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LASSWADE HIGH SCHOOL S5/S6 PROSPECTUS Welcome to the Senior School Prospectus. This booklet has been compiled to help those of you intending to return for Fifth and Sixth year to make the best possible decisions about your courses. In each department’s section you will find descriptions of the courses offered: entry requirements for each particular course, as well as an outline of the subject content, assessment and progression to further study. Please note that only those with an A or B will be eligible for Higher. By reading the relevant pages carefully, and through discussion with your teachers, you should be in a good position to make the best possible decision about your course choice for the coming year. One of the main aims of your final years is to provide you with an environment in which you can achieve academically. Equally important, however, is the opportunity for you to develop as an individual. In general terms, the final two years should be seen as a preparation for more independent life beyond school. You will find that you are gradually expected to show more independence and take more responsibility for managing your studies both in and out of the classroom. You will need to demonstrate good organisational skills, as well as self-discipline, if you are to make the most of the opportunities that are offered. The most important entry requirement for any student intending to return for S5/S6 is personal commitment. Our range of courses provides the opportunity to choose a programme which is suited to you: to build on the knowledge and skills which you have developed in the first four years and to apply them in an increasingly specialised programme which will allow you to move on to Further and Higher Education or employment. All students intending to return for S6 will be expected to play an active part in the wider life of the school, through a variety of activities which will enhance your personal development: prefect role, house activities, peer support, work experience, enterprise, charities, website. Some, but not all, of these may be offered as timetabled activities. We hope you will develop some responsibility for these activities and for initiating new ones. CONTENTS Page A Guide to Fifth/Sixth Year 1-3 Course Sheet 4-5 Administration & IT 6 Art and Design 7-9 Biology 10-12 Business Management 13-14 Chemistry 15-16 Computing 17-19 Dance 20 Design and Technology 21-25 Drama 26-27 English 28-29 Geography 30-31 History 32-33 Home Economics 34-36 Mathematics 37-41 Modern Languages 41-43 Modern Studies 44-45 Music 46-48 Physical Education 49 Physics 50-51 Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies 52 Interest Courses 53-54 Guidance, PSE and Support for Learning 55-56 Careers 57 1


Selecting Courses At Lasswade we offer a wide choice of SQA courses from National 3 to Advanced Higher. In addition for S6 students Interest courses are offered: to be taken as subjects of interest or personal development. Your ideas about a future career will influence your choice of subject, however the vast majority of occupations are best prepared for by following courses which suit your abilities and interests. So do not worry if you do not have definite career plans yet. We hope that the range of subjects on offer will allow students to follow a course of their choice. However, where subjects appear in more than one column, you may be asked to change columns in order to allow us to meet the needs of the maximum number of students. It is also important to be aware that, where there is insufficient demand for a course, we may withdraw it. If a preferred subject cannot be offered then it may be possible, in some cases, for us to make arrangements for a student to study it at another school or college. If this is not possible we will discuss with individuals their career plans and help them to select another appropriate subject. Timetable requirements All students in S5 will be expected to have a full timetable and should select one subject from each column. In S6, students will be expected to study a minimum of three academic subjects, with a loading of around 26 periods in total. Eight periods are allocated for each Advanced Higher and six for each Higher. In addition to subject choices we would expect that S6 students, will offer up to 4 periods of their time to supporting younger students in subject departments. Work Experience placements may also be arranged by S6 students in addition to their academic choices. Entry Requirements National 5 A Pass at National 4 will be required. Higher An A or B pass at National 5 is required. Advanced Higher A Higher grade pass at A or B (or in some cases C) will be required. Please refer to subject entries or ask your subject teacher for more detailed advice on specific requirements for each level. Homework Homework will be intensive, but will vary from subject to subject. It is an integral part of every course and students must accept the need to undertake a regular programme of study at home. A student following a highly academic course might expect up to 15 hours of homework per week.

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Assessment The core of your time in S5/S6 is, of course, your academic study. Students should be aware that all subjects carry a large portion of internal assessment. These Unit Assessments (NABs) are spread throughout the year and vary in number from subject to subject. In order to achieve an overall pass, students must pass ALL Unit Assessments at the first or second sitting. Because of the nature of these courses, students are strongly advised not to take time off during term time as this can seriously jeopardise academic success. Progression to University In broad terms, Scottish Universities tend to make offers based on four or five Highers, while English Universities tend to make offers on Advanced Highers alone. What is clear is that increased competition for university places is making the grades achieved of great importance, whether at Standard Grade, Higher or Advanced Higher. All universities value the increased opportunity for independent study that comes with the study of Advanced Highers, provided that solid Higher passes have already been achieved in S5. Support Your Tracking reports and Prelim results are important pointers for your future. You may already have plans for your eventual career; nevertheless you should read this booklet carefully before selecting courses. There is a range of advice available to you as you consider your next step. This booklet is designed to help you understand the contents of the courses on offer. Further advice can be provided by your Guidance teacher and our Careers Advisers. Please check with them and make use of the Careers Library to ensure that you are selecting the combination of courses required for a particular career area. If you require more detailed information about any particular subject, teachers in the relevant departments will be able to advise you. Once you have embarked on a programme of study you are committed to it for the full year. Remember that it is your commitment which will help you get the most from the opportunities that are offered in your final years at Lasswade High School.

Mrs R Mitchell February 2014

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Lasswade High School Level Advance d Higher (S6 only)

Higher

Nat 5

Nat 4 (or Nat 3)

Senior Phase S5 & S6 Course Choice Session 2014-15

A Art & Design English Maths

B Modern Studies Physics

C Biology Drama Geography Graphic Communication Modern Languages

Art & Design Computing English Geography German RMPS

French Information Systems Maths Modern Studies Music Music Technology Photography RMPS

Drama Graph. Communication History Human Biology Maths Modern Studies Physics

Chemistry Dance Design & Manufacture English Fashion & Textile Tec Geography German Physical Education

Art & Design Biology Business Management Chemistry English Health & Food Tec. Music History Physics

Art & Design Geography German Hospitality Maths RMPS Sport & Recreation

French English Information Systems IT & Administration Modern Studies Music Music Technology Physical Education Practical Electronics Practical Craft Skills

English Graph. Communication History Maths Lifeskills Modern Studies Physics Travel & Tourism

Chemistry Dance Design & Manufacture Fashion & Textile Tec Geography German Mandarin Maths Physical Education

Art & Design Biology Business Management Cake Decoration Computing Science Engineering Crafts Health & Food Tec History Maths Music Spanish

Art & Design Engineering Crafts Hospitality Maths Modern Languages for Life and Work

English IT & Administration Modern Studies Physical Education Practical Electronics Practical Craft Skills

Computer Games Dev. Financial Education Graph. Communication History Maths Lifeskills Modern Studies Travel & Tourism

Biol or Chem or Physics Construction Skills Mandarin Maths Media Geography Design & Manufacture

Computing Science Financial Education Hospitality Maths Spanish

QMU Edin College (Interview required)

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D Chemistry RMPS

E Computing History Music Product Design

F S6 Options: Eco-Schools Year Book Young Enterprise Charities Website Events Management

Creative Industry Academy Food Science Academy Health & Social Care Hospitality Academy Engineering Academy


Name: _____________________________________________

Tutor Group: _____________

Date of Birth: __________________

Although every attempt will be made to meet your course choice some classes may not run if there is insufficient demand or if staffing is not available Key points to remember: •

All S5 Senior Students will have Registration, PSE, PE and RME as part of their Senior Phase Education.

You must choose each subject only once.

If you are intending to go to University, you should give serious consideration to studying 5 Highers.

S6 MUST sign up for a Senior School Committee. S6 will also have Health & Well-being as part of PSE, PE and RME.

S6 must undertake School Service if all Column Choices are not complete.

________________________________________________________________________ This form must be returned to your Registration Tutor

Please tick this box if you intend to leave school in summer 2014

For school use only

Date …………………………….. Pastoral Guidance Teacher Signature……………………………………… Choices entered……………………..

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IT and ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL 4 AND NATIONAL 5 IT and Administration supports the effective running of organisations across the economy, and offers wide-ranging employment opportunities. This course makes an important contribution to general education through developing a range of essential practical skills that will equip you for life regardless of the career path you eventually choose. Course Content: The course has 3 units as follows: 1.

Administrative Practices Skills, tasks and qualities of an administrative assistant. Health and safety. Planning an event.

2.

IT Solutions for Administrators Creating and using a variety of software eg spreadsheets, databases and word processing. Merging data from spreadsheets and databases into a business document.

3.

Communications in Administration Search and extracting information from the Internet and an internal network (intranet). Using desktop publishing and multimedia applications to create a presentation. Using electronic methods of communication.

Course Assessment: National 4 – Added Value Assignment This assignment is set and marked internally. It involves organising and supporting a small-scale event to a given brief, making use of current or emerging technologies. National 5 – Assignment The assignment is worth 100 marks and is carried out in class under exam conditions. This will be marked externally. The assignment includes planning an event eg travel arrangements, budgeting, key speaker presentations, minutes, event evaluations etc. Administrative theory will be integrated within the tasks and will be awarded 10-20% of the mark. Recommended Entry: While no previous experience is required to undertake either of these courses, the following is a guide to entry: For National 4 – National 3 Administration and IT and/or English at National 4 or National 4 Computing Science. For National 5 – National 3 Administration and IT and/or English at National 5 or National 4 or National 5 Computing Science.

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ART & DESIGN DEPARTMENT ART & DESIGN HIGHER Art & Design provides opportunities for students to express themselves, solve visual and functional problems and work directly with materials and equipment in enjoyable and rewarding ways. Course Content: The Higher Course is split into three units:- Design, Expressive and Art & Design Studies. 1.

2.

3.

Design After selecting and creating their own personal design brief, students will work through the design process: investigating, through drawing and observation, particular design problems. They will develop ideas, designing a range of solutions to the problem. Finally the students will come up with their ideal design solution which they will create. Expressive This area is more related to self expression: illustrating and developing artistic and aesthetic skills. Students will select a topic to investigate, create ideas and produce a final piece of work which could be a painting or a piece of sculpture. Art and Design Studies Students will study a range of different designers and artists and complete assignments to prepare them for a written exam. As well as developing knowledge and appreciation of Art & Design, this area increases student’s critical abilities.

Course Assessment: To gain an overall award, the student must pass all the unit assessments as well as the external assessment (the whole folio). There will be an end of course (written) exam. Homework Homework will be a constant feature of the course. Pupils will be expected to practice their practical skills or complete research study at home on a regular basis. Recommended Entry: For Higher, students would normally be expected to have attained National 5 A or B Art & Design.

ART NATIONAL 5 Course Content: You will complete three Units: 1. 2. 3.

Expressive with Critical Activity (National 5) You will produce a range of visual research and development, and study artists’ working practices. Design with Critical Activity (National 5) You will produce a range of investigative research and development, and study designers’ working practices. Added Value Unit: (National 5)

You will produce one finished piece of expressive art, and one finished piece of design.

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National 5 requirements: You will produce a portfolio of research and development plus finished work in design and expressive. You will also sit a question paper in order to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of Art & Design practice. Course Assessment: You must pass the units within school and the folio and exam which are marked by the SQA. The Course assessment is graded A–D. Homework Homework will be a constant feature of the course. Pupils will be expected to practice their practical skills or complete research study at home on a regular basis. Recommended Entry: Pupils will be expected to have gained a good pass at National 4. Progression: Students will progress to Higher

PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE MEDIA HIGHER This course explores the photographic medium in detail. Students will develop a broad knowledge of photographic techniques including composition, presentation and dark room processes. They will explore digital techniques and creative image making. Course Content: This course comprises two mandatory units: Basic camera techniques and Photography: Research Projects and one optional unit selected from: Digital Imaging; Photo reportage; Photography: Creative Image Making Techniques. Course Assessment: In order to gain the award of the course, students must pass the internal assessments associated with the component Units. In addition, students must meet the standards targeted by the external assessment. Recommended Entry: Students would normally be expected to have attained Standard Grade Art & Design at Credit or a pass at Intermediate 2 or National 5. Progression: Students could progress to a number of specialist Photographic courses at a variety of institutions.

ART & DESIGN ADVANCED HIGHER Advanced Higher provides the opportunity for students to reap the benefit of earlier groundwork by promoting increased emphasis on student autonomy. It allows scope for individual enquiry and comment in areas of personal interest. Course Content: The course consists of 2 units of study taken from 3 possible options: Expressive, Design and Art & Design Studies. One unit is mandatory with a choice of one of the remaining two as a support unit.

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1.

2. 3.

Enquiry: Expressive Students will be expected to develop the enquiry through study of a personally selected area or theme based on or related to the visual arts. They will produce a body of work related to their personal theme using a wide range of creative media. Design Activity Students will be required to develop a personal Design Brief identifying an area of Design. They will create a body of work which resolves a Design challenge using the Design Process. Related Studies: Visual Arts Students are required to undertake a single study which must be linked directly to the Enquiry: Expressive unit or the Design Unit.

Course Assessment: To gain the award of a course, the student must pass all the unit assessments as well as the external assessment. Recommended Entry: Students would normally be expected to have achieved a pass at Higher Art & Design. Progression: Students could progress to Art College, University and FE Colleges.

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BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT Biology is the study of life at all levels from cells to organisms to the earth's ecosystems. By choosing to study Biology, students will be provided with the opportunity to build on their existing scientific understanding and to find out about specialised cells including the use of stem cells in society, the way that the brain and nervous system respond to changes and how characteristics are inherited. This will demonstrate the importance and the impact that Biology has on their lives, on the lives of others, on the environment and on society.

BIOLOGY NATIONAL 4 Course Content: The course is made up of three units:1. 2. 3.

Cell Biology Multi-Cellular Organisms Life on Earth

Course Assessment: Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment, one scientific report of a research investigation and an Added Value Unit. There is no external assessment. Recommended Entry: • National 3 Biology or National 3 Chemistry or National 3 Physics • National 4 Chemistry or National 4 Physics Progression: Successful completion of the National 4 course in S5 can lead to National 5 in S6.or National 4 or 5 Course in another science subject

BIOLOGY NATIONAL 5 Course Content: There are three units of study. These are:1. Cell Biology Cell structure; DNA and the production of proteins; Genetic engineering; Photosynthesis; Respiration 2. Multi-Cellular Organisms Cells, tissues and organs ;Stem cells; Nervous system and hormones; Reproduction; Variation and Inheritance; Cardiovascular, respiratory and digestion systems; Effects of lifestyle choices on human transport and exchange systems 3. Life on Earth Biodiversity and the distribution of life; Energy in ecosystems; Sampling techniques and measurement of abiotic and biotic factors; Adaptation, natural selection and the evolution of species; Human impact on the environment Recommended Entry: • National 4 Biology • National 5 in Physics or Chemistry • For session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Biology at Grade C or D

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Course Assessment: Assessment has both internal and external elements. Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment and one scientific report of a research investigation. There is a final external exam and an Assignment to be completed which is externally assessed. Progression: Taking this course in S5 would give you an opportunity to study Higher Grade in S6.

BIOLOGY HIGHER This is the Biology course to follow for a good general Biology qualification.

Course Content: The course is a more thorough development of topics from National 5 in the fields of: 1. Cell Biology Cell structure, photosynthesis, respiration, DNA and protein synthesis and cell defence. 2. Genetics and Adaptation Variations and genetics, selection and speciation, animal and plant adaptations to the environment. 3. Control and Regulation Control and regulation of growth and development, homeostasis, population dynamics. Each topic is covered in 40 hours with an additional 40 hours available for extension work, support and preparation for assessments. Recommended Entry: National 5 Biology at Grades A or B. Or for session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Biology at Grades A or B. Course Assessment: Emphasis is placed on carrying out practical work and there is an assessment of a written experimental report. Students are expected to complete a fair amount of private study, reading and written homework. There will be both internal assessments of each unit and a final external exam. Progression: This is an ideal course for those wishing to study the following courses at university medicine, nursing or any other job in the medical profession; psychology; conservation; veterinary medicine and many more courses and careers within biology. Within school it can lead to entry into Advanced Higher Biology.

HUMAN BIOLOGY HIGHER Course Content: The course deals with all aspects of the biology of the human. There are three units each of 40 hours duration. They are: 1. Cell Function and Inheritance Enzymes and metabolism, protein synthesis, respiration, cell transport, cell defence and inheritance. 2. The Continuation of Life Reproduction, development, transport mechanisms, delivery of nutrient and oxygen to cells, blood, kidneys and homeostasis. 3. Behaviour, Populations and the Environment Nervous system and memory, behaviour, population growth and the environment. There is an additional 40 hours for extension work, support and preparation for assessments.

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Recommended Entry: National 5 Biology at Grades A or B. Course Assessment: Emphasis is placed on carrying out practical work and there is an assessment of a written experimental report. Students are expected to complete a fair amount of private study, reading and written homework. There will be both internal assessments of each unit and a final external exam. Progression: This is an ideal course for those wishing to study the following courses at university medicine, nursing or any other job in the medical profession; psychology; conservation; veterinary medicine and many more courses and careers within biology. Within school it can lead to entry into Advanced Higher Biology.

BIOLOGY ADVANCED HIGHER Course Content: The course has two compulsory 40 hour units: 1. Cell and Molecular Biology Cell types, prokaryotes, cell cycle, tissue culture, cell molecular components, membranes, enzymes, cell signalling, DNA and associated technologies. 2. Environmental Biology Circulation in ecosystems (energy and nutrients), ecosystem interactions, human impact on the environment. In addition one 20 hour unit is completed on Physiology, Heath and Exercise (cardiovascular system, exercise, energy balance, weight control, osteoporosis and diabetes). Lectures, course practical work, video material and out-of-school visits are complemented by reading, discussion, analysis and written work. A Biology investigation (of the student’s choosing and lasting 20 hours) is completed by the student during terms 1 and 2. Recommended Entry: Students will be expected to have a good pass at Higher Biology or Higher Human Biology (A or B) and a high degree of self-motivation. Progression: This is an ideal course for those wishing to study medicine, nursing or any other job in the medical profession; psychology; conservation; veterinary medicine; and many more courses and careers within biology. This course will give you an advanced understanding of a science subject, including research and investigation techniques which are transferable to careers and university courses out-with this field.

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BUSINESS EDUCATION BUSINESS MANAGEMENT – HIGHER Many University courses incorporate Business Management within their degree; therefore this course is of value to those students planning to study at this level. It is also of benefit to anyone hoping to follow a career in Management although it also gives students an insight into the decisions made in many industries/occupations. The course will enable the student to enhance their decision-making skills and powers of analysis with particular reference to the role of management. Course Content: The course at Higher is divided into three units of work. 1. 2. 3.

Business Enterprise (including Information and ICT and Decision Making). Business Decision Areas (Marketing and Operations). Business Decisions Areas (Finance and Human Resource Management).

This course offers opportunities for students to develop the crucial skills and knowledge which allow them to access, understand and contribute to the dynamic, complex business and enterprise environment we live and work in. The course highlights the importance of enterprise to all organisations and the increasing role that information and communication technology (ICT) plays in business-orientated organisations, particularly with respect to the use and operation of ICT in decision-making. As a result, the Course helps to equip students to cope with the requirements of today’s changing employment market. Course Assessment: Assessment is both internal and external. The external is a written exam. The internal assessment consists of written exercises for each of the units. Recommended Entry: While no previous experience is required to undertake either of these courses, the following is a guide to entry. National 5 Business Management (Grade A or B) and/or be attempting English at Higher. Progression: Higher Business Management leads to other Social Subject Highers

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT – NATIONAL 5 Business Management is relevant to everybody – no matter what route their life takes. We all come into contact with business on a daily basis, from using public transport, to buying something in a shop. Business has a powerful influence and impact on us, the economy and the world. This course will enable you to understand how businesses operate and the activities they undertake. It will also develop your employability and enterprise skills Course Content: The course at National 5 is divided into three units of work. 1. Understanding Business The role of business, customer satisfaction, objectives, factors influencing businesses 2. Management of People and Finance Recruitment and Selection, motivation, financial statements

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3.

Marketing and Operations Product development, product life cycle, market research, promotion, quality, ethical and environmental factors, technology

This course offers opportunities for candidates to develop crucial skills and knowledge which allow them to access, understand and contribute to the dynamic business and enterprise environment we live and work in. This course highlights the importance of enterprise to all organisations and the increasing role that technology and ethics plays in all organisations. As a result the course helps to develop skills of enterprise and ICT which are essential in today’s society. Course Assessment: Assessment is both internal and external. The external assessment is a written exam worth 70 marks and an assignment worth 30 marks. The Assignment involves investigating a local business, collecting research information to prepare a report on your findings. The internal assessment consists of unit assessments set by your teacher. They can be written answers to questions, research and PowerPoint presentations, multiple choice questions or a case study. Recommended Entry: While no previous experience is required to undertake this course the following is a guide to entry. National 4 Business Management and/or be attempting English at National 5. Progression: National 5 Business Management leads to Higher Business Management.

YOUNG ENTERPRISE Do you see yourself as being a budding entrepreneur? Are you interested in running your own business? Are you enthusiastic and like to work as part of a team? If so then Young Enterprise is for you. This course meets formally for one period a week but occasionally you will need to meet up to plan and organise events. You will learn all the necessary skills and qualities needed to help setting up and running your own business. You will be given support from an existing entrepreneur as well as training events supplied by the Young Enterprise organisation. This is an exciting and useful committee which is certificated and looked favourably upon by Universities. The group will decide on a product or service they wish to provide and work together and individually to ensure its success. Business skills gained would include: Marketing, Finance, Human Resources and Operations. You will be able to sell your product at a Trade Fair which takes place in December for all schools participating. Prizes and certificates are awarded for best idea, product, stall, presentation, etc Enthusiasm and commitment are the only entry requirements. However if you are taking Higher Business Management this would be an excellent source to gain practical experience. For more information, contact the department.

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CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT All Chemistry courses are of value to anyone intending to study a Science course at University or Further Education College. Knowledge of the subject is also useful for careers in: Agriculture; Beauty Industry; Catering; Engineering (of all kinds); Environmental Sciences; Health Sciences; Laboratory Work; Medicine and Quality Control. All students considering a science course at College or University should check to see if Chemistry is an essential entry requirement.

CHEMISTRY NATIONAL 4 Course Content: The course is made up of three units: 1. Chemical Changes and Structure 2. Nature’s Chemistry 3. Chemistry in Society . Course Assessment: Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment, one scientific report of a research investigation and an Added Value Unit. There is no external assessment. Recommended Entry: • National 3 Physics OR National 3 Chemistry OR National 3 Biology • National 4 Physics OR National 4 Biology Progression: Successful completion of the National 4 course in S5 can lead to National 5 in S6.OR National 4 OR 5 Course in another science subject.

CHEMISTRY NATIONAL 5 Course Content: The course is made up of three units: 1. Chemical Changes and Structure Rates of reaction; Atomic structure and bonding related to properties of Materials; Acids and bases; Formulae and reaction quantities 2. Nature’s Chemistry Everyday consumer products; Energy from fuels; Homologous series 3. Chemistry in Society Metals; Properties of plastics; Fertilisers; Nuclear chemistry; Chemical analysis Recommended Entry: • National 4 Chemistry • National 5 in Biology or Physics at grades A or B. • For session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Chemistry at grades C or D. Course Assessment: Assessment has both internal and external elements. Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment and one scientific report of a research investigation. There is a final external exam and an Assignment to be completed which is externally assessed. Progression: Taking this course in S5 would give you an opportunity to try Higher Grade in S6.

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CHEMISTRY HIGHER Course Content: The course is made up of three units: 1. Energy Matters Reaction Rates, Chemical Energy, Periodic Table, Bonding, Structure and Properties of Elements and Compounds. 2. World of Carbon Fuels, Hydrocarbons, Carbon Compounds, Polymers and Natural Products. 3. Chemical Reaction Chemical Industry, Equilibrium, Acids & Bases and Nuclear Reactions. Course Assessment: Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments and one formal report on a practical activity. External assessments consist of an exam - written paper (100 marks - 40 fixed response plus 60 extended answer). To gain a course award you must achieve a pass in each of the Unit assessments and a pass in the external exam. Your overall grade will be determined by your performance in the external exam. Recommended Entry: • National 5 Chemistry at Grades A or B. • For session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Chemistry at Grades A or B. Progression: Successful completion of the Higher course in S5 can lead to Advanced Higher in S6.

CHEMISTRY ADVANCED HIGHER The course builds on the Higher level, developing further the underlying theories of Chemistry and the practical skills used in the chemical laboratory. The course also develops the skills of independent study and thought that are essential in a wide range of occupations. Course Content: The course is made up of four units: 1. Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table Electronic Structure, Chemical Bonding and Chemistry of the Periodic Table. 2. Principles of Chemical Reactions Chemical Equilibrium, Thermochemistry, Reaction Feasibility, Electrochemistry and Kinetics. 3. Organic Chemistry Systematic Organic Chemistry, Stereoisomerism, Structural Analysis and Medicines. 4. Chemical Investigation Plan an investigation, collect and analyse information obtained from the investigation. Course Assessment: Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments and one formal report on a practical activity. External assessments consist of an exam - written paper (100 marks - 40 fixed response plus 60 extended answer) and an Investigation Report (25 marks). To gain a course award you must achieve a pass in each of the Unit Assessments and a pass in the external assessments, (written exam + investigation report). Your overall grade will be determined by your performance in the combined external assessments. Recommended Entry: Higher Chemistry at Grade A or B Progression: Successful completion of the Advanced Higher course in S6 could result in being offered accelerated courses at University or exemption from some of the requirements of their courses.

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COMPUTING DEPARTMENT COMPUTING HIGHER Computing is ubiquitous; it touches everyone’s daily lives. Computer science-related jobs remain strong despite extraordinary economic challenges. This course is essential for any student who would like to go on to University to study Computing or who wishes a career in this area. Course Content: 1. Computer Systems How computer hardware and software work, latest developments in peripherals and networks. 2. Software Development Systematic methods of developing software using the software development cycle, implementation using the Delphi programming language. 3. Artificial Intelligence Expert systems, neural nets, computer vision, simulating human intelligence and creating AI programs using the Prolog language.

Course Assessment: Internal assessment is by multiple choice questions and practical coursework. External assessment has two parts: coursework 30%, written examination 70%. Recommended Entry – All Levels: While no previous experience is required to undertake any of these courses the following is a guide to entry: At least A or B Grade in National 5 Computing Science or A or B Grade in Intermediate 2 Information Systems or at least 2 Grade A or B’s from National 5 Mathematics, English or Physics.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS – HIGHER Information and its associated technologies now have

important

roles in many aspects of modern life. The purpose of this course is to develop your IT skills and with knowledge and experience of modern information

provide you systems.

Course Content: 1. Using Information This unit will develop an awareness of different types of information system in local, national and global contexts. Students examine the variety of software used in Information Management from database systems to web authoring packages 2. Database Systems This unit will develop a knowledge and understanding of data analysis and data modelling concepts. Practical applications will be undertaken in Access. 3. Applied Multimedia The unit develops your skills in designing and implementing multimedia systems using a variety of applications. Recommended Entry: While no previous experience is required to undertake any of these courses the following is a guide to entry. Higher At least A or B Grade in National 5 Computing Science or A or B Grade in Intermediate 2 Information Systems or at least 2 Grade A or B’s from National 5 Mathematics, English or Physics. Course Assessment: 17


Internal assessment is by multiple choice questions and ongoing practical assessment. External assessment has two parts. Practical coursework: 30% and written examination 70%.

COMPUTING - ADVANCED HIGHER The Advanced Higher Course in Computing is designed candidates with both the necessary knowledge and understanding and the practical problem solving skills to them to become the ICT tool designers of the future.

to provide

This course allows you to make the transition from a learning and teaching environment to a more flexible, independent learning.

structured

enable

Course Content: 1. Software Development Develops knowledge and skills of the different stages of the software development process and the use of high level programming language structures and constructs. 2. Development of a Software Solution An investigation to analyse, design and implement a solution to a significant computing problem. 3. Artificial Intelligence Build on the knowledge and skills gained from Higher Computing in this cutting edge area of computing. Course Assessment: All units must be completed and assessed by your teacher. 60% of the final award is based on an external examination and 40% on the investigation. Recommended Entry: Pass at Higher Computing.

NATIONAL 4/5 - COMPUTING SCIENCE Computing science is vital to everyday life — socially, technologically and economically; it shapes the world in we live and its future. Computing is embedded in the around us, from systems and devices in our homes and of work, to how we access education, entertainment, transportation and communication. Understanding computational processes is also vital to other fields, including science, economics, business and industry.

which world places

many

Course Content: 1. Software Design and Development Learners will develop short programs and will explain how programs work. Learners will also develop an understanding of hardware and software. 2.

Information System Design and Development Learners will develop web pages and databases using appropriate development tools and consider a number of basic factors when designing and implementing an information system. Learners will also develop an understanding of how computers are networked.

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Course Assessment:

At both National 4 and National 5 students are required to pass each individual unit. At National 4 the students have to pass an Added Value unit. National 5 is graded AC and the grade is determined by a practical coursework (40%) and an external examination (60%). Recommended Entry: National 5 At least a pass in National 4 in Computing Science or a National 4 pass in both English and Mathematics. National 4 No previous experience required Progression: Students who successfully complete the National 4 course can progress to National 5. Students who successfully complete the National 5 course at level at A or B Grade can progress to Higher Computing Science in S6.

NPA COMPUTER GAMES DEVELOPMENT (SCQF Levels 3 & 4) The course provides a foundation in the knowledge of Computer Games Development that will be if you intend to later specialise in aspects of Computer Development, Digital Media Studies, Computing and IT subjects.

and skills necessary Games Science

This course is offered at SCQF Levels 3 and 4 which is the equivalent of National 3 and 4. Course Content: 1. Computer Games: Design Students will learn how to recognise and distinguish differences between gaming platforms, environments and genres. Students will be introduced to the planning and design stages involved in the production of a digital game. Students will plan and design a level in a game. 2. Computer Games: Media Assets Students will acquire an understanding of the different types of media asset required for developing a digital game such as sound, graphics and animation. Students will learn how to plan and produce media assets for use in a game development environment. 3. Computer Games: Development Students will gain an understanding of the processes involved in the final stages of development of a game. Students will produce a working game. Students will gain an understanding of the evaluation process and then go on to plan and deliver a promotional activity. Assessment: Students will be expected to create a portfolio of their work which should be constructed over the period of the course, with students contributing material to the portfolio on an on-going basis. In order to achieve the award students must pass all three units. Recommended Entry: No previous experience required.

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HIGHER DANCE Curriculum Area: Expressive Arts Introduction: Higher Dance is a new course on the school curriculum. This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop their technical and choreographic skills through practical classes and analysis of experienced performers. Course Content: The Higher Dance course is divided into the areas of Technical Skills and Choreography. Within these units students will be expected to develop and refine technical skills in contrasting dance styles (Contemporary and Jazz) and apply them in choreographed sequences. They will also learn about choreographic principles and use them to create a piece of group choreography. The course also includes theoretical work where students will be required to develop knowledge and critical understanding of a selected dance style. They will also analyse and evaluate their own performance, those of professional dancers and recognise the importance of theatre arts within choreography. Course Assessment: The course will be assessed both internally and externally by the SQA. The areas that the students will be assessed in are: 1. Performance of a solo in two dance genres 2. Performance of group choreography 3. Support log for choreography Continued assessment will also take place in technique classes throughout the year, through a written support log and on the research and analysis ability of the students. Who’s it for: The course is suitable for students who have a very keen interest in Dance and have completed the NPA in Dance (SCQF Level 5) or have relevant previous experience. Interested students should be prepared to attend an audition/introduction to the course so that they can ensure that this is the correct course choice for them. Students must be prepared to attend classes dressed appropriately in leotards and tights and must also be prepared to perform as an individual and/or as part of a group.

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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT DESIGN & MANUFACTURE HIGHER and NATIONAL 5 The Design and Manufacture Course allows students to explore the multi-faceted world of product design and manufacturing. Creativity is at the heart of this Course and its combination with technology makes it exciting and dynamic. In the Course, students are encouraged to exercise imagination, creativity and logical thinking. The Course thus provides a broad scope for personalisation and choice. Course Content: The Course provides students with opportunities to develop: • research skills • idea generation techniques • the ability to read drawings and diagrams • the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details • the ability to evaluate and apply feedback • the ability to devise, plan and develop practical solutions to design opportunities •  skills in design and in refining design proposals • practical skills in the planning and development of models and prototypes including rapid prototyping using a 3D printer. • skills in evaluation and research • knowledge and understanding of manufacturing processes and materials • an understanding of the impact of design and manufacturing technologies on our environment and society Course Assessment: The course assessment is in two parts: • The Design and Manufacture Assignment examines the student’s response to a given brief and will include a folio and model and/or a prototype. • The question paper introduces breadth to the assessment. It requires depth of understanding and application of knowledge from the Units. As well as the Course assessment, the Course includes two mandatory Units. Design and Manufacture: Design (Higher and National 5). This Unit covers the processes of product design from brief to resolved design proposals and specification. Design and Manufacture: Materials and Manufacturing (Higher and National 5) This Unit covers the processes of product design from design proposals to prototype. In both Units, students will gain knowledge and understanding of design and manufacturing technologies and how these impact on our environment and society. Recommended Entry: National 5 – A pass at National 4 in Design and Manufacture. Higher – A pass at National 5 in (A or B) in Design and Manufacture. Progression: Students completing Design at Manufacture at one level can move on to the next level with the exception of Higher where an A or B is required at NAT 5 before they can progress to Higher.

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PRODUCT DESIGN ADVANCED HIGHER The Course is firmly focused on the process of design, development and manufacture. It also develops appreciation of the consequences of technological development, manufacturing processes and the complexity of making design decisions. Knowledge of design for manufacture is explored within the context of commercial and industrial environments with creative aspects being developed by generating ideas and creating solutions to design problems, using various design techniques. Course Content: The content of this course is similar to the Higher Product Design course but looks at the application of this knowledge to design situations. Course Assessment: • Unit 1 Case Study – A report covering the historical development of a chosen product and illustrating the key factors that influenced its development. • Unit 2 Product Design Analysis – A report requiring the student to analyse an existing product. • Unit 3 Product Development – Students will be expected to develop a design proposal from a specification. • Extended Case Study – This folio is executed under exam conditions. • Knowledge and Understanding exam. Recommended Entry: Students should have studied Product Design at Higher level. Progression: This course would be excellent preparation for students interested in a career in design or going to college or university to study design at degree level.

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION HIGHER and NATIONAL 5 This course provides opportunities to extend the practice of relevant skills while relating work to that of the industrial and commercial world. It focuses on the graphical skills involved in every stage in the progression from design through to the marketing of a product or service. The use of computers is an essential part of the course with students gaining experience on computer applications that are used both in industry and commerce. Course Content: • Replicating basic, familiar and some new graphic forms in 2D, 3D and pictorials • Initiating and producing simple preliminary, production and promotional graphics in straightforward, familiar and some new contexts • Initiating and producing simple informational graphics in straightforward, familiar and some new contexts • Visual literacy by interpreting simple but unfamiliar graphic communications • Spatial awareness in straightforward but unfamiliar 2D, 3D and pictorial graphic situations • Using standard graphic communication equipment, software and materials effectively for simple tasks with some complex features • Knowledge of graphic communication standards, protocols and conventions in straightforward but unfamiliar contexts • Applying design skills, including creativity, when developing solutions to simple graphics tasks with some complex features

• •

The ability to take initiative in evaluating work in progress and completed graphics, and applying suggestions for improvement in presentation Knowledge of a range of computer-aided graphics techniques and practice 22


Knowledge of colour, illustration and presentation techniques in straightforward, familiar and some unfamiliar contexts • Knowledge and understanding of the impact of graphic communication technologies on our environment and society Course Assessment: At Higher the assessment will consist of the following units: 1. Technical Graphics 1 Apply manual techniques of: pictorial representation; geometric construction in the generation of orthographic drawings; illustration and presentation. 2. Technical Graphics 2 Apply manual techniques of orthographic projection; apply the principles of dimensioning to orthographic drawings; demonstrate knowledge of the use of graphics in industry. 3. Computer Graphics Produce orthographic and pictorial drawings using CAD; produce computer-rendered drawings; demonstrate knowledge of terminology and hardware. A thematic presentation is an essential part of the course. This task will take the form of an extended item of course work. In addition to passing each unit, all students will be required to pass the external assessment consisting of: an exam covering all three units of the course and a Thematic Presentation, incorporating manual and computer-aided graphics. At National 5 the assessment will consist of the following units: 1.

2.

2D Graphic Communication In this Unit, evidence will be required that the student can produce a series of straightforward 2D graphics, to a given standard, in familiar and some new contexts. Knowledge and understanding will also be assessed. 3D and Pictorial Graphic Communication In this Unit, evidence will be required that the student can produce a series of straightforward 3D and pictorial graphics, to a given standard, in familiar and some new contexts. Knowledge and understanding will also be assessed.

In addition to passing each unit, all students will be required to pass the external assessment consisting of: an Exam covering the units of the course and a Graphic Assignment. Recommended Entry: Higher – A or B at National 5 or Intermediate 2 National 5 – National 4 Progression: Students completing Higher Graphic Communication will be able to progress to Advanced Higher. This course would be excellent preparation for students interested in a career in design/graphics or going to college or university to study design/graphics at degree level. Students completing National 5 will be able to progress to the New Higher.

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION ADVANCED HIGHER Visual communication has been revolutionised by advances in computer graphics, output devices and reproduction techniques and this course recognises these exciting developments. It is also important that students understand the principles of orthographic projection and develop the spatial thinking and visual literacy which comes from the production of drawings involving the manipulation of lines and planes. Course Content: 1. Technical Graphics Apply manual techniques of: geometric constructions to produce orthographic drawings, 2-point measured perspective to architectural settings. 2. Computer-Aided 3D Modelling Visualisation and Presentation Create 3D Computer-Aided Design surface and solid models. Produce Computer-Aided drawings and rendered images from a 3D CAD model.

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3.

Computer-Aided Graphic Presentation Evaluate the application of design principles in professional graphics presentations. Design and produce a professional Graphic Presentation for a client group. Identify and describe Desktop Publishing characteristics.

Course Assessment: In addition to passing each unit, to gain an overall award, students will be externally assessed by an examination paper, a Computer-Aided 3D Modelling Folio and Graphic Presentation. Recommended Entry: Students should have studied product Graphic Communication or Art and Design at Higher level. Progression: This course would be excellent preparation for students interested in a career in design/graphics or going to college or university to study design/graphics at degree level.

PRACTICAL CRAFT SKILLS WOODWORKING NATIONAL 4 & 5 This course will contribute to the knowledge, understanding and practical experience of students whose aspirations and abilities are towards practical work, or who are considering a career in an industry which involves practical activity in any capacity. Course Content: The Course will develop skills in: • Using a range of woodworking tools, equipment and materials safely and correctly for woodworking tasks with some complex features • Adjusting tools where necessary, following safe practices • Reading and interpreting drawings and diagrams in familiar and some unfamiliar contexts • Measuring and marking out timber sections and sheet materials in preparation for cutting and shaping tasks with some complex features • Practical creativity in the context of simple and familiar woodworking tasks with some complex features • Following, with autonomy, given stages of a practical problem-solving approach to woodworking tasks • Applying knowledge and understanding of safe working practices in a workshop environment • Knowledge and understanding of the properties and uses of a range of woodworking materials • Knowledge and understanding of sustainability issues in a practical woodworking context Course Assessment: The student must achieve all of the component units as: Units of Study: 1. Flat-frame Construction. 2. Carcass Construction. 3. Machining and Finishing 4. Added Value Unit – course project Recommended Entry: National 4 Design and Manufacture or demonstration of good craft skills and an interest in trades/construction and a recommendation from the class teacher. Progression: This course would be excellent preparation for students interested in a career in woodworking or joinery or going to college to study woodworking or joinery at a higher level.

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PRACTICAL METALWORKING NATIONAL 4 & 5 This course will contribute to the knowledge, understanding and practical experience of students whose aspirations and abilities are towards practical work, or who are considering a career in the engineering industry in any capacity. Course Content: The course is focused on practical work and takes place in a workshop environment. • Using a range of metalworking tools, equipment and materials safely and correctly for metalworking tasks with some complex features • Adjusting tools where necessary, following safe practices • Reading and interpreting drawings and diagrams in familiar and unfamiliar contexts • Measuring and marking out metal sections and sheet materials in preparation for cutting and forming tasks with some complex features • Practical creativity in the context of familiar metalworking tasks with some complex features • Following, with autonomy, given stages of a practical problem-solving approach to metalworking tasks • Applying knowledge and understanding of safe working practices in a workshop environment • Knowledge and understanding of the properties and uses of a range of metals and metalworking materials • Knowledge and understanding of sustainability issues in a practical metalworking context Course Assessment: 1. Bench Skills 2. Machine Processes 3. Fabrication and Thermal Joining 4. Added Value Unit – course Project A third unit chosen from Fabrication and Thermal Joining Techniques (Intermediate 2) further extends metalworking skills. The course assessment is based entirely on a practical project. The project allows integration of the knowledge, understanding and skills gained in the units of the course. Recommended Entry: This is a composite class and the minimum requirement would be a Foundation level award in Craft and Design or evidence of previous practical experience. Progression: This course would be excellent preparation for students interested in a career in metalworking/engineering or going to college to study metalworking/engineering at a higher level.

CONSTRUCTION CRAFT SKILLS INTERMEDIATE 1 Course Content: This course aims to give a thorough foundation in practical skills for a range of construction crafts. It provides experience of working with others in a practical construction environment and gives opportunities for employment at a basic skill level in the construction industry. This programme will encourage a positive attitude and also develop valuable workplace skills. To achieve this, students will learn about the skills and attitudes that employers are looking for, how to work effectively with others and what to expect when in the workplace. A National Progression Award in Construction is built into the course content. (Covering: bricklaying; joinery; painting and decorating; plumbing and electrical wiring) • Basic Hand and Machining Skills • Experience in the use of Basic Construction Tools and Equipment • An Appreciation of the Interdependence of Various Building Trades in the Construction Industry • Communication and Interpersonal Skills Course Assessment This course is unit based. Units are largely practical with some paperwork – pupils are assessed based on their skills in completing each unit. 25


Mandatory Units covered are: Employability Skills, Site Carpentry and Bench Joinery Plumbing, Decorative Painting and Half Brick Walling. Career Paths: Bricklayer, Carpenter and Joiner y, Painter and Decorator, Plumber or Electrician Progression: SVQ Level 3 in a Construction Craft related discipline at College.

DRAMA DEPARTMENT Students considering these courses should be aware that a considerable amount of written and performance work must be undertaken outside the classroom. Evening theatre visits are an essential part of the course. Anyone planning to take a period of time out of school should not consider Drama because of the group work involved.

DRAMA HIGHER Course Content: The aims of the Course are to enable students to: • Generate and communicate thoughts and ideas when creating drama • Develop a knowledge and understanding of the complex social and cultural influences on drama • Develop complex skills in presenting drama • Develop knowledge and understanding of complex production skills when presenting drama • Explore form, structure, genre and style There is a new two-Unit Structure: Course Assessment: Drama Skills and Drama: Production Skills. To achieve the Higher Course, students must pass all of the required Units and the Course assessment. The Course assessment will consist of two Components: 1. A performance 2. A question paper. Both will be externally assessed. A performance The performance will allow the learner to demonstrate skills in an acting or directing or designing role. A Question paper The question paper will sample the skills, knowledge and understanding from the Course. Recommended Entry: NAT 5 Drama Grade A or B or by discussion with the department. Progression: Higher Drama provides good preparation for Drama or Theatre Studies courses in Further or Higher Education.

DRAMA ADVANCED HIGHER Course Content: 1. Unit 1 - Devised Drama Each individual student will use creative drama skills to investigate and explore a theme. They will devise, direct and present their own drama either as a solo or group activity. 2. Unit 2 - Twentieth Century Theatre-Theories of Performance Students will study and explore the theories and practices of two leading 20th century theatre practitioners selected from a prescribed text. Students should investigate the influence of these practitioners on current theatre practice within and out-with Scotland from the perspective of an actor and director. 3. Unit 3 - Specialist Study Students will opt to specialise in an aspect of performance - acting or direction or design. The special study will focus on the process of translating text (from a prescribed list) into theatre within 26


the chosen option. The end product of the unit will involve the communication of the performance concepts to an audience. Course Assessment: External assessment will consist of a written examination and a practical acting examination, conducted by an external examiner. The three units will also be assessed internally by your teacher by means of written evaluations, essays and assignments. Recommended Entry: Higher Drama, Grade A or B or by discussion with the department. Progression: Advanced Higher Drama provides good preparation for Drama or Theatre Studies courses in Further or Higher Education.

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT English courses are offered to students in S5 at two* different grades: Higher and National 5 AND to students in S6 at three different grades: Advanced Higher, Higher and National 5. *It may be possible to offer National 4 English to some S5 students.

HIGHER ENGLISH In session 2014 – 2015 students will take the traditional Higher English course. Course Content Two units must be taken: 1. Language Study Close Reading of unseen non-fiction texts. Writing. 2. Literary Study Study of prose fiction, drama and poetry and analysis of extracts from unseen literary texts.

Course Assessment: There is a combination of internal and external assessment. Internal assessment: Three elements of the course are assessed internally on a pass/fail basis. These are Close Reading, Writing and Textual Analysis. Students must pass all three before taking the graded external assessments. External assessment: In the course of the session, students are required to prepare a Writing Folio which is assessed externally and carries 20% of the final marks available. The Writing Folio comprises two pieces of writing in different genres. There is an examination which is taken in early May. Students sit two compulsory papers: Close Reading and Critical Essay. Together these carry 80% of the marks available. Grades are awarded according to the aggregate score – exam and Writing Folio. Recommended Entry Requirements: For students beginning S5 – A or B pass at National 5 English. For students beginning S6 – A or B pass at Intermediate 2 English or passes in the units at Higher. Progression: Students who gain a secure pass at Higher (normally A or B) may progress to Advanced Higher English in S6.

NATIONAL 5 ENGLISH Course Content: Two units must be taken: 1. Analysis and Evaluation Reading – study of prose fiction, drama and poetry (including the compulsory study of Scottish literature) and analysis of shorter non-fiction and literary texts. Listening – analysis of spoken texts 2. Creation and Production Writing Talking – individual presentation and group discussion. Course Assessment: 28


There is a combination of internal and external assessment. Internal assessment: Four outcomes of the course are assessed on a pass/fail basis. These are: analysis and evaluation of short, unseen written texts (close reading); analysis and evaluation of spoken texts (listening); creation and production of a written text (writing); creation and production of a spoken text (talking). Students must pass all four before taking the graded external assessments. External assessment: In the course of the session, students are required to prepare a Writing Portfolio which is assessed externally and carries 30% of the final marks available. The portfolio comprises two pieces of writing in different genres. There is an examination which is taken in late April/early May. Students sit two compulsory papers: Reading for Understanding, Analysis and Evaluation (close reading) – 30 marks; Critical Reading (seen textual analysis of a Scottish text and one critical essay) – 40 marks. Together the papers account for 70% of the marks available. Grades are awarded according to the aggregate score – exam and Portfolio of Writing. Recommended entry requirements: For students beginning S5 – a pass at National 4 and the recommendation of the English Department; or passes in the units at National 5 For students beginning S6 – A or B pass at Intermediate 1 or passes in the units at Intermediate 2. Progression: Students who attain an A or B at National 5 English may progress to Higher.

ADVANCED HIGHER ENGLISH This course is designed for students who wish to enter Higher Education, though not necessarily to study English exclusively. Many students have, in the past, opted for this course purely for interest. Course Content: Three units will be taken: 1. A dissertation on a topic of the candidate’s choice. 2. Literary Study of the specified works of two writers. 3. Either a Creative Writing (4 pieces) or Textual Analysis. Course Assessment: There is a combination of internal and external assessment. Internal assessment: Each of the above units is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Students must pass all three before taking the external assessments. External assessment: In the course of the session, students write a dissertation, the final version of which is submitted to the SQA for assessment. It carries 40% of the marks available. Those students who choose the Creative Writing option submit their two most effective pieces, in different genres, to the SQA for assessment. The Creative Writing Folio carries 30% of the marks available. There is an examination which is taken in early May. The critical essay section is compulsory and carries 30% of the marks available. Those students who choose the Textual Analysis option, which carries 30% of the marks available, answer the additional section of the examination paper. Grades are awarded according to the aggregate score – dissertation and exam critical essay and either exam textual analysis or creative writing folio. Recommended Entry: A good pass, usually A or B, at Higher English.

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GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT Geography is a subject that deals with people and their environment and brings together aspects of both the sciences and humanities. The subject makes an important contribution to General and Vocational Education and the wider curriculum by: • Raising awareness of the links between the subject and other disciplines. • Developing independent and co-operative learning. • Developing problem solving and numeracy skills. • Emphasising the development and application of learning skills relevant to everyday life. Geographical methods and techniques or fieldwork skills will be taught throughout.

GEOGRAPHY NATIONAL 5 Course Content: There are three sections to the course: 1. Physical Environments: Different physical landscape types and their formation; land use management and sustainability and weather. 2. Human Environments: A comparison of developed and developing countries with the focus on case studies in urban and rural areas. 3. Global Issues: Environmental hazards and health. Course Assessment: All three sections are assessed internally. External assessment will be through a NQ exam, comprising of one paper. An internal added value unit assignment task will be conducted under exam conditions, then submitted to the SQA. Recommended Entry: A National 4 pass in Geography or any other Social Subject. Progression: To move on to Higher Geography, students need to achieve an A or B pass in Geography National 5.

GEOGRAPHY HIGHER Course Content: Higher Geography covers three units of work: 1. Physical Environments Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Lithosphere and Biosphere. 2. Human Environments Population Geography, Rural Geography, Industrial Geography and Urban Geography. 3. Environmental Interactions River Basin management and Development & Health. Course Assessment: All three areas are assessed internally by end of unit tests. External assessment will be through an exam, consisting of two papers. This will include all aspects of the course and will require some extended responses as well as map work. Recommended Entry: Students wishing to study Higher should have one of the following: A Credit pass in Standard Grade Geography or another Social Subject, Intermediate 2 A. Progression: Students passing Higher Geography can go on to take Advanced Higher in S6.

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INTERMEDIATE 2 TRAVEL & TOURISM Tourism is a major employer in Scotland and is of increasing importance to the country’s economy. This course is a response to the industry’s need for a well-trained work force that can identify and meet the needs of tourists. The aim of the course is to prepare students who wish to pursue a career in the tourist industry. It may also be of interest to anyone wishing to study travel and tourism as part of general education or as a consumer wishing to gain an insight into how the industry works. Course Content: Students study three units each lasting 40 hours. 1. Unit 1 – Travel and Tourism: An Introduction This Unit introduces the candidate to terminology used in the travel and tourism industry. It looks at how and why the industry has developed and is currently changing. 2. Unit 2 – Business Practices in Travel and Tourism In this Unit candidate investigates the main groups involved in the travel and tourism industry. There is a strong focus on customer service policies and the use of information and communication technologies. 3. Unit 3 – Tourist Destinations This Unit develops the candidate’s knowledge of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe and North America. Course Assessment: Internal Assessment: end of unit assessments for Units 1 and 3. Production of a folio for Unit 2. External Assessment: final exam. Recommended Entry: Students will be expected to have attained one of the following:Standard Grade English or Standard Grade in a Social subject at General level or above. Progression: This course may provide progression to Higher Geography, Further Education, training or employment in the industry.

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT SQA History courses have been developed to give students an understanding of complex historical issues in Scottish, British and European and World contexts. The following history courses enable students to develop essay writing skills as well as the ability to analyse and interpret evidence. The assignment requirement for each course introduces students to further research skills in the context of a historical issue. Students have an open choice of historical issue to allow for personalisation and choice.

HISTORY HIGHER This one-year course expands and extends the skills of National 5 History and provides clear progression on to Advanced Higher History, as well as Higher and Advanced Higher in other Social Subjects and further study at University or College. Recommended Entry: Students are expected to have an A or B at National 5 History in order to progress to Higher level. Those who have achieved an A or B at National 5 (or equivalent) in another Social Subject, and are highly motivated, will also be considered. A National 5 pass in English is also essential – extended writing is a significant demand of the Higher History course. Course Content: The New Higher History Course will cover three units of Historical study: 1. British – Britain 1850s – 1979 This unit focuses on over a century of political developments and their impact on the British people. They include Voting Rights, the Growth of Democracy and the creation of the Welfare State. 2. European and World – Appeasement and the Road to War 1919 – 1939 This unit explores the events leading up to and causes of the Second World War. Particular attention is paid to the Foreign Policies of Britain and the Fascist countries Germany and Italy as well as the relationship between them. 3. Scottish – Migration and Empire 1830 – 1939 This unit examines reasons for the emigration of Scots and the impact they had on receiving nations. The unit also explores the experience of immigrants in Scotland. Course Assessment: Across the course assessment, both skills and knowledge and understanding have equal importance. Students must achieve the learning outcomes for each of the units. The unit assessments are completed throughout the year and prepare students for the standard expected in the final exam. Students will also be required to produce an “assignment”, which takes the form of an extended essay. Time will be available in class for research but a level of independent study is required for students to adequately prepare. The assignment is completed under controlled conditions and submitted to the SQA prior to the end of the course and is worth 30 marks (33% of the total mark) The final external assessment examines all three units of work. Source-handling questions are in the Scottish section only. The British and European and World sections are assessed using essay questions.

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HISTORY NATIONAL 5 This course expands and extends the skills of National 4 History in knowledge and Understanding and Source-handling skills; and provides progression to Higher History, as well as National 5 or Higher in other Social Subjects and further study at University or College. Course content: This year we expect to mirror the National 5 History units taught at National 4 and 5 in S4. This will benefit students by allowing them to focus on improving their skills in order to achieve National 5 in S5. The current National 5 course includes three units of study: 1. Scottish – Scotland and the impact of the Great War 2. British – The Atlantic Slave Trade 1770 - 1807 3. European and World – Hitler and Nazi Germany 1919 – 1939 Recommended Entry: Students are expected to have a pass at National 4 History in order to progress to National 5 level. Those who have achieved a pass at National 4 or a D/C at National 5 in another Social Subject, and are highly motivated, will also be considered. A National 4 pass in English is also essential – developing extended writing is an important part of the National 5 course. Course Assessment: Across the course assessment, both skills and knowledge and understanding have equal importance. Students must achieve the learning outcomes for each of the units. The individual outcome assessments are completed throughout the year and prepare students for the standard expected in the final exam. Students will also be required to produce an “assignment”. Time will be available in class for research but a level of independent study is required for students to adequately prepare. The assignment is completed under controlled conditions and submitted to the SQA prior to the end of the course and is worth 20 marks (25% of the total mark) The final external assessment examines all three units of work. Source-handling questions and extended answers can appear in any of the three units.

HISTORY ADVANCED HIGHER This course builds on and extends the skills of Higher History. Students concentrate on a “field of study” and use a wide variety of Primary and Secondary source material. Students are encouraged to take much of the responsibility for their own learning and research but discussions, lectures and tutorials are all part of the course. Advanced Higher History is excellent preparation for a wide range of College and University courses, especially Humanities, English and Law. Recommended Entry: Students are expected to have a pass at Higher History in order to progress to Advanced Higher level. Assessment: There are two unit assessments for Advanced Higher History. One relating to the field of study; the other forms part of the research process for the dissertation. The dissertation is an opportunity to research and present an extended piece of writing on an issue chosen by the student from the field of study. Students should carry out research, analyse the issues, decide on an approach and plan and organise the structure and content of the dissertation. The course assessment examines knowledge and understanding and analysis and evaluation covering the content of the Historical Study Unit. Some questions will require an extended response; others will require a short response and assess source-handling skills.

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HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT HEALTH AND FOOD TECHNOLOGY HIGHER Enjoy food? Interested in Health? Read on, this is the Higher course for you. This Higher covers two main areas of food related study:1. If you are interested in food and not just consuming it you will learn about how and why recipes work; what ingredients actually do; how new products are developed, manufactured and marketed. 2. If you are interested in health this course explores: the relationship between diet and health; nutrition and dietary needs; factors which influence our food choice. Course Content: The course consists of two units: 1. Resource Management. This is an interesting programme of study focusing on Nutrition and health; Function of ingredients and factors affecting finished products. 2. Consumer Studies. This unit looks closely at issues affecting consumer choice, Food safety; Food product development; Marketing; Recent technological innovations. Course Assessment: Internal - Assessment of two units:- Resource Management and Consumer Studies. External –Technological Project – product development of a new food product Written Exam – 2 hours Recommended Entry: Pass A - B National 5 Health and Food Technology Pass A - B National 5 English Progression: There are many career options linked to these areas of study: Food Product Development, Food Scientist, Marketing, Home Economist, Food Journalist, Dietician, Nurse, Teacher, Sports Scientist, Health Promotion, Community Health/Social Care, Environmental Health Officer and childcare.

FASHION AND TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY HIGHER This course is suitable for students who have previously studied fashion and textile technology and now want to develop an understanding of how the fashion industry operates. Students will investigate the effects and influences on consumer choices. The course provides students with opportunities to develop and communicate their own ideas for fashion/textile items considering design and construction skills. The course aims to enable the student to: • Know and understand the technological process and skills to produce a fashion/textile item. • Apply understanding of textile properties and characteristics. • Investigate current issues which influence the fashion/textile industry. • Demonstrate practical skills and techniques through safe use of tools and equipment. Course Content: The course has 3 units: • Fashion and Textile Choices • Fashion Item Development • Textile Technologies

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Assessment: Students must pass all three internal unit assessments before they can be presented for the course assignment. The SQA will set a choice of briefs and students will use a range of skills, knowledge and understanding to develop ideas, plan, make and evaluate a fashion/textile item. Recommended Entry: National 5 Fashion/Textile Technology at A - B pass Progression: Fashion/Textile courses at further and higher education. Career options – Fashion Designer, Fashion Marketing and Retailing, Textile Design, Interior Design, Costume Design, Clothes Buyer

HOSPITALITY PRACTICAL COOKERY NATIONAL 5 What is Hospitality? The Hospitality Industry is the biggest employer in Scotland and has the following career opportunities:- Hotel Management, Chef, Receptionist, Food and Drink service and Conference Management. Many of you will work full or part time in the industry at some point in your life, perhaps as a career, or temporary work to make ends meet whilst studying. Course Content: The course is titled “Practical Cookery” and is designed to develop skills and knowledge which will prepare students for a career in the Hospitality Industry. The course is divided into three units of work:• • •

Cooking Skills, Techniques and Processes Understanding and using ingredients Organisational skills for cooking

Course Assessment: Internal: Continuous practical assessments Assessment of three units Final Practical Activity – Students will plan, prepare and cook a three course meal for a given number of people within a given timescale and present it appropriately. Recommended Entry: National 4 Hospitality or a keen interest in Practical Cookery. Progression: College course – Hospitality Management, Food and Beverage Management.

NATIONAL 5 – PRACTICAL CAKE CRAFT Do you like cakes? Do you enjoy practical work? Are you creative? Then Practical Cake Craft is for you. This course is aimed at the complete beginner and it will teach you how to create beautiful edible works of art. You will develop practical skills, knowledge, understanding and skills involved in making cakes, and how to plan and evaluate your work. Course Content: The course will cover two units: 1. Cake baking. 2. Cake finishing.

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These units will teach you the basic principles of cake making, decoration, finishing techniques and how to produce a commercially acceptable product. Course Assessment: Students must pass both unit assessments before progressing to complete the course assessment which is a practical activity. This will require students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding related to cake baking and cake finishing. Recommended Entry: Home Economics, National 4 Hospitality Progression: College courses – Hospitality, Cake Decorating and Sugar Modelling.

NATIONAL 5 FASHION AND TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY This course is suitable for students interested in fashion and textiles through producing fashion/textile items. Students will develop practical skills, techniques and knowledge through a variety of fashion/textile related activities. The course aims to enable the student to: • Understand the properties of textiles and the factors which influence consumer choice • To develop practical skills and techniques through the safe use of relevant tools and equipment • Investigate, manufacture and evaluate a fashion/textile item Course content: The course has 3 units: Unit 1 – Textile Technologies Unit 2 – Item development Unit 3 – Fashion choices Assessment: National 5 will be assessed through a design brief set by the SQA, which will be marked internally and verified by the SQA. Recommended Entry: Fashion and Textiles, National 4 Fashion and Textiles. Progression: National 5 can progress to Higher Fashion and Textile Technology and is useful for anyone intending to study Art, Fashion and Textiles at Further or Higher Education.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Mathematics is rich and stimulating. It engages and fascinates students of all ages, interests and abilities. Learning Mathematics develops logical reasoning, analysis, problem solving skills, creativity, and the ability to think in abstract ways. It uses a universal language of numbers and symbols, which allows us to communicate ideas in a concise, unambiguous and rigorous way. Mathematics equips us with many of the skills required for life, learning and work. Understanding the part that Mathematics plays in almost all aspects of life is crucial. This reinforces the need for Mathematics to play an integral part in lifelong learning and be appreciated for the richness it brings.

NATIONAL 4 MATHEMATICS National 4 Mathematics enables students to select and apply straight forward mathematical skills in a variety of mathematical and real life situations. Students interpret, communicate and manage information in mathematical form. Course content: The course consists of three units and the Value Added Unit. Unit 1 – Expressions and Formulae Unit 2 – Relationships Unit 3 – Numeracy Value Added Unit – Mathematics test Course Assessment: Unit Assessments – each unit above has an assessment. To pass the unit students must pass each of the standards (topic area) within the unit. Value Added Unit – Students must pass each of the standards in the Mathematics test. To get an overall award in National 4 Mathematics, students must pass all the units and the Value Added test. There is no external exam for National 4 Mathematics. Recommended Entry: National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics, Intermediate 1 B

NATIONAL 5 MATHEMATICS National 5 Mathematics course enables students to select and apply mathematical techniques in a variety of mathematical and real life situations. Students interpret, communicate and manage information in mathematical form. Course Content: The course consists of three units and the Bridging Unit. Numeracy is embedded across all the three units. Unit 1 – Expressions and Formulae Unit 2 – Relationships Unit 3 – Applications Bridging Unit – Numeracy Topics Course Assessment: Unit Assessments – each unit above has an assessment. To pass the unit, students must pass each of the standards (topic area) within the unit. Bridging Unit – students must pass each of the standards in the unit.

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Prelim - the students will sit a prelim in December and in March. It will be two papers, one of which will be non-calculator. Final SQA Exam – the final exam consists of two papers, one of which is non-calculator. Recommended Entry: National 5 Lifeskills Mathematics & Bridging Unit, National 4 Mathematics & pass in National 5 entry assessment, Intermediate 2 B or C.

NATIONAL 4 LIFESKILLS MATHEMATICS National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics course enables students to apply mathematical ideas and strategies to managing finance, statistics, geometry and measurement in straight forward real life context. Course Content: The course consists of three units and the Value Added Unit. Unit 1 – Managing Finance and Statistics Unit 2 – Geometry and Measure Unit 3 – Numeracy Value Added Unit – Mathematics test Course Assessment: Unit Assessments – each unit above has an assessment. To pass the unit, students must pass each of the standards (topic area) within the unit. Value Added Unit – Students must pass each of the standards in the Mathematics test. To get an overall award in National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics, students must pass all the units and the Value Added Unit. There is no external exam for National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics. Recommended Entry: National 3 Lifeskills Mathematics, Intermediate 1 C.

NATIONAL 5 LIFESKILLS MATHEMATICS National 5 Lifeskills Mathematics course enables students to apply Mathematical ideas and strategies to managing finance, statistics, geometry and measurement in straight forward real life context. Course Content: The course consists of three units and the National 4 Value Added Unit. Unit 1 – Managing Finance and Statistics Unit 2 – Geometry and Measure Unit 3 – Numeracy Value Added Unit – National 4 Value Added test Course Assessment: Unit Assessments – each unit above has an assessment. To pass the unit, students must pass each of the standards (topic area) within the unit. Value Added Unit – Students must pass each of the standards in the Mathematics test. Prelim – students will sit a prelim in December and in March. It will be two papers, one of which will be non-calculator. Final SQA Exam – the final exam consists of two papers, one of which is non-calculator. Recommended Entry: National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics and N5 Lifeskills entry assessment, National 4 Mathematics, Intermediate 1 A.

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MATHEMATICS HIGHER Higher Mathematics aims to build upon and extend students’ mathematical skills, knowledge and understanding in a way that recognises problem solving as an essential skill and enables them to bring together their knowledge of different aspects of the subject. The Higher Mathematics course has the particular objective of meeting the needs of students at a stage in their education where career aspirations are particularly important. The course has obvious relevance for students with interests in fields such as commerce, engineering and science where the mathematics learned will be of direct and immediate use. The syllabus is designed to build upon and extend students’ previous mathematical learning in the areas of algebra, geometry and trigonometry and to introduce students to elementary calculus. Course Content: The course consists of three compulsory units:1. 2. 3.

Unit 1 Straight Line, Functions and Graphs, Differentiation and Recurrence Relations. Unit 2 Polynomials, Integration, Addition Formula and Circles. Unit 3 Vectors, Further Calculus, Wave Function and Logs & Exponential.

Course Assessment: See note at end of courses. Final SQA Exam: The final exam consists of two papers. Paper 1, non-calculator, consists of multiple choice and short questions. Paper 2 is calculator paper with extended questions. Recommended Entry: National 5 Grade A or B, Intermediate 2 Grade A

MATHEMATICS ADVANCED HIGHER The course offers students, in a stimulating and enjoyable way, the opportunity to extend their knowledge in a variety of fields of mathematics. The importance of mathematical applications to modern society is reflected at all times. An emphasis is placed on problem solving and on the use of new technology to build upon and extend students mathematical skills. Students will have the opportunity to sample a wide variety of mathematical topics, many of which form part of a large number and extensive range of first year University courses. Course Content: The course consists of three compulsory units:1. Unit 1 Binomial Theory, Partial Fractions, Differential Calculus, Integral Calculus, Equations, Properties of Functions, Theory and System Equations. 2. Unit 2 Proof & Number Theory, Further Differentiation, Further Integration, Complex Numbers and Sequences & Series 3. Unit 3 Matrices, Vectors, Further Sequences, Differential, Proof & Number Course Assessment: See note at end of courses. Final SQA Exam - The final exam is a 3 hour calculator paper. Recommended Entry: Higher Grade A, Grade B with consultation with department. 39


Course Assessment – All NQ Courses Each Higher Still course is split into three units. To obtain an overall award, students need to pass each internal unit and the final exam. Students following the Higher Still courses will have the following assessments:End of Learning Outcome Assessments – these will be at Level C, therefore the threshold score is high. SQA Unit Assessments (NAB) – this assessment covers all the Learning Outcomes in the unit. It is testing minimum competency, Level C. The threshold is high. Unit Assessment 2 – this assessment is above minimum competency. This assessment has been produced by the department. Prelim – the students will sit a prelim in January and then a Unit 3 prelim in March. It will be two papers, one of which will be non–calculator. Final SQA Exam – the final exam consists of two papers, one of which is non calculator. Advanced Higher papers consist of one 3 hour paper.

MONEY MANAGEMENT Institute of Finance – Foundation Course in Finance This course is all about you and your money. It looks at all areas of personal finance. It looks at how you need to manage your money when you start work, go to college or get your first flat. The courses are run in conjunction with the Institute of Finance and SQA. Successful completion of this course leads to a certificate from both Institute of Finance and SQA. The SQA equate the Foundation Certificate course to Intermediate 1 level and the Intermediate Certificate course to Intermediate 2. Course Content: Foundation Course: The course consists of two Units:Unit 1 – Introduction to Money Unit 2 – Money Management

Intermediate Course: The Course consists of three Units:Unit 1 – Personal Finance Unit 2 – Money Management Unit 3 – Finance Management

Course Assessment: Foundation Course- There are two final exams for each unit. These exams are set by the Institute of Finance. Intermediate Course- There are three final exams for each unit. These exams are set by the Institute of Finance. Recommended Entry: Foundation Course – National 3 Lifeskills Mathematics, National 4 Lifeskills Mathematics, Intermediate Grade B or C. Intermediate Course – National 4 Mathematics, National 5 Lifeskills Mathematics.

INTERMEDIATE 2 AND 1 MATHEMATICS For one year only Intermediate 2 and 1 will be on offer to S6 students. Students who take these courses must have taken in S5 and are looking to resit or upgrade.

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MODERN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT Modern Languages for Life and Work Award (SCQF level 3)

N4 pass Int 1 A or B pass

Modern Languages for Life and Work Award (SCQF level 4)

N5 A or B pass Int 2 A or B pass

Higher A or B pass

Advanced Higher

National 5 German and French Prior learning of German or French is not essential - entry to this course is at the discretion of the centre - but the Modern Languages Department would expect potential candidates to achieve a pass at National 4 level (or, in the case of current S5students, to have a pass (A or B) at Intermediate 1 level). The course aims to enable students to develop the ability to: • read, listen, talk and write in a modern language • understand and use a modern language • apply knowledge and understanding of a modern language The course covers the meaningful, real-life contexts of: • society • learning • employability • culture There are two mandatory units: • Understanding Language (listening and reading) • Using Language (talking and writing) To gain the award of the course, the student must pass all of the units, as well as the course assessment, which forms the basis for grading attainment in the course award. The units are internally assessed. This course includes assessment of 'added value.' The course assessment takes the form of a performance (talking) and two question papers (listening, reading and writing).

HIGHER GERMAN AND FRENCH Prior learning of German or French is not essential - entry to this course is at the discretion of the centre - but the Modern Languages Department would expect potential candidates to achieve a pass (A or B) at National 5 level (or, in the case of current S5students, to have a pass (A or B) at Intermediate 2 level). The course aims to enable students to develop the ability to: • read, listen, talk and write in a modern language • understand and use a modern language • develop the language skills of translation • apply knowledge and understanding of a modern language 41


The course covers the meaningful, real-life contexts of: • society • learning • employability • culture There are two mandatory units: • Understanding Language (listening and reading) • Using Language (talking and writing) To gain the award of the course, the student must pass all of the units, as well as the course assessment, which forms the basis for grading attainment in the course award. The units are internally assessed. This course includes assessment of 'added value.' The course assessment takes the form of a performance (talking) and two question papers (listening, reading and writing).

ADVANCED HIGHER FRENCH Entry to this course is at the discretion of the centre but the Modern Languages Department would expect potential candidates to achieve a pass (A or B) at Higher level. The course aims to enable students to develop the ability to: • read, listen, talk and write in a modern language • understand and use a modern language • apply advanced language skills of translation • apply knowledge and understanding of a modern language to a range of contexts • understand, analyse and evaluate complex literary and/or media texts in the modern language • apply knowledge and understanding of language in work in the modern language The course covers the meaningful, real-life contexts of: • society • learning • employability • culture Mandatory unit: • Understanding and Using Language (listening and reading) Students develop their understanding of cultural and topical issues in the relevant country/countries in the contexts of society, learning, employability and culture. Students develop the skills needed to understand and use a modern language in a wide range of contexts by further developing their listening, talking and reading skills. Students also compare and contrast issues, and increase their language proficiency. Optional units: • Extended Reading/Viewing Students develop analytical and evaluative skills through the study of complex literary or media texts in the modern language, or through the study of a thematic aspect of the country/countries of the modern language. Students develop the skills needed to use a modern language by further developing their writing skills. • Language in Work Students develop the productive, interactive or mediating uses of language which are often required in work-related contexts. Students also read and understand relevant textual material. The unit also provides some knowledge of specific aspects of business, commerce or other similar contexts. Students develop the skills needed to use a modern language by further developing their writing skills. To gain the award of the course, the student must pass all of the units, as well as the course assessment, which forms the basis for grading attainment in the course award. All units are internally assessed. 42


This course includes assessment of 'added value.' Students provide evidence of their listening and talking, reading and writing skills, and their ability to understand and use a modern language in a range of contexts. The course assessment takes the form of: a performance, through which students demonstrate their talking skills in the modern language a portfolio, through which students demonstrate their analysis skills, in English, of either literature and/or a background topic, or the modern language in work a question paper, through which students demonstrate their reading, translation, listening and writing skills in the modern language

MODERN LANGUAGES FOR LIFE AND WORK AWARD (SCQF LEVEL 3) Prior learning is not essential, although the Award provides opportunities to build on prior learning experience in a broad general education. The Award offers students opportunities to develop and extend a wide range of skills and attributes, including communication, self-awareness and confidence and independent learning. Students develop the ability to interact and collaborate with others in vocational and cultural contexts. Students, with directive support, develop: • listening and talking skills in one or two modern languages in the contexts of life and work • basic knowledge of one or two modern languages in the contexts of life and work • employability skills The Award provides the opportunity to study a range of languages, but the Modern Languages Department intends to offer Mandarin and Spanish. Mandatory units: • Modern Languages for Work Purposes • Building Own Employability Skills • Modern Languages for Life Assessment for the Award consists of gathering evidence (in any form appropriate to the candidate and the activity undertaken) to show that the candidate is able to complete successfully all the outcomes in the units. For further details please: speak to a member of the Modern Languages Department or visit http://www.sqa.org.uk

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MODERN STUDIES DEPARTMENT MODERN STUDIES HIGHER Higher Modern Studies provides students with an opportunity to extend their study of political, social and economic issues at local, national and international levels. The course encourages students to develop their interest in current issues and to build analytical skills. Course Content: The course covers study themes which are directly relevant to the contemporary world. Examples of these are outlined below. 1. Political issues in the United Kingdom Decision Making in Central Government. Electoral Systems, Voting and Political Attitudes. 2. Social Issues in the United Kingdom Wealth and Health Inequalities in the United Kingdom. 3. International Issues The Republic of South Africa. The European Union. The USA.

Course Assessment: Students are required to achieve internal and external assessments. To gain a course award the candidate must have achieved three unit assessments internally and have gained at least a “pass” in the external examination. The external examination comprises two papers. One involves essay style questions and the other a decision making exercise. Recommended Entry: Candidates require a Grade A - B National 5 in Modern Studies or another Social Subject, and should be attempting Higher English in S5. Progression: Higher Modern Studies in S5 leads to Advanced Higher Modern Studies in S6.

MODERN STUDIES ADVANCED HIGHER Students study Law and Order which is particularly relevant to those individuals who wish to study Journalism, Law, Politics, Psychology or Sociology. The department has been successful in securing temporary membership of Edinburgh University Law Library and the Main Library for our students. Students become ‘legal eagles’ by participating in the Bar Mock Trial Competition at the Court of Session. Students have the assistance of an advocate in preparing for cases and the trials are enacted in front of judges. Course Content: The course is divided into two units: Political Issues and Practical Research. 1. Unit 1:- Law and Order and Research Methods Theories of Law and Order – nature and role of laws, nature and limits of individual rights. Crime and Public Disorder in the UK – causes of different types of crime, social and economic effects of crime on individuals and groups. Responses to Crime and Public Disorder in the UK – role of the police and justice system, the response of Government and other political parties. The Penal System – main theories of deterrence, punishment and rehabilitation, the effectiveness of the penal system, comparisons with systems used in other countries. 2. Unit 2:- Practical Research This unit will allow the student to carry out independent research on the content of a unit studied at either Higher or Advanced Higher Modern Studies. The student will develop the investigative skills of planning, researching, analysing and presenting. This will be assessed through the production of a DISSERTATION.

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Course Assessment: To gain the award of the course the student must achieve the units of the course as well as the external assessment. The examination comprises of one paper. Students answer two essays and research method questions. This paper, coupled with the dissertation, forms the external assessment. Recommended Entry: Students must have attained at least a ‘C’ in the Modern Studies Higher or a ‘C’ in another Social Subject Higher or a ‘C’ in Higher English. Progression: Advanced Higher Modern Studies is particularly relevant to those intending to pursue a University Course in Law, Politics, Psychology and Sociology.

NATIONAL 5 MODERN STUDIES Modern Studies is about the world in which you live and the people in it. Our focus is on political, social and economic issues in the news. The course encourages students to develop their understanding of these issues and their ability to express their views about them confidently. Students also develop sources skills. Course Content: The course covers the following issues 1. Democracy in Scotland and the UK 2. Crime and the Law 3. The USA 4. An assignment on an issue of choice Course Assessment: Students are required to achieve unit assessments which are marked internally and Added Value made up of an assignment (worth 25% of the grade) and a question paper (worth 75% of the grade). Recommended Entry: Candidates require a National 4 in Modern Studies or another Social Subject. Progression: A pass at National 5 Modern Studies (A or B) leads to Higher Modern Studies.

NATIONAL 4 and NATIONAL 3 MODERN STUDIES Modern Studies at this level focuses on students’ interest in political, social and economic issues in the news. There is scope for a lot of personalisation and choice. Students develop some basic sources skills and their confidence in expressing views. Course Content: The course covers the following issues 1. Democracy in Scotland and the UK 2. Crime and the Law 3. China 4. An assignment on an issue of choice Course Assessment: There is no external assessment. To gain the course award students must achieve assessments for their three units and pass the assignment. Recommended Entry: Candidates require a National 3 in Modern Studies or another Social Subject to do National 4. All students are considered for National 3. Progression: National 4 Modern Studies leads to National 5 Modern Studies or a broadening of learning in other Social Subjects. National 3 Modern Studies leads to National 4 Modern Studies or a broadening of learning in other Social Subjects.

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MUSIC DEPARTMENT MUSIC NATIONAL 5 Course Content: The National 5 Course is designed to allow a considerable degree of flexibility, increasing personalisation and choice for students. The Course has three mandatory Units: 1. Performing: Develop performing skills on two instruments, or on one instrument and voice 2. Composing: students can create music by composing/arranging or improvising 3. Understanding music: developing understanding and knowledge of music styles, concepts and music literacy Course Assessment: To achieve the National 5 Course, students must pass all three mandatory Units and the Course assessment. The Course assessment will consist of two Components: 3. A performance. 4. A question paper. Both will be externally assessed. 1. A performance programme on 2 instruments,(or one instrument and voice) minimum Grade 3 or equivalent, lasting for a combined total of 8 minutes, performed to an outside examiner during February/March. 2. The question paper will assess the student’s ability to aurally distinguish between music concepts. It will allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of music, music signs, symbols and terms and music literacy by listening and responding to excerpts of music.

Recommended Entry: National 4 Music Grade A or B or by discussion with the department.

MUSIC HIGHER Course Content: As above.

Course Assessment: To achieve the Higher Music Course, students must pass all three mandatory Units and the Course assessment. The Course assessment will consist of two Components: 1. A performance. 2. A question paper. Both will be externally assessed. 1. A performance programme on 2 instruments,(or one instrument and voice) minimum Grade 4 or equivalent, lasting for a combined total of 12 minutes, performed to an outside examiner during February/March. 2. The question paper will assess the student’s ability to aurally distinguish between music concepts. It will allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of music, music signs, symbols and terms and music literacy by listening and responding to excerpts of music. Recommended Entry: National 5 Music Grade A or B or by discussion with the department.

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MUSIC ADVANCED HIGHER Course Content: Students will have the opportunity to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Develop performance skills in works that are more musically demanding. Build competence in handling a wide range of compositional techniques. Develop awareness of a range of musical and stylistic concepts. Develop musical literacy. A dissertation of 1500-2000 words on two or more musical works/movements.

Course Assessment: Students will be assessed on the following:1. A performance programme on TWO instruments, minimum Grade 5 or equivalent, one lasting 15 minutes the other for 10 minutes, performed to an outside examiner during May. 2. Two compositions, including a score/performance plan and programme note, recorded for verification by the end of March. 3. A Listening Exam, testing concept knowledge and understanding and musical literacy, in May/June. 4. Submission of dissertation at end of March. Recommended Entry: Music Higher Grade A or B or by prior discussion with the department. Progression: The above may provide progression to further study of Music or careers in the Music Industry.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY NATIONAL 5 Course Content: The Music Technology Course is explored through the following areas of study: 1. Music Technology Skills 2. Understanding 20th and 21st Century Music 3. Music Technology in Context Course Assessment:

To achieve the National 5 Course, students must pass all of the required Units and the Course assessment. The Course assessment will consist of two Components: 1. Coursework: The assignment will allow students to apply a range of practical and cognitive skills to plan, implement and evaluate a short creative production using music technology. Students may choose an appropriate brief and will have flexibility in how they present their production. 2. Question paper: The question paper will be a listening paper, in which students will answer questions based on 20th and 21st century music excerpts. Recommended Entry: National 4 Music Grade A or B or by discussion with the department.

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MUSIC TECHNOLOGY HIGHER Course Content: As above. Course Assessment: To achieve the Higher Music Technology Course, students must pass all of the required Units and the Course assessment.

The Course assessment will consist of two Components: 1. Coursework: The assignment will allow students to apply a range of practical and cognitive skills to plan, implement and evaluate a short creative production using music technology. Students may choose an appropriate brief and will have flexibility in how they present their production. 2. Question paper will be a listening paper, in which students will answer questions based on 20th and 21st century music and audio excerpts. Recommended Entry National 5 Music, Grade A or B or by discussion with the department.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT PHYSICAL EDUCATION HIGHER Course Content: The course aims to provide an advanced study of Physical Education in order that students may improve their performance in selected physical activities. Through critical and imaginative practice, students should achieve a thorough understanding of performance and the ways in which such performance by self, and others, might be improved. Students will also be given the opportunity to achieve a Unit 1 Performance at Advanced Higher. Course Assessment: 1. Unit 1 Performance – two/three activities - internally assessed/externally verified. 2. Unit 2 Analysis of Performance - written paper - externally assessed. To gain the full award, students must achieve a pass in both units above, as well as the external assessment. The performance unit contributes to 40% of the overall course assessment. Recommended Entry Higher Physical Education requires a very high standard both physically and academically. Only students who have an A or B pass at National 5, and have been recommended by the Department should consider Higher.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION NATIONAL 5 Course Content: This course will look at improving the students performance in a range of activities. Students will gain an understanding of the Four Factors that Impact on Performance and through these factors improve their ability to identify strengths and weaknesses within their own performance. Course Assessment: Unit 1 Performance is carried out through a One-Off Performance of your chosen sport. 40% is for your performance and 20% for your ability to prepare and analyse your performance. Unit 2 Portfolio This is the written element of the course worth 40% and is externally verified. Recommended Entry: Students who have gained a Pass at National 4 level and are recommended by their Physical Education teacher.

SPORT & RECREATION NATIONAL 5 Course Content: This course is aimed at students wishing to pursue a career in the Leisure industry. The aim of the course is to gain skills required for employment in the Sport and Recreation sector. This would be achieved by gaining hands-on experience in an appropriate Sport and Recreation setting. Course Assessment: This is a modular based course, with no overall exam. The course gives students experiences working with young children, planning fitness programmes and creating a safe environment. This is a practical based course where students will be assessed on their performance in working with students and their work placements. Students will develop communication and organisational skills by planning and implementing activity sessions with primary students.

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PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Scotland needs good scientists to go into research and develop new ideas and products for the wealth of the country. Without Physics, many things that we accept today would just not exist, eg mobile telephones, television, computers, techniques used in medicine, electronics, lasers, atomic and nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, travel, biophysics and physical chemistry.

PHYSICS NATIONAL 4 Course Content: The course is made up of three units: 1. Dynamics and Space 2. Electricity and Energy 3. Wave and Radiations Course Assessment: Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment, one scientific report of a research investigation and an Added Value Unit. There is no external assessment. Recommended Entry: • National 3 Physics or National 3 Chemistry or National 3 Biology • National 4 Chemistry or National 4 Biology

Progression:

Successful completion of the National 4 course in S5 can lead to National 5 in S6.OR National 4 OR National 5 Course in another science subject

PHYSICS NATIONAL 5 Course Content: The course is made up of three units:1. Electricity and Energy Conservation of energy; Electrical charge carriers and electric fields; Ohm’s law Practical electrical and electronic circuits; Specific heat capacity Gas laws and the kinetic model. 2. Wave and Radiations Nuclear radiation; Light; Electromagnetic spectrum; Wave parameters and behaviours. 3. Dynamics and Space Acceleration; Newton’s laws; Projectile motion; Space exploration; Cosmology; Velocity–time graphs Recommended Entry: • National 4 Physics • National 5 in Biology or Chemistry at Grades A or B. • For session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Physics at Grades C or D. Course Assessment: Assessment has both internal and external elements. Internal assessment consists of three unit assessments, one scientific report of an experiment and one scientific report of a research investigation. There is a final external exam and an Assignment to be completed which is externally assessed. Progression: Taking this course in S5 would give you an opportunity to study Higher Grade in S6.

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PHYSICS HIGHER The Higher Physics course has been designed to provide progression from both the Standard Grade Physics and Intermediate 2 Physics courses. Through a deeper insight into the structure of the subject, the course aims to provide an opportunity for reinforcing and extending the student’s knowledge and understanding of the concepts of physics and developing both the student’s ability to solve problems and to carry out experimental and investigative work. The aims and endeavours behind the course are similar to those for Intermediate 2. Course Content: 1. Mechanics and Properties of matter. 2. Electricity and Electronics. 3. Radiation and Matter. Course Assessment: • Internal Assessment at the end of each unit of work. • External Examination assessing all units. • Report on Practical Work. Recommended Entry: National 5 Physics at Grades A or B. OR For session 2014/2015 only, Intermediate 2 Physics at Grades A or B. Progression: The course provides those who wish to proceed beyond Higher Physics (eg to Advanced Higher) with a suitable basis for further study.

PHYSICS ADVANCED HIGHER The Advanced Higher Physics course has been designed to provide a progression from the Higher Physics course. Through a deeper insight into the structure of the subject, the course aims to provide a challenging experience for those who wish to study the subject to a greater depth and to assist students towards an understanding of the use of mathematical models and techniques for describing the behaviour of nature. The course seeks to illustrate and emphasise situations where the principles of physics are used and applied, to promote the student’s awareness that physics involves interaction between theory and practice. An opportunity for engaging in some independent research is provided through the investigation. Course Content: 1. Mechanics. 2. Electricity Phenomena. 3. Wave Phenomena. 4. Physics Investigation. Course Assessment: • Internal Assessment at the end of Mechanics, Electricity Phenomena and Wave Phenomena. • External Assessment assessing Mechanics, Electricity Phenomena and Wave Phenomena. • Report on Practical Work. • External assessment of Investigation. Recommended Entry: Higher Physics at Grades A or B and Higher Mathematics. Progression: The course provides those who wish to proceed to a variety of Science and Engineering courses in Higher Education.

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RELIGIOUS, MORAL & PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT HIGHER AND NATIONAL 5 RMPS is an interesting and challenging course. It will appeal to students with thoughtful and enquiring minds. This course centres on contemporary issues and beliefs. We aim to make the course as relevant and stimulating as possible with visits, speakers, discussion, ICT and media. Course Content: The course consists of three units which are:1. World Religion We are currently studying Buddhism. This will involve a trip to The Samye Ling Buddhist Centre in Eskdalemuir. 2. Religion and Justice This unit involves the study of moral philosophy, crime and punishment and the effectiveness of capital punishment. 3. Religious and Philosophical questions Arguments for and against the existence of God arising from philosophy and scientific discussions. Course Assessment: a. Each of the three units will be internally assessed with a National assessment. b. Students will also produce an assignment. This is based on investigation of a religious, moral or philosophical topic or issue. It is worth 30 marks of the final exam. c. The final exam is worth a further 60 marks. Recommended Entry: National 5 English, RMPS or Social Subjects at an A or B pass. Consideration will be given to students who have performed well in core RMPS. Progression: University courses in RMPS, Philosophy or general entry to college or university to study a variety of subjects for example psychology, sociology and social anthropology. RMPS is a valuable subject for anyone who plans to work with people. It develops skills of debating, analysis and evaluation. It is a contemporary, relevant subject, which helps students develop skills for life.

ADVANCED HIGHER Advanced Higher RMPS is an interesting, contemporary course. It is stimulating and highly relevant to issues facing society today. Due to the skills developed, it is also excellent preparation for university courses. Course Content: There are two main areas of study: 1. Philosophy of Religion This section examines some of the philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God, including development of atheism and its contemporary forms. 2. Medical Ethics This section examines the ethical issues surrounding abortion, euthanasia and organ transplants. It included the study of religious and secular viewpoints. Course Assessment: In addition to a final exam on the two areas of study outlined above, students are expected to produce a dissertation of approximately 4000 words. Dissertation topics come from any of the prescribed areas of the course. Possible topics from the Philosophy of Religion section would be based on:The Cosmological argument The Design argument Atheism Possible topics from the Medical Ethics section could include issues around:Organ donation Euthanasia Abortion The course is demanding and will require a high level of commitment and independent study. Recommended Entry: A or B at Higher RMPS. 52


INTEREST COURSES S6 CHARITIES Lasswade High School has a long tradition of fund raising. There are charities we try to support every year such as The Poppy Appeal, Breast Cancer Research, Children in Need and Red Nose Day. We also have a Christmas Appeal each year. Over the last few years our Christmas Appeal has raised money for the Armed Services. The main challenge for every 6th Year is to try to raise more money than any previous year. The record currently stands at just over £10,000. A second challenge is to find as many imaginative ways as possible of raising funds while at the same time having as much fun as possible. How much can your 6th Year raise?

S6 ECO GROUP Interested in getting involved in improving our local environment and making a difference? This year the main focus of the group is working towards the school gaining ‘Fairtrade’ status and also creating a sensory garden at Mount Esk Nursery. Our efforts are accredited by Eco schools, an international organisation. In 2011, we retained our Green flag status. In past years, the senior group has been involved with organising school assemblies, a variety of surveys, music concerts, sporting events, clean ups, local conservation projects, encouraging Fair Trade products, helping to host environmental events and much more. The previous S6 Eco groups have made a big difference to the school through fundraising e.g. providing footballs, goals, drum-kits and even picnic tables for use. In essence, the group is proactive and can decide what they would like to get involved in each year, as long as it comes under the wide umbrella of Eco schools. If you are someone who likes to get involved and cares about the environment, this could be for you.

S6 WEBSITE The Website group meet for 1 a week. Initially students will training in the blogging software Wordpress. They are then full access to the school website and are responsible for posting and maintaining articles. Students work with departments and school groups to provide information for the website. No computing skills are necessary. Students can see Mitchell for further details or have a look at the website:www.lasswade.info

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S6 YEARBOOK The Yearbook class are responsible for creating a high quality record of the year’s journey through Lasswade High School Centre. This involves the collation of photos and written material into a hardback publication. The Group will require to work together and compile information from their peers. They will also be required to use a desk top publishing package to design and create their unique yearbook. This will be done in partnership with a professional publishing company. The Yearbook group will be responsible for pricing and sales of the book.

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S6 YOUNG ENTERPRISE Do you see yourself as being a budding entrepreneur? Are you interested in running your own business? Are you enthusiastic and like to work as part of a team? If so then Young Enterprise is for you. This course meets formally for one period a week but occasionally you will need to meet up to plan and organise events. You will learn all the necessary skills and qualities needed to help setting up and running your own business. You will be given support from an existing entrepreneur as well as training events supplied by the Young Enterprise organisation. This is an exciting and useful committee which is certificated and looked favourably upon by Universities. The group will decide on a product or service they wish to provide and work together and individually to ensure its success. Business skills gained would include: Marketing, Finance, Human Resources and Operations. You will be able to sell your product at a Trade Fair which takes place in December for all schools participating. Prizes and certificates are awarded for best idea, product, stall, presentation, etc Enthusiasm and commitment are the only entry requirements. However if you are taking Higher Business Management this would be an excellent source to gain practical experience. For more information, contact the department.

EVENTS MANAGEMENT – to be confirmed

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GUIDANCE AND PERSONAL & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT In the last two years of schooling, the focus of Guidance support is on helping students to plan their steps towards life beyond school. Guidance staff work closely with individuals to help them make the most appropriate choices and to steer them through the process of applying to University or College or moving into employment.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL EDUCATION In PSE we aim to address some of the issues that are directly relevant to young adults. There is a structured programme which seeks to respond to student needs at each stage and to enhance personal development. Preparation for life beyond school is the underlying theme, but this entails much more than careers education. Fifth Year PSE All students in S5 will have 1 period per week of PSE with their Guidance teacher. During this time they will follow a variety of courses which will include:1.

2. 3.

Careers, Further and Higher Education Students are encouraged to plan their career pathway and will have the opportunity to meet with the careers adviser individually and as a class. The benefits of Higher Education will be explored and options at the end of S5 will be discussed. Study Skills are also covered at this point. Interested students will also have the opportunity to visit the Higher Education Convention. Citizenship Topics such as Crime and the Community; Personal Safety; Domestic Violence and Housing are covered. The Young Drivers programme is also offered. Health The focus in S5 is on mental health, including managing stress. Other health issues are covered by visiting speakers.

Sixth Year PSE All students in S6 will have one period per week of PSE. The autumn term is dominated by preparation for Higher Education or Employment. 1.

Higher Education Guidance teachers work closely with their students, supporting them through the application process. Outside speakers are called on to give advice about choosing courses, managing finance and completing the application. School staff provide support with writing the personal statement. 2. Preparing for Employment Students who select this course will spend time undertaking job research, updating their CV, improving their interview skills and developing their ability to work as part of a team. For the remainder of the year, a programme of visiting speakers and workshops on a range of issues is arranged. These may include: independent living, gap year, young drivers and domestic abuse plus a variety of contemporary moral issues. Time permitting students will also be able to select from a variety of short courses which in the past have included first aid, parenting skills and teambuilding.

S6 WORK EXPERIENCE Students in S6 may choose to undertake a further Work Experience placement if their timetable permits. Many University courses, particularly Medicine, Vet Medicine, Education, Nursing and other Health related degrees will expect applicants to have had a variety of relevant, recent work experience. Students are responsible for making their own arrangements, in discussion with their Guidance teacher.

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SUPPORT FOR LEARNING DEPARTMENT The Support for Learning Department works throughout the school with students of all levels of ability. We are still available to support you, if you need it, in the fifth and sixth year. Students who have experienced some difficulties with their learning in the past may have had support from the Support for Learning Department already. There are a few students, however, who only begin to find work challenging when they enter fifth year. It is not too late to come and ask for help with study skills, exam techniques or with a particular difficulty with work. You would probably be seen for a single period at a time with a review period later in the term.

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS IN THE SQA EXAMINATIONS Students who have had special arrangements in their National 5 exams will be asked to discuss their needs for fifth and sixth year examinations with a member of the Support for Learning staff as well as with their subject teachers. Where necessary some changes may be made to these arrangements.

S6 IN-CLASS SUPPORT/PEER MENTORING AWARD This is your opportunity to give something back to the school, develop new skills, enhance existing ones and gain a recognised certificate. It will broaden your experiences and develop skills that will be useful within the workplace. You can do this by working with the Support for Learning department to provide support for S1 and S2 students in classes. Wherever possible you will be placed in a subject that you have studied at Higher level or have a real interest in. We also offer a Paired Reading programme which you can be involved with. In order to gain the award you have to complete a number of challenges and activities. Over the course of the year you will build up a portfolio of evidence that will be submitted for moderation and assessment. You will have one period a week to complete paperwork and organise your evidence. Evidence can take many forms, for example, a diary, log book, notes, photographs, recordings of meetings, copies of letters or emails. You will be assessed on the following skills; improving own learning, working with others, problem solving, ICT and communication. Remember you will be offering a great deal to students with additional needs. This could make a huge difference to the lives of these students. Students in previous years have enjoyed this experience and learned a lot. We look forward to working with you.

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CAREERS ADVICE FROM S4 ONWARDS As students begin to explore their post school options, it is important that they know how to access appropriate advice. The Skills Development Scotland’s Careers Adviser at Lasswade High School, Judy Tyler, works with pupils to encourage them to develop the career management skills needed throughout life and to make well informed decisions about their future. Schools are now also building career management into the curriculum. To support this Skills Development Scotland’s website My World at Work – www.myworldofwork.co.uk – provides information on careers and courses; has a My Strengths tool, which students can use to help identify what they are good at and shows how this can link to career choice; a facility to create and customise a CV; a job search facility; information on preparing for interviews; articles on funding for learning and many other tools. Students are encouraged to do their own research into careers and courses, using My World at Work, and should register on the My World at Work website to be able to make full use of its resources. The Careers Adviser works in partnership with Guidance Staff to identify students who may need tailored support in making the transition from school. Such students will be offered a careers interview. However, any students, who, having done some research in to their career options, feel that they would like to have a meeting in school with the Careers Adviser, should speak to their Guidance Teacher, who will arrange an appointment. In S4 and S5 students have to make important decisions about their future. They have to choose from one of the following options:1. 2.

3.

Staying on at School This involves selecting subjects to be studied during S5 and S6 and needs careful consideration, particularly in relation to subjects required for entry to college or university courses. Going to College Students, who already have a career in mind, may decide to begin vocational training, after S4 or S5, by taking a relevant course at college. The local colleges, Jewel and Esk College, Stevenson College Edinburgh and Edinburgh Telford College have recently merged to form Edinburgh College – www.edinburghcollege.ac.uk. Students, who are considering a college course beginning in August 2014, should apply to college as soon as they can, preferably by the end of February. Entering Employment or Training Although there can be a perception this it is difficult for young people to find work, an increasing number of students from Lasswade High School, who have wanted to go into employment, have successfully found a job on leaving school. Details of job vacancies for school leavers are posted on the Careers notice board in school. Students should also consider making speculative approaches to employers to ask about likely job vacancies. They can compile a CV to send to employers, using the My World of Work CV template.

The Careers Adviser holds a Careers Drop-In session in the Careers section of the school library each week on a Wednesday 1.30 pm to 1.45 pm. No appointment is needed. The Careers Adviser will also be at the Senior Department Fair on 25 February to answer questions and give advice on option choice and career plans. On leaving school students can receive on-going advice by calling at the local Skills Development Scotland Centre, 29 Eskbank Road, Dalkeith, telephone number 0131 663 7287. When not at Lasswade High School, Judy Tyler can be contacted at: Skills Development Scotland Centre, Adam Ferguson House, Station Road, Musselburgh. Email: judy.tyler@sds.co.uk Tel: 0131 653 1016

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S5 s6 prospectus  
S5 s6 prospectus  
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