 hot-water maker • Coffee for 10 with creamer and sugar • 1 pack of throat coat tea • 1 organic vegetable dip tray • 1 loaf of whole wheat bread • 1 small jar of organic crunchy peanut butter • 1 small jar of organic jam • 1 small jar of Dijon mustard • 1 bag of organic mixed greens • 1 pound of sliced turkey breast • 1 pound of sliced pepperjack deli cheese • 2 organic tomatoes • 1 organic fruit platter • 1 bag of pita bread

• 1 container of hummus • 8 Cliff Bars (variety) • 1 bag of trail mix • 1 bag of almonds • 8 coconut waters • 2 Kombuchas • 2 cans of Monster energy drink • 4 oranges • 6 bananas • 1 bag of tortilla chips and a jar medium salsa • 1 bar of dark chocolate • 1/5 quart of whiskey (Jack Daniels) • 1 case (24 cans) of Bud Light • 1 half-case (12 bottles) of Stella Artois • 1 half-case (12 bottles) of Sierra Nevada • 1 bottle of cabernet sauvignon

PERFORMER HONORARIUMS

Miller has the highest price tag this year at $75,000, which exceeds the University’s expenses for the entire festival in past years. SUA students and staff research what per formers usually ask for before they settle on a number and then negotiate from there, Dussault said. This year’s lowest-paid performer is California-based Finish Ticket, at $500. Negotiations can var y depending on whether a group has to fly to Minneapolis exclusively to perform or if Spring Jam is on the group’s way between two venues, Dussault said. SUA boasted the biggest Spring Jam in the festival’s history this year, but Dussault said that doesn’t mean each performer is higherprofile than in the past — rather, the combined list of performers is more high-profile.

SLOW TICKET SALES The University is shelling out about $190,000 for Spring Jam performers this year, tripling what it has paid in the past. But Dussault said the goal is to ear n enough back in ticket sales so that the overall spending is similar to past festivals. For now, ticket sales are slow, Herink said — they tend to sell quickly in the first few days after the performers are announced, and they jump back up closer to the festival. Herink said she hasn’t gotten any negative feedback about the artist selection on social media or elsewhere. “From what students are commenting on Facebook or Twitter is that they’re excited for at least one of the performers,” she said, “which is exactly what we tried to do.”

$75,000

$37,000 $25,000 $20,000

$22,000 $10,000 $500

POLIÇA

EARL SWEATSHIRT

THE MOWGLI’S

GLORIANA

MAC MILLER

MOD SUN

FINISH TICKET

$3,500 LEAGUES

GRAPHICS SOURCE: CONTRACTS BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY AND THE ARTISTS


04-14-2014 Minnesota Daily