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CONTENTS

SPOTLIGHT ONE / FALL 2019 EDITION

Program Spotlight: Leader in Me – Page 10

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION Spotlight ONE is published by the Richland One Office of Communications. It is mailed to parents and posted online at www.richlandone.org. Copies also are available at district schools and administrative buildings and at the Office of Communications, 1616 Richland Street, Columbia, SC 29201. For more information, call (803) 231-7504. Contributors: Karen York, Executive Director of Communications; Edith Caudle, Public Information Manager; Mitch Wyatt, Web Administrator; and Gwen Etheredge, Executive Assistant Graphic Design: Tommy Flowers, Project Design Specialist – Richland One Printing Services Notice of Non-Discrimination Richland County School District One does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, age or other protected characteristic in its programs and activities.

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Spotlight ONE • Fall 2019 Edition

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Features New Strategic Plan

The start of the 2019-2020 school year marks the beginning of the district’s implementation of its new fiveyear Strategic Plan.

Points of Pride From prestigious awards to new and renovated stadiums to a record-setting $86.5 million in scholarships earned by the Class of 2019, Richland One schools, students and employees had a lot to celebrate during the 2018-2019 school year!

Program Spotlight: Leader in Me The Leader in Me program is helping to transform school culture and develop students’ leadership and life skills at Burnside Elementary and five other Richland One schools.

Program Spotlight: Firefighter Training Academy First students earn certification as firefighters through the Firefighter Training Academy at Lower Richland High School.

School Spotlight: Logan Elementary School Logan Elementary School’s expanded arts program will include an enhanced curriculum, guest artists and more opportunities for students to perform.

School Essentials

Enrollment information, immunization requirements, attendance policies, inclement weather procedures and more!

Employee Spotlights

Meet two outstanding members of the Richland One team – our 2019-2020 Teacher of the Year and Classified Employee of the Year!

ALSO INSIDE: Superintendent’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Board of School Commissioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Directory of Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Frequently Called Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Key Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2019-2020 Academic CalendaR . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover


Superintendent’s Message Dear Richland One Families, The 2019-2020 school year begins on August 21 and we eagerly anticipate welcoming our 24,000 students back to school for another great year. To families that are new to the district, we welcome you to the Richland One family. Although the regular school year ended in June, the summer has been anything but quiet. Learning never stops in Richland One. Thousands of students participated in our Summer SOAR camps and programs across the district, and employees in schools and departments have been engaged in professional development activities to expand their knowledge and skills. Much work also has been done to get our buildings and campuses ready for the new school year. The start of the new year brings with it tremendous excitement and incredible potential. We want to keep the momentum going from the 20182019 school year and build on our achievements, which included the launch of our Leadership Richland One magnet programs at four schools (Bradley Elementary, Carver-Lyon Elementary, W.G. Sanders Middle and W.J. Keenan High); the inaugural year of our commercial driver’s license program at Eau Claire High School (the first program of its kind in South Carolina and only the third in the nation); 195 South Carolina Junior Scholars (the most Junior Scholars among Midlands school districts and the fourth-highest number in the state); 14 state sports championships won by district teams and individual student-athletes; and a record-high $86.5 million in scholarships earned by the Class of 2019. We have many Points of Pride in Richland One and we share some of them with you in this publication, but we know we cannot stop working to bring about even greater outcomes and create more opportunities for our students – they deserve nothing less. We want to see continuous improvement throughout the district and, to accomplish that, we all have to be on the same page and we must have a focused plan of action. During the 2018-2019 school year, we developed and finalized our new Strategic Plan which will guide our work for the next five years. You can read about it on page 5. You’ll see that our mission, literally and figuratively, has not changed. As we implement our 2019-2024 Strategic Plan, we promise that we will keep our parents and other stakeholders informed about our progress along the way. To keep up with all the great things that will be happening in the district throughout the year, be sure to visit our website (richlandone.org); watch Richland One TV (Spectrum cable channel 1303) and R1TV On Demand on our website; follow the district on Facebook and Twitter (facebook.com/ richlandone and twitter.com/richlandone); and download our free mobile app from Google Play or the App Store. I also invite you to follow me on Twitter (@RichlandOneSupe). Students, parents, district employees, volunteers and community partners – we are one team with a shared vision and mission. We are Richland One Strong! Sincerely, Craig Witherspoon, Ed.D. Superintendent

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BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS The seven-member Board of School Commissioners is the governing body of Richland County School District One. The Board is comprised of three at-large members and four members who represent geographic election districts. Board members are elected to serve four-year terms. Non-partisan elections are held in November of evennumbered years on a staggered basis. The Board holds regularly scheduled meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month, with meeting locations alternating between schools and the district office (Stevenson Administration Building, 1616 Richland Street). Open session begins at 7:00

p.m. The Board sets aside time during each meeting for public speakers. Persons who wish to address the Board may sign up to speak at the meeting. Each speaker is given three minutes. Speakers receive a written response from the Board within five to 10 business days. School board meetings are videotaped and broadcast on Richland One TV (Spectrum Cable channel 1303) and posted on R1TV On Demand at www. richlandone.org. Board meeting agendas, the R1TV broadcast schedule and board policies also are posted on the district’s website (www.richlandone. org).

JAMIE L. DEVINE Chairman

Election District 2 Term expires in 2020 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-6985

AARON BISHOP

Vice Chairman Election District 1 Term expires in 2022 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-6984

LILA ANNA SAULS

Secretary-Treasurer Elected At-Large Term expires in 2020 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-7562

CHERYL HARRIS

Parliamentarian

2019 -2020

Board Meeting Schedule July 23, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office August 13, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office August 27, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office September 10, 2019 . . . . . . . . Bradley Elementary School September 24, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office October 8, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hopkins Middle School October 22, 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office November 12, 2019 . . Heyward Career & Technology CTR December 10, 2019 . . . Annie Burnside Elementary School January 14, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office January 28, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . W.G. Sanders Middle School February 11, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office February 25, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W.J. Keenan High School March 10, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office March 24, 2020 . . . . . . . . Carver-Lyon Elementary School April 28, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crayton Middle School May 12, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office May 26, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lower Richland High School June 9, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office June 23, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Office

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School Board Office Stevenson Administration Building 1616 Richland Street Columbia, SC 29201 Hours: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday Contact: Eva Wilson, Special Assistant to the Board Phone: 803-231-7556 Fax: 803-231-7560 E-mail: eva.wilson@richlandone.org

Election District 4 Term expires in 2020 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-6981

BEATRICE KING Election District 3 Term expires in 2022 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-6986

DARRELL BLACK Elected At-Large Term expires in 2020 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-7561

YOLANDA ANDERSON Elected At-Large Term expires in 2022 Voice Mailbox Number: (803) 231-6987


2019-2024 STRATEGIC PLAN District Launches New Five-Year Strategic Plan The start of the 2019-2020 school year marks the beginning of the district’s implementation of its 2019-2024 Strategic Plan. The new Strategic Plan, which was approved by the Richland One Board of School Commissioners in March 2019, was developed with input and feedback from stakeholders including board members, district employees, students, parents, community members and business partners. “We are excited to continue the progress of the district through this new plan,” said Superintendent Dr. Craig Witherspoon. “With equitable learning experiences as well as safe and supportive learning environments as priorities, we further our commitment around our core business of improving students’ outcomes.”

VISION

CORE PRIORITIES

Richland School District One, in collaboration with an engaged community, is committed to ensuring that each learner achieves his/her potential in a safe, caring, academically challenging and diverse learning environment that will develop productive citizens for a changing world.

1. Ensure equitable experiences that support educational excellence for all learners.

MISSION We are Richland One, a leader in transforming lives through education, empowering all students to achieve their potential and dreams.

CORE VALUES COLLABORATION – We believe everyone has a role to play in promoting student success, so we will embrace the diversity of our stakeholders by building an inclusive community to accomplish our goals. EQUITY – We are fair and just in providing opportunities for success for all. EXCELLENCE – We provide excellent educational experiences that ensure expanded opportunities for learners and prosperity for our community.

2. Employ a quality professional in all positions to ensure every student receives personalized opportunities for success. 3. Offer varied opportunities for families, stakeholders and community partners to be meaningfully engaged in supporting student success. 4. Provide a safe, secure, supportive learning environment for all students and employees. 5. Develop a long-range facility and technology plan to accommodate enrollment shifts as well as modernization of buildings to support learning and working efficiencies and innovation.

ACTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT • Deliver and implement a tiered system of interventions to provide students specific academic and behavioral supports to increase opportunities for success. • Ensure students are reading on grade level when promoted to third grade. • Develop and implement rigorous recruitment and retention processes.

SAFETY – We provide a culture and environment of emotional, intellectual, cyber and physical safety.

• Increase kindergarten readiness for potential students of Richland One.

COURAGE – We make bold decisions and take informed and thoughtful actions to meet present and future challenges.

• Provide opportunities for all graduates of Richland One to be considered college and career ready as defined by the Profile of a South Carolina Graduate.

COMPASSION – We respect all people by offering care and compassion with integrity.

• Develop and execute organizational efficiencies by developing and implementing systems and processes to support the work of the district.

For more information about our 2019-2024 Strategic Plan, go to www.richlandone.org.

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RICHLAND ONE POINTS OF PRIDE 2018-2019 School Year

195 $86.5 Million+

The Richland One Class of 2019 earned

in scholarships and other financial aid … a new district record!

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STUDENTS WERE NAMED 2019 NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP SEMIFINALISTS, A PRESTIGIOUS DISTINCTION ACHIEVED BY LESS THAN 1 PERCENT OF ALL HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS IN THE UNITED STATES.

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RICHLAND ONE HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS WERE AMONG THE FIRST IN THE STATE TO BE AWARDED THE SOUTH CAROLINA SEAL OF BILITERACY, WHICH RECOGNIZES STUDENTS WHO HAVE ATTAINED A FUNCTIONAL LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY IN TWO LANGUAGES.

380

Richland School District One

RICHLAND ONE STUDENTS COMPLETED CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (CATE) PROGRAMS OF STUDY, WITH MANY EARNING STATE AND NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED CERTIFICATIONS.

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Richland One eighth-grade students were named South Carolina Junior Scholars by the S.C. Department of Education based on their academic ability, talent and achievements. Richland One had more Junior Scholars this year than any other school district in the Midlands and the fourth-highest number in the state. Criteria included students’ scores on the PSAT. STUDENTS WERE HONORED AS RICHLAND ONE ACADEMIC ALL-STARS. TO QUALIFY AS ACADEMIC ALL-STARS, STUDENTS MUST HAVE AT LEAST A 3.5 GPA, RANK IN THE TOP 10 PERCENT OF THEIR HIGH SCHOOL’S SENIOR CLASS AND HAVE NO GRADE LOWER THAN A C FOR ANY SUBJECT TAKEN FOR HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT. THIS YEAR’S CLASS OF ACADEMIC ALL-STARS WAS THE LARGEST IN THE 17-YEAR HISTORY OF THE RECOGNITION PROGRAM. STATE CHAMPIONSHIP TITLES IN SIX SPORTS (SWIMMING, TENNIS, WRESTLING, BASKETBALL, SOCCER, AND TRACK AND FIELD) WERE WON BY RICHLAND ONE TEAMS AND INDIVIDUAL STUDENT-ATHLETES. (RICHLAND ONE IS ONE OF ONLY A FEW SOUTH CAROLINA SCHOOL DISTRICTS REQUIRING STUDENTS TO HAVE AT LEAST A C AVERAGE TO PARTICIPATE IN ATHLETICS AND OTHER CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES.)

74%

OF RICHLAND ONE HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS EARNED A BRONZE CREDENTIAL OR HIGHER ON THE READY TO WORK (R2W) NATIONAL CAREER READINESS ASSESSMENT WHICH HELPS DETERMINE WHETHER STUDENTS HAVE THE SKILLS NECESSARY TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN THE WORKFORCE.


MORE POINTS OF PRIDE • 2018-2019 marked the inaugural year of the Leadership Richland One magnet programs, which are funded through a $15 million grant awarded to the district by the U.S. Department of Education. The language immersion magnet program at Carver-Lyon Elementary School was expanded and three new career leadership magnet programs began at Bradley Elementary (top picture), W.G. Sanders Middle and W.J. Keenan High schools. • Dreher and A.C. Flora high schools were ranked among the top 15 high schools in South Carolina in the U.S. News & World Report “Best High Schools” recognition program. The national program ranked Dreher as the seventh-best high school in South Carolina and A.C. Flora as the state’s 15th-best high school. • The Richland One Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Program at Eau Claire High School began in August 2018. The program, which was established through a partnership between Richland One and the S.C. Trucking Association, is the first high school CDL training program in South Carolina and only the third in the nation. (center picture) • Caughman Road Elementary School was designated as a World Citizen International Peace Site for its outstanding efforts to promote peace, which is a core Montessori principle. Caughman is one of four schools in Richland One offering Montessori education. • Ribbon-cutting ceremonies were held to celebrate the completion of the new Stadium at W.J. Keenan (bottom picture) and the completion of renovations and additions at The Stadium at Lower Richland and Memorial Stadium. The projects were part of the upgrades to the district’s athletics facilities, many of which had not undergone major improvements in 40 or more years. The upgrades to the athletics fields at A.C. Flora, Eau Claire and Columbia high schools have been completed. The two remaining projects (Bolden Stadium and the Dreher field) will be completed during the 20192020 school year. • For the 31st consecutive year, Richland One received international awards for excellence in financial accounting and reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association and the National Association of School Business Officials. For more of our Points of Pride from the 2018-2019 school year, go to www.richlandone.org.

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DIRECTORY OF SCHOOLS ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Arden Elementary 1300 Ashley Street Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-3400 Principal: Dr. Timothy Blackwell Enrollment: 288 Grades: PreK-5

Gadsden Elementary 1660 South Goodwin Circle Gadsden, SC 29052 Telephone: 353-2231 Principal: David Thorpe Enrollment: 173 Grades: PreK-5

Pine Grove Elementary 111 Huffstetler Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Telephone: 214-2380 Principal: Dr. Tracy Pickett Enrollment: 526 Grades: PreK-5

Bradley Elementary 3032 Pine Belt Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone 738-7200 Principal: Kezia Myers Enrollment: 440 Grades: PreK-5

Hopkins Elementary 6120 Cabin Creek Road Hopkins, SC 29061 Telephone: 783-5541 Principal: Audrey White-Garner Enrollment: 281 Grades: PreK-5

H.B. Rhame Elementary 1300 Arrowwood Road Columbia, SC 29210 Telephone: 731-8900 Principal: Dr. Monica Owens Carter Enrollment: 482 Grades: PreK-5

Brennen Elementary 4438 Devereaux Road Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 738-7204 Principal: Mark D. Shea Enrollment: 839 Grades: PreK-5 Brockman Elementary 2245 Montclair Drive Columbia, SC 29206 Telephone: 790-6743 Principal: Dr. Heidi Stark Enrollment: 321 Grades: PreK-5 Burnside Elementary 7300 Patterson Road Columbia, SC 29209 Telephone: 783-5530 Principal: Dr. Felicia Richardson Enrollment: 395 Grades: PreK-5 Burton-Pack Elementary 111 Garden Drive Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 691-5550 Principal: Dr. Sarah Smith Enrollment: 478 Grades: PreK-5 Carver-Lyon Elementary 2100 Waverly Street Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 343-2900 Principal: Dr. Monica Adams Enrollment: 370 Grades: PreK-5 Caughman Road Elementary 7725 Caughman Road Columbia, SC 29209 Telephone: 783-5534 Principal: Shawn Hall Enrollment: 642 Grades: PreK-5 Forest Heights Elementary 2500 Blue Ridge Terrace Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 691-3780 Principal: Dr. Winnie Johnson Enrollment: 505 Grades: PreK-5

Horrell Hill Elementary 517 Horrell Hill Road Hopkins, SC 29061 Telephone: 783-5545 Principal: Parthenia Satterwhite Enrollment: 569 Grades: PreK-5 Hyatt Park Elementary 4200 Main Street Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-3421 Principal: Dr. Dell Brabham Enrollment: 425 Grades: PreK-5 Lewis Greenview Elementary 726 Easter Street Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-3417 Principal: Dr. LaShaunda Evans Enrollment: 357 Grades: PreK-5 Logan Elementary 815 Elmwood Avenue Columbia, SC 29201 Telephone: 343-2915 Principal: Christopher Richards Enrollment: 294 Grades: PreK-5 Meadowfield Elementary 525 Galway Lane Columbia, SC 29209 Telephone: 783-5549 Principal: Lisa Davis Enrollment: 713 Grades: PreK-5 Mill Creek Elementary 925 Universal Drive Columbia, SC 29209 Telephone: 783-5553 Principal: Dr. Charles DeLaughter Enrollment: 350 Grades: PreK-5 A.C. Moore Elementary 333 Etiwan Avenue Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 343-2910 Principal: Dr. Chantelle Baker Enrollment: 334 Grades: PreK-5

Enrollment figures listed are as of the 135th day of the 2018-2019 school year.

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Rosewood Elementary 3300 Rosewood Drive Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 343-2930 Principal: Elizabeth Williams Enrollment: 395 Grades: K-5 W.S. Sandel Elementary 2700 Seminole Road Columbia, SC 29210 Telephone: 731-8906 Principal: Claudia Brooks-McCallum Enrollment: 599 Grades: PreK-5 Satchel Ford Elementary 5901 Satchel Ford Road Columbia, SC 29206 Telephone: 738-7209 Principal: Dr. Matthew Scandrol Enrollment: 770 Grades: K-5 South Kilbourne Elementary 1400 South Kilbourne Road Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 738-7215 Principal: Samantha Carlisle Enrollment: 286 Grades: PreK-5 Edward E. Taylor Elementary 200 McRae Street Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 343-2924 Principal: Debbie R. Hunter Enrollment: 285 Grades: PreK-5 J.P. Thomas Elementary 6001 Weston Avenue Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-3430 Principal: Selina Latimore Enrollment: 396 Grades: PreK-5 Watkins-Nance Elementary 2525 Barhamville Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 733-4321 Principal: Dr. Linda Norton Enrollment: 354 Grades: PreK-5 Webber Elementary 140 Webber School Road Eastover, SC 29044 Telephone: 353-8771 Principal: Dr. Sommer Jones Enrollment: 229 Grades: PreK-5


MIDDLE SCHOOLS Alcorn Middle 5125 Fairfield Road Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-3439 Principal: Dr. Carla Mathis Enrollment: 383 Grades: 6-8 Crayton Middle 5000 Clemson Avenue Columbia, SC 29206 Telephone: 738-7224 Principal: Angela Burns Enrollment: 1148 Grades: 6-8 Heyward Gibbes Middle 500 Summerlea Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 343-2942 Principal: Ron Webb Enrollment: 359 Grades: 6-8 Hand Middle 2600 Wheat Street Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 343-2947 Principal: Dr. Patrice Green Enrollment: 854 Grades: 6-8 Hopkins Middle 1601 Clarkson Road Hopkins, SC 29061 Telephone: 695-3331 Principal: Bobbie Hartwell, Jr. Enrollment: 457 Grades: 6-8

W.A. Perry Middle 2600 Barhamville Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 256-6347 Principal: Dr. Robin Coletrain Enrollment: 343 Grades: 6-8

Dreher High 3319 Millwood Avenue Columbia, SC 29205 Telephone: 253-7000 Principal: Kevin Hasinger Enrollment: 1150 Grades: 9-12

St. Andrews Middle 1231 Bluefield Road Columbia, SC 29210 Telephone: 731-8910 Acting Principal: Jametta Hodges-Stewart Enrollment: 712 Grades: 6-8

Eau Claire High 4800 Monticello Road Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 735-7600 Principal: Neshunda Walters Enrollment: 491 Grades: 9-12

W.G. Sanders Middle 3455 Pine Belt Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 738-7575 Principal: Andrenna Smith Enrollment: 513 Grades: 6-8

A.C. Flora High 1 Falcon Drive Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 738-7300 Principal: Susan Childs Enrollment: 1430 Grades: 9-12

Southeast Middle 731 Horrell Hill Road Hopkins, SC 29061 Telephone: 695-5700 Principal: Inger Ferguson Enrollment: 520 Grades: 6-8

C.A. Johnson High 2219 Barhamville Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 253-7092 Principal: Dr. Veronica Scott Enrollment: 356 Grades: 9-12 W.J. Keenan High 361 Pisgah Church Road Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 714-2500 Principal: Vondre’ Whaley Enrollment: 705 Grades: 9-12

HIGH SCHOOLS Columbia High 1701 Westchester Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Telephone: 731-8950 Principal: Craig Washington Enrollment: 614 Grades: 9-12

SPECIAL SCHOOLS & CENTERS Heyward Career & Technology Center 3560 Lynhaven Drive Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 735-3343 Principal: Dr. Sherry Rivers Grades: 9-12

Adult Education 2612 Covenant Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 343-2935 Coordinator: Dr. Marva Coates Challenger Learning Center 2600A Barhamville Road Columbia, SC 29204 Telephone: 929-3951 Director: Dr. Carolyn Donelan

Olympia Learning Center 621 Bluff Road Columbia, SC 29201 Principal: Nathan White Grades: 9-12

Evening High School Program 621 Bluff Road Columbia, SC 29201 Telephone: 738-7574 Coordinator: Kerry Abel Grades: 9-12

Pendergrass Fairwold School 5935 Token Street Columbia, SC 29203 Principal: Faythe Redenburg Grades: n/a

CHARTER SCHOOLS Carolina School for Inquiry 7405-A Fairfield Road Columbia, SC 29203 Telephone: 691-1250 Director/Lead Teacher: Victoria Dixon-Mokeba Grades: K-5

Richland One Middle College 316 S. Beltline Boulevard Columbia, SC 29205 Phone: 738-7114 Principal: Dr. Carla Brabham Grades: 11-12

BELL SCHEDULE

Lower Richland High 2615 Lower Richland Boulevard Hopkins, SC 29061 Telephone: 695-3000 Principal: Dr. Ericka Hursey Enrollment: 1115 Grades: 9-12

Elementary Schools 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Middle Schools 8:40 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. High Schools 8:00 a.m. - 3:15 p.m.

FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS Richland One Main Line

231-7000

Four-year-old Kindergarten

799-9494

Security and Emergency Services

231-7130

Adult Education

343-2935

School Counseling Services

231-6939

School Board Office

231-7556

Advanced Academic Programs

400-1688

Hearing Office

231-6926

School Board Policies

231-7404

Athletics 231-6722

Homebound Instruction

231-6904

School Improvement Councils

231-6842

Attendance Lines

231-6944

Homeschooling

231-7459

School Psychologists

231-6773

Instructional Services

400-1715

Human Resource Services

231-7418

Social Work Services

231-6757

Challenger Learning Center

929-3951

InfoPhone

231-7512

Special Services

231-6773

Charter Schools

231-7151

Information Technology

231-7464

Special Services (pre-school)

691-3993

Communications (Public Relations)

231-7504

Insurance (student)

231-7401

Standardized Testing

231-7450

Secondary Education

231-7459

231-6799

231-6953

790-6763

Learning Environments and Instructional Resources

Student Nutrition Services

Dropout Prevention

231-6709

Student Transfers

231-6944

Elementary Education

231-6855

212-1475 738-3548

231-6791

Early Childhood Education

International Welcome Center Montessori Programs

Student Records

738-7574

231-6730

231-7002

Evening High School Program

Nursing Services

Student Transportation Services

231-7500

231-6842

Parents and Students Succeed (homeless initiative)

Superintendent’s Office

Extended-Day (Afterschool) Programs

231-6914

Teaching and Learning

231-6704

Facility Services

231-7057

Partnerships 231-6842

Textbooks 231-6716

Federal and State Programs

231-6815

Procurement Services

231-7033

Visual and Performing Arts

231-6858

Registrar’s Office

231-6944

Volunteer Programs

231-7144

Richland One TV

231-6700/6701

Foreign Language and International Programs

212-1475

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PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT: LEADER IN ME Leader in Me program helping to transform school culture, develop students’ leadership and life skills

In recognition of the school’s exemplary implementation of the Leader in Me school transformation model, Annie Burnside Elementary has been designated as a Leader in Me Lighthouse School. Pictured (left to right) are Burnside students Jordan Ibekwe, Andrea Alvarado, Cordae Armstrong, Aidan Caudle and Loc Nguyen.

At Annie Burnside Elementary School, beautiful colorful artwork and affirmations encouraging students to be positive, set goals and “begin with the end in mind” adorn the building from floor to ceiling and hall to hall. You’ll also hear buzz words and phrases like “transformation” and “finding your voice” to describe the change in students since the school started using the Leader in Me process about four years ago. The FranklinCovey company describes Leader in Me as “a wholeschool transformation model that empowers students with the leadership and life skills they need to thrive in the 21st century. It is based on principles and practices of personal, interpersonal and organizational effectiveness, and upon the powerful premise that every child possesses unique strengths and has the ability to be a leader.” Leader in Me incorporates Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits for Highly Effective People. Burnside is one of six Leader in Me schools in Richland One. W.J. Keenan High, Bradley Elementary, Carver-Lyon Elementary, W.G. Sanders Middle and Hopkins Elementary also have implemented the Leader in Me process. “We have seen such amazing results from implementing the Leader in Me process at our school, such as an increase in family involvement, students becoming more confident and self-motivated, and teachers establishing strong classroom communities where students are responsible for setting personal and academic goals,” said Burnside Principal Dr. Felicia Richardson. The school-wide impact of the program led to Sean Covey, president of FranklinCovey Education, naming Burnside as a Leader in Me Lighthouse School. The prestigious designation recognizes Burnside’s outstanding results in developing student leaders and improving the school’s culture by using the Leader in Me process. One of Dr. Richardson’s favorite stories is that of Andrea Alvarado, a shy nine-year-old who could not speak English when she arrived at Burnside. “When I came to this school, I was really shy and didn’t know how to make friends,” said Andrea. “I finally met a girl and we became best friends. She taught me how to break out of my shell and be someone true and now here I am … now I’m not shy anymore. I have a new friend now who’s really shy in class and doesn’t talk that much … I’m teaching her how to break out of her shell and start talking to other people instead of just me.”

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“Andrea has now spoken to several large audiences of teachers, students and community members about her remarkable journey and how the strong implementation of the Leader in Me philosophy helped her to ‘find her voice!’” Dr. Richardson said. “This process not only has had a significant impact on this student, but on all students, and we expect to see greater results over time.” For 10-year-old Aidan Caudle, the Leader in Me taught him how to stand up to bullies. Fourth-grader Jordan Ibekwe is a singer who has performed at events including a Columbia Fireflies baseball game and helps to encourage students to follow The 7 Habits, even when they think no one is watching. All students set their own specific reading goals, with strategies, and track them daily in their notebooks. The students’ “accountability partners” help them stay on track with reaching their goals. The impact of Leader in Me at Burnside extends beyond the classroom. Fourth-grader Cordae Armstrong and third-grader Loc Nguyen share stories of how they used the Leader in Me concepts to be more compassionate and generous with their siblings and friends when they were having a bad day. Fourth-grade teacher Angelia Alston says one student used the concept to figure out ways to get herself better organized so she could get up and be ready for school each morning. “Excellence is a journey and we’re on our way to excellence through this Leader in Me program,” said Alston. “We’re taking limits off of our students and tapping into their creativity and their potential that we’re sometimes unaware of unless they’re given the opportunity – and that opportunity is for everyone. It’s amazing to see the change over time. It’s amazing to watch students take over roles and build character and traits that will be with them in college and the professional workplace.” Students say the biggest lesson they’ve all learned is that “a leader is a leader no matter how small.” Since its official launch nearly six years ago, nearly 4,000 public, private, charter and magnet schools across 50 countries have adopted the Leader in Me process. To learn more about the Leader in Me, go to www.theleaderinme.org. For more information about Burnside’s Leader in Me program, contact Principal Dr. Felicia Richardson at felicia.richardson@richlandone.org.

Leader in Me/The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People •

HABIT 1: Be Proactive (You’re in Charge)

HABIT 2: Begin With the End in Mind (Have a Plan)

HABIT 3: Put First Things First (Work First, Then Play)

HABIT 4: Think Win-Win (Everyone Can Win)

HABIT 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood (Listen Before You Talk)

HABIT 6: Synergize (Together Is Better)

HABIT 7: Sharpen the Saw (Balance Feels Best)


PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT: FIREFIGHTER TRAINING ACADEMY First students earn firefighter certification through program at Lower Richland High

Jasmine Myers, Robert Harris, Jamari Lloyd, Xavier Hannibal, Bryan Moye and Charles Smith are the first Richland One students to receive their Firefighter I certification from the South Carolina Fire Academy through the Firefighter Training Academy at Lower Richland High School.

Robert Harris can’t wait to be a firefighter. “I actually want to save other people’s lives and run into burning buildings and rescue people and cut them out of cars and put out fires and do a lot of different things,” he said. Robert and Bryan Moye, Jamari Lloyd, Jasmine Myers, Charles Smith and Xavier Hannibal are the first Richland One students to receive their Firefighter I certification from the South Carolina Fire Academy through the Firefighter Training Academy at Lower Richland High School. That certification means they are ready to begin careers as firefighters after they graduate from high school and turn 18. The two-year program at Lower Richland offers high school students certifications in CPR/first aid, hazardous material awareness, hazardous material operations, Firefighter I, vehicle extrication and Firefighter II. “I’m actually proud of myself because I didn’t think I would make it because there were different challenges I didn’t think I would be able to accomplish by myself, but I’ve got the team and we work together,” said Robert, who graduated from Lower Richland in June. His teammate, Bryan, also a 2019 Lower Richland graduate, said the course allowed him to thrive in new challenges. “I’ve learned a lot and overcome a lot of my fears, such as getting on a roof,” he said. “I can do that now – no problem.” All of the students agree on one point: The program takes a lot of work and dedication, but it’s worth it. “Actually, it’s been one of the best things I’ve ever done,” said Charles. “And I have a newfound respect for firefighters. It takes a lot to do this.” As the program’s first female graduate, Jasmine encourages more girls to consider firefighting as a profession. “Running into buildings and putting out fires, females can do it,” she said. “It’s very challenging, but you just have to put your mind to it. Oh yes, I can do what the fellas can do.” And, according to her classmate Charles, “on some days she can outdo us guys.” Xavier, who is also team commander, says being successful in the program begins with the right attitude. “To be honest, this is not an easy profession, so when you come in, you have to have the mindset to do it right – no playing. It’s OK to joke around with your friends, but when it’s time to get to business in class, we know how to put play aside and get

what we have to get done for the instructor as she tells us.” Fire Chief Angel O’Neal, the program’s instructor, says the starting salary for local firefighters is about $38,000 a year, a salary students could make right out of high school. She said each student who successfully completes the Firefighter I and II classes will have a chance to take the International Fire Service Accreditation Congress (IFSAC) firefighter exams, which would allow them to work anywhere in the world. “Many of my students plan on becoming full-time firefighters. Some plan on taking what they have learned with them to the military, the police world and beyond,” O’Neal said. “These certifications will make them more marketable to colleges and employers no matter what their final profession turns out to be. They can even pursue a different career and still be volunteer firefighters so that they can serve and give back to the community for years to come!” In addition to the six students who received their firefighter certification, nine students completed the program and 20 received their hazardous material certification. The foundation for that success includes the program’s impressive advisory board made up of fire chiefs and assistant fire chiefs from local fire departments, McEntire Joint National Guard Base, McCrady Fire Department at Fort Jackson, the South Carolina Fire Academy and Richland County Emergency Services. The program is sponsored and supported by the City of Columbia Fire Department. “Richland One has done an incredible job funding and establishing this program to be the best in the state,” said O’Neal, who was a firefighter with the Columbia Fire Department for 16 years, worked at the fire department for McEntire Joint National Guard Base for 11 years and received extensive training locally, with the Department of Defense and the National Fire Academy in Maryland. “The career as a firefighter involves constantly learning, training and growing in the profession,” she said. “I hope the students will also join me in being hungry for knowledge and success in this career field.” To learn more about Lower Richland High School’s Fire Training Academy, contact Fire Chief Angel O’Neal at angel.oneal@richlandone. org.

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PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT: LOGAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Expanded arts program to include enhanced curriculum, guest artists and more opportunities for students to perform Just imagine: What if a science lesson inspired you to write a poem or a math problem moved you to create an original art piece? This year, Logan Elementary School, well-known for its outstanding strings, steel drums, chorus and dance ensembles, will be using the power of art and academics in new ways in the classroom, at lunchtime and in the community. Principal Chris Richards says the goal of the expanded arts program is to allow every Logan student to have access to various art forms and to enhance the academics they’re learning in the classroom. “Right now some students, like our bus riders, are missing out on arts programs and ensembles because most are offered before or after schools,” Richards. “All of that will change in the fall.” Logan teachers will use the established curriculum based on college and career standards and integrate it with arts-based skills in every classroom. While studying an academic subject, students also will learn about various art forms and mediums, which they will use to create their own original art piece (i.e. a song, poetry, dance) based on the subject matter they’re studying. “It’s not going to be an extra class where it’s just a related art,” Richards explained. “Their homeroom teacher is going to be working possibly with an artist-in-residence or a full-time artist to develop art-integrated units. The children can experience art authentically but also create and produce art authentically.” Richards believes the arts and academics support each other. “The thing is, it’s not just the art enhancing the subject matter. It’s the subject matter enhancing the art. It goes both ways,” he said. “We’re looking for that balance where they go back and forth. If you ask the question, ‘What comes first? Does art follow history or does history follow art?’ Well, you can’t tear those two apart. In the Harlem Renaissance, what happened? Did the music come out of the Harlem Renaissance or did the Harlem Renaissance come out of the music? It goes both ways.” Another key component of the expanded arts program at Logan will be exposing students to different art forms through lunchtime concerts and events called All You Can Arts Buffet, where musicians and artists will share their art forms with students on stage in the school’s cafetorium. “Our goal is to, at least once every two weeks, showcase a unique form of art,” Richards said. “So that could be musicians coming in and playing and then the next week having someone in singing and playing the guitar. But we’re also going to have some potters bring a mobile potter’s wheel. We’re also hoping to have some artists come in and create artwork in front of the kids. We’ll get cameras and screens so that kids can just watch what these artists are doing in different mediums. We’re going to get some woodworkers in to create or whittle right in front of the kids. We’re also going to get some dancers in and other various things, such as spoken word poetry.” The third component of the expanded arts program at Logan will be sharing the students’ talents with the community. “These kids do all of this hard work and we don’t always get a chance to display it and show it off, “Richards said. “We want to get our ensembles out to perform more often, so if anyone has a need for a chorus or strings or steel band or dancers for an event, call me.” The expanded arts program, just like Logan’s Montessori program, is open to elementary students in the Columbia, Eau Claire, W.J. Keenan and C.A. Johnson high school clusters. Parents who would like more information may call Principal Richards at 343-2942 or

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email him at christopher.richards@richlandone.org. Richards encourages artists who are interested in sharing their art forms with students by participating in the All You Can Arts Buffet to contact him as well. “The three things Logan is known for and uses to support the academic and social success of all Leopards (the school’s mascot) are the arts, community and Montessori,” Richards said. “We have an amazing school environment. We want to build on that environment for our Leopards’ academic and social success.”

CALLING ALL ARTISTS! A component of the expanded arts program at Logan Elementary School will be exposing students to different art forms through lunchtime concerts and events called All You Can Arts Buffet, where musicians and artists will share their art forms with students on stage in the school’s cafetorium. Interested artists should contact Principal Chris Richards at 343-2942 or christopher.richards@richlandone.org.


SCHOOL ESSENTIALS SCHOOL ZONE LOCATOR Richland One’s School Zone Locator is a convenient online tool for parents to use to find out which schools their children are zoned to attend and which buses they will ride. To access the School Zone Locator, go to richlandone.org, click on the School Zone Locator link and type in the information requested. The 2019-2020 school bus routes are posted on the district’s website. For more information, contact the Registrar’s Office at 231-6944 or Student Transportation Services at 231-7002.

ENROLLING IN SCHOOL Children must be 5 years old on or before September 1 to enroll in kindergarten and 6 years old on or before September 1 to enroll in first grade. State law requires students to be in school from ages 5 to 17. Parents who choose not to send their child to a public or private 5-year-old kindergarten must sign a waiver to that effect. Waiver forms are available on the Parent Resources page of the district’s website (www. richlandone.org). If a child will be enrolling in school for the first time or transferring from another school district, parents should complete the online registration forms on the Registrar’s Office department page by clicking on 2019-2020 New Student Registration. The child’s school will need the following documents: •

Long-form birth certificate

South Carolina Certificate of Immunization

Two proofs of residence, such as a lease or mortgage statement and a utility bill

For students who are transferring from another school district, parents should provide the child’s most recent report card and the withdrawal form from the previous school, in addition to the documents required for registration. Students are assigned to schools based upon where their parents/legal guardian live. If parents are divorced or legally separated, the student is assigned to a school based upon where the custodial parent lives. If the parents/legal guardians do not have the lease or mortgage in their names, they must complete the shared housing proof of residence process at their zoned school. For more information about registration requirements or school assignments, contact the Registrar’s Office at 231-6944.

INTERNATIONAL WELCOME CENTER Richland One’s International Welcome Center is located on the lower level of the Richland One Adult Education Center at 2612 Covenant Road, Columbia, SC 29204. Testing for potential new English Learners (ELs) will begin August 7, 2019 and continue throughout the school year. The office is open for ESOL testing Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. – noon. Parents should bring two proofs of residence as well as your child’s official proof of age (birth certificate, passport, etc.). For more information, call 212-1475.

All Richland One students can eat meals at school free regardless of their household income, thanks to the district’s participation in the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) Program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National School Lunch Program. Above, Superintendent Dr. Craig Witherspoon and Arden Elementary School student Laycee Conway, who won the Junior League of Columbia’s 2019 Kids in the Kitchen Junior Chef competition, enjoy her culinary creation, Pita Pocket Pizzas, which was featured on the menu at all district schools.

IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS According to South Carolina state law, every student must present a valid South Carolina Certificate of Immunization showing the minimum immunization requirements at the time of school entrance or valid exemption. If the student is entering from another South Carolina school, he/she must submit an immunization certificate at registration. Students from out-ofstate have 30 days to comply. Failure to comply will result in disenrollment. Changes in immunization requirements for the 2019-2020 schedule include: • 5th grade has been added to the requirement for two doses of varicella. A child with a positive history of the disease is considered immune and is exempt from this requirement. • 7th grade has been added to the requirement for three doses of oral and/or inactivated polio vaccine with at least one dose received on or after the fourth birthday. • The requirement for the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination has been updated to refer to MMR vaccine, as it is the only available vaccine in the United States. Requirements are: one dose of MMR vaccine on or after the first birthday for child care and two doses of MMR vaccine on or after the first birthday for school. Children enrolled in pre-K or 4K programs and younger must meet day care requirements, even if attendance is in a school setting. Children enrolled in 5-yearold kindergarten through grade 12 must meet school requirements. A new Hepatitis A vaccine requirement for child care will begin July 1, 2020, and will begin for 5K with the 2020-2021 school year. • Child care: Two doses of Hepatitis A vaccine with both doses received on or after the first birthday and separated by at least 6 months for any child born on or after January 1, 2019. • School: Two doses of Hepatitis A vaccine with both doses received on or after the first birthday and separated by at least 6 months for 5K and an additional grade added each school year. Details regarding immunization requirements are outlined in the 2019-2020 schedules of required vaccines for school admittance and day care attendance which are posted on the Richland One website (www.richlandone.org) and on the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) website (www.scdhec.gov). Questions may be directed to DHEC’s Immunization Division at 800-277-4687 or immunize@dhec.sc.gov.

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ATTENDANCE MATTERS

Help Your Child Succeed In School In Richland One, we are always working to improve and increase academic achievement. As we welcome our 24,000 students back to school, it is important that parents and guardians recognize that attending school daily and maintaining a strong attendance record is essential to their child’s success in school. Please note these important facts about student attendance: 1. The South Carolina Compulsory Attendance Law requires that a child attend school from the school year in which the child is 5 years old before September 1 until the child’s 17th birthday. 2. A child, at least 6 years old but not yet 17, who has three unexcused absences in a row or a total of five unexcused absences at any point in the school year, is deemed truant by law and in violation of the South Carolina Compulsory School Attendance Law. The law also states that once a child is found to be truant, the parent/guardian must work with the school to develop a written attendance plan. 3. Anytime that a student is absent, the parent or guardian must provide a written note to the school explaining the absence within 48 hours of the child returning to school. Legal and excused absences include, but are not limited to illness, death in the immediate family, and recognized religious holidays of the student’s faith, emergency conditions as determined by the school administration, inclement weather and short-term suspensions. 4. Students will be referred to the school social worker or other support services staff at any time it is deemed appropriate for excessive excused/unexcused absences for full or partial day absences (i.e. late arrival, early dismissals). 5. Parents or guardians are encouraged to check their child’s attendance regularly and at any time by contacting their child’s school or by logging into the Parent Portal. 6. Parents/guardians also should disclose and discuss with school administrators if extenuating circumstances arise that prevent their child from attending school daily. Richland One has school social workers and school counselors in place to assist families with options related to student attendance. 7. There are 180 school days in the school year. Per state regulation, high school students or middle school students taking courses for graduation credit can have only three unexcused absences during a 45-day course, five unexcused absences during a 90-day course and 10 unexcused absences during 180-day courses to earn course credit. Absences can affect students’ projected graduation dates and may result in a failure to graduate. Encouraging regular school attendance is a vital component to academic success. The more days a student misses from school, the further the student will fall behind academically. Let’s work together to help your child build the habit of daily attendance. We know that when we connect and partner with families, we are positioning our students for greatness! For more information about school attendance laws and policies, contact the Office of School Social Work and Student Attendance at 231-6757. You also can access the full student attendance and truancy brochure at www.richlandone.org; click on Departments then Social Work Services and click on School Social Work Forms, Resources and and Documents.

INCLEMENT WEATHER PROCEDURES There may be times during the school year when inclement weather will prompt a late start, early dismissal or cancellation of school. Richland One has procedures in place to make decisions about whether school and work schedules will be modified and to notify students, parents, district employees and community members as quickly as possible. • Parents will receive automated phone calls and text messages from the district through the SchoolMessenger notification system. Announcements of school closings or delays also will be sent to local news media and posted on the district’s website (www.richlandone.org) and Richland One TV (Spectrum cable channel 1303), as well as Facebook (facebook.com/ richlandone), Twitter (twitter.com/richlandone) and the Richland One InfoPhone (231-7512). An alert notification also will be sent through the district’s mobile app (download free from the App Store or Google Play). Parents are urged not to call the schools because doing so could hinder district emergency communications. • Other school emergencies, such as power and heating/air-conditioning outages, also may result in delayed school starts, early dismissals or cancellations. Similar notification procedures are followed at the district or school level, including notifying parents whether after-school programs, child care programs and athletics activities will proceed as scheduled. • Under a two-hour delay, buses will pick up students two hours later than normal and school will start two hours later than normal; any exceptions and any other pertinent information will be announced. Please note that state law requires students to receive 180 days of instruction. Days missed will have to be made up at some other time during the school year, unless they are waived by the Board of School Commissioners or at the state level. Richland One has designated four dates in the 2019-2020 district calendar that would be used as student make-up days if necessary: November 25, November 26, March 20 and April 10. The decision whether to cancel school, start late or dismiss early during inclement weather conditions is seldom an easy one, but the safety of our students and employees will continue to be our most important consideration. Parents are urged to make arrangements in advance and establish an emergency plan for their children in the event that schools are closed, start late dismissed early.

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NEW STUDENT LAPTOP PROCEDURES For the 2019-2020 school year, instead of students in grades 3-8 taking their district-issued laptops home, the laptops will be kept at their schools. At the start of each school day, students will retrieve their laptops from the charging stations in the classrooms. During the school day, students will have their laptops for all learning activities. Before leaving school at the end of the day, students will return their laptops to the charging stations. Student laptops may be sent home with students for infrequent special projects assigned by their teachers. In such cases, the laptops will be checked out to the individual students (like library books) who will be required to bring the laptops back to class fully charged every day during the project period. At the end of the project, the students must check in the laptops and return them to the charging stations.

For more information about student laptop procedures, contact your child’s school.

K-12 Student Accident Insurance To supplement any existing insurance policy(s), parents are able to purchase additional insurance coverage for their child/children while at or participating in any school-sponsored activity. Although it is not meant to be a primary policy, this will provide additional coverage for your child in the event that your child has an incident, accident or injury at school. Forms can be picked up from your child’s school at the beginning of each school year. Parents can enroll online by the use of a dedicated secure enrollment website: markel.sevencorners. com. On the website, parents can view all of the coverage and premium options; review a Frequently Asked Questions section; and purchase the insurance using a credit/debit card and receive an instant and printable confirmation of what they purchased. Parents also may call Customer Service at 1-877-444-5014.

FREE COMET RIDES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS Again this year, Richland One high school students can ride The COMET bus free, thanks to the district’s partnership with the Central Midlands Regional Transit Authority (The COMET). Students in grades 9-12 who are enrolled in a Richland One high school or program just need to present their ID to The COMET driver. There are no route restrictions or other limitations. Students can ride the bus free during the school year and in the summer. The free bus fare only applies to the student pictured on the ID. “Being able to ride The COMET free is a tremendous advantage and convenience for our high school students, especially for students who need a reliable way to get to after-school jobs or to special programs, such as our Evening High School Program, for which they have to provide their own transportation,” said Richland One Superintendent Dr. Craig Witherspoon. Through the partnership, Richland One employees also can ride The COMET free by presenting their district ID. Parents of Richland One high school students who would like additional information should contact their child’s school. For bus routes and other information about The COMET, go to www. catchthecomet.org.

EXTENDED-DAY PROGRAMS Richland One’s extended-day programs are designed to increase academic achievement through structured afterschool, before-school, weekend and summer programs that offer a variety of academic and enrichment activities. • Comprehensive remediation programs operate at all elementary schools and middle schools for students in grades 3-8. Days/hours of operation are Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 2:30-4:30 p.m. (elementary schools) and 4:00-6:00 p.m. (middle schools). There is no cost to students/parents. • Afterschool child care programs are offered at all elementary schools for students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade. The days/hours of operation are Monday-Friday from 2:30-6:00 p.m. Child care programs are provided through agreements with schools and licensed child care providers approved by the district. A weekly fee ($50-$75) is assessed to parents for these services. • 21st Century Community Learning Centers are located at St. Andrews Middle School and W.J. Keenan High School and operate Monday-Friday (specific days of operation may vary by school) from 4:00-6:00 p.m. (middle school) and 3:00-5:00 (high school). There is no cost to students/ parents. • Athletic tutorial programs are designed to help ensure that student-athletes maintain good academic standing. These programs operate at all middle schools and high schools Monday-Friday, 4:00-6:00 p.m. (middle schools) and 3:00-5:00 p.m. (high schools). There is no cost to students/parents.

For more information, contact the Office of Strategic Partnerships and Extended-Day Programs at 231-6842.

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EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT Shawn Norris Satchel Ford Elementary School 2019-2020 Teacher of the Year If you ask Shawn Norris about his proudest accomplishments, most likely he’ll tell you about his 15-year-old son Jonah, a straight-A student, and his 17-year-old daughter Hannah, who plans to become a teacher, just like him and his wife, Megan. He tears up as he ponders whether his weekly fatherdaughter dates at Subway with Hannah may end after she starts college next year (she assures him that they won’t.) It’s been their tradition since Hannah was in third grade. Putting family and faith first is a conviction he cherishes, but teaching children is his joy. Shawn was a physical education teacher at Hyatt Park Elementary School for 17 years. He’s spent the last two years at Satchel Ford and is working on his master’s degree in administration. He says his students have taught him that people are more important than scores, rankings and wins. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, hiking in the mountains, any Gamecock sport and writing a baseball anthology book. What’s number one on his bucket list? Hiking the Rocky Mountains.

What has been your proudest moment as a teacher? I would say the development of the Richland One Fitness Bowl, which is in its ninth year. The Fitness Bowl was developed at Hyatt Park as a way to improve individual student fitness score outcomes, techniques and effort, as well as to develop best practices with other professionals and peers. We originally started with four schools (Hyatt Park, WatkinsNance, Bradley and Forest Heights) and 60 total participants. Now we host 14-15 district schools with 250-270 participants and over 1,000 fans. The program has even branched into the middle school ranks as well.

Why should others go into the teaching profession? Kids are our future and our greatest investment. Impacting the life of a child changes families, neighborhoods, communities and nations.

What lessons have your students taught you? They teach me that they can often do far more than you expect or believe is possible, so I tell them to dream big.

What would people be surprised to learn about you? They would be surprised to know that as a kid, I wanted to be the lead singer of Journey and that I danced in a ballet with my daughter because she said “my dad won’t let me down.”

How are you making a difference in the lives of your students? I challenge them to do their best in whatever they do and that making mistakes, losing and messing up is part of the process of healthy learning, so don’t be afraid to mess up. I tell them that everyone has value and worth, so there are no mistakes in the room. We all have a God-given purpose to fulfill.

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How can parents better support teachers? I encourage parents to spend quality time with their kids and instill a love of learning. If you weren’t in education, what would you be doing? I have no clue.

What else would be interesting for people to know about you? I was an intermural ping pong champion in college. I collect World War II artifacts and have an extensive baseball card collection. I’ve been married to my best friend for 20 years.


EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT Me’Linda Legette Challenger Learning Center 2019-2020 Classified Employee of the Year

As an administrative assistant at the Challenger Learning Center, Me’Linda Legette is the first smiling face visitors see and the first friendly voice they hear as they plan their adventures in simulated space flights, building robots and flying drones. She refers to the Challenger Learning Center as the “Disney World of Richland One” because “once people come here, they are so excited.” Me’Linda admits that when she was in school, she didn’t like science much. When she started working at the Challenger Learning Center, she wanted to be more knowledgeable

What does your job entail? As the Mission Secretary II, my goal is to speak with an attitude of caring and patience with all customers, employees and teachers. Along with bookkeeping, confirmations and the administrative duties, I greet and treat people with love and professionalism so that each person will feel special and engaged in what we have to offer in Richland One. I also schedule groups for the community by notifying them of STEM activities that we provide for summer camps, faithbased groups and homeschool programs. My motivation is knowing that I am contributing to an awesome experience for our students and my community, as well as future doctors, scientists and astronauts. What do you love most about your job? I love seeing the excitement on the students’ faces as they enter the

about the topics she was discussing with visitors, so she decided to learn more about science on her own time. “I had to go home and study because everything here is science-centered. Our commanders are certified science teachers. We follow South Carolina state standards. I learned the standards and I asked questions. I had to look at shows and videos and ask more questions. I spent a lot of time off the clock learning about things and reading.” Working for Richland One was a natural fit for Me’Linda, a 1991 graduate of Eau Claire High School who went on to earn a B.A. degree in psychology from Winthrop University. Her mother attended C.A. Johnson High School and her children attend W.J. Keenan High School. “When you’re a product of District One, you have more understanding and you take your job more personally. I remember two teachers, Mr. McCants and Ms. Snow, and those teachers took my education personally. I wasn’t very good at math at first and Mr. McCants would work with me after school. I didn’t know how to tumble in gym. My gym teacher would say ‘hey, if you come back during recess, I’ll teach you how to tumble.’ So that personal one-on-one attention was amazing, and then going on to Alcorn and seeing the secretaries there who were really nice and would speak to you and make you feel special.” She believes that being in band, chorus and JROTC at Eau Claire changed her life. “My perception of me changed and my experiences, like going to Canada, are things I’ll always appreciate. Because of those experiences, you build community and friendships within the community. It’s just the connections and the way teachers poured themselves into you as a student.”

Center and become engaged in each activity. Hearing comments from teachers like “This is one of the best field trips we’ve had!” makes my day. I am invested in our children, I love administrative work and I love great customer service which is why I love my job. I remember the secretary of every school I attended in Richland One. Every person that entered that front office received their attention. I am simply carrying on the torch. I have been in District One for many years and I am proud of where I work, what I do and what is to come. What are your interests outside of Richland One? Through my organization called Women Need Time II, I coordinate events to encourage and uplift women and children through networking events, book clubs, spiritual and fun gatherings and an annual back-to-school youth conference.

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2019

KEY DATES

August 2 Countdown to Kindergarten, EdVenture Children’s Museum, 5:30-8 p.m. August 17

Sportsarama, Memorial Stadium, 6 p.m.

August 21

First day of school for students

August 21

Afterschool child care and athletics tutorial programs begin

August 23, 26, 27

Pre-kindergarten home visits

August 28 -30

Pre-kindergarten staggered start week

September 1-30

National Attendance Awareness Month

September 3 First full week of school for all pre-kindergarten students September 5

Richland One Consolidated Fair – ED OP 2019, Carolina Coliseum, 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. (college, career and military information for juniors and seniors)

September 10

Comprehensive Remediation, 21st Century and SC Chamber Homework Centers begin

September 12

“How to Plan and Pay for College 101” workshop, A.C. Flora High School auditorium, 6:30-8 p.m.

October 1-31

Bullying Prevention Month

October 1-31

National Dropout Prevention Month

October 14-18

National School Lunch Week

October 12

Prisma Health Midlands Foundation’s Walk for Life and Famously Hot Pink Half Marathon, 5K+10K; call (803) 434-2898 for details.

October 16

PSAT for grades 7-8 and 10-11

October 23

Financial Aid 101 workshop (for juniors and seniors), A.C. Flora High School auditorium, 6:30-8 p.m.

October 31

Parent/teacher conferences; no school for students

November 11-15

American Education Week

First Day of School – August 21

November 19 Richland One Choice Fair, 5-7 p.m., Heyward Career and Technology Center November 21

National Parental Involvement Day

November 25-29

Thanksgiving Break

Dec. 23-January 2

Winter Break

Richland One Consolidated Fair – September 5

2020 January 1-31

National Mentoring Month

February 1

Richland One Hall of Fame Induction Gala, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center; red carpet reception at 5 p.m., program/dinner at 6 p.m.

February 13 Superintendent’s State of the District Address, 6 p.m., LR High School Auditorium February 28

Parent/teacher conferences; no school for students

March 1

2020-2021 pre-kindergarten and kindergarten online registration begins

March 2-6

National School Breakfast Week

April 10-17

Spring Break

April 13-17

Week of the Young Child

April 30

Early registration for pre-kindergarten ends

May 1

National School Lunch Hero Day

May 4-8

Child Nutrition Employee Appreciation Week

May 5

National Teacher Day

May 6

National School Nurse Day

May 30

SOAR Into Summer Success Celebration, State Fairgrounds, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

June 5

Last day for district child care programs and athletics tutorial programs

June 5

Last day of school for students

State of the district address – February 13

NOTE: Dates are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, go to www.richlandone.org. The 2019-2020 academic calendar is posted on the website and printed on the inside back cover of this publication.

18

Spotlight ONE • Fall 2019 Edition

soar into summer success celebration – May 30


2 9 16 23

1 8 15 22

29

T

7 14 21

28

7 14 21

28

7 14 21

28

M

6 13 20

27

M

6 13 20

27

S

6 13 20 27

S

5 12 19

26

S

5 12 19

26

T

W

T

M

7 14 21 28

T

30

1 8 15 22

29

T

2 9 16 23

W

30

2 9 16 23

29

T

1 8 15 22

3 10 17 24 31

T

4 11 18 25

W

30

3 10 17 24 31

1 8 15 22 29

W

T

2 9 16 23 30

M

S

4 11 18

5 12 19 26

4 11 18 25

24

2 9 16 23

3 10 17 24

F

3 10 17 24 31

S

S

4 11 18 25 25

4 11 18

M

3 10 17

S

M

25

4 11 18

M

S

24

3 10 17

S

12 19 26

5

M

4 11 18 25

April 2020

31

3 10 17 24

F

January 2020

S

F

25

S

S

6 13 20 27

October 2019

5 12 19 26

F

July 2019

26

5 12 19

T

25

4 11 18

T

26

5 12 19

T

27

6 13 20

T

27

6 13 20

W

26

5 12 19

W

27

6 13 20

W

28

7 14 21

W

T

30

2 9 16 23

F

S

31

3 10 17 24

7 14 21 28

T

27

6 13 20

T

29

1 8 15 22

F

30

2 9 16 23

S

S

1 8 15 22 29

1 8 15 22 29

F

2 9 16 23 30

S

May 2020

7 14 21 28

F

February 2020

28

7 14 21

T

November 2019

29

1 8 15 22

August 2019

35 10 17

2 9 16 23 30

22 29

7 14 21 28

24

W

T

25

4 11 18

W

25

4 11 18

W

1 8 15

M

24 31

23 30 22 29

S

3 10 17

2 9 16

S

1 8 15

T

24 31

23 30

M

3 10 17

2 9 16

1 8 15 22 29

T

M

25

24

23 30

22 29

S

4 11 18

T

3 10 17

M

2 9 16

S

1 8 15

W

2019-2020 District Calendar

Richland County School District One

F

27

6 13 20

S

28

7 14 21

25

4 11 18

T

26

5 12 19

T

26

5 12 19

T

S

28

7 14 21

S

28

7 14 21

26

5 12 19

F

27

6 13 20

S

June 2020

27

6 13 20

F

March 2020

27

6 13 20

F

December 2019

26

5 12 19

T

September 2019

August 21, 2019 August 20, 2019 August 16, 2019 August 14, 2019 August 14, 2019 August 7, 2019 July 24, 2019 July 1, 2019

180 – day employees 182 – day employees 184 – day employees 186 – day employees 190 – day employees 200 – day employees 220 - day employees 240 – day employees

First Workday

June 30, 2020

June 8, 2020 June 15, 2020 June 29, 2020

June 5, 2020 June 8, 2020 June 8, 2020 June 8, 2020

Last Workday

2019-2020 Richland One Employee Work Schedule

First/last day of school for students Professional Development Day (No school for students) Student/Staff Holiday (Schools/Offices Closed) Teacher Workday (No school for students)

240-day employees work on December 23, 2019, March 20, 2020 and April 10, 2020.

Note: 180, 182, 184, and 186 day employees do not work on October 31, 2019, January 3, 2020, January 17, 2020 and February 28, 2020.

Make-up days: November 25, 2019, November 26, 2019, March 20, 2020 and April 10, 2020

CALENDAR NOTES

Independence Day Holiday July 4 Professional Development Days August 14 - 15 Teacher Workdays August 16, 19 - 20 First Day of School for Students August 21 Labor Day Holiday September 2 Interim Reports Issued September 26 End of First Nine Weeks (45th day) October 23 Report Cards Issued October 30 Parent/Teacher Conferences (p.m.) /Professional Development Day October 31 Thanksgiving Break November 25 - 29 Interim Reports Issued December 6 Winter Break Dec. 23 - Jan. 2 Teacher Workday January 3 Students Return from Winter Break January 6 End of Second Nine Weeks (90th Day) January 16 Professional Development Day January 17 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday January 20 Report Cards Issued January 23 Interim Reports Issued February 21 Parent/Teacher Conferences (p.m.) /Professional Development Day February 28 Student/Staff Holiday March 20 End of Third Nine Weeks (135th Day) March 25 Report Cards Issued April 1 Spring Break April 10 - 17 Interim Reports Issued May 1 Memorial Day Holiday May 25 End of Fourth Nine Weeks (180th Day) June 5 Last Day for Students June 5 Teacher Workday/Last Day for Teachers June 8


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Richland County School District One Spotlight ONE Back-To-School Edition  

Richland County School District One Spotlight ONE Back-To-School Edition