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RESIDUAL REINFORCEMENT MASTERPLANNING WITH MASSIVE FLUX MLA Design Research Project A

Ben Kazacos S3167866 1


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RESIDUAL REINFORCEMENT MASTERPLANNING WITH MASSIVE FLUX MLA Design Research Project A

Ben Kazacos S3167866 3


Acknowledgements Thankyou to the following people for helping me along the way. Craig Douglas (for making it fun) Charles Anderson (for making things clear) Natasha Morgan (for cutting through the crap) William Welsh (for his genius perspective) Jim McGuinness (for the hard to answer questions) Brock Hogan and Phoebe Baker-Gabb (for all the pencils) Tom Hulse (for the jams) Mum (for her love and support) Dad (for his belief in me) Age (for the exercise and mashed potatoes) Matt (for the hilarious conversations and messages)

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For Mum and Dad

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CONTENTS 08.

THE FIELD OF RESEARCH 10.

14.

20.

THE FOLLIES

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48.

The shift Set one; form

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Set two; behaviour

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Set three; reaction

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Set four; restraint

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Set five; thawed

THE FLUX 22.

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Broad framework

MIZUHO SPORTS PRECINCT

Making sense of demand Remapping & contrasting unique types of seasonal demand An investigation of stadia’s effect on post war Nagoya

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Arena breakdown

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Relationship to context

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U.S Military strategic breakdown

RUSUTSU SKI VILLAGE

An examination of concentrated seasonal flux in Hokkaido

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Occupancy ratios

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Agriculture vs. environment

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Condition & consequence

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Re-appropriating infrastructure

PHILLIP ISLAND

A study of massive flux, service & infrastructure

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Primary & secondary housing

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Season & demand

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Detailed cluster distribution

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Freeway stack

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Adapting structure voids

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Primary systems

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Secondary systems

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Informed filteration

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Spatial breakdown

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Boat launch precinct 6


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Two pronged attack

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Water security

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Congestion

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Working masterplan

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Synergetic seasonal sections

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CONCLUSION

& future direction for project B

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REFERENCES

Text

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Images

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Remember when we met? That car was racing toward me, I was trying to greet it, you pushed me out of the way? Didn’t you find it a little strange that I was trying to shake hands with a car? I assumed you were drunk. I thought cars were the dominant life form. I was trying to introduce myself. And that’s why you’re named after a discontinued car from the seventies?

Conversation between Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect, approximately seven minutes before the destruction of Earth to make way for a hyperspace express route. (Adams, 1979)

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THE FIELD OF RESEARCH BROAD FRAMEWORK

Massive Flux in a Rural context

Mizhuho Sports Precinct, Nagoya, Japan. How can stadia typologies influence the organisation of their surrounding urban environment? Event determines Infrastructure

Massive Flux in an Urban context

Rusutsu Ski Village, South Hokkaido, Japan. What effects do seasonally dependent events and their consequences place on urban environments? Seasonal Event, determined by Site can lead to inflexible and wasted Infrastructure

Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia. How can infrastructure be implemented on Phillip Island to effectively negotiate growing peak season demands while still spatially and programmatically facilitating the off season demands of permanent residents? Infrastructure has the capacity to repsond to shifting Site demands as a result of seasonal Event.

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I believe that the modern surface parking lot is ripe for transformation. Few of us spend much time thinking about parking beyond availability and convenience. But parking lots are, in fact, much more than spots to temporarily store cars: they are public spaces that have major impacts on the design of our cities and suburbs, on the natural environment and on the rhythms of daily life. We need to redefine what we mean by “parking lot� to include something that not only allows a driver to park his car, but also offers a variety of other public uses, mitigates its effect on the environment and gives greater consideration to aesthetics and architectural context.

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Eran Ben-Joseph

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RESIDUAL REINFORCEMENT BROAD FRAMEWORK

During the summer months, Phillip Island’s seasonally concentrated events inflate the permanent population of 7,000 to exceed 50,000 people, on top of the island’s annual 3.45 million day visitors. This massive flux stretches the island’s infrastructures well beyond capacity. Services including car parking, potable water, roads and boat launching become stretched to failure. The rapid shift in demand not only places services and infrastructures under stress, but also creates an imbalance between them and current needs as the island’s existing infrastructure has been determined purely by peak season demands. As a result, the contrast in the off-season is an abundance of redundant infrastructure that manifests an adverse effect. Currently, commuter vehicles occupy up to 200 hectares of Phillip Island’s surface for approximately 30 to 90 days of the year. In 2032, the spatial occupation will increase to over 350 hectares, spanning over the same time of year. For the remaining days of the year, the car parks built to facilitate this surge sit empty and unused. I believe that they can provide more for their island and still negotiate the influx of vehicles. Instead of car parks, they could become Support Parks that shift between primary and secondary modes in response to the massive flux to sustain the island. With the population projected to increase by approximately 180% over the next two decades, large infrastructural upgrades will be required to maintain the island as a functional tourist destination. Government intervention has, to date, taken the form of a Desalination Plant, a new freeway, and several generic housing estates. These additions are all designed to cope with consistently high volume rather than compensate and adapt to relative usage. They are highly inflexible reactions. As a result they will only exacerbate the existing problem and eventually need further extensive upgrades as the population continues to expand. This research explores alternatives design strategies that promote growth, mediate the problems produced by the existing planning strategy, and catalyse new opportunities for future development.

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The body of design research conducted has been concerned with alternative forms and systems of infrastructure that might negotiate and shift with Phillip Island’s massive seasonal flux. It examines how these alternatives might begin to offset the negative effects of massive flux by regenerating resources, bolstering ecosystems and ultimately preparing the island for the next surge of summer hungry tourists. More recently, the aim has been to reorganise current services and infrastructures in a way that utilises car parking facilities to solve these issues. It is being developed through the classification of event, flux and service, and how they ultimately affect and inform one another. Specifically, I am testing this research through the following lens.

How can alternative forms and systems of car parking infrastructure engage with Phillip Island’s massive flux to offset the negative impact is has upon service, infrastructure, local residents and ecologies to generate a set of unique landscapes that are capable of establishing synergetic networks at a macro scale?

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THE SHIFT My initial research question; How can the interchangeable and adaptive intention of stadiums extend beyond their architectural boundaries to generate the urban growth and development of satellite cities? grew from my job as an operations technician at the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Precinct. Constructing event specific infrastructures from incredibly flexible and highly designed modular systems was somewhat at odds with the relatively rigid nature of the overall stadium. It sparked the thought that these great structures, with such extensive amounts of construction and money being poured into these buildings it didn’t seem impossible that a hybridised stadium facilitating sports and events could be seamlessly integrated with or actually generate an urban condition. Working through the five series of follies over and over has begun to help me define the;

flexibility retention expansion contraction stress relaxation & reaction that I wish to explore throughout this year. The process made me realise that a standard arena-esque stadium would not keep me sufficiently occupied, nor would it address social and urban issues through the discourse of landscape architecture.

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“

The empire was vast. A Roman citizen could travel from the north of England, through France and Germany to the Middle East, along the whole of the north coast of Africa and into Spain and never cross a national boundary. Rome was the focal point of this empire, and Rome’s most important building was the Colosseum. (Lightner, 1988) 17


THE FOLLIES SET ONE

The search for this initial material (pool noodle) was framed by my desire to build a series of concept stadium models. I think this form based work was influenced by the research into the Colosseum, MVRDV’s Stockholm Stadium and the work of Populous Architects. The first attempts were too revolved around form, but I see now that I needed to understand that my research was not so. Similarly in my attempt to depict the notion of decenteralisation my outcomes were far too literal, somewhat crude physical diagrams.

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SET TWO The shift between my initial research question and my current one came about between my first and second follie series’. The orange foam material was chosen based on its physical likeness to a traditional stadium rather than the flexible qualities I wanted to exacerbate. I was frustrated at not immediately grasping the intention of the exercise and so went searching furiously for the material that best manifested in the physical what was in my head. The idea to use sponges came to me at 3am during a night of sleeplessness. The second series aimed to broadly test constraint and resiliance while playing with the capacity of the sponge and various forms of resistance, (elastic, stockings, twine).

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SET THREE It then occurred that any intervention on site would have cause-effect on local ecology, existing spatial and systems arrangements, and patrons. The exercise was performed again though this time with wet sponges. The sensitive reaction of cold leaking water onto my face and arms kept this occurrence fresh in my mind for the duration.

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SET FOUR The materials sought to demonstrate adaptability and demand while testing the retention of form verses memory over time. After several days the restraints were released and the sponges eventually reclaimed their original rectangular prism form. Each sponge tested different types and degrees of restraint through varying materials (cotton, elastic bands, pantyhose) and manipulation of those materials. The sponges were dry.

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SET FIVE Progressing from the third set of follies, performed with wet sponges, this set was soaked in water, bound in elastic and then frozen for a period of time. It was hypothesised that the sponges would retain their new forms for much longer given their new restraint of infiltrated ice. This was similar in some ways to the cotton threading technique as both penetrated the internals of the sponge, influencing form from the inside out but also as it melted; through temporal ways like the elastic materials.

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THE FLUX

MAKING SENSE OF DEMAND My first attempt at mapping Phillip Island’s seasonal demands was not so successful in that neither the process nor the outcome were useful as tools for understanding. A linear layout would have been more coherent when depicting chronological scale.

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PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

PENGUINS *CIRCUIT *PYRAMID ROCK FEST BEACHING SURFING FISHING

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JUST ANOTHER DAY SCHOOL HOLIDAYS DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME (DLST) BASS COAST POPULATION PEAK LONG WEEKEND/PUBLIC HOLIDAY NO USE (CLOSED) LOW/OCCASIONAL USE MEDIUM-HIGH/REGULAR USE VERY HIGH/CAPACITY USE SPECTACLE EVENT 25


REMAPPING & CONTRASTING UNIQUE TYPES OF SEASONAL DEMAND This updated series of seasonal demand mappings provd to be much more useful to me throughout Project A. The layout here allowed me to include and more easily identify school holidays, daylight savings perdiods, months, seasons and in the case of Phillip Island my intended site visit dates.

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

SUMMER S UMMER UM MMER M WINTER W T

S NG SPRING

SNOW SEASON WINTER OLYMPICS

RUSUTSU

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

SUMMER S UMMER UM MMER M WINTER W

SPRING

PENGUINS GP CIRUIT PYRAMID ROCK FEST GENERAL HOLIDAYING SURFING FISHING

PHILLIP ISLAND 26

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

MIZUHO


MAY

APRIL

MARCH

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

MAY

APRIL

MARCH

AUTUMN

SUMMER

AUTUMN

SUMMER

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AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

WINTER AUTUMN

RUSUTSU

AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

WINTER AUTUMN

AUGUST

JULY

JUNE

MIZUHO

PHILLIP ISLAND 28


NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

29 DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

SPRING S

WINTER

SPRING

WINTER


DECEMBER

SUMMER

RUSUTSU

DECEMBER

SUMMER

MIZUHO

DECEMBER

Comparing these three unique site of flux over one year made me understand that despite location, site specific events and tailored infrastructure massive flux essentially produces similar affect onto its context. It was this process that crystalised the larger framework of research and how all my work on Phillip Island could fit within it under its own research question and abstact.

PHILLIP ISLAND 30


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MIZUHO SPORTS PRECINCT AN INVESTIGATION OF STADIAS’ EFFECT ON POST WAR NAGOYA Nagoya’s central sporting precinct was constructed one year after the city suffered devastating bombings during World War Two. My investigations into testing stadia typologies’ unexplored potentials lead me to draw and redraw out U.S. Military maps depicting bombed and built up areas following the war. The tests undertaken explored the effects (if any) the new and vastly increased sporting precinct had any effects on the post-war city’s spatial and programmatic arrangement and if so, how the results of these effects could be considered. Through drawing out relational sections and plans spanning from pre-war to post-war it was determined that large roads, car parks, industrial zones and green spaces were affected by the precinct’s existing persuasions. While it was assumed or rather anticipated that housing patterns would demonstrate effects they did not.

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ARENA BREAK DOWN The following drawings are based on Hisense Arena, Melbourne as Mizuho Athletics Stadium holds approximately the same number of people. The drawings were derived from more detailed plans and elevations of Hisense Arena. The intention of the exercise was to better understand through section, the access permitted to both public and private parties. Stadiums are most commonly stacked from basement, arena, concourse, suites and catwalk level. Both basement and catwalk are limited to private access while the central three permit both. Concourse level is essentially the bridge between inside the arena and the external context and as such influences adjacent spatial arrangements through negotiating massive flux.

ARENA LEVEL

To gain a better understanding about how (if at all) the flow of people did in fact shape surrounding infrastructures it seemed prudent to zoom out, placing the stadium into Nagoya.

CONCOURSE LEVEL

SUITE LEVEL

CATWALK LEVEL

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RELATIONSHIP TO CONTEXT The main issue with these sections is that they are unable to portray any information about what construction occurred in between the years drawn.

1944 EAST/WEST

As these were purely hypothetical (though based on spatial accuracies) the intention was not to understand the intricacies of what did occur, but rather how stadia typologies could start to inform the layout of entire cities based on the unique qualities distilled from their earlier sponge follies.

1944 NORTH-SOUTH

This method was further utilised through the plan analysis of basic U.S. Military maps.

1946 EAST/WEST

1946 NORTH-SOUTH

2007 EAST/WEST

2007 NORTH/SOUTH

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U.S MILITARY STRATEGIC BREAKDOWN The plan perspectives of this Military analysis looked into how a portion of the city’s road network might have been strengthened and detailed through direct negotiation of seasonally concentrated flux brought on by the stadium’s sporting events. The immediate reconstruction of the Mizuho Sports Precinct could have influenced the redesign of Nagoya after the devastation of the World War Two bombings in ways that could begin to inform future megacities of hyper-density of relatively less but highly modular space. Although this exercise was brief and not all together accurate it has succeeded in making me believe that these stadia structures have more potential than they are currently given credit for.

1,504,255 5 PRE WWII

597,941 POST WWII

IZUHO BUILT

2,265,033 TODAY

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RUSUTSU SKI VILLAGE

AN EXAMINATION OF CONCENTRATED SEASONAL FLUX IN HOKKAIDO My investigations into Rusutsu’s ski village resulted in unexpected information shaping the direction of the research. The unexpectedness presented itself in the form of the wheat farming industry. The temperature of the village and its surrounding farms make growing winter wheat the logical agricultural choice, as durum and summer grains can only be sewn for four months of the year. By drawing out sections and plans of the main farming district the origin of their forms sought to be better understood. With a severely definite snowline, the winter wheat land surrounding Rusutsu must sit between the higher snow covered ridges that fan out from Shiribetsu-dake to the east. Occupancy ratios in the village were briefly explored to determine basic population fluxes that directly follow Hokkaido’s very popular snow season. The contrasting side of this flux (summer) could potentially capitalise on unused acreage by sewing summer and durum wheat and re-appropriating existing infrastructures (chairlifts) to design a niche type of farming.

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OCCUPANCY RATIOS It was my initial intention to explore the effect of seasonal flux on the small farming village to the west of the internationally popular ski hills. After mapping the occupancy shifts I realised that as this had already been performed in great detail on Phillip Island there were not much new to discover. I began looking for another, different angle from which to approach this site.

APR-DEC

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DEC-MAR

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AGRICULTURE VS. ENVIRONMENT The interest shifted during a Google Earth search of the area. The unorthodox farming plots seemed strange and interesting, so I redrew them in plan, choosing to shade the undefined areas and put the detail into the plots, those holding information that was clear from an aerial perspective. At this point I was unsure as to the reason for the arrangements, so redrew the space in a series of quick sections.

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CONDITION & CONSEQUENCE Again, Google Earth led the dimly lit way; its topography setting informing me that the farms enclosed a series of steep, high ridges. The reason for the arrangement was becoming somewhat clearer and by drawing out these sections I can roughly gather that the hills were either too steep to sew and harvest, or that the snowline falls as low as their peaks and below, making food production impossible during the winter. The seasonal condition of snow and the consequential mass of tourists eager for some of the world’s best powder skiing generate a harmonious partnership and flux within the surrounding villages. During the winter, local economy is fuelled by tourism, which in turn allows the production and necessary equipment upgrades. The summer allows for wheat production and preparation for the upcoming ski season rush.

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RE-APPROPRIATING INFRASTRUCTURE Part of this case study was a speculation into reclaiming some of the farmable acreage lost during the winter and simultaneously propose a new and weird type of farming. The collage aimed to test one possible aesthetic of mountain farming. Despite the image’s simplicity I can read richness in its discussion between traditional farming methods and event specific infrastructure. The regrade needed to make a mountain accessible to all levels of skier skills leaves the dry ground wide, open and flat despite the slope (which must be shallow enough to permit snow machine access.)

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If sewn areas were determined by the positioning of chairlift infrastructure harvesting machines could be retrofitted to develop entirely automatic or still manual farming methods. The costs for chairlift insertion are so extensive yet they are only used for a maximum of three months a year. If an alternative use could be found these steadily warming resorts could not only still exist in the future, but be depended upon. Furthermore there is the potential revenue gained in the short term from produce sales and agri-tourism.

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PHILLIP ISLAND

A STUDY OF MASSIVE FLUX, SERVICE & INFRASTRUCTURE Initially I approached my Japanese case studies with the intention that they would inform how I addressed my major project site (Phillip Island). Negotiating massive flux was initially the end game. In comparing the work produced for each case study and the information derived from that work I believe that my research on massive flux could have the capacity to take me back to my initial question. Retrospectively I realise that stadium is now the alternative forms and systems of infrastructure I am currently working towards better understanding. After forming a well devised toolbox and method for using that toolbox those infrastructures could be tested on a site that doesn’t share my three precedents’ fluxes such as Regional Victoria or potentially French Island.

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“

Our masterplan proposal for the Norwegian city of Åndalsnes turns the old industry train tracks into a new kind of infrastructure for mobile buildings that can be rolled back and forth depending on seasons and situations. (Jagnefält, 2010)

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PRIMARY & SECONDARY HOUSING ORGANISATION Complementary to this separate tests were administered to each of the islands’ housing clusters. These tests questioned primary grouping against secondary scattering and looked at new ways to create temporary storage, park and agricultural spaces during the off seasons while seeking to avoid compromising secondary housing. With any temporary or modular proposals however, they must be speculative and optimistic on an urban scale.

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NATURAL

PEAK

HALF ‘N’ HALF

SURROUNDED


LONGITUDE

LATITUDE

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

RING

BOUNDARY

MICRO-CLUSTER

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SEASON & DEMAND Understanding the relationship between the seasons (off/peak) and the demands they produce is crucial when negotiating massive flux. To the right is a very brief site analysis’ of several of Phillip Islands’ public spaces. During the off season car parking, transport or souvenirs are not in high demand like they are during peak season. This simple process allowed me to define a comprehensive and informed list of services and related infrastructure that spike and lull according to the seasonally concentrated events. This exercise was done complementary to a detailed occupational ration study concerned with primary and secondary housing on the island and its simultaneous impact and potential during both seasons. It was determined from this study that there is an approximate 0.14 to 0.86 ratio (primary to secondary respectively)

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OFF SEASON

PEAK SEASON

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DETAILED CLUSTER DISTRIBUTION Complementary to this separate tests were administered to each of the islands’ housing clusters. These tests questioned primary grouping against secondary scattering and looked at new ways to create temporary storage, park and agricultural spaces during the off seasons while seeking to avoid compromising secondary housing. With any temporary or modular proposals however, they must be speculative and optimistic on an urban scale.

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FREEWAY STACK A stage of my process prior to the site visit. It was influenced by Le Corbusier’s Plan Obus, “a plan for a future Algiers, an Algiers that was to become the center of Africa.” (Oran, 2009) It was quickly abandoned due to its vast physical, financial and aesthetic impositions. One of my discussions with Sue Anne Ware during my end of semester presentation regarded my willingness to design bold, provocative infrastructures to negotiate Phillip Island’s massive flux. My position was that any massive infrastructures shouldn’t interfere with the island’s somewhat naturalesque appearance. The feedback regarding this opinion was that imposing structures (so long as they operate usefully and fulfil relevant purpose) could generate a more interesting field of enquiry than what I described as my “timid” interventions thus far.

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“After implementing environmental standards, why does green architecture look so bland? Passive cooling, low flush toilets, and harvested lumber do not foreground evocative design. During the last two decades, the prevalent challenge for the sustainable design movement in the United States has been to sluggishly modify the behavior of the developers, architects, and planners responsible for the sizable majority of new projects. From this outlook, it’s not salient ensembles but uniform conventions that ought to stand as the peak objective for green advocates. I’ve considered such standardized aspirations as limiting and myopic.” (Joachim, 2008)

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ADAPTING STRUCTURE VOIDS I had a loose idea earlier on in the semester to adapt existing structures’ void spaces such as the underside of the island’s adjoining bridge to double as storage areas; much like any space under stadium seats is currently used. Similarly, in dealing with the void spaces generated by the Ronda de Dalt in Barcelona, “the space above the highway is occupied by new public buildings, especially high-volume structures such as sports venues.” (ed. Corner, 1999, p.239) It was vaguely thought that this space could be used to store some kind of flat pack, fold out public space on the water for fishing, running etc. This direction wasn’t explored rigorously enough to discover anything exciting, though it may have potential for Project B if correctly synconised with the framework.

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EVENTS & ECOLOGY During a two day site visit to the island I was fortunate enough to meet with Martin Gill, Development Services Manager of the Bass Coastal Shire region. He helped shed light on the specific services and related infrastructures (or systems) that were being stretched beyond capacity by the island’s seasonal flucuation. It was determined that by addressing the five primary systems shown, the secondary (not by importance but rather infrastructural requirements) could be subsequently addressed. The site visit also assisted with the development and understanding of these system’s geographical locations.

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INFRASTRUCTURAL SYSTEMS While systems shown here are by no means less important to the function of Phillip Island they are in some ways determined by the effectiveness of the primary systems, and as such fail dependently. I feel that these three and possibly others will play more influentials roles throughout Project B.

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SERVICE SYSTEMS While systems shown here are by no means less important to the function of Phillip Island they are in some ways determined by the effectiveness of the primary systems, and as such fail dependently. I feel that these three and possibly others will play more influentials roles throughout Project B.

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INFORMED FILTERTATION Site specific conditions were mapped in the hope that their varying influences upon the eight struggling systems and their unique spatial and programmatic requisites would assist in an educated masterplan placement scheme. During my end of semester presentation feedback it was said that sea level rise could play an intergal part in this stage of my process. It had, until then, not occured to me. I beleive that to address it as more than the eighth site specific condition would be casting the field of my research to broad, therefore diluting my produce.

TOPOGRAPHY

URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARIES

EVENT PROXIMITY

NATURE RESERVES 74


TIDE

WIND

WAVES

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SPATIAL BREAKDOWN The technique of developing a set of specific spatial and programmatic requisites is one I have used in passed studios to much enjoyment and effect. It was originally influenced by MVRDV’s Pig City.

=

APPROX.

170,000 &

(3%

(7.90 million - 2032)

IN VICTORIA

237,000 IN 2032 OF THE POPULATION)

5.0m

5.65 million

15.0m

75m PER UNIT 2

x

50% 25%

3500

(PERMANENT POPULATION) (TEMPORARY POPULATION)

10750

2012

2

1,068,750m 262500m2

2032

PEAK SEASON

Furthermore, with both peak and off season populations forecast to grow by approximately 180%, spatial requisites were also determined for the year 2032 as a way to understand the consequences of maintaining the island as a tourist destination into the future.

OFF SEASON

2

1,687,500m 472500m

2

73% 7,000 RESIDENTS = (7.90 million - 2032)

+

&

43,000 RESIDENTS =

5.65 million

5,110

CARS

9,198 IN 2032

31,390 &

CARS

56,500 IN 2032

2.7m

9.2m

912,500m

2

25m PER UNIT x 36,500= 2

5,110

=

127,750m

2

2012

1,642,450m

2

x

=

APPROX.

200litres

1.5%

65,698= 9,198

OF WATER PER DAY

=

2032

229,950m

2

OFF SEASON

PEAK SEASON

IS CONSUMED.

37,800lt (2032)

3lt

X

21,000 litres

7000 =

OFF SEASON

PER DAY

323,200lt (2032)

150,000 litres

50000 =

X

PEAK SEASON

4.65 megalitres over 31 days 85% BECOMES GREY WATER

170

2,142,000lt (2032)

X

1,190,000litres

7000 =

OFF SEASON

PER DAY

14,348,000lt (2032)

8,500,000litres

& X 50000 = J

F

M

A

M

J

J

PEAK SEASON

A

S

O

N

D

31DAYS OF PEAK WATER USEAGE =263.5megalitres (105 OLYMPIC POOLS)

2012

OFF

AT 2m DEEP

4m

8m

32m PEAK

16m

2012

OFF

AT 2m DEEP

4m

8m

32m PEAK

16m

2032

30

115% BECOMES SEWRAGE

378,000lt (2032)

X

210,000litres

7000 =

OFF SEASON

2,322,000lt (2032)

PER DAY

In multiplying the information relationing to each of the primary systems by the ratio of massive flux a spatial map was generated in which each system’s spatial area (based on programmatic processes) required to operate at maximum capacity can be compared.

1,500,000litres

& X 50000 = J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

PEAK SEASON

S

O

N

D

31DAYS OF PEAK WATER USEAGE =46.5megalitres (20 OLYMPIC POOLS)

AT 2m DEEP

76

2032


77


BOAT LAUNCH PRECINCT My first attempt at utilising any of the spatial information derived from the breakdown infographic was focused on boat launching infrastructure. My meeting with Martin informed me that the island’s three boat launch sites were the cause of congestion and illegal parking made worse by the extra length of a cumbersome boat trailer.

78


79


As this system was addressed individually I found that I became stuck very quickly. With nothing to bounce my decisions off of there was no interesting or relevant way to test my ideas. My site visit did provide the opportunity to observe the existing boat launches and made it very clear how under utilised all the island’s infrastructure is during the winter months.

80 80


NEW HAVEN

MOORING QUEUING LAUNCHING PARKING RETRIEVING

RHYLL

QUEUING LAUNCHING PARKING RETRIEVING

COWES

QUEUING LAUNCHING PARKING RETRIEVING 81


This resulted in me spending too much time on the details that were actually irrelevant to my overall research. I ended up with some nice looking renders, but their meaning was shallow excluding their action to make me try something else.

82


83


84 84


During the trace sketch stage however, my work was still negotiating the previously defined requisite sets. This work could become more relevant if positioned against my other attempts to address car parking or capturing storm water runoff for example.

85


TWO PRONGED ATTACK More as a test example to myself more than anything I began negotiating the issues relating to both water security and traffic congestion simultaneously. The intention was to see what the combination of each system’s required space and infrastructure could produce and enable, what it would destroy and disable, and how this responded differently to relative usage throughout the year. From mid semester the intention of my work has not been to develop a perfect networked system (though I feel now that my work into the system breakdowns may actively contradict this) but rather to test relationships between individual systems; where and when they collide, heirachies between systems, and the spatial qualities that these all generate.

86


87


WATER SECURITY Much like Michael Van Valkenburgh’s CT Water Treatment Facility, a natural curing wetlands system would offer a “a rich, humanely scaled terrain that invites neighbors to engage with the land from the perspective of the water that flows through it.” ( ) In other words; a landscape solution to the current desalination plant in Wonthaggi. Furthermore, a natural system would generate a new ecosystem on the island, where there is currently grazing land. A new ecosystem could potentially start to skew the existing flux and associated demand.

07

88 07


89


CONGESTION How do you design a carpark that can comfortably collect, hold and disperse 20000 cars without leaving the people who live on Phillip Island permanently with acres and acres of unusable, ugly asphalt? This was the question I kept asking myself throughout the majority of this semester. It continually reminded me that my work must negotiate a site of constant, annual change. My first attempt during this two pronged attack was simply to try a permeable parking surface, one that, in the winter could be grown through and blended with the surroundings. The general feedback expressed an expectation for the parking infrastructure to harvest rain water in the winter, something I would like to experiment with futher during Project B.

90


91 91


92


9933


WORKING MASTERPLAN This working masterplan will continue to be developed over the remainder of the year. At the moment it primarily deals with spatial requirements and buffering arrangements between systems and so lacks a level of detail. Zooming in on these buffered zones should help me understand what it is I’m actually producing and how feasible it is with in the existing context.

94


95


SYNERGETIC SEASONAL SECTIONS This section was intended as a tool for me to better understand how synergetic relationships between adjacent systems could be forged and the dual programs certain infrastructure could be used for.

96


97


Although not entirely accurate, I found the process extremely useful and think that this diagrammatic approach to sectioning could be taken further and better utilised throughout Project B.

98


99


WIND MAPPING

100


101


WEATHER MAPPING

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

o

Temp. C

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 -5

102

MAY

JUNE


AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER 100 80 60 40 20 0

103

Rainfall (mm)

JULY


SITE & EVENT SPECIFIC FLUXES

SURFING: SUMMERLAND PENINSULA MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

0 9:0

20:00

09:00

FEB

20:00

JAN

1

00 17:

06:00

0 05:0

06:00

SURFING: SURF BEACH REGION APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

00

MAR

0 08:0

FEB

20:00

JAN

00 17: 104

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

07 :


SURFING: WOOLAMAI REGION FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

00

00

20:00

JAN

07 :

18:00 07 :

SURFING: CAT BAY REGION FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

0 9:0

20:00

JAN

00

1

07 :

06:00

SURFING: SMITH’S BEACH REGION MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

DEC

20:00

FEB

06:00

18:00

00

00

20:00

JAN

07 :

07 :

RECREATIONAL CONSUMPTION JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

DEC

00:00

00

00

07 :

07 :

00

21:0 0

00:00

105

07 :


BAY FISHING APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

:00

20:00

MAR

20:00

FEB

04 :

19

18:00

04 :

00

04 :

00

JAN

00

0 05:0

ROCK FISHING FEB

MAR

APR

OCT

NOV

DEC

23:00

00

21:0 0

JAN

07 :

0 05:0

06:00

SURF FISHING MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

0 20:00

FEB

21:0

JAN

04 :

04 :

00

00

JETTY FISHING MAR

NOV

:00

21:0 0

APR

04 :

00

04 :

106

DEC

03:00

21:0 0

FEB

19

JAN

00


PHILLIP ISLAND CIRCUIT JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

09:00

09:00

00:00

0 17:0

0 17:0

PYRAMID ROCK FESTIVAL JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

00:00

EUDYPTULA MINOR JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

00

22 :

22 :

00

0 20:0

15:00

18:00

18:00 107


SUPPORT PARK MODES

108


PRODUCTION MODE

TRANSITION MODE

HIBERNATION MODE

109


SITE 01. SMITHS BEACH

110


SURFING: SMITH’S BEACH REGION MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

00

06:00

18:00

07 :

00

AUG

20:00

FEB

20:00

JAN

111

07 :


APPROACHES

112


113


114


115


116


117


118


119


120


121


122


123


124


125


SITE 02. PHILLIP ISLAND CIRCUIT

126


PHILLIP ISLAND CIRCUIT MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

09:00

09:00

00:00

0 17:0

FEB

0 17:0

JAN

127

NOV

DEC


128


129


130


131


SITE 03. PYRAMID ROCK

132


PYRAMID ROCK FESTIVAL JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

00:00

133

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC


134


135


136


137


138


139


SITE 04. EUDYPTULA MINOR

140


EUDYPTULA MINOR JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

00

SEP

OCT

NOV

22 :

22 :

00

0 20:0

15:00

18:00

18:00 141

DEC


142


143 4


SITE 07. COWES

144


RECREATIONAL CONSUMPTION JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

00:00

00

00

07 :

07 :

00

21:0 0

00:00

145

07 :


SITE 09. NEW HAVEN

146


BAY FISHING APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

:00

20:00

MAR

20:00

FEB

04 :

19

18:00

04 :

00

04 :

00

JAN

00

0 05:0

JETTY FISHING MAR

OCT

NOV

:00

21:0 0

APR

04 :

00

04 :

147

DEC

03:00

21:0 0

FEB

19

JAN

00


TRAJECTORY Direction for 29 October

At the end of the year I envision presenting Phillip Island as a network of synergetic networks, not as one perfect system, but a series of tests exploring the array of site typologies, their potentials and limitations. My research does not seek to solve the problems on the island but rather to demonstrate that by part retrofitting and part instituting new proposals, the car parks (now support parks) of Phillip Island have the capacity of working with the massive flux (what is currently considered a problem). I will do this by refining the current designs on each site, each ot which test different and specific things relating to car parking, masive flux, and Phillip Island itself. By working with the flux, the project investigates how my interventions can enhance development, rather than stunt it, but by taking it in a more sustainable or considered direction.

148


149 04


REFERENCES TEXT

Adams, D. (1979) ‘Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’, Del Ray, Random House, p.12 Green, S. ‘Melbourne sprawl a blot on us all’, The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 February 2012, accessed 10 Friday 2012, <http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/editorial/melbourne-sprawl-a-bloton-us-all-20120120-1qac4.html> ‘Secrets of Lost Empires: Colosseum’, dir. Lightner, R., USA, NTSC, 1988, [videocassette] Jagnefalt, C. ‘Andalsnes Master Plan proposal / Jagnefält Milton’, Arch Daily, accessed 25 May 2012, <http://www.archdaily.com/98795/andalsnes-master-plan-proposaljagnefalt-milton/> Oran, M.G. ‘Mad to be Saved: Finding purpose for the residual space of the highway intersection’, accessed 1 June 2012, <http:// highwayspace.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/rock-the-casbah/> Joachim, M. (2008) ‘Tilling Education: An Eco-Tech Aesthetic Approach.’ Columbia University Press, U.S. Wall, A. ed. Corner, J. (1999) ‘Recovering Landscape: Essays in Contemporary Landscape Architecture’ Architectural Press, U.S.

Princeton

Van Valkenburgh, M. Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates Inc., accessed 3 May 2012, < http://www.mvvainc.com/project. php?id=13&c=public_landscapes>

150


IMAGES Graham, B. ‘Future Gridlock’, cartoon extracted from the second issue of ‘Multiple Warheads’, accessed 15 May 2012 < http://supercolossal. ch/> Kim, S. Jun, J. Cho, K. (2012), ‘Athletic Horizon’, hero render extracted from competition panel, accessed 25 April 2012, < http://www. bustler.net/index.php/ar ticle/winners_of_stadium_of_tomorrow_ competition_in_korea/> Koolhaas, R. MVRDV, (1996) ‘Stockholm Olympic Stadium, Sweden, Stockholm, 1996’, model of the conceptual stadium, accessed 18 March 2012, <http://oma.eu/projects/1996/stockholm-olympicstadium> Jagnefält Milton, ‘Rolling Hotel’, proposal for the Norwegian city of Åndalsnes, accessed 25 May 2012, <http://www.archdaily. com/98795/andalsnes-master-plan-proposal-jagnefalt-milton/> Terreform ONE, ‘Homeway’, model of two futuristic mobile homes, accessed 24 May 2012, < http://ffffound.com/image/081516ca65c ceff1481680fdbc110ac3481faf4b> Terreform ONE, ‘Car Elevator’, 3D render of a futuristic car elevator, accessed 24 may 2012, <http://www.terreform.org/projects_ mobility_elevator.html> Michael Van Valkenburgh Ass. ‘CT Water Treatment Facility’, photographs of the completed facility, accessed 3 may 2012, <http:// www.mvvainc.com/project.php?id=13&c=public_landscapes> ‘Flavian Amphitheatre’, accessed 10 Friday 2012, <http://www. legionxxiv.org/colosseum/> ‘ASWP (Airship Stadium of World Peace)’ (2012), hero render extracted from competition panel, accessed 25 April 2012, < http://www. bustler.net/index.php/ar ticle/winners_of_stadium_of_tomorrow_ competition_in_korea/> United States Military, (1939-1945), ‘Nagoya southeast Aichi-Ken, Honshu, Japan’, 1:12500 tactical plan of southeast Nagoya, accessed 15 March, <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/ams/japan_city_plans/> Oran, M.G. ‘Mad to be Saved: Finding purpose for the residual space of the highway intersection’, accessed 1 June 2012, <http:// highwayspace.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/rock-the-casbah/> Arets, W. (1990) ‘Boulevard Domburg’, hand drawn hero render of a highway scheme, accessed 4 June 2012, <http://htcexperiments. org/page/4/>

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