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RIGHT: CPT Greg Maximovitch and four cadets walk past Stribling Hall on November 1. LEFT: The back steps of Stribling Hall.

“Attitude is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company, a school, a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change our past. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play the one thing we have, and that is our attitude.� CHARLES SWINDOLL


President Charles McGeorge pauses for a photo with Sandir de Silva ’16, Bruno Avataneo Truqui ’15, Emilio Cueto Mendez ’14, Jacob Conyers ’16 and Jorge Aduna Leon ’17 on October 6.

CHARACTER. HONOR. INTEGRITY. We are One MMA. We represent different countries, states, cities, races, nationalities. We are scholars, athletes, artists, and musicians.

We are leaders and followers. We are the 124th Corps of Cadets at Missouri Military Academy.

For some of us, this was the first time we called ourselves cadets. For others, it was the continuation of a journey.

For all of us, MMA was the path to where we need to be — or more importantly, where we want to be. As we traveled through the

year, we discovered that life at MMA is challenging and satisfying. We’ve all been homesick. We’ve all had our hearts broken by

someone, somewhere, for some reason. We’ve all made someone proud. We’ve all made mistakes and earned victories.


Cadets compete in an endurance race at Army Days on April 4.

CHARACTER. HONOR. INTEGRITY. We learned from every one of our errors. We take a deep breath and realize that the cadets to our left and right are experiencing

the same thing. We remember that there have been thousands more just like us in whose footsteps we follow and thousands

more will follow our lead. We are part of the MMA legacy. This legacy is bigger than we are.

Missouri Military Academy is an institution. It’s a tradition. This was our year to hold the tradition in our hands, to put our mark on it,

and pass it along to the next band of brothers. And in doing so, MMA left its mark on us. We are strong. We are men of character.

We are leaders. We are brothers. We are, we always will be, MMA. OneMMA.


Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez ’13 stands at attention during homecoming weekend September 28.


Joshua John ’17 works on an assignment in CPT John Noel’s class.


SIXTH GRADE 14 SEVENTH GRADE 15 EIGHTH GRADE 16 FRESHMEN 18 SOPHOMORES 22 JUNIORS 26 SENIORS 30 CLASS CHRONICLE 35 SENIOR ACHIEVEMENTS 36 UNDERCLASSMEN ACHIEVEMENTS 38

ACADEMIC STAFF 40 ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 43 ADMISSIONS STAFF 44 DEVELOPMENT & ADVANCEMENT 44 MARKETING STAFF 44 TECHNOLOGY STAFF 44 CADET CLINIC STAFF 46 MAINTENANCE STAFF 46 QUARTERMASTER STAFF 46 RESIDENTIAL LIFE STAFF 46 Jose Reding Ortiz ’15.


Chandler Bolinger

Samer Doumit

Channing Carlson

Alberto Elizondo Carranza

Braulio Garcia

Juan Gonzalez Luna Escoto

Pablo Garza-Rios-Blanco

Juan Guerra Gonzalez

Michael Hilt Sky Henio Dimitri Lamping Yanni Le Juan Leal Michael Penniman Lucas Moore

6th GRADE

7th GRADE William Moore Charles Norman Miguel Quijano Santiago Sada

Ivan Salinas Mason Scott PVT Jean-Luc Shyaka Francisco Siller

William Moore ’18 and Joshua John ’17 paddle a kayak during a field trip September 21. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE

FRESH IDEAS As of January 1, Fresh Ideas Food Service Management became the campus’ official food service vendor. According to President Charles McGeorge, the company was selected due to its reputation in mid-Missouri and beyond as a provider of high-quality, innovative food service and catering. Fresh Ideas is headquartered in Columbia, Missouri, and is regarded as the freshest,

highest quality and best tasting full-service food operation in the Midwest. “Fresh Ideas is looking forward to a long partnership with Missouri Military Academy and is committed to providing a program based on Academy and cadet needs,” Matt Clervi, vice president and owner of Fresh Ideas, said. “I am particularly excited about this opportunity because of

my personal experience as a sergeant in the Army and as a food service director at military schools.” “This change is reflective of our administration’s responsiveness to our customers — the students,” McGeorge said. text courtesy of CHRISTINE SMITH


WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN 10 YEARS? HOW WILL YOU GET THERE? Going to Mizzou for college and majoring in health, minoring in criminal justice and then going through the ROTC program and becoming an officer. DEREK RYAN ’15

I will be in college studying. And I will get there because MMA has taught me that I should try to the end.

CLAYTON EBERT ’17

Millionaire. I will get there by working hard.

RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’17

I will be a college student and I will get there by getting good grades. JONATHON GROSSL ’17

In the military. MMA will help me get there. TAJAE

BLUE ’17

2PVT Jorge Aduna Leon Sean Atamian Eugenio Barrera Martinez 2PVT TaJae Blue

Clayton Ebert Raul Escarcega Martinez 1PVT Sean Fitzgerald Edward Gbemudu

8th GRADE

ABOVE: Sergio Mayer Mori ’17 plays the guitar October 4 in the barracks. JACOB TAYLOR ’13

Jonathon Grossl 2PVT Julien Ngonga Mugabo Andrew Hansen Daniel Perez Bracamontes Juan Hernandez Antillon Tan Photsavat Pongsuea Yiheng Hu

Joshua John Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez 2PVT Sergio Mayer Mori Antonio Montes Gutierrez

Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina Ricardo Salido Vives


Juan Aguirre Gonzalez Byron Amidon Austin Bouche Hunter Bush

Jacob Conyers Michael Courte Connor Cunningham Sandir de Silva

9th GRADE

FRESHMEN

Liam Downing Emilio Elias Vidaurri 1PVT Jose Estrada Pinon Orlando Farias

Oscar Garcia Eduardo Gonzalez Luna Flores PVT David Gu Quentin Heasler

2PVT Yun Il Jeon Maverick Jones Nishan Khanal Jonathan Kirkland

Students and teachers await the beginning of a presentation by former Hitler youth Hans Neumann in the Chapel on April 17. Neumann is a local retiree who immigrated to America from Germany in 1952 to live in freedom. CHERYL MORRIS


IF YOU COULD HAVE ONE SUPER POWER, WHAT WOULD IT BE? WHY? I would not like to have a power. I love my life now. I do not want anything to change. BYRON AMIDON ’16

I would be a shape shifter, and thus [possess] all the various conceivable superpowers.

SANDIR DE SILVA ’16

To move things without touching them. JASON

RUSSELL ’16

Flight, because I could travel to all the places I’ve never been and get to places on my own.

Freeze time. So I could do Teleporting, because I am things at my own pace. lazy. JUAN AGUIRRE

EDWARD GEERNAERT ’14

GONZALEZ ’16

GABRIEL SUMMERS ’16

Travel from the USA to China in one second.

DASHENG SUN ’14

To be the most intelligent [person] in the world.

ORLANDO FARIAS ’16

John Kohm 1PVT David Lazcano Alan Loquay Ramsauer Enkhbilegt Luvsandorj

Gavin Martin Kyle Mertens PVT Jack Moore Robert Moore

Brennan Morand Gabriel Summers Emilio Nanni De Valle 1PVT Pedro Tinoco Chase Osborne Andres Vidal Daniel Pares Garzon

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS President BYRON AMIDON Vice President PEDRO TINOCO Secretary JASON RUSSELL Treasurer YUN IL JEON

PVT Christian Paz Valdez Jason Russell Omar Sanchez Ibarra Jon Snyder

Oliver Worthington Andres Zamora Villalpando

Representative JOSE ESTRADA PINON TOP RIGHT: The Stribling Hall Atrium.


Kane Anderson

Nolan Borgsmiller

Bruno Avataneo Truqui

Vincent Burke

Simon Barrera

Purevsuren Byambatseren

Munkhbold Batmunkh

Donald Canard

Juan Ramon Flores Tenorio

Edmond Biruta

Brais Galvan Sotelo

Fernando Blanco Gonzalez Joshua Bloothoofd

WeiHang Gao

Austin Bohannon

1PVT Jose Garcia

I0th GRADE

SOPHOMORES Victor Gomez Ramirez Roger Gonzalez

Donald Canard ’15 answers a question in Eric Reynolds’ class November 5.

Hector Granillo Mendez Brandon Guterman

Hugh Harris Gavin Hendee Jinwook Jung CPL Kotaro Kasamatsu

ALUM DONATES One hundred historical works were added to the library in December thanks to 1956 alumnus Clay Dodson, who donated funds through the “100 Greatest Books” program. “They are recognized as texts that develop the mind and strengthen the will,” Dean of Academics LTC Frank Giuseffi said. Works comprise a canon of theology, philosophy, history and mathematics that

has stood the test of time and shaped the thoughts and events of Western civilization. “As part of our commitment to a 360 Degree Education, these books will be intertwined in our curriculum,” Giuseffi said. “We will require several of these books to be read and analyzed in our literature classes.” Giuseffi believes these works will inspire cadets to grapple with the ideas and

questions that have challenged humankind throughout history. “While MMA is always exploring new and productive ways to educate our cadets, we also recognize the necessity of a liberal arts education,” Giuseffi said. “An education that ideally stirs the mind and heart toward elevated and noble things.” text courtesy of THE EAGLE


Mason Kussman

Ariyandev Sandui

1PVT Qi Li

Adam Schmitz

David Lozano

Tony Reed Vaughan

Wade Lueckenotte

Rodrigo Vilches Amor

Victor Marroquin Gonzalez

Chen Wang

Carlos Mateos Miranda

Guangning Wei

Mark McKee

Jiahao Wu

Miles O’Keefe

2PVT Hang Zhang

D’Cherion Owens Rodrigo Padilla Gonzalez

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS

Felix Paz Valdez

President D’CHERION OWENS

Steven Prinster

Vice President JOSE GARCIA Jose Reding Ortiz

Treasurer KOTARO KASAMATSU

Jonathan Richardson

Representative JOSE REDING ORTIZ

Derek Ryan

Ariyandev Sandui ’15 eats lunch with fellow cadets May 15. DILLION BROWN-DAWSON ’14

Sergio Salas Rojo

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO FUTURE MMA STUDENTS? Stay calm. It’s all really simple. You just need to not freak out.

MARK MCKEE ’15

Never give up. Just keep trying. There are some times you will have to take the tackle but every time you do just stand back up.

SIMON BARRERA ’15

Never quit no matter how hard the school is.

SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA ’14

Give 100% all the time, because that makes life way easier. VICTOR

MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15

Always respect your leaders and people of higher rank. AUBREY

DAVIDSON ’14

Get your stuff done and don’t argue with leaders and you will have a better experience here. VINCENT

Work hard. Be respectful and never argue. Arguing will lead you to trouble. DIEGO

BURKE ’15

Work hard because it will pay off.

D’CHERION OWENS ’15

Relax and focus.

HANG ZHANG ’15

MARTINEZ BLANCO ’13

Just keep pushing on.

TYLER GROGAN ’13


JiaLun He

Noah Agne

Jesus Herrera Alvarez del Castillo

SGT Jose Bours Murrieta CPL Parker Bridge

Xinshuai Hu

Dillion Brown-Dawson

SGT Javier Ibanez Posada

Gates Burchfield

Benjamin Jennison

Jordan Butz

PVT Jon Johnston

SGT Chadwick Cardott

PVT Dallas Lopez Fernando Lopez Chumacero

SGT Jose Carrillo Noriega

IIth GRADE

JUNIORS

SGT Emilio Cueto Mendez SGT Brennan Darnall Aubrey Davidson Sebastian Diaz

Fernando Estrada Pinon Hayden Fairbanks Daniel Garcia Edward Geernaert

EDUCATIONAL TOUR SGT Marcelo Gomez Flores Ricardo Gonzalez Oscar Gonzalez Schiefenbusch Roy Grabowski

A few dozen students and staff explored Russia during a 2013 educational tour. Cadets departed February 23 from St. Louis. Sightseeing students stopped first in Moscow to visit the Red Square — defunct KGB headquarters — and Lubyanka prison. Boys basked in the beauty of St. Basil’s Cathedral and Bolshoi Theatre. In the heart of Moscow, students also visited Russia’s most recognizable landmark — the Kremlin. From Moscow, students boarded an overnight train to St. Petersburg. A local guide led a tour of the Kazan Cathedral

and the Peter and Paul Fortress, a site where political prisoners were historically interrogated and incarcerated. The Hermitage Museum was next on the itinerary. Once the home of the imperial family, the Hermitage featured Catherine the Great’s hanging garden and boasted 12 miles of galleries, more than three million exhibits and 1,000 rooms. The group also toured Tsarskoye Selo, formerly known as Pushkin Palace, the tsar’s summer house. Students returned home March 2. Chaperones included International Relations

Coordinator Michelle Martinez and President Charles McGeorge, who holds a degree in sino-Soviet history. Other Russia tour stops included the St. Petersburg Artillery Museum, Novgorod and the Naval Museum & Battleship Aurora. Other 2013 educational tour destinations included Peru, the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota and Washington, D.C. information courtesy of ERIC REYNOLDS, photo by EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16


WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL? WHY? Derrick Rose. He shows no matter how young you are if you chase your dream with all your heart you will surely achieve it. TYLER VAUGHAN ’14

My father, because when I was little he was the best person in my life and I wanted to grow up to be like him. BENJAMIN SWIGER ’14

My grandfather. He influenced me to come to MMA for the betterment of my person.

DALLAS LOPEZ ’14

My grandfather. He always had a smile on his face. He served our country and was always willing to help. NICHOLAS

MABBS ’14

John Legend. I really want to be a successful musician with soul.

COREY TRENT ’14

My stepdad. Because no matter how I might treat him, he still treats me like a son. BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14

Weiding Ma SGT Nicholas Mabbs Javier Malpica Palmeros Pedro Onieva

Jacob Phillips Jacob Priester Santiago Prieto Ledesma Ivan Quiroz Espino

PVT Gabriel Rodriguez Mendoza

1PVT Austin Teague

SGT Roel Rodriguez Valdez

Corey Trent

Andres Rosado

SGT Tyler Vaughan

Paolo Rosado

Khas-Ochir Sod-Erdene SGT Jack Solls

Connor Wilkinson

Dasheng Sun

PVT Zhuoteng Ying

Benjamin Swiger

JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS President ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ Vice President JOSE CARRILLO NORIEGA Secretary JOSE BOURS MURRIETA Treasurer JACK SOLLS Representative JACOB PRIESTER TOP RIGHT: MAJ Peggy Reynard helps Gates Burchfield ’14 with an assignment November 1.


Emeterio Gomez Flores Victoria, Tamaulipas Mexico

Blake Bibles Bartlesville, Oklahoma

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” Henry David Thoreau

Jason Boisseau Allen, Texas

Jesus Gonzalez Botello Monterrey, Nuevo Leon Mexico

Francisco De Llano Crowley Mexico, D. F. Mexico

Blake Gorman Wentzville, Missouri

I2th GRADE

SENIORS Tyler Grogan St. Clair, Missouri

Francisco Del Rio Rivero Queretaro, Queretaro Mexico

Oscar Gutierrez San Juan, Texas

Daniel Diaz Charlotte, North Carolina

Patricio Herrera Villagomez Monterrey, Nuevo Leon Mexico

John Dillon Colorado Springs, Colorado

Brandon Kacar Ladue, Missouri

Oliver Fitzgerald Spring Hill, Tennessee

Nischal Khanal Mexico, Missouri

Andres Garcia Almada Caborca, Sonora Mexico

“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Jose Garcia Puerta Monterrey, Nuevo Leon Mexico

Alexander Kolyasnikov Yekaterinburg, Russia

SENIOR CLASS MESSAGES The past three years have been the toughest of my life. I have been pushed to mental and physical limits and challenged beyond what I have experienced before. Now that it is over, I realize how much this school did for me. I wouldn’t be doing all these things I am doing now if it wasn’t for MMA. I would have missed out on many experiences.

I am excited to begin a new chapter in my life, but I will never forget my time here at MMA. Shout out to my graduating brothers going into the Armed Services. Rachell, Grogan, Nguyen. I’ll miss you all and good luck. I’ll see you on the other side. My brothers from Daytona Beach 2012: Never forget. Of course I will never forget the

Greater Federation of the Third Floor — the year that started it all. Bravo 3rd platoon. Good luck to all the underclassmen with time still left here. But best of luck to all the graduating seniors. I’ll miss you guys. ALEC NOONAN

My teachers: I thank you for all the excellent work you have done. Future cadet leaders: Do what is right. Cadets: Remember that while MMA is a road to success, you still have to drive. Class of 2013: It was a pleasure knowing you. As you move on to the next chapter of your lives, remember our time here. EOGHAN MATTHEWS

All of us have come a long way since our beginning. We have all developed from students and cadets into the leaders of tomorrow. We will now deviate from the path laid out by our supporters and fashion our own way in the world. Thank you to the administration, the academic staff, the commandant and the maintenance staff

and, most importantly, our parents for the sustenance and guidance you have provided us with. Congratulations to the class of 2013 and best of luck in your future. NISCHAL KHANAL


Kurtis Mennemeier O'Fallon, Missouri John Benjamin Mertens Mexico, Missouri Francisco Morales San Pedro Garza Garcia Nuevo Leon, Mexico

Jacob Myers Stillwater, Oklahoma

SENIOR MESSAGES I want to thank my family for giving me the opportunity to be at MMA and for everything they do for me. I also want to thank the faculty and staff that helped me succeed throughout my three years here. To the juniors that are becoming seniors:

Zhongyi Li Liuzhou, Guangxi China Leonardo Lozano Villarreal San Pedro Garza Garcia Nuevo Leon, Mexico Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes Mexico

I hope you all have a great year and you better appreciate all the good moments you have because the last one is the year that goes by fastest. Finally, to the Class of 2013, I wish you all the best of luck in life and in everything you do. Do not forget this

Christopher Nguyen San Jose, California

year and everything we accomplished and remember to always take advantage of every opportunity that is presented to you. EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES

Alec Noonan Lake Oswego, Oregon “Sure I am this day we are masters of our fate, that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength. Its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied.” Winston Churchill

John O'Leary St. Louis, Missouri Cody Olson Lee’s Summit, Missouri Ricardo Padilla Gonzalez San Salvador, San Salvador El Salvador

Diego Martinez Blanco Mexico City, D. F. Mexico

Roberto Piza Gonzalez Mexico, D. F. Mexico

Richard Massey-Scott Springfield, Missouri

NingYong Qin Shenzhen City, Guangdong China

Eoghan Matthews St. Louis, Missouri

Ethan Rachell O’Fallon, Missouri


Diego Salinas Estrada Brownsville, Texas Jacob Taylor Chicago, Illinois Christian Thomas Washington, Missouri

Eduardo Valenzo Garduno Chilpancingo, Guerrero Mexico Isaias Valtierra Chula Vista, California Nicholas Vanatta Monkey Island, Oklahoma

The Class of 2013 poses for a group photo in their Nine Line T-shirts before heading off on a senior bivouac hike and campout.

20I3 CLASS CHRONICLE

Gilberto Villarreal Guerrero Monterrey, Nuevo Leon Mexico Yu Zhou Wuxi, Jiangsu China

SENIOR CLASS MESSAGES After spending five years at MMA, I am glad to say that it is over. While there were good times and bad times, I believe the whole overall experience has definitely been valuable. I want to thank the entire commandant, academic, military and the Cadet Clinic departments. Without all of you, I would not be where I am today. Good luck next year Roel Rodriguez Valdez: I am sure you will do fine. Jacob Priester: Congrats on your accomplishments this school year and

keep it up! Parker Bridge: It has been great knowing you for five years and good luck with the staff. Chadwick Cardott: Do great things with the band and your own musical endeavors. To the rest of the underclassmen: Stick with the program. It might be tough sometimes, but the end result is well worth it. To all the leaders out there: Remember that a leader usually is out in front leading the pack, but sometimes they need to slow to that grueling pace with the slowest man. Also,

a leader is not always the loudest but the one who can listen and give the best advice. Finally, a leader needs to realize that knowing their subordinates is oftentimes more helpful then their subordinates knowing them. Take some time to actually get to know who you are leading. Thank you to everybody for a great five years. Congrats class of 2013! Battalion Commander JOHN DILLON

I will never forget my very first day on campus. I can even tell you my very first meal in the MMA mess hall was a BLT wrap, chocolate pudding and red Powerade. The food now is ten-fold times better than it was during my eighth grade year. Unfortunately, I am the only cadet left in my graduating class that was here my first year. During my freshman year, there were a few new additions. Daniel Diaz, Christian Thomas, NingYong Qin, Cody Olson, and Leonardo Lozano Villarreal — my roommate for the beginning of the year. Our freshman year was the first year Barnard Hall opened for classes. The mess hall also reopened after some major renovation. Our freshman year was the first year MMA admitted day students to include Nischal Khanal and John Benjamin Mertens. Our class received a large influx of new brothers during sophomore year. We added Eoghan Matthews, Andres Garcia Almada, Emeterio Gomez Flores, Ethan Rachell, Blake Bibles, Jesus Gonzalez Botello, Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez, Diego Martinez Blanco, Richard Massey-Scott, Francisco Morales, Jacob Myers, Alec Noonan, Nicholas Vanatta

and Zhongyi Li. Most cadet leaders of the 124th Corps of Cadets came to MMA during our sophomore year. We received the largest addition to our class during my junior year. We received Gilberto Villarreal Guerrero, Jason Boisseau, Francisco De Llano Crowley, Francisco Del Rio Rivero, Oliver Fitzgerald, Jose Garcia Puerta, Blake Gorman, Tyler Grogan, Oscar Gutierrez, Brandon Kacar, Alexander Kolyasnikov, Christopher Nguyen, John O’Leary, Ricardo Padilla Gonzalez, Jacob Taylor, Isaias Valtierra and Yu Zhou. During our junior year we faced designations, the opening of the rebuilt Stribling Hall, and the retiring of President MajGen Robert Flanagan. Our senior year we added the smallest number of members to our family. We added Patricio Herrera Villagomez, Kurtis Mennemeier and Eduardo Valenzo Garduno. These few cadets completed our class of 2013 brotherhood. This year the majority of us were leaders, which added a massive challenge to our lives. We were in more difficult classes and we saw a transition to the current administration.

All of us have seen rough times, good times and better times. Though some of us did not make the decision to come to MMA, we all have been blessed with an amazing opportunity to better ourselves. Nobody on the outside can understand the type of brotherhood and camaraderie that is forged in these halls, but each and every one of us can feel it. Some came into this school acting as children. All of us have lived and embraced the MMA lifestyle and are leaving as young men who I hope will continue to be productive members of society. We have formed an extraordinary bond that is very hard to break. Now we will complete our journey at MMA. Some of us will never see each other again, but let us all remember the good times we have had at MMA. Nobody can take away from us what we have learned at MMA. Let us always remember that we can fall back on our brothers for support. Congratulations to the Class of 2013. Battalion Commander JOHN DILLON


BLAKE BIBLES: Sergeant First Class. District band competition “good” rating in saxophone quartet. Second year band ribbon & bronze star. 2012-13 Most Versatile Dramateer. Third year drama ribbon & silver star. Football player. Academic All-State Football Award. “M” Club member. Top 10 at 2012-13 Excellence in Math state competition. Daughters of the American Revolution Medal. Lt. Gov. Joe Maxwell Community Service Award. Academic Fourragere.

Honor Society vice president. Delta Phi secretary. Academic Fourragere. Ribbons/bars for Evensong, journalism, Cadet Council, chapel worker & reader, art, instrumental music, Honor Guard, math, LET, parade, adventure training, soldiers, orienteering, summer camp. Golf captain. Raiders, cross country, swimming, baseball, Dramateers & “M” Club member. JROTC academic wreath. Missing Man/POW. Open Water Diving Certification. SCUBA member.

JASON BOISSEAU: Sergeant First Class. Academic Fourragere. Football player.

OLIVER FITZGERALD: Master Sergeant. LTC E. R. Jackson Music Award for distinguished service to the music program. Streep Brothers Band Award. Second year ribbon & bronze star in band & drama. Scottish Rite Free Mason Leadership Award. Richard Benton Hall Memorial Award. Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline. Dramateer technology crew. Delta Phi member. Academic Fourragere.

FRANCISCO DE LLANO CROWLEY: First Sergeant. Echo First Sergeant. Soccer player. FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO: Sergeant First Class. Delta Phi VP. Bravo First Sergeant. “M” Club member. Ribbons for academics, Delta Phi, visual art & fine art. Two-time Athlete of the Month. Soccer captain. Best Goal of the Season 2011. Maroon, MP, Honor Company, soldiers, parade, LET I & II bars. Honor Company 2012-13. Bravo First Sergeant, Supply Sergeant. National History Day. Class of 1984 Plaque: Unheralded Leader Award. Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline. Academic Fourragere.

DANIEL DIAZ: Second Lieutenant. Colonel Paul F. Cherches Award for Most Valuable Band Member. Fourth year band ribbon & gold star. Crain-Jorischie Jazz Musician Award. State & district band competition “superior” rating in clarinet. Delta Phi member. FBLA president. Second place at FBLA district competition. Dramateers member. First year drama ribbon. Academic Fourragere. JOHN DILLON: Major. Salutatorian. Battalion Commander. Richard Cooper Plaque. Senator John C. Danforth Plaque. Expert Rifleman. Legion of Honor. Superior Cadet. Senator Thomas F. Eagleton Plaque for Excellence in Senior English. JROTC Excellence Award. Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline. General Douglas MacArthur Award. Class of 1968 Freshman Leadership Award. Streep Brothers Band Award. District band competition “excellent” rating in brass quintet. Fourth year ribbon & gold star in band & drama. National

JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO: Captain. Charlie Company Commander. Colonel Veon McConnell Korean Trophy. Charles I. Wall Cup. Taps & “M” Club member. Track & soccer player. Class 1 All-State Soccer Team. BLAKE GORMAN: Sergeant First Class. Richard Hall Memorial Award. Honor Cadet of the Month. Student of the Month. Pearl Green Whitney Memorial Journalism Award. Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline. Dramateers & Eagle member. Drama & art ribbons. Academic Fourragere. TYLER GROGAN: Master Sergeant. Bravo Company Executive Officer. Soldier’s bar. Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War JROTC Award. Railsplitter member. Baseball team captain. Academic Fourragere. OSCAR GUTIERREZ: Sergeant First Class. Football player. Art ribbon.

ANDRES GARCIA ALMADA: First Lieutenant. Battalion Staff Executive Officer. Senior class treasurer. Most Valuable Baseball Player. American Legion Award for Scholastic Excellence. Academic Fourragere.

PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ: Senior class representative. Joe D. Bailey Award. “M” Club member. Golf, football, basketball & soccer player. Class 1 District 7 All-District first team.

JOSE GARCIA PUERTA: Captain. Delta Company Commander. Soccer Captain.

NISCHAL KHANAL: Valedictorian. 2013 Alumni Plaque. NHS president. Delta Phi member. National Merit Scholar Finalist.

Missouri Class 1 All-State Soccer Team. First-Team All-District. First-Team All-Region, Honorable Mention. AllState, MVP 2012-13. Ribbons for LET I, company competition, parade, chapel worker, chapel reader, community service, academics, math, visual art & art. Delta Phi, “M” Club member. Soldier & maroon bars. Guidon and Second Platoon Sergeant. American Legion Award for Scholastic Excellence. Celebrate Freedom Foundation JROTC Award for Excellence in Academics. EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES: Master Sergeant. Battalion Staff S2, Security & Intelligence Officer. Senior class vice president. Red Ireland Trophy for a Fighting Heart. Don Hooton Fellowship Cup. Academic Fourragere. Most Improved Tennis Player 2013. Member of Military Police, “M” Club, Dramateers, FBLA & Ambassadors. Head MP. Football player. Second year ribbon & bronze star in drama. Bravo Company Guidon 2011. Disciplinary Officer.

AP Scholar with distinction. Highest scholarship in 9th, 10th, 11th & 12th grades. William F. Enright, Jr. Award. Wallace Fry finalist. Winston Churchill Memorial Award. Student of the Month. Sophomore class treasurer. Cross country captain. Tennis player. Audrain Medical Center volunteer. FBLA state finalist & national qualifier. Third place at Excellence in Math state competition. Math bar. Bohm Medal. McDonough Trophy. James C. Olson Award. Instrumental music ribbon. Math bar. Top 10 at 2012-13 Excellence in Math state competition. Academic Fourragere. ALEXANDER KOLYASNIKOV: Sergeant First Class. Master Sergeant Billy Crawford Memorial Award. Soccer player. ZHONGYI LI: Cadet Chorus member. LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL: Sergeant First Class. Dramateers & “M” Club member. First year drama ribbon. Football & track player.

RICARDO MANCILLA VAZQUEZ: Master Sergeant. Delta Company Executive Officer. Association of Military Colleges & School of the United States Medal. Taps staff. Soldier’s bar. DIEGO MARTINEZ BLANCO: Master Sergeant. Echo Company Executive Officer. FBLA member. Second place in FBLA district competition. RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT: Sergeant First Class. Delta Company First Sergeant. Superior Cadet Award. FBLA member. Second & third place in FBLA district competition. Eleventh place in FBLA state competition. Dramateers, “M” Club, Cadet Chorus & Delta Phi member. Third year ribbon & silver star in drama. Vocal music ribbon. “Excellent” rating at district vocal music competition. Outstanding Contributor to Chorus Award. Academic Fourragere. EOGHAN MATTHEWS: Master Sergeant. Battalion Staff S3, Training & Operations. MAJ William Bryant Essay medal. Ribbons in LET service, summer camp, orienteering, adventure training, commendation, JCLC, Raiders, JROTC athletics, parade, POW/MIA ceremony, staff performance, Evensong, chapel worker, community service, library & math. Dramateers & “M” Club member. Second year ribbon & bronze star in drama. Cross country & track athlete. Raiders captain. Superior Cadet Decoration Award. Academic wreath. Expert marksmanship badge. COL Jerome G. Harris Cup. Special Forces Association Award. Raider Nationals Medal. Stribling Trophy. Delta Phi president. Academic Fourragere. KURTIS MENNEMEIER: FBLA member. Second place in FBLA district competition. Twenty-third place in FBLA state competition. Dramateers, “M” Club & Eagle staff member. First year drama ribbon. Football player. Academic Fourragere. JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS: Math bar. Top 10 at 2012-13 Excellence in Math state competition. Jack Meyers Memorial

Cup. Delta Phi member. Visual art & fine art ribbons. Stribling Dramateer Award. Fourth year ribbon & gold star in drama. Academic Fourragere. FRANCISCO MORALES: First Lieutenant. Bravo Company Commander. Outstanding Performance by a Company Commander Award. Superior Cadet. Soldier, maroon & parade bars. Chapel worker & reader. Member of Fusiliers, Raiders, FBLA, Military Police, Student Council, Honor Company & JROTC. Second place at FBLA district competition. Tennis & soccer player. Fine art & visual art ribbons. JACOB MYERS: Corporal. Golf player. Second year ribbon & bronze star in band. Academic Fourragere. CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN: Master Sergeant. Charlie Company Executive Officer. “M” Club member. Football & track player. ALEC NOONAN: Master Sergeant. Battalion Staff S1, Adjutant. Association of the U. S. Army Medal. Delta Phi member. Academic Fourragere. Member of Railsplitters, Sea Cadets & Fusiliers. 2012-13 Most Improved Golfer. Honor Guard commander. Private pilot. Battalion Staff Adjutant. FBLA vice president. Fifth place at FBLA district competition. JOHN O’LEARY: Private. Math bar. Sons of the American Revolution Award. “Superior” rating in piano at state & district band competitions. Instrumental music ribbon. Delta Phi & “M” Club member. Tennis & football player. Academic Fourragere.

ROBERTO PIZA GONZALEZ: Master Sergeant. NINGYONG QIN: Master Sergeant. Battalion Staff S5, Public Affairs. Dorsey Anderson Cup. Art ribbon. ETHAN RACHELL: First Sergeant. Battalion Staff Sergeant Major. Senior class president. William S. Lowe Trophy. Daedalian JROTC Medal. Wallace Fry Speaking Award finalist. Eagle staff. Football player. DIEGO SALINAS ESTRADA: Captain. Echo Company Commander. ROTC Distinguished Service Award. JACOB TAYLOR: Sergeant First Class. Pearl Green Whitney Journalism Award. Eagle staff. Delta Phi member. Cellist at local church. Accumulated 43 hours community service. Rifle team. National Rifle Competition in Camp Perry, Ohio. CHRISTIAN THOMAS: Sergeant First Class. AMVETS Medal for Leadership. Dramateers member. Second year ribbon & bronze star in drama. EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO: Sylvia Mansfield Memorial Award. Instrumental music ribbon. Soldier’s bar. Academic Fourragere. ISAIAS VALTIERRA: Staff Sergeant. NICHOLAS VANATTA: Staff Sergeant. Outstanding MMA Athlete plaque. Selected for All-American Football Game. Football First-Team All-District, Offensive MVP. Football & baseball captain. “M” Club, Eagle staff & Dramateers member. First year drama ribbon.

CODY OLSON: Sergeant First Class. “Excellent” rating in brass quintet at district band competition. Fourth year ribbon & gold star in band. Golf & football player.

GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRO: Master Sergeant. Battalion Staff S4, Supply & Logistics. Dramateers & “M” Club member. Second year ribbon & bronze star in drama. Football player. Babe Ruth Sportsmanship Award.

RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ: First Sergeant. Charlie Company First Sergeant. Dramateers member. Art & first year drama ribbons. Basketball player.

YU ZHOU: Sergeant First Class. American Mathematics Competition award. Top 10 at 2012-13 Excellence in Math state competition.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME? Play the PlayStation 3. Call my friends at home. Work out. OSCAR Play computer games and sleep. WEIDING MA ’14 GARCIA ’16 I like to OSCAR GUTIERREZ ’13 STEVEN PRINSTER ’15 listen to Go outdoors, Play sports I like to sleep Spend time with Researching new music, watch hunt, fish and and be with my in my free time my friends and ideas about science movies and backpack. and go to Vega’s friends. CARLOS watch movies. and listening to play sports. JACOB Burritos. TYLER music. BLAKE EDUARDO RAMOS JOSE BOURS JIAHAO WU ’15

PRIESTER ’14

VAUGHAN ’14

MURRIETA ’14

GORMAN ’13

MOLINA ’17


FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE CLASS ACHIEVEMENTS Class of 1968 Freshman Leadership Award BYRON AMIDON ’16 JUNIOR CLASS ACHIEVEMENTS 82nd percentile PSAT score NOAH AGNE Lyle C. Wilson Journalism Award DILLION BROWN-DAWSON 84th percentile PSAT score CHADWICK CARDOTT Daughters of the American Revolution History Medal AUBREY DAVIDSON Steve Walker Memorial Award for an Outstanding First-Year Cadet; and American Veterans Medal for Military Excellence OSCAR GONZALEZ SCHIEFENBUSCH

MIDDLE SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENTS Judy A. Twells Drama Award; Kuhlman Award; George Piper Outstanding Middle School Athlete; Stribling Cup for Highest Efficiency in the Middle School; and Plaque for Highest Scholarship in 8th Grade TAJAE BLUE ’17

National Sojourners Award JON JOHNSTON

Superior Cadet Award PAOLO ROSADO

Honor Award DALLAS LOPEZ

Plaque for Highest Scholarship in the Junior Class; Military Order of the World Wars Award for Military and Scholastic Improvement; and 86th percentile PSAT score JACK SOLLS

Senator Christopher Bond Award for Most Effective Cadet Council Member; and Thomas Wittman Plaque, presented for supporting the vespers program NICHOLAS MABBS Superior Cadet Award; United States Army Recruiting Command Award for JROTC; and Fritsch Plaque and stipend JACOB PRIESTER Superior Cadet Award; David Whitney Conservation Plaque; and Military Order of the Purple Heart ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ

Plaque for Highest Scholarship in 6th Grade CHANNING CARLSON ’19 Faculty Plaque; and Richard White Improvement Award SEAN FITZGERALD ’17 Piper Barracks Award JEAN-LUC SHYAKA ’18 and SKY HENIO ’19

Military Officers Association of America Medal TYLER VAUGHAN 86th percentile PSAT score CONNOR WILKINSON Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline ANDRES ROSADO, PAOLO ROSADO and KHASOCHIR SOD-ERDENE

Best Squad Leader JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17 Senator Christopher Bond Award for Outstanding Middle School Underclassman; and Plaque for Highest Scholarship in 7th Grade JUAN LEAL ’18

89th percentile PSAT score; and 99th percentile PLAN score KANE ANDERSON ’15 Plaque for Highest Scholarship in the Sophomore Class JOSE GARCIA ’15

92nd percentile PSAT math score; and 98th percentile PLAN score NISHAN KHANAL ’16

96th percentile PLAN math score; and OneMMA award GUANGNING WEI ’15

92nd percentile PLAN score WADE LUECKENOTTE ’15

Meritas Plaque for Excellence in Discipline BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI ’15, VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15, RODRIGO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’15 and JIAHAO WU ’15

Special Forces Association Award; and Raider of the Year FELIX PAZ VALDEZ ’15 97th percentile PLAN math score SERGIO SALAS ROJO ’15

LEFT: Jason Boisseau ’13 poses after performing at competitive drill May 24. JACOB TAYLOR ’13 RIGHT: Jacob Conyers ’16 enjoys homecoming weekend with a family member September 30.

Science Fair Champions EUGENIO BARRERA MARTINEZ ’17 and CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA ’17 Leaders of Tomorrow Award ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17 and DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17

Petit Fellowship ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17

OneMMA Award; and Harris Plaque CHARLES NORMAN ’18

Rotary Club Service Above Self Award WILLIAM MOORE ’18

Heyman All-American Boy Award TAN PHOTSAVAT PONGSUEA ’17

Bailey Discipline Trophy JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17

Petit Plaque RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’17 and JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17


CPT Erin Akhtar Math Instructor

CPT Craig Flynn English Instructor

LT Christopher Bain Art Instructor

LTC Frank Giuseffi Dean of Academics

LT Edsel Baker Math Instructor

CPT Jonathan Griffin English/Drama Instructor

Penny Bealmear Administrative Assistant

1SG Alan Hakes Army Instructor

LT Marcos Benavides Chemistry Instructor

1SG Randy Jacobson Army Instructor

MAJ Richards Boyce Middle School Principal

MAJ Ananta Khanal Math Department Chair

LT Gailyn Fennewald Computer Literacy Instructor Leigh Ann Finck Assistant Director of College Placement

LTC Willis Kleinsorge MS Science Instructor

ACADEMIC

Melissa Knipp Assistant to the Dean and Registrar

DEPARTMENT

CPT Katherine Larison Librarian LT Cheryl Lu ESL Instructor LT Mary Maupin MS Reading Instructor

CPT John Noel and Marc Wilson show their spirit at the holiday lunch on December 20.

MAJ Larry McClarey Social Studies Department Chair

Dr. Greg McDonald Biology Instructor LT Annette Meinheit ESL Instructor Mark Murphy Robotics Instructor CPT John Noel Athletic Director and MS Social Studies Instructor

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN 10 YEARS? HOW WILL YOU GET THERE? A sergeant in the U.S. Army. Working to the best of my ability in everything I do. TYLER

GROGAN ’13

Flying in a C-130 delivering cargo for the Air Force. By [earning] a degree in aeronautical engineering. AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14

I will be a private pilot and have a good job in my dad’s business.

GABRIEL RODRIGUEZ MENDOZA ’14

I’ll be running a business.

SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA ’14

With a good job or running my own business. EMILIO

CUETO MENDEZ ’14

As a mechanic in the Air Force. Work hard.

DILLION BROWNDAWSON ’14

Having a job with computers. WADE

LUECKENOTTE ’15

Environmental scientist. Working hard in science and getting recruited to an excellent college.

D’CHERION OWENS ’15


LT Robert Olive English Instructor

Amy Adair-Groves Business Manager

MAJ Michael Pemberton Science Department Chair

Rhonda Blaue Executive Administrative Assistant to the President

MAJ Peggy Reynard Math/Business Instructor

Kathy Brooks Accountant

CPT Eric Reynolds Social Studies and History Instructor

LTC Tim Scherrer Director of College Placement

Charles McGeorge President

LT Joseph Shafer English Department Chair

LTC Jim Medley Executive Officer

MAJ Mike Shoemaker Fine Arts Department Chair

Justin Rottger Information Officer

Renae Stumpe Learning Center Director

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT SGM Henry Suddarth Senior Army Instructor LT Andrea Vollrath Spanish Instructor Dr. Steven Wolf Math Instructor CPT Joshua Yancey Bandmaster

ADMINISTRATION Rev. Randall Sawyer Chaplain WO2 Richard "Rik" Thornton Director of Cadet Life Julia Welch Accounts Receivable

RIGHT: Jiahao Wu ’15, Hang Zhang ’15, Xinshuai Hu ’14 and NingYong Qin ’13 attend an MMA art exhibition at the Vault Gallery on January 10. LEFT: JiaLun He ’14 leads a line of cadets during battalion review September 28.


Development and Special Events Coordinator Cassandra Brooks

CPT Keith Morgan Technology Instructor Cheryl Morris Graphic Designer

Publications Coordinator Erin Chambers Director of Admissions Phillip Dunbridge

Nicholas O'Neil Assistant Network and Systems Administrator

Chinese Instructor and Admissions Counselor Jackie Li

Sandra Riutcel Admissions Coordinator

ADMISSIONS

Terry Logue Alumni Relations/Annual Fund Manager Michelle Martinez International Relations Coordinator CPT Greg Maximovitch Webmaster and Marketing Manager Mitch Moffitt Admissions Counselor

ADVANCEMENT

MARKETING

TECHNOLOGY Christine Smith Group Director Gary Stewart Assistant Director of Admissions David Wilkins Director of Technology Marc Wilson Head Football Coach and Social Studies Instructor

LEFT: Oliver Fitzgerald ’13 receives the Richard Benton Hall Memorial Award from LT Joseph Head at the Echo Company end-of-year picnic May 21. ERIN CHAMBERS RIGHT: Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez ’13, Roger Gonzalez ’15 and Jose Garcia Puerta ’13 pose February 10 outside Stribling Hall. EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16


IF YOU COULD HAVE ONE SUPER POWER, WHAT WOULD IT BE? WHY? Super brain power, to unlock all human potential now instead of waiting 50 years for technology to catch up.

JACOB TAYLOR ’13

I would be Flash so I can do things fast so I can have more free time. I would be fast at sports and would do things at school like homework and work really fast so I could sleep more.

JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16

Invisibility. So that no one could see me.

EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13

Genius-level intellect, because I could build or create things that would help the Earth and I could be rich. DIEGO MARTINEZ

BLANCO ’13

WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT MMA? It disciplines me and challenges me to do my best at everything. BLAKE GORMAN ’13

I still talk with cadets that graduated or left many years ago. The brotherhood and relationships started here at MMA last a lifetime.

JOHN DILLON ’13

The connection, community and military education.

KHAS-OCHIR SOD-ERDENE ’14

You can meet people from all over the world. SEAN ATAMIAN ’17 It helps you be more successful. Priority setting, time management, confidence. JOHN KOHM ’16

LT Murrell Adams Residential Faculty

LT Joseph Head Residential Faculty

MAJ Bill Chrismer Residential Faculty

Chad Herron Residential Faculty

Mark Clark Barber

CPT David Higgins Residential Faculty

Melody Daly Laundry Supervisor

Greg Morton Director of Facilities

CADET CLINIC, QUARTERMASTER LT Brian Davis Residential Faculty

2LT James Poettker Residential Faculty

MaryAnn Dickherber Tailor

LTC Greg Seibert Commandant of Cadets

MAJ Dennis Diederich Quartermaster

GySGT Mark Tompkins Director of Transportation

Dr. Joseph Fugaro Physician

MAJ Brian Galarza Assistant Commandant Anne Vines Cadet Clinic

Donna Gastler Assistant Quartermaster

CPT James Ward Residential Faculty

LaWanah Gillette Director of Health Services Irene Hard Laundry

EMPLOYEES NOT PICTURED LAUNDRY: JAMIE BLAIR, MARTHA BRUCE, FAYE LEHNEN. MAINTENANCE: LARRY ANTHONY, DAVID JESSE BLAIR, DAN BURTON, DAVID CROSS, JAMES HILDERMAN, JULIA HUNT, JASON JONES, DOUG SCOTT, CHARLES STOCKDALL, JEFF STONE, BERNARD STRUNK, RICHARD VANDUYNE. RESIDENTIAL LIFE: LT JESSE MCKEE, LT ROBERT OWEN, CPT EDDIE RATLIFF, THOMAS ROBERTS, MAJ RICHARD TREADWAY. TRANSPORTATION: MICHAEL BUCKALLEW, LARRY MEHRHOFF, TOM REED. OTHER: WINNIE BARKER (QUARTERMASTER); DEANNA BLAIR (CADET CLINIC); DAVID NEVERGALL (ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR); MATTHEW VORE (TECHNOLOGY); GINA WHITESELL (EQUESTRIAN)

WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL? WHY? My father. He helps and works with everyone.

JONATHAN RICHARDSON ’15

My mother because she is a very smart and nice woman. JOSE REDING ORTIZ ’15

My father because he always challenges me to do my best. BLAKE GORMAN ’13

My brother. He has managed to overcome a difficult past.

ADAM SCHMITZ ’15

My dad. I wanna be like him. JUAN

RAMON FLORES TENORIO ’15

My father. He is a great person. I admire him. CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA ’17


SCIENCE: ROCKETS 50 ALGEBRA, ARCHAEOLOGY & SPANISH 52 MILITARY HISTORY & LITERATURE 53 HUMANITIES & WORLD HISTORY 54 CREATIVE WRITING 55 SCIENCE: ANGRY BIRDS 56

ADMINISTRATION 60 FIRST-YEAR EMPLOYEES 62 MATHEMATICS 66 SCIENCE FAIR & FOREIGN LANGUAGE 68 ENGLISH & VISUAL ART 70

LTC Frank Giuseffi speaks with cadets Tyler Grogan ’13 and NingYong Qin ’13.


First-year instructor LT Marcos Benavides’ chemistry students launched rockets into the sky from Colonels’ Field in early April. High school cadets spent a week preparing for the experiment. Benavides’ summer school cadets performed a similar experiment in July 2012 and 2013 — and according to Facebook, so did dozens of MMA alumni years before. Posters shared their memories with a network of MMA fans via social media. “We launched Alka-Seltzer rockets in John Reddick’s general science class,” alumnus Tom Mullen ’74 said. “The test flights were from the roof of the academic building.” Students in 1977 launched rockets on campus as a class project, alumnus Kelly Lloyd said. Alumnus George Morrell said he and his roommate David Peak performed similar experiments in the 1960s with the help of the Rocket Manual for Amateurs. “I did this back in 1964,” Morrell said. “Ours was made out of whatever parts we could dig up and a long fuse.” Benavides’ students used a different launch technique to send projectiles shooting into “space” — water pressure.

Cadets created original models and learned the basics of engineering. Building materials included plastic bottles, duct tape, tennis balls and cardboard. Cadet groups collaborated on the project and referred to online videos for advice on how to construct the best rocket. “We would build off each other’s ideas,” Benjamin Swiger ’14 said. Students deconstructed the experiment in class, discussing the outcomes and learning about the scientific principles of gas. Cadets were thrilled to see their creations fly high into the air and come in for landing. “The ones I thought wouldn’t work well actually did work better than the others,” Nicholas Vanatta ’13 said. According to Benavides, students during the regular school year have the opportunity to try multiple rocket variations. Summer school students conducted an abbreviated version of the experiment. “I’m happy to see that our great MMA tradition of blowing things up and sending things into the heavens still lives on today!” Mullen joked. text courtesy of THE EAGLE

LARGE: Javier Ibanez Posada ’14, Jose Carrillo Noriega ’14, Fernando Lopez Chumacero ’14 and first-year instructor LT Marcos Benavides prepare to launch a rocket April 11 on Colonels Field. INSET: LT Marcos Benavides readies the trigger mechanism for launch [top] and a rocket floats back down for landing [bottom] June 11 during Summer Academy 2013. ERIN CHAMBERS


COOL CLASSES TALL TALE OF GUINNESS GIANT

ARCHAEOLOGY ADVENTURE

Guinness World Record-holder Robert Wadlow stood at 8 feet, 11 inches tall until his death in 1940. Onlookers traveled from across the country to Wadlow’s hometown in Alton, Illinois, about 30 miles north of St. Louis, to meet the tallest person in history. MAJ Richards Boyce presented Wadlow’s tall tale to students in mid-February to teach middle schoolers about proportional measurement. Boyce challenged cadets to construct a scale drawing of Wadlow’s massive body using only one clue: The measurements of his hand. Barnard hallways were filled with sketching students armed with rulers, markers, pencils and wide sheets of paper.

CPT Katherine Larison led an archaeological adventure September 15 at Graham Cave State Park in Danville, Missouri. Students hiked through the park’s Woodland Trail to a site where Native American artifacts have been discovered. The field trip included an arrowhead construction demonstration by a park “flintnapper” and a lesson in throwing an atlatl, a spear-like weapon used by ancient Native American tribes. DIA DE LOS MUERTOS November 2 was Dia de los Muertos, a Spanish holiday known as the Day of the Dead. LT Annette Meinheit, Spanish

instructor LT Andrea Vollrath and other faculty members coordinated the construction of a holiday altar. MMA cadets created a second altar on the third floor of Barnard Hall to honor Hispanic culture. Families traditionally remember lost loved ones on Dia de los Muertos and choose to celebrate, not mourn, the lives of those who have passed on. THE RISE, RUN AND SLOPE OF THE STRIBLING STEPS Cadets in MAJ Peggy Reynard’s algebra class studied rise, run and slope by calculating the measurements of the Stribling Hall front steps in early December. Reynard posed the

question, “Is there a correlation between the slope of the steps and the ease of climbing?” LIEUTENANT FOR A DAY President Charles McGeorge dressed in period costume and visited LTC Tim Scherrer’s military history classes September 19, playing the part of fictional Revolutionary War figure “General Gage.” Cadets acted as lieutenants in the British Army who delivered strategy pitches about potential responses to the Lexington and Concord incidents in a mock briefing. Students presented descriptions of key area towns and an analysis of the terrain where Americans were stationed, alerting “Gage” to potential

hazards during a British march and offensive strike. Cadets detailed the demographics of American combat troops, summarized recent battle incidents and commented on typical issues of dissent among colonists. BRIT LIT WITH A VIKING TWIST LT Robert Olive and LT Joseph Shafer combined British Literature classes September 13 to teach students how to play “kubb,” an ancient Viking game similar to chess. During a match, players attempt to knock down pieces of wood on their opponent’s side of the field. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

TOP LEFT: Samer Doumit ’18 and Dmitri Lamping ’18 map out Robert Wadlow’s legs. BOTTOM LEFT: Andres Vidal ’16 and Julien Ngonga Mugabo ’17 measure the front steps of Stribling Hall. RIGHT: Ivan Salinas ’18 and Juan Guerra Gonzalez ’18 conduct a water experiment in science class November 29. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE REYNOLDS CHALLENGES CADETS TO EXAMINE BELIEFS First-year instructor CPT Eric Reynolds posed a deep question for his humanities classes in mid-October: “Who am I, and where do I fit in?” Students experimented with an ancient writing style called cuneiform,

LEFT: CPT Joshua Yancey gives an electric guitar lesson. RIGHT: Students watch class pet Pepe the snake eat a meal in science class October 19. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE

which is similar to Egyptian hieroglyphics. Mesopotamian cultures recorded their history and told tales using cuneiform. Reynolds introduced students to the “Epic of Gilgamesh,” one of the earliest surviving works of literature. “Gilgamesh” is a poem written entirely in cuneiform which details the legendary rise to power and battles of ancient warrior-king Gilgamesh. After viewing photos of the original stone tablets

on which “Gilgamesh” was carved, students carved their reflections about the project in cuneiform. Writing assignment prompts included questions like, “How has this project changed your views regarding human achievement and advancement?” “I had the students come up with one phrase to ‘write out’ in cuneiform,” Reynolds said. “The total time it took for them to write a single phrase equaled about two hours.”

Reynolds strives to present lessons which make students aware of their place in history. He said he hopes to challenge cadets to examine their personal convictions. WRITING LAB FOSTERS CADET CREATIVITY English department faculty launched a new after school program in 2012 to foster improvements in creative and academic

writing styles. Middle school English and writing instructor LT Mary Maupin said the class challenges cadets to take a closer look at their compositions, which will result in more confident, competent writers. “The program is based on the college model of student-run writing centers that empower students to take an active role in their education,” Maupin said.

“There are many facets to writing. The more students are allowed to practice without a grade looming overhead, the better they get.” The writing center was manned and managed by cadet tutors, who were trained by faculty and chosen based on competence. text courtesy of THE EAGLE


ANGRY BIRDS: Middle school students learned Newton’s Laws of Motion and terms such as hypothesis, constant and dependent variables — by playing a real-life version of the popular online game Angry Birds in LTC Willis Kleinsorge’s science classes. In Angry Birds, players launch birds at enemy pigs stationed on faraway structures. The goal of the game is to knock down the buildings, effectively destroying all rivals.

Kleinsorge said he wanted to introduce cadets to the Scientific Method of Inquiry and data collection. “[I hoped] that it would be a topic they all knew [and] might have fun with,” Kleinsorge said. “It was all based on science.” Cadets constructed catapults and slingshots with tape, rubber bands, protractors, paper and plastic spoons. Students flung

marshmallows at wooden block structures, changing angles and projectile sizes to observe which materials knocked down the most blocks. “Angry Bird Physics” ended in mid-October with a lab report assignment. “The purpose was to see how the variables affect the results of the experiment,” wrote project partners Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez ’17 and Juan Hernandez Antillon ’17. “We tried to prove that using more force

in our weapon would make the projectile go farther.” “If we changed the angle to 45 degrees, then the projectile would knock out more structures,” JeanLuc Shyaka ’18 hypothesized. “If I put the smallest marshmallow on the catapult, then the shot will be longer than if I put a bigger one

because it is heavier,” wrote Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17 and Ricardo Salido Vives ’17. Cadets recorded quantifiable data and created graphs of their results, which were used to make practical conclusions. Text courtesy of ERIN CHAMBERS

TOP LEFT: A wooden block building with tiny marshmallow “pigs” served as the target. BOTTOM LEFT: Santiago Sada ’18 aims his catapult and fires October 8. MIDDLE: Project partners Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17 and Ricardo Salido Vives ’17 show off their data September 25. FAR RIGHT: Braulio Garcia ’19, Channing Carlson ’19, Pablo Garza-Rios-Blanco ’19, Sky Henio ’19 and Yanni Le ’19 complete a study of the human skeletal system October 8. Photos by LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


LEFT: LT Mary Maupin lectures a middle school class November 1. Right photo by ERIN CHAMBERS

JANUARY ACADEMIC FOURRAGERE RECIPIENTS JORGE ADUNA LEON ’17, BLAKE BIBLES ’13, TAJAE BLUE ’17, JASON BOISSEAU ’13, PARKER BRIDGE ’14, CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, JOSE CARRILLO NORIEGA ’14, AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14,

SANDIR DE SILVA ’16, FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO ’13, DANIEL DIAZ ’13, SEBASTIAN DIAZ ’14, JOHN DILLON ’13, FERNANDO ESTRADA PINON ’14, JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16, OLIVER FITZGERALD ’13, SEAN FITZGERALD ’17, JUAN RAMON FLORES TENORIO ’15, BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO ’15,

ANDRES GARCIA ALMADA ’13, JOSE GARCIA ’15, BLAKE GORMAN ’13, TYLER GROGAN ’13, DAVID GU ’16, GAVIN HENDEE ’15, YUN IL JEON ’16, KOTARO KASAMATSU ’15, NISCHAL KHANAL ’13, NISHAN KHANAL ’16, DAVID LAZCANO ’16, YANNI LE ’19, JUAN LEAL ’18, QI LI ’15, DALLAS LOPEZ ’14,

FERNANDO LOPEZ CHUMACERO ’14, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, JAVIER MALPICA PALMEROS ’14, RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’17, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13, EOGHAN MATTHEWS ’13, SERGIO MAYER MORI ’17, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS ’13,

JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17, JACOB MYERS ’13, ALEC NOONAN ’13, JOHN O’LEARY ’13, DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17, TAN PHOTSAVAT PONGSUEA ’17, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA ’17, ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ ’14, ANDRES ROSADO ’14,

PAOLO ROSADO ’14, SANTIAGO SADA ’18, OMAR SANCHEZ IBARRA ’16, JEAN-LUC SHYAKA ’18, JACK SOLLS ’14, AUSTIN TEAGUE ’14, PEDRO TINOCO ’16, EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13, ANDRES VIDAL ’16, RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR ’15, GUANGNING WEI ’15, HANG ZHANG ’15


Outgoing Missouri Military Academy President Major General Robert Flanagan left the MMA campus on the back of a bright red BMW motorcycle on Friday, June 29. Flanagan, who served as MMA president for five years, began his retirement with a 3,000-mile trip along the Lewis and Clark Trail. “I felt some affinity for the trip because it started here in Missouri,” he said, “so I’m going to follow the Missouri River to the headwaters, then the Columbia River out to the coast.” Flanagan said he had hoped to take this trip for many years and decided to hit the road before moving to Georgia with his wife Debbie. “I’ll finish packing up the truck, put on my jeans and head out sometime Saturday,” Flanagan said. About 30 faculty and staff members wished Flanagan farewell June 28 at a goodbye celebration in Stribling Hall. The MMA community wished him “Happy Trails” with a themed cake — a motorcycle speeding across a cookie crumb road. After taking the MMA reins in 2007, Flanagan oversaw the renovations of Barnard Hall and Stribling Hall. Cadets received record-breaking college scholarship amounts and 100percent college acceptance rates during his tenure. “We certainly thank MajGen Flanagan for his outstanding leadership over these past six years and wish him well on his retirement,” MMA Board of Trustees Chairman R. Stribling Koster said. “He certainly has left an important and lasting legacy at the Academy.” Flanagan handed Charles A. “Tony” McGeorge the reins in early July. McGeorge became the 10th Missouri Military Academy president. Prior to his appointment at MMA, McGeorge served as president of Valley Forge Military Academy and College. He sat on the Board of Trustees for the Valley Forge Military Academy Foundation and served as Counsel to the Office of the President, overseeing enrollment management, marketing and public relations.

“During his tenure as president, Tony did an outstanding job and proved himself to be both a visionary and strategic thinker,” William R. Floyd Jr., chairman of the board at VFMAC, said. “He will be an excellent addition to MMA.” McGeorge is a former president of the Association of Military Colleges and Schools of the United States. McGeorge founded the Mustang Scholars Foundation, which provides college scholarships to underprivileged young men and women of promise, character and intelligence. “Tony brings with him not only a wealth of experience as a businessman, consultant and president of Valley Forge Military Academy and College but also a passion and commitment to excellence that will serve the Academy well,” Koster said. As a representative of Johnson & Johnson, McGeorge served as spokesman during the Tylenol poisoning crisis which made business history and became a Harvard Business School case study. He holds a B.A. in sino-Soviet history from Boston University and an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. He also holds a certificate in Advanced Management from Northwestern University. McGeorge also served as a guest lecturer and graduate school professor. He came to MMA with his wife Joy from Devon, Pennsylvania. “For 123 years, Missouri Military Academy has delivered excellence in character-based education to young men from around the nation and the world,” McGeorge said. “We will build upon that wonderful legacy by focusing on delivering a world-class, 21st-century education that prepares young men and boys for life. MMA will continue to be where the world educates its future leaders.” text courtesy of KXEO, CHRISTINE SMITH and THE MEXICO LEDGER

ABOVE: MajGen Robert Flanagan poses with Mitch Moffitt as he prepares to leave campus atop his motorcycle June 29. BOTTOM LEFT: MajGen Robert Flanagan’s themed cake. BOTTOM RIGHT: President Charles McGeorge presents an award to Paul Petit ’85 on September 28 during the homecoming alumni drilldown.


RIGHT: First-year history teacher Eric Reynolds delivers a presentation November 1. LEFT: Faculty crock pot cookoff winners pose December 14. retired MMA Bandmaster COL Dana Reynard won first place for his creamed corn. First-year teacher LT Marcos Benavides’ short ribs earned second place. First-year staffer CPT Greg Maximovitch won third place for his pork medallions.

FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS Abbott-Albright Award for an outstanding teacher MAJ LAWRENCE MCCLAREY Heimos Trophy, presented to the faculty or staff member who has done the most for the boys LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE Mentor of the Year, given to the mentor who has made an impact in the lives of the cadets in his barracks LT ANDREW ADAMS Presidential Gold Star MAINTENANCE, LAUNDRY and QUARTERMASTER STAFFS; GREG MORTON and LTC GREG SEIBERT

FIRST-YEAR EMPLOYEES World traveler LT Christopher Bain joined the MMA ranks as art instructor and assistant soccer coach. Bain attended the Winchester School of Art in England before continuing his studies in the United States, earning an MFA at Boston University. LT Marcos Benavides served as chemistry instructor during the 2012-13 school year. He previously taught physical science and biology at Mexico High School and is a Texas A&M University at Kingsville alumnus.

Rhonda Blaue joined the MMA staff as executive assistant to the president in 2012. Blaue is a retired public school educator with 30 years of experience. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Missouri. Louisiana State University alumna Erin Chambers became publications coordinator, journalism teacher and yearbook and newspaper adviser in May 2013. Chambers has professional experience in graphic design

and served as copy editor of LSU’s student newspaper The Daily Reveille and editorin-chief and managing editor of the LSU Gumbo yearbook. Registered Nurse LaWanah Gillette joined the Cadet Clinic as Director of Health Services in August 2012. Gillette holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Truman State University. Gillette has experience as an administrator and director of nursing. She has treated both home and hospital patients.

Administrators appointed Cheryl Lu as MMA’s second English as a second language teacher in 2012. Lu is a University of Pennsylvania alumna and served as an English teacher for YMCA and Upper Darby High School in Philadelphia. Assistant Director of Admissions and International Relations Coordinator Michelle Martinez is fluent in Spanish and specializes in recruiting international students and working with their families. She holds a

bachelor’s degree in international business from California State University at Fullerton. U.S. Army veteran Greg Maximovitch joined the MMA staff as Marketing Manager and Web Commerce and Game Design instructor. Maximovitch served in military intelligence for five years before becoming an instructor at the local Hart Career Center. He earned a bachelor’s degree in management from William Jewell College.

Cheryl Morris joined the MMA staff in 2013. Morris has more than 20 years of experience in graphic design, publishing and production and has owned her own design firm since 1996. Morris is an accomplished professional photographer and involved in her own personal fine art production and sales. Morris holds a bachelor’s degree in fine arts and business from William Woods University. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


SERVICE ANNIVERSARIES Director of Facilities and Grounds, 30 years GREG MORTON Maintenance Technician, 25 years JAMES HILDERMAN Quartermaster, Admissions Counselor and Director of Admissions, 15 years MAJ DENNIS DIEDERICH Laundry Technicians, 15 years FAYE LEHNEN and10 years MARTHA BRUCE Director of Guidance and College Placement, 5 years LTC TIM SCHERRER Residential Faculty, 5 years CPT JAMES WARD and 5 years CPT EDDIE RATLIFF

LEFT: MAJ Dennis Diederich and retired MMA Bandmaster COL Dana Reynard celebrate May 19 after the employee recognition review. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE First-year staffer Robert Olive serves as varsity football running backs coach and British literature, English II and creative writing teacher. Olive taught English at both Harrisburg Academy and York Preparatory School in Pennsylvania. Olive earned a Master of Education from the University of Massachusetts. First-year technology staffer and Assistant Network and Systems Administrator Nick O’Neil joined MMA this school year. O’Neil holds an A.A.S. in network administration from State Fair Community College and a B.A. in computer science from Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri.

The social studies department hired Eric Reynolds to teach world history and military history this school year. He also joined the athletic department as head soccer coach. Reynolds taught Advanced Placement courses at Dunbar High School in Florida before settling at MMA. He served as a U.S. Marine Corps engineer and earned a master’s in military history from Norwich University. Andrea Vollrath came to MMA as Spanish instructor from neighboring Missouri school districts Herman and Paris. Vollrath earned a master’s degree from the University of Missouri at St. Louis. David Wilkins joined the staff as director of technology during the 2012-13 school year. Wilkins has worked in information

technology with Fidelity Security Life Insurance, Cerner Corporation and OCCI, Inc. He has served on the Centralia City Council and holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Northwest Missouri State University. ALUMNI RELATIONS/ANNUAL FUND MANAGER TERRY LOGUE Missouri Military Academy 1972 alumnus Terry Logue joined the staff as Alumni Relations/Annual Fund Manager in early September. His professional experience is in broadcasting, management, public relations and collegiate athletics. He previously worked at Westminster College for 17 years and held a variety of institutional and conference

RIGHT: Faculty and staff members display their alma mater pride on college T-shirt day May 17. ERIN CHAMBERS administrative positions, including Director of Athletics. He also taught courses in athletic administration, public relations, sports history and sports sociology. Logue earned undergraduate degrees in psychology and political science at Westminster College in Missouri and a graduate degree in athletic administration from the United States Sports Academy in Daphne, Alabama. To assist in his professional development, Logue has held membership in the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics, the National Association of Division III Athletic Administrators, the College Sports Information Directors of America and the National Association of Sports Public Address Announcers.

“I have always been proud to be a graduate of Missouri Military Academy and for some time I’ve wanted to return in some capacity,” Logue said. “It is an honor to be able to return and be a part of the team which will provide others the opportunity to receive the quality education I received.” DIRECTOR OF CADET LIFE RIK THORNTON Director of Cadet Life and Royal Marines Commando (Ret.) WO2 Richard “Rik” Thornton facilitated the adoption of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award upon joining the MMA ranks in April. Thornton previously served as commandant of cadets, command sergeant major, training officer and tactical officer at Valley Forge Military Academy

and College. He holds a bachelor’s degree in military training and science from Indiana University and a long list of professional licenses and certifications in first aid, SCUBA instruction and survival tactics. In his spare time, Thornton is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sailing, running, cycling and shooting. Thornton has participated in traithlons, skydiving, cross country and Alpine skiing and has climbed the Matterhorn, Mont Blanc, Mt. Kilimanjaro and the foothills of Mt. Everest. “Rik brings an impressive knowledge of and enthusiasm for engaging young people in exciting, challenging activities,” said MMA President Charles McGeorge. text courtesy of THE EAGLE


DEPARTMENT CHAIR KHANAL LEADS MMA CADETS TO MATHEMATICS SUCCESS MMA CADETS PLACE IN TOP TEN OUT OF 800 STUDENTS Math department chair MAJ Ananta Khanal accompanied five students to the Excellence in Math competition in St. Louis on November 10. Blake Bibles ’13, Nischal Khanal ’13, John Benjamin Mertens ’13 and Yu Zhou ’13 joined forces to receive a team score of fifth place. In individual competition, Khanal placed fifth and Zhou placed ninth in the senior division. More than 800 students from 45 Missouri high schools competed. The 2012 event marked the fourth year Missouri Military Academy cadets have competed. “Each year our students have placed in the top ten in both

individual and team events,” Khanal said. “It was a challenging competition but our students represented the school very well.” MMA cadets again competed to prove their mathematical skill in a second competition this school year. Brais Galvan Sotelo ’15 and Zhou topped the charts on The American Mathematics Competition exam in March. According to Ananta, this is the fourth year in which MMA cadets participated — 15 students competed in the 2013 contest. MATH BAR RECIPIENTS MAJ Khanal presented math bars to Channing Carlson ’19, John Dillon ’13, Galvan, Jose Garcia Puerta ’13, David Gu ’16, Yun Il Jeon ’16, Nischal Khanal ’13, Nishan Khanal ’16, Juan

Leal ’18, Yanni Le ’19, Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez ’17, Eoghan Matthews ’13, Mertens, John O’Leary ’13, Chase Osborne ’16, Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17, Jacob Priester ’14, Paolo Rosado ’14, Santiago Sada ’18, Sandir de Silva ’16 and Guangning Wei ’15. MMA’S FIRST-EVER NATIONAL MERIT SEMIFINALIST Mexico resident Ananta and his wife Indira are the proud parents of two exceptional MMA cadets — freshman Nishan and senior Nischal. Nischal received a perfect score of 800 on the SAT physics test. He also boasts a perfect score on the Math 2 subject test, which he took in October 2012 as an MMA junior.

LEFT: Excellence in Math winners John Benjamin Mertens ’13, Yu Zhou ’13, Nischal Khanal ’13 and Blake Bibles ’13 pose with MAJ Ananta Khanal on November 27. RIGHT: Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17 completes a math assignment in CPT John Noel’s class November 1.

For the first time in Missouri Military Academy history, a cadet was named a National Merit Scholarship Corporation semifinalist. Nischal scored in the top one-third of 50,000 high scorers across the nation and was named one of 15,000 high school student semifinalists in September 2012.

Nischal qualified as a semifinalist candidate by scoring in the top 1 percent nationwide on the PSAT National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. The pool of semifinalists represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors and includes the highestscoring entrants in each state. Based on his accomplishments, abilities and academic record, Khanal was one of only 8,300 finalists who received an $8,000 National Merit Scholarship in spring 2013. Judges selected Nischal after evaluating his standardized test scores, school involvement and personal essay.

Nischal earned a total of $1,189,948 in scholarships from more than a dozen institutions. He accepted an offer of $242,000 from Washington University in St. Louis and an additional $3,500 scholarship to attend the WU summer program. Nischal received a perfect score of 5 on the AP physics, biology, calculus and macroeconomics exams in his junior year. According to LTC Frank Giuseffi, this is the first time in MMA history that a cadet has earned so many perfect scores on Advanced Placement tests.

Nischal earned both National AP Scholar and AP Scholar with Distinction awards in July 2012. Only 20 percent of 2.1 million students worldwide who take AP Exams earn these honors. YOUNGEST KHANAL SON SHOWS OFF HIS SMARTS Nishan scored in the 98th percentile of high school students on the PLAN test, an exam offered to underclassmen as practice for the ACT. Nishan scored in the 99th percentile on the math section of the exam, the highest MMA portion score of

the school year. Nishan also took the PSAT exam in October and received notice of a score in the 92nd percentile in December. Nishan received his impressive SAT scores in May. The freshman scored in the 83rd percentile in critical reading and the 86th in writing. Nishan scored a perfect 800 on the math portion of the exam ­— the same mark his brother reached. Nishan earned the plaque for the Highest Scholarship in the Freshman Class during commencement. text courtesy of THE EAGLE


HIGHLIGHTS

MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE FAIR Middle school science teacher LTC Willis Kleinsorge honored cadets at the annual MMA Middle School Science Fair during Spring Family Weekend from April 19-21. The eighth grade and first place overall winner was “Getting a Bang out of Breath Spray” by Eugenio Barrera Martinez and Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina. “Producing Hydrogen Gas” by Juan Hernandez Antillon, Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez and Antonio Montes Gutierrez; “Dancing Fire” by Daniel Perez Bracamontes and Ricardo Salido Vives; and TaJae Blue’s “Thermal Insulation” tied for second place overall and second place in the eighth grade competition. Third place in eighth grade competition went to “The Color of Flames” by Sean Fitzgerald, Yiheng Hu, Julien Ngonga Mugabo and Tan Photsavat Pongsuea. “Elephant Toothpaste” by Jorge Aduna Leon, Raul Escarcega Martinez and Sergio Mayer Mori won an honorable mention. Multiple group projects also tied for the seventh grade competition title. “Smoking”

by Santiago Sada and Ivan Salinas tied for first place with “The Glowing Penny” by Juan Guerra Gonzalez and Juan Leal. Second place medals went to Jean-Luc Shyaka’s “Which Popcorn Brand Pops The Best?” and “The Fire Tornado” by Charles Norman and Mason Scott. Third place went to Samer Doumit and Juan Gonzalez Luna Escoto’s “Nail Bed.” Pablo Garza-Rios-Blanco’s “The First Turbine Ever Made” won first place in the sixth grade competition. Second place went to Yanni Le’s “Colored Milk” and Chandler Bolinger and Braulio Garcia’s “The Big Volcano.” FOREIGN LANGUAGE Seven MMA cadets, who hail from different countries across the globe, participated in an international panel discussion at Mexico High School in late January. Students educated their peers about the global culture and background of their home nations. They also shared opinions about the United States formed during their individual study abroad experiences. Francisco De Llano Crowley ’13, Alexander

Kolyasnikov ’13, NingYong Qin ’13, Yun Il Jeon ’16, Julien Ngonga Mugabo ’17 and Khas-Ochir Sod-Erdene ’14 spoke about countries including Mexico, Russia, China, South Korea, Rwanda and Mongolia. Chinese instructor Jackie Li, Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi and science instructor LTC Willis Kleinsorge accompanied 19 students to the sixth annual Dumpling Festival hosted by the Columbia Friends of China. The cultural celebration was open to the public and held at the Forum Christian Church in Columbia. More than 250 guests joined the MMA group for the holiday celebration in late October. International students were treated to authentic meat and vegetable dishes, homemade dumplings and Chinese bread. Guests participated in raffles and shopped for Chinese jewelry. Cadets chatted with teachers and students from the Confucius Institute at the University of Missouri. Three MMA cadets from Mongolia were surprised by a pastor from a local church who spoke to them in their native language. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Sylvia Mansfield Memorial Award and stipend, presented to ESL students who have demonstrated great improvement in English JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17, EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13 and ORLANDO FARIAS ’16 Eugene Lamm Memorial Award, presented to the most improved ESL cadet GUANGNING WEI ’15 Senator Thomas F. Eagleton Plaque for Excellence in Senior English JOHN DILLON Senator Thomas F. Eagleton Plaque for Excellence in Junior English DALLAS LOPEZ Major William Bryan Essay Medal, presented for excellence in writing EOGHAN MATTHEWS ’13 Art Achievement Award PAOLO ROSADO ’14 and JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18 Creative Art Award JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16 and OMAR SANCHEZ IBARRA ’16 Jack Meyers Memorial Cup for Most Creative Cadet JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS ’13

TOP RIGHT: TaJae Blue ’17 delivers his speech “Standing Up for the Future” at the Wallace Fry competition May 23. ERIN CHAMBERS LEFT: Seventh grade science fair winners pose for a picture with Middle School Science Instructor LTC Willis Kleinsorge. BOTTOM RIGHT: The Atrium is decorated for a Chinese New Year celebration meal February 11.


VISUAL ART RIBBON KANE ANDERSON ’15, FERNANDO BLANCO GONZALEZ ’15, VINCENT BURKE ’15, HUNTER BUSH ’16, FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO ’13, JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16, JOSE GARCIA ’15, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS ’13, FRANCISCO MORALES ’13, FELIX PAZ VALDEZ ’15, PAOLO ROSADO ’14, KHAS-OCHIR SOD-ERDENE ’14, RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR ’15, HANG ZHANG ’15

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CLASS? Art because it teaches us the different ways of drawing with different things [like] pencil, collage and ink. EDMOND BIRUTA ’15

ART RIBBON JUAN AGUIRRE GONZALEZ ’16, BYRON AMIDON ’16, KANE ANDERSON ’15, BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI ’15, EDMOND BIRUTA ’15, FERNANDO BLANCO GONZALEZ ’15, JOSE BOURS MURRIETA ’14, VINCENT BURKE ’15, HUNTER BUSH ’16, JOSE CARRILLO NORIEGA ’14, MICHAEL COURTE ’16, FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO ’13, SEBASTIAN DIAZ ’14, CLAYTON EBERT ’17, EMILIO ELIAS VIDAURRI ’16, JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16, HAYDEN FAIRBANKS ’14, ORLANDO FARIAS ’16, JUAN RAMON FLORES TENORIO ’15, JOSE GARCIA ’15, JOSE GARCIA PUERTA ’13, VICTOR GOMEZ RAMIREZ ’15, ROGER GONZALEZ ’15, JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18, HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ ’15, OSCAR GUTIERREZ ’13, BLAKE GORMAN ’13, QUENTIN HEASLER ’16, XINSHUAI HU ’14, OMAR SANCHEZ IBARRA ’16, BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14, JONATHAN KIRKLAND ’16, JOHN KOHM ’16, QI LI ’15, ENKHBILEGT LUVSANDORJ ’16, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS ’13, FRANCISCO MORALES ’13, EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16, CHARLES NORMAN ’18, PEDRO ONIEVA ’14, RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’13, RODRIGO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’15, FELIX PAZ VALDEZ ’15, NINGYONG QIN ’13, JONATHAN RICHARDSON ’15, PAOLO ROSADO ’14, SERGIO SALAS ROJO ’15, IVAN SALINAS ’18, ADAM SCHMITZ ’15, KHAS-OCHIR SODERDENE ’14, DASHENG SUN ’14, PEDRO TINOCO ’16, RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR ’15, CHEN WANG ’15, WEIHANG GAO ’15, OLIVER WORTHINGTON ’16, JIAHAO WU ’15, ANDRES ZAMORA VILLALPANDO ’16, HANG ZHANG ’15

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ENGLISH The 81st annual W. Wallace Fry, Jr. public speaking contest took place May 23. The Wallace Fry Speaking Award is given to the cadet whose speech is judged to be the best on the basis of delivery, content and depth of thought. Competitors were TaJae Blue ’17, whose speech was entitled “Standing Up for the Future”; Adam Schmitz ’15, whose speech was entitled “Is the World Really What We Think It Is?”; Kyle Mertens ’16, whose speech was entitled “A Pirate’s Life for Me”; Jon Johnston ’14, whose speech was entitled “Fighting Back: Developing Support Systems to Combat Gang Culture”; and Ethan Rachell ’13, whose speech was entitled “Suffering Adolescence: Addressing the Child Poverty Issue in the United States.” Following the presentation of the speeches and a short deliberation

period, judges selected Johnston the recipient of the 2013 Wallace Fry Speaking Award Cup. Blue became the first middle schooler to earn The Winston Churchill Memorial Award, which is presented for speaking on behalf of a just cause. MMA cadets Sean Fitzgerald ’17, Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina ’17 and four other area students took a limo ride April 19 to the Mexico Veterans Home to deliver speeches. Competitors composed essays based on the prompt “what veterans mean to me.” Winners of the second annual Veterans Day essay contest, sponsored by The Mexico Elks Lodge, were announced April 16. Two eighth graders each from Mexico Middle School, St. Brendan’s and MMA received medals and were invited to present their speeches to area veterans. VISUAL ARTS Students showcased their artwork in the Vault Gallery on January 10.

Cadet artwork was again displayed February 5 at the Missouri Military Academy Painting Exhibition at the Chamber of Commerce’s Vault Gallery. First-year art teacher LT Christopher Bain organized the free event, which was open to the public and featured live music. Several student pieces were sold. Talented MMA cadets were recognized at the Festival of the Arts on April 20 and 21, an annual showcase of student achievements in visual and performing arts. The Epple Memorial Art show took place in the Charlie Company barracks and featured photos, paintings, pencil drawings and other media. Pieces were available for sale, with the proceeds benefiting student artists and the MMA visual art program. text courtesy of KXEO, CHRISTINE SMITH and THE EAGLE

LEFT: Jose Estrada Pinon ’16 shows off his doodle. RIGHT: Pieces by Paolo Rosado ’14, Jose Estrada Pinon ’16 and Felix Paz Valdez ’15 are on display April 20 at the Festival of the Arts.


William Moore ’18 and Charles Norman ’18 exit the middle school building.


MMA SUMMER CAMPS

NEW ERA SUMMER ACADEMY Students spent four weeks studying — and SCUBA diving, riding horses, lifting weights and building robots — at Missouri Military Academy’s New ERA summer school program. Registration began June 24 as the majority of the 50-plus campers from seventh to twelfth grade moved into Bravo barracks for the duration of camp.

“I go to public school, so this is really different. But I like it,” summer student Ross Nigro said. Summer school trips included a group adventure to Big Surf Water Park, a visit to the St. Louis Zoo and a biology class trek to the Runge Nature Center for a day dedicated to learning about local plants and wildlife. MMA also offered a diving class for the first time, taught by certified SCUBA instructor

Mitch Moffitt ’82. Students responded with enthusiasm, so the program was also offered as a fall semester extracurricular club. Spain native Brais Galvan Sotelo ’15, winner of the summer Academic Excellence Award, traveled overseas to enroll in the robotics course. Galvan Sotelo said he chose to go to school to learn something instead of wasting his summer being bored.

LEFT: Hugh Harris ’15 studies June 25 during Summer Academy 2013. ERIN CHAMBERS RIGHT: Summer school students learn to navigate and read maps July 12 at the 2012 Leadership Camp. Students in the robotics class traveled to Kansas City on June 26 with instructors Mark Murphy and CPT Keith Morgan for the 48th annual SkillsUSA National Leadership Conference. The event showcased innovation in dozens of industries and college competition in electronics, computer-aided drafting, precision machining, medical assistance and culinary art.

According to MAJ Michael Pemberton, continuing education into the summer gives students an advantage against their peers. “Every day is equivalent to about a week of school, so there’s no downtime,” Pemberton said. “The student really has to get in class, focus on their studies and get out as much as they can get out for that entire day.”

New ERA students spent their evenings outside in athletic events including football, swimming, soccer and basketball. According to Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi, presenting children with outlets for physical activity is just as important as traditional education. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


LEFT: Summer Leadership Camp cadets ride a zip line and complete a ropes course at Meramec Adventure Learning Ranch in Steelville, Missouri on July 14, 2012. Text courtesy of THE EAGLE, ERIN CHAMBERS and KOMU CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE “They’re still learning great things — teamwork, fair play [and] competition,” Giuseffi said. “New ERA can keep kids focused on their schoolwork, even over the summer. It allows them to get a head start on their fall classes and be ready to go when they head back to school.”

JROTC CADET LEADERSHIP CAMP Fifteen MMA and first-year Mexico High School JROTC cadets accompanied instructors SGM Henry Suddarth, 1SG Alan Hakes and 1SG Randy Jacobson for a ten-day camp in June 2012 at Wentworth Military Academy. Cadets participated in teamwork activities including Army exercises, camping, rappelling and swimming.

SUMMER LEADERSHIP CAMP More than 50 cadets pushed themselves to the limit, displaying self-confidence and determination at MMA’s two-week 2012 Summer Leadership Camp. Three competing platoons under the direction of camp counselors faced off in military exercises and fitness challenges. Summer cadets participated in daily physical training including obstacle courses, rappelling,

RIGHT: Derek Ryan ’15 and fellow members of the 2013 Summer Leadership Camp First Platoon complete a cross-country ski teambuilding challenge in the Field House on July 9. kickball, rifle marksmanship, canoeing, swimming, knot tying, tug-of-war, first aid certification and map reading in the woods on MMA’s 288-acre campus. “I made so many friends and had so many fun experiences,” cadet Joseph Phelan said. “This camp has changed me as a person.” “I actually miss MMA a lot,” cadet Whitten Hardy said. His favorite activities were

paintball, swimming and physical training. “I really want to go back and have even more fun and meet more people.” At the end of the summer, President Charles McGeorge and LTC Greg Seibert commended Jacob Priester ’14 for his performance. “Jacob is so excited that he is enrolled in MMA for his junior year,” Joyce Priester Smith, Jacob’s mother, said.

A few weeks after the conclusion of the 2012 event, Summer Leadership Camp received American Camping Association accreditation. Camp Director Seibert said the honor was bestowed based on transportation, medical and nutritional requirements. “We hope this certification brings very talented and adventurous students to our camps each year,” Seibert said.


RIGHT: Brennan Darnall ’14 chows down with his family during the opening picnic August 25.

FRIENDLY COMPANIES BATTLE FOR BRAGGING RIGHTS AT OPENING GAMES, CADET CHALLENGES AND ARMY DAYS OPENING GAMES Faculty, families, staff and cadets convened for the annual start-of-term picnic August 25. Cadets chowed down on barbecue hamburgers and bratwurst, a feast followed by fierce company competition in the traditional Missouri Military Academy “Opening Games.” Students stood atop the bleachers in company groups for the first contest — the Enthusiasm Competition. Cadets cheered their company names as loud as they could muster to show their Colonel pride. LTC Greg Seibert declared Echo Company, conducted by Company Commander Diego Salinas Estrada ’13, the winner. The boys next ran a laundry bag relay race followed by fireman’s carry races, carpet square relays and a tug-of-war contest. Echo

added more first place honors to its winning streak. In the “dizzy izzy” relay, disoriented cadets spun in circles around a stationary baseball bat before racing across the field. Bravo proved the most coordinated and beat out Echo. In the cross country ski competition, small groups of students stood on lengths of wood as if skiing. Frustrated cadets attempted to coordinate their movements so as to move fluidly — the game tested patience and perseverance as several companies fell over repeatedly and had to begin again. Echo Company earned yet another victory. To wrap up the games, the Corps competed in one final contest judged by MAJ Mike Shoemaker — singing “Old MMA.” “The enthusiasm was excellent, but the singing quality needed a great deal of

improvement,” Shoemaker said. “Charlie Company was the best of the bunch.” Echo Company earned a hard-fought first place in the 2012 Opening Games. “Our enthusiasm and desire to have fun led us to victory,” Jack Solls ’14 said of Echo’s efforts. CADET CHALLENGES Students test their flexibility, cardio strength and endurance every year during two biannual Cadet Challenge events. Individual physical fitness activities include measured sit-reach stretches, sit-ups, pull-ups and laps around the track in the mile and 25-meter runs. Faculty and staff recorded results to measure upper body strength, lower body strength, speed and agility CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

2012-13 GOLD STAR RECIPIENTS BRAVO COMPANY MUNKHBOLD BATMUNKH ’15, JOSHUA BLOOTHOOFD ’15, GATES BURCHFIELD ’14, PUREVSUREN BYAMBATSEREN ’15, AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14, EMILIO ELIAS VIDAURRI ’16, ALBERTO ELIZONDO CARRANZA ’18, HAYDEN FAIRBANKS ’14, JUAN RAMON FLORES TENORIO ’15, JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18, OSCAR GONZALEZ SCHIEFENBUSCH ’14, YANNI LE ’19, VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15, ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17, WILLIAM MOORE ’18, SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA ’14, STEVEN PRINSTER ’15, CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA ’17, JON SNYDER ’16, GABRIEL SUMMERS ’16 CHARLIE COMPANY JUAN AGUIRRE GONZALEZ ’16, BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI ’15, EUGENIO BARRERA MARTINEZ ’17, DONALD CANARD ’15,

SANDIR DE SILVA ’16, ORLANDO FARIAS ’16, BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO ’15, BRAULIO GARCIA ’19, EDUARDO GONZALEZ LUNA FLORES ’16, HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ ’15, JUAN GUERRA GONZALEZ ’18, JUAN LEAL ’18, FERNANDO LOPEZ CHUMACERO ’14, ALAN LOQUAY RAMSAUER ’16, MARK MCKEE ’15, IVAN QUIROZ ESPINO ’14, SANTIAGO SADA ’18, IVAN SALINAS ’18, OMAR SANCHEZ IBARRA ’16, EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13, GUANGNING WEI ’15, OLIVER WORTHINGTON ’16 DELTA COMPANY SEAN ATAMIAN ’17, VINCENT BURKE ’15, HUNTER BUSH ’16, CHANNING CARLSON ’19, SAMER DOUMIT ’18, PABLO GARZA-RIOS-BLANCO ’19, ROGER GONZALEZ ’15, SKY HENIO ’19, PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ ’13, JAVIER MALPICA PALMEROS ’14,

EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16, DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17, JOSE REDING ORTIZ ’15, ANDRES ROSADO ’14, DEREK RYAN ’15, RICARDO SALIDO VIVES ’17, FRANCISCO SILLER ’18, COREY TRENT ’14, JIAHAO WU ’15 ECHO COMPANY SEBASTIAN DIAZ ’14, FERNANDO ESTRADA PINON ’14, DANIEL GARCIA ’14, EDWARD GBEMUDU ’17, JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17, BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14, JINWOOK JUNG ’15, RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’17, CARLOS MATEOS MIRANDA ’15, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, RODRIGO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’15, DANIEL PARES GARZON ’16, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, MIGUEL QUIJANO ’18, JONATHAN RICHARDSON ’15, PAOLO ROSADO ’14, SERGIO SALAS ROJO ’15, RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR ’15, CONNOR WILKINSON ’14, ANDRES ZAMORA VILLALPANDO ’16


Best Athletic Record BRAVO Highest Scholastic Standing BRAVO Highest Disciplinary Standing BRAVO Highest Military Standing BRAVO Honor Company BRAVO Best Company Spirit CHARLIE Best Drilled Company ECHO

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE for comparison against national averages. According to SGM Henry Suddarth, one cadet earned the Presidential Physical Fitness Award in November and was exempt from participating in the second Cadet

Challenge in May. The Presidential Physical Fitness Award is bestowed upon those who achieve 85th percentile ranking or better in every event. The ten students who earned 55th percentile scores or better in all five categories were awarded the National Fitness Award.

ARMY DAYS Companies completed an obstacle course, inched along rope bridges, raced down a gravel road and climbed a rope to the top of the Field House on April 4 during the annual traditional Army Day competition — all in pursuit of the coveted Golden Boot Award.

BOTTOM LEFT: Francisco Morales ’13 passionately conducts Bravo as they sing Old MMA at the Opening Games. TOP LEFT: Cadets compete November 30 in a mile run competition during the first of two Cadet Challenges. RIGHT: Lucas Moore ’18 receives a piggy back ride from Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez ’17 during the Opening Games.

“I enjoyed tug-of-war and how nice the weather was,” Juan Hernandez Antillon ’17 said. “We all had a fun time ... but it was really hard.” Army Days began with a physical training test at 5:30 a.m. Companies then gathered in the Centennial Gymtorium following

breakfast for an event briefing. Buses brought students to the starting line of a three-mile road march. Cadets broke into companies and raced to the finish line before competing in rope bridge crossing, litter relays, giant tire flips, cross-country ski relays, tug-of-war, pugil stick battles

and leadership challenges. Echo Company triumphed against 2012 winner Delta to earn the 2013 title with a score of 857 out of a possible 1,000 points. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and SGM HENRY SUDDARTH


Home is where the heart is — according to nearly 200 MMA alumni, from as far back as the 1940s and as far away as Thailand, who returned to campus for Missouri Military Academy’s annual homecoming celebration September 28-30. FRIDAY About 15 alums kicked off the weekend Friday with a scramble golf tournament and luncheon hosted by MMA on September 28. Families, faculty, staff, administrators and Mexico community members converged on campus as the competition continued that afternoon. A handful of alums challenged the varsity soccer team and fell 2-4 in a hard-fought battle. After a busy afternoon of athletics, students treated guests to a special homecoming review on Colonels Field. First-year MMA President Charles McGeorge and outgoing Alumni Association President David Telford ’65 invited alumni to join them in trooping the line. Alums then presented the Class of 2013 with their senior rings before ending the day with some socializing at the alumni BBQ at the Mexico Country Club. SATURDAY The day began with the fifth annual donor breakfast at Barnard Hall. After a progress update, McGeorge presented awards to generous contributors. The celebration continued on Colonels Field with a dress parade and alumni drilldown challenging former cadets to remember the rules from their school days. Paul Petit ’85 proved victorious in the contest, which was judged by Executive Officer LTC Jim Medley. The top ten alums then faced the ten best current cadets in a sweepstakes drill. Carlos Anda ’95 took home the trophy.

Guests then gathered in the Gymtorium for the alumni convocation and State of the Academy address. Administrators presented the LTC Paul Gillette ’70 Distinguished Alumnus Award to George Cline ’46. Cline was the third graduate to receive the honor, which was established in 2010. The honor is bestowed upon an alumnus who boasts success in his professional career and has rendered exceptional service to his community and alma mater. Former MMA President and 1944 alumnus Charles R. Stribling, III and his wife Winnie were added to the ranks of the Legacy Society for their outstanding contributions. The 1889 Society also welcomed donors R. Stribling Koster and his wife Janie for their sustained and substantial contributions. Former and current cadets fell into formation and marched to noon mess in Barnard Hall, accompanied by the 2012-13 Fighting Colonels band and alumni musicians playing the trumpet and drums. Robert Ernest ’77, Jeff Kays ’84, Tom Reynolds ’61, Tom Mullen ’74, Todd Helm ’80, Jose Garcia ’81, President McGeorge, Dana Dabney ’69, Marco Scherer ’94 and Jeff Nedblake ’77 hosted the alumni luncheon. HALFTIME Following lunch, the MMA community held a pep rally as the Fighting Colonels faced off against Kansas City’s Central High School for the homecoming football game. Alumni Relations/Annual Fund Manager Terry Logue ’72 took the field at halftime to announce the winner of the barracks decorating contest as chosen by an alumni wives judging committee. Bravo chose a “Fallen but not Forgotten” theme to memorialize 2003 alumnus and Army Specialist Christopher D. Horton who died

on September 9, 2011. Delta and Echo themes depicted the Colonel mascot roasting a Kansas City Central eagle. Charlie cadets chose a “Tradition Never Graduates” theme including banners, balloons and a piñata. Charlie won the competition for the second year in a row. Logue and outgoing Alumni Association President Telford announced the MMA Hall of Fame induction of the undefeated state runner-up 1992 MMA tennis team under Coach Walt Diehl. “This was my first homecoming as an employee of MMA,” Logue said. “As we move forward, I hope to initiate positive changes in the schedule and see an increase in the number of alumni returning.” Saturday concluded with a dinner and dance at the Mexico Elks Lodge. Telford installed Jesus Soriano ’82 as the 2012-13 president of the alumni association. Representatives of the Class of 1992, which raised the most funds during homecoming, proudly accepted the Class of ’55 plaque for attendance and philanthropy. SUNDAY Homecoming celebrations continued with a special battalion review and Railsplitters re-enactment performance at the Audrain County Historical Society’s Walk Back in Time event. The festival featured actors portraying American historical figures in period costumes from as far back as the 1770s. Back at the Chapel, Tom Reynolds ’61 spoke at the evening Vespers service and concluded the homecoming celebrations. text courtesy of CHRISTINE SMITH and THE EAGLE Pablo Garza-Rios-Blanco ’19 and Braulio Garcia ’19 test antique weapons at the Walk Back in Time festival during the homecoming celebration September 30.


TOP RIGHT: Alumni compete to determine the drilldown competition winner September 29. BOTTOM RIGHT: Battalion Commander and Salutatorian John Dillon ’13 displays his class ring. BOTTOM LEFT: A group of alums visiting for homecoming poses for a picture on the Colonels Field bleachers September 28. TOP LEFT: Blake Bibles ’13 receives his class ring from his mother September 28 at a ceremony on Colonels Field.


FAR RIGHT: Alberto Elizondo Carranza ’18 enjoys a picnic lunch with his family in the Field House on October 13.

WHY IS FALL FAMILY WEEKEND IMPORTANT?

MIDDLE: Alec Noonan ’13 salutes during the passing through ceremony on the front lawn October 13.

Fall family weekend is ... the most important event for the cadets, the parents and the faculty. The faculty wants to show the parents that their sons have changed in [some] way — academically, in sports, leadership, maturity and respect for superiors. The first months of the school year it is very hard to adapt to the school system. If the cadet gets the opportunity to see his parents it creates an incentive to be motivated. Parents can see their sons for the first time marching as military personnel.

TOP LEFT: Richard Massey-Scott ’13 and his partner slow dance at the military ball on October 13. BOTTOM LEFT: Cadets shake hands with President Charles McGeorge, LTC Jim Medley, LTC Frank Giuseffi, MAJ Richards Boyce, Greg Seibert and Battalion Commander John Dillon ’13 during the passing through ceremony October 14.

JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO ’13

FALL FAMILY WEEKEND Parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters and friends of MMA cadets arrived on Friday, October 13 for the annual Fall Family Weekend celebration. Many families spent the afternoon in parentteacher conferences to check on their cadet’s academic performance. Friday’s festivities ended with a Fighting Colonels varsity football game against Lutheran St. Charles.

Saturday morning brought a second round of parent-teacher conferences. The senior class hosted a pancake breakfast in the mess hall, with proceeds benefiting the senior class project. The Academy then honored new cadets, or “recruits,” with a “passing through” ceremony on the front campus lawn. Recruits were formally admitted as full members of the 124th Corps of Cadets after completing

their training period. Each new cadet received a gold star and shook hands with President Charles McGeorge, Executive Officer LTC Jim Medley, Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi, Middle School Principal MAJ Richards Boyce, Commandant of Cadets LTC Greg Seibert and Battalion Commander John Dillon ’13. Families witnessed their sons’ transformations at the battalion review in the Field House. Faculty and staff presented

cadets with monthly GPAs above 3.7 with Academic Fourragere. McGeorge, Giuseffi and Boyce invited cadet fathers and grandfathers to join them in trooping the line. Parents left the Field House and headed to the Centennial Gymtorium for the Parents Convocation and Academic Update. MMA alumnus Anthony Wurl ‘09 delivered a

recent graduate’s perspective about the influence of an MMA education on his college career. Director of College Placement LTC Tim Scherrer delivered a college preparation presentation and McGeorge gave a State of the Academy address. Students and families shared a picnic lunch together before the Fighting Colonels soccer team took the field against Kirksville, winning 3-1 despite a rain delay.

Cadets, dates and families danced the night away at a military ball at the end of the evening. Students spent Sunday with their parents and families, returning to campus in time to hear guest speaker and MMA parent Paul Petit ’85 at Vespers that night in the Memorial Chapel. text courtesy of THE EAGLE


BOARD MEMBERS: Chairperson CINDY DILLON Treasurer KATIE MYERS RANDAL and PAT CARDOTT DONITA RACHELL LAUREN MABBS LORI and SHAWN JONES SHANNON MERTENS ACTIVE MEMBERS: PAMELA MARSHALL LINDA ANGEL HONORARY MEMBERS: CAROLINE CARNAHAN RICK GUTH ’65 PAUL PETIT ’85 TRACY BELTON CHU WOOLERY

BOTTOM: Students prepare to chug a green goo mixture during a Parents Committee Halloween competition October 27. JACOB TAYLOR ’13 TOP: Parents attend the Mother’s Day tea party in Barnard Hall on April 20.

From barbecues to birthday cards and holiday lunches to Halloween costume contests, the Missouri Military Academy Parents Committee proved moms and dads still know how to party. Committee members manned stocking stuffing assembly lines, donated thousands of dollars to Academy activities and thanked faculty and staff with gifts and coffee. Sponsoring more than 15 events throughout the school year, Parents Committee members kept cadets happy with cookies, Chinese food, Mexican fiestas and a steady supply of care packages. Event organizers focused on Facebook this year, boosting club awareness, increasing fundraising proceeds and keeping international families connected through social media. “The cadets are from all over the world,” Parents Committee Liaison Cassandra Brooks said. “[The Committee] allows parents, as well as past parents, grandparents, staff and friends, the opportunity to share information that will keep everyone connected. ... They feel like they are a part of the everyday things that the cadets are involved in.” FIRST SEMESTER Committee Chairperson Cindy Dillon kicked off the 2012-13 school year with a Parents Committee meeting of more than 50 members in Barnard Hall during homecoming September 28. Parents held a second project and planning meeting in the library the following morning. “The Parents Committee is here to help provide fun and a social outlet to our cadets,” Dillon said. “We sponsor parties, Christmas activities, staff appreciation treats and other surprises along the way.” According to Dillon, the first semester is always the busiest for parents. The Committee provided cadets with a surprise supply of milk and cookies prior to exam week in mid-November, bringing a boost of energy to study sessions. Parents Committee members

also arranged a Halloween celebration including decoration drives and a costume contest in late October. Competitions and relays kept cadets

[The Committee] allows parents, as well as past parents, grandparents, staff and friends, the opportunity to share information that will keep everyone connected. ... They feel like they are a part of the everyday things that the cadets are involved in. CASSANDRA BROOKS Parents Committee Liaison

entertained with chicken’s feet, crickets, frogs and rubber “zombie hands.” Parents Committee members also make an effort to recognize faculty and staff contributions. The Committee hosted a coffee break with refreshments and signed cards for every employee, which Brooks distributes on staff member birthdays. Thanks to Tom and Leslie Teague, faculty and staff members returned from Thanksgiving break to find poinsettia plants on their desks. As part of a new Parents Committee fundraising initiative, members assembled and delivered care packages called Thinking of You (TOY) boxes full of treats every month of the school year. Lori Jones, Mexico High School JROTC cadets and 1SG Alan Hakes helped stuff TOY boxes with seasonal items, snacks and drinks for every MMA student in December and May — brightening up an otherwise stressful finals week. Brooks maintained a system for family members to purchase TOY boxes on an individual basis at a rate of $10 per month. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE “Several of our faculty and staff signed up to sponsor kids whose parents didn’t purchase them,” Brooks said. “The boxes cost around $5 to make and the Parents Committee uses the extra money raised to sponsor other events for the cadets.” All cadets also received a holiday-themed TOY box in December. According to Dillon, the Parents Committee traditionally provides barracks holiday parties, stockings and a visit by St. Nicholas during the month of December. Students awoke to a surprise December 6 — gifts outside their dormitory doors donated by Committee representatives Tracy Belton and Joy Taylor. Mentors lent St. Nick a helping hand in the middle of the night by delivering chocolate Santas, candy canes and scrolls explaining the holiday legend to each cadet. Paul and Veronica Petit donated oversized stockings of Mexican candy for each company to help make foreign students feel at home for the holidays. Local parents and grandparents spent a full day in the Barnard Hall conference room December 18 stuffing stockings and holiday hats for cadets, faculty and staff with gingerbread men, rubber duckies, candy, bubbles, ornaments, stress balls and Slinkies. Goodies were distributed at lunch December 20. SECOND SEMESTER

TOP RIGHT: Parents Committee Liaison Cassandra Brooks puts the finishing touch on a pile of stockings distributed at the holiday party December 20. BOTTOM RIGHT: Parents Committee Chairperson Cindy Dillon receives a token of appreciation from MMA at the Mother’s Day tea party April 20. BOTTOM LEFT: Chinese zodiac place mats and chop sticks decorate the mess hall tables February 11 during the Parents Committee Chinese New Year celebration. TOP LEFT: A child snags a chocolate-covered strawberry snack at the Mother’s Day tea party April 20.

Parents Committee members met February 9 during Spring Family Weekend. Attendees planned second semester events and, according to Brooks, coordinated a $1,000 donation to support the junior class Valentine Ball. February’s TOY boxes included chips, soda, stuffed animals, toys and holiday candy. Parents Committee members arranged Super Bowl pizza parties in early February. Brooks said students were treated to a Chinese New Year celebration at lunchtime February 11 featuring paper lanterns, wind-up dragon toys, noisemakers and traditional Chinese coins. The special themed lunch included egg rolls, rice, sweet and sour chicken and noodles served over zodiac place mats and eaten with chop sticks. Parents gathered for a traditional Mother’s Day tea party in Barnard Hall during Spring Family Weekend — while wearing fancy, over-the-top hats. Mothers spent the morning of April 20 sipping from teacups and munching on fresh fruit, chocolate-covered strawberries, cakes and cookies.

The Committee celebrated Cinco de Mayo with a delivery of Mexican food including guacamole, salsa, beans, corn, queso and chips. MMA’s cooks and kitchen staff served the themed meal wearing smiles and sombreros. “The cadets and faculty enjoyed the Cinco de Mayo celebration at lunch,” MAJ Peggy Reynard said. “Thanks so much for the chips [and] salsa from Dos Arcos! That was the crowning touch!” The final Parents Committee event of the school year turned out to be, according to Brooks, the most fun. The Committee donated $1,000 to host an end-of-the year barbeque May 18. Cadet volunteers helped WO2 Rik Thornton and Hakes set up an inflatable bungee runner, dunk tank, UFO and bounce house. Committee members donated sunscreen and sports equipment to entertain cadets. Students held water gun battles and played whiffle ball and Frisbee,. “The kids loved the bungee runner,” Brooks said. “When we ran out of snow cone juice, the boys had a snowball fight.” John Dillon ’13 and Brooks’ daughter Mexico High School JROTC cadet Madeline Brooks dumped ice on Hakes. “I told him that it was his own fault for teaching them to run as fast as him in Raiders,” Brooks joked. According to Brooks, students continued smiling and laughing as cadets and Committee members packed up. She thanked Thornton, Hakes, the mentors, Michelle Ryan, Jackie Burke and GySGT Mark Tompkins for their help. Others spent countless hours preparing TOY boxes and planning events but, Brooks said, Dillon was ultimately the source of Parents Committee success throughout the school year. “She was, without a doubt, the reason that the Parents Committee was able to do so much,” Brooks said. “She was a fantastic president and an efficient leader.” Other Committee projects included coordinating the distribution of goody bags for SAT and ACT test-takers on four occasions and contributing to MMA’s Maroon & Gold fundraiser. Parents Committee members donated items to create several gift baskets which were auctioned to raise money for the school. “The main purpose of the Parents Committee is to support the kids, support the school and network,” Brooks said. “It takes a village.” text courtesy of ERIN CHAMBERS and CASSANDRA BROOKS


CADETS COMPETE IN COSTUME AND DORM DECORATION CONTESTS, SPOOKY RELAYS

Ghosts, ghouls, goblins and aliens invaded the Missouri Military Academy campus on October 27 during the Parents Committee Halloween celebration. Festivities featured relay races with chicken’s feet and toads, a bobbing for apples and gummy worms contest, a caterpillar and green smoothieeating challenge and a “torture chamber” where brave cadets withstood showers of creepy-crawlies like crickets and toads. Bravo barracks boasted tombstones, a caged ghoul and a larger-than-life ghost floating from the balcony. Eugenio Barrera Martinez ’17 won Bravo barracks first place with his Frankenstein monster costume. A blood-splattered zombie outfit earned Gates

Burchfield ’14 the second place title while Yanni Le ’19 earned third place with his mummy costume. Delta decorations followed an Area 51 theme with UFOs and aliens. A two-story ghost guarded the front door while two skeletons stood on the lawn. Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez ’13 dressed as a beer mug and carried a lifesize stuffed banana to earn Delta first prize. Quentin Heasler ’16 won second with a Santa outfit while Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17 dressed as a gorilla and carried a basket of bananas to earn third place. Echo cadets placed an inflatable black cat on the barracks roof and hung a giant inflatable

spider on the side of the building. Boys boarded up their windows, placed zombie silhouette posters behind the curtains and wrote a bloody warning on the front door. Students fenced off the long sidewalk leading to the dormitory with crime scene tape and scattered evidence of an undead bloodbath across their front lawn. Gavin Hendee ’15 painted his face yellow and donned heels and tall blue wig to imitate Marge Simpson and earn Echo first place. Second-place winner Jacob Phillips ’14 practiced his poses and wore a red wig, a velvet dress and a crown to play a beauty pageant contestant. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

BOTTOM LEFT: Costumed cadets pose October 27. TOP LEFT: Cadets roast a skeleton on a spigot during the decoration contest October 27. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE RIGHT: Cadets take a field trip to Shyrock’s Corn Maze on November 2. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Nicholas Vanatta ’13 earned third place for his 1960s-era hippie costume complete with a guitar, peace sign necklace, wig, blue jeans and vest. Charlie Company was crowned the barrack decoration contest champion. The winning display featured a werewolf and a guardian ghost and devil duo hanging from the barrack columns. A joker costume from The Dark Knight Rises movie earned Jonathan Kirkland ’16 the Charlie Company first prize. Jacob Conyers ’16 stole second place with his Luigi costume, followed by third-place winner Juan Aguirre Gonzalez ’16 who carried a flashlight and drew on fake facial hair to dress as MMA’s LT Brian Davis. The overall best costume award went to Hendee. Other cadet costumes included a handful of

zombies and ghostly jesters, a nun, President Barack Obama, an FBI agent, an alien, a superhero, a cowboy, a platypus, a hospital patient and several undead Army recruits. Faculty and staff members also joined the party. Davis donned a pig-monster mask while Thomas Roberts sported a fake butcher’s knife through his brain. LTC Willis Kleinsorge led a spooky nighttime field trip through an SEC-themed Shyrock Corn Maze on November 2. Kleinsorge chaperoned a group of cadets including Jorge Aduna Leon ’17, TaJae Blue ’17, Jose ’16 and Fernando Estrada Pinon ’14, Juan Hernandez Antillon ’17, Juan Leal ’18, Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17, Tan Photsavat Pongsuea ’17, Rodrigo ’17 and Victor Marroquin Gonzalez ’15 and Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina ’17. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and ERIN CHAMBERS

RIGHT: Clayton Ebert ’17 holds a chicken foot in his mouth during a relay race at the Parents Committee Halloween celebration October 27. JACOB TAYLOR ’13 LEFT: A tombstone warns Bravo barracks visitors to beware October 27.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO FUTURE MMA STUDENTS? It’s a great school that teaches you how to be a better citizen, leader and person. ORLANDO FARIAS ’16

Learn to manage your stress.

GABRIEL SUMMERS ’16

Stay focused and behave.

GUANGNING WEI ’15

Do not do stupid things.

CARLOS MATEOS MIRANDA ’15

Don’t get into trouble.

BRENNAN MORAND ’16

Enjoy the little things. JON JOHNSTON ’14

Stay focused every second.

YUN IL JEON ’16

IF YOU COULD HAVE ONE SUPER POWER, WHAT WOULD IT BE? WHY? Read minds, because I would be able to know the truth and expose it. ALAN LOQUAY RAMSAUER ’16 Teleportation. I could go anywhere I want. HANG ZHANG ’15

Teleportation. I would never be late and could go anywhere I wanted when I wanted. BRENNAN DARNALL ’14

Super speed, so I could save lives while serving in the Armed Forces. WILLIAM MOORE ’18

The power to control people’s minds. VINCENT BURKE ’15


LEFT: Robert Moore ’16 and Joshua John ’17 pose with a Veterans Day parade attendee in a clown costume November 11. RIGHT: Cadets hang flags in the Mexico town square November 8.

November 11 was Veterans Day — but cadets began volunteer work well in advance. A group of MMA students joined more than 200 athletes who participated in the second annual 5K/10K Wounded Warrior Project race through Columbia on November 4. The University of Missouri Army ROTC kicked off a Veterans week celebration with the early morning event, which raised more than $3,000 for veteran rehabilitation. More than a dozen students spent a November 8 serving Mexico at the Mobile Food Pantry with LTC Tim Scherrer.

“There was easily a line of 300 people needing food,” Scherrer said. “The cadets were helping them go through the line and transporting the food to their cars.” On the same afternoon, fifteen cadets accompanied 1SG Randy Jacobson and SGM Henry Suddarth to the Mexico town square to mount American flags on light posts. The entire Corps of Cadets attended the second annual joint Veterans Day assembly November 9 alongside the Mexico High School student body. The Fusiliers performed a drill routine and a formal flag folding

ceremony and Suddarth delivered the keynote address about the experiences of servicemen and women. The Railsplitters spent Veterans Day weekend representing MMA at a World War II re-enactment in Columbia. The Corps of Cadets conducted a battalion review at the Mexico Veterans Home on November 10 followed by a band and color guard march at the Veterans Day parade in suburban St. Louis on November 11. text courtesy of KXEO and THE EAGLE


BOTTOM LEFT: MAJ Brian Galarza poses with Santa Claus while admiring the barracks decorations on December 15. TOP LEFT: Jose Bours Murrieta ’14, Diego Martinez Blanco ’13 and Andres Garcia Almada ’13 pose in Barnard Hall during the holiday lunch party December 20. RIGHT: Pablo Garza-RiosBlanco ’19 stands outside in the snow December 20. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


BOTTOM RIGHT: Simon Barrera ’15 carries a festive cane on his last day at MMA before the winter furlough December 20. MMA faculty and staff and the Mexico community spent a week in mid-December voting to determine the winning company in the barracks holiday decoration contest. MMA Facebook fans “liked” their favorite album of photographs to cast votes online. Voting opened December 17. After one day of voting, Bravo held the lead. MAJ Peggy Reynard said the Bravo decorations “captured the true spirit of Christmas” with live ponies, a nativity scene and elaborately lighted columns. “I like Bravo’s decorations the best because they really did a great job at organizing the decorations and they represented the real meaning of Christmas,” Simon Barrera ’15 said. Charlie Company trailed closely behind Bravo in the polls. Cadets posted an animated, inflatable reindeer and a decorated holiday tree beside the barracks entrance. Strings of colored lights created an outline of a two-story Christmas tree on the side of the building. “Very creative and beautiful,” Reynard, who voted for Charlie Company, said of her favorite display. On December 19, with 24 hours left to vote, Charlie stood in first place with 88 likes. Echo held second with 77 likes, trailed by Bravo with 70 likes and Delta’s 52 likes. Echo Company cadets earned praise for their international flair and attention to diversity. An inflatable Christmas tree perched atop the roof while a teddy bear and Santa Claus decorated the yard. “I liked Echo Company’s diversity,” Jack Solls ’14 said. “They had a variety of signs with Merry Christmas written in different languages, as well as a menorah to acknowledge Hanukkah.”

About a dozen posters in multiple foreign languages were planted on the Echo lawn. Student signs wished readers Merry Christmas, Joyeux Noel and Feliz Navidad. Jewish students were encouraged to “put on your yamaka — it’s time for Hanukkah!” “[I] have to go with Echo because of their representation of other cultures,” Admissions Director Phillip Dunbridge said. Bravo’s Pedro Tinoco ’16 and Charlie Company cadets Austin Bohannon ’15 and Bruno Avataneo Truqui ’15 said they enjoyed Echo’s clever light placement. Avataneo praised the lighted path leading to the Echo barracks door while Bohannon admired the flashing light show synced to music. Tinoco noted the extravagant amount of lights and placement encircling the entire building. Delta decorations featured an inflatable dog and Santa Claus. Inside the barracks, two “giving trees” stood. The first tree was constructed of a stack of cans donated to the food pantry. Hats, gloves and scarves for donation to the homeless hung from the second tree. According to Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi, cars drove by campus every evening to admire the lights. “These barracks displays are absolutely wonderful. So much more time, commitment and work when into these decorations than went into ours in the ’70s,” alumnus Tom Mullen ’74 said. “The Alumni Corps are all very impressed. ... Thanks for making us proud!” Bravo Company boasted a final total of 126 likes and officially received the People’s Choice Award for Best Decorated Barracks. The Commandant’s staff named Echo the Best Decorated Barracks. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

TOP RIGHT: A holiday party attendee from the Missouri School for the Deaf plays with her new Polly Pocket toy December 18. LEFT: The Barnard Hall Christmas tree sports some athletic ornaments December 20.


A crowd of cadets admires the Bravo barracks light display December 15.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Cadets enjoyed company holiday parties hosted by the Parents Committee on December 15. Celebrations included live music, television, refreshments and themed games. Zhuoteng Ying ’14 said he enjoyed the holiday parties because it helped him battle homesickness. According to Solls, holiday parties are important because they serve as a source of stress relief and “homey” atmosphere. “The holiday party is a great opportunity to bring everybody together,” Solls said. “The holidays are meant to be spent with those who are close to you, and the holiday party helps to make that happen.” Jose Reding Ortiz ’15 relaxed and socialized at the Delta party. He appreciated the opportunity to spend time with company leadership in a friendly environment. “The whole company was at the rec room having fun eating and watching A Charlie Brown Christmas,” Reding Ortiz said. “[We all liked] laughing about stupid jokes, just having a good time and not worrying about anything.” Cadets hosted a Christmas party and dinner for a group of about ten young children and their families in the mess hall December 18.

According to LTC Jim Medley, MMA has partnered with the Missouri School for the Deaf for more than 15 years to organize the annual event. Members of the MMA band performed holiday songs alongside children who joined in on the tambourine and jingle bells. Cellist Jacob Taylor ’13 and guitarist Thomas Roberts also performed a duet. Santa Claus delivered gifts including Polly Pockets, Barbies, craft projects and remote control cars and helicopters. Cadets helped children assemble their toys and played together following the meal. “We have been doing this ever since I started working here,” Medley said. “The cadets buy the presents with money they chip in.” Administrators donned aprons, gloves and candy-cane costume hats in Barnard Hall on December 20 to serve students a hearty holiday buffet of turkey, ham, rolls, mashed potatoes, vegetables and pie. Cadets, faculty and staff received stockings courtesy of the Parents Committee and enjoyed a visit by Santa Claus himself. Echo and Bravo company representatives received Best Decorated Barracks recognition plaques. Cadets posed before a Christmas tree in the Atrium, bidding one another goodbye before heading home for the holidays the following morning. text courtesy of ERIN CHAMBERS


LEFT: A Christmas tree shines inside the Stribling Hall Atrium on December 14. RIGHT: Snow flurries fly past the Chapel front steps December 17. CHRISTINE SMITH

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT THE HOLIDAYS? WHY? It is the only time of the year that everybody gets together and everybody is a big family. It doesn’t matter who you are — you will get acceptance.

RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’13

It is a special holiday. A time to relax. You spend time with your family and the people you love. It is a time of happiness.

BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI ’15

It is a holiday that allows you to be with your family and friends when you can give and receive gifts. You can get ready to start a better year.

JOSE CARRILLO NORIEGA ’14

Spending time with people you love, seeing your family happy. It is a time where there is no fighting and everything is joyful.

JOSE REDING ORTIZ ’15

It is not only a time for giving and receiving but a time to enjoy family, friends and everyone you love. SIMON BARRERA ’15

It brings everyone together. It helps cadets relax and motivates them in the middle of the year.

OLIVER FITZGERALD ’13

It is a time of fellowship and family gathering.

AUSTIN BOHANNON ’15


COMMUNITY SERVICE TESTIMONIALS that was made much easier by the Thanks to the young MMA cadets MMA cadets. (September 15, 2012) who helped with the Mobile Food Pantry at First Presbyterian Church Central Missouri Food Bank yesterday. They were an enormous Representative BARBARA GREEN help. Many people who received food commented on their willingness I would like to express the Lodge’s to help, their good [work] and their appreciation for the Missouri great manners. Their presence was Military Academy cadets and choir a great gift to the community. They that attended and entertained at our were extremely busy the entire time annual Christmas dinner on December they were there. A part of the time, 2. A special thank you goes to MAJ they unloaded groceries in the rain. Michael Shoemaker and MAJ Peggy We provided food to 310 families, Reynard and the MMA choir for representing 898 individuals — a job their performance of Christmas

music and their assistance with our memorial service. Their addition to our service gave it more meaning to all those involved. Those cadets that attended our celebration were very well-behaved and exemplary young men. I received many positive comments on the choir’s performance and on those cadets in attendance. Thank you for allowing these fine young men to attend our event. Mexico Elks Lodge #919 Exalted Ruler STEVE MAGNUS

HOW WOULD YOU SPEND ONE MILLION DOLLARS? On family and people that need it. FRANCISCO SILLER ’18 Donate 25% to charity and the rest goes to a house or a car. SEAN ATAMIAN ’17

Donate it. BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14

Foundations and donations. ROGER GONZALEZ ’15

Charity. ADAM SCHMITZ ’15

Help the people who really need help.

GUANGNING WEI ’15

I would give $400,000 to help breast cancer and $600,000 to help my family. YANNI LE ’19

Good house, cars, business and charity.

VICTOR GOMEZ RAMIREZ ’15

LT Andrea Vollrath and cadets participate in fall Community Service Day on October 2. The group cleared brush from overgrown areas at Mexico’s Lakeview Park.

In the years since Missouri Military Academy instated its community service program in 2008, more than 493 cadets have contributed more than 18,000 hours of community service. CADETS PITCH IN DURING BIANNUAL MMA COMMUNITY SERVICE DAYS More than 170 MMA students and 20 Mexico High School JROTC cadets traveled to 14 locations throughout Audrain and Boone counties as part of MMA’s third annual fall Community Service Day on October 2. Service areas included the Central Missouri Humane Society, the Audrain County Historical Society, Arthur Hills Golf Course, Lakeview Park, First Baptist Church, St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church and the King’s Daughters Home. “The cadets really provided a valuable service to the city,” said Kensey Russell, City of Mexico public works director and city engineer. Groups of cadets spent seven hours placing storm drain signs and painting curbs at the Mexico square — blue for handicapped and yellow for no parking. Approximately 30 cadets prepared food to be distributed across mid-Missouri at the Central Missouri Food Bank. “For so many years, MMA segregated from the community,” said Christine Smith, group director. “To close that gap and to teach responsibility, we’re showing them how to give back.”

About 25 students headed to Auxvasse to assist city officials with cleanup around town. Cadets cleared brush, cleaned highways and emptied storm drains. “A recipient in Auxvasse said they were very awesome and others called inquiring about [the cadets’] services,” LTC Tim Scherrer said. Students participate in allday spring and fall events as part of MMA’s community service program, which requires cadets to complete at least 20 hours every school year in order to graduate. “I think it’s a great program,” Russell said. “They do fall and spring community service that all of the cadets are required to participate in. ... It helps the Academy really become part of the community.” Spring Community Service Day was held May 2. Cadets volunteered in 16 locations throughout mid-Missouri. “Community service is an integral part of characterbased education,” said Dean of Academics LTC Frank Giuseffi. “This is a way for cadets to understand the needs of the world around them and the positive impact they can make.” Columbia’s Red Cross Heart of Missouri building received a facelift on Spring Community Service Day courtesy of MMA cadets. Chaperones LT Edsel Baker and Christopher Bain supervised as cadets repaired the front porch, pruned trees and removed dead plants. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior cadets Andres Garcia Almada, Leonardo Lozano Villarreal, Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez, Jose Garcia Puerta and John O’Leary show off their Nine Line apparel after lunch April 30.

LEFT: Nolan Borgsmiller ’15, Brennan Darnall ’14, Jon Johnston ’14 and Jack Solls ’14 volunteer at Spring Community Service Day on May 2 at the Central Missouri Food Bank. TOP RIGHT: Students spend Spring Community Service Day at Hawthorne Elementary School.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE “Eighteen cadets came down and did a bunch of landscaping at our office. It was a wonderful morning,” Clayton Kennedy, RCHM spokesman, said. STUDENTS TAKE THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS POLAR PLUNGE A handful of staff and cadets calling themselves the “MMA Superheroes” won a costume contest Golden Plunger Award and raised $1,100 for the fifth annual Special Olympics Polar Bear Plunge at Kiwanis Lake’s Plunkett Park on February 16. More than 160 community members and Special

Olympics athletes formed more than a dozen teams. Students spent the sunny day jumping into and splashing through the cold lake dressed as Batman, the Incredible Hulk, Captain America and Iron Man. More than 4,500 people took the plunge in 13 areas across the state. Plunge proceeds totaled more than $980,000 to support year-round physical training and athletic competitions for children and adults with intellectual disabilities in the state of Missouri. STUDENTS HELP OUT AFTER HURRICANE SANDY STRIKES Hurricane Sandy hit the eastern seaboard of the United States hard in late October.

As residents of the northeast continued to rebuild in the aftermath, MMA cadets pitched in to help the recovery effort. Assistant Commandant MAJ Brian Galarza collected donated items from the Corps of Cadets before heading off to visit his family in his hometown of Bell Harbor, New York. Galarza delivered socks, rubber gloves, clothing, diapers and other necessities to hurricane victims in December. STUDENTS SERVE THE CENTRAL MISSOURI FOOD BANK Middle school cadets participated in the Buddy Pack program by preparing meals once a week for Mexico’s three public

elementary schools. According to MAJ Richards Boyce, middle school principal, the Central Missouri Food Bank sponsored the program to feed underprivileged kids when school isn’t in session. Boyce accompanied ten cadets to First Presbyterian Church in September to volunteer their time with the Food Bank. Students helped man the Mobile Food Pantry, a makeshift grocery store where those in need travel from station to station shopping for donated food items. Cadets led underprivileged Mexico residents down a makeshift aisle, helping them fill grocery carts. Cadets then boxed up groceries and loaded cars.

According to Food Bank representative Barbara Green, more than 20,000 pounds of food are distributed at the Mobile Food Pantry each month. Green said cadet efforts benefitted 898 individuals in 310 families. Cadets volunteered at the Mobile Food Pantry on the second Tuesday of every month. By May 9, cadets had donated a total of 5,363 community service hours during the 2012-13 school year. And when cadets are gone for the summer break, the rest of the MMA community carries on the project. MMA summer 2013 volunteers on June 13 included Penny Bealmear, 1SG Randy Jacobson, Ananta and Indira Khanal, Jackie Li, Renae Stumpe and SGM Henry Suddarth. Mexico High School JROTC cadets

Madeline Brooks, Austin Bise, Sierra Westphal, Jessica Ludovicy, Matthew Prater and Bradley Hutchinson joined forces with local MMA cadets Gavin Martin, Nishan Khanal and Nischal Khanal. Army Instructor 1SG Alan Hakes led the MMA summer Mobile Food Pantry effort. He said he accumulates hundreds of hours of community service a year and believes it is “extremely important” for MMA faculty and staff to contribute their time — and not just to earn credibility with cadets. “You never know when you may be on the other side,” Hakes said. “I’ve been there.” CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


RIGHT: Company and battalion staffers pose with approximately 3,000 cans of food collected for the Central Missouri Food Bank. MIDDLE: A cadet rakes debris on spring Community Service Day. LEFT: Christopher Nguyen ’13 and Francisco De Llano Crowley ’13 ring bells for The Salvation Army at Walmart on December 15.

WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL? WHY? Kobe Bryant. ENKHBILEGT

My dad because he is a great man. I respect him. ZHUOTENG YING ’14

Lindsey Stirling, because she is an amazing musician.

My dad because he works every day to give me a good life and a great education and I want to do the same. RODRIGO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’15

LUVSANDORJ ’16

CHRISTIAN THOMAS ’13

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE The director of the Central Missouri Food Bank addressed cadets in the Centennial Gymtorium on December 13 at the second all-school assembly of the school year. She expressed her gratitude for the Corps of Cadets’ ongoing commitment to serving the mid-Missouri community. Before cadets boarded buses and airplanes for the 2012 December holiday furlough, the Corps collected over 2,700 pounds of food for

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME?

The Marines, because they make me want to strive for more. ROY GRABOWSKI ’14

the less fortunate in mid-Missouri. Students spent the month of December collecting food donations and ultimately gathered 3,000 cans of food for the Food Bank. CADET CAMPOUT SUPPORTS NINE LINE FOUNDATION Ten chaperones and 42 seniors “Marched for Those Who Can’t” May 4-5 during the 2013 senior bivouac hike. According to Executive Officer LTC Jim Medley, the annual event theme was chosen to support the nonprofit Nine Line Foundation.

My dad because he is a loving person and everybody likes him.

EMILIO ELIAS VIDAURRI ’16

“There was a lot of camaraderie [and] learning,” Medley said. “We had a great time. Although, I have to admit, it took me a couple of days to recover.” Participants hiked 7 kilometers of Cedar Creek Trail in Mark Twain National Forest while wearing Nine Line T-shirts. The trip served as a final bonding experience for senior cadets who graduated from MMA and attended colleges and universities in multiple countries. Medley applauded 1SG Alan Hakes for his hours spent planning

Go to the Canteen.

CHASE OSBORNE ’16

Hang out with friends and watch movies.

COREY TRENT ’14

Hang out with friends.

GATES BURCHFIELD ’14

Preparing for some other schoolrelated event. VINCENT BURKE ’15

Go to the gym and after that relax in my room to prepare for the next day.

JUAN RAMON FLORES TENORIO ’15

the event. According to Medley, chaperones Marc Wilson, SGM Henry Suddarth and Rik Thornton hiked and camped alongside students. Faculty, staff and cadets wore Nine Line Foundation T-shirts on campus May 9. Fundraiser proceeds benefited U.S. Army CPT Edward “Flip” Klein, a West Point graduate recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, after losing his right arm, three fingers and both of his legs to a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in 2012. Klein has faced more than 100

Watch TV or play video games. JONATHAN

KIRKLAND ’16

surgeries and battles daily complications. Klein’s former West Point classmate Tyler Merritt was inspired by his story — thus the Nine Line Foundation was born. Merritt’s military duties included responding to “nine line” radio distress signals. Nine separate lines request the immediate evacuation of wounded soldiers from the battlefield. Nine Line sells apparel to raise awareness of the plight of severely wounded veterans upon returning from service. Nine Line provides help on an individual basis to

Write music. CONNOR CUNNINGHAM ’16

Read the Holy Bible.

JAVIER MALPICA PALMEROS ’14

help stabilize life-threatening injuries and cover the cost of lodging and transportation during rehabilitation. Following recovery, Nine Line awards college scholarships to the children of soldiers and funds the reconstruction of handicap accessible homes. text courtesy of CHRISTINE SMITH, ERIN CHAMBERS, THE MEXICO LEDGER, KXEO, THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE and THE EAGLE


An MMA Honor Guard member prepares to perform at a Veterans funeral November 29. Honor Guard members provide full military honors during veteran funerals.

A few dozen MMA cadets honored more than one thousand fallen veterans during the 2012-13 school year with a tombstone repair project at area cemeteries. Efforts earned national attention via a USA TODAY spotlight in February 2013. The ambitious community service project was born under the direction of SGM Henry Suddarth, 1SG Randy Jacobson, 1SG Alan Hakes and Dr. Steven Wolf. “Elmwood Cemetery has approximately 15,000-plus graves in it — one thousand of which are identified as veterans,” Wolf said. “The cadets ... are going to help clean, repair and renovate those headstones.” The months-long process began behind desks in November 2012. Students and supervisors first tracked down veteran families in order to receive permission to improve the conditions of area gravesites. MMA partnered with the Mexico Parks

and Recreation Department to obtain lot identification information and equipment access. According to MPRD Cemetery Director Chad Shoemaker, heirs have the final say regarding gravesite upkeep. Tombstones are considered the personal property of the descendants of the deceased. The city of Mexico is only responsible for lawn mowing and debris removal. “There are lots of families that have vets buried there,” Shoemaker said. “If they would contact us, then we can start creating a list of those interested and [obtain] permission to proceed.” Chuck Rentschler, executor of the estate of late Air Force veteran Marvin McCowan, was among the first to give cadets permission to tend graves. Rentschler said he hopes other towns will “see what a great idea this is and decide to do it in their communities.”

Some families made it easy for cadets by contacting cemetery representatives directly. Other heirs were difficult to locate. It isn’t easy to find descendants of men who died in the 1800s, so students sought assistance from the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Audrain Genealogical Society to expedite searches. Wolf and LTC Tim Scherrer, community service program coordinator, spoke at Rotary and Kiwanis meetings to boost awareness of the project. “It’s possible they won’t be able to finish the project,” Shoemaker said in a call-forinformation article printed in the Mexico Ledger. “But the fact that they care so much says a lot. All they need is your help, information and permission.” “We’ve got a generation of young people that care and that want to honor the veterans,” Shoemaker said. “It’s a project that will be based on public response.”

While adults collected contact information, cadets focused on repair work. Clay deposits in the soil have caused most tombstones in Elmwood Cemetery to shift over the decades. Wolf said many heavy stones shove their concrete slab foundations into the soil, effectively sliding sideways over many years. “Some of the headstones simply need to be cleaned,” Wolf said. “Others are falling over and will need to be re-set with a proper foundation. Still others may need to be re-set or re-glued.” Students researched the appropriate methods for cleaning aged stones without further damaging them. As permission reports trickled in, they began the process of restoring gravesites. Kane Anderson ’15 and Tyler Vaughan ’14 wandered through toppled and broken tombstones at Elmwood Cemetery in midFebruary, hunting for veteran graves. They

searched for markers indicating soldiers who served in the Civil War, World War I and World War II, brushing away moss as they read faded inscriptions. Many stones were damaged and dirty. Some leaned precariously while others sat in pieces. “They deserve better treatment than this,” Anderson said. Ten cadets spent May 2 cleaning tombstones at Rock Hill Cemetery, a small plot on a rural gravel road where both Union and Confederate Civil War veterans are buried. “We say no man left behind or no person left behind in today’s military,” Eoghan Matthews ’13 said. “Even after they have passed on we still take the time to honor them.” “If they’re in a national cemetery, like Jefferson Barracks or the state cemetery up in Jacksonville, things are going to get taken care of,” Scherrer said.

“But in these smaller cemeteries, it’s very easy for things like this to happen.” Anderson said scrubbing tombstones clean of grime and lichen was hard but rewarding. “It feels like it’s right. It feels like it’s honorable,” Anderson said. “It feels like that’s what they deserve and that is what I would deserve if I went into the service and died in combat.” According to Scherrer, cadets were proud and eager to honor fallen soldiers. “Knowing that someone could be out there taking care of their grave 100 years from now is important,” Scherrer said. text courtesy of THE MEXICO LEDGER, USA TODAY and KOMU


CARDINAL CARAVAN VISITS MEXICO Missouri Military Academy hosted the St. Louis Cardinals baseball club in mid-January during Mexico’s third consecutive year as a stop on the annual 2013 Cardinal Caravan circuit. Players toured 18 cities in four days throughout Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas and Tennessee in late winter to sign autographs, conduct interviews and meet fans. Ticket proceeds benefited the Community R-6 and Mexico High School sports boosters clubs. Mexico residents, cadets and MMA staff members met Cardinals athletes including Jon Jay, Fernando Salas and Joe Kelly. The Caravan crew also featured minor league player Jordan Swagerty, Cardinals radio commentator John Rooney, team mascot Fredbird and former players Ray King and Tom Lawless. According to Rooney, tours are a dying tradition in major league baseball. “Many teams have their fan conventions and gave up on the caravan idea,” Rooney said. “I applaud the Cardinals for going out to places where fans can all make it into winter warm-up.” The program included prize giveaways and an interview session with King, who says he has never yet been stumped by a fan question. The first 400 child attendees to arrive at the Centennial Gymtorium received autographs from all players in attendance.

“You could probably name all the states and find Cardinal fans. It’s important to come out and say thank you and get fans ready,” Rooney said. “This is the beginning of our baseball season.” GREENER GAME VOLUNTEERING LT Edsel Baker accompanied about a dozen students to Busch Stadium on September 8 to help collect recyclables from fans in the stands during the St. Louis Cardinals’ 3-6 loss to the Milwaukee Brewers. Cadet volunteers included Noah Agne ’14, Sebastian Diaz ’14, Fernando ’14 and Jose Estrada Pinon ’16, Marcelo Gomez Flores ’14, Tyler Grogan ’13, Gilberto Villarreal Guerrero ’13, Diego Martinez Blanco ’13, Jacob Phillips ’14, Santiago Prieto Ledesma ’14 and Diego Salinas Estrada ’13. Students wore neon green vests and traveled down aisles searching for recyclable items. Partnering with the Cardinals’ “4 A Greener Game” initiative allowed cadets to watch the game for free in standing room only sections of Busch Stadium, collecting recyclables during downtime between innings and pitching changes. Since its inception in 2008, the program averages more than 25 volunteers per game and has diverted more than 1,836 tons of recycling and 575 tons of yard waste from local landfills. text courtesy of THE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS, KXEO and THE HEALTHY PLANET

TOP: William Moore ’18 [right] meets Cardinals player Joe Kelly and Jesus Gonzalez Botello ’13 [left] poses with Cardinals player Jon Jay. BOTTOM: Jose Estrada Pinon ’16 picks up recyclables in Busch Stadium on September 8.

HOW WOULD YOU SPEND ONE MILLION DOLLARS? A new Bugatti! NOLAN

BORGSMILLER ’15

Save it. SERGIO SALAS ROJO ’15

On a business that can get me more money. JUAN RAMON

FLORES TENORIO ’15

On my friends and family.

CHANNING CARLSON ’19

I would give half to charity, put a fourth in the bank, pay off debts and renovate my house. CONNOR CUNNINGHAM ’16

Open a men’s club or buy a yacht.

JAVIER MALPICA PALMEROS ’14

On clothes and cars and trips. IVAN

SALINAS ’18

Save it.

MICHAEL COURTE ’16

I would spend the money on essentials to keep me set and in a house while I get my bachelor’s degree.

DALLAS LOPEZ ’14

Buying houses to rent them afterwards.

Save it. BRANDON

Make my own company and make even more money so my parents won’t have to work. FELIX PAZ VALDEZ ’15

A new car and a nice house. BENJAMIN

HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ ’15

GUTERMAN ’15

SWIGER ’14

I would give 25% to charity; 10% on video games; 25% on a car; and 15% I would use to buy stuff that I like.

SAMER DOUMIT ’18


Parents, siblings, friends and family arrived on campus for the Valentine Weekend celebration February 8. The festivities began February 9 with a pancake breakfast in the dining hall sponsored by the senior class. Cadets perused the Scholastic Book Fair in Barnard Hall while faculty members welcomed adults to attend parent-teacher conferences until noon. Conferences were followed by a formation in front of Stribling Hall for the passing through ceremony. New students or “recruits” who enrolled in January were formally admitted to the 124th Corps of Cadets after completing their training. Students spent the afternoon off campus with their families, returning Saturday evening for a formal military Valentine Ball planned and sponsored by the junior class. Organizers selected a casino theme. Hearts, clubs, spades and diamonds hung from the ceiling. Black and red balloons, feathers, sparkly stones and dice decorated the room. Excited cadets changed into their dress uniforms and began gathering early in the Centennial Gymtorium. Cadets and their dates shared punch and took photographs in the lobby prior to a four-course dinner. Faculty, staff, students, dates, parents and administrators performed the traditional

Grand March through the gym — then they hit the dance floor. TaJae Blue ’17, Sebastian Diaz ’14, Jose Estrada Pinon ’16, MAJ Brian Galarza, Roy Grabowski ’14 and 1SG Alan Hakes jumped into the spotlight to show off their moves. The crowd paused midway through the evening for the reveal of the 2013 Valentine Ball Queen. Junior class officers Roel Rodriguez Valdez, Jose Bours Murrieta, Jose Carrillo Noriega, Jack Solls and Austin Teague escorted Miss Missouri 2012 Tippe Emmott and queen candidates Jessica Ludovicy, Madeline Brooks, Sierra Westphal and Morgan Smith to their seats on the stage. The crowd roared as Dallas Lopez ’14, Emmott and Rodriguez Valdez helped crown Ludovicy the winner. After camera flashes ceased, cadets continued with break dances, the Cha Cha Slide and the Macarena until 10 p.m. Parents signed cadets out for free time for the remainder of the night and Sunday. The weekend concluded with a battalion review in the Field House on February 10 honoring 71 cadets who earned Academic Fourragere for the month of January. text courtesy of THE EAGLE TOP RIGHT: Dmitri Lamping ’18 meets Miss Missouri 2012 Tippe Emmott at the Valentine Ball on February 9. EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16 BOTTOM RIGHT: MAJ Mike Shoemaker dances with his wife Iris at the Valentine Ball. BOTTOM LEFT: Javier Malpica Palmeros ’14 and Gabriel Rodriguez Mendoza ’14 pose February 10 outside the Chapel. EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16 TOP LEFT: Edward Gbemudu ’17 participates in a Valentine Weekend battalion review on February 10. EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE ’16


BELOW: Hayden Fairbanks ’14 escorts 2012 Valentine Ball Queen Jessica Ludovicy. MIDDLE: Francisco Del Rio Rivero ’13 leads his partner down the aisle during the Grand March. BOTTOM LEFT: Junior cadets Sebastian Diaz, Fernando Estrada Pinon, Pedro Onieva and Paolo Rosado stop dancing to pose at the Valentine Ball. TOP LEFT: Jack Solls ’14 makes a card on February 8.

WHAT IS THE BEST THING ABOUT MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY? The pond because it looks very beautiful.

JIAHAO WU ’15

The Canteen. ANDREW HANSEN ’17

My favorite part of MMA is the gym and sports time.

WEIHANG GAO ’15

All of the friends.

COREY TRENT ’14

The academics.

BRANDON GUTERMAN ’15

The structured learning environment. MICHAEL HILT ’18

The cool educational development trips. CHANNING CARLSON ’19

HOW DO YOU DEAL WITH PRESSURE?

The friends you make. STEVEN

PRINSTER ’15

Awards and promotion.

ARIYANDEV SANDUI ’15

Listen to music. JUAN AGUIRRE GONZALEZ ’16

Take a deep breath and figure out a solution. EDWARD GEERNAERT ’14

I keep calm and carry on.

By taking that pressure situation and making it fun. DEREK RYAN ’15

GABRIEL RODRIGUEZ MENDOZA ’14

Calm down and give myself a break. MARK MCKEE ’15

Take a step back, clear your head and take one thing one step at a time.

TYLER GROGAN ’13

Work out. JON JOHNSTON ’14 By taking deep breaths. WADE

LUECKENOTTE ’15


WHAT DID YOU THINK OF FORMAL INSPECTION? I was really nervous when the inspector approached me. I think I did really well.

JACOB PRIESTER ’14

I was really scared and nervous when the inspector walked up to me. My mind went completely blank. CLAYTON EBERT ’17

I look back at it and I don’t know why I was so nervous. It was really easy and if you study well you would have no problem during the inspection. CHANDLER BOLINGER ’19

FORMAL INSPECTION Missouri Military Academy cadets prepared all school year to perform at the annual JROTC Formal Inspection on April 26. The event began at 8 a.m. as senior cadets delivered a battalion briefing to U.S. Army representatives, detailing cadet officer duties and accomplishments throughout the year. Company commanders and platoon staff led inspectors through barracks hallways. Inspectors entered each room, evaluated the space and quizzed occupants.

“I was so nervous because it was my first time being in FI and the guy was so big and scary,” Andrew Hansen ’17 said. “He asked me how I was doing. I was so scared I could barely answer.” The Corps of Cadets lined up in the Field House for an In Ranks Inspection followed by a battalion review. The inspection team examined each cadet, checking for proper position and uniform. One week after a stressful Formal Inspection, thrill-seeking students screamed atop

adrenaline-pumping roller coasters at Six Flags. Students spent five hours on May 3 riding the Batman, Mr. Freeze, The Boss and the Screamin’ Eagle. Many rides were closed due to the weather so students played carnival games and rode the open coasters multiple times. “We just went on all the [rides] we could,” Dillion Brown-Dawson ’14 said, “and we had a great time.” text courtesy of THE MEXICO LEDGER

WHAT DID YOU THINK OF SIX FLAGS? The weather could have been nicer but I had a really good time and I rode a lot of rides.

PARKER BRIDGE ’14

It was amazing. It was the first time I ever rode the Superman. SERGIO

MAYER MORI ’17

I had never been to Six Flags before. When I got on my first roller coaster I was so scared and I just wanted to get off. But then I rode another one and it got funner and funner every time I went. ANDREW HANSEN ’17

RIGHT: Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina ’17 and other middle school cadets prepare to ride The Patriot [top] and students cheer as they ride the Mamba [bottom] at Worlds of Fun on May 13. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE LEFT: Omar Sanchez Ibarra ’16 is inspected April 26.


FAR RIGHT: Juan Aguirre Gonzalez ’16 and Emilio Nanni De Valle ’16 pose in Russia during an educational tour in late February. MIDDLE: Raul Escarcega Martinez ’17 prepares to perform at the employee recognition battalion review May 19. LEFT: Michael Hilt ’18 stands at attention October 13 during Fall Family Weekend festivities.


Roel Rodriguez Valdez ’14 runs during practice September 25 before the Fighting Colonels soccer team’s 5-2 win against Kirksville.


With 50-plus players on the roster including nine returning offensive starters, seven returning defensive starters and 18 returning letterman, expectations were high for the 2012-13 Missouri Military Academy football season. Coming off a 2-8 record for 201112, the coaching staff — Head Coach Marc Wilson, Offensive Assistant Tim Gooch, Athletic Director CPT John Noel, Running Backs Assistant LT Robert Olive, Wide Receiver and Defensive Back Specialist Dr. Greg McDonald and Technical Assistant LT Annette Meinheit — hoped for wins. ELIGIBILITY FORMALITY PLAGUES STARTERS Camp registration began August 5, marking the start of the 120th football season in Missouri Military Academy history. The Colonels squared off against West Hancock in the home opener August 24. The out-ofstate opponent started

fast and capitalized on several MMA turnovers. Multiple Colonel starters were unable to play due to Missouri restrictions requiring athletes to participate in a fixed number of practices before taking the field. The Fighting Colonels ultimately fell to West Hancock in an 8-53 defeat. “Changes in weather, injuries large and small, eligibility issues and losses all take a toll,” Wilson said. “We want them put in challenging situations so that they can learn to excel.” He encouraged cadets to embrace defeat and be open to adversity. By August 31, most cadets were eligible to play ball. The Colonels hit the road to go head-to-head with the Van-Far Indians. According to Wilson, several players made their first appearance at MMA while others played organized football for the first time. Student-athletes held their own in the first half, trailing 6-18 and sliding on a wet, postHurricane Isaac field.

“Several turnovers and sloppy tackling in slippery conditions helped give the home team the edge,” Wilson said. Fatigue set in and the Colonels muddled through a scoreless second-half. The team lost 6-46 and prepared to face Winfield in the second home game of the season. All players earned eligibility in time to face off against Winfield on September 7. MMA struggled defensively and had trouble with turnovers in the 0-53 shutout. Wilson pointed to center Juan Aguirre Gonzalez ’16, wide receiver John O’Leary ’13 and defensive end Ivan Quiroz Espino ’14 as outstanding performers. “So far this season has not been easy,” Wilson said. “They continue to fight strongly throughout the duration of each game. We are pleased with the [progress] of the season so far.” CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

HOW CAN THE FOOTBALL PROGRAM IMPROVE? The other teams they play against have been playing together as a team one or two years and MMA gets new cadets every year. It’s difficult to learn new plays, new teammates. With the help of the coaches, every year the team has been improving.

JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14

It has players that have a lot of heart in them and want to play. We need to have more consistency in returning players. It is hard to get to know the plays and play well when every year you have to start from zero.

NICHOLAS MABBS ’14

The coaches are great at teaching football. I think we need more easy practice teams and we can gain confidence. BLAKE BIBLES ’13

TOP: The Colonels face off against Grandview on September 14. BOTTOM: The 2012-13 student leadership.


FOOTBALL ROSTER: KANE ANDERSON ’15, JUAN AGUIRRE GONZALEZ ’16, BLAKE BIBLES ’13, JASON BOISSEAU ’13, JOSHUA BLOOTHOOFD ’15, NOLAN BORGSMILLER ’15, AUSTIN BOUCHE ’16, HUNTER BUSH ’16, CONNOR CUNNINGHAM ’16, BRENNAN DARNALL ’14, AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14, DILLION BROWN-DAWSON ’14, EDWARD GEERNAERT ’14, DANIEL GARCIA ’14, EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES ’13, MARCELO GOMEZ FLORES ’14, OSCAR GUTIERREZ ’13, PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ ’13, JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14, BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14, YUN IL JEON ’16, JON JOHNSTON ’14, MAVERICK JONES ’16, LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL ’13, DAVID LAZCANO ’16, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, MARK MCKEE ’15, HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ ’15, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, JACK MOORE ’16, CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN ’13, CODY OLSON ’13, JOHN O’LEARY ’13, D’CHERION OWENS ’15, SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA ’14, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, STEVEN PRINSTER ’15, IVAN QUIROZ ESPINO ’14, ETHAN RACHELL ’13, JASON RUSSELL ’16, COREY TRENT ’14, NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13, TYLER VAUGHAN ’14, GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRERO ’13, GUANGNING WEI ’15, CONNOR WILKINSON ’14

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE TEAM TOURS UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI FACILITIES

v. WEST HANCOCK: 8-53 L v. VAN-FAR: 6-46 L v. WINFIELD: 0-53 L v. GRANDVIEW: 6-49 L v. PRINCIPIA: 0-41 L v. CENTRAL ACADEMY: 2-30 L v. FATHER TOLTON: 6-31 L v. LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES: 7-57 L v. ST. PAUL LUTHERAN: 6-73 L v. CALIFORNIA: 0-71

TOP: Players battle for control of the ball September 29 during a match against Central Academy. BOTTOM: Cadets huddle for a pep talk during a time out August 24.

MMA coaches and varsity players took their traditional trip to a University of Missouri football game on Saturday, September 15. Cadets and chaperones cheered as the Tigers beat the Arizona State Sun Devils 24-20 in Faurot Field. Students toured the academic support center, weight training center, nutrition center and other facilities. Cadets also met MU Head Coach Gary Pinkel, Offensive Coordinator David Yost and Athletic Director Mike Alden. The trip followed a Friday night loss to Grandview on September 14. According to Wilson, the beginning of the battle was marked by mental mistakes that led to Grandview scores and failed Colonel drives. Following a scoreless first half, O’Leary returned a kickoff 65 yards for a touchdown. Quiroz contributed two defensive sacks. Wilson praised Connor Wilkinson ’14, who led an aggressive passing attack. Two interceptions were returned for Grandview touchdowns and put the game out of reach late in the second half. “Scoreboard aside,” Wilson said, “our football boys have had an excellent week. They played

their best and most impassioned game of the year so far despite a few execution errors.” He praised student-athletes for their enthusiasm, intensity, discipline and effort. “What we witnessed out there was a conscious and collective decision to have fun and give their physical best on each play,” Wilson said. “We hope that we can continue to practice and play this Saturday with the same passion against the Principia Panthers.” The Panthers played host September 22. The Colonels’ 0-41 shutout loss marked the second Principia win of the season. Up next was a 2-30 loss to Central Academy on September 29 and a 6-31 defeat October 5 at the hands of Father Tolton. The Colonels faced the Lutheran St. Charles squad on October 12 for homecoming. Coaches recognized senior players prior to the game, thanking them for their commitment to the team. During halftime, Charlie Company accepted an award for winning the homecoming Barracks Decorating Contest for the second year in a row. MMA lost 7-57, but proud parents in town for Fall Family Weekend festivities enjoyed seeing their sons in action. The Colonels fought St. Paul Lutheran on October 19. Too many turnovers led to a one-

sided 6-73 defeat. Next MMA met the undefeated, No. 1 ranked California for a playoff game. The Colonels fell in a shutout 0-71 to end the season. PLAYERS RECOGNIZED FOR OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE Just under 2,000 Missouri football players were recognized for their performance. Only 300 earned the Academic All-State Award, including six cadets — Aubrey Davidson ’14, Guangning Wei ’15, Nicholas Mabbs ’14, Jesus Herrera Alvarez del Castillo ’14, Blake Bibles ’13 and Jacob Priester ’14. Several middle school students took the field in fall 2012 to take advantage of opportunities with the Mexico Public Schools football program. TaJae Blue ’17, Sean Fitzgerald ’17, Juan Leal ’18, Lucas Moore ’18, Charles Norman ’18 and Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina ’17 suited up this season. Two-sport athlete Priester was named Athlete of the Month in November for his performance on the football and soccer fields. Priester served as quarterback, running back, tight end and punter throughout the 2012-13 season. Text courtesy of THE MEXICO LEDGER, THE EAGLE and MARC WILSON


WHY DO YOU LOVE FOOTBALL? Because it is action-packed. There are big plays. Big hits. People tailgate rain or shine before games. It is a game of inches and teams only have one shot for the title. There is one game where players will give it all they have. NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13 WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY SPORTS MOMENT THIS YEAR? Football and strength and conditioning.

IVAN QUIROZ ESPINO ’14

I loved the homecoming football game. KANE ANDERSON ’15 Winning first-team All-District and All-American in football.

NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13

Nicholas Vanatta ’13 was the undisputed star of the Fighting Colonels 2012-13 football program. Vanatta attended a four-day offense-defense camp in June 2012. Vanatta and MMA Head Coach Marc Wilson chose the event coordinated by former Dallas Cowboys Head Coach Bill Bates. About 180 young men from across the nation attended. “The camp was rugged, tough and long,” Vanatta said. “It was a ton of fun. We did a lot of drills. ... We learned and ran a lot of different plays.” Only 200 boys out of 800 O-D camp attendees nationwide were invited to participate in

Elite Camps. Officials selected Vanatta to attend a two-day Elite Camp in July with 35 other student-athletes in Denton, Texas. “Nick had not really played football until last season, but through hard work and determination both in the classroom and on the field, combined with the guidance of our football staff, Nick achieved his goal of playing football at the next level,” Athletic Director CPT John Noel said. Vanatta’s offensive bursts and defensive prowess earned him a spot to play alongside the best high school players in the nation during postseason. Wilson accompanied Vanatta to Texas on January 1 for the Offense-Defense All-American Bowl. Vanatta

sported his Colonels gear and represented MMA at Cowboys Stadium. “We want to continue the tradition of putting our athletes in a position to achieve their highest potential, but more importantly the tradition of training our athletes to be great men [and] citizens,” Noel said. Vanatta boasted 31 catches for 514 yards and two scores. Vanatta led the team in total offense, earned two interceptions, completed 36 tackles and tallied 24 assisted tackles. He was also named to the Missouri Class 3 District 6 First-Team All-District squad. Based on his excellent record, Vanatta was courted by several colleges and met with

multiple representatives before making a decision. He eventually chose to accept Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s scholarship offer. He was recruited as a wide receiver and plans to major in criminology. “It’s been a pleasure to coach and mentor Nick,” Wilson said. “I’m excited to see him reach his potential both as an athlete and a young man at Northwestern.” Alongside Wilson and Noel, Vanatta signed a letter of intent on February 6. His mother

Vicki Vanatta made the trip from northeast Oklahoma to attend the ceremony. She said she is “forever grateful” to Wilson. “He was a huge part in changing the next phase of our son’s future, and his adventure as a scholarship, college-bound football player,” she said. Focus soon turned toward conditioning for the 2013-2014 college football season. “I’m excited to get started,” Vanatta said. “I’ll do training this spring and over the summer

Playing football and forcing a safety or coaching the middle school wrestlers.

NICHOLAS MABBS ’14

Away games for football and baseball and all of the team bonding and fun memories.

CONNOR WILKINSON ’14

when I’m back in Oklahoma, but once August comes around I’ll have to really step up my game and work hard.” Vanatta was recognized as the Most Valuable Offensive Player for the 2012-2013 season. At commencement in May 2013 he was awarded the Plaque for Outstanding MMA Athlete. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13

TOP RIGHT: MMA senior Nicholas Vanatta signs his letter of intent to play football at Bacone College alongside his mother Vicki, Athletic Director CPT John Noel and head football coach Marc Wilson on January 6 in the Atrium. MIDDLE: Nicholas Vanatta ’13 pauses September 14 during practice before the Colonels’ 6-49 loss to Grandview.


WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SPORT? Wrestling, because it has let me be myself and learn to find the center between physical [skill] and technique needed to win. NICHOLAS

MABBS ’14

RIGHT: The middle school wrestling team. BOTTOM RIGHT: Pablo Garza-RiosBlanco ’19 earns a third place trophy. LEFT: Derek Ryan ’15 takes down a Tipton opponent January 17. MMA’s Jacob Priester ’14 stole the show at the Missouri Class 2 District 2 Wrestling Championships at St. Charles West High School on February 8. Priester competed in the 195-pound weight class and, despite his No. 3 seed, got off to a rough start, losing by one pin in the first round. After receiving a bye in the first round of the consolation

bracket, he went on to win all three following matches by pin, earning third place overall in the tournament. Priester qualified to compete at the MSHSAA Class 2 Wrestling Championships at Mizzou Arena. He also served as a football captain and played for the soccer team.

The middle school Fighting Colonels traveled to Centralia in January to take on area squads in a weekend tournament. Top MMA finishers included second place winner Charles Norman ’18 and third place winners Carlos Eduardo Ramos Molina ’17, Clayton Ebert ’17 and Pablo Garza-RiosBlanco ’19. Norman earned three pins while

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE SPORTS YOU PLAY? I decided to play soccer and football and wrestle again because of the love of the game. I love playing football and soccer because they are both very competitive not just as an individual but as a team. Wrestling is pretty much about the individual and how

well I can do. It is who is better — me or my opponent? I train for myself, to beat my opponents and do my best in wrestling. But in soccer and football I train and practice so I can be better for my teams. I play football and soccer to become a better

team player and show my skills while working with my friends. I wrestle so I can show how hard I train for myself and how good I am. The love for every sport I have ever played is what really drives me. JACOB PRIESTER ’14

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE MMA SPORTS MOMENT THIS YEAR? Pinning my first guy in wrestling.

BENJAMIN JENNISON ’14

Ramos Molina recorded two. Ebert and Garza-Rios-Blanco each managed one pin. Coaches MAJ Richards Boyce and LT Edsel Baker congratulated the student-athletes who proudly represented MMA on the road. Middle school wrestler Quentin Heasler ’16 and high school junior Priester defeated their opponents at a matchup against

Wrestling and strength and conditioning. OSCAR GARCIA ’16

Getting first place in middle school wrestling in my first tournament. SKY HENIO ’19

Versailles in early December. MMA scored 8th place overall out of 11 teams at the Owensville Invitational in early January. Middle school wrestlers competed at the Brookfield Kids Club Wrestling tournament January 26. MMA cadet Sky Henio ’19 won first place in his bracket 2-0 with two pins.

Rodrigo Marroquin Gonzalez ’17 earned a 3-1 score with two pins and placed second in his bracket. Ramos Molina placed second in his bracket with three pins and a 3-1 score. text courtesy of THE MEXICO LEDGER and THE EAGLE


RIGHT: Cadets work out in the Centennial Gymtorium weight room September 29. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE LEFT: A Fighting Colonels baseball player prepares to bat during MMA’s 5-6 loss to Paris on May 7.

HOW WOULD YOU SPEND ONE MILLION DOLLARS? In a family business and in a political party. JOSE BOURS MURRIETA ’14

Invest it in the stock market. AUSTIN

BOHANNON ’15

Give half to a charity or medical foundation. The rest would be used to pay for my family. JOHN KOHM ’16 I would buy a huge house. RICARDO GONZALEZ ’14

I would donate half and with the other half I would buy a house and a new car. JUAN

HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17

Cars, house and family. ROY

GRABOWSKI ’14

A car, house, clothes and candy. MICHAEL

PENNIMAN ’19

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO FUTURE MMA STUDENTS? Invest. Put it in a bank and use the interest.

CHRISTIAN THOMAS ’13

I would use it to help people. ZHUOTENG YING ’14

Be unique in the way you do things and never hesitate to do the right thing. FERNANDO

BLANCO GONZALEZ ’15

Work hard and keep good grades. MIGUEL QUIJANO ’18

You have to do it yourself. No matter what it is. No one can do it for you.

Work really hard and don’t whine!

Follow orders from your leaders and life will be much easier.

Go with the MMA system.

Do what you’re told. It pays off in the end. HUNTER BUSH ’16 Listen and follow instructions.

JASON RUSSELL ’16

Keep on trying and don’t give up on your dreams.

CLAYTON EBERT ’17

CHANDLER BOLINGER ’19

EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13

DAVID GU ’16

EDMOND BIRUTA ’15


RIGHT: Fighting Colonels baseball players give it their all during MMA’s 5-6 loss to Paris at Paris High School on May 7. LEFT: The 2012-13 baseball team.

BASEBALL The 2012-13 Fighting Colonels baseball team earned a disappointing 0-7 record. But, win or lose, student-athletes enjoyed their experiences on the diamond. “My favorite moment in baseball this year was going to districts,” baseball player Jordan Butz ’14 said. “Even though we did not play many games or win many we still had fun and I thought it was exciting to go to districts. Districts was also fun because we stopped

caring about winning and just had fun. It was Father Tolton. A successful offensive barrage a new experience for me because I never just and multiple errors pushed the Colonels wanted to have fun in a game. I always wanted ahead 6-0 early in the game. But a frenzied to win.” MMA battled WHAT WAS THE BEST SPORTS MOMENT? at American Legion Field on April 30 to Baseball verses Paris Missouri. I hit the ball really well. earn a six-run VICTOR GOMEZ RAMIREZ ’15 lead against

Almost beating Paris High School in baseball.

ADAM SCHMITZ ’15

six-run inning at the bottom of the second tied the game at 6-6 for the majority of the afternoon. MMA held onto a 7-6 lead coming into the seventh inning. Tolton scored after a lucky break — the ball slid between the legs of a Colonel first baseman. The first battle of the Tolton-MMA doubleheader ended in a narrow, disappointing Trailblazer victory. The Colonels attempted a comeback but

fell short 6-13 late in the game to the Trailblazers, who scored eight runs in the fifth inning. MMA’s district title battle ended in five innings — the No. 6 seed Colonels suffered a 1-17 loss to the No. 3 seeded Mexico Bulldogs. Coaches recognized outstanding studentathletes at the Spring Sports Banquet in May. Victor Gomez Ramirez ’15 and David Lozano ’15 were named the Most Improved

players of 2012-13. The Most Valuable Player award went to Andres Garcia Almada ’13. Tyler Grogan ’13 and Nicholas Vanatta ’13 served as team captains. text courtesy of THE MEXICO LEDGER, THE EAGLE and THE COLUMBIA DAILY TRIBUNE


There is no better way to start a season than with a big win. The 2012-13 Fighting Colonels soccer squad netted seven secondhalf goals en route to a 9-1 defeat of the Elsberry Indians on September 11.

BOTTOM: Jose Garcia ’15 protects the net September 25 during the Colonels’ 5-2 win against Kirksville. TOP LEFT: Head coach CPT Eric Reynolds watches from the sidelines September 25. TOP RIGHT: Team captain Jose Garcia Puerta ’13 dribbles past a Fatima player during MMA’s 0-2 loss October 5.

GONZALEZ BOTELLO NETS FIVE GOALS IN 9-1 VICTORY Match MVP Jesus Gonzalez Botello ’13 scored five times in the opener. Senior striker Francisco De Llano Crowley, wingman Patricio Herrera Villagomez ’13, midfielder Jose Estrada Pinon ’16 and freshman forward David Gu also found the net. “Jesus’ game play was nothing short of what a captain should do and that is to lead by example,” head coach CPT Eric Reynolds said. “He passed and

pushed his body to the limits to lead his team.” Herrera Villagomez made his mark on the scoreboard less than ten minutes in as he pounded a shot over the goalkeeper from about 20 yards away. Gonzalez Botello added a second goal minutes later on a similar shot. The Colonels held a 2-0 lead at halftime, but the Indians narrowed that lead minutes into the third quarter. MMA quickly quelled any comeback hopes when Gonzalez Botello scored again to restore a two-goal lead. The team never looked back after adding six more goals for a 9-1 final. Gu led the team with five assists. The freshman striker earned seven total points in his varsity debut. Also making his first appearance was goalkeeper Jose Reding Ortiz ’15 who stopped 10 of 11 Elsberry shots. The Fighting Colonels defense stood tall, featuring strong performances from center back Jacob Priester ’14 and sweeper Fernando Estrada Pinon ’14. “The win was an overall team effort. Every player had a direct role,” Reynolds said. “Elsberry players even complimented us on how good our sportsmanship and conduct was.” The team headed back to practice for the remainder of the week before a crosstown matchup on September 17, where the Colonels fell 0-2 to Mexico. MMA shut out the Bulldog offense in a scoreless second half but was

unable to make up for two early Mexico goals. Playing multiple games in consecutive days is never an easy task, but the varsity Colonels responded to a disappointing loss by grinding out a strong overtime victory over the Fatima Comets the following day. HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ SCORES GOLDEN GOAL IN VICTORY MMA trailed early when a Fatima roofed a goal over Reding Ortiz just ten minutes into the game. Jose Garcia Puerta ’13 answered midway through the first half to tie the score at 1-1. Gonzalez Botello gave the Colonels the lead minutes later off a cross from Victor Marroquin Gonzalez ’15. Gonzalez Botello’s sixth goal of the season put the team up 2-1 at halftime. The Colonels held their lead into the second half until the Comets, desperate for an equalizer, sent a ball into the box with 11 minutes remaining in the game. The ball bounced off a defender, shot up to the crossbar, came back down onto a Fatima player’s head and flew past Reding Ortiz. Despite several rushes in the final minutes, the second half ended at 2-2. Herrera Villagomez scored within minutes in the first extra period, giving the Colonels a 3-2 win. Marroquin Gonzalez ran down the right wing and sent a cross CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


VARSITY v. ELSBERRY: 9-1 W v. MEXICO: 0-2 L v. FATIMA: 3-2 W v. ROCK BRIDGE: 2-2 T v. KIRKSVILLE: 5-2 W v. ELSBERRY: 3-1 W v. FATIMA: 0-2 L v. CROCKER: 4-1 W v. SOUTHERN BOONE: 1-4 L v. FULTON: 4-5 L v. KIRKSVILLE: 3-1 W v. SOUTHERN BOONE: 0-7 L v. SMITHTON: 10-0 W v. MONTGOMERY: 10-0 W v. FULTON: 4-1 W v. SOUTHERN BOONE: 0-5 L JUNIOR VARSITY v. MEXICO: 1-2 L v. FATIMA: 1-1 T v. ROCK BRIDGE: 2-2 T v. KIRKSVILLE: 4-1 W v. KIRKSVILLE: 4-1 W v. FULTON: 1-0 W v. SOUTHERN BOONE: 2-2 T RIGHT: Jesus Herrera Alvarez del Castillo ’14 watches teammates practice September 25 before facing Kirksville. LEFT: Senior players Alexander Kolyasnikov and Jose Garcia Puerta are caught on camera September 20.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE into the box, where Herrera Villagomez settled the ball off his chest and onto his foot for a beautiful volley and the golden goal. Reding Ortiz saved 15 of 17 shots while Marroquin Gonzalez earned two assists. “It was a hard fought game that exemplified the sport,” Reynolds said. “This is our biggest win of the season to date.” The squad scored a 5-2 road victory September 25 against the Kirksville Tigers followed

by a rematch against Elsberry. Gonzalez Botello earned his third hat trick October 1 as the Colonels defeated the Indians for the second time. Gonzalez Botello scored all three goals in the 3-1 win and scored 13 goals in the first five games of the

season. He was assisted twice by Herrera Villagomez and once by Marroquin Gonzalez. MMA SUFFERS DOUBLEOVERTIME DEFEAT There was no rest for the Colonels — MMA played four

games in one week. The team traveled October 5 to compete in the Fatima High School Blue and Gold Tournament, where they squared off against Fatima, Crocker and Southern Boone. For the second time in the 2012-13 season, fans were treated to an

WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THE MMA SOCCER PROGRAM? Our soccer team is phenomenal. I think we need to recognize the soccer team more. That way we can get more nationalities playing. BLAKE BIBLES ’13

Soccer is the best sport at MMA. To improve I would suggest that we get consistency in returning players. Most of our players know how to play, but not together as a team.

NICHOLAS MABBS ’14

HIGH SCHOOL ROSTER BYRON AMIDON ’16, CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, FRANCISCO DE LLANO CROWLEY ’13, FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO ’13, SEBASTIAN DIAZ ’14, JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16, FERNANDO ESTRADA PINON ’14, HAYDEN FAIRBANKS ’14, BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO ’15, JOSE GARCIA ’15, JOSE GARCIA PUERTA ’13, ROGER GONZALEZ ’15, JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO ’13, DAVID GU ’16, PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ ’13, JAVIER IBANEZ POSADA ’14, ALEXANDER KOLYASNIKOV ’13, ALAN LOQUAY RAMSAUER ’16, VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15, FRANCISCO MORALES ’13, CHRISTIAN PAZ VALDEZ ’16, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, JOSE REDING ORTIZ ’15, GABRIEL RODRIGUEZ MENDOZA ’14, ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ ’14, ANDRES ROSADO ’14, RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR ’15 MIDDLE SCHOOL ROSTER JORGE ADUNA LEON ’17, JUAN GUERRA GONZALEZ ’18, JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18, JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17, MICHAEL HILT ’18, RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’17, SERGIO MAYER MORI ’17, ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17, JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17, DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17, MIGUEL QUIJANO ’18, SANTIAGO SADA ’18, RICARDO SALIDO VIVES ’17 MOST SEASON ASSISTS VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15

overtime thriller. The Colonels gave the Fulton Hornets a run for their money during a 4-5 double-overtime loss October 9. The Colonels battled fiercely as the second half dwindled. Fernando Estrada Pinon sent a free kick soaring into the Fulton penalty area. Herrera Villagomez fired home a free kick from 20 yards for his first goal of the night. His second goal was a header over the keeper at the top of the box. MMA trailed 2-4 late in the rain-soaked second half, but

the Colonels came on strong in the final 15 minutes of the game. Gonzalez Botello scored to bring MMA within one at the 15-minute mark. With time ticking down, MMA turned up the offensive pressure and kept the ball on the Fulton half of the field. Herrera Villagomez stepped in with three minutes remaining in regulation, bouncing a shot off the left post and in past the Hornets’ keeper for his seventh goal of the season. With the score tied at 4-4, a feverish offensive drill by Fulton failed in the final

three minutes and the teams headed to extra time. With players slip-sliding all over the soggy field, it was difficult for either team to gain an advantage. The Hornets netted the final goal late in the second overtime period, earning a victory. Reding Ortiz managed to stop 21 of 26 Fulton shots and Herrera Villagomez nabbed a hat trick. MMA played a Fall Family Weekend rematch against Kirksville on October 13. The team then traveled to Smithton

on October 18 and returned home with a 10-0 shutout victory. The Fighting Colonels scored three goals in the first half and seven in the second. Gonzalez Botello boasted four goals and two assists while Jose Estrada Pinon scored two goals. Scoring one goal each were Roger Gonzalez ’15, Christian Paz Valdez ’16, Gabriel Rodriguez Mendoza ’14 and Priester. Rodriguez had two assists; CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THE MMA SOCCER PROGRAM?

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Roger Gonzalez ’15, Marroquin Gonzalez, Alan Loquay Ramsauer ’16, Fernando Estrada Pinon and Garcia Puerta earned one assist each. MMA ADVANCES TO DISTRICT COMPETITION Following a season of ups and downs, the MMA varsity

Colonels were given six days to prepare for their opening round district matchup against Fulton. That rest may have been a contributing factor in the team’s comfortable victory over the Hornets on October 29. The No. 2 seeded Fulton fell to the No. 3 seeded Colonels in a 4-1 upset. Gonzalez Botello continued his success on the field, tallying three more goals to boost his total to 31.

Herrera Villagomez provided outstanding wing play once again, adding another goal and assisting on a Gonzalez Botello strike. Reding Ortiz stood steady for the Colonels, stopping 21 of 22 Hornets shots. The victory ensured MMA a spot in the Class 1 District 7 Championship game against Southern Boone, during which the Colonels sought to avenge a 0-7 loss to the Wildcats on October 15.

The No. 3 seeded Colonels fell to No. 1 seeded Southern Boone in the district title match November 1. The Eagles earned their third consecutive title via the 5-0 shutout victory. The Eagle defense held MMA to only one goal shot. “Boone likes to play the long ball and beat with you speed, and that’s what they were able to do in the first half,” Reynolds said.

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE SPORTS MOMENT? The district games in soccer. BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO ’15

Soccer when we won against the Tigers. ROGER GONZALEZ ’15

Soccer getting the alldistrict award.

DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17

Since my first year at MMA, I have known that the soccer team is the best. ... They have very good players. The coaches are always on the lookout for the team. The corps of cadets enjoys the games. Every year the soccer team earns a district award for their hard teamwork. The team improves every single day.

JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14

“We started to take possession of the ball, and I think that’s why we were able to shut their offense down in the second half.” The second-place district finish ended the first Fighting Colonels soccer season under Reynolds.

Head Coach Reynolds and Assistant Coach LT Christopher Bain led the way with only eight players returning from the previous season. “To be able to coach these kids to this level and see them walk off

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SPORT? Soccer because you run a lot. And it is a good way to stay healthy and at the same time you will have fun and you will be stronger.

BRANDON KACAR ’13

the field with their heads held high means a lot,” Reynolds said. Text courtesy of THE COLUMBIA DAILY TRIBUNE, THE MEXICO LEDGER and THE EAGLE

RIGHT: MMA players rest on the bench during the Fighting Colonels’ 9-1 defeat of the Elsberry Indians on September 11. LEFT: Junior varsity players huddle up for a pep talk during a 2-2 tie against Rock Bridge on September 20.


POSTSEASON HONORS

INSET: Soccer players pose for a team photo in early September. LARGE: Cadets get into position October 15 to face off against the Eagles at Southern Boone Football Field.

SENIORS GARCIA PUERTA, GONZALEZ BOTELLO JOIN ALL-STATE TEAM Two MMA senior soccer studentathletes were named to the Missouri Class 1 All-State Team with Honorable Mention during the 2012-13 season. Jose Garcia Puerta ’13 spent the first half of the season at midfield for the Fighting Colonels, but made a mid-season switch to sweeper. Garcia Puerta scored just one goal all season, but provided much-needed leadership on the defensive side of the soccer field. He recorded 168 steals during the 201213 campaign, including 22 in his final game against Southern Boone. Jesus Gonzalez Botello ’13 also flip-flopped positions. He began as an aggressive midfielder, but was called upon by head coach CPT Eric Reynolds to play forward. The move paid huge dividends for Reynolds and his team, as Gonzalez Botello netted 31 goals and assisted on nine. He peppered opposing keepers all season with 123 total shots. Six of Gonzalez Botello's 31 goals came in the season opener against Elsberry. Gonzalez Botello finished as one of the top 100 players in the state. He averaged 4.4 points and 2 goals per game, both good for third place overall in Missouri's Class 1. Forward Patricio Herrera Villagomez ’13 and goalkeeper Jose Reding Ortiz ’15 were also named to the Class 1 District 7 All-District first team, with defender Jacob Priester ’14 recognized as AllDistrict Honorable Mention. Reynolds was named Co-Coach of the Year in the All-Central Region of Class 1 private schools. He led the Fighting Colonels to a 9-6-1 record and a district championship appearance in his first season as head coach. Text courtesy of THE EAGLE

SOCCER COLONELS EARN SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD MMA Athletic Director CPT John Noel received a letter from a Fulton High School soccer fan in November praising Jacob Priester ’14 for outstanding sportsmanship on the field. This praise foreshadowed accolades to come — at its first annual banquet January 5, the Missouri State High School Soccer Coaches Association awarded the 2012-13 Fighting Colonels the Team Sportsmanship Award for displaying respectable play on the pitch. MMA was one of four finalists for the title, which was awarded based on votes from high school soccer coaches from across the state. The finalists received votes by member schools from MSHSSCA Classes 1, 2 and 3. Head coach CPT Eric Reynolds said he received numerous compliments about his players from a number of coaches at the banquet. He said Chris Miller, head coach of MMA’s district rival Southern Boone, praised the team. “I faced this team three times this season and I have seen them win with dignity, lose with dignity and treat their opponents with the utmost respect every time they set foot on the pitch regardless of the outcome,” Miller said. “MMA’s soccer program is a class act and stands out more than any team in the state.” Fatima head coach Kirby Keith added, “[the] boys have done an amazing job turning around the soccer program at MMA. They are very deserving of this award and represent everything the sport of soccer is about.” Text courtesy of THE EAGLE


IF YOU COULD HAVE ONE SUPER POWER, WHAT WOULD IT BE? WHY? Flight. It is very convenient.

XINSHUAI HU ’14

The power to stop time. ANDRES ROSADO ’14

To transport myself home in less than a minute so that I get to see my family more often.

EDMOND BIRUTA ’15

Teleportation. Most useful in real life.

YUN IL JEON ’16

Flight because I could go home and come back whenever I want.

GABRIEL RODRIGUEZ MENDOZA ’14

To go back in time.

CARLOS MATEOS MIRANDA ’15

Being able to breathe underwater. I want to be an Olympic swimmer.

SIMON BARRERA ’15

I would want to never have to sleep and spend all of my time in the most productive way possible. DAVID GU ’16

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN 10 YEARS? HOW WILL YOU GET THERE? Graduated from college and in business, hopefully making lots of money.

MARK MCKEE ’15

I see myself as an inventor of technology that could change the near future. GABRIEL SUMMERS ’16

I want to be a famous businessman because my parents are business people. I want to be a very successful person.

JIAHAO WU ’15

Working for somebody else, and I’m going to get there by working hard in school.

DASHENG SUN ’14

An army officer, and I will get there by going to Mizzou.

DEREK RYAN ’15

As an architect or engineer. BRENNAN MORAND ’16

Graduating from a prestigious medical school. DAVID GU ’16

BOTTOM LEFT: The MMA line of scrimmage prepares to hike against Central Academy on September 29. TOP LEFT: A cadet spots for a friend in the Centennial Gymtorium weight room February 4. RIGHT: Andres Garcia Almada ’13 stops to pose during MMA’s 5-6 loss to Paris at Paris High School on May 7.


TOP RIGHT: High school player Jose Estrada Pinon ’16 pauses on the sidelines during the Colonels’ loss to North Callaway on January 17. BOTTOM RIGHT: Cadets watch the high school home opener against Silex on November 29. LEFT: MMA high school players receive a pep talk from head coach LT Joseph Shafer during a time out against North Callaway on January 17.

FIGHTING COLONELS BASKETBALL The high school squad fell short in a winless 2012-13 season — but the middle school Fighting Colonels held their own. The B Team kicked off the season with a 12-10 overtime thriller victory October 31 against South Callaway. According to Assistant Coach LTC Willis Kleinsorge, MMA held the lead for the majority of the game. TaJae Blue ’17 earned 8 points. Julien Ngonga Mugabo ’17 and Tan Photsavat Pongsuea ’17 each contributed two points. The A Team faced a bigger, tougher and quicker Bulldog opponent. The Colonels held South Callaway to only a five-point lead

during the first quarter, but MMA made several turnovers and were out-rebounded by South Callaway. The underdogs eventually lost momentum and fell 12-47. Lead scorer Juan Hernandez Antillon ’17 earned 10 points, followed by Sean Fitzgerald ’17 and Antonio Montes Gutierrez ’17 who each contributed free throw point. The Colonels hit the court again the following evening for a hard-fought, come-from-behind 27-23 home victory against Community R-VI. According to Kleinsorge, MMA fumbled through the first half with turnovers and missed shots. The Trojans held a four-point lead at halftime.

“With some words of encouragement from the coaches and some team self-motivation, we settled down some in the second half and played good, team basketball,” Kleinsorge said. The Colonels forced multiple turnovers which led to easy baskets. Cadets took charge during the third quarter, ending with a two-point lead. Community fought hard in the fourth quarter — the score was tied with only four minutes left. When the final buzzer rang, MMA was victorious. Hernandez Antillon led the team with 13 points. Fitzgerald and Juan Leal ’18 made three baskets each. Blue and Eugenio Barrera Martinez ’17 boasted 2 points each.

The win was soon followed by another nailbiter — MMA’s 32-28 defeat of St. Brendan’s Irish on December 11. Hernandez Antillon dominated with 17 points, followed by Leal with 7 points and Fitzgerald with 6 points. According to Head Coach MAJ Michael Pemberton, defense was the key to the win. After a slow start, MMA guards broke into the passing lanes and disrupted the Irish game plan. “This was probably the best game we have played all season,” Pemberton said. The middle school squad soon boasted two defeats of the Irish including a 32-26 home

overtime victory December 18. Pemberton said the Colonels entered the physical game with a sluggish start, failing to convert chances. Hernandez Antillon topped the score sheet with 17 points and Leal boasted eight points. Fitzgerald contributed 5 points and Montes Gutierrez posted 2 points. Barrera, Pongsuea and Blue provided relief from the bench — all delivered a muchneeded spark. According to Pemberton, the star of the second half was the MMA defense. “They did an outstanding job,” Pemberton said. “I was extremely proud of our effort and perseverance.”

The Fighting Colonels forced several timely turnovers that turned into fast break opportunities in the extra frame, giving them a six-point victory. Pemberton and Kleinsorge named Fitzgerald and Hernandez Antillon the 2012-13 Most Valuable Players. Most Improved Players were Montes, Mugabo, Pongsuea and Jorge Aduna Leon ’17. Text courtesy of MAJ MICHAEL PEMBERTON and LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


RIGHT: The middle school basketball team gathers for a pep talk December 18 during MMA’s 3226 win against St. Brendan’s. LEFT: Middle school student-athlete Antonio Montes Gutierrez ’17 shows off his skills December 11. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE

HIGH SCHOOL BRENNAN DARNALL ’14 VINCENT BURKE ’15 DONALD CANARD ’15 EMILIO CUETO MENDEZ ’14 DILLION BROWN-DAWSON ’14 JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16 PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ ’13 JAVIER IBANEZ POSADA ’14 JINWOOK JUNG ’15 RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’13 STEVEN PRINSTER ’15 v. SILEX: L v. NORTH CALLAWAY: L v. WELLSVILLE-MIDDLETOWN: L v. TUSCUMBIA: L v. SOUTH CALLAWAY: L v. NEW BLOOMFIELD: L v. FATHER TOLTON: L v. JAMESTOWN: L v. VAN-FAR: L v. WINFIELD: L

MIDDLE SCHOOL JORGE ADUNA LEON ’17 EUGENIO BARRERA MARTINEZ ’17 TAJAE BLUE ’17 SEAN FITZGERALD ’17 JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17 JUAN LEAL ’18 ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17 JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17 TAN PHOTSAVAT PONGSUEA ’17 SANTIAGO SADA ’18 JEAN-LUC SHYAKA ’18 FRANCISCO SILLER ’18

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME?

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE MMA SPORTS MOMENT THIS YEAR? Every Saturday my friends and I used to play soccer. After soccer we went to Dos Arcos for dinner. FERNANDO

BLANCO GONZALEZ ’15

When I scored my first point in a basketball game.

ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17

I like strength and conditioning. It is challenging and helped me grow my muscle. PUREVSUREN

BYAMBATSEREN ’15

The first basketball game.

ARIYANDEV SANDUI ’15

Play basketball, read books and hang out with friends.

KHAS-OCHIR SOD-ERDENE ’14

Watch movies and go to the Canteen and hang out with my best friend Sky Henio. YANNI LE ’19

Play catch. ADAM SCHMITZ ’15

Play soccer. DAVID

LOZANO ’15

Listen to music. AUSTIN BOHANNON ’15 Play basketball.

JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17

Play basketball.

ENKHBILEGT LUVSANDORJ ’16


High school track athletes competed against 17 area schools May 11 at the 2012-13 district track meet at Mexico High School. MMA student-athletes didn’t advance to the sectional meet but placed high at districts. Hugh Harris ’15 earned 8th place in the 110M hurdles and 5th place in the 300M hurdles. Harris came within one place of qualifying for sectionals in the 300M hurdles. Hayden Fairbanks ’14 came in 10th in the 1600M run. “The competition at districts, as always, was intense this year. Our district contains many large schools,” Coach MAJ Larry McClarey said. “Our team performed well given the level of competition.” Middle school athletes proudly represented MMA at the Mexico Relays meet April 24 at Mexico High School. “There were over a dozen schools participating and the best of each school competed,” Coach LTC Willis Kleinsorge said. “We did quite well.” TaJae Blue ’17 placed fourth in the long jump with 15 feet, 9.5 inches. Daniel Perez Bracamontes ’17 placed fourth in the high jump with 4 feet, 10 inches — marking a two-inch improvement over his jump at the previous meet. Perez Bracamontes cleared the jump on his first attempt, breaking a six-way tie. “Our boys put forth a good effort once again,” Kleinsorge said. “They just had more competition. Two of the team members earned medals. Most of them improved their times or distances.” Middle school track athletes were honored by faculty, coaches and parents May 21 at the

Spring Sports Banquet. Blue was named Most Valuable Player and Tan Photsavat Pongsuea ’17 was named Most Improved Player. Charles Norman ’18 won the Team Player Award and Perez Bracamontes won the Sportsmanship Award. Several high school track athletes were also recognized. May 21. Harris was named Most Valuable Player, D’Cherion Owens ’15 was named Most Valuable Runner. David Lozano ’15 won the Colonel Richard B. Noonan Award for Excellence in Field Events. CROSS COUNTRY TEAM RETURNS AFTER HIATUS MMA’s cross country team returned for the 2012-13 season after a one-year absence. Colonel runners participated in the Linn Invitational on September 8 against 15 other mid-Missouri schools. The team average for the 5K race was 23:10. Top performers included Dallas Lopez ’14, who completed his race in 21:58. Gavin Hendee ’15 was named the Most Improved Runner. MMA also participated in the Fulton Invitational in September. “Many of our runners are new to the sport this year,” McClarey said. “It was their first taste of competitive racing. We are excited to get back to practice.” text courtesy of MAJ LARRY MCCLAREY and LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE TOP: The 2012-13 high school Colonels track team. BOTTOM: The 2012-13 middle school Colonels track team.

WHAT IS IT LIKE LIVING IN THE BARRACKS? Life in the barracks is good. My friends and I get along.

WEIHANG GAO ’15

[I enjoy] living with my friends and the ability to go across the hall and see them every day. HUNTER BUSH ’16

I do sometimes enjoy having a roommate because it can be a lot of fun. But sometimes I don’t like it because I want to have some privacy. DEREK RYAN ’15

The mentors in my barracks take care of us and [care] about us. EMILIO

CUETO MENDEZ ’14

HIGH SCHOOL ROSTER BYRON AMIDON ’16, AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14, HAYDEN FAIRBANKS ’14, DANIEL GARCIA ’14, JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO ’13, HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ ’15, HUGH HARRIS ’15, GAVIN HENDEE ’15, NISHAN KHANAL ’16, DALLAS LOPEZ ’14, DAVID LOZANO ’15, LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL ’13, KYLE MERTENS ’16, CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN ’13, D’CHERION OWENS ’15 MIDDLE SCHOOL ROSTER TAJAE BLUE ’17, EDWARD GBEMUDU ’17, JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18, JONATHON GROSSL ’17, JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17, LUCAS MOORE ’18, JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17, CHARLES NORMAN ’18, DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES ’17, TAN PHOTSAVAT PONGSUEA ’17, JEAN-LUC SHYAKA ’18


WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN I0 YEARS? HOW WILL YOU GET THERE? Professional tennis player. By training a lot. VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ ’15

Running my own business. XINSHUAI HU ’14

At a job that pays well. By working hard. ANDRES

ROSADO ’14

I like architecture. I think I will grow up and design buildings. PUREVSUREN

BYAMBATSEREN ’15

Blowing things up with tanks. Join the Marines. EDWARD

GEERNAERT ’14

HOW HAS MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY HELPED YOU BECOME A BETTER PLAYER? My first year at Missouri Military Academy, the alumni hired Adam Brack, a golf instructor from Florida, to instruct us. ... He worked oneon-one with us at certain times and at other times he worked with the entire team. He not only taught

the players how to score better on the course but he also helped our instructor learn different tactics to improve his teaching to cadets the following years. I have taken what I was taught and helped my friends at home become better golfers. Missouri

Military Academy has really helped me become a better golfer because of the connections all the alumni have and their willingness to help current cadets improve in any way possible. ALEC NOONAN ’13

v. JEFFERSON CITY: 4-5 L v. FULTON: 3-6 L v. MEXICO: 8-1 W v. FATHER TOLTON: 9-0 W v. KIRKSVILLE: 1-8 L v. HANNIBAL: 0-9 L v. MOBERLY: 3-6 L v. KIRKSVILLE: 2-7 L v. MEXICO 5-1: W v. FULTON: 3-5 L

GOLF

TENNIS Under the direction of head coach MAJ Michael Pemberton, the tennis teams earned an overall record of 4-9. Brennan Morand ’16, Emeterio Gomez Flores ’13, Marcelo Gomez Flores ’14, Nischal Khanal ’13, Victor Marroquin Gonzalez ’15, Francisco Morales ’13, John O’Leary ’13 and Jose Reding Ortiz ’15 make up the MMA tennis teams.

The Most Improved Player Award went to Emeterio Gomez Flores. Best First Year Player Marroquin Gonzalez also won the M. L. Lowe Award for the most valuable tennis team member. MMA faced Moberly on April 26. Emeterio Gomez Flores stomped the competition 10-3 and O’Leary defeated his opponent 10-7

in singles play. MMA’s best contest of the season was a shutout victory April 11 against Father Tolton. Tolton lost a singles match to Marroquin Gonzalez and a doubles match to Marroquin Gonzalez and Reding Ortiz. text courtesy of MAJ MICHAEL PEMBERTON and THE MOBERLY MONITOR

MMA 2012-13 varsity golfers: Chadwick Cardott ’14, Team Captain John Dillon ’13, Marcelo Gomez Flores ’14, Fernando Lopez Chumacero ’14 and Alec Noonan ’13. Patricio Herrera Villagomez ’13, Jacob Myers ’13 and Cody Olson ’13 were junior varsity golfers. The 2012-13 MMA record was 11-4. Cadets competed April 29 in the Class 3, District 4

tournament at Heritage Hills Golf Club in Moberly. The MMA team total was 419. Lopez Chumacero scored 89 for 18 holes at district competition. He competed May 6 in sectional competition. Lopez Chumacero was awarded two gold medals and one silver medal. Gomez Flores won a gold medal and Cardott won a silver medal.

Lopez Chumacero was named MVP and was awarded the Chuck Foley Golf Trophy at the 2013 Athletic Award Ceremony in May. Noonan was named the Most Improved Golfer. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and 1SG RANDY JACOBSON


BAND 158 BOY SCOUTS 162 DELTA PHI 163 CHORUS 164 EAGLE & TAPS 166 COLOR GUARD 167

DRAMATEERS 170 FBLA 174 FUSILIERS 176 MILITARY POLICE 177 HONOR GUARD 178 JROTC 180

“M” CLUB 184 NHS & NJHS 186 RAILSPLITTERS 188 SCUBA 190

Members of the Railsplitters, MMA’s WWII re-enactment club, prepare for battle November 10 in Ottawa, Kansas.


MMA BAND SWEEPS THE FLOOR AT DISTRICTS The Fighting Colonels Marching Band is a fixture at Missouri Military Academy. Cadets provide the music for all reviews, parades and ceremonies. For its first trip of the school year, the cadets marched as one of 28 bands in the 64th annual Hannibal Marching Band Festival on October 9. Six cadets joined CPT Joshua Yancey and MAJ Mike Shoemaker for a performance February 21 at the 37th Annual Military School Band Festival. The concert band earned an excellent rating at the MSHSAA District Large Ensemble Contest on March 22. Multiple MMA musicians also represented the Academy in individual competition. Three cadets received superior ratings at the district level. Daniel Diaz ’13, John O’Leary ’13 and Chadwick Cardott ’14 advanced to earn superior ratings in the state solo competition April 25 at the University of Missouri. “All of our cadets put in an extraordinary amount of extra time honing their skills to perfect their respective solos and ensembles,” Yancey said. “[Shoemaker] and I couldn’t be more proud.”

Band members received an impressive list of accolades at the annual MMA Festival of the Arts on April 20. The festival opened with performances by the middle school band. Cardott performed the trombone solo “Hasse Suite” followed by band performances including “Ballad for a Blue Horn,” which featured an alto saxophone solo by Diaz. O’Leary performed Chopin’s “Nocturne in C# Minor” on the piano, followed by Diaz’s “Nocturne” clarinet performance. After a performance by the high school concert band, Yancey presented awards and ribbons to outstanding band students. According to senior trumpet player and Battalion Commander John Dillon ’13, the MMA band focuses on competition, not sports performances. The band simply marches onto the field, forms an “M” and performs pep songs at football games. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and THE HANNIBAL COURIER-POST

2012-13 MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY FIGHTING COLONELS BAND RIBBONS AND STARS INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC RIBBON CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, EMILIO CUETO MENDEZ ’14, DANIEL DIAZ ’13, JOHN DILLON ’13, NISCHAL KHANAL ’13, JOHN O’LEARY ’13, JON SNYDER ’16, EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO ’13 GOLD STAR IN BAND GAVIN HENDEE ’15 and MILES O’KEEFE ’15

FIRST YEAR RIBBON TAJAE BLUE ’17, JORDAN BUTZ ’14, JACOB CONYERS ’16, CONNOR CUNNINGHAM ’16, RAUL ESCARCEGA MARTINEZ ’17, SEAN FITZGERALD ’17, DAVID GU ’16, GAVIN HENDEE ’15, YUN IL JEON ’16, JOSHUA JOHN ’17, MAVERICK JONES ’16, JONATHAN KIRKLAND ’16, MASON KUSSMAN ’15,

DAVID LAZCANO ’16, ROBERT MOORE ’16, BRENNAN MORAND ’16, JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO ’17, MILES O’KEEFE ’15, JASON RUSSELL ’16, JON SNYDER ’16, PEDRO TINOCO ’16, HANG ZHANG ’15 SECOND YEAR RIBBON, BRONZE STAR BLAKE BIBLES ’13, OLIVER FITZGERALD ’13,

KOTARO KASAMATSU ’15, JACOB MYERS ’13, D’CHERION OWENS ’15, TONY REED VAUGHAN ’15 THIRD YEAR RIBBON, SILVER STAR CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14 and AUSTIN TEAGUE ’14 FOURTH YEAR RIBBON, GOLD STAR DANIEL DIAZ ’13, JOHN DILLON ’13 and CODY OLSON ’13

BOTTOM: Brennan Morand ’16 practices playing his flute before the Veterans Day parade in St. Louis. TOP: The 2012-2013 MMA high school band.


TOP LEFT: The band prepares to perform September 28 during homecoming weekend. BOTTOM LEFT: The Fighting Colonels Band marches past the capitol building in Jefferson City during the inaugural parade January 14. TOP RIGHT: The 2012-2013 MMA middle school band.

MIDDLE SCHOOL BAND RIBBON EUGENIO BARRERA MARTINEZ ’17, CHANDLER BOLINGER ’19, SAMER DOUMIT ’18, JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON ’17, ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ ’17, MIGUEL QUIJANO ’18, CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA ’17, SANTIAGO SADA ’18, RICARDO SALIDO VIVES ’17, MASON SCOTT ’18, FRANCISCO SILLER ’18

2012-13 MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY FIGHTING COLONELS BAND HONORS John Philip Sousa Award For Outstanding Contribution To Band JACOB MEYERS ’13 Streep Brothers Band Award for loyalty, active participation and outstanding performance GAVIN HENDEE ’15, CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14 and OLIVER FITZGERALD ’13

DISTRICT EXCELLENT tenor saxophone YUN IL JEON ’16; tuba AUSTIN TEAGUE ’14; trombone GAVIN HENDEE ’15; brass quintet CODY OLSON ’13, JOHN DILLON ’13 and TONY REED VAUGHAN ’15 DISTRICT GOOD saxophone quartet BLAKE BIBLES ’13 and JACOB CONYERS ’16

STATE & DISTRICT SUPERIOR piano JOHN O’LEARY ’13 clarinet DANIEL DIAZ ’13 trombone CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14 Colonel Paul F. Cherches Award for Most Valuable Band Member; Crain-Jorischie Jazz Musician Award DANIEL DIAZ ’13


WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MMA MEMORY? The cake fight in the barracks on my birthday. JACOB CONYERS ’16

The advice the mentors, teachers and cadets gave me the times when I was homesick. EDMOND BIRUTA ’15 Time spent with my friends, either on general leave, uptowns, permits or just hanging out. DAVID GU ’16

Every single one of them.

YUN IL JEON ’16

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO FUTURE MMA STUDENTS? My first day, even though it was hard and unexpected.

JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18

Study hard and get good grades so that you can get somewhere in life.

JONATHON GROSSL ’17

Keep your uniform and room squared away and do your homework and this school becomes really easy.

CONNOR WILKINSON ’14

It may look hard at the beginning but don’t give up. You get used to it.

EDUARDO GONZALEZ LUNA FLORES ’16

Make a lot of friends. ALAN

LOQUAY RAMSAUER ’16

Listen to leaders.

QUENTIN HEASLER ’16

DELTA PHI SENIOR MEMBERS FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO, DANIEL DIAZ, JOHN DILLON, OLIVER FITZGERALD, JOSE GARCIA PUERTA, NISCHAL KHANAL, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT, EOGHAN MATTHEWS, JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS, JACOB MEYERS, JOHN O’LEARY

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Missouri Military Academy proudly offers young men multiple extracurricular opportunities. Boy Scout Troop 39 is a member of the Great River Council and the Grand Prairie District, which represent Columbia and northeast Missouri. Scouts have MMA's 288-acre campus at their disposal. From fishing and boating on the school's private lake to campouts in its wooded wilderness area, there is plenty

of room for scouts to learn about the great outdoors and work on merit badge projects. Experienced Scoutmasters MAJ Dennis Diederich gives each cadet one-on-one assistance as they conduct fun and structured activities in an exciting environment. Scouts who attend MMA are able to reach higher levels within the organization. Fifteen MMA cadets have become Eagle Scouts since 2000. To become an Eagle Scout, young men

must meet multiple requirements in addition to coordinating a community service project. MMA hosted an annual Cub Scout Day Camp in late May. According to Diederich, the camp typically brings several hundred Cub Scouts to campus from a number of midMissouri communities. Text courtesy of THE EAGLE

DELTA PHI SCHOLASTIC SOCIETY Delta Phi Scholastic Society recognizes exemplary academic standing. Pledges must earn a GPA of 3.7 or higher and have no grades below “C” for four consecutive months to become a Delta Phi associate member. Cadets who meet this requirement for at least six consecutive months are invited to become full members. Delta Phi was founded under the guidance of MAJ Marquess Wallace in May 1929 by a group of high-achieving cadets. Membership privileges include one permit per week and increased personal freedom.

On May 17, in the presence of faculty, family and MMA administration, cadets were inducted into Delta Phi. Keynote speaker Dr. Kurt Jefferson, Director of the Center for Engaging the World at Westminster College, addressed attendees in the Atrium at the annual Scholars Banquet and Initiation Ceremony. President Eoghan Matthews ’13 initiated incoming Delta Phi members and passed the presidency to Jack Solls ’14. MMA President Charles McGeorge congratulated cadets and presented senior keys, a symbol of scholarship during one’s senior year, to Delta

Phi members. Richard Massey-Scott ’13 and John Dillon ’13 led attendees in singing Old MMA and reciting the benediction as the ceremony adjourned. Delta Phi Scholastic Society is advised by Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi. Senior cadet officers were Vice President Francisco Del Rio Rivero, Secretary John Dillon and President Eoghan Matthews. Text courtesy of ERIN CHAMBERS


CADET The MMA Cadet Chorus, directed by Music Instructor and Fine Arts Department Chair MAJ Mike Shoemaker, entertains the Academy community and competes at the community, district and state levels in vocal music. Shoemaker conducts group and individual performances during rehearsals throughout the year. Members perform weekly at Vespers, provide music for the Baccalaureate and Commencement programs and give joint concerts with the band at special events.

Chorus members were highlighted at the Festival of the Arts on April 20. The event showcased MMA talent in visual and performing arts. Richard Massey-Scott ’13 performed a solo version of “Brother Will, Brother John.” Kotaro Kasamatsu ’15, Dallas Lopez ’14, Massey-Scott and Jacob Phillips ’14 were awarded ribbons for vocal music at the Festival. Other chorus performances during the school year included a September 29 performance during homecoming; an October 13 show

during Fall Family Weekend; a December 6 holiday-themed selection at the all-school meeting; a concert at the 72nd annual Evensong on December 20; and a February performance at the annual Missouri State Association of County Commissioners conference in Jefferson City. Jesus Herrera Alvarez del Castillo ’14 received the 2012-13 Phillip Russell award, which is presented to the best first-year chorus member. Massey-Scott was named Outstanding Contributor to Cadet Chorus.

Phillips, Massey-Scott and Kasamatsu earned excellent ratings and Lopez earned a good rating at the 2012-13 district-level vocal music competition. Text courtesy of THE EAGLE TOP RIGHT: The Chorus performs during the Festival of the Arts. BOTTOM RIGHT: MAJ Mike Shoemaker directs the Chorus on during Evensong.

CADET CHORUS MEMBERS: EDUARDO GONZALEZ LUNA FLORES ’16, JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14, QUENTIN HEASLER ’16, JON JOHNSTON ’14, JINWOOK JUNG ’15, KOTARO KASAMATSU ’15, ZHONGYI LI ’13, DALLAS LOPEZ ’14, ALAN LOQUAY RAMSAUER ’16, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13, SERGIO MAYER MORI ’17, JACK MOORE ’16, DANIEL PARES GARZON ’16, ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ ’14, GABRIEL SUMMERS ’16, COREY TRENT ’14


FAR RIGHT: The 2012-13 National and International Color Guards. MIDDLE: Dillion Brown-Dawson ’14 photographs Fall Family Weekend events October 13. LEFT: Jacob Taylor ’13 photographs opening weekend events August 25.

EAGLE AND TAPS STAFF: PARKER BRIDGE ’14, DILLION BROWN-DAWSON ’14, EMILIO CUETO MENDEZ ’14, JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO ’13, BLAKE GORMAN ’13, JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14, QI LI ’15, RICARDO MANCILLA VAZQUEZ ’13, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, ETHAN RACHELL ’13, ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ ’14, JACOB TAYLOR ’13, NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13, TONY REED VAUGHAN ’15, ZHUOTENG YING ’14

The Eagle newspaper and Taps yearbook are Missouri Military Academy’s student-run publications. Eagle and Taps classes provide a hands-on learning experience for aspiring journalists, who photograph school events, write articles and compose commentaries. Taps offers students an opportunity to be featured in bylines and photo credits in a publication which will be treasured for

decades. The yearbook is included in student fees and distributed to all cadets. The Eagle is the nation’s longest-running student newspaper, established in 1900 and published in hard copy until 2011. In its long history, The Eagle has earned the highest ranking in all three national scholastic press contests: a medalist title from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association; an All-American

title from the National Scholastic Press Association; and an International Honor Award from the Quill and Scroll. The publication has moved to online-only format as The E@gle, which is frequently updated and remains the main source of MMA news. text courtesy of THE CADET HANDBOOK

The Missouri Military Academy Color Guard includes both the National Color Guard and the International Color Guard. The National Color Guard carries the American flag, Missouri flag and MMA school flag at events including battalion reviews, athletic events, ceremonies and school functions. The International Color Guard posts in a limited number of special events, carrying the colors of every home nation of foreign

MMA cadets. In addition to flag bearers, two riflemen march alongside the Color Guard. The MMA Color Guard has frequently won state-level drill competitions. The unit was selected by the White House in 1987 to present the colors for President Ronald Reagan’s appearance in Columbia, Missouri. Both color guards regularly appear with the Fusiliers and drum and bugle corps at pregame and half-time shows.

Color Guard appearances during the 2012-13 school year included Missouri Governor Jay Nixon’s inaugural parade past the capitol building in Jefferson City on January 14; a November performance at the Veterans Day parade in Florissant; and a presentation at the Audrain County Courthouse to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on January 21. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and THE CADET HANDBOOK


TOP RIGHT: A cadet overlooks a mountain on the Peru Educational Tour on February 28. TOP LEFT: A fountain on the front lawn overlooks Echo barracks May 16. ERIN CHAMBERS BOTTOM LEFT: Hang Zhang ’15 marches during review October 28. BOTTOM RIGHT: An empty Barnard Hall classroom. LTC WILLIS KLEINSORGE


TOP RIGHT: Dramateers attend a stage adaptation of Beauty and the Beast on December 15 at the Orpheum Theatre in Omaha, Nebraska. BOTTOM RIGHT: The cast of Foggy Mountain Mayhem bids adieu to the audience November 11.

MMA DRAMATEERS PERFORM Cadets with a flair for the dramatic or comedic can audition for the MMA Dramateers, a theater troupe directed by CPT Jon Griffin. The Dramateers are composed of cadets interested in stagecraft, directing, costuming and acting in productions. The Dramateers

perform works that span from the classics to original adaptations. Immediately before their first show of the school year, students hosted a chicken dinner fundraiser to benefit the club. Cadets dressed in character served guests. On November 16 and 17, the Dramateers performed “Foggy

Mountain Mayhem,” an original stage comedy written by Griffin featuring three stranded city boys who stumble into a nest of hillbillies under siege by federal agents. Stars included John Dillon ’13 as Agent Smith; Sebastian Diaz ’14 as Agent Jones; Jacob Phillips ’14 as Agent Doe; Kyle Mertens

’16 as Sam; Blake Bibles ’13 as Jed; Chadwick Cardott ’14 as Whitney; Parker Bridge ’14 as Zeke; Jonathan Kirkland ’16 as Squirrel; John Benjamin Mertens ’13 as Grandpappy and Eoghan Matthews ’13 as Tom. Blake Gorman ’13 served as director’s assistant; Oliver Fitzgerald ’13 and Daniel

Diaz ’13 served as technology crew; and Kurtis Mennemeier ’13 and Gilberto Villarreal Guerrero ’13 served as stage crew. To prepare for their spring performance, the Dramateers trained with Griffin and Admissions Director Phillip Dunbridge in December.

Dunbridge, who has a background in theater, helped cadets train to present a realistic fight during a sword fighting scene. The Dramateers proudly presented a stage adaptation of William Goldman’s cult classic CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


2012-13 DRAMA RIBBONS AND STARS FIRST YEAR RIBBON KANE ANDERSON ’15, JACOB CONYERS ’16, MICHAEL COURTE ’16, DANIEL DIAZ ’13, SEBASTIAN DIAZ ’14, ALBERTO ELIZONDO CARRANZA ’18,

JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO ’18, BLAKE GORMAN ’13, HUGH HARRIS ’15, GAVIN HENDEE ’15, LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL ’13, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13,

KYLE MERTENS ’16, CHASE OSBORNE ’16, RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ ’13, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA ’14, NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13

2ND YEAR RIBBON, BRONZE STAR TAJAE BLUE ’17, OLIVER FITZGERALD ’13, EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES ’13, JONATHAN KIRKLAND ’16, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, EOGHAN MATTHEWS ’13, JACOB PHILLIPS ’14,

CHRISTIAN THOMAS ’13, GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRERO ’13 3RD YEAR RIBBON, SILVER STAR CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13,

BLAKE BIBLES ’13, PARKER BRIDGE ’14 4TH YEAR RIBBON, GOLD STAR JOHN DILLON ’13, JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS ’13

The opening night of the “Princess Bride” performance also featured a themed “Florinese Feast” dinner theater fundraiser. Guests enjoyed a catered meal of stoup, salad, steamed vegetables, Cornish game hen, salmon, cheese potatoes and creme brule. At the annual MMA Festival of Arts in April, the Dramateers performed Jabberwocky, a short play adapted by Griffin. Cadets also

acted out the skits Random #42 and X7, which were written entirely by Griffin. John Benjamin Mertens received the Stribling Dramateer award. Bibles was named the 201213 Most Versatile Dramateer. text courtesy of CHRISTINE SMITH and THE EAGLE

BOTTOM RIGHT: Kyle Mertens ’16 practices an emotional scene during rehearsal September 5. TOP RIGHT: The crowd applauds after Festival of Arts skit performances April 20. LEFT: Eoghan Matthews ’13 performs December 15 in Foggy Mountain Mayhem.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE film “The Princess Bride” on March 1 and 2 in the Centennial Gymtorium. Cadets performed selections of the beloved tale that has it all — true love, sword fights, beautiful ladies, dangerous creatures, miraculous cures and wicked, evil-hearted men. Dramateers detailed the deeds of such

classic characters as the heroic Westley, played by Matthews; the conniving Vizzini, played by Kyle Mertens; the powerhouse Fezzik, played by Emeterio Gomez Flores ’13; the avenging Inigo Montoya, played by John Benjamin Mertens; and Prince Humperdinck, played by Bridge. Audience members were brought face-to-face with the denizens of the Fire Swamp — the

dreaded “Rodents of Unusual Size” played by TaJae Blue ’17, Alberto Elizondo Carranza ’18 and Juan Gonzalez Luna Escoto ’18. Other stars included Richard Massey-Scott ’13 as Matteo Amadori; Bibles as Count Rugen; Phillips as Miracle Max; Jacob Priester ’14 as Yellin; Austin Bouche ’16, Michael Courte ’16 and David Lozano ’15 as noblemen; Villarreal Guerrero as The Albino; Kirkland as the

Clergyman; Ricardo Padilla Gonzalez ’13 as the sergeant; and Kane Anderson ’15, Hugh Harris ’15, Leonardo Lozano Villarreal ’13, Chase Osborne ’16, Santiago Prieto Ledesma ’14 and Nicholas Vanatta ’13 as soldiers. Tech crew members included Fitzgerald, Jacob Conyers ’16, Daniel Diaz, Gavin Hendee ’15, Mennemeier and Christian Thomas ’13. Villarreal Guerrero, Phillips and Nicholas Mabbs ’14 served as stage crew.


2012-13 FBLA DISTRICT COMPETITION HONORS

Future Business Leaders of America is the largest and oldest student business organization in the world. FBLA strives to prepare young people for careers in business. MMA’s chapter was chartered in 2008 by club adviser MAJ Peggy Reynard. In that time, according to Reynard, FBLA cadets have

FIRST PLACE: NISCHAL KHANAL ’13, PAULO ROSADO ’14, CONNOR WILKINSON ’14

THIRD PLACE: RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13, NISCHAL KHANAL ’13, PARKER BRIDGE ’14, BRENNAN DARNALL ’14

SECOND PLACE: KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, FRANCISCO MORALES ’13, CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, ANDRES ROSADO ’14, DANIEL DIAZ ’13, BRENNAN DARNALL ’14, CONNOR WILKINSON ’14, DIEGO MARTINEZ BLANCO ’13, JON JOHNSTON ’14, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13

FOURTH PLACE: FERNANDO ESTRADA PINON ’14, PARKER BRIDGE ’14, NISCHAL KHANAL ’13, JAVIER IBANEZ POSADA ’14

won 14 first-place district awards; more than 20 cadets have advanced to state competition; 18 presentations have been eligible for state competition; and FBLA cadets have won numerous first to tenth place state awards. On October 7, Reynard hosted an initiation ceremony for

2012-13 FBLA members. Reynard formally installed FBLA club officers including president Daniel Diaz ’13 and vice president Alec Noonan ’13. In the presence of MMA President Charles McGeorge, newly-appointed FBLA leaders lit candles to represent their

recognition of leadership responsibilities. Keith Reynard, 1995 MMA alumnus, returned to campus September 7 and addressed a crowd of FBLA members gathered in the library. Reynard discussed his college experience and the process of becoming a certified public

FIFTH PLACE: PARKER BRIDGE ’14, ALEC NOONAN ’13

accountant. He also spoke about his years with the Army’s finance branch in Germany and his time in the corporate world as a cost and public accountant. MMA cadets won dozens of honors at the 2012-13 FBLA District Competition. Global Business trio Nischal Khanal, Paulo Rosado ’14 and Connor Wilkinson ’14 won overall first place on the district test in the state of Missouri. According to Reynard, testing for state competition took

place the first week of March. Khanal, Rosado and Wilkinson took first place in the State FBLA Leadership Conference in Columbia, Missouri, in April 2013. Reynard said more than 3,000 FBLA from across the state attended the conference. The win qualified the trio for the National FBLA Leadership Conference in June. The win marked the third consecutive year that MMA FBLA members have qualified to attend the national competition.

“We are now preparing to go to National competition in June,” Reynard said. “We are so excited. We had a great day at the FBLA State Leadership Conference.” Individual cadets boasting wins at the state competition included Richard Massey-Scott ’13, who placed 11th in economics, and Kurtis Mennemeier ’13, who placed 23rd in sports management. “Our chapter is particularly good at the team events,” Reynard said. “It’s been a very

successful run. We have 12 first place district plaques and two state plaques displayed in my classroom.” text courtesy of THE EAGLE MAJ PEGGY REYNARD and CHRISTINE SMITH RIGHT: A proud MAJ Peggy Reynard poses April 24 with Global Business team members Nischal Khanal, Paolo Rosado ’14 and Connor Wilkinson ’14.


THE FUSILIERS The Fusiliers is a select group of young men who volunteer their free time to practice rifle drill movements and perform at state and regional events. The Fusilier unit performs in strict accordance with the U.S. Army Drill Manual. The Fusiliers have won the State Military School Championship

26 times. The platoon was the official Missouri unit in the inaugural parades for presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter. Members spend countless hours practicing to acquire the skills required to execute precision rifle drill movements. Members are selected on a competitive basis.

The Fusiliers perform intricate maneuvers while executing precision movements with the drill rifle. Movements are performed without verbal commands, requiring the cadets to memorize sequences while marching and spinning weapons in tight formations.

Parker Bridge ’14 was named the Fusilier of the Year. Eduardo Gonzalez Luna Flores ’16 was named the Best First Year Fusilier. text courtesy of SGM HENRY SUDDARTH

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE SPORTS MOMENT THIS YEAR? The Fusiliers’ Mother’s Day performance.

CHRISTIAN THOMAS ’13

Going to nationals for rifle team.

DALLAS LOPEZ ’14

My first time catching a Fusilier rifle from somebody flipping it in the air to me. SAMER DOUMIT ’18

MILITARY The Military Police are a group of elite cadets who enforce discipline and promote the behavior standards of the Corps of Cadets. Military Police assist cadets who fall out of

formation during reviews and parades. They also provide traffic control during all major events. MPs are advised by SGM Henry Suddarth and the Battalion S-2. The Military

Police function during Sunday reviews and parades, formal dances and special occasions such as commencement weekend, fall family weekend and homecoming weekend.

Felix Paz Valdez ’15 was named Military Policeman of the Year. text courtesy of THE CADET HANDBOOK


TOP RIGHT: Honor Guard members provide military detail for a Veterans funeral February 16. Select Missouri Military Academy cadets serve as members of the MMA Honor Guard, which was officially authorized in 2012 by the Missouri National Guard to provide full military honors during veteran funerals. Honor Guard cadet members are supervised by adviser MAJ Mike Shoemaker. Members must display exemplary military protocol and must be in good standing.

On April 25, a casket and cart were delivered to campus by David Pickering of Pickering Funeral Home in Mexico, Missouri. However unusual it may be, the purpose of the donation is quite serious. The casket will be used as a practice vessel by the Honor Guard. MAJ Brian Galarza, Assistant Commandant, worked for six months to coordinate the donation.

“Having an actual casket makes a huge difference in the cadets’ training for the Honor Guard,” Galarza said. “Precision of movement is a hallmark of military protocol and the casket will allow cadets to practice more effectively.” text courtesy of CHRISTINE SMITH

HOW WOULD YOU SPEND ONE MILLION DOLLARS? A Gran Torino or Maserati, a new pair of Michael Jordan shoes and a new house. TYLER VAUGHAN ’14

A new snare drum; a new computer; a speaker system; Microsoft Points for Xbox Live; a new TV; go to Roswell, NM. [I would] give the rest to various charities. ROBERT MOORE ’16 I would spend it on stuff I needed. PUREVSUREN BYAMBATSEREN ’15

I would use some money to buy something that I want and I would make my own company. JIAHAO WU ’15

Buy a house, a car and a business. IVAN

QUIROZ ESPINO ’14

BOTTOM RIGHT: Cadets pose following a funeral service September 28. Left photo by ERIN CHAMBERS


The Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) mission is to motivate young people to become better citizens. The JROTC program develops leadership skills, promotes a drug-free environment, strengthens character, emphasizes positive values, improves fitness and promotes a healthy lifestyle. MMA is recognized as an Honor Unit with Distinction — the Academy has special nomination privileges for the nation’s service academies. MMA military department instruction emphasizes leadership development and citizenship. Military subjects include first aid, drill, weapons familiarization, rifle marksmanship, American military history, organization of the armed services and land navigation.

TOP LEFT: The battalion staff stands at attention during senior review May 25. ERIN CHAMBERS TOP RIGHT: John Dillon ’13 attaches the competitive drill ribbon to Echo Company’s guidon May 24. BOTTOM: Blake Gorman ’13 holds a cadet’s ankles during a physical challenge at JCLC summer camp June 2, 2012.

A group of 15 MMA and Mexico High School students, supervised by SGM Henry Suddarth, 1SG Alan Hakes and 1SG Randy Jacobson, attended the JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge summer camp in June 2012 at Wentworth Military Academy. Activities included Army exercises, camping, rappelling and swimming. Programming focused on leadership, teamwork and character. Mexico High School students trained at MMA for months to start a MHS JROTC chapter and took part in JCLC for the first time. MHS cadet Madeline Brooks was appointed company commander for the duration of camp. Soldiers bar recipients included Jose Carrillo Noriega ’14, Weiding Ma ’14, Ricardo Mancilla Vazquez ’13, Christian Paz Valdez ’16, Felix Paz Valdez ’15, Roel Rodriguez Valdez ’14, Jason Russell ’16, Jack Solls ’14, Pedro Tinoco ’16 and Tyler Vaughan ’14. text courtesy of THE EAGLE

2012-13 SENIOR BATTALION STAFF Battalion Commander JOHN DILLON Executive Officer ANDRES GARCIA ALMADA S1 Adjutant ALEC NOONAN S2 Security & Intelligence EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES S3 Training & Operations EOGHAN MATTHEWS S4 Supply & Logistics GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRERO S5 Public Affairs NINGYONG QIN Sergeant Major ETHAN RACHELL 2012-13 BRAVO COMPANY SENIOR LEADERSHIP Commander FRANCISCO MORALES Executive Officer TYLER GROGAN First Sergeant FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO 2012-13 CHARLIE COMPANY SENIOR LEADERSHIP Commander JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO Executive Officer CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN First Sergeant RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ 2012-13 DELTA COMPANY SENIOR LEADERSHIP Commander JOSE GARCIA PUERTA Executive Officer RICARDO MANCILLA VAZQUEZ First Sergeant RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT 2012-13 ECHO COMPANY SENIOR LEADERSHIP Commander CPT DIEGO SALINAS ESTRADA Executive Officer DIEGO MARTINEZ BLANCO First Sergeant FRANCISCO DE LLANO CROWLEY


BOTTOM LEFT: Isaias Valtierra ’13 participates in homecoming review September 28. FAR RIGHT: Cadets embrace following Final Formation on May 25. CHRISTINE SMITH TOP LEFT: Cadets march to the front lawn for Final Formation on May 25. ERIN CHAMBERS MIDDLE LEFT: Chandler Bolinger ’19 poses with a loved one May 25. ERIN CHAMBERS


“M” CLUB “M” Club is Missouri Military Academy’s athletic honor organization. “M” Club is named for the “M” patch which appears on letter jackets and is earned through superior athletic performance. All letter jacket patches are authorized on an individual basis by the director of athletics. To be eligible for membership in “M” Club, a cadet must be awarded varsity letters in two different sports in two consecutive seasons. Responsibilities of “M” Club membership include promoting sportsmanship and organizing pep

rallies, meetings and parades in support of varsity teams. “M” Club student-athletes also help keep campus free of litter and assist the athletic department by manning the concession stand at all home sporting events. “M” Club is advised by Marc Wilson. “M” Club recognized Bravo Company in May by presenting the “M” Club Trophy at the annual Athletic Award Ceremony. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and MARC WILSON

2012-13 “M” CLUB MEMBERS BLAKE BIBLES ’13, AUSTIN BOUCHE ’16, DILLION BROWN-DAWSON ’14, CHADWICK CARDOTT ’14, BRENNAN DARNALL ’14, AUBREY DAVIDSON ’14, JOHN DILLON ’13, JOSE ESTRADA PINON ’16, JOSE GARCIA PUERTA ’13, EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES ’13, MARCELO GOMEZ FLORES ’14, JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO ’13, DAVID GU ’16, HUGH HARRIS ’15, PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ ’13, JON JOHNSTON ’14, DAVID LOZANO ’15, DALLAS LOPEZ ’14, LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL ’13, NICHOLAS MABBS ’14, RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT ’13, EOGHAN MATTHEWS ’13, KURTIS MENNEMEIER ’13, CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN ’13, JOHN O’LEARY ’13, D’CHERION OWENS ’15, JACOB PRIESTER ’14, FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO ’13, NICHOLAS VANATTA ’13, GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRERO ’13

WHY DO YOU THINK “M” CLUB IS IMPORTANT? They are always helping the athletic program become better.

DILLION BROWNDAWSON ’14

Because they represent how good the school can be.

It recognizes the athletes that give their time to represent our school. NICHOLAS MABBS ’14 It recognizes an athlete who has shown great performance in their sports skills, and motivates cadets to achieve that goal. JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14

BRANDON KACAR ’13

It recognizes the people who put in more effort. BLAKE BIBLES ’13

HOW DO YOU DEAL WITH PRESSURE? Go to a calm, quiet place. Like my room. JONATHON

Marching. It actually helps.

GROSSL ’17

EDUARDO GONZALEZ LUNA FLORES ’16

I take deep breaths.

Relax and think about it.

BRENNAN MORAND ’16

ORLANDO FARIAS ’16

By alleviating the sources that cause pressure one by one I eventually can be free. DAVID GU ’16

They are recognizing the people who work hard in athletics all year. BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI ’15

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME? Concentrating on what I need to do. Talking with my friends. Telling myself to calm down and enjoy the months left here at MMA. JUAN GONZALEZ

LUNA ESCOTO ’18

Play video games. BRANDON GUTERMAN ’15

I like to listen to music and lie down. PUREVSUREN BYAMBATSEREN ’15

Play video games.

ARIYANDEV SANDUI ’15

Play soccer. DAVID

LOZANO ’15

Sketch. JOHN

KOHM ’16

Play Xbox.

CHANNING CARLSON ’19

Either play ice hockey or lacrosse or hang out with my friends and drive around. BENJAMIN SWIGER ’14

Play on my computer.

MICHAEL PENNIMAN ’19


NATIONAL NHS MEMBERS President NISCHAL KHANAL ’13 Vice President JOHN DILLON ’13 Treasurer JACOB PRIESTER ’14 Secretary JACK SOLLS ’14 JORDAN BUTZ ’14 DALLAS LOPEZ ’14 NICHOLAS MABBS ’14 JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO ’14

National Honor Society is one of the oldest and most prestigious organizations which promote appropriate recognition of highachieving students. Chapters exist in more than 60 percent of the nation’s high schools and millions of students have been selected for membership. Millions of dollars in scholarships have been awarded to senior members since 1945 by the society’s parent organization, the

LEFT: National Honor Society members. RIGHT: National Junior Honor Society members.

National Association of Secondary School Principals. The MMA chapter of National Honor Society, led by adviser MAJ Michael Pemberton, has been an active part of the campus community since 2005. The MMA chapter of the National Junior Honor society, an NHS counterpart which recognizes middle school students, was founded by Pemberton in 2009.

NJHS members must in good standing and must meet a 3.3 GPA minimum. NHS cadets must meet a 3.7 GPA and are chosen by the Faculty Council, which considers candidates twice yearly based on high standards of scholarship, service, leadership and character. During battalion review on February 10, five cadets formally became members of NHS. Junior cadets Jesus Herrera Alvarez

del Castillo, Dallas Lopez, Nicholas Mabbs, Jacob Priester and Jack Solls were selected for NHS initiation. On May 17, in the presence of faculty, family members and MMA administration, additional cadets were inducted into NHS and NJHS by Nischal Khanal, NHS president, at the annual Scholars Banquet. “National Honor Society members are chosen and then expected to continue their

exemplary contributions to the school,” Pemberton said. “These students are the most worthy of this honor.” Sean Fitzgerald ’17 served as National Junior Honor Society president. TaJae Blue ’17 was NJHS vice president. text courtesy of THE EAGLE and MAJ MICHAEL PEMBERTON


WWII RE-ENACTMENT CLUB AWARDED GRANT FOR PURCHASE OF NEW WEAPONS Missouri Military Academy’s World War II re-enactment group the Railsplitters is led by CPT Mike Shoemaker with assistance from club founder LTC Tim Scherrer. MMA cadets represent the roles of infantryman, medic, cook and machine gunner. Railsplitters train using historically accurate uniforms, weapons and tactics. The Railsplitters club is the only such group at a military academy in the United States, providing members with leadership opportunities and insight into WWII history. The Railsplitters are recognized by the WWII Historical Reenactment Society and the Railsplitters Living History Company. The Railsplitters attend WWII re-enactments around the Midwest, which include tactical battles and public displays. The Garand Collectors Association (GCA) of Kansas City approved a $940 grant request for additional weapons for MMA’s Railsplitters in July 2012. According to Scherrer, the group received a gift of M1 garands for use at events throughout the year. Scherrer said the Railsplitters have received six rifles from the organization over the past few years, as well as two rifle donations from individual GCA members. From January 18-20, two Mexico High School JROTC cadets and 13 MMA cadets participated in a Battle of the Bulge re-enactment at Camp Clark in Nevada,

Missouri. Roles included a scout sniper section and a support element. Kyle Hughes ’12 led a one of two rifle squads. Former MMA student Jordan Uthe also participated. The company’s four Camp Clark missions began with a hasty attack to make contact with enemy Germans. Cadets defended their territory

Scherrer said the Railsplitters received compliments on performance authenticity. The evening of January 19, cadets celebrated their successful re-enactment by watching period films “Buck Privates and “This is the Army.” Cadets were visited by “Splitterclaus” — a nod to the original Battle of the Bulge, which was fought during Christmas 1944.

TOP RIGHT, BOTTOM: Cadets pursue enemy soldiers April 27 during the re-enactment at Jefferson Barracks. TOP LEFT: Railsplitters pose before a tent at a club event September 29. The Railsplitters strive to remain authentic to all aspects of a WWII soldier’s life; cadets peel potatoes for dinner, sleep in tents and ride in Jeeps.

with a flanking movement which pinned the Germans against a barrier. Cadets defended a town and hilltop in the second mission. Tyler Grogan ’13 served as designated marksman and barricaded the road leading to the Railsplitter position through sniper fire. The objective of the third mission was to recover a downed parachute containing “supplies” — a box of Hershey chocolate bars. Railsplitters were victorious and recovered the prize in only 17 minutes — umpires anticipated a mission completion time of 90 minutes. By the end of their final mission, an attack on a bridge, Scherrer estimated cadets had crossed 8 miles.

“Thanks to Scherrer and Shoemaker,” said Paul Petit ’85, who performed in a re-enactment with the Railsplitters. “Their passion and devotion to the Railsplitters and the boys is beyond imagination. I feel honored and proud to have been part of this fine group.” Other performances included a Veterans Day celebration in Columbia and a performance at the annual Audrain County Historical Society’s Walk Back in Time on September 30. A special Veterans Day review and Railsplitter performance wowed homecoming weekend guests and community members. text courtesy of LTC TIM SCHERRER and THE EAGLE

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MMA MEMORY?

The Railsplitters re-enactment at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis, Missouri. VINCENT BURKE ’15


WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL? WHY? David Beckham because I want to be a soccer player. MICHAEL Assistant Commandant and certified SCUBA instructor Mitch Moffitt ’82 offered a SCUBA diving course during the summer of 2012. Based on the success of the trial organization, Moffitt was approved to offer the program to cadets during the 2012-13 school year.

SCUBA club members are offered a unique opportunity to experience the exhilarating weightlessness of underwater diving in a safe environment. Members must pay a small fee which, in addition to school funds, pays to purchase diving equipment. Students must earn a WHAT IS YOUR BEST MMA MEMORY? perfect score on SCUBA When I was certified for SCUBA. ROY GRABOWSKI ’14

exams for two reasons. “We want our SCUBA divers to be the safest and best prepared divers upon date of certification,” Moffitt said. “We want to be recognized as the bestoverall SCUBA-certifying high school in the world.” MMA is the only middle and high school in the world recognized by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) in the college and university category.

PENNIMAN ’19

My dad because he will never give up and always does his best at everything he does.

BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO ’15

According to Moffitt, this is because “our program is much harder and more rigorous than the normal PADI courses.” Members of the open water class receive a PADI/ Project Aware certification and college credit. Open water divers include Admissions Coordinator Sandra Riutcel and Chandler

My dad. He went from nothing to having everything and getting his son into MMA.

MICHAEL COURTE ’16

Bolinger ’19, John Dillon ’13, Roy Grabowski ’14, Nicholas Mabbs ’14, Jonathan Richardson ’15, Derek Ryan ’15, Jon Snyder ’16 and Austin Teague ’14. Ricardo Gonzalez ’14 was certified as an advanced open water diver. text courtesy of MITCH MOFFITT and THE EAGLE

My aunt because she has helped me do a lot. AUSTIN

BOHANNON ’15

LEFT: Sandra Riutcel poses with SCUBA club members May 8. MIDDLE: Cadets practice diving at the MMA Natatorium. RIGHT: Members of the SCUBA club prepare to dive March 28.


COMMENCEMENT 194 STUDENT COMMENTARY 200 IN MEMORIAM 202 INDEX 204 COLOPHON 208 The gold dome of the new Stribling Hall peeks through the trees. JACOB TAYLOR ’13


LEFT: Families gather in the Chapel for the middle school final assembly May 24. RIGHT: Senior students prepare to sing Old MMA for the final time as cadets at the graduation ceremony May 25. Photos by ERIN CHAMBERS

124TH COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES BACCALAUREATE MMA hosted a short religious ceremony on May 24 preceding the senior banquet. A congregation of faculty, staff, students and families gathered to sing hymns and recite scripture readings in honor of the class of 2013. Following the invocation, which was presented by LTC Frank Giuseffi, MAJ Mike

Shoemaker directed the Cadet Chorus in singing “Promises of God.” MMA President Charles McGeorge gave a short speech, encouraging the members of the Class of 2013 and congratulating the proud parents and teachers who helped them achieve success. McGeorge defined courage and fear, calling on cadets to persevere and act with determination.

“Courage is the strength to stand up,” McGeorge said, “when it’s easier to remain quiet.” McGeorge finished by reading Invictus, his favorite poem. Giuseffi concluded the ceremony by leading a benediction and directing attendees to the Centennial Gymtorium for the senior banquet.

SENIOR BANQUET The class of 2013 passed through an arch of sabers for the final time May 24. MMA Alumni Association Board President Jesus Soriano ’82 inducted cadets in to the MMA Alumni Association. Ethan Rachell ’13 led toasts and Battalion Commander John Dillon ’13 presented the

class chronicle and slide show. Keynote speaker Soriano spoke about his time at MMA. Soriano served as Echo Company second floor commander, won the 1981 heavyweight weightlifting title, was a Fusilier and a member of the Glee Club. Soriano shared a letter written to his son on his graduation day with cadets.

Soriano and McGeorge presented awards to high-achieving seniors. Families received copies of the Mexico Ledger containing the 2013 MMA class photo. Richard Massey-Scott ’13 led seniors in a recitation of Old MMA. The ceremony ended with a benediction led by Alec Noonan ’13. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


LEFT: Francisco Morales ’13 cheers as he accepts the Honor Company Cup at the high school final assembly. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE HIGH SCHOOL FINAL ASSEMBLY The high school final assembly began May 24 with remarks from McGeorge, who led the signing of the National Anthem. Giuseffi presented academic awards and bandmaster CPT Joshua Yancey presented music awards.

Shoemaker then led the Cadet Chorus in singing “Courage Lives.” Military Instructor SGM Henry Suddarth presented military department awards. Miscellaneous awards were presented by 1SG Alan Hakes, Jean Lee Lamb, LTC Dan Arden of the Special Forces Association, Alan Heidbreder, LTC John Jones and AMVETS State Coordinator J. Scott Adams.

The 2013 Honor Company Cup was awarded to Bravo Company. Jesus Gonzalez Botello ’13 was awarded The Charles I. Wall Cup, the second-highest leadership award given to an MMA cadet. The Charles I. Wall Cup is presented annually to the cadet who typifies ideals of character including leadership, scholarship and service. The Legion of Honor, the highest award

RIGHT: D’Cherion Owens ’15 embraces a family member following Final Formation. ERIN CHAMBERS given to an MMA cadet, was presented to Dillon. The Legion of Honor is bestowed upon an outstanding cadet who demonstrates industry, integrity, leadership and loyalty. Athletic Director John Noel presented athletic awards and Commandant LTC Greg Seibert presented commandant department awards. McGeorge presented the last batch of awards before concluding the assembly ceremony.

SENIOR REVIEW Graduation day began with a stroke of bad luck — heavy rain. The battalion review, originally scheduled to take place on Colonels Field, was relocated indoors and held in the Field House. The Class of 2013’s cadet leaders formally transferred duties to their successors. McGeorge trumped the line for the final time in the 2012-13 school year. Dillon upheld

tradition and passed the Davison Saber to newly-appointed Battalion Commander Roel Rodriguez Valdez ’14. Following a series of emotional congratulations from family members, graduates led the way through the rain to the Centennial Gymtorium for the 124th Commencement Exercises. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


LEFT: Julien Ngonga Mugabo ’17 poses with family and LTC Willis Kleinsorge at Final Formation. CHRISTINE SMITH CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE GRADUATION CEREMONY MMA President Charles McGeorge announced the entrance of the class of 2013, led into the Gymtorium on May 25 by the battalion commander and valedictorian. Attendees recited the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by the presentation of middle school awards by Middle School Principal MAJ Richards Boyce. Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi presented academic awards.

McGeorge presented principal awards and Senior Class President Ethan Rachell presented a gift of $725 from the Class of 2013 for the purchase of a zip line and climbing wall for back campus. McGeorge presented the Robert H. Weaver Memorial Award for philanthropy to Joseph “Bo” C. Koster, whose generous bequest enabled MMA to develop and build the Koster Global Media Center. The complex is currently under construction and will use technology to connect students to the world. The following family members accepted

the award for the late Dr. Koster — former Academy President and Chairman of the Board of Trustees Charles Stribling III ’44; R. Stribling Koster, current chairman of the board of trustees; and current Board of Trustees Member Ann Antoniou. LTC Giuseffi presented the Dr. James C. Olson Award for Highest Scholarship in the Class of 2013 to Valedictorian and National Merit Finalist Nischal Khanal ’13. Khanal earned a perfect 800 on the math section of the SAT and was awarded nearly $1.2 million in scholarships from 14 institutions.

RIGHT: Jose Garcia Puerta ’13, Jose Bours Murrieta ’14, Jose Carrillo Noriega ’14 and Andres Garcia Almada ’13 pose for a photo May 25 on the front lawn at Final Formation. ERIN CHAMBERS Khanal addressed the audience and offered encouragement to his fellow graduates, urging seniors to make a difference in the world. The graduating class, which represents four countries, upheld the Academy’s record of 100 percent college admission for the fifth year in a row. Eoghan Matthews ’13 earned an appointment at the United States Military Academy and was accepted to three additional institutions, earning a total of $849,000 in college scholarships. McGeorge introduced keynote speaker retired USMC Colonel John Church, Jr. Church

is a decorated Marine Corps veteran who has taught and served as dean at multiple universities. Church currently serves as assistant professor at Immaculata University. The father of three spoke of his role models including his son Travis Joseph’s namesake, a fellow Marine who died in battle. Following Church’s standing ovation, the concert band performed “A Joyful Journey.” McGeorge presented senior cadet candidates with diplomas and declared the class of 2013 official graduates of MMA.

The ceremony closed with the signing of Old MMA and the benediction. Final Formation followed, with an emotional gathering of cadets and families on the front campus lawn. The bittersweet end of the 2012-13 school year came as cadets bid farewell to their brothers in the class of 2013. text courtesy of ERIN CHAMBERS and CHRISTINE SMITH


STARTING OVER an essay by BLAKE GORMAN ’13 Think of a high school environment. Imagine yourself as that kid that just seems to be in the background and doesn’t like to cause a scene. But it always seems to happen. You don’t know exactly why but your only intent is to help society do the right thing. But you always seem to get ridiculed for it and you seem to veer off your goal. One day you veer off. You do something very foolish that seems to have a negative effect. Not what you intended to do. You just want to restart but it isn’t possible. All you can do is wait until you naturally start over. Switch schools again. I have started over eight times. Starting over is a very hard thing to do at first. But when you experience it so many times you get used to it, you may even start enjoying it. ... As human beings we need to start over. The senior class of 2013 is seeing the end of their high school journey and they are going to be starting over in a whole new world where they are officially independent. Eighth graders are starting high school next year and they are going

MY OPPORTUNITY an essay by NICHOLAS MABBS ’14 It’s common for most people to think about boys in a military boarding school as troublemakers or delinquents. ... What they may not know is that most kids go to military school for the opportunity to learn another language, to achieve college acceptance, to improve their grades and to maintain high academic standards. More people need to see the advantages of military boarding schools, and how this program can help guide young men on the right track in life. Before I made the decision to go to military boarding school, I was like the average teenager. I was a bit of a rebel and did not care about my grades. I never thought about the future. I lived for the moment and only for it. When I was in trouble I always took the easy way out and never faced my consequences. This pattern was not only at school with my academics, but also with my family. I went from a “B” average student to a “D” student and started being disrespectful

to start all over academically. They will have to make the decision to be the top of their class or choose the ‘easier’ way and just get by. When most people think of starting over they think of it as playing a video game. They make that one mistake where the only option they have is to press the pause menu and hit restart. ... Whenever this happens you automatically restart at the last checkpoint in the game. ... In reality, starting over completely is not easy. But it is possible. As a senior, I am nervous, excited and anxious to see what the world has planned for me. I will be faced with opportunities that will allow me to excel in my career. Cadet Richard Massey-Scott ’13 said of his hard work at Missouri Military Academy, “It almost pains me to throw away three years of hard work, but I must move on.” The hard work pays off in some ways. You learn from your hard work. The knowledge that you obtain from your hard work carries over with you whenever you start over. New cadets that are coming to MMA next year: It is a different way of life.

MMA is a perfect example of starting over with a new slate. It will be very tough but if you work hard and respect your peers life will be a little easier. “You will be pushed out of your comfort zone, so be prepared to change old habits,” Jack Solls ’14 said. “MMA is what you make it. If you come into the school with a negative mindset, your first few months will most likely be difficult. MMA provides you with you plenty of opportunities. Taking advantage of them will not only improve your immediate life, but it will help ensure future success as well.” New boys adjust to the new way of life. My best advice for you is let the sky be the limit. Go above and beyond. We can’t control whenever we start over. We just do. Whether it be switching to a new school or switching to a different work place, it doesn’t matter. What matters is what we do in order to recreate that face behind the name. We can make the face of a successful person. For whom the sky is the limit. Or there is the face of a failure that has nothing to lose — so he just keeps digging deeper and deeper.

to my parents. I started to hang around negative people who had problems with the authorities. I was wasting my life away for the thrill of the moment. Going to boarding school was hard to cope with, but it was the right thing to do. With less distractions and a consistent schedule I was able to develop proper study habits and time management skills. My GPA increased and so did my opportunities to succeed. The first few months were hard. I was never good at cleaning my room. Being in uniform is also different. But it is easy to get used to. Being told what to do by a boy my age was the hardest thing for me. But I soon became used to the way things work and became a team player in order to better myself. I started to be more responsible for my actions. Once on the right path, I started to build a strong resume to send to colleges. ... Improving my GPA will make it easier to receive that acceptance letter I have been waiting for. I believe that having

“military academy” in my high school transcript makes it easier to get accepted to a better college. I am also expected to meet a certain amount of community service hours — at least twenty per year, if not more. I think that for those of us who attended MMA, college life overall will be easier because we are trained leaders. We know how to prioritize our time, and we can easily follow instructions in a group or lead a study team. Knowing how to walk, talk, act and dress like a gentleman will also help improve our overall appearance. All these qualities are taught to students at a military academy. Military boarding school has helped me regain the confidence I lost in previous schools. It helped me turn my life around and do what is right. I have become a responsible young man with a plan for my future. MMA has changed my life for the better. Soon, I will be one of the leaders of tomorrow.


IN MEMORIAM: LES BARNARD MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY COMMUNITY MOURNS LOSS OF ALUMNUS AND DONOR

MMA HONORS THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY MEMBERS WHO PASSED AWAY IN 2012-13 The MMA community mourns the loss of alumnus and philanthropist Leslie C. Barnard ’48, of Flossmoor, Ill., who died July 12, 2012. Summer school students took a moment during dinner to remember a man they’ve never met whose legacy was present all around them. “Generous is not even enough,” former MMA President Ron Kelly said. “He truly loved the school.” Les Barnard attended MMA from 1945 to 1948. He long remembered his time at Missouri Military Academy as a transformative experience and attributed his success as an entrepreneur to his MMA education. He was successful in the construction, real estate and hotel industries. “Les was a good student at MMA and a very good friend,”

classmate USAF (Ret.) THOMAS BLEDSOE ’61 SMSgt Albert Brown JOHN G. CAMPBELL '38 ’48 said. JUAN PABLO CELADA At MMA, he was DE LA GARZA widely respected by DAVID COUNTIE ’56 his classmates, the RANDY ETZKORN ’70 board of trustees, RICHARD GILDEHAUS ’62 staff and faculty as a GARY RUPERT GRAHAM '63 kind man of excellent FREDERICK “RICK” GUTH ’65 character. Barnard ED HARBUR ’50 was a loving husband CHRISTOPHER HORTON ‘03 to his wife, Joanne; TOM HUNGATE ’49 proud father of GAYLON JACKSON ’61 Nancy Barnard Knox, RUSSELL JACOBS Stephen Barnard and Ross Barnard; and a grandfather to their children. step up and serve the Alumni Association when it was revived Barnard was a lifelong supporter after World War II. He served as of Missouri Military Academy. the Association president in the Former MMA President and 1950s. Chairman of the Board of Trustees Charles R. Stribling “Les was a great person. We III ’44 remembered Barnard as will miss him tremendously,” an “incredibly loyal” alumnus classmate Wallace Beckley ’48 who was among the first to said.

LARRY JONES '50 GAYLON KENT ’45 MICHAEL H. KNOLL ’74 JAMES M. LEARAKOS ’56 SERGIO F. LUJAN ’05 AURIE MCCLELLAN BILL OGG ’42 CHARLES E. PICKETT '53 WILLIAM RASPBERRY ’51 GARY L. ROGERS ’58 BOB STEPHENSON CARL F. STINDEL ’58 GEORGE R. STOKER ’45 MELVIN WATKINS

In 2009, he decided to make the gift of a lifetime, contributing $3 million to construct MMA’s academic building, which was named Barnard Hall in his honor. A modern, state-of-the-art facility that transformed the way MMA cadets learn, Barnard Hall

RIGHT: Les Barnard speaks at the dedication of Barnard Hall in October 2009.

THE MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY COMMUNITY REMEMBERS ALUMNUS AND GENEROUS DONOR LES BERNARD Les will always be remembered as not only an accomplished cadet and later a highly successful businessman, but also as one of the Academy’s most generous benefactors and philanthropists. His vision and support in spearheading the construction of Barnard Hall will leave a lasting imprint on MMA cadets for generations to come. MMA Board of Trustees Chairman R. STRIBLING KOSTER

was the first LEED-certified high school constructed in the state of Missouri. Barnard’s gift remains the largest single contribution in MMA history. He found tremendous personal gratification from philanthropy, and once said he considered the dedication of

I am saddened to hear of Les Les and his wife Joanne have truly Barnard’s passing. Saddened because been transformational figures at he was a good friend and because he MMA. Their commitment to the was a man of character who will be institution and its cadets is manifest missed by many. Les was a successful in the beautiful state-of-the-art entrepreneur who worked hard all Barnard Hall which serves cadet his life and he always attributed his and members of our facultyeach and success to the values and lessons he every day. We will all truly missstaff this learned at MMA. I’ll miss Les. wonderful son of MMA. So will many others. former MMA President, USMC (Ret.) MAJGEN ROBERT FLANAGAN

Barnard Hall among the best moments in his life. Les and Joanne cut the ribbon during the Barnard Hall dedication in October 2009. “Due to the extraordinary generosity of one of MMA’s own, Les Bernard, we have an academic building that is

conducive to the intellectual development of today’s youth,” Academic Dean LTC Frank Giuseffi said. “So many of our cadets will benefit from Barnard Hall for years to come.” In many ways, Barnard Hall is a symbol of Les himself. Elegant. Innovative. Welcoming.

current MMA President CHARLES MCGEORGE

Supportive of a cadet’s ability to learn and grow. And in those walls, his spirit lives on. text courtesy of TERRY LOGUE and THE EAGLE


A

AMY ADAIR-GROVES: 43 MURRELL ADAMS: 46 ANDREW ADAMS: 62 J. SCOTT ADAMS: 196 JORGE ADUNA LEON: 4, 16, 58, 68, 94, 141, 149, 150 NOAH AGNE: 26, 38, 114 JUAN AGUIRRE GONZALEZ: 18, 20, 70, 79, 92, 119, 123, 126, 129 ERIN AKHTAR: 40 MIKE ALDEN: 129 BYRON AMIDON: 18, 20, 21, 39, 141, 152 CARLOS ANDA: 82 KANE ANDERSON: 22, 39, 70, 113, 129, 131, 172, 173 LINDA ANGEL: 88 LARRY ANTHONY: 46 ANN ANTONIOU: 198 DAN ARDEN: 196 SEAN ATAMIAN: 16, 47, 79, 106 BRUNO AVATANEO TRUQUI: 4, 22, 39, 70, 79, 100, 104, 185

B

CHRISTOPHER BAIN: 40, 62, 71, 107, 143 EDSEL BAKER: 40, 107, 114, 133 LIZ BARDIN: 208 WINNIE BARKER: 46 LESLIE C BARNARD: 202, 203 JOANNE BARNARD: 202 STEPHEN BARNARD: 202 ROSS BARNARD: 202 NANCY BARNARD KNOX: 202 SIMON BARRERA: 22, 24, 100, 101, 105, 146 EUGENIO BARRERA MARTINEZ: 16, 39, 68, 79, 92, 150, 161 MUNKHBOLD BATMUNKH: 22, 79 PENNY BEALMEAR: 40, 109 WALLACE BECKLEY: 208 TRACY BELTON: 88, 91 MARCOS BENAVIDES: 40, 50, 51, 62 BLAKE BIBLES: 30, 35, 36, 58, 66, 84, 126, 129, 140, 158, 161, 171, 172, 173, 185 STEVE BIGGERS 208 EDMOND BIRUTA: 22, 70, 135, 146, 162 AUSTIN BISE: 109 DEANNA BLAIR: 46 DAVID JESSE BLAIR: 46 JAMIE BLAIR: 46 FERNANDO BLANCO GONZALEZ: 22, 70, 135, 150 RHONDA BLAUE: 43, 62 THOMAS BLEDSOE: 202 JOSHUA BLOOTHOOFD: 22, 79, 129

TAJAE BLUE: 16, 39, 58, 68, 69, 71, 94, 117, 129, 148, 150, 152, 158, 172, 173, 187 AUSTIN BOHANNON: 22, 100, 105, 134, 151, 191 JASON BOISSEAU: 30, 35, 36, 38, 58, 129 CHANDLER BOLINGER: 14, 68, 120, 135, 161, 182, 191 NOLAN BORGSMILLER: 23, 108, 114, 129 AUSTIN BOUCHE: 18, 129, 172, 185 JOSE BOURS MURRIETA: 26, 29, 37, 70, 98, 117, 134, 199 RICHARDS BOYCE: 40, 52, 86, 87, 108, 109, 133, 198 COETTA BRASHEAR: 208 PARKER BRIDGE: 26, 34, 58, 121, 166, 171, 172, 173, 175, 176 KATHY BROOKS: 43 CASSANDRA BROOKS: 44, 89, 91 MADELINE BROOKS: 91, 109, 117, 180 ALBERT BROWN: 202 DILLION BROWN-DAWSON: 25, 26, 38, 41, 120, 129, 150, 166, 185 MARTHA BRUCE: 46, 64 MICHAEL BUCKALLEW: 46 GATES BURCHFIELD: 26, 29, 79, 92, 111 VINCENT BURKE: 23, 24, 70, 79, 95, 111, 150, 189 JACKIE BURKE: 91 DAN BURTON: 46 HUNTER BUSH: 18, 70, 79, 129, 135, 152 JORDAN BUTZ: 26, 136, 158, 186 PUREVSUREN BYAMBATSEREN: 23, 79, 150, 154, 178, 185

C

JOHN G CAMPBELL: 202 DONALD CANARD: 22, 23, 79, 150 CHADWICK CARDOTT: 26, 34, 38, 58, 141, 155, 158, 161, 171, 173, 174, 185 RANDALL CARDOTT: 88 PATRICIO CARDOTT: 88 CHANNING CARLSON: 14, 39, 56, 66, 79, 114, 118, 185 CAROLINE CARNAHAN: 88 JOSE CARRILLO NORIEGA: 26, 29, 50, 51, 58, 70, 104, 117, 180, 199 JUAN PABLO CELADA: 202 ERIN CHAMBERS: 44, 51, 57, 59, 62, 65, 69, 75, 77, 91, 94, 103, 111, 163, 168, 178, 180, 182, 194, 195, 197, 198, 199, 208 BILL CHRISMER: 46 TRAVIS JOSEPH CHURCH: 199 JOHN CHURCH JR: 199 MARK CLARK: 46 MATT CLERVI: 15 JACOB CONYERS: 4, 18, 38, 92, 158, 161, 162, 173

DAVID COUNTIE: 202 MICHAEL COURTE: 18, 70, 114, 172, 191 DAVID CROSS: 46 EMILIO CUETO MENDEZ: 4, 26, 41,150, 152, 168, 166 CONNOR CUNNINGHAM: 18, 111, 114, 129, 158

D

DANA DABNEY: 82 MELODY DALY: 46 BRENNAN DARNALL: 26, 78, 95, 108, 129, 150, 174, 185 AUBREY DAVIDSON: 24, 26, 38, 41, 58, 79, 129, 185 BRIAN DAVIS: 46, 94 FRANCISCO DE LLANO CROWLEY: 30, 35, 36, 68, 111, 138, 141, 181 SANDIR DE SILVA: 4, 18, 20, 58, 66, 79: FRANCISCO DEL RIO RIVERO: 30, 35, 36, 58, 70, 119, 141, 163, 181, 185 SEBASTIAN DIAZ: 26, 58, 70, 79, 114, 117, 118, 141, 170 DANIEL DIAZ: 30, 35, 36, 58, 158, 161, 163, 171, 172, 173, 174 MARYANN DICKHERBER: 46 DENNIS DIEDERICH: 46, 64, 162 WALT DIEHL: 82 JOHN DILLON: 30, 34, 35, 36, 58, 47, 66, 69, 85, 86, 91, 155, 158, 161, 163, 170, 173, 181, 185, 186, 191, 195, 197 CINDY DILLON: 88, 89, 91 CLAY DODSON: 23 SAMER DOUMIT: 15, 52, 68, 79, 115, 161, 176 LIAM DOWNING: 18 PHILLIP DUNBRIDGE: 44, 100, 171

E

CLAYTON EBERT: 16, 70, 95, 120, 132, 135 EMILIO ELIAS VIDAURRI: 18, 70, 79, 110 ALBERTO ELIZONDO CARRANZA: 15, 79, 87, 172 TIPPE EMMOTT: 117 ROBERT ERNEST: 82 RAUL ESCARCEGA MARTINEZ: 16, 68, 122, 158 JOSE ESTRADA PINON: 18, 21, 46, 58, 69, 70, 71, 94, 114, 115, 117, 138, 141, 149, 150, 185 FERNANDO ESTRADA PINON: 26, 79, 94, 114, 118, 138, 141, 142, 175 RANDY ETZKORN: 202

F

HAYDEN FAIRBANKS: 26, 70, 79, 119, 141, 152

ORLANDO FARIAS: 18, 20, 69, 70, 79, 94, 184 GAILYN FENNEWALD: 40 LEIGH ANN FINCK: 40 SEAN FITZGERALD: 16, 38, 58, 68, 71, 129, 148, 149, 150, 158, 187 OLIVER FITZGERALD: 30, 35, 36, 44, 58, 105, 158, 161, 163, 171, 173 ROBERT FLANAGAN: 35, 60, 61, 203 DEBBIE FLANAGAN: 60 JUAN RAMON FLORES TENORIO: 23, 47, 58, 70, 79, 111, 114 WILLIAM FLOYD JR: 60 CRAIG FLYNN: 41 JOSEPH FUGARO 46

G

BRIAN GALARZA: 46, 98, 108, 117, 178 BRAIS GALVAN SOTELO: 23, 58, 66, 74, 79, 141, 142, 191 WEIHANG GAO: 23, 70, 118, 152 BRAULIO GARCIA: 14, 57, 68, 79, 82 OSCAR GARCIA: 18, 37, 133 JOSE GARCIA: 82 JOSE GARCIA: 23, 25, 39, 58, 70, 138, 141 DANIEL GARCIA: 26, 79, 129, 152 ANDRES GARCIA ALMADA: 30, 35, 36, 58, 98, 109, 137, 147, 181, 199 JOSE GARCIA PUERTA: 30, 35, 36, 45, 66, 70, 109, 139, 140, 141, 142, 145, 163, 181, 185, 199 PABLO GARZA-RIOS-BLANCO: 14, 57, 68, 79, 83, 99, 133, 134 DONNA GASTLER: 46 EDWARD GBEMUDU: 16, 79, 116, 152 EDWARD GEERNAERT: 20, 26, 119, 129, 154 RICHARD GILDEHAUS: 202 LAWANAH GILLETTE: 46, 62 FRANK GIUSEFFI: 23, 41, 48, 67, 68, 75, 76, 86, 87, 100, 107, 163, 194, 196, 198, 203 MARCELO GOMEZ FLORES: 26, 114, 129, 154, 155, 185 EMETERIO GOMEZ FLORES: 31, 32, 35, 36, 154, 172, 173, 181, 185 VICTOR GOMEZ RAMIREZ: 23, 70, 106, 136, 137 ROGER GONZALEZ: 23, 45, 70, 79, 106, 141, 142 RICARDO GONZALEZ: 26, 134, 191 JESUS GONZALEZ BOTELLO: 31, 35, 36, 87, 114, 138, 140, 141, 142, 145, 152, 166, 181, 185, 196 JUAN GONZALEZ LUNA ESCOTO: 15, 68, 69, 70, 79, 141, 152, 162, 172, 184 EDUARDO GONZALEZ LUNA FLORES: 18, 79, 163, 165, 176, 184 OSCAR GONZALEZ SCHIEFENBUSCH: 26, 38, 79 TIM GOOCH: 126

BLAKE GORMAN: 31, 35, 36, 37, 47, 58, 70, 166, 171, 172, 180, 200 ROY GRABOWSKI: 26, 110, 117, 134, 190, 191 GARY RUPERT GRAHAM: 202 HECTOR GRANILLO MENDEZ: 23, 70, 79, 115, 129, 152 BARBARA GREEN: 106, 109 JONATHAN GRIFFIN: 41, 170, 171, 173 TYLER GROGAN: 24, 30, 31, 35, 36, 41, 48, 58, 114, 119, 137, 181, 188 JONATHON GROSSL: 16, 152, 163, 184 DAVID GU: 18, 58, 66, 135, 138, 141, 146, 147, 158, 162, 184, 185 JUAN GUERRA GONZALEZ: 15, 53, 68, 79, 141 BRANDON GUTERMAN: 23, 115, 118, 185 FREDERICK GUTH: 88, 202 OSCAR GUTIERREZ: 31, 35, 36, 37, 70, 129

H

ALAN HAKES: 41, 77, 89, 91, 109, 111, 112, 117, 180, 196 ANDREW HANSEN: 16, 118, 120, 121 ED HARBUR: 202 IRENE HARD: 46 WHITTEN HARDY: 77 HUGH HARRIS: 23, 74, 152, 172, 185 JIALUN HE: 27, 42 JOSEPH HEAD: 44, 47 QUENTIN HEASLER: 18, 70, 92, 133, 163, 165 TODD HELM: 82 GAVIN HENDEE: 23, 58, 92, 94, 152, 158, 161, 172, 173 SKY HENIO: 14, 38, 57, 79, 133, 151 JUAN HERNANDEZ ANTILLON: 16, 38, 56, 68, 69, 79, 81, 94, 134, 141, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 161 JESUS HERRERA ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO: 27, 126, 129, 141, 165, 166, 185, 186, 187 PATRICIO HERRERA VILLAGOMEZ: 31, 35, 36, 79, 129, 138, 140, 141, 142, 145, 150, 155, 185 CHAD HERRON: 47 DAVID HIGGINS: 47 JAMES HILDERMAN: 46, 64 MICHAEL HILT: 15, 118, 122, 141 CHRISTOPHER DAVID HORTON: 82, 202 YIHENG HU: 16, 68 XINSHUAI HU: 27, 43, 70, 146, 154 KYLE HUGHES: 188 TOM HUNGATE: 202 JULIA HUNT: 46 BRADLEY HUTCHINSON: 109

I

JAVIER IBANEZ POSADA: 27, 50, 51, 141, 150, 175

J

GAYLON JACKSON: 202 RUSSELL JACOBS: 202 RANDY JACOBSON: 41, 77, 96, 109, 112, 155, 180 JON JAY: 114 KURTIS JEFFERSON: 163 BENJAMIN JENNISON: 27, 28, 70, 79, 106, 129, 133 YUN IL JEON: 18, 21, 58, 66, 68, 94, 129, 146, 158, 161, 162 JOSHUA JOHN: 10, 14, 16, 96, 158 JON JOHNSTON: 27, 38, 71, 94, 108, 119, 129, 165, 174, 185 MAVERICK JONES: 18, 129, 158 JASON JONES: 46 LORI JONES: 88, 89 SHAWN JONES: 88 JOHN JONES: 196 LARRY JONES: 202 JINWOOK JUNG: 23, 79, 150, 165

K

BRANDON KACAR: 31, 35, 143, 185 KOTARO KASAMATSU: 23, 25, 58, 158, 164, 165 JEFF KAYS: 82 KIRBY KEITH: 145 JOE KELLY: 114 RON KELLY: 202 CLAYTON KENNEDY: 108 GAYLON KENT: 202 NISHAN KHANAL: 18, 39, 58, 66, 67, 109, 152 NISCHAL KHANAL: 31, 35, 36, 58, 66, 67, 109, 154, 158, 163, 174, 175, 186, 187, 198, 199 ANANTA KHANAL: 41, 66, 109 INDIRA KHANAL: 66, 109 RAY KING: 114 JONATHAN KIRKLAND: 18, 70, 94, 111, 171, 172, 173 EDWARD “FLIP” KLEIN: 111 WILLIS KLEINSORGE: 14, 41, 53, 55, 56, 57, 62, 68, 92, 93, 94, 99, 121, 135, 148, 149, 152, 169, 198, 208 MELISSA KNIPP: 41 MICHAEL H KNOLL: 202 JOHN KOHM: 20, 47, 70, 134, 185 ALEXANDER KOLYASNIKOV: 31, 35, 36, 68, 140, 141 R STRIBLING KOSTER: 60, 82, 198, 203 JANIE KOSTER: 82 JOSEPH BO C KOSTER: 198 MASON KUSSMAN: 24, 158


L

JEAN LEE LAMB: 196 DMITRI LAMPING: 15, 52, 117 KATHERINE LARISON: 41, 52 TOM LAWLESS: 114 DAVID LAZCANO: 20, 58, 129, 158 YANNI LE: 14, 57, 58, 66, 68, 79, 92, 106, 151 JUAN LEAL: 15, 39, 58, 66, 68, 79, 94, 129, 148, 149, 150 JAMES M LEARAKOS: 202 FAYE LEHNEN: 46, 64 QI LI: 24, 58, 70, 166 ZHONGYI LI: 32, 35, 36, 165 JACKIE LI: 44, 68, 109 KELLY LLOYD: 51 TERRY LOGUE: 44, 64, 65, 82, 203 DALLAS LOPEZ: 27, 28, 38, 58, 69, 115, 117, 152, 164, 165, 176, 185, 186, 187 FERNANDO LOPEZ CHUMACERO: 27, 50, 51, 58, 79, 155 ALAN LOQUAY RAMSAUER: 20, 79, 95, 141, 142, 163, 165 DAVID LOZANO: 24, 137, 151, 152, 172, 185 LEONARDO LOZANO VILLARREAL: 32, 35, 36, 109, 129, 152, 172, 185 CHERYL LU: 41, 63 JESSICA LUDOVICY: 109, 117, 119 WADE LUECKENOTTE: 24, 39, 41, 119 SERGIO F LUJAN: 202 ENKHBILEGT LUVSANDORJ: 20, 70, 110, 151

M

WEIDING MA: 6, 28, 37, 180 NICHOLAS MABBS: 28, 38, 58, 70, 126, 129, 131, 132, 140, 173, 185, 186, 187, 191, 200 LAUREN MABBS: 88 STEVE MAGNUS: 106 JAVIER MALPICA PALMEROS: 28, 58, 79, 111, 114, 116 RICARDO MANCILLA VAZQUEZ: 8, 32, 35, 37, 45, 92, 109, 166, 180, 181 RODRIGO MARROQUIN GONZALEZ: 16, 56, 58, 66, 68, 79, 81, 94, 133, 141 VICTOR MARROQUIN GONZALEZ: 24, 39, 79, 94, 138, 140, 141, 142, 154 PAMELA MARSHALL: 88 GAVIN MARTIN: 20, 109 MICHELLE MARTINEZ: 27, 44, 63 DIEGO MARTINEZ BLANCO: 24, 32, 35, 37, 46, 98, 114, 174, 181 RICHARD MASSEY-SCOTT: 32, 35, 37, 58, 86, 163, 164,165, 172, 173, 174, 175, 181,185, 195, 200 CARLOS MATEOS MIRANDA: 24, 79, 94, 146 EOGHAN MATTHEWS: 31, 32, 35, 37, 59, 66, 69, 113, 163, 171, 172, 173, 181, 185, 199

MARY MAUPIN: 41, 55, 58 GREG MAXIMOVITCH: 2, 44, 62, 63 SERGIO MAYER MORI: 16, 17, 59, 68, 121, 141, 165 LARRY MCCLAREY: 41, 62, 152 AURIE MCCLELLAN 202 MARVIN MCCOWAN 112 GREG MCDONALD: 41, 126 CHARLES MCGEORGE: 4, 15, 27, 43, 53, 60, 61, 65, 77, 82, 86, 87, 163, 174, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 203 MARK MCKEE: 24, 79, 119, 129, 147 JESSE MCKEE: 46 JIM MEDLEY: 43, 82, 86, 103, 110, 111 LARRY MEHRHOFF: 46 ANNETTE MEINHEIT: 41, 52, 126 KURTIS MENNEMEIER: 33, 35, 37, 59, 79, 129, 166, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 185 TYLER MERRITT: 111 KYLE MERTENS: 20, 71, 152, 171, 172, 173 JOHN BENJAMIN MERTENS: 33, 35, 37, 59, 66, 69, 70, 163, 171, 172, 173 SHANNON MERTENS 88 CHRIS MILLER: 145 MITCH MOFFITT: 44, 61, 74, 190 ANTONIO MONTES GUTIERREZ:16, 39, 68, 79, 141, 148, 149, 150, 161 LUCAS MOORE: 15, 81, 129, 152 WILLIAM MOORE: 14, 15, 39, 72, 79, 95, 115 JACK MOORE: 20, 129, 165 ROBERT MOORE: 20, 96, 158, 178 FRANCISCO MORALES: 33, 35, 37, 70, 81, 141, 154, 174, 181, 196 BRENNAN MORAND: 20, 94, 147, 154, 158, 159, 161, 184 KEITH MORGAN: 45, 75 GEORGE MORRELL: 51 CHERYL MORRIS: 19, 45, 63, 208 GREG MORTON: 47, 62, 64 JULIEN NGONGA MUGABO: 17, 39, 52, 59, 68, 141, 148, 149, 150, 152, 158, 198 TOM MULLEN: 51, 82, 100 MARK MURPHY: 41, 75 JACOB MYERS: 33, 35, 37, 59, 155, 158, 163 KATIE MYERS: 88

N

EMILIO NANNI DE VALLE: 20, 45, 70, 79, 116, 117, 123, 208 JEFF NEDBLAKE: 82 HANS NEUMANN: 18 DAVID NEVERGALL: 46 CHRISTOPHER NGUYEN: 30, 33, 35, 37, 110, 129, 152, 181, 185 ROSS NIGRO: 74

JOHN NOEL: 10, 40, 41, 67, 126, 130, 131, 145, 197 ALEC NOONAN: 30, 33, 35, 37, 59, 87, 155, 174, 175, 181, 195 CHARLES NORMAN: 15, 39, 68, 70, 72, 129, 132, 152

O

BILL OGG: 202 MILES O'KEEFE: 24, 158 JOHN O'LEARY: 33, 35, 37, 59, 66, 109, 126, 129, 154, 158, 161, 163, 185 ROBERT OLIVE: 42, 53, 64, 126 CODY OLSON: 33, 35, 37, 129, 155, 158, 161 NICK O'NEIL: 45, 63, 64 PEDRO ONIEVA: 28, 70, 118 CHASE OSBORNE: 20, 66, 111, 172 ROBERT OWEN: 46 D'CHERION OWENS: 24, 25, 41, 129, 152, 158, 185, 197

P

RODRIGO PADILLA GONZALEZ: 24, 39, 70, 79, 110 RICARDO PADILLA GONZALEZ: 33, 35, 37, 70, 104, 150, 172, 181 DANIEL PARES GARZON: 20, 79, 165 CHRISTIAN PAZ VALDEZ: 20, 141, 180 FELIX PAZ VALDEZ: 24, 39, 70, 71, 115, 177, 180 DAVID PEAK: 51 MICHAEL PEMBERTON: 42, 74, 75, 149, 154, 186, 187 MICHAEL PENNIMAN: 14, 134, 185, 191 DANIEL PEREZ BRACAMONTES: 17, 56, 57, 59, 66, 67, 68, 79, 92, 94, 141, 142, 152 PAUL PETIT: 61, 82, 87, 88, 91, 188 VERONICA PETIT: 91 JOSEPH PHELAN: 76 JACOB PHILLIPS: 28, 92, 114, 164, 170, 172, 173 DAVID PICKERING: 178 CHARLES E. PICKETT: 202 GARY PINKEL: 129 ROBERTO PIZA GONZALEZ: 33, 35, 37 JAMES POETTKER: 47 TAN PHOTSAVAT PONGSUEA: 17, 39, 59, 68, 94, 148, 149, 150, 152 MATTHEW PRATER: 109 JACOB PRIESTER: 28, 29, 34, 37, 38, 59, 66, 77, 79, 120, 129, 132, 133, 138, 141, 145, 172, 185, 186, 187 SANTIAGO PRIETO LEDESMA: 24, 28, 41, 79, 114, 129, 172 STEVEN PRINSTER: 24, 37, 79, 118, 129, 150

Q

ETHAN RACHELL: 30, 33, 35, 37, 71, 129, 166, 181, 195, 198 DONITA RACHELL: 88 CARLOS EDUARDO RAMOS MOLINA: 17, 37, 39, 47, 59, 68, 71, 79, 94, 121, 129, 132, 133, 161 WILLIAM RASPBERRY: 202 EDDIE RATLIFF: 46, 64 JOHN REDDICK: 51 JOSE REDING ORTIZ: 12, 24, 25, 47, 79, 103, 105, 138, 141, 142, 145, 154 TOM REED: 46 CHUCK RENTSCHLER: 112 PEGGY REYNARD: 29, 42, 52, 91, 100, 106, 174, 175 DANA REYNARD: 62, 64 KEITH REYNARD: 174 ERIC REYNOLDS: 27, 42, 54, 63, 64, 138, 140, 142, 143, 145 TOM REYNOLDS: 82 JONATHAN RICHARDSON: 24, 47, 70, 79, 191 SANDRA RIUTCEL: 45, 190, 191 THOMAS ROBERTS: 46, 94, 103 GABRIEL RODRIGUEZ MENDOZA: 28, 41, 116, 119, 141, 146 ROEL RODRIGUEZ VALDEZ: 28, 29, 34, 38, 59, 117, 124, 141, 165, 166, 180, 197 GARY L. ROGERS: 202 JOHN ROONEY: 114 ANDRES ROSADO: 28, 38, 59, 79, 118, 141, 146, 154, 174 PAOLO ROSADO: 28, 38, 59, 66, 69, 70, 71, 79, 174, 175 JUSTIN ROTTGER: 43 JASON RUSSELL: 20, 21, 129, 135, 158, 180 KENSEY RUSSELL 107 DEREK RYAN: 16, 24, 77, 79, 119, 147, 152, 191 MICHELLE RYAN: 91

ARIYANDEV SANDUI: 25, 118, 150, 185 RANDY SAWYER: 43 MARCO SCHERER: 82 TIM SCHERRER: 42, 53, 64, 87, 96, 107, 112, 113, 188 ADAM SCHMITZ: 25, 47, 70, 71, 106, 136, 151 MASON SCOTT: 15, 68, 161 DOUG SCOTT: 46 GREG SEIBERT: 47, 62, 77, 79, 86, 197 JOSEPH SHAFER: 42, 53, 148 IRIS SHOEMAKER: 117 MIKE SHOEMAKER: 42, 79, 106, 117, 158, 164, 165, 178, 188, 194, 196 CHAD SHOEMAKER: 112 JEAN-LUC SHYAKA: 15, 38, 56, 59, 68, 150, 152 FRANCISCO SILLER: 15, 79, 106, 150, 161 CHRISTINE SMITH: 15, 45, 60, 71, 82, 89, 105, 107, 111, 173, 175, 178, 183, 198, 199, 208 MORGAN SMITH: 117 JON SNYDER: 20, 79, 158, 191 KHAS-OCHIR SOD-ERDENE: 6, 28, 38, 47, 68, 70, 151 JACK SOLLS: 28, 29, 38, 59, 79, 100, 103, 108, 117, 118, 163, 180, 186, 187, 200 JESUS SORIANO: 82, 195 KYLE SPRADLEY: 208 BOB STEPHENSON: 202 GARY STEWART: 45 CARL F STINDEL: 202 CHARLES STOCKDALL: 46 GEORGE R STOKER: 202 JEFF STONE: 46 WINNIE STRIBLING: 82 CHARLES STRIBLING: 82, 198, 202 BERNARD STRUNK: 46 RENAE STUMPE: 42, 109 HENRY SUDDARTH: 42, 77, 80, 81, 96, 109, 111, 112, 176, 177, 180, 196 GABRIEL SUMMERS: 20, 21, 79, 94, 147, 165 DASHENG SUN: 6, 20, 28, 70, 147 JORDAN SWAGERTY: 114 BENJAMIN SWIGER: 28, 51, 115, 185

SANTIAGO SADA: 15, 56, 59, 66, 68, 79, 141, 150, 161 SERGIO SALAS ROJO: 24, 39, 70, 79, 114 RICARDO SALIDO VIVES: 17, 56, 57, 68, 79, 141, 161 IVAN SALINAS: 15, 53, 68, 70, 79, 114 DIEGO SALINAS ESTRADA: 34, 35, 37, 79, 114, 181 OMAR SANCHEZ IBARRA: 20, 59, 69, 70, 79, 120

JACOB TAYLOR: 17, 34, 35, 37, 38, 46, 88, 95, 103, 166, 192, 208 JOY TAYLOR: 91 AUSTIN TEAGUE: 29, 59, 117, 158, 161, 191 TOM TEAGUE: 89 LESLIE TEAGUE: 89 DAVID TELFORD: 82 CHRISTIAN THOMAS: 34, 35, 37, 110, 134, 173, 176 RICHARD THORNTON: 65, 91

NINGYONG QIN: 33, 35, 37, 43, 48, 68, 70, 181 MIGUEL QUIJANO: 15, 79, 135, 141, 161 IVAN QUIROZ ESPINO: 28, 79, 126, 129, 131, 178

R

S

T

PEDRO TINOCO: 21, 59, 70, 100, 158, 180 MARK TOMPKINS: 47, 91 RICHARD TREADWAY: 46 COREY TRENT: 28, 29, 79, 111, 118, 129, 165

U, V

JORDAN UTHE: 188 EDUARDO VALENZO GARDUNO: 34, 35, 37, 46, 59, 69, 79, 135, 158 ISAIAS VALTIERRA: 34, 35, 37, 182 NICHOLAS VANATTA: 34, 35, 37, 51, 94, 129, 130, 131, 137, 166, 172, 185 VICKI VANATTA: 131 RICHARD VANDUYNE: 46 TONY REED VAUGHAN: 25, 158, 161, 166 TYLER VAUGHAN: 28, 29, 37, 38, 113, 129, 178, 180 ANDRES VIDAL: 21, 52, 59 RODRIGO VILCHES AMOR: 25, 59, 70, 79, 141 GILBERTO VILLARREAL GUERRERO: 34, 35, 37, 114, 129, 171, 172, 173, 181, 185 ANNE VINES: 47 ANDREA VOLLRATH: 42, 52, 64, 106 MATTHEW VORE: 46

W

MARQUESS WALLACE: 163 CHEN WANG: 25, 70 JAMES WARD: 47, 64 MELVIN WATKINS 202 GUANGNING WEI: 25, 39, 59, 66, 69, 79, 94, 106, 129 JULIA WELCH: 43 SIERRA WESTPHAL: 109, 117 GINA WHITESELL: 46 DAVID WILKINS: 45, 64 CONNOR WILKINSON: 29, 38, 79, 129, 131, 163, 174, 175 MARC WILSON: 40, 45, 111, 126, 129, 130, 131, 185 STEVEN WOLF: 42, 112, 113 CHU WOOLERY: 88 OLIVER WORTHINGTON: 21, 70, 79 JIAHAO WU: 25, 37, 39, 43, 70, 79, 118, 147, 178 ANTHONY WURL: 87

Y, Z

JOSHUA YANCEY: 43, 54, 158, 196 ZHUOTENG YING: 29, 103, 110, 134, 166 DAVID YOST: 129 ANDRES ZAMORA VILLALPANDO: 21, 70, 79 HANG ZHANG: 24, 25, 43, 59, 70, 95, 158, 168 YU ZHOU: 6, 34, 35, 37, 66


COLOPHON & CREDITS The 58th volume of the Taps yearbook was produced by two elective classes at Missouri Military Academy in Mexico, Missouri. Taps 2013 written content was compiled from school press releases, local newspaper stories and student and staff articles written for Missouri Military Academy’s newspaper The Eagle. Thanks to major contributors Christine Smith and Erin Chambers and student journalists on the Taps and Eagle staffs. Photographic content is courtesy of marketing department archives, professional photographers and MMA students, faculty

and staff primarily using a Canon EOS 60D camera. Thanks to major photography contributors Jacob Taylor ’13, Emilio Nanni De Valle ’16, LTC Willis Kleinsorge, Kyle Spradley, Steve Biggers, Coetta Brashear and Cheryl Morris. All templates, graphic elements and layouts were designed, produced and copy edited in InDesign CS3 by Missouri Military Academy Publication Coordinator Erin Chambers from May to August 2013. Taps 2013 was published by the Missouri Military Academy marketing department

and printed by Balfour. Thanks to Balfour representative Liz Bardin for your guidance. Typefaces are as follows. Captions and short quotes: Open Sans Extrabold and Light, 10 pt. Headlines and folios: Open Sans Extrabold, 30 pt. Body: Neuton Extralight, 10 pt. Long quotes: Neuton Italic, 12 pt. Color swatches are as follows. Red: C28, M100, Y100, K37. Blue: C97, M87, Y46, K61. All stroke weights are 0.5 pt. Content, student classifications and sports scores are current as of July 2013.


MMA 2013 Taps yearbook