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Matthew Bohne

PORTFOLIO

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The Minimum Number of Lines

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The Aesthetics of Accelerationism

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Free Migration

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The Merrimack River City

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Disheveled Geometries: Ruin and Ruination

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Formal Analysis

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Robert A.M. Stern Rome Seminar

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Scene Design

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Screen Space

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On Volatile Ground: The Divergent Monolith

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(Re)Collection: Shadows of Our Future

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Computing Drawing: Inhabiting the Surface

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Bridge to the Floating World

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Some Drawings

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Community Garden 2.0

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Final drawing from Post-FAT, Exploration of a room through plan, elevation, an axonometric


Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 39

POST-FAT THE MINIMUM NUMBER OF LINES THE MAXIMUM NUMBER OF THINGS Yale School of Architecture Advanced Design Studio, Spring 2016 Sean Griffiths, Sam Jacob, and Jennifer Leung The project explores adjacent, converging, and isolated fields that produce an ambiguity in drawing that addresses the spatial indices of architecture. The project explores the line as a fragment, capable of defining density, atmospheric and material, minimum and maximum. Various lines wander, respecting some edges, disobeying others, simulating the configuration and dissolution of material. The use of various types of projections allows for simultaneous views, the articulation of flat objects and the collapse of perceived dimensional objects. Together, the hatched lines and the experimentation of projection provided an architectural and spatial language that was interested in the development of textured surface, expressed through material and graphic. In a drawing, these techniques produce an implied line, a boundary between fields, that describe distinct spaces, and also resist a singular reading. The absence of a definite boundary produces a multiplicity that engages plan, section, and elevation simultaneously. This language of drawing and material was explored through the design of a large funeral home in Peckham, South London. [1]

Studio leaflet

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100 line studies

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Grid, 1, Detail

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Grid, 2, Detail

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Grid, 3, Detail

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Gridscape 1

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Gridscape 1 details

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Gridscape 2

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Gridscape 3

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Gridscape 3 detail

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Gridscape 4

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Gridscape 5

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Gridscape 5 detail

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Linescape 1

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Linescape 2

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Linescape 2 detail

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Linescape 3

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In addition to the explorations in drawing, observational drawing was used in Peckham (our site), to record “everything but the architecture.� This included, the way consumer goods were arranged, graffiti, cracks, surfaces, etc.

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Concrete study model of hatching, line and graphic

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Form studies

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Surface study, foam, cheesecloth, plaster, enamel, and ink

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Surface study, detail

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The final drawing completed before midterm was a variation of the “ninesquare grid.� Using our previous studies, the grid brought together the elements of our drawing at different scales, projection, orientation. 018


The first drawing completed that addresses the final project, involved a collaging of previous drawings - a search for architectural elements, using previous drawings to curtail judgment and further speculation. 019


Final Drawing 1, Urban Narrative

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Final Drawing 2, The Building Finalist for Student Digital/Mixed, Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition (KRob), 2016

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Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 40 Included in “Tomorrows: Urban Fictions for Possible Futures” Exhibition at the Onassis Cultural Centre in Athens, Greece. Summer 2017.

THE AESTHETICS OF ACCELERATIONISM Yale School of Architecture Advanced Design Studio, Fall 2016 Michael Young Part 1 Collaborators: Aymar Marino-Maza and Robert Yoos, Part 2 (post-midterm) work was completed individually In Iceland, 99% of electricity is produced from renewable resources, 30% is from geothermal and 69% is from hydroelectric production. In recent history, the demand for renewable energy has instantiated the use of experimental drilling and energy harnessing technologies.

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Since 2020, Iceland has successfully developed two new types of energy production: the deep drilling project, which taps into magma below the earth’s surface for a still yet undetermined supercritical point, and the joining of geothermal and hydroelectric power. Much of what we understand that occurs below the surface of Iceland is still being developed, much by my colleague here, but we have only very recent research to speculate on the impact and long term effects of these experimental projects. Iceland is one of the most geologically active sites on the planet; providing vast and variegated energy-rich geologic compositions. Chasing the country’s embedded energy reserves has increased the frequency at which wells are drilled. As commercial energy development accelerates so does the encounter with new dissolved solids, toxic metals, and corrosive gases. In order to meet the demand for energy production, Networx, a multinational power conglomerate developed roving regulating and ventilation chambers that are able to be repositioned over ongoing mining operations.

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The “beasts” or dýrið, as they are referred to by locals, have become the center of an argument between conservation and industrialization. The extensive drilling operation is disguised below the surface, marked by 2-meter wide nozzles. Considering that the most visually dominant objects of the infrastructure are not stationary nor permanently fixed to the terrain has provoked a discussion of infrastructure’s sovereignty in the heated debate of contemporary conservation. [1]

Project Alpine Outflow

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Project Alpine Phase II at Firn Line

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Sector G Drill Site (below accumulation zone)

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Sector G Ground Moraine

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Sector G Terminal Moraine

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Sector G Ablation Zone Pipeline

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Composite map of sub-glacial activity, thermo-infrared imaging, and destruction caused by a massive avalanche

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Sector G Crevasse Excavation

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Sector G Ablation Zone

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Sample of excavated phreatomagmite

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Part II: The following work was completed by Matthew Bohne

Vent trajectories and predicted outflow, aligned to a heat maps below

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The sulfuric and other metallurgic deposits from the vents are contributing to a new landscape of Iceland

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At the microscopic level, the deposits from the vents have impacted the composition of the terrain

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The vents combine a flexible outer skin that is continually inflated with sulfur hexafluoride, and an interior rigid structure that protects the machinery

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An inverted X-Ray image, shows the collection chamber and the equipment within an peculiar relationship between phase change and synthetic structure

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A drawing of the surface deformation of the outer skin

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The vents fully functioning with minimal accumulation of geological deposits

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Sub-glacial structure that has ruptured

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Subcontractors maintaining and harvesting the deposits.

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1:50 Model

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Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 40

FREE MIGRATION Yale School of Architecture Advanced Design Studio, Spring 2017 Keller Easterling Collaborator: Aymar Marino-Maza We are used to understanding migration as the physical movement of people from one place to another. But we live in a world of borders. The Trump administration promises to strengthen the border between the US and Mexico, through physical and economic barriers. Over the last four decades this border has been thickened by trade metropolises and industrial zones. This thickening is in part due to the maquiladora program, which was intended to mitigate unemployment in Mexico, has become a system of abuse particularly of women. Beyond the checkpoints that dot the border, a trade network extends the entire North American continent, called the NAFTA super corridor. This network has an expanded footprint of trucks, trains, ships, and planes, road, track, ports, and airports. But the benefits of trade between the US and Mexico are not equal. Mexico can turn away from American dependency to international independence. Strengthening trade partnerships with China and the European Union. With hundreds of international companies, such as Bayer Corp, Ford, Samsung, IBM, Foxconn, dependent on the benefits of the maquila program for manufacturing, there is an untapped network of trade partners. Mexico can impose a new system of control over the way products produced in maquilas leave Mexico to make a better bargain on behalf of the Mexican worker. Maquilas can be incubators for a new type of Mexican employee, with a set of skills that go beyond manufacturing. The new agreement would demand that companies take part in a new institution, one that grants workers access to education and an international job market. Mexico is well positioned to become a dominant international trade partner. Mexico currently ranks 64 of 148 countries in terms of infrastructure. By 2018, Mexico will spend 600 billion dollars over four years to improve its infrastructure. An investment in a new institution that inverts the free trade infrastructure to make a university-airport hybrid, can have a sustainable long-term impact. Just south of the US border, along Interstate 35, a major north south trucking corridor, Situated in Nuevo Laredo, the institution would link this trucking route with the train line and an international airport, all the while, preserving the moment of exchange within Mexico. Fabrica Universitaria de Comercio Internacional de Mexico (FUCIM) combines the commercial and freight airport with a university and broadcast center. As a hybrid of these different movements it monumentalizes the intersection of people, goods, and ideas. This institution is not another variant of the Free Zone, but new type of cosmopolitanism. [1]

Reprinted plan and section, originally shown at 1/32” = 1’’0” (96” x 64”)

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University bridge with lecture hall

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Study pod and communal space

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Air traffic control with view of complete roof structure and runway

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Commercial airport and university bridge

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Commercial bridge with view to hotel and storage warehouse

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Ground floor of storage warehouse

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Worm’s eye drawing showing the underbelly of the 1.2 million square feet institution

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Poster advertising FUCIM

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A map showing the expanding super corridor

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A regional park system designed for the Merrimack River Valley. Final drawing showing interventions into various systems adjacent to the river. 044


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Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 39

MERRIMACK RIVER CITY Yale School of Architecture Post Professional Design Studio, Fall 2015 Edward Mitchell and Aniket Shahane Collaborator: Jamie Edindjiklian We believe that each town along the Merrimack River cannot develop independently. Our ambition is to rethink the river and reorient the region towards a revitalized resource. Our project proposes a regional park system to create a regional identity in order to share, manage, and leverage resources. With a combined population approaching that of Boston, we believe that the new Merrimack River City has the potential to challenge how the scale and scope of a successful New England city performs. We see this series of operations as participatory, and each town contributing to the development of the greater park system. This strategy is also a means to target funding, from federal, state, and municipal resources, so towns are no longer competing with one another. Our strategy addresses the fragmentation of these towns environmentally, culturally, and financially. As a result, the regional identity designed around the river will be used as leverage to share and balance resources, and to protect and improve the ecological and economic future of the entire region. [1]

Advertisement for the City of Lowell, MA. A series of posters were designed to educated and promote the design of the river’s edge

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View of model, showing the 18-mile scope of work

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Icons designed to be deployed and used as pieces for a larger regional matrix

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In order to understand the river, and the possibilities of the adjacent conditions, a large drawing was made to document the dozen sectional conditions, infrastructure, obstacles, crossings, and land use.

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Advertisement for the City of Haverhill, MA. A series of posters were designed to educated and promote the design of the river’s edge

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View of model showing adjacent river development, using existing flood wall

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The “Water Sector” diagram and view

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The “Recreation Sector” diagram and view

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Gridscape 3

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Gridscape details

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Construct of “hatch,� Foam, plaster, cheesecloth, enamel, acrylic paint, and charcoal

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Cast concrete construct

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Midterm pamphlet presenting previous experiments

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Since our project addressed the regional scale, large diagrams were used to communicate the potential of underutilized resources and institutions that could directly benefit from the River.

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The “Production Sector” diagram and view

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The “Filtration Sector” diagram and view

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The “Agriculture Sector” diagram and view

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The “Art and Culture Sector” diagram and view

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A series of perspectives were made to show the passing of time and seasons along the 18-mile stretch of the river that was isolated for study. The perspectives show various scales of proposals including recreational trails, rest areas, and articulated surfaces.

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The “Energy Sector” diagram and view

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View from a small pavilion to river garden

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View from a hanging structure e, proposed as restaurant extensions in Haverhill, MA

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The “Civic Sector” diagram and view

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A series of perspectives were made developed to further the narrative of exploring the river as an underutilized resource. Shown here, living by the river, working by the river, entertainment on the river and a small recreational rest area on the river.

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Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 39

DISHEVELED GEOMETRIES: RUINATION Yale School of Architecture Disheveled Geometries VI: Ruins and Ruination, Spring 2016 Mark Foster Gage This work emerges from the study of “ruination,� in the history of architecture, philosophy, and popular culture. The projects engage both philosophical and aesthetic ruination to arrive at evocative images that defamiliarize the viewer through visual arguments. Ruination is used as a way to reveal the essential qualities of something, thus producing images that demonstrate lucidity of intention, while captivating the imagination. [1]

Ruining Yale, Peabody Museum of Natural History Great Hall of Dinosaurs

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Defamiliarization Study First Prize for Student Digital/ Mixed, Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition (KRob), 2016

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Defamiliarization Study

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FORMAL ANALYSIS Yale School of Architecture Formal Analysis, Fall 2015 Peter Eisenman and Miroslava Brooks with Wesley Hiatt, Teaching Fellow

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Final Drawing, Drawing Competition

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Santa Maria della Pace and Palazzo Ducale “The critical difference between the articulation of the corner�

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Basilica of Sant’Andrea - Mantua “The critical relationship between the front facade and the interior facade”

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Santa Maria dei Miracoli Piazza del Popolo

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Work selected for publication in Retrospecta 39

ROBERT A.M. STERN ROME SEMINAR Yale School of Architecture Rome: Continuity and Change Bimal Mendis, Joyce Hsiang, George Knight, Miroslava Brooks, and Brennan Buck The drawing explores Porte Maggiore as an integral piece of ancient infrastructure and as a contemporary urban node. Porte Maggiore allows for a drawn excavation at many scales: from the relationship of brick coursing and the flow of water, and the integration of the gate into the Aurelian wall. Porta Maggiore is a monument, a critical infrastructural element, and the site of a unique tomb. The gate can be understood from the scale of the city and region, as well as the tension between formal design strategies and urban realities. The drawing examines issues of infrastructure, scale, and time as it relates to the development of the city of Rome as well as the act of drawing. Final Drawing, Porta Maggiore and Aurelian Wall, 66� x 60�, Graphite on paper (all drawn on site) (Far right) Detail of drawing shown at actual size

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SCENE DESIGN Yale School of Drama Scene Design, Fall 2016 - Spring 2017 Ming Cho Lee, Michael Yeargan, and Riccardo Hernandez The studio gives emphasis to the close reading of text and actions of a play. Every two weeks an opera, play, musical, or movement piece is assigned and closely examined. The design process concludes with the production of a model. The studio is conduction with collaboration with directors and all other designers. All models presented at 1/8” = 1’0” [1]

Káťa Kabanová by Leoš Janáček

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Othello by William Shakespeare

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String Quintet in C major by Franz Schubert, movement piece/response by Matthew Bohne

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The Most Happy Fella by Frank Loesser

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Pagliacci by Ruggero Leoncavallo

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The Piano Lesson by August Wilson

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SCREEN SPACE Yale School of Art Sarah Oppenheimer and Joseph Zinter The work explores the role of periodicity in the construction of space defined by light. The final installation consists of three components: two encased pendulum lights, and a partition, which is placed between the two lights. The pendulum swing, and thus, its period, is determined by the force applied by the visitor. As the pendulum swings past its case, the space around oscillates between light and dark. In this way, the space to the four sides assumes various roles, and whether it is made evident by the presence or absence of light. Straddling between the two lit sides, the partition collects the oscillating shadows, which is periodically interrupted by visitors. The use of linear LED lights creates an array of shadows that are “thrown� against the wall and floor. [1]

Diagram of light and shadow

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Final installation view

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Final installation view

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ON VOLATILE GROUND: THE DIVERGENT MONOLITH Rhode Island School of Design Undergraduate Thesis, Fall 2014-Spring 2015 Silvia Acosta with Chelsea Linbird This thesis interrogates representation as a generative model in the production of architecture. The work revels in the craft and impulsiveness of an available material palette, historical precedents, and an archive of fragments. The thesis does not intend to explore the capacity of drawing in the creation of form, but the latent, real, and speculative relationships related to inhabiting the indeterminacy of a drawing. Therefore, the work seeks to identity indexical attributes of an architectural proposition that shapes a spatiotemporal reality of incompleteness: an architecture that keeps the possibilities for settlement faint. Confronted by a demand for architecture that is efficient, conceptually pure, and that relies on a translatable-operational methodology, the thesis relies on empirical experimentation to create, observe, and inhabit the idiosyncratic allure of (1) thinking and making, and then pursuing of the conceptual embers to (2) material configuration, and (3) future inhabitation. The work positions architects as storytellers, cultural geographers, acupuncturists, and taxidermists: conspirators with a predilection of augmenting a collection of the petrified past. Digging, 22� x 30�, Graphite and ink on Mylar First Prize for Student Hand Drawing, Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition (KRob), 2015

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Chiral inverse drawing

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Collage study for Devil’s Slide proposal

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Drawing, “Excavating”

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Detail of construct

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1 Drawing [in] Space 2 Devil’s Slide Observatory, 1 3 Devil’s Slide Observatory, 2-7 4 In Search of a Stable Center 5 Devil’s Slide Observatory, 8 6 Works from Japan 7 37 Aphorisms 8 Retreating Model 9 Digging, Excavating, Piling 10 Six Books from Japan

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Degree Project Books Early Drawings Relics Constructs, 1, 2, 3 Relief Drawing Indexical Construct, 1, 2 Indexical Construct, 3,4 Indexical Construct, 5 Haikus and Tile from Japan

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(RE) COLLECTION: SHADOWS OF OUR FUTURE Rhode Island School of Design Advanced Studio, Fall 2013 Addition for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Laura Briggs and Warren Schwartz The following work aims to problematize the notion of the museum and question how the hybrid form of Japanese cultural production might be consumed in a foreign setting. A primary theme of the studio is to explore how new paradigms for collecting and curating could affect architectural space. Transformer toys are the starting point. Examining the exuberance, iconography, along with the complex representation of technology, explorations address how a building can transform to adapt to its environment and the dynamic meaning of architecture’s relation to nature and artifice. Histories run parallel, but memories intersect. Examining the scales of a global history and architecture, the project investigation seeks to demonstrate the elastic relationship between architectural artifacts and memory. Furthermore, it aims to reveal the complexity and richness of the intersection of time, space, and place. This phenomenon creates opportunities for spaces that are voids for contemplation and frames for observation allowing for a dynamic dialogue between the artifacts within and beyond. Boston’s new artifact is a monster that is constantly (r)evolving. The unique relationship to the viewer produces a transformative state, which demonstrates the struggle between cultural traditions and modern tendencies. Reconsidering the museum expansion, spatially and programmatically, transforms its narrative and leads to the development of a new myth; a myth that begins both at the scale of the body and the city, simultaneously carving through time towards the constructed center. [1]

Site plan and exterior view of museum addition

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View of final model

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Section through museum extension showing major gallery spaces and collection chamber

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Thematic drawing, 22’ x 60�, Graphite, ink, watercolor, and collage on paper Finalist Student Digital/Mixed Finalist, Ken Roberts Memorial Delineation Competition (KRob), 2013

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Thematic drawing

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Perspective of lecture hall and studio/workshop

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View of repository

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COMPUTING DRAWING: INHABITING THE SURFACE Rhode Island School of Design Advanced Studio, Spring 2014 A Toll Plaza for Massachusetts Carl Lostritto The notion of architectural drawing is always under intense debate. This has only become more complex by the notion of digital tools, in particular computation. The following work explores the role of computer programming as a design medium. This new territory begins to question authorship, ambiguity, and representation. The work begins as drawing and becomes building, all the while addressing very real architectural problems. Drawing, in its many forms, has the power to mediate, fuel, and disrupt our current relationship with our known design processes. The investigation explores the capacity of drawing (computation) to inform architectural form making to lyricize spatial and temporal conditions. The architecture does not serve nor dictate, it simply reveals. For this reason, there is no single point of visual comprehension. It is an architecture that is seductively incomplete that is awaiting occupation. The project proposes an architecture that engages both the center and the periphery. [1]

Programmed drawing

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Exploratory construct, towards a programmed, tectonic order

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Collage of drawing and construct

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Exploratory construct, variation #3

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Thematic collage of programmed drawing and site events

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Exploratory construct, towards a programmed, tectonic order

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Thematic collage

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Various views of final proposal, Toll Plaza 096


Various views of final proposal, Toll Plaza 097


A BRIDGE TO THE FLOATING WORLD Drawings of all kinds can be immersive, evocative, and become places of inhabitation. Our work always comes in complex layers: perhaps a layer of mechanical electrical plumbing drawings, but also a layer of the unseen nature of the places we create. By way of drawings, architects create stories of what architecture could possibly be. This layer, the narrative – a combination of synthesizing analysis, anticipation, and intuition - I am most interested in constructing. I believe this is the foundation for all of the work we do. We construct the stories of our lives, only to have them become the void in which others make their own memories and write their own narratives. Exiled, dwelling below the crushing weight of the waterfall, the collector has made a place to collect. The only way that he can understand the former world above is by staying vigil by day and waiting for artifacts to make the descent. By night, there are artifacts that allude the character downstream, so every morning the character projects a sounding line into the beyond hoping that it will encounter obstacle artifact. These then need to be navigated to, cataloged and brought back to the character’s dwelling. As the character collects, his dwelling grows. [1]

The Collector’s Dwelling, 22” x 30”, Ink and graphite on paper

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The Collector’s Island, 22” x 30” Ink and graphite on paper

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SOME DRAWINGS Drawing experiments in-between projects [1]

Drawing for Tudela, 22” x 30”, Graphite, ink, charcoal, and watercolor on paper

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Drawing for Tudela #2, 22” x 30”, Graphite and digital collage

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Drawing of a Winery, 22” x 30”, Graphite on paper

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Hand, 36” x 72”, Charcoal on paper

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COMMUNITY GARDEN 2.0 Rhode Island School of Design Design Build, Architectural Design Part II Spring 2012 Jason Wood The Architecture Department sanctioned the continued development of a design-build curricular program that aims to give back to the local community through the real service it knows how to provide—thoughtful attention to the needs of residents and quality design responses to such needs. The studio has two main objectives: 1) to contribute directly to institutions outside of RISD through community engagement efforts and the improvement of a place, and 2) to foster a dialogue about the importance of collaboration among students and members of the local building industry while providing an enriching service. In mid-April 2012 students collaborated to design the additions to Blossom I at the Chinese Church of Rhode Island. The additions to the site were propelled by the desire to provide a constructed dialogue between the existing two pavilions as well as to begin to address the conversation between human action and river ecology. The studio collaborated extensively with the Mayor’s Office of the City of Pawtucket, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, the Permitting Office, and local organizations that have been working to clean up the Blackstone River in recent years. During the design phase I was chosen as one of the Project Ambassadors for the Floating Pavilion. I remained on this team throughout the entirety of the project. The final design and construction was lead by Nicole Marple, Aaron Tobey, Mike Todd, and myself. For many, including myself this was our first experience with construction. [1]

Drawing of the final floating pavilion, showing the flood arms

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Hinging deck detail

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Bulk head hinge detail

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View down the Blackstone River

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View from the floating pavilion up to existing shelter

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matthewbohne.com

Matthew Bohne, Architecture and Design Portfolio 2017  

This portfolio is the summary of my graduate and undergraduate experience, including thesis explorations, architecture studio projects, rese...

Matthew Bohne, Architecture and Design Portfolio 2017  

This portfolio is the summary of my graduate and undergraduate experience, including thesis explorations, architecture studio projects, rese...

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