Page 1

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

SWIMMING & DIVING

Gophers fire Borton, move in new direction

Minnesota finishes 22nd at NCAA meet

Pam Borton went 236-152 in 12 years as the coach of the women’s team.

Derek Toomey tied his career-best time in the 50-yard freestyle at the NCAAs.

u See PAGE 11

SHOWERS HIGH 58° LOW 26°

U OF M

u See PAGE 12

MINNEAPOLIS

CAMPUS & METRO

ST PAUL

MONDAY

MARCH 31, 2014

Science students back bonding request

Students from all five U campuses visited the capital to push for funding. u See PAGE 18

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES AT MNDAILY.COM

BOARD OF REGENTS

Board reps fight GPA conditions The Board of Regents will now require student representatives to hold a GPA of 2.5 or higher. BY MEGHAN HOLDEN mholden@mndaily.com

Biology society and environment sophomore Matthew Cohen, left, and fisheries and wildlife junior Dan Dewey study at the Veterans Transition Center in Johnston Hall on March 7. Both are veterans and go to the VTC to study and hang out with other student veterans.

TRACKING MILLIONS A nontraditional educational path makes veteran students difficult to track. Words by Jeff Hargarten Photos by Chelsea Gortmaker

U

niversity of Minnesota student Zac Bair enlisted in the U.S. Army to help pay for college. After three deployments in Afghanistan with the 75th Ranger Regiment and his “fair share” of combat, Bair was honorably discharged. Soon after, he enrolled at the University. The Post-9/11 GI Bill completely covered his tuition and provided a $1,000 yearly stipend for books and an allowance for living costs. Without GI benefits, Bair said, he would likely be either working low-end jobs, living with his family, homeless or back in the military. “It’s been a huge load off my shoulders,” he said, as he sets his sights on becoming a high school biology teacher. Bair is among 1 million students aided in their academic ventures by the 2008 GI Bill, according to the U.S. Depar tment of Veterans Af fairs. The U.S. has spent more than $30 billion since 2009 in financial aid for veterans pursuing college degrees. But when it comes to finding out whether those

students graduate, answers can be hard to find. At the University, data compiled at the request of the Minnesota Daily showed the four-year graduation rate for student veterans has fallen, while the retention rate has jumped — suggesting that many are simply taking longer to graduate. This falls in line with national numbers released last week, of fering the most comprehensive look so far at veterans’ academic success. The Million Records Project, released by Student Veterans of America, shows about half of student veterans are graduating with degrees, and many are taking longer than the traditional four years to finish school — on average, veterans take about six years to complete a bachelor’s degree. “Veterans don’t have a linear path to a degree,” said Dr. Chris Cate, vice president of research for Student Veterans of America. Student veterans may have jobs, families or militar y obligations, in addition to the challenges that come from having spent time on the battlefield. Any of these can interrupt or elongate their educational journeys, making it dif ficult to track their progress. This

A slight majority of student veterans have earned post-secondary degrees 3.25% CERTIFICATE

48.3% NO REPORTED COLLEGE DEGREE

15.08% ASSOCIATE

HIGHEST DEGREE EARNED 24.43% BACHELOR’S 8.11% MASTER’S 0.83% DOCTORATE

means that, as a group of students who often need the most suppor t — and whose education is publicly funded — they can sometimes fall through the cracks.

See VETERANS page 6

The University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents has made it a little tougher to become one of its student representatives — but students leaders say in doing so, the board is overstepping its role. Under policy revisions passed Friday by the board, only full-time students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher can be selected as representatives. While regents say it’s a fair expectation, some students oppose the measure, saying it weakens their voice in the selection process. “The larger concern for me is the Board of Regents dictating who students can select for students,” said Matt Forstie, chairman of the Minnesota Student Legislative Coalition. “[The policy changes] really infringe on the decision-making rights that the students have.” The Minnesota Student Association and Graduate and Professional Student u See REGENTS Page 5

STUDENT LIFE

Mac Miller tapped for Spring Jam Earl Sweatshirt and local rapper Mod Sun fill out the bill for Saturday’s headlining show. BY ANNE MILLERBERND amillerbernd@mndaily.com

This year’s Spring Jam headliner will be Mac Miller, with Earl Sweatshirt, Mod Sun and the Spring Jam Battle of the Bands winner as supporting acts at Mariucci Arena on April 26. Student Unions and Activities predicted that this year’s festival will be the biggest Spring Jam to date. Cost for the performers will total about $190,000, paid for mostly by sponsorships and ticket sales. That’s nearly triple what the University has spent in past years for fewer artists. The main concer t will be a ticketed event to help pay for a higher-profile artist, but some students say the lineup isn’t worth the cost. Student tickets are $20 for general seating and $25 for floor seating. Tickets are available to the public for $35 in general seating and $45 for floor tickets. SUA’s Program Board marketing u See SPRING JAM Page 4

MEN’S HOCKEY

Gophers headed to Philly Minnesota advanced to the Frozen Four with a 4-0 win over St. Cloud State. BY MEGAN RYAN mryan@mndaily.com

As far as celebrations go, the Gophers’ after winning the NCAA West Regional wasn’t the most exuberant. Minnesota players skated leisurely to huddle around goaltender Adam Wilcox. Gloves, helmets and sticks weren’t shed until the memorabilia hats appeared after the handshakes. That, paired with the fact that Wilcox, freshman for ward Justin Kloos and head coach Don Lucia barely cracked a smile in the postgame press conference, makes it clear how the Gophers treated this game — as business. A trip to the Frozen Four has been expected of this team for much of this season. The real celebration can wait another two

weeks — though Lucia did admit “going to the Frozen Four, it never gets old.” Minnesota thrashed Robert Morris 7-3 on Saturday before beating St. Cloud State 4-0 on Sunday at the Xcel Energy Center. Minnesota will face North Dakota on April 10 in Philadelphia. Union and Boston College round out the group competing for the national championship. While fans were already giving a standing ovation with eight minutes left on the clock and some even left early to beat the traf fic, the Gophers’ per formance this weekend was hardly worth missing. “I thought it was the two best games since I’ve been here in two years,” Wilcox said. The Gophers struck first about 11 minutes into the first period with a goal by Kloos, who took over his team’s top-scoring honors. Kloos was joined in the scoring column about four minutes into the second period by junior forward Seth Ambroz. u See HOCKEY Page 11

PATTY GROVER, DAILY

The Gophers men’s hockey team beat St. Cloud State 4-0 Sunday evening at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul. Minnesota advanced to the Frozen Four for the second time in three years.

VOLUME 115 ISSUE 94


2

Daily Review

Monday, March 31, 2014

This day in history

1981 President Ronald Reagan is shot in the chest outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by a deranged drifter named John Hinckley Jr. historychannel.com/tdih

SPRING JAM Vol. 115 Monday, March 31, 2014, No. 94

An Independent Student Newspaper, Founded in 1900. 2221 University Ave. SE, Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55414 Phone: (612) 627-4080 Fax: (612) 435-5865 Copyright © 2014 The Minnesota Daily This newspaper, its design and its contents are copyrighted. OFFICE OF THE PUBLISHER Tony Wagner awagner1@mndaily.com Co-Publisher and Editor-in-Chief (612) 435-2759 Morgan Goronkin mgoronkin@mndaily.com Co-Publisher and President Bailey Alto balto@mndaily.com Co-Publisher and Business Operations Officer =

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Dessa joins the audience of students during the performance of her last song at her concert at Coffman Union on Saturday night. This concert preceded the announcement of the long-awaited Spring Jam lineup.

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world briefing

No objects from search have yet been linked to Flight 370 BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PER TH, Australia — Despite what Australia called an “intensifying search effort,” an international hunt Sunday by aircraft and ships in the southern Indian Ocean found no debris linked to the Malaysian jet that vanished more than three weeks ago. Several dozen angr y Chinese relatives of Flight 370 passengers demanded “evidence, truth, dignity” from Malaysian authorities, expressing their frustrations at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur as the myster y drags on. Nine aircraft and eight ships searching the waters off western Australia found only “fishing equipment and other flotsam” not con-

nected to the Malaysia Airlines plane, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority said. The Boeing 777 disappeared March 8 while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people aboard. But at least four orange objects that were more than 2 meters (6 feet) in size were seen by the crew of an Australian P3 Orion search plane, said the pilot, Flight Lt. Russell Adams, after returning to base. “I must stress that we can’t confirm the origin of these objects,” he said, adding that images of the items have yet to be verified, and a GPS buoy was dropped and ships must still investigate. Adams said it was “the

most visibility we had of any objects in the water and gave us the most promising leads.” The planes and ships are scouring a search zone that was redefined Friday based on satellite data from the Boeing 777, but they have found no debris associated with the flight, said Australian Navy Commodore Peter Leavy. The zone lies in a shipping lane where sea trash is common, complicating the effort. Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott insisted the “intensifying search ef for t” was positive because objects “have been recovered from the ocean” in the zone after a weeklong search in another area saw items from planes

that ships never managed to find. The planes taking part in Sunday’s search included three Australian P3 Orions, a Japanese P3, a Chinese Il76, a Korean Orion, a U.S. Poseidon, and two Malaysian C-130s. Eight ships were on the scene, an area roughly the size of Poland or New Mexico, about 1,850 kilometers (1,150 miles) west of Australia. The vessels include the Australian navy supply ship HMAS Success, which was designated to carry any wreckage found. Abbott said a former Australian defense chief, Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, will head a new center in Perth for search and recovery operations, coordinating the international effort.

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Kerry, Russian counterpart meet on Ukraine crisis BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — Russia on Sunday set out demands for a diplomatic resolution to the crisis in Ukraine, saying the former Soviet republic should be unified in a federation allowing wide autonomy to its various regions as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov met in Paris in another bid to calm tensions. After a brief call on French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, Kerry sat down with Lavrov at the residence of the Russian ambassador to France to go over Moscow’s response to a U.S. plan to de-escalate the situation as Russian troops continue to mass along the Ukrainian border. The men said nothing of substance as they shook hands, although after Kerry ended the photo op by thanking assembled journalists, Lavrov cryptically added, in English, “Good luck, and good night.” Appearing on Russian television ahead of his talks with Kerry, Lavrov rejected suspicions that the deployment of tens of thousands of Russian troops near Ukraine is a sign Moscow plans to invade the country following its annexation of the strategic Crimean peninsula. “We have absolutely no intention of, or interest in, crossing Ukraine’s borders,” Lavrov said. Russia says the troops near the border are there for military exercises and that they have no plans to invade, but U.S. and European officials say the numbers and locations of the troops suggest something more than exercises. And, despite the Russian assurances, U.S., European and Ukrainian officials are deeply concerned about the buildup, which they fear could be a prelude to an invasion or intimidation to compel Kiev to accept Moscow’s demands. In his interview, Lavrov made clear that Moscow believes a federation is the only way to guarantee Ukraine’s stability and neutrality. “We can’t see any other way to ensure the stable development of Ukraine but to sign a federal agreement,” Lavrov said, adding that he understood the United States was open to the idea.

Egyptians to elect new president in May BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AM snow showers/wind

wednesday High 45° Low 31°

CAIRO — Egypt’s presidential election will be held in late May, the electoral commission announced on Sunday, finally setting dates for the crucial vote widely expected to be won by the countr y’s former militar y chief who ousted an elected president last year. The commission set the first round of voting for May 26 and 27, with results expected by June 5. If a second round is necessar y it will be held by mid-month with results announced no later than June 26, the commission said. The countr y’s powerful former militar y chief AbdelFattah el-Sissi, who led the overthrow of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi last summer, has announced his bid for office and is widely expected to win. His victor y would restore a tradition of presidents from militar y backgrounds that Egypt had for all but one year since 1952, when of ficers over threw the monarchy and became the dominant force in politics. A mostly conscript force that fought four wars with Israel, the army has a strong suppor t base among the population, many of whom see it as a pillar of the countr y’s identity. Morsi was removed from office on July 3, amid massive protests demanding his resignation and accusing him of monopolizing power and mismanagement in the face of myriad economic and social problems. The militar y, led by el-Sissi, stepped in to remove Morsi and backed a political road map that promised presidential and parliamentar y elections. But the countr y’s division only grew with Morsi’s ouster. His backers, largely Islamists and sympathizers, have held near daily protests demanding his reinstatement, describing the militar y over throw of Morsi as a coup. Youth groups who initially backed Morsi’s ouster have increasingly grown critical of the militar y’s handling of the post-Morsi days, denouncing a heavy crackdown on Islamists and dissent. Several thousands have been detained and killed in political violence since Morsi’s ouster. But with a widely divided opposition, el-Sissi has garnered wide support among a public war y of turmoil.

Cloudy

thursday High 41° Low 29° Cloudy

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How to contribute to the Daily Freelance audio/video: Contact Multimedia Editor Amanda Snyder at asnyder@mndaily.com. Letters to the editor: Email submissions to letters@mndaily.com Guest columns: Emails submissions to Editorials & Opinions Editor Eric Best at ebest@mndaily.com. All submissions are welcome, but there is no guarantee of publication. Corrections

errors@mndaily.com The Minnesota Daily strives for complete accuracy and corrects its errors immediately. Corrections and clarifications will always be printed in this space. If you believe the Daily has printed a factual error, please call the readers’ representative at (612) 627–4070, extension 3057, or email errors@mndaily.com immediately. The Minnesota Daily is a legally independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization and is a student-written and student-managed newspaper for the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus. The Daily’s mission is: 1) to provide coverage of news and events affecting the University community; 2) to provide a forum for the communication and exchange of ideas for the University community; 3) to provide educational training and experience to University students in all areas of newspaper operations; and 4) to operate a fiscally responsible organization to ensure its ability to serve the University in the future. The Daily is a member of the Minnesota News Council, the Minnesota Associated Press, the Associated Collegiate Press, The Minnesota Newspaper Association and other organizations. The Daily is published Monday through Thursday during the regular school year and weekly during the summer, and it is printed by ECM Publishers in Princeton, Minn. Midwest News Service distributes the 22,000 issues daily. All Minnesota Daily inserts are recyclable within the University of Minnesota program and are at least 6 percent consumer waste. One (1) copy of The Minnesota Daily per person is free at newsstands in and around the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents each. U.S. Postal Service: 351–480.


3

Monday, March 31, 2014

U on track to meet Leg. requirements

Beyond metrics, more improvements

Kathy Brown, vice president for the Office of Human Resources, pre-

MNsure website, call center succeed in enrollment hopes BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PAUL — Of ficials with Minnesota’s health insurance exchange said its website and call center were functioning well Sunday as the deadline looms for open enr ollment. “I’m tickled pink. I have a big smile on my face. Things are going well,” MNsur e spokeswoman Jenni Bowring-McDonough said. Minnesotans have until 11:59 p.m. Monday to enroll for health insurance coverage or face federal tax penalties under the federal Affordable Care Act. The call center wait time from the first ring and a series of prompts until a real person answered was under eight minutes when The Associated Press placed a test call just before 2 p.m. Sunday. That’s about the same wait that MNsure of-

ficials repor ted for most of last week as people who hadn’t signed up previously started rushing to beat the deadline. MNsure hasn’t issued a tally yet of how many of the 400,000 previously uninsured Minnesotans have enrolled. The exchange didn’t plan to issue updated figures Sunday, BowringMcDonough said. But as of Friday, more than 152,000 Minnesotans had either enrolled in private insurance plans or qualified for government-subsidized public plans. MNsure will grant reprieves for people who make a good-faith effort to enroll but can’t complete the process before the deadline. The exchange has more than 50 sign-up events scheduled across the state Monday, capping a month of more than 1,000 enrollment events statewide.

History repeats itself with clash between police and upset Arizona fans BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUCSON, Ariz. — Repeating a scene from 13 years ago, several hundred Arizona fans and Tucson police clashed in the streets late Saturday following the University of Arizona basketball team’s loss to Wisconsin in the NCAA tournament. Authorities said 15 people were arrested after fans hurled beer bottles and firecrackers at officers, who then used pepper spray to disperse the crowd. No officers were hurt, but three people who were arrested had minor injuries in the unrest that lasted more than an hour, police said. Meanwhile, officials at the University of Arizona vowed to punish any students who participated in the fracas. The clash began after crowds leaving bars and restaurants near campus filled University Boulevard after the game, Tucson police Sgt. Pete Dugan said. He said officers fired pepper spray, pepper canisters and pepper balls to try to get people to leave the business-lined thoroughfare. Earlier Saturday, Arizona lost 64-63 to Wisconsin in the West Region final in Anaheim, Calif. “We’ve been training for this event for several months now,” Dugan said. “It got a

little rowdy and it got a little violent, but no businesses suffered any damage.” The melee resembled what happened in 2001, when police arrested 17 people after Arizona lost to Duke in the championship game. But in that clash, a student lost an eye after he was struck by a beanbag filled with lead birdshot fired by Tucson police and around 22 businesses suffered some damage. In a statement, Dean of Students Kendal Washington White called Saturday’s disturbance “disappointing” and said it was not reflective of the culture of the University of Arizona or Tucson. “Our basketball team had a great season, and they exhibited exceptional class at every turn,” White said. “They do not deserve the bad actions of these others.” White said all students who are found to have violated the school’s code of conduct “will be held accountable.” Police brought in cruisers and a unit of officers with batons, helmets and face masks to block the street when people started tossing beer bottles, cans and firecrackers, hitting police vehicles and endangering officers.

1%

1%

1%

1%

4-YEAR RATE 5-YEAR RATE 6-YEAR RATE INCREASE IN TWIN CITIES LOW-INCOME (PELL GRANT) UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATION RATES

1%

1%

4-YEAR RATE 5-YEAR RATE 6-YEAR RATE INCREASE IN SYSTEM-WIDE UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATION RATES

DECREASE SYSTEM-WIDE ADMINISTRATION COSTS TARGET VALUE: $15 MILLION PROGRESS TO DATE: UNDERWAY

3% DEGREES INCREASE IN TWIN CITIES BACCALAUREATE STEM DEGREES AWARDS

341

331

3%

PROGRESS TO DATE: +14 COMPARED TO THIS TIME LAST YEAR

2,730

2,634

2,557

70.3%

67.8%

68.8%

69.1%

66.2%

52.0%

49.0%

48.0%

61.3%

TARGET INCREASE

PROGRESS TO DATE

65.2%

TARGET VALUE

57.8%

56.8%

60.7%

54.3%

53.3%

BASELINE

45.7%

The University of Minnesota is proving that it can strengthen its performance when more state dollars are on the line. Following criticism of administrative bloat last legislative session, the state Legislature established performance metrics in order for the institution to receive its full operational budget funding in the next budget cycle. On Friday, senators reviewed progress reports stating the University is on track to meet the requirements. “I was quite pleased, and I felt as though [the University] took our request last session to heart,” said Sen. Ter ri Bonof f, DFL-Minnetonka. Higher education committees agreed on targets last year in hopes of increasing transparency between the University and state. The five measures included increasing graduation rates of low-income students; increasing science, technology, engineering and mathematics degrees; and lowering administrative costs by $15 million. The state will withhold 5

PERFORMANCE METRICS PROGRESS

39.9%

BY ROY AKER raker@mndaily.com

percent of next year’s operating budget if the University doesn’t meet the goal. The findings presented to the Legislature are based on audits of the University’s administrative structure and spending, which began last spring. The stakes are higher than before — before last year, only 1 percent of the following year’s budget was connected to state-requested performance metrics. University Chief Financial Officer Richard Pfutzenreuter said the University is ahead of schedule to meet all of the measures, even though the institution is only required to hit three of the five. He said the University is planning to exceed portions of the state’s request, noting that it will cut more administrative spending than legislators asked. Other expectations include increasing graduation rates of undergraduates and Pell Grant recipients system-wide by 1 percent, which Pfutzenreuter said the University is also set to surpass. The University is required to repor t a more finalized version of its progress before the legislative session ends.

38.9%

The U must meet certain metrics to get its full operating budget next year.

INVENTION DISCLOSURES INCREASE IN INVENTION DISCLOSURES

SOURCE: SENATE HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE HEARING

sented updated findings — from the University-hired consulting firms Sibson Consulting and Hur on Consulting Group — analyzing the leadership and operational str uctures of faculty and staff. One of Huron’s r ecommendations is using a more ef ficient job classification system. Brown said the system redesign is going well and will finish next year. “In 2014, a lot of changes have happened in the workplace, and our job classifications haven’t necessarily kept up with

those,” Brown said at Friday’s hearing. The upgrade will make the job application process much faster and user-friendly, she said, and data on faculty and staf f appointments will be more accessible. Another improvement, the Enterprise Systems Upgrade Program, will update the University’s technology platform. Brown told legislators Friday that changing the pr ogram could save OHR mor e than $560,000 annually, with additional savings University-wide.

BRIDGET BENNETT, DAILY

Sen. Terri Bonoff, DFL-Minnetonka, hears a presentation on performance metrics from University of Minnesota administrators Friday at the state Capitol.

MNsure goes out to target youth

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

MNsure navigators help people with questions about enrollment and available health insurance plans Thursday at Sweeney’s Saloon.

Many young people still haven’t joined the health insurance marketplace. BY ALLISON KRONBERG akronberg@mndaily.com

The Affordable Care Act’s March 31 midnight deadline will mark the end of national and state health care exchanges’ push to recruit more uninsured people — especially young, healthy ones. MNsure, Minnesota’s online health care exchange, finished its “March to Enroll” month with a week dedicated to enrolling young people, in response to the Affordable Care Act’s requirements. From libraries to local breweries, MNsure representatives sat in on more than 100 events throughout the state, ready to answer young people’s questions about their health care options. “This is a group that’s traditionally really underinsured and financially very vulnerable,” said MNsure Spokesman John Schadl. “People in their 20s are starting out their careers, and they don’t have much money. An accident could pile on top of $30,000 to $80,000 in student loans, and that could hurt your career.” According to MNsure, two-thirds of all bankruptcies are the result of medical costs. Of MNsure’s approximately 152,000 enrollees, 21 percent are between ages 19 and 34 — and that’s not enough, Schadl said. That age group, known as the “young invincibles,” is valuable because it’s statistically the healthiest, he said.

PERCENT OF UNINSURED 18- TO 34-YEAR-OLDS BY METROPOLITAN AREA

28% NATION 17% MINNESOTA 13% DULUTH 15% ROCHESTER 17% MINNEAPOLIS 21% ST. PAUL SOURCE: UNITED STATES CENSUS 2013

In order for insurance costs to go down for ever yone, healthy people have to enter the market so there’s more money to go around. But this group is often uninsured. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, young adults ages 19 to 25 represent 30 percent of the nation’s uninsured — higher than any other age group. In Minnesota, U.S. Census data showed the uninsured rate of 18- to 24-year-olds dropped from 20 to 13 percent in the past two years. If someone doesn’t already have or apply for insurance by midnight, they will have to pay $95 or 1 percent of their income above $10,150 — whichever is higher. “It’s the law now,” Schadl said. “Much like you have to have car insurance, you’re going to be required to have health insurance.” University of Minnesota College Republicans Treasurer Matthew Stetler said he thinks health insurance is important, but he doesn’t

think it should be required for everyone. “It really should just be up to the individual people,” he said. “I think the individual mandate is ridiculous. Whether or not it’s good or bad, it should be up to whoever to do what they want to do.” Economics freshman Ken Cowles is covered under his father’s insurance plan and has never been uninsured. When he turns 26 and can’t be on his father’s plan anymore, he said, the military will insure him once he graduates through the Reserve Officers Training Corps. “No matter what, no matter how physically in shape you are and however healthy you eat, stuff can happen,” Cowles said. The University offers its own health insurance, the Student Health Benefit Plan, to students taking six or more credits of a degree program. In 1975, the University started mandating that all students have a health insurance plan in order to enroll, and it began requiring proof in

spring 2012. “Over the years, it has been part of our mission to ensure that students have access to health care because that is essential to their academic success,” said University Student Health Benefits Director Sue Jackson. The most common reasons students drop out of school are medical and financial, she said. The plan offers no outof-pocket costs, covers 98 percent of providers in Minnesota and has international providers for students studying abroad. But the plan is only available to students, and it is not one of the options on the MNsure exchange website. When choosing a health care option, Jackson said, there are three things that students should consider: low deductibles or out-of-pocket costs for medical procedures, a wide network of available providers and a low monthly premium. The Affordable Care Act has changed some things for young people, Schadl said. For example, they’re now eligible both for more tax credits and Medicaid. If people don’t yet have a health insurance plan and aren’t eligible to be enrolled under the University’s plan, Schadl said to go to the MNsure website and fill out an enrollment attempt form. As long as applicants fill out the form by midnight on March 31, he said, they won’t be fined. The next opportunity to enroll is Nov. 15. “We’ll be doing aggressive marketing like this again all over the state,” Schadl said.


4

Monday, March 31, 2014

Condoleezza Rice’s U visit sparks protest Students and faculty are asking the U to revoke her April 17 speaking invitation. BY HALEY HANSEN hhansen@mndaily.com

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

Greg Donofrio, assistant professor and director of heritage conservation and preservation, presents information about conservation districts at the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs Housing Forum at the Carlson School of Management on Friday.

Prospect Park residents discuss conservation

A city ordinance would let neighborhoods decide which development to recommend.

BY ETHAN NELSON enelson@mndaily.com

Some University of Minnesota area neighborhoods may soon have the power to stop undesirable development. Community members discussed the merits of adopting conser vation districts in the Marcy-Holmes and Prospect Park neighborhoods at a forum held at the Carlson School of Management on Friday. Wa r d 2 C o u n c i l m a n Cam Gor don, who represents Prospect Park, recently proposed an ordinance that would allow Minneapolis residents to create the districts, which have protections similar to the historic registr y and would prevent development inconsistent with the community’s visual character. The proposed ordinance, which came out of Prospect Park residents’ frustration about development in the area, is a way to make sure that development is “context sensitive,” said Minneapolis city planner and historian John Smoley, who is lead-

ing the effort to hear community input on the issue. “Members of the public have sought greater input in ensuring that development is sensitive,” he said. There were attempts to preser ve par ts of Prospect Park before much of the recent development around campus began. Neighborhood residents wanted to include it in the National Register of Historic Places in 2001, but Gordon said “it wasn’t a good fit.” “Minneapolis has most recently been focusing on preser vation of historic architecture,” said Dick Poppele, former president of the Prospect Park East River Road Improvement Association and cur rent member of the University District Alliance. College of Design assistant professor Greg Donofrio, a member of the Center for Urban and Regional Af fairs who spoke at the for um, said conser vation districts are like the light version of historic designation — though they can be stronger than that definition would make them seem.

“Conser vation districts often require a high level of c ommu n i t y i n v ol v e ment,” Donofrio said at the forum. “This could be a bad thing, but encouraging public involvement can’t hurt.” The way the cur rent proposal is written, residents would have to identify areas they want to preser ve and detail why they want to preser ve them, Smoley said. These areas would have to be at least one block-face large with two or more main buildings, or be centered at an intersection and include all corner lots. Smoley emphasized that the conser vation districts would mainly preser ve the “visual character” of the area. They could also define how tall buildings can be or what the landscape should look like. One-third of proper ty owners would have to agree to conser vation proposals before the city would look into creating a conser vation district, and two-thirds would have to agree on the guidelines defining the district’s power.

During the for um, Donofrio detailed his research on conser vation districts, mentioning other cities in Minnesota and around the countr y that have implemented similar designations. Some cities, like Savannah, Ga., require even paint color to be approved by district guidelines. Minnesota towns, including Red W ing and Stillwater, have had conser vation districts for years. Gor don said he drew inspiration from these cities when drafting the proposal. “I think we’ll see mixed results from the conser vation districts,” he said. S mol ey a n d G or d on are cur rently working with a 20-member advisor y board made up of community members and historians to recommend changes to the ordinance before committees and the full City Council vote on it. Gordon said he hopes to have the or dinance proposal passed and the first conser vation districts in the works by June or July, though he said that’s optimistic.

Mac Miller tapped for Spring Jam concert Spring Jam u from Page 1

coordinator, Ashley Herink, said students’ most common response when sur veyed about a ticketed Spring Jam was that they would pay $20 or $25 to see a headlining artist. Other concer ts — all free for students — include Gloriana, the Mowgli’s and Finish Ticket, which will play sets on Thursday of the weeklong festival. Minneapolis-based Poliça will play at noon Friday, with Leagues set to take the stage in front of Coffman Union at 9 p.m. Friday. The Wake is sponsoring Leagues’ show and is paying SUA for the band to come, said The Wake sound and vision editor Sara Glesne. Ar t senior Sarah Morgan said she’s pleased with this year’s lineup and will likely pay for the headliner. “[The per formers are] way better than last year,” she said. “I’m excited; I would pay.” However, vocal music education sophomore Iris Kolodji said she’s excited for Poliça and some of the other free shows but doubts she’ll pay for the headliner. “I think the free concer ts will be good,” she said. “I’d probably pay for the tickets if [my friend’s band] wins battle of the bands, but otherwise, no.” Mac Miller was one of several artists SUA student of ficials considered when crafting the Spring Jam lineup, said assistant director of student activities Erik Dussault.

SPRING JAM TICKET PRICES STUDENT GENERAL SEATING $20 STUDENT FLOOR $25 PUBLIC GENERAL SEATING $35 PUBLIC FLOOR $45 SOURCE: STUDENT UNIONS AND ACTIVITIES

SPRING JAM LINEUP THURSDAY NOON GLORIANA 7 P.M. (DOORS AT 6 P.M.) THE MOWGLI’S FRIDAY NOON POLIÇA 5–7:30 P.M. BATTLE OF THE BANDS 9 P.M. THE LEAGUES SATURDAY 7:30 P.M. (DOORS AT 6:30 P.M.) MAC MILLER WITH MODSUN, EARL SWEATSHIRT, AND BATTLE OF THE BANDS WINNER SOURCE: STUDENT UNIONS AND ACTIVITIES

“They’re working from a large list of possible artists all year long,” he said. “The dif ficulty with both our homecoming show and Spring Jam show is that we only have one date.” Miller began recording solo in 2009, but he didn’t gain much momentum until the following year with the release of the K.I.D.S. mixtape. His album “Blue Slide Park” was the first independently distributed debut album to top the Billboard 200 in 16 years. Miller’s sophomore effort, “Watching Movies with the Sound Of f,” has been well received critically and commercially.

LISA PERSSON, DAILY

Students react Saturday at Coffman Union after hearing the announcement that Mac Miller will headline Spring Jam.

SPRING JAM HONORARIUMS: PAST AND PRESENT 2010

$71,282

ARTISTS: Gym Class Heroes and Cloud Cult

2011

$55,589

ARTISTS: OK GO, Trampled By Turtles, P.O.S., Solid Gold, and Caroline Smith and the Goodnight Sleeps

2012

$65,669

ARTISTS: New Boyz, The Head and the Heart, The Cataracs, Jesse James and Prof

2013

$64,500

ARTISTS: Mat Kearney, Theophilus London, Greg Bates, Kayla Con, Pert’ Near Sandstone and Chastity Brown

$190,000

2014

ARTISTS: Mac Miller, Mod Sun, Earl Sweatshirt, Leagues, Gloriana, the Mowgli’s, Finish Ticket and Poliça SOURCE: STUDENT UNIONS AND ACTIVITIES DATA

Miller has toured solo three times, once with fellow Pittsburgher Wiz Khalifa. Earl Sweatshir t initially found fame with Los Angeles-based hip-hop collective Odd Futur e. He released his debut album “Doris” last year af-

ter a two-year hiatus from music. Mod Sun is a self-proclaimed “Hippy Hop” rapper from Bloomington, Minn. He’s gained national attention for his dr uggy pop-rap, joining one leg of the Vans Warped Tour this summer.

Members of the University of Minnesota community are voicing disapproval of former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice’s campus visit next month, citing her involvement in the George W. Bush administration’s wartime policies. Students for a Democratic Society requested the University Faculty Senate vote Thursday on a resolution asking the Humphrey School of Public Affairs to cancel Rice’s invitation. “If the University is trying to represent itself as a global institution and really have its presence on a global scale, you have to think about how other governments and countries are going to view us,” SDS member Nick Theis said, noting Rice’s role in approving torture during her time as secretary of state. The ticketed event at Northrop Memorial Auditorium on April 17 is free and open to the public. Rice’s lecture is a part of Humphrey’s Distinguished Carlson Lecture Series, an annual event that aims to spark conversation by bringing “provocative” speakers to the University, said Tammy Lee Stanoch, vice president of Corporate Communications for Carlson Companies. “Controversy is in the eye of the beholder,” Stanoch said. “There are some people that would think that other speakers are controversial because they don’t align with their own particular political views.” The Carlson Family Foundation will cover the $150,000 cost for Rice’s visit, which Stanoch said is not an unusually high price tag for this type of speaker.

Humphrey spokesman Kent Love-Ramirez said Rice will talk about overcoming adversity as an AfricanAmerican woman who faced discrimination growing up in the southern U.S. The topic is consistent with the school’s yearlong series “Keeping Faith with a Legacy of Justice: The 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.” “We firmly believe in [students’] right to protest and welcome it as an extension of the public discussion,” he said. College Republicans Co-Chair Adam Motzko said he thinks the University should welcome guests with all viewpoints and political affiliations. “Just because some people might disagree with some of the things [Rice] said or has said in the past, that doesn’t mean she should be disqualified from speaking at the University,” he said. Motzko said the opposition to Rice’s visit isn’t as widespread as it appears, and many students are excited about the event. “We should allow people from different backgrounds, different religions, different political ideologies — [invite all of them] to campus, and we shouldn’t restrict their speech on our campus,” he said. While acknowledging that the University will likely not cancel Rice’s visit, Theis said it’s still important that his and other opponents’ messages are heard. “It’s more of a symbolic way to generate support and bring people out to this protest,” Theis said, “because we really need to be having a discussion about what it means to bring someone like this here.”

California museum to display animal mummies BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA ANA, Calif. — We love our dogs and cats, but the ancient Egyptians REALLY loved their dogs and cats — not to mention their snakes, crocodiles and birds. Animals held such a prominent place in ancient Egyptian society that tens of millions were mummified, some going into the pharaohs’ tombs to rest eternally in the company of their kings. Others had their own special cemeteries, where they were buried in coffins as elaborately car ved as those of royal family members. Dozens of the best surviving specimens have taken up residence at Orange County’s Bowers Museum as the centerpiece of “Soulful Creatures: Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt.” There’s a dog so well detailed that even its floppy ears are prominent. An ancient cat has been laid to rest with its little paws drawn across its body, creating an image eerily reminiscent of a human’s funeral pose. “It just shows how closely Egyptians thought of animals on some basic level as being ver y similar to human beings,” said Edward Bleiberg, the exhibition’s curator. “The Egyptians believed that animals had souls.” But soulful or not, most people — other than a king or queen — couldn’t afford to keep a dog or cat around just for companionship in ancient times, Bleiberg said. Thus the hunting dog seen waiting patiently under a chair during a dinner table scene etched onto an ancient tablet in the exhibition would likely have been shown the door if it hadn’t contributed to making that meal possible. Most animals had an even greater job. They were charged with the re-

sponsibility of using their souls in death to car r y messages to the gods they had represented on Ear th during their lives. The dog, for example, was the sacred votive or messenger of the god Anubis, who is depicted in ancient Egyptian art as a man with the head of a dog. The Ibis communicated directly with the god Thoth, who had the body of a man and head of a bird and who, it seems, was especially good at resolving human disagreements. “There’s a letter included with one of the animal mummies that suggests there’s this man who is having a terrible problem at work,” Bleiberg noted. “He has this rivalr y with a co-worker, he’s cer tain that the co-worker is badmouthing him to the boss and making him look bad and he requests that Thoth make him stop.” Another letter sent with an animal mummy included a plea to heal a sick relative. In all, the exhibition contains more than 100 items, including drawings and sculptures, as well as the mummified remains of dogs, cats, birds, snakes and crocodiles. Many are wrapped in intricately patter ned linens, and some have been placed in sarcophaguses car ved to resemble how the animal looked in life. To give museum visitors a better look at what’s underneath the wrappings, the mummies have been CT scanned and the scans used to create three-dimensional images. Preparing animal mummies was detailed and expensive work. So much so that Bleiberg says an expert at the craft earned twice that of a farmer. Animal mummifying was such big business that Ptolemaic III, who ruled Egypt more than 2,000 years ago, passed several decrees regulating the industry.


Monday, March 31, 2014

5

Student reps fight new GPA conditions

HOLLY PETERSON, DAILY

The Board of Regents discusses the strategic plan for the University and the institution’s role in solving global agricultural and natural resources sustainability challenges Friday afternoon at the McNamara Alumni Center.

Regents u from Page 1

Assembly join each spring to choose four student representatives from the Twin Cities campus to ser ve the following academic year. One student is selected from each of the University’s four other campuses by their student governments. The student representatives offer opinions to the board but don’t vote on official measures. At the Friday board meeting, regents briefly discussed the policy before

unanimously approving it. Those who spoke said the GPA requirements are necessar y because students who seek these positions should already be proficient in their studies. They said the change shouldn’t negatively af fect the process. “This additional service, while important, is secondar y to the academic progress of their making, and we think it’s a reasonable threshold to meet,” said Board Chair Richard Beeson. Previously, there was no GPA requirement for stu-

dent representatives. The board originally proposed a 3.0 GPA requirement in February but later lowered it after voiced opposition. Despite the compromise, student representatives to the board said they wish they would have had a more open dialogue with the board before it voted to tighten the regulations, adding that they would have preferred talking with the regents directly rather than going through the board’s office. “I feel like it passed pretty quickly and there was ver y little discussion,”

Apple, Samsung go to court again BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE, Calif. — The fiercest rivalry in the world of smartphones is heading back to court this week in the heart of the Silicon Valley, with Apple and Samsung accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features. The trial will mark the latest round in a long-running series of lawsuits between the two tech giants that underscore a much larger concern about what is allowed to be patented. “There’s a widespread suspicion that lots of the kinds of software patents at issue are written in ways that cover more ground than what Apple or any other tech firm actually invented,” Notre Dame law professor Mark McKenna said. “Overly broad patents allow companies to block competition.” The latest Apple-Samsung case will be tried less than two years after a federal jury found Samsung was infringing on Apple patents. Samsung was ordered to pay about $900 million but is appealing and has been

allowed to continue selling products using the technology. Now, jur y selection is scheduled to begin Monday in another round of litigation, with Apple Inc. accusing Samsung of infringing on five patents on newer devices, including Galaxy smar tphones and tablets. In a counterclaim, Samsung says Apple stole two of its ideas to use on iPhones and iPads. “Apple revolutionized the market in personal computing devices,” Apple attorneys wrote in court filings. “Samsung, in contrast, has systematically copied Apple’s innovative technology and products, features and designs, and has deluged markets with infringing devices.” Samsung countered that it has broken technological barriers with its own ultraslim, lightweight phones. “Samsung has been a pioneer in the mobile device business sector since the inception of the mobile device industry,” Samsung attorneys wrote. “Apple has copied many of Samsung’s innovations in its Apple

iPhone, iPod, and iPad products.” In the upcoming case, Apple claims Samsung stole a tap-from-search technology that allows someone searching for a telephone number or address on the web to tap on the results to call the number or put the address into a map. In addition, Apple says Samsung copied “Slide to Unlock,” which allows users to swipe the face of their smartphone to use it. Samsung countered that Apple is stealing a wireless technology system that speeds up sending and receiving data. The most attention grabbing claim in the case is Apple’s demand that Samsung pay a $40 royalty for each Samsung device running software allegedly conceived by Apple, more than five times more than the amount sought in the previous trial and well above other precedents between smartphone companies. If Apple prevails, the costs to Samsung could reach $2 billion. Apple’s costs, if it lost, are expected to be about $6 million.

said Joelle Stangler, MSA’s ranking representative to the board. She said while setting academic standards isn’t bad, it narrows the application pool and could potentially disqualify capable students. “It puts us in a very awkward position because we know that that person’s the best, and then there’s this arbitrar y standard being put in place,” she said. Joseph Daniewicz, vice chair of student representatives to the board, said the GPA requirement is “troubling” and creates a negative stigma for students

who fall below the mark. “I’m incredibly disappointed that it passed,” he said. The new policy change also eliminated the alternative student representative position — someone who ser ves as a substitute when representatives are absent — a move also contentious with the student associations. But students didn’t oppose all of the changes. The expectations for the representatives, like requiring attendance and clarifying how much time the job requires, are clearer in the

new policy and will help applicants be more aware of what they’re signing up for, said Meghan Mason, chair of student representatives to the board. The regents’ main motive for passing the policy changes was to set clearer expectations, Regent Abdul Omari said. Beeson said having students’ fresh perspective on the University is an important part of the governance structure. “Having somebody connected at different parts of the life cycle is really good,” he said.

Plot foiled at Vatican bank BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROME — Two men toting a briefcase stuffed with false bond certificates purportedly worth trillions of euros (dollars) tried to bluff their way into the exclusive Vatican bank in a foiled fraud plot, Italian police said Sunday. Financial Guard police Lt. Col. Davide Cardia said the would-be swindlers, who were wearing business suits, tried to convince Swiss Guards at a Vatican City gate earlier this month that “cardinals were expecting them.” Cardia told The Associated Press in a phone interview that the suspects, a

middle-aged Dutchman and a U.S. citizen, were detained by Vatican authorities after rapid checks by Vatican officials showed they had no such appointment nor connections with the Institute for Religious Works, the formal name of the bank, which is behind the tiny city-state’s walls and isn’t open to the public. The Vatican has been scrambling to upgrade procedures and standards at the bank since a 2010 moneylaundering probe. Cardia said the fake documents purported to be bond certificates for non-Italian companies. “The sum — worth some 3 trillion euros

(more than $4 trillion dollars) — is impressive, even though it’s only symbolic because we’re talking about false” certificates, said Cardia, in charge of the financial police’s operations in Rome and surrounding area. Investigators suspect the men might have planned to use the fake bonds as security to open a hefty line of credit through the Vatican bank. The Vatican asked Italian authorities to help in the investigation. Italian police searched the men’s room at a hotel near the Vatican and seized stamps and seals used to create the false documents, Cardia said.


6

Monday, March 31, 2014 GO TO MNDAILY.VETACADEMICS.ORG TO EXPERIENCE THE PROJECT ONLINE WITH ADDITIONAL GRAPHICS AND INTERACTIVE CONTENT.

Chelsea Gortmaker, Daily Student veterans gather at the Veterans Transition Center in Johnston Hall to eat pizza together on March 7. Student veterans say they have trouble relating to younger students in their classes, and the Student Veterans Association keeps the space to allow students to study, hang out and connect over having similar life experiences.

TRACKING

MILLIONS VETERANS from page 1

TRACKING DIFFICULTIES

As the first Post-9/11 GI Bill beneficiaries start to graduate, lawmakers, media outlets, student advocacy groups and others are calling for results on whether the money is serving its purpose by helping student veterans earn college degrees. Within the Million Records Project study sample, 51.7 percent of student veterans earned a college degree or certificate. This number is higher than previously reported by various media outlets but lower than recent estimates of nearly 70 percent. Passed in 2008, the Post-9/11 GI Bill expanded educational benefits for military veterans serving after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The bill allows the federal government to pay tuition and fees, a monthly housing allowance and book stipends. The Montgomery GI Bill and the Minnesota GI Bill also provide support to active duty members and Minnesota veterans, respectively. In Minnesota, there are about 18,800 veteran students across 181 schools, according to News21 research, and more than $244.5 million awarded in GI Bill funds. The Million Records study examined veterans using government education benefits, including a million Montgomery GI Bill and Post-9/11 GI Bill beneficiaries. After excluding those still in school, the study found after sifting through 788,915 records that about 15 percent of beneficiaries got associate’s degrees, about 24 percent attained bachelor’s and about 8 per-

51.7%

OF VETERANS COMPLETE A DEGREE

cent got master’s. But elsewhere, information available about veteran students is less consistent. The University does not currently have a comprehensive tracking system in place for veteran graduation and retention rates, but Jennifer Peterson, assistant director of University Veterans Services, said the office is actively looking to better grasp the data. The Minnesota Daily requested information from all Big Ten schools, most of which didn’t start tracking veterans as a population until the past few years, while others had very little data readily available and had to compile it. Other Big Ten schools that shared the most detailed data were the University of Illinois, Penn State University, the University of Iowa and Purdue University, and most painted a general picture of veteran success. Tracking veteran students presents a number of challenges for universities, and there is no uniform method. The University of Minnesota’s pool includes those who self-identify and those receiving GI Bill benefits, so some may not be counted at all. Most veterans are in categories often overlooked by university research and policies: those of nontraditional age, those going to school part time and those with mixed enrollment. Additionally, GI Bill benefits have a 36-month limit. Because the VA uses financial awards for tracking purposes, Cate said, student veterans whose benefits run out before they graduate are counted as not finishing at all. “There’s a difference between falling off the grid and quitting academia,” Cate said. Bair said while the GI Bill’s time limit helps keep him focused on graduating within four years, it may be a downside to a majority of his friends who have changed majors during their college careers. “There’s not really wiggle room,” he said. Tours of duty interrupt or halt academic careers, too. Many reservists were called up to serve in Middle Eastern wars between 2004 and 2009, Cate said, and they could have lost all their

CHALLENGES TO COMPLETING A DEGREE: FAMILY TO SUPPORT FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT DELAYED ENROLLMENT DEPLOYMENTS PART-TIME ENROLLMENT SINGLE PARENT SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITES

VETERAN DEGREE ATTAINMENT AGES 25+

15.75%

credits. Since 2007, at least 45 active-duty University students interrupted their education to serve military tours of duty, according to One Stop, though the numbers only represent those who reported their departure to advisers and received a tuition refund. Tracking how many veterans actually drop out can also be difficult. “The problem is when people drop out, they do it very quietly and just disappear,” said Andrew Friedrichs, treasurer of the Student Veterans Association. “They don’t go around telling everyone.” Nationally, there has been a push for more comprehensive and uniform tracking and transparency regarding educational services for veterans. In 2012, Congress passed the Improving Transparency of Education Opportunities for Veterans Act, requiring colleges to share more information about how they serve veterans, mostly in an effort to combat misleading, targeted marketing by for-profit colleges. Recently, proposed legislation that would require the VA to track veteran graduation rates died in a House committee. “Inconsistent methods of collecting such information has led to confusion about the completion rates of student veterans in higher education,” the Million Records Project report said, “and without

85%

At the University of Minnesota, fewer veterans are dropping out than in previous years but are taking longer than four years to graduate. Among student veterans, the four-year graduation rate in recent years fell from 48 percent to 36.2 percent, while the retention rate jumped from 22 percent to 42.6 percent. The six-year veteran graduation rate at the University is 72 percent, close to the 75.7 rate among the general student population and in line with the Million Records Project findings. The four-year graduation rate among the general University population is 59.1 percent. While the University’s data does show declines, a single year’s drop does not necessarily describe a trend, according to One Stop and the Office of Institutional Research, and the combined graduation and retention rates suggest that student veterans are sticking around. Priority registration is a big issue for the Student Veterans Association on campus, said Zach Benson, the group’s president, because veterans need to graduate

51.7% MILLION RECORDS PROJECT VETERANS 56.1% SIX-YEAR OVERALL POPULATION

47%

MINNESOTA VETERAN DEGREE ATTAINMENT

47%

35%

Female veteran students

Colleges with veteran transition services

Colleges with trained staff to handle veterans

32%

27%

RANS

VE TE

NON-

37%

Veteran students with families

Persisted veterans with a GPA of 3.0 or higher

Veteran students 24 years and older

HELPING VETS GRADUATE ON TIME

43.3% FIVE-YEAR NONTRADITIONAL STUDENTS

77.4%

Graduated veterans with a GPA of 3.0 or higher

strong, empirical data, the uncertainty will persist.”

UNITED STATES COMPLETION RATES

STUDENT VETERAN DEMOGRAPHICS 85.6%

41.88%

32%

33%

33%

34%

30%

25%

25%

2008

25%

VETERANS

25%

26%

24%

2009

2010

2011

2012


Monday, March 31, 2014

7

UNIVERSITY RETENTION AND GRADUATION RATES 2007 88.5%

90.7% 89.5%

2008

2009

86.1% 87.2% 82.0%

54.6%

58.6% 59.1% 48.0% 48.8% 36.2%

Chelsea Gortmaker, Daily Microbiology junior Surene Henderson, left, and history junior Nick Jensen hang out and talk at the Veterans Transition Center in Johnston Hall on March 7. Both are veterans and have been going to the VTC to study and visit with other student veterans since 2011.

VETERAN TIME TO COMPLETION

VETERAN FOUR-YEAR GRADUATION RATE

ASSOCIATE DEGREE 69% COMPLETED WITHIN SIX YEARS

U OF M VETERAN POPULATION IN SPRING 2014

29.0% TWO YEARS

13.6% THREE YEARS

*those using GI Bill benefits es and universities for veterans included a number of Big Ten schools, with Penn State topping the list and Iowa, Indiana and Nebraska falling in the top 15. The University of Minnesota didn’t make the list.

TACKLING VETERAN CHALLENGES Getting a college degree is important for many veterans to reintegrate into civilian life. There are about 2.3 million post-9/11 veterans in the workforce nationwide, with an unemployment rate of 9 percent, according to November 2013 data from the Senate’s Joint Economic Committee. In Minnesota, the post-9/11 veteran unemployment rate is 8.8 percent with about 30,000 former service members in the labor force. But there are a number of barriers between veterans and a degree — barriers not usually faced by their younger classmates. Those challenges include family

10.5% FIVE YEARS

responsibilities, rusty academic skills and lingering battlefield wounds like brain injuries and post-traumatic stress. Some combat veterans also dislike being in large crowds, a common obstacle on college campuses. About 21 percent of those who entered the University in 2009 dropped out over the next four years — an estimated rate similar to the general student population and a decrease from a 30 percent dropout rate two years before. But it’s still an issue on the radar of campus veteran advocates. “A huge issue is those coming back from active duty are dropping out [early in their college careers],” Friedrichs said. “It is one of our largest concerns.” One Stop reports that 913 students on the Twin Cities campus self-identify as veterans or accept GI bill benefits and estimates that between 650 and 750 of those are using GI bill benefits. So, on a campus of nearly 50,000 students, veterans comprise a small population, and not all of them have GI Bill benefits or support systems helping them forward. “University culture is frustrating for some,” said Allen Roberts, the University of Iowa’s military and veterans education specialist, who works to keep veterans engaged and active in campus life while trying to “channel their inner civilian.” He said some veterans may find vocational programs better for them. But about 80 percent of student veterans are enrolled in public institutions, the Million Records Project study said, while about 11 percent are at private nonprofit schools and another 10 percent attend proprietary schools. Having some previous college experi-

STUDENT VETERAN HEADCOUNTS BALDWIN WALLACE UNIVERSITY 102/3,509

VETERAN STUDENTS

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY 232/14,590

10.0% FOUR YEARS

8.6% FIVE YEARS

7.8% SIX YEARS

BACHELOR’S DEGREE 74.2% COMPLETED WITHIN EIGHT YEARS 40.0% FOUR YEARS

Twin Cities 913

on time but cannot always get the classes they need. He has tried working with One Stop on this and other issues but said University employees don’t listen because he’s a student worker. “A lot of vets get the short end of the stick,” he said. “If athletes get priority, why not those who served our country?” A 2013 Pat Tillman Foundation study said veterans wanted priority registration for classes, greater collaboration between student veteran groups and administration, more employment opportunities for graduating veterans and a separate orientation for new veteran students. Only 37 percent of colleges with military services assist veteran students with transitioning into school, according to the Tillman report, while 47 percent provide training for faculty and staff to better address veteran concerns. Only 28 percent of those institutions have programs to help veteran and military students reignite their academic careers after absences. The University was among the first big colleges to launch a veteran services department — which was nationally recognized in 2012 — and many other schools have since followed suit. University Veterans Services’ main focus is helping veterans understand their GI Bill benefits and to “streamline the process as much as possible,” Peterson said. But it also works to help veterans in a number of other ways. The University has a 10-member Veterans Advisory Committee, offers orientation specially geared toward new veteran students and holds a student veterans appreciation day each year. The University’s Career Services also offers job search resources and advice for veterans. One Stop is examining a number of new initiatives geared toward veterans, including an introductory class for veterans to kick off their college careers. Dusten Retcher, an officer with the Student Veterans Association, said the University overall is good for veterans, but “there’s always room for improvement.” A USA Today ranking of the top colleg-

TOTAL FOUR-YEAR GRADUATION RATE

Duluth 189*

VETERAN ONE-YEAR RETENTION RATE

Crookston 47*

TOTAL ONE-YEAR RETENTION RATE

TOTAL STUDENTS

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-FLINT 250/6,959 UNIVERSITY OF DENVER 259/5,453 COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 397/8,517 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 400/47,146 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 419/7,590 UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 453/26,234 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 482/52,567 UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 515/24,593

8.9% SIX YEARS

7.7% SEVEN YEARS

7.1% EIGHT YEARS

ence can make the transition easier. Bradley Hanson, a senior journalism student, spent a year and a half at the University before entering the military to help pay for school. Upon returning from more than two years at a Marine Corps base in Japan, he said he found the transition relatively simple and has used few of the veteran resources on campus. But for Bair, the academics and social aspects were more difficult to tackle. Academics is a “perishable skill,” he said, and he took his first semester easier to get into the swing of it. “But it just comes down to hard work,” he said, “which isn’t a big deal compared to military stuff.” The Student Veterans Association on campus offers a place to engage and aims to help veterans navigate the challenges of civilian life at college. The association also helps out financially, offering emergency loans for veteran students experiencing financial difficulties. Originally centered in Wesbrook Hall before it was torn down, the group runs its Veterans Transition Center in the basement of Johnston Hall as a place where members can stop by, eat, socialize, kick back on a couch or study and watch movies, while also offering free printing and other services. “Most of the services we offer are geared towards creating a social support network of peers for returning veterans that they can not only relate to but feel a sense of belonging,” said Friedrichs, who served with the U.S. Navy from 2005 to 2011 in Sasebo, Japan. “There’s pizza on Fridays,” he said. As students who are often older than their classmates, veterans can also feel alienated from their peers. “With the age gap, you can’t relate to the other students,” Retcher said. “It’s an alternate universe.” Benson said the age and experience gap can make school a lonely exercise for veterans, who before entering school may get frustrated, bored, “do dumb stuff” or otherwise not have a plan for tackling college life. Now a senior human resources development major, he spent eight years in the U.S. Army, five of those overseas stationed in Germany, Korea and elsewhere. He said joining the student group has helped him and others find camaraderie in civilian life where many don’t understand their experiences. “You don’t know what I’ve been through,” he said.

U OF M VETERAN INITIATIVES TIMELINE

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 517/31,988 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY 560/39,867

Fall 2001 Compiled veterans focus group information.

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 600/33,952 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 603/37,631

Summer 2007 Established University Veterans Services.

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY 650/17,187 GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 722/10,406

Fall 2007 Developed veteran orientation program.

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 994/30,665 UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE 1,006/24,270

November 2007 Annual student veteran appreciation day starts on campus.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 1,149/48,308 EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY 1,217/13,902 COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY 1,348/22,500

2010 Veteran Certification coordinator wins award.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1,750/47,000 ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY 1,816/58,404

June 2011 Conducted focus groups with student veterans to gather feedback about campus involvement.

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 1,841/64,425 MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY 2,111/6,312 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY 2,172/20,782 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2,223/110,436 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 2,582/44,453 PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

3,223/83,086

SOURCES: STUDENT VETERANS OF AMERICA, MILLION RECORDS PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, PAT TILLMAN FOUNDATION, INDIVIDUAL UNIVERSITIES, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2012, UNIVERSITY VETERANS SERVICES

2012 University of Minnesota recognized by Pat Tillman Foundation for its service to veteran students, active military and their families.

INFOGRAPHICS AND LAYOUT BY AMBER BILLINGS


8

Editorials & Opinions www.mndaily.com/opinion

Monday, March 31, 2014 The Editorials & Opinions department is independent of the newsroom. The editorial board prepares the editorials labeled “EDITORIALS,” which are the opinion of the Minnesota Daily as an institution but not representative of Daily employees’ opinions. Columnists’ opinions are their own.

EDITORIALS

VIDEO GAMES

Sony’s PS4 has a savior in new tech Stangler, Reichl are best for MSA leadership I Virtual reality adaptability may be the only way to increase PS4 sales.

t has been more than three months since the release of the Sony PlayStation 4 and the Microsoft Xbox One, which joined the Nintendo Wii U in the eighth generation of video game consoles. This generation is facing a startling decline in sales compared to previous consoles, but Sony has hope in new technology on the horizon. As a staunch supporter of the PS4, I grew concerned when PlayStation developer Sony first announced the release of the console more than a year ago. In a Minnesota Daily column at the time, I warned Sony that its new console needs to have flair or else face a similar fate as Sega, a video game company that downgraded to the third-party development of games due to the Sega Saturn’s failure. Unfor tunately, a recent analysis from leading technology website TechCrunch

RONALD DIXON columnist

shows that my fears may be coming tr ue. TechCr unch compared the sales statistics of eighth-generation consoles to that of their predecessors after a few months on the market. Video game systems such as the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and the Wii were making between double and quadruple the sales of their latest counterparts. The author of the article, TechCrunch writer Natasha Lomas, considers a few of the causal explanations to this phenomenon. One hypothesis is that, since 2006 and the approximate star t of the seventhgeneration console era, a large portion of gamers have either ditched the consoles in place of smartphones (the

casual gamers) or customized PCs (the hardcore gamers). Casual gamers are unwilling to justify spending $500 on a new console when they can fulfill their gaming needs with “Flappy Bird,” and hardcore gamers can build PCs at more affordable rates than purchasing a new console. What’s worse, if one invests a little bit more into their home computer than buying a PS4 or Xbox One, they can easily game with much better specs and speeds than eighthgeneration consoles. Lomas also posits that the relatively miniscule number of games in the market is also contributing to the lackluster sales of consoles. Indeed, despite the fact that I would love to purchase the slick PS4, if there are not many games to play for the system, then what is the point? I would much rather spend money on PS3 games that I have yet to play than to drop several hundred dollars on a new console with fewer available games. Thankfully, there appears to be some hope. Earlier this month, Sony unveiled “Project Morpheus,”

DEATHS IN IRAQ: U.S. & COALITION TROOPS: 4,802 — IRAQI CIVILIANS: 122,316- PLUS DEATHS IN AFGHANISTAN: U.S. & COALITION TROOPS: 3,415 — AFGHAN CIVILIANS: UNKNOWN

a prototype of a user-friendly, game-enhancing set of virtual reality (VR) goggles. As I explained in my previous column, Sony’s past three consoles had elements to them that made them stand out, such as the PS2’s ability to play DVDs and PS1 games (backward compatibility). Beforehand, there was not really anything that made the PS4 shine, apart from the general technical and hardware updates. However, if they were to place the VR device in the market, it would give all kinds of gamers a reason to actually purchase the new video game system. Even better, the refreshing gaming experience would likely amaze casual gamers, and hardcore gamers would play the PS4 alongside their PC games due to the unique features of the PS4. If Sony ever expects to climb out of its rut, it must finish the VR prototype and offer virtual reality gaming on the PS4.

Ronald Dixon welcomes comments at rdixon@mndaily.com.

GUEST EDITORIAL

Information requests require attention Why it matters: Stopping information from seeing sunlight hampers the democratic process.

T Maxwell Smith welcomes comments at msmith@mndaily.com.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR A response to “A pledge against greek hazing” After reading the column, “A pledge against greek hazing,” in the March 24 edition of the Minnesota Daily, I was stirred to respond with a personal perspective coming from a University of Minnesota greek member. Unfor tunately, hazing is a problem around the countr y for some greek organizations, and I am not attempting to argue other wise. However, it is not only greek organizations where hazing is a tradition. I have been a student at the University for three years, and while I have never heard of hazing occur ring in one of the greek chapters here, I have heard of countless other organizations that haze their members. I believe this piece targets fraternities and sororities that may have a histor y of hazing on a national level but have had no incidents here on our campus. By gathering national information, the column is unclear about what is tr ue specifically at the University of Minnesota. I can say with all honesty, although I admit I may be biased, that the greek organizations at the University are genuinely some of the best in the countr y. We live up to our values as we take a strong stand against hazing and other negative

stereotypes that the media attempts to associate us with. My own chapter, for example, has such strict anti-hazing policies that we are not even allowed to be quizzed on the histor y of our organization, so as not to put girls in uncomfortable situations. As Inter frater nity Council frater nities and Panhellenic Council sororities, our organizations all have immensely strict national r ules that our headquar ters demand we follow in regard to social events, chapter programming and hazing. This keeps us in check and allows us to focus on the tr ue impor tance of the benefits we can receive from our organizations, as opposed to the “barbaric behavior” outlined in the column. This cannot be said about almost any other student organization. Looking on to the argument that students join greek organizations in order to “fit in with a crowd,” we belong to a school of about 50,000 students. Who, at one point in their college life, has not felt a desire to find a place where they belong? Any person joining any organization on campus will join for the same reason: They’ve found a place where they can fit in. Greek organizations are not so dif ferent from others. We are all brought together by shared values

and ideals. There is not one day of my time being greek that I have not been pushed to become a better version of myself — not through hazing tactics, but through constant encouragement, a network of peers who inspire me to be the best I can be and a set of values that have become deeply ingrained into the deepest core of my being. I live ever y day of my life tr ying to better myself, my individual chapter and the greek community as a whole. If I didn’t have something bigger in my life to succeed for, I couldn’t imagine where I would be today. There is not an organization in the world that comes without flaws — frater nities and sororities included. However, before students buy into the hazing r umors that sweep the media of our nation, they should first look to the living examples that greeks set ever y day. As a greek, I am not defined by the inaccurate accusations of widespread hazing around the countr y. As a greek, I am defined by the values I live by daily, the inspirational leaders I have met through my organization and the lifelong lessons that my sorority has taught me. Talia Saville President, University Panhellenic Council

ransparency is more than giving lip ser vice to the idea of open government. Record requests actually have to be attended to in an efficient, fair manner. According to a recent analysis of Freedom of Information Act requests by The Associated Press, that’s just not happening at the federal government level, despite the Obama administration’s pledge to be the most open government in histor y. The AP says that five years after Obama directed agencies to less frequently invoke a “deliberative process” exception to withhold materials describing decision-making behind the scenes, the government did it anyway — a record 81,752 times. Under the act, anyone who seeks information through the law is generally supposed to get it unless disclosure would hur t national security, violate personal privacy or expose business secrets or confidential decision-making in certain areas. The AP repor t points out repeatedly that those requests are often met with resistance or take much too long to be processed. Last year, the government denied 6,689 out of 7,818 requests for so-called expedited processing, which moves an urgent request for newswor thy records to the front of the line for a speedy answer, or about 86 percent. It denied only 53 percent of such requests in 2008. Journalists aren’t the only people who should be whining about records being withheld. What the media can’t get, the public can’t get either. As a result, you might not find out that the defense industr y buys $5,000 toilets or that your congressman took an unusual number of working trips to Hawaii during a brutally harsh winter. And, isn’t it ironic that a news ser vice unveiled the informationaccess problem by getting information about the lack of access to it? The free flow of information is one of the attractions of a strong democracy. If that information is getting plugged up in the bureaucratic pipeline, major plumbing needs to be done sooner than later. This editorial appeared in the Mankato Free Press on March 24. Please send comments to letters@mndaily.com.

Stangler and running mate Reichl would bring enthusiasm and experience to MSA leadership.

B

eginning Wednesday, University of Minnesota students will once again have the oppor tunity to elect two students for president and vice president of the Minnesota Student Association. This year, the Minnesota Daily Editorial Board endorses Joelle Stangler and her running mate John Reichl as president and vice president for the next academic year. Stangler’s ambition is the driving factor behind her campaign. As a sophomore, she is MSA’s intern coordinator and a representative to the Board of Regents. Reichl, a junior, would also bring multiple leadership experiences to the vice president position as a Board of Regents representative and president of the Honors Student Association. The two have a long-reaching platform covering sexual assault awareness, transportation and a generally more responsive MSA, among other issues. While Stangler is ambitious, the two also told the editorial board about numerous tangible goals, including working with the Aurora Center to promote Sexual Assault Awareness Month, tackling MSA tur nover problems and voicing student concerns about bus routes on and around campus. The other presidential candidate, Abdisamed Awed, is not without his own merits and, in an inter view with the editorial board, rightly voiced concern over MSA’s biggest challenge: outreach and accessibility. While MSA’s promising polling initiative — a major component of Stangler’s platform — is one way of reaching out to University undergraduate students, MSA must work to improve its approachability. Please visit vote.umn.edu to vote for MSA candidates this Wednesday through Friday.

A stronger DBA would help the area A tightly run Dinkytown Business Association would benefit the area.

P

rolific area developer Kelly Doran appeared at March’s Dinkytown Business Association meeting to question the group’s legitimacy after its small-area plan delayed his controversial hotel project. He has a point. The association’s own members admit they haven’t collected dues or held formal elections in years. That said, the city has an interest in more thoughtfully planning Dinkytown and settling questions about its historic status, and that won’t change even if the technicality pushes the DBA out of those talks. Doran’s protestations are a distraction, but they’re a much-needed reminder that the DPA needs to tighten up. The Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association’s interests seem to lie primarily on the other side of the interstate, and Dinkytown is adding hundreds of students each year through new development. The DBA has become the de facto neighborhood organization representing them. Doran and developers like him bring students to Dinkytown through new student housing, and the area needs an organization to advocate for those who live and work there. The DBA has done a decent job of this so far, but it needs to get its administrative affairs in order. A strong, elected leader r unning a tight ship will help smooth out developers’ relationships with the DBA and will benefit businesses and students alike.

LETTERS AND GUEST COLUMNS

The Minnesota Daily welcomes letters and guest columns from readers. All letters must include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification. The Daily reserves the right to edit all letters for style, space, libel and grammar. Letters to the editor should be no more than 600 words in length. Readers may also submit guest columns. Guest columns should be approximately 350 words. The Daily reserves the right to print any submission as a letter or guest column. Submission does not guarantee publication. letters@mndaily.com Fax: (612) 435-5865 Phone: (612) 435-1578 Letters and columns to the editor 2221 University Ave. SE Suite 450 Minneapolis, MN 55414

Look for online exclusive columns at www.mndaily.com/ opinion.

@mndailyopinions

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF TONY WAGNER = EDITORIALS & OPINIONS EDITOR ERIC BEST = SENIOR EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER WILLIAM BORNHOFT = BOARD MEMBER CASSANDRA SUNDARAM


www.mndaily.com/opinion

Opinions DINKYTOWN

What does Dinkytown need in its retail vacancy? In this quasi-market study, I explore what would be best suited to occupy the retail space in the new Dinkytown buildings.

trend to feed students’ demands (pun intended). TargetExpress is the only shop that will open this summer so far, which means eight spots are open. If I had a bottomless supply of financing and control over the retail slots’ future, here is what I would open for business.

CHRIS IVERSON columnist

T

he famed Hibbing, Minn., singersongwriter Bob Dylan famously sang, “The times they are a-changin’.” Appropriately, Dylan’s old stomping grounds in Dinkytown are seemingly changing as fast as the melting snow. In one light, Dinkytown is still the quaint, nostalgic, histor y-driven commercial node. Its founders built the activity district around a former streetcar line, which is home to well-known, decadesold establishments like Al’s Breakfast and the Varsity Theater, as well as events such as the 1970 Red Barn protest and the 2003 hockey riots. It’s a unique place where many current and former students hold memories dear. On another hand, Dinkytown is smackdab in the middle of a citywide growth spur t. A cultural shift to live in more urban areas is fueling the desire to drive less and live around campus, which has burst near Dinkytown’s business node. Since 2010, Dinkytown and the surrounding neighborhoods have seen hundreds of new apar tment units rapidly pop up, many with a notorious “luxur y” quality. The boom in apartments leads to a rise in population. Thousands of additional students in the area also mean new customers for the surrounding businesses in the commercial node. Although the old park-and-shop model might not apply as much as it had before, Dinkytown is about to embark into a different, more local economic structure. To meet the future population demand, as well as achieve new urbanist goals, the two major projects currently under construction in Dinkytown’s commercial node — the Venue at Dinkytown and The Marshall — include several thousand square feet of retail space on the streetfacing ground floor. In their current design, the two apar tment complexes will contain 50,500 square feet. For reference, this is about the size of a Rainbow Foods grocer y store. Hopefully, the businesses that venture into the new Dinkytown frontier will thrive and quickly establish themselves in the rooted nostalgia the area contains. In order to succeed, however, businesses and entrepreneurs need to look at what is already there and what current retail market trends illustrate. Dinkytown has evolved from a neighborhood-catered node with hardware and drug stores to a more college-oriented district with a plethora of restaurants and bars. New businesses in the two apar tment complexes will likely continue to reflect that

Bring back clothiers In the distant past, Dinkytown contained several clothing retailers. Nowadays, clothing-based stores have fared poorly in the area. Recent clothiers Pacific and Maine and Peppermint Park closed within about a year of opening, and former staple Mindstate Distribution closed in Januar y 2013. That leaves Goldy’s Locker Room and Underground Printing as the only clothing stores left in the once retail-dominated district. With the incoming population, clothing demand should once again increase. Forever 21, a clothing retailer popular with younger women, would thrive in the college-dominated area. Other cheap, pseudo-counterculture clothing retailers like Ragstock would likely appeal to thrifty students. Regardless of the brand, any clothing retailer would add a ser vice that residents need in Dinkytown, and it would hopefully find long-term success.

Music and pizza strike back When constr uction began on the Venue at Dinkytown, longtime businesses House of Hanson, The Podium and Duffy’s Dinkytown Pizza closed. In order to mitigate the void where these businesses once were, I would add a music-related shop and another pizza station. The owner of Duffy’s has said that they would like to return in the new building, and a music-filled shop, like a smaller version of the Electric Fetus, would cater to artsy students as well. Both businesses would be in small retail slots and could capitalize on the hundreds of new residents in the area. In addition to these options, another cof fee shop or fast casual restaurant would succeed in the neighborhood. All new businesses, including TargetExpress, will add unique and interesting ser vices to an area about to witness a bit of rebirth in business. Chris Iverson welcomes comments at civerson@mndaily.com.

9

EDUCATION

Segregation 60 years later Segregation in Twin Cities public schools is the result of class as much as race.

Bowling alley bar In addition to the Dinkytown nighttime hotspots in the Librar y Bar and Grill, Blarney Pub and Grill, the Kitty Cat Klub and Burrito Loco, another bar with bowling lanes could be a nice addition next to TargetExpress in The Marshall. Although the traditional bowling model may be declining in popularity, alleys with a bar-like aura have grown in recent years. Town Hall Lanes, a 10-lane bar in south Minneapolis, opened last year to much acclaim. Its founders designed Town Hall Brewer y on the West Bank with 20 beer taps, which has been financially successful and has done wonders in creating a unique community hotspot. Even though Goldy’s Gameroom in Cof fman Union has the bowling monopoly, something like Town Hall Lanes in Dinkytown would likely do ver y well and would help bridge a student community.

Monday, March 31, 2014

Open enrollment’s racial effect may be a result of economic class as well. Low-income families lack the resources necessar y to send their children to distant schools. Consequently, open enrollment disproportionally affects urban districts such as Minneapolis, St. Paul and St. Cloud, whose student bodies are generally poorer than those of the suburbs. Unfortunately, the loss of students results in the loss of state aid as well. Due to open enrollment, about 400 Minneapolis students attend school in St. Anthony. With their departure, Minneapolis loses — and St. Anthony gains — approximately $3.6 million in state aid every year.

Eden Prairie’s boundaries BRIAN REINKEN columnist

T

he 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education laid the foundation for racial desegregation of schools across America, declaring separate institutions to be inherently unequal. Sixty years later, a new report has declared New York’s public schools to be the most segregated in America. Brown v. Board of Education targeted Southern schools, where the degree of racial segregation surpassed that of their Northern counterparts. This policy, however, sidelined segregation in Northern schools until several decades later. Minneapolis took its first steps toward racial integration in 1967, when the state’s board of education initiated a voluntar y transfer program among urban schools. Four years later, the Minnesota government declared Minneapolis’s failure to meet the state’s desegregation goals — including a 30 percent ceiling on minority students — and ordered it to draft a desegregation plan. Despite a long history of desegregation efforts, the Twin Cities metro area remains stricken with inequality. More than half of minority students in the metro attend “high-poverty” schools in which more than 40 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. The same is true for only 10 percent of the metro’s white students. Disturbingly, the trend extends to the suburbs. Roughly 30 percent of elementary schools in the metro area have a student body whose majority is nonwhite and poor. Of that 30 percent, 90 percent experience “very high poverty,” in which 75 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. Critics of segregation in the Twin Cities often point to open enrollment as a leading contributor to inequality. The open-enrollment program allows parents to send their children to whichever school is best suited to their academic needs. In theory, it’s a color-blind program that helps increase competition among schools seeking to maintain and attract the metro’s best students. In reality, open enrollment is increasing racial segregation in Twin Cities schools. In the 2009-10 school year, more than 35,000 students attended school in a district where they did not live. The majority of these students were Caucasian. Education officials deemed the exodus “white flight.”

In 2011, officials in the Eden Prairie school district finalized a plan to redraw the boundaries that determine which of the city’s students attend certain schools. Formerly, substantial income inequality troubled Eden Prairie’s education system. The most upsetting aspect of the district was the 33 percent gap in the number of students who used free or reduced-price lunches between two of its elementary schools. Many of these students were members of the city’s populous Somali community who lived around one particular school. By redrawing school boundaries, Eden Prairie aimed to reduce the income and racial gap. Although the plan eventually passed, it was met with substantial backlash. After a tempestuous period in which detractors called for her resignation, the district’s superintendent ultimately quit. Nevertheless, Eden Prairie’s desegregation plan was at least somewhat successful. Within a year, the number of students who qualified for free or reduced-price lunches at Forest Hills Elementary School dropped from 50 to 34 percent, a direct result of the influx of students from other regions of the city. Compared to Eden Prairie, Minneapolis is larger, its median household income is lower and it’s more racially diverse. Without some adjustment, what worked in one city might not work in another. Nevertheless, the benefits to desegregation transcend mere political or ethical concerns. Research from the desegregation period following Brown v. Board of Education suggests that black students and other minority students who attend a desegregated school experience higher graduation rates and eventually enjoy a higher average income than their counterparts in segregated schools. They are also less likely to be in prison by the age of 30. These results manifested, however, only when schools adjusted their resources to increase average per-pupil spending. The open-enrollment program, despite its good intentions, is contributing to segregation in Twin Cities public schools and draining resources from districts that most need them. Perhaps it is time to re-examine the current approach to open enrollment and consider something more like Eden Prairie’s desegregation policy. However, the state’s metro areas should adjust the approach to meet the realities of a larger and more urban environment. Brian Reinken welcomes comments at breinken@mndaily.com.

TECHNOLOGY

Young social media users could learn from previous generations We should embrace older generations’ social media use.

TRENT M. KAYS columnist

T

he concept of social media is hardly original. Often, when we discuss social media, we do so in a way that refers to contemporary variations of media, chiefly Facebook or Twitter. However, such discussions would be stilted if we didn’t consider social media to be more than simply Facebook or Twitter. As long as there has been media, there’s been social media. It’s a natural function of humanity: to share discoveries and creations with others. We need others’ validation on the work of living. That’s why we see both mundane and profound messages on social media. Do I really care what you had for breakfast? Probably not. But that doesn’t mean you should stop sharing that part of your life. What is mundane to one person is profound to another. It’s the question of mundaneness that

seems to plague older generations as they approach contemporary social media. For the second year, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Minnesota has asked me to teach a class. The course, “Social Media: Practice and Critique,” is for returning adult and retired students. Last year, the students’ ages ranged from the mid-50s to 80. Despite their unfamiliarity with contemporary social media, most of my OLLI students are highly intelligent, successful professionals (or were) and are interested in how to use certain social media. However, they also question why they should even bother to learn about social media. It’s the last bit that is particularly relevant, because it brings a type of critical eye to social media engagement that younger generations don’t always bring. These students likely have more social media experience than current undergraduates. Returning adult and retired students have been communicating over the phone, through email, in letters and collaborating for decades. Generally, they know how to socialize over various media. While they may struggle with contemporary iterations of social media, they understand the base structures. In many ways, they are better equipped to understand the changes in media because they’ve seen its evolution; they’ve lived it. Social media has become more complicated and more massive, and it’s these aspects that cause such cognitive dissonance among some generations. According to the Pew Research Center, about 73 percent of adults online use a so-

cial networking site. Moreover, 45 percent of adults online age 65 or older use Facebook. To many of my students, these figures are shocking. My response to their shock is normally adulation. Eventually, every adult online will use a contemporary social networking site; it’s inevitable. My students may be the best people to help shepherd younger generations into social media use. As I mentioned before, the students approach their studies with a certain amount of diligence that many younger students don’t discover until they’ve experienced more of life. This is a tremendous asset, and it would be ridiculous to not recognize it. This is especially true at a university where there is no dedicated general social media course for undergraduate students. The assumption is that 18-year-old students don’t need their own course. They’ve grown up with the prevalent social media of today. It’s true that I’ve found my undergraduate students to be savvy — almost zealous — social media users. However, they often approach their use with such tenacity that they overlook issues of privacy, security and design. They don’t approach their use with the acute nature of one who has lived through various instances of shaming, love, loss, bullying, job hunting and other lifelong issues. This, of course, isn’t always the case; however, many students should have a guide when learning and relearning how to interact with diverse and complicated social media. Despite the idea that technology should always be user-friendly and accessible, that’s

simply not always true. Sometimes, transgenerational students need a helping hand or even just an ear to listen to their gripes. Users join social media sites for various reasons. The most notable motivation among many of my OLLI students is that they want to see their family. Grandparents want to see pictures of grandchildren. I often get questions like “How can I set up a photo feed?” or “How can I set my Facebook so just family members see me?” from my students. The key point here is that no matter the generation, students are students. They yearn to understand, to find acceptance and to connect with other humans. Media theorist Marshall McLuhan once wrote: “Today we’re beginning to realize that the new media aren’t just mechanical gimmicks for creating worlds of illusion, but new languages with new and unique powers of expression.” It’s not enough anymore that students use social media: They must use social media critically. While it’s possible to learn such criticalness from instructors, students can also learn it from older generations who have experienced change before. Social media will not only serve as a source for connection, but as a source for generational harmony. One generation has zeal, and other generations have attentiveness. Imagine what our world would be if we got them together. Trent M. Kays welcomes comments at tkays@mndaily.com.


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Monday, March 31, 2014


Monday, March 31, 2014

Sports

11

@MNDAILYSPORTS

MEN’S HOCKEY

Gophers advance to Frozen Four WITH SAM GORDON

A

PATTY GROVER, DAILY

Minnesota forward Justin Kloos handles the puck against St. Cloud State on Sunday evening at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul.

Hockey u from Page 1

But Kloos didn’t relinquish the scoring crown so easily. After a SportsCenter-worthy tic-tac-toe play with linemates freshman Taylor Cammarata and senior Nate Condon, Kloos buried the puck into the net for his second goal about six minutes later. Minnesota was pulling away at that point, but junior forward Kyle Rau added to the haul on the power play

about eight minutes into the final period. Kloos, Condon, sophomore defensemen Brady Skjei and Mike Reilly, and Wilcox made the regional team, with Kloos garnering MVP honors. On Saturday, the Gophers committed two penalties early in the game to give Robert Morris a 5-on-3 advantage. Minnesota overcame the potentially dangerous start by scoring three goals in the last four minutes of the first period from Condon, freshman

defenseman Michael Brodzinski and Kloos. The game seemed well in hand when Rau scored about eight minutes into the second period, but Robert Morris was far from giving up. The Colonials tallied two goals from Cody Wydo and Zac Lynch before the final period. In the third, the Gophers left no doubt, as freshman forward Hudson Fasching positioned the Gophers for the win with a power-play goal about 14 minutes into the third period. Robert Morris stole anoth-

er point back with a goal by David Friedmann before Minnesota put the game away. Rau said he wasn’t surprised by Robert Morris’ unwillingness to roll over. “At this time of the year, no one is going to give up because it’s their season on the line,” he said. “We need to take that into account … because we know that no one is just going to fold over for us.” Condon added his second goal of the game, and Reilly tallied the final blow. This is Minnesota’s first

MEN’S HOCKEY RESULTS SATURDAY 1 0 3

Robert Morris Minnesota

2 2 1

3 1 3

FINAL 3 7

3 0 1

FINAL 0 4

SUNDAY St. Cloud State Minnesota

1 0 1

2 0 2

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

trip to the Frozen Four since 2012, when it lost to Boston College 6-1 in the semifinals.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Gophers fire Borton, move in new direction Pam Borton went 236-152 in 12 years as the coach of the women’s team. BY JACK SATZINGER jsatzinger@mndaily.com

Pam Bor ton has been fired as head coach for the Gophers women’s basketball team, the University announced Friday. “We have extremely high expectations for our women’s basketball program,” athletics director Norwood Teague said at a press conference Friday. “Our goal is to be the best women’s basketball program both in the Big Ten and at a national level.” Those high expectations pushed Borton, who hasn’t led the Gophers to the NCAA tournament since 2009, out of a job. Borton has been at Minnesota since 2002 and took the Gophers to their only Final Four appearance in program history in 2004. Her record was 236-152 in 12 seasons with the program. The University has to pay Borton $335,000 to buy out her contract. Teague met with Borton Friday to inform her of the decision. “I am grateful for my 12 seasons at the University of Minnesota,” Borton said in a release. “This is a great state and University, and I have enjoyed becoming a part of this community.” Teague will conduct a national search, from which he expects a significant amount of interest, and said he has a “pool” of coaches to choose from. “This program has succeeded in the past,” he said. “We’ve proven we can win. There are so many intangibles that make this a terrific job that raise those expectations.” Kelly Roysland, an assistant coach and one of Borton’s former players with the Gophers, has been named interim coach. Teague said he didn’t want to single out any candidates and wouldn’t say whether Roysland will be considered for head coach.

PAM BORTON

BY THE NUMBERS

236-152 RECORD OVER 12 YEARS AS GOPHERS COACH

6NCAA TOURNAMENT APPEARANCES

$335,000 BUYOUT SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

Teague said he won’t rule out candidates without head coaching experience, like Roysland and possible candidate Lindsay Whalen — another of Borton’s former players. It’s unclear if Whalen, who signed a three-year contract extension with the WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx in September, would be interested in the job. Teague noted that prior experience with the Gophers could impact his decision. “It helps. That always helps whenever you’re recruiting a coach,” he said. “I like when they do have that, but it’s by no means a dealbreaker.” Teague said he hopes to finish the coaching search as soon as possible and is looking for three major traits in a good candidate: leadership, an ability to recruit locally and nationally, and communication skills. Teague said he met with current players on the team Friday afternoon to break the news. “They have relationships there, and there’s hurt when that happens,” he said.

Wagner won’t waver Teague said he also called Carlie Wagner, the program’s top committed recruit, before addressing the media. ESPN ranked Wagner 54th in this year’s recruiting class. “[We] had a great conversation and will keep communicating with her, definitely,” he said. “You have to do that; you want to make them feel at ease with what’s going on.” Wagner’s mother, Jane Wagner, told the Minnesota Daily that Teague called Carlie

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota head coach Pam Borton, right, checks on guard Rachel Banham, who was injured March 23 in a WNIT game against Southern Methodist at Williams Arena. Borton was fired Friday.

Minnesota ends season with a loss BY JACK SATZINGER jsatzinger@mndaily.com

The Gophers women’s basketball team (22-13) saw its season end Thursday night with a 70-62 loss at South Dakota State. Minnesota’s star freshman center, Amanda Zahui B., set the Big Ten’s single-season rebounding record in the game, finishing with 394 boards this season. Zahui B. led the team with 26 points and 11 rebounds. Rachel Banham racked up 25 points of her own while playing through a midfoot sprain. a “top priority.” She also said Carlie is upset and loves Bor ton “like a second mom.” Still, all signs point to Carlie Wagner wearing a Gophers uniform in the near future. Jane Wagner said even after hearing the news, her daughter went shopping for maroon and gold apparel. “She’s a Minnesota girl, and as far as I know, that’s the way it’s going to stay,” Jane Wagner said. “I think we’re

Those ef for ts were wasted, though, as the rest of the team combined to score only 11 points, highlighting a seasonlong trend — the stars need more help from the role players on the squad. A potentially dynamic third scorer will be joining Banham and Zahui B. next year in form of highly touted recruit Carlie Wagner. A new coach will also be coming to Minnesota after the University announced the firing of head coach Pam Borton on Friday afternoon. good. … She’s just sad and needs to process.”

Borton was abroad A team spokesperson confirmed that Borton was recently out of the country and on the recruiting trail before being fired, suggesting she was still engaged as head coach. Borton had success with international players, bringing in Amanda Zahui B. from Sweden. She set the Big Ten and Minnesota single-season rebounding records in the

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE 70, MINNESOTA 62 Minnesota South Dakota State

24 38 — 62 23 47 — 70

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE FG FT Reb Player Min M-A M-A O-T Strop 23 2-4 0-0 3-4 Clarin 15 2-6 0-0 1-3 Boever 26 1-8 2-2 3-5 Paluch 31 7-16 2-4 2-5 Waytashek 32 3-7 0-0 1-8 Stevens 17 1-4 0-0 0-1 Young 15 2-7 0-0 0-1 Heiser 16 3-6 6-7 0-2 Ober 24 2-7 4-6 4-9 Cornemann 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 Total 200 23-65 14-19 19-45

Ast 1 0 6 6 1 2 0 1 1 0 18

PF 2 3 0 1 1 2 0 3 1 0 13

Pts 5 4 5 17 9 3 5 14 8 0 70

FT Reb M-A O-T Ast PF 0-1 0-5 0 0 4-4 2-11 0 3 3-4 1-2 6 4 0-0 1-3 6 3 1-2 0-1 1 5 1-1 0-4 0 1 0-0 2-6 0 1 9-12 8-35 13 17

Pts 2 26 25 3 1 5 0 62

MINNESOTA Player Hirt Zahui B. Banham Noga Bailey Riche Hedstrom Total

Min 26 33 38 40 26 19 18 200

FG M-A 1-2 11-14 8-22 1-10 0-0 2-6 0-2 23-56

Gophers’ 70-62 loss to South Dakota State in the WNIT on Thursday night. But even with a standout at center, coupled with the Big Ten’s leading scorer in Rachel Banham, Borton couldn’t get back to the NCAA tournament. “You want to get in the NCAA tournament,” Teague said. “We look for ward to finding a candidate that will build a consistent and continued successful program here.”

half-empty Xcel Energy Center watched top-seeded Minnesota tangle with St. Cloud State with a trip to the Frozen Four on the line. Those who stayed home didn’t miss much. This Sunday’s game was more one-sided than a chubby kid on a teetertotter. Minnesota dominated the game from the drop of the puck en route to a 4-0 win. As the final horn sounded, players mobbed goaltender Adam Wilcox in celebration. The Gophers will return to the Frozen Four for the second time in three years. Yes, a trip to the Frozen Four is a big victory for the program, but it’s not enough anymore. Maybe at other schools going to the Frozen Four is enough. Maybe at other schools titles from decades past are still revered. But this is Minnesota. And success in Minnesota, especially in hockey, is measured a little differently. Former Gophers captain Taylor Matson, who helped lead Minnesota to its last Frozen Four in 2012, said it best a couple of years ago: You come to Minnesota to hang banners. The Gophers haven’t hung a national championship banner since 2003. They are the premier institution in the State of Hockey and haven’t won a title in more than 10 years. That could all change in Philadelphia in a couple of weeks. This year’s group is rife with talent, and it appears to have all the makings of a national champion. They boast an elite freshman class, coupled with strong veteran leadership. They trot out Wilcox, the best netminder in the country. They boast a well-balanced offense, with every line more than capable of scoring that key goal. They’re stingy defensively, too. Now it’s up to Minnesota to do what it hasn’t the last two seasons: cash in on its potential. Minnesota has done that early in the NCAA tournament, easily beating Rober t Morris and St. Cloud State, but it’ll only get harder for the Gophers moving forward. Minnesota will square off with archrival North Dakota in the Frozen Four. The longtime foes didn’t play this year because of the WCHA disbanding. Nor th Dakota is famous for starting slow, putting together a great second half of the season and peaking at tournament time. That looks to be happening yet again. But this time the Gophers appear to be peaking, too. After the game, Wilcox said the Gophers played two of their most complete games this weekend. “Six complete periods of just giving it to the other team,” he said. In two weeks, they’ll need six more. Ya feel me? Sam Gordon welcomes comments at sgordon@mndaily.com or on Twitter.

@SamuelEGordon


12

Monday, March 31, 2014

SWIMMING & DIVING

Minnesota finishes 22nd at NCAA meet

Minnesota’s Derek Toomey swims in the men’s 100-yard breaststroke during the Minnesota Challenge on Feb. 9, 2013, at the University Aquatic Center.

Derek Toomey tied his career-best time in the 50-yard free at the NCAAs. BY DAVID NELSON dnelson@mndaily.com

Minnesota’s men’s swimming and diving team produced some of its best performances of the year at the NCAA meet over the weekend, but it regressed from last year’s 18th-place finish and placed 22nd overall. “They swam and dove great,” head coach Kelly Kremer said. “We really got some ver y tough breaks at almost ever y turn. And

at the end of the day, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect what a great job these men did.” Minnesota boasted seven swimmers in total who garnered All-America honors, but it wasn’t enough. Gophers seniors Derek Toomey and Kyler Van Swol were two of those AllAmericans. They capped their careers with two of the best performances of their careers. Toomey tied his careerbest time in the 50-yard freestyle at 19.05 seconds. Van Swol’s time in the 200-yard butter fly prelim broke the school record in the event. But aside from those

performances, bad breaks seemed to follow the team. “It seemed like at every turn, things didn’t go our way at critical moments,” Kremer said. “We found a way to really make life difficult for ourselves.” The Gophers qualified for the final or consolation final in five events but failed to capitalize on those opportunities. “We definitely swam better in prelims than we did in the finals,” Kremer said. “We didn’t make the most of those opportunities.” Gophers junior C.J. Smith said he wasn’t happy after finishing 16th in the 1,650-yard freestyle and 46th in the 500-yard freestyle.

“I don’t think the best swimmers in the nation settle in any races,” he said. “I’m certainly eager to improve this summer.” This weekend, the best swimmers came from warmer climates. Califor nia blew away the competition with 468.5 points, Texas followed with 417.5 points and Florida took third with 387 points. “It’s tough to keep guys not bummed out when you watch some teams actually dominate a meet like that,” Smith said. Perhaps no one was more bummed than freshman diver Matt Barnard, who injured his leg while diving on the 3-meter

springboard. That injur y kept him out of the platform competition. “He was disappointed, but he has such a positive attitude,” Kr emer said. “That’s why I know he’ll get right back on the horse and he’ll be fine. He’ll come back better than ever.” Barnard was one of six freshmen who made the trip to Austin, Texas, to compete on college swimming’s biggest stage. Smith said that’s one positive that can be taken away from an other wise unsatisfactor y competition. “We had six freshmen this year, and I think that’s the biggest positive,” he

ICHIGO TAKIKAWA, DAILY FILE PHOTO

SWIMMING AND DIVING RESULTS

TEAM STANDINGS: 22ND TOP-16 FINISHES EVENT PLACE 4th Toomey 50-yard freestyle 100-yard freestyle 16th 15th 400-yard IM Maly 16th 1,650-yard Smith freestyle Van Swol 200-yard butterfly 15th 200-yard freestyle 13th Team relay SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

said. “We had those guys step up and swim fast, and that just shows the capability that they have and the direction this program is headed in.”

MEN’S GYMNASTICS

Mannon takes home his first title on pommel horse Minnesota stumbled out of the gates and never recovered en route to fifth place. BY DAVID NELSON dnelson@mndaily.com

When the Gophers missed their first routine Friday night, perhaps it was a sign the Big Ten meet wouldn’t go in their favor. Minnesota struggled to establish any semblance of momentum until the second par t of the competition, and by then, the hole was too deep. The Gophers placed a disappointing fifth at the Big Ten championships, their worst finish of the season. “It was a bit of a struggle,” head coach Mike Burns said. “That outcome wasn’t exactly what we were hoping for.” Minnesota stumbled out of the star ting blocks on high bar, posting a score of 68.95 after averaging 70.513 this season. After posting similar subpar marks on floor, senior Zach Chase said the team needed a spark. “It really brings out the leadership that we need to play a role in,” he said. Chase and the seven other seniors provided that spark, and the team rallied down the stretch. “In spite of the fact we star ted out ver y rough,” Burns said, “we did battle back, and we never gave up. … I was proud of that.” Though the team didn’t finish as high as expected in the team standings, Minnesota still qualified four competitors in five of the individual event finals a day later.

MEN’S GYMNASTICS RESULTS

TEAMS Michigan Ohio State Penn State Illinois Minnesota Nebraska Iowa

SCORE 448.200 441.050 438.000 435.350 429.150 428.150 425.600

MINNESOTA LEADERS Floor Pommel horse Still rings Vault Parallel bars High bar All-around

SCORE Chase, 14.900 Mannon, 15.000 Metcalf, 15.200 Chase, 15.250 Jaciuk, 15.350 Jaciuk, 14.700 Mannon, 85.700

INDIVIDUAL EVENT FINALS All-around Pommel horse Vault Still rings Parallel bars High bar

SCORE Mannon, 6th Mannon, 1st Chase, 3rd Metcalf, 5th Jaciuk, 5th Jaciuk, 7th

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

“I told them when we lined up before we started warm-ups that today was about redemption,” Burns said. “I said, ‘We didn’t do what we came here to do last night, so it’s up to you four guys to go out here and represent the Gophers.’ “I guess they took that to heart.” Gophers junior Ellis Mannon definitely did. Mannon per formed second to last on the pommel horse Saturday night and said he was a little nervous before his routine. “It’s a tough environment in the finals,” Mannon said. “I was just tr ying to concentrate on doing my set the best I could.” Mannon was in good position after none of the six gymnasts that performed before him posted a score higher than 14.7.

JAAK JENSEN, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota’s gymnast Ellis Mannon performs his parallel bars routine March 2, 2013, at the Sports Pavilion.

He took the apparatus and posted a 15.325 to move into first place. Still, he had to sit and w a t c h a s P en n S t a t e’s Craig Her nandez went last. Hernandez fell shy of Mannon’s score, and Mannon captured the first Big Ten title of his career. “That was probably the best routine I’d ever done,” Mannon said. “I guess

it came at a good time.” Mannon represents Burns’ first Big Ten champion since Chase won on vault as a freshman. “It’s just great when you’re walking through the arena after your gymnast wins the title and ever yone’s patting you on the back,” Burns said. “It makes you realize all the hard work pays off.”

Chase took thir d on vault in the final Big Ten meet of his career. “It was great,” Chase said. “I spent my freshman and sophomore year on the podium, and to come back after surger y last April … was a pretty awesome feeling.” Minnesota sophomore Jack Metcalf took fifth on still rings after producing

some of his best scores of the season. And junior captain Steve Jaciuk took fifth and seventh on parallel bars and high bar, respectively. Burns said even though the squad didn’t finish as high as it wanted in the team standings, he was happy to return with some hardware.


13

Monday, March 31, 2014

BASEBALL

Gophers lose two of three to Spartans

Minnesota played in its first home series of the season over the weekend. BY BETSY HELFAND bhelfand@mndaily.com

The good news for the Gophers baseball team is that it was able to play all three of its games against Michigan State over the weekend. The bad news is what happened in two of those three games. Minnesota won the first game of the series but followed up with a Sunday doubleheader in which it was outscored 20-0. The Gophers lost 15-0 in the first game, then 5-0 in the second game, which ended after eight innings due to Michigan State’s travel schedule. The eight-inning game wasn’t predetermined, but head coach John Anderson said the teams couldn’t start another inning after 4:45 p.m. “The way we were playing, the last inning wouldn’t have mattered,” he added. The Gophers started the weekend strong, winning the first game 4-2 thanks in large part to a quality start from senior Alec Crawford. Crawford endured a couple of rough outings in the first month of the season, but recently, he’s given the team three consecutive quality starts. “[I] try not to change too much, trust my stuff [and] know that I’m capable of getting the job done,” Crawford said. Crawford was a bright spot this past weekend for the

Gophers, especially considering the results Sunday. Minnesota sophomore pitcher Jordan Jess started Sunday’s first game and had trouble with his command right away. “He has a mechanical flaw, in my opinion … and it’s affected his command,” Anderson said. Jess loaded the bases on walks in the first inning but escaped without giving up any runs. The Spartans scored a run in the third but broke through in the fourth. Jess again loaded the bases before he was removed from the game. Still, all three of the runners eventually scored, in addition to two others, before the inning was over. Minnesota gave up 16 walks and hit three batters in the first game alone. In the second game, the Gophers also hit three batters. “I can’t remember the last time we walked that many people and hit that many people in one day,” Anderson said. “What do you attribute it to? I wish I knew.” In addition to Jess’ four runs, Tyler Hanson gave up two, Matt Fiedler gave up seven and Lance Thonvold gave up two. Minnesota junior Mark Tatera said the team tried to come back with a tougher mentality for the second game. “It kind of seemed like we gave up in the middle of the first game,” he said, adding that he thought the team started with good energy in the second game. Gophers junior Ben Mey-

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

Top: Minnesota second baseman Connor Schaefbauer bats against Michigan State on Saturday at Siebert Field. Above: Minnesota’s Alec Crawford pitches against Michigan State on Saturday at Siebert Field.

er started the second game and gave up five runs in 5.2 innings pitched. The Spartans hit two home runs in the game, but Anderson said he thought Meyer pitched competitively and gave the team a chance. “We didn’t pitch good, didn’t play good, didn’t have competitive at-bats,” Anderson said. “[We] didn’t really do anything today that was good enough to win in this league,

and so we paid the price.” Tatera said he hopes this weekend gives the team more energy going into the rest of Big Ten play. “It was kind of an eyeopener,” Tatera said. “We had been playing well and kind of got our butts kicked.” Before the Gophers return to Big Ten play, they will have a midweek game Tuesday with North Dakota State — weather permitting.

BASEBALL RESULTS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R

H

E

Michigan St. Minnesota

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

2

6

1

1

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

X

4

8

0

Michigan St. Minnesota

0

0

1

5

0

2

6

1

0

15

13

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

2

Michigan St. Minnesota

1

0

2

1

1

0

0

0

-

5

7

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

-

0

4

1

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

SOFTBALL

LeMay, Groenewegen pace squad The Gophers swept Illinois to improve their record to 27-4 on the season. BY JARED CHRISTENSEN jchristensen@mndaily.com

No. 15 Minnesota swept Illinois over the weekend, improving its overall record to an unprecedented 27-4. The Gophers also moved to 5-1 in Big Ten play with the trio of wins. Minnesota’s bats stayed hot all weekend, and the team posted 23 runs in the three-game series. Gophers sophomor e catcher Taylor LeMay powered the team at the plate, launching two home runs to move her season total to a team-high eight blasts. Still, she said she’s more excited about the team’s hot start. “It was a great series,” she said. “It’s awesome to be 5-1 in Big Ten play.” While the of fense paced the team, the Gophers’ pitchers weren’t to be outdone. That group

tossed 18 shutout innings and struck out 27 batters in the series. A l l - B i g Te n p i t c h e r senior Sara Moulton’s two wins in the series improved her record to 18-3. And her 15-strikeout weekend moved her career tally to 1,111 — just 11 shy of the program record. Minnesota freshman Sara Groenewegen also picked up a win for the Gophers, striking out 10 batters en route to a complete-game shutout and her seventh win of the year. She is now 7-0 in the pitcher’s circle, and her numbers in the batter’s box have been equally impressive. Groenewegen went 3-for-7 at the plate this weekend, smacking a home run in each game to move her season total to seven, just one behind LeMay for the team lead. Minnesota junior infielder Kaitlyn Richar dson said Groenewegen’s and LeMay’s contributions in their first season have been immeasurable.

SOFTBALL RESULTS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

R

H

E

Illinois Minnesota

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

3

7

0

5

0

0

0

2

1

X

8

9

2

Illinois Minnesota

0

0

0

0

0

0

X

0

4

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

X

8

4

1

Illinois Minnesota

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

3

3

X

7

8

2

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

“They came in and wer en’t timid, wer en’t scared,” she said. “They’ve just done their job, and that’s what it’s going to take for us to be a World Series team.” So far, the formula is working. Minnesota’s 27-4 overall record leads the Big Ten, and its five conference wins are second only to Michigan. Gophers head coach Jessica Allister said the great start is a step toward accomplishing the team’s ultimate goal. “The girls are ver y focused on the main goal, which is winning a Big Ten championship,” she said.

“[They are] doing a great job so far, and everybody’s very excited about it.” This was the Gophers’ first home series of the year after they spent the first six weeks of the season on the road. Still, it wasn’t exactly a home game. The Gophers moved the series to the University of St. Thomas because of poor conditions at Jane Sage Cowles Stadium’s natural-grass field. Minnesota is scheduled for another home series — weather permitting — next weekend against Wisconsin. LeMay said she’s excited

STEPHEN OFFERMAN, DAILY

Minnesota’s Sara Groenewegen pitches against Illinois on Saturday afternoon at St. Thomas University.

for the opportunity to take on a rival, something she hasn’t had the opportunity to do since transferring to Minnesota a year ago. “I haven’t been around to have the feel for a re-

ally big rivalr y game,” LeMay said. “So I’m super excited to be able to play in that environment next weekend. “I know we’re all pumped for that series.”


14

Monday, March 31, 2014

MEN’S TENNIS

Gophers split a pair BY JACE FREDERICK jfrederick@mndaily.com

The Gophers women’s tennis team entered the weekend hoping for a sweep over two ranked Big Ten opponents. Minnesota didn’t accomplish its goal, but players and coaches weren’t necessarily disappointed with a split. The Gophers salvaged the split with a 5-2 victory over No. 35 Indiana on Sunday morning after falling 4-3 to No. 46 Purdue on Friday night. Minnesota head coach Chuck Merzbacher said he talked to his team about responding after the Purdue loss — a match the team could have won. “There was only one way to go, which is to respond with a finish like we had today,” he said. “We wanted to respond this way, and we got it done.” The No. 63 Gophers (14-4, 4-1) appeared to be headed toward a defeat Sunday after losing the doubles point,

MEN’S TENNIS RESULTS

WOMEN’S TENNIS RESULTS

PURDUE 6, MINNESOTA 1 Singles W 6-4, 3-6, 1-0 (8) Toledo L 6-2, 6-4 Weber L 6-3, 6-4 Hamburg L 7-5, 6-1 Froment L 6-1, 6-0 Ramirez L 6-2, 7-5 Frueh

PURDUE 4, MINNESOTA 3 Singles W 6-2, 6-2 Brichacova L 6-0, 6-2 Pintusava L 5-7, 7-5, 6-1 Mozia W 6-1, 6-2 Courter W 6-1, 6-1 Lambert L 6-2, 6-3 Otero

Doubles Hamburg/Froment Toledo/Frueh Ramirez/Sydow

Doubles Brichacova/Mozia Pintusava/Courter Lambert/Otero

W 8-5 L 8-3 L 8-7

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

but two quick victories at No. 1 and No. 4 singles by Tereza Brichacova and Julia Courter, respectively, flipped the script. Brichacova, who’d lost her first three Big Ten matches, won two over the weekend. She said she’s started to focus on every point during her matches, and the results are starting to show. “I’m really happy about those two matches,” Brichacova said. “I was trying to get my confidence back, and these matches helped a lot.”

MINNESOTA Singles Brichacova Pintusava Mozia Courter Lambert Vujic Doubles Brichacova/Mozia Pintusava/Courter Lambert/Vujic

L 8-5 W 8-3 L 8-3 5, INDIANA 2 W L W W W W

6-4, 6-1 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 6-2, 4-6, 7-5 6-1, 6-4 7-5, 6-3 5-7, 7-6 (8), 1-0 (7)

L 8-4 W 8-4 L 8-1

SOURCE: GOPHERSPORTS.COM

The Gophers’ success wasn’t limited to the top of the order, though. Courter and junior Aria Lambert won both their matches at No. 4 and No. 5 singles, respectively, this

LISA PERSSON, DAILY FILE PHOTO

Minnesota’s Jessika Mozia returns the ball to Purdue on Friday at the Baseline Tennis Center. The Gophers lost 4-3. weekend. ing Sunday’s performance. tered on Weber’s court, the “The bottom of the lineup “It means a lot,” he said. “If sophomore built a 6-5 lead in is really holding it up,” Merz- we’re going to be that tough the second set after he had albacher said. “We have a lot of when we need to be tough ready taken the first set. great players, and we have to against a very good team … But Weber couldn’t close. take advantage of it.” we can play with anyone.” He had his serve broken and Merzbacher has talked then lost the tiebreaker, sendabout his team being “Gopher Weber wins one ing the match to a decisive Tough” all season — a senti- for men final set. ment that was embodied durRuben Weber was the last In the third set, he fell man standing for the Gophers behind 3-1. (9-8, 3-2) on Sunday afternoon “I got really tight,” Weber in Indiana. said, “so my mindset changed No. 50 Minnesota, which a little bit in a negative way.” lost an ugly 6-1 match against Weber managed to regain No. 41 Purdue on Friday, his composure and won five was locked at 3-3 against of the next six games down No. 65 Indiana with just We- the stretch to seal his match ber’s match left. and give the Gophers the “I knew it was going to be win. really intense,” Weber said. His teammates rushed “We had guys [from both onto his court after the win. teams] yelling back and forth. “It felt amazing,” Weber It was crazy. I loved it.” said. “We really needed that With the attention cen- win.”

WOMEN’S GOLF

Laguna leads team to fifth

BY NATE GOTLIEB ngotlieb@mndaily.com

Minnesota junior captain Carmen Laguna rebounded from a lackluster per formance two weeks ago with a fourth-place finish at the Mountain View Collegiate Invitational in Tucson, Ariz. Her four th-place finish paced the Gophers women’s golf team to a fifth-place finish. Minnesota finished with an aggregate team score of 23-over par over the course of the 54-hole tournament. It finished just 13 strokes behind first-place Nebraska. Laguna led the team with an even-par 216 about two weeks after shooting a 20-over par 236 at the BYU Entrada Classic. “Carmen got back into her own mental game and focusing on herself,” head coach Michele Redman said. “She just did a really good job getting back to Carmen on the golf course and just trusting herself.” Laguna was Minnesota’s top player during the fall season, averaging 74 strokes per round. She has averaged 73.8 strokes per round this spring, despite the above-average scores at the BYU tournament. “Before playing this tournament, I didn’t feel confident about myself,” Laguna said. “And now I feel like I’m getting back that confidence.” Gophers freshman Emie Peronnin was the team’s

WOMEN’S GOLF RESULTS

GOLFER RD1 RD2 72 71 Laguna 72 76 Peronnin Thitiratanakorn 74 77 75 76 Laorr 77 78 Theinthong 76 71 Quinn TEAM 1 Nebraska 2 Kent State 3 Missouri 4 Gonzaga 5 Minnesota

RD1 291 292 293 289 295

RD2 288 292 299 297 300

RD3 73 74 74 75 73 83

TOTAL 216 222 225 226 228 230

RD3 295 291 287 298 294

TOTAL 874 875 879 884 887

*out of 17 teams

SOURCE: GOLFSTATRESULTS.COM

second-leading scorer this past weekend, shooting a 6-over par 222 to tie for 23rd. She was followed by junior Sarinee Thitiratanakorn, who was third on the team with a 9-over 225. Minnesota junior Anna Laorr tied for 35th at 10- o ver p ar, s en i o r Banchalee Theinthong tied for 48th at 12-over par and redshirt junior Taylor Quinn rounded out the lineup with a 14-over par. The Gophers shot a 5-over par 293 in the first round Friday morning and a 12-over par 300 that afternoon. They finished with a 6-over par 294 on Saturday afternoon. Redman said the team hit the ball well but struggled with putting. She said she isn’t too concerned, though, given that the team’s scores have improved over the course of the spring season.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Eliason injures ankle BY JACE FREDERICK jfrederick@mndaily.com

Elliott Eliason gingerly strolled through the Bierman Field Athletic Building on Saturday afternoon with his left foot in a walking boot. Eliason turned his left ankle in practice Thursday when he came down on it awkwardly, head coach Richard Pitino said. Eliason wasn’t practicing as of Saturday, but Pitino said he doesn’t think the injury is as bad as the ankle sprain junior guard Andre Hollins sustained in the middle of the season, which caused him to miss two games. “We’ve just got to be leery of it and watch it,” Pitino said. “We’ve got to get him healthy.” Eliason’s presence will be a necessity for the Gophers in

the National Invitation Tournament semifinals Tuesday against Florida State — the third-tallest team in the nation, according to KenPom.com “If he can’t play full minutes, can he give us 10 [to] 15 minutes?” Pitino said. “That’s huge for us, because we need a backup center. We can’t have Mo [Walker] play 40 minutes.” Walker isn’t a bad option to turn to for heavy minutes if Eliason can’t give it a full go. Walker has turned into an offensive force for the Gophers down low of late. He delivered a 12-point effort in Minnesota’s victory over Southern Mississippi. Pitino said Walker — the backup center for most of the season — is likely to get the starting nod Tuesday with Eliason unable to practice.


Monday, March 31, 2014

Classifieds

15

RATES PER LINE/DAY • PREPAID: $2.70, BILLED: $3.10, CREDIT CARD: $2.70 To place a Classified linage ad, call: 612-627-4080 or email: classifieds@mndaily.com To place a display ad, call: 612-435-5863 For billing questions, call: 612-627-4080 *$60 minimum billing Linage hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. E-mail address: classifieds@mndaily.com Classified Sales Manager: Brittany Swaine 612-435-2750

The Minnesota Daily must approve all ad copy and reserves the right to request text changes, reject or reclassify an ad. Advertisers are responsible for the truthfulness of their ads. Advertisers are also subject to credit approval. Corrections are accepted until 2 p.m., Mon.-Fri., by calling 612627-4080. To cancel an ad, call 612-6274080. In order to ensure proper credit, cancellations must be made by 1 p.m.; otherwise the ad will appear in the following day’s paper and be charged accordingly. Prepaid ads will be refunded by mail or in person if canceled before the end date. Please check the ad carefully after its first run; linage will not be responsible for any errors after that. The Minnesota Daily discourages sending credit card information through email.

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

HOUSING

Campus Club Banquet Server: Part time servers needed for Campus Club, 4th Union. Flexible hours including weekends. Able to lift/move 40lbs. Great for summer work. Prior wait experience preferred but will train the right person. Work with friendly staff and learn about local organic cuisine! Apply 4th floor Coffman Union.

The UPS Store in Mpls has a part time position open. This is a retail position. If you are interested you may email your resume and telephone # to Store3408@theupsstore.com

DINKYTOWN

Love People?!!Love Cleaning?!!Love Dogs?!!Hip Downtown Dog Daycare is seeking Dog Handlers! Please apply at 821 2nd Ave N, Mpls MN 55405. You can get direction off of our website www. downtowndogsminneapolis.com!

UNIVERSITY POSITIONS Landcare Student Worker Positions Available for immediate employment. Must be an undergraduate U of MN student. PT during the school year and FT employment the summer. Mon-Fri, Wed-Sun, Sat-Wed. 7:00 am -3:30 pm. Go to http://z.umn.edu/landcarestudent

E.Bank Apts 3, 2, & 1 BR avail. 8/1-9/1 CPT, A/C, PKG, LNDRY, 612-237-6941 www.UofMHousing.com

HOUSING Sandy Hill Apartments Large 2 br, large patio and gar, heat inc, avail now 2 mi east of St Paul campus www.sandyhillapartments.com 651-775-0511

HOUSE & DUPLEX-DINKYTOWN 8 Bedroom 3 Bath House for rent 8 BEDROOM 3 BATH HOUSE FOR RENT 1 BLOCK TO CAMPUS. LAUNDRY AND OFF STREET PARKING, AVAILABLE 9/3/2014, 1 YEAR LEASE, GROUPS ONLY.Email rminn@sp-realestate.com

Events

HAVE AN EVENT YOU WOULD LIKE TO PROMOTE IN THE DAILY? Submit your event to have it featured here for free. If you would like your event promoted here, go to mndaily.com/contact and fill out the provided form.

UPCOMING EVENTS WHAT: Live Fibers WHO: For students WHEN: 6-9 p.m. Wednesday WHERE: Textile Center, 3000 University Ave. SE, Minneapolis PRICE: Free Are you a student? JOIN US for free food, free micro-workshops and free supplies! Do you know students who may be interested? Please invite them and spread the word! On April 2, we will give college students studying art and design the opportunity to learn about the Textile Center’s resources through a hands-on, social and interactive event. Students will explore the center’s facilities while participating in fiber art micro-workshops presented by local experts!

WHAT: Die Laughing WHO: Fearless Comedy Productions WHEN: 7 p.m. Friday-9 p.m. Sunday WHERE: Hilton, 3800 American Blvd. E., Bloomington PRICE: $15 Die Laughing is 50 hours of nonstop comedy … that’s right, 50 hours. The members of Fearless Comedy Productions and the local comedy community will be staying up way past their bedtimes to entertain the Twin Cities. Presented by Fearless Comedy Productions, Die Laughing will raise money for its upcoming season of shows and new theatrical productions through pledges, money-raising “fearless” challenges and even an amazing silent auction and raffle.

WHAT: Author Debut and Book Launch WHO: Haley Snyder (Minnesota author and public speaker) WHEN: 3-9 p.m. Saturday WHERE: The Park Tavern, 3401 Louisiana Ave. S., St. Louis Park, Minn. PRICE: Free Join Univeristy of Minnesota alumna Haley Snyder on Saturday, April 5, from 3-9 p.m. at the Park Tavern for the debut of her book “Get That Girl a Cheeseburger: Eating Disorder Myths and Misnomers.” You are invited to enjoy appetizers, refreshments and a book signing by the author, as well as a reading from the book followed by a Q-and-A at 6 p.m.

Featured Student Group HAVE A STUDENT GROUP YOU WOULD LIKE TO PROMOTE IN THE DAILY? The Minnesota Daily promotes student groups here for free. If you would like your student group featured, e-mail studentgroups@mndaily.com with contact person, contact phone, contact e-mail, student group name, group description (limit 250 characters), and a photo if possible. Don’t have a photo? Contact us in advance to take your group photo.

The Minnesota Daily Classifieds page is a service for student groups. Student groups can promote themselves for free in the featured section. Featured student groups run for one week and are published on a rolling submission basis. This page is independent from the Minnesota Daily’s editorial content and is operated by the advertising staff. Group submissions are subject to approval by the Publisher for wording, illustrations and typography. Any content that attacks, criticizes or demeans any individual, race, religion, sex, institution, firm, business, profession, organization or affectional preference shall not be accepted.


16

Monday, March 31, 2014

BACKTALK

horoscopes

sudoku

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve sudoku, visit sudoku.org.uk.

3/31/2014

Thursday’s solution © 2013 Michael Mepham. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Today’s Birthday (3/31): Happiness and fun flavor this year. Career is furthered through education and communication skills. Your purpose and passions are becoming clearer.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Written By Linda C. Black

Aries (3/21 - 4/19): Today is a 6 — You’re thinking about romance and beauty. Imagine the possibilities. Let a family member handle a problem at home. Delegate a task you hate.

Libra (9/23 - 10/22): Today is a 6 — Unexpected situations arise, and actions seem to deviate from the itinerary. Revise agreements. Sell more to old clients.

Taurus (4/20 - 5/20): Today is a 5 — Take short term, local actions, without force. Paying dues leads to more income. Make a list of what you need.

Scorpio (10/23 - 11/21): Today is a 6 — Take care of your mind, body and spirit. Pursue peace and privacy with inexpensive pleasures, like tea under a tree or fragrant bath crystals.

Gemini (5/21 - 6/21): Today is a 5 — Make love, not war. Be careful with sharp instruments. Argue privately, if you must. Your attentions linger close to home.

Sagittarius (11/22 - 12/21): Today is a 6 — Play to see who can have the most fun while managing urgencies. Delegate what you can. Pamper yourself.

Cancer (6/22 - 7/22): Today is a 5 — Change your work habits. A new trick doesn’t work, and it could cause a breakdown. Postpone chores, and put in the correction.

Capricorn (12/22 - 1/19): Today is a 6 — Proceed with caution, one step at a time. Don’t get stopped by old fears, but don’t rush, either. Get something for your home.

Leo (7/23 - 8/22): Today is a 5 — Don’t save in a sieve. Study the situation. There’s another possible problem here. Be prepared for physical labor with discipline.

Aquarius (1/20 - 2/18): Today is a 5 — Consider the consequences before diving into action. Wait for more data. Think it over, and figure the costs.

Virgo (8/23 - 9/22): Today is a 5 — Don’t rush into anything. You’re building your family fortune, and things don’t go as planned. New problems develop. Avoid reckless spending.

Pisces (2/19 - 3/20): Today is a 6 — Take small, persistent actions close to home. Little profits add up, and cash flow arises through community connections.


Monday, March 31, 2014

crossword

from the archive

Wednesday, March 31, 2004

BACKTALK

13

FOR FOR RELEASE RELEASE MARCH MARCH 28, 31, 2014 2014

DAILY CROSSWORD Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Hey Networkia, guess everybody’s working on papers or something, since y’all are unusually reticent today. We could’ve printed this e-mail we got yesterday about how much we suck, but we figured that everyone knows how much we suck already. Say, did you ever notice how the exact same people who complain about a couple of dollars in taxes to pay for bus service for everybody are also the people who want to charge you 125 clams every year to pay for a new stadium that the majority of people on campus will never see the inside of? It’s like the psychopaths who want to ban abortion AND condoms. Or the lunatics who want to end welfare AND send all the jobs to India or China. Nutcases like the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. We tell ya’ Networkia, somebody oughta write a book about people — they’re peculiar.

From TitleIXEnforcer

I, like GoldenGopherHockeyFan, also had a tear come to my eye with the realization that there would be no three-peat. Net: Isn’t “three-peat” a weird word? Sounds like something that old Irish people would have sitting next to the fireplace in their cottage. Being a supporter of the beloved Title IX, I was shocked when there was no riot for the Women’s Hockey National Championship. I mean come on, what ever happened to equality in men’s and women’s sports? If you’re going to have a riot for a men’s national hockey championship, then you have to have one for a women’s national hockey championship. Net: You got that right! MOC: Riot, you’ll like it! There are only two things that can be done to bring justice to this horrible situation. First the NCAA is going to have to come in and sanction the men’s hockey team. I HEY! SEND YOUR ENTRY, NAME & PHONE TO:

mean if you get a few years probation and a post season ban for having some overweight tutor doing homework for the basketball team, then a violation of Title IX as blatant as this surely deserves as harsh a punishment if not more. Net: To ensure that the men’s hockey team lives up to their tradition of greatness, Network has devised a scheme for “negative reinforcement.” Every year that men’s hockey does not win the championship, they will be subject to the following punishment: The entire team (including the sports Goldy associated with hockey games) will be forced to wear green felt beanies with a pink “L” for “loser” whenever they are on campus. Students who see a men’s hockey player will be allowed to throw geology books at them and taunt them mercilessly until they cry. Finally, the entire team will be forced to strip down to frilly, satin panties and run through Dinkytown singing the rouser while being paddled by the women’s rowing team on the last day of classes. The second thing that will need to be done to bring justice to this situation is that the Women’s hockey team is going to need to sue the entire student body for not rioting after they won their first NCAA championship. They can just get the money from student fees next year. We pay for so much needless crap anyway what’s another 50 bucks a person? Net: Heck, why not make it a hundred or even two hundred? The victorious women’s team could get gleaming titanium-alloy helmets, with laseretched logos highlighted in 18-carat gold. Also, they could get some of those gigantic Humvee limousines to drive them to games. Then, they could have a triumphal arch constructed to look like gigantic pair of hockey sticks (sorta like what Saddam Hussein had in Baghdad, but more tastefully done).

NETWORK@MNDAILY.COM

Minnesota Daily Volume 105, Issue 120 March 31, 2004

ACROSS 1 Thermoplastic resin ACROSS ACROSS 6 Musial or Lee 10 __ Bator, 11 Dominion Insect stage Mongolia Sink down in the 66 Food on a stick 14 Varnish ingredient 11 Olympus middle OM-2, 15 Movie: pref. Heavy haulers 16 Palm thatch 9 briefly 17 Meat pastes14 14 Templo Not quite Mayor 18 Director spherical builder Preminger 15 Home Single to some 19 Consider 15 20 Start of Mae 16 Mild-mannered mollusks West quote reporter Kent 22 Part 2 of quote 16 Plus 23 Lady's man 17 Tennis court official 17 Guys with plenty 24 Maritime 19 of Overzealous type 26 Kind of time for child perception 20 Point after deuce 28 In a tawdry 21 care? More narcissistic manner 20 Stirling topper 32 Little nails 23 Asian New Year 21 in Marseille 34 __ Moines, IA 24 One Harbor long-term 35 Hook's right-22 Is gaga over resentment hand man 23 36 Ely or Howard 27 Astern Portuguese 37 Part 3 of quote 24 They’re explorer Vasco 41 Mil. captive 4 Changed 42 Como __ 30 established Open courtfor the better Usted? 26 Lament following hearing, in law 5 Unless, in law 44 100 square 31 an News org. 6 Elizabethan Word with pine meters or tape 45 Amherst sch.32 wardrobe Construction 7 Church 47 Make like new zone cones malfunction? contribution 49 Principle 8 Long-tongued 51 Tornado 36 Hei-tiki Earth-orbiting 31 wearers predator 53 Outer edges Gagarin 32 Passes 9 Keanubetween in "The 56 Part 4 of quote Matrix" 59 End of quote39 peaks Birds that 10 Disconnects 61 Kind of frost symbolize peace 33 “Stat!” from the space 62 Narrow 41 Pop Right, vis-à-vis shuttle secluded valley 34 star John 11 In __ of 63 Vedas reader left: Abbr. producer 12 Simians 64 Scots Gaelic35 Sched. 42 Tie Early PC interface 13 together Designate 65 Legendary loch 36 21 Ready in ads 66 Open sore 43 Glasses, R&B alternative 67 New Jersey 38 Island 44 derivative More 22 __ than jacet mono team 25 Editorialfacility 68 Food on the 46 Workout 39 cartoonist of hoof 47 “Dragonwyck” Water, in Juárez 33 34 old Seton 69 Flash of light 49 author Amazingly 38 27 Greek letter 40 Resolution 39 29 Restlessness DOWN enough 40 30 Most born in 1 Flower part targets 51 Creamy 43 August 2 Place to Barney with 46 31 Poisonous remember 41 Like confection evergreens 3 Delaying his pal? 56 End of atitle prof’s 48 49 32 Fox's agents

45 “Twisted” actress URL 57 Richards Type of vegetable 46 Short oil life story? 47 58 Small Yuckypower muck 62 source Soup scoop 64 The “Staylotput!” 49 66 Banff Partner of vim 50 Upper Hot 67 Springs, Seventh e.g. Greek letterlocked out of 53 Got 68 aLove, to Luciano Finnish sauna 69 during Length-timeswinter? widthrotten calculations 57 Feel 70 End Opposite 58 of __of NNW 71 Remove Yankee shortstop 59 Jeter who 60 Gnarly relative announced he 61 Greek salad will retire at the features end of 2014 62 Lets DOWN DOWNshe 1 Whatever 1 Slew wants, she gets 22 University Zealous Cornell 3 founder Rice-A-__

Edited Edited by by Rich Rich Norris Norris and and Joyce Joyce Lewis Lewis

3/28/14 3/31/14 34 “Up andof__!” Capital Austria Thursday’s Saturday’s Puzzle Solved Wd. modifying 45 Sheltered side a noun 5 Nationwide 6 sandwich Dr Pepperdebut and Dr.1972 Brown’s of 50 Pause fillers Ballplayer Pete 1973 The ones here Female rabbitRolling 67 Citizen of52Little 54 Euripides play Rani'sStones wrap ballad Salem, 55 __ und Drang Grappler 8 Colorado Davis 56 Subsequently Attila the __ of “A 57Their Had on OutfitsLeague of 7 Flight Actress Dina stat58 Tobacco kiln Own” 60 Hoodlum Possess 8 It’s good for 9 little Move like62a Econ. meas. Very Michel squirrel 9 NFL owner who 10 Right-angle bend 11 moved Politicalthe Oakland Raiders commentator to L.A. back with anand Internet 10 11-Down “Report” 12 supporters Discount rack 11 Show abbr. founded as 13 aGlide on ice vehicle for 18 Scott Sunlamp danger, (c)2014 3/28/14 Hamilton (c)2014 Tribune Tribune Content ContentAgency, Agency, LLC LLC 3/31/14 briefly 12 Ear piece 29 out 47 out there 52 Way Firefighter Red 35 Pointed “All Things 22 Acuff Narcissists 13 and have 53 Musical South American Considered” 30 Milk sources airer for 48 big ones Orbison range 37 Pecorino Rogers and Clark cheese highlight 25 __’acte Men pocketing 18 54 Cries Pays,of as the bill 38 Fit Beliefs baseballs 31 together well 49 19 Big Ben sound 55 discovery Radii-paralleling 40 Outdoor WWII vet,camera say 26 Prefix Sometimes-illegal 36 23 with bones “The __ 42 user’s Synthesizer turns, for short accessory 50 Sibelius’ 59 of Skunk’s pioneer 27 ballistic Fizzling 37 Actor Robert De Tuonela” 24 “Hallelujah!” defense 44 Room in una casa firecrackers 51 visitor 25 60 Unwanted Fairy tale fiend 45 __ Conclude by 28 “That’s Each for sure!” 39 compound 26 blue streak 61 Some Eye onpints the sly 48 Dye Stomach ailments 52 29 __ Push gently 54 27 way 42 63 Fishing Hawaii’said 50 “Holy Lentil moly!” or pea 33 Inconsistent Valet’s purview 43 55 Musical syllable run Mauna __ 51 Greening Aqua __: up 34 to Not shut, 28 Baker’s creations 44 Willing cohort? 65 Profitable Terrible rock aftershave brand 56 poetically By Hunsberger By Paul Ed Sessa

dr. date Dr. Date,

I have been good friends with this guy for four years. We met in a class, and he liked me, but I dated other guys who were not as innocent as he was. I had a boyfriend for almost two years, and he provided the shoulder I could cry on and a person to vent to. At some point, we were having an emotional affair, and my boyfriend, at the time, forced me not to talk to him. After a while, I approached him but then got friend-zoned. He now has had a girlfriend for a while, and I was his go-to person. I gave him advice about the pill, ways to pleasure her, reasons to break up with her, Plan B, etc. Whenever we talk to each other, he only asks me if I have been dating other guys, not about my life. Is it me, or is this odd?

—Platonic Love

The Used,

It sounds like he’s bitter about something. Asking about your dating life is one thing, but when it’s the only topic of recent conversations, it sounds like there’s something lurking beneath the surface. You already know what it is. He likes you. He’s always liked you. He’s resentful that you dated a bunch of other dudes while stringing him along and using him to fulfill your emotional needs. Now he’s doing the same thing to you. We all need to feel powerful sometimes. I’m sure he’s still bitter about your past relationship dynamics and now that he’s in a position to give you the same treatment, he’s all over it. And it doesn’t feel good, does it? He’s doing exactly what you did to him — he’s using you. If you two want to remain friends, you need to lay it all out. Ideally, he would approach you with his woes instead of silently retaliating, but that’s not usually how things work. If you want change, you need to make it happen.

—Dr. Date

Dr. Date,

I was in a yearlong long-distance relationship (I’m here, she’s in Illinois) that ended last fall when she broke my heart and told me she didn’t think she wanted

to stay in a relationship anymore. Now, several months later, I sent her a simple Facebook message just checking up on her and seeing how she’s been. She has been doing all right, but things have been “tough” for her lately. We had a brief chat online, and I ended the conversation by asking her if I could text her sometime soon, to which she said, “Yes.” Now, here’s my predicament: I am still entirely in love with this girl, and I miss her something terrible, despite the 400-mile buffer. I’ve dated a handful of new girls since our breakup, but those flings dissolved quickly and felt minimal in comparison to what I once had, even though it was the taboo long-distance. The bottom line is that I want her back in my life more than anything, even if it means going the extra mile(s). Therefore, I seek your trusty advice: Should I delight in my petty optimism and play with the idea that maybe, just maybe, she misses me and still loves me also? Although I know it’s a very risky idea, part of me wants to build contact in hopes that I can win back the woman I still love. However, the experienced side of me is screaming the opposite: Do not text her — protect yourself! (The latter is clearly the safer option, yet it eliminates any chance of us getting back together.) Give me the goods!

—I Can’t Let Her Go ... Yet

Proclaimer In Training,

Dammit, now I have the Proclaimers stuck in my head. Would you walk 500 miles for this girl? A thousand miles? It sounds like you would. Probably not a good idea, though. Listen, if she already broke the relationship off last time you were dating, what makes you think she won’t do it again? I tend to believe that it’s impossible to stay in a committed relationship after a breakup, but I’m sure some people make it work. That being said, you have the added obstacle of special distance. Make this easy on yourself. Don’t text her. Put the Band-Aid back on the wound, and move on with your life until the right lady comes along. It’ll happen.

—Dr. Date

Need relationship advice? Email Dr. Date at drdate@mndaily.com.

17


18

Monday, March 31, 2014

Science students back bonding request Students from all five University campuses flocked to the Capitol on Thursday to push for state funding. BY BLAIR EMERSON bemerson@mndaily.com

More than a 150 students from the University of Minnesota campuses flooded the state Capitol on Thursday to advocate for the school’s 2014 capital request. Many of the students were in the sciences, there to support the University’s requests for money to build and renovate science buildings and laboratories, including a $56.7 million renovation of the Tate Laboratory of Physics. “We need to have the facilities to complement the students and the faculty that utilize those facilities,” biology freshman Mitchell Fuller said. Students met with more than 50 legislators to share how the proposed projects could affect their future educations if they receive state funding. “[Legislators] need to understand that you need to learn and do your research in 21st-century facilities,” University President Eric Kaler said in a speech Thursday at Coffman Union. Students filled a room at the Capitol to listen to legislators talk about the capital request projects and the continuation of a tuition freeze for undergraduate students. Rep. Gene Pelowski, DFL-Winona, wore a red sweater — the same one he wore at the 2013 Support the U Day — to “symbolize historic cuts to higher education over the last eight years.” Pelowski told students in a speech Thursday that he wants to continue the tuition freeze for resident undergraduates and pursue other means of lowering tuition. “This is the last time I’m wearing a red sweater,” he said. Gov. Mark Dayton’s

bonding proposal recommended that the University receive just over half of its $232 million bonding request, but Pelowski said he hopes that the final bonding bill provides greater funding for outstate campuses. Some state leaders expressed concerns earlier this session that the University’s Duluth campus may not receive its fair share of funding, which has led some, including Pelowski, to ask the University to reevaluate where it appropriates money. Pelowski said it will be important for students to encourage lawmakers to vote for full funding of the University’s request. “We need nine Republican votes,” he said. “If we don’t get nine Republican votes, there is no bonding bill, there is no repair [and] there are no new buildings.” Many students showed their support for the capital request projects that will fund research lab improvements. Beau Miller, a senior studying biochemistry and genetics, cell biology and development, attended Support the U Day to vouch for the University’s bonding requests to build and renovate labs. He said improving lab conditions will hopefully bring more students to the College of Biological Sciences and increase undergraduate student research.

Outstate campuses have their say

Some students from the University of MinnesotaDuluth campus said Higher Education Asset Preservation and Replacement funding will be especially important to their campus this year. “Walking through the halls ever y day in certain buildings, you can definitely tell ... we’re in need of [ren-

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

Crookston Student Association President Alexmai Addo speaks to Minnesota State Sen. LeRoy Stumpf, DFL-Plummer, about the University’s bonding bill at Support the U Day on Thursday at the Capitol.

“We need to have the facilities to complement the students and the faculty that utilize those facilities.” MITCHELL FULLER Biology freshman

ovations],” said Hannah Keil, the Duluth campus’s student representative to the Board of Regents. The University requested $100 million in HEAPR funds, which would renovate campuses systemwide, but both the governor and the House recommended only $40 million. Rep. Thomas Huntley, DFL-Duluth, used to be a professor at the Duluth campus and said lab renovations for that institution are vital. “We have two buildings there that haven’t been touched in 50-plus years,” he said. “[They] need

some upgrading.” Eric Gandrud, a German and international relations senior at the University’s Morris campus, said that although Mor ris made a smaller request, he hopes legislators will allocate some money to renovate the campus’s buildings. “Mor ris is hor ribly handicapped-inaccessible,” he said. Crookston students also suppor ted the $10 million request to remodel the campus’s Wellness Center, which was recommended full funding by the governor and the House. “I’m happy that the Uni-

CHELSEA GORTMAKER, DAILY

Students talk to Minnesota State Sen. Kari Dziedzic, DFLMinneapolis, about the University’s bonding bill at Support the U Day on Thursday at the state Capitol.

versity had put [the Wellness Center] on its list,” Sen. LeRoy Stumpf, DFLPlummer, told students in a small-group meeting Thursday. Many students attended the Suppor t the U Day to advocate for both the University’s capital request and the impor tance

of investing in higher education. “It’s impor tant for our leaders to invest in our futures so that we will have the ability to bring the skills and knowledge that we learned to ever y corner of the state,” said Kimberly Newton, Duluth’s student body president.

March 31, 2014  
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