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NEWS

REAL-LIFE FUGITIVE: FLATHEAD MAN INSISTS HE’S INNOCENT, REFUSES TO REGISTER AS SEXUAL OFFENDER

MORRISON HELPS WITH BUDDY JACKSON MESSAGE IS REP. NEWS OPINION WHAT MUSIC OBAMACARE ROLLOUT BRINGS THE NOISE DAINES TRYING TO SEND?


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

REAL-LIFE FUGITIVE: FLATHEAD MAN INSISTS HE’S INNOCENT, REFUSES TO REGISTER AS SEXUAL OFFENDER

MORRISON HELPS WITH BUDDY JACKSON MESSAGE IS REP. NEWS OPINION WHAT MUSIC OBAMACARE ROLLOUT BRINGS THE NOISE DAINES TRYING TO SEND?


[2] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013


News Voices/Letters Sacred land, revenge votes and corrections...........................................4 The Week in Review Are we in South Dakota?..............................................................6 Briefs Grant money, medicinal plants and more fish ....................................................6 Etc. Mayor Engen makes a splash ...................................................................................7 News Montana—and John Morrison—brace for Obamacare rollout ..............................8 News Hanson insists he’s innocent, refuses to register as sex offender ........................9 Opinion What message is Rep. Daines hoping to send? ..............................................10 Opinion In defense of That Burning Guy Thing in the Desert....................................11 Feature Gambling addicts face long odds, little support in recovery..........................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Shakewell’s nine-member lineup keeps Missoula in the groove..........................18 Music Buddy Jackson, Piñata Protest, Cody Beebe & The Crooks and Jeffrey Foucault and Kris Delmhorst .................................................................19 Books Greta Wrolstad’s posthumous poems shine......................................................20 Film Fruitvale Station needs a few more layers ..........................................................21 Film Rush is solid but lacks daringness........................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .....................................................23 Flash in the Pan The lost hens ....................................................................................24 Happiest Hour Bitter Root cans ..................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Looking for something quippy? Don’t bet on it..................................27 Mountain High National Public Lands Day .................................................................33 Agenda Obamacare forum............................................................................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk..............................................................................................................4 In Other News......................................................................................................12 Classifieds ..........................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ...........................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y.............................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle...............................................................................................C-7 Camp Sleepover .................................................................................................C-9 This Modern World...........................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Dameon Pesanti COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Revenge vote

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, Sept. 24, inside the UC at the University of Montana. What’s the last bet you made? Follow-up: If you had to say you were addicted to something, what would it be?

Mark Meimerstorf: I bet $50 on fantasy football this year. I’m 0-for-3 right now so it’s not looking good. Butter nut: Peanut butter. I don’t like the organic stuff you have to stir. I love the processed stuff. I can’t get enough of it. I even put it on hamburgers.

Christian Lipscomb: Who could grow a better mullet. I lost. Coffee fiend: Coffee. Butterfly Herbs’ organic Bolivian. It’s the tits.

Baruch Chamberlain: There was a bet I made with my boss’ wife that if I didn’t eat cookies for two days I would get the whole bag. I won. Go bananas: Sweet stuff. Banana bread is my go-to.

Robert Sears: I just went back to school so it’s really about making a bet with myself to have a good life and do something with it. Speed freak: Trying to find new experiences and not get tied down to a routine. That doesn’t go so well with school but you gotta make sacrifices sometimes.

Michael Wright: I bet somebody I couldn’t get a girl when I had a mustache. I won. Java junkie: Coffee. Straight black, disgusting, stomach-rotting, tooth-decaying coffee.

[4] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Ravalli County Commissioners Suzy Foss, Ron Stoltz and Jeff Burrows voted against us on Friday. They refused to accept our taxpayer dollars back from the federal government for our family planning services, which provide us and our neighbors with cancer screenings, STD screenings, birth control and pre-natal care to name a few (see “etc.,” Sept. 19). Lack of screening leads to disease. Lack of birth control leads to pregnancy or abortion. Hundreds of people took off work for three long meetings last week to voice their support for family planning funds, which do not include abortion. Since two of them were Board of Health meetings, only Mr. Burrows was required to be there. Ms. Foss and Mr. Stoltz, who also voted against accepting the funds, missed 5-plus hours of testimony from the public, even though their presence was requested. The family planning office will be closed for good on Sept. 30. Patients who have appointments on Oct. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc., will have to scramble for an appointment. It takes a minimum of six weeks to get an appointment in an affordable Missoula clinic. Ms. Foss, Mr. Stoltz and Mr. Burrows voted to close down a clinic within 30 days without offering anything to replace it. Your rising insurance costs will be thanks to Ms. Foss, who said that the hospital will have to absorb the costs of the preventative care of the 400-plus patients who need someplace to go. Remember these votes. They voted against you. Vote against them. Vote against Suzy Foss in 2014. Vote against Ron Stoltz in 2014. Vote against Jeff Burrows in 2014. If you need cancer screening or family planning services, please call the commissioners at 375-6500 or email commissioners@rc.mt.gov. Sarah Roubik Corvallis

Sacred grounds The first week of September, I sent a letter to Sidney Longwell, the Baton Rouge speculator, whose lawsuit to drill for oil threatens Montana’s Badger-Two Medicine wildlands, bordering Glacier National Park. Fracking the “Backbone of the World” would desecrate both the integrity of this landscape and the cultural identity of present and future generations of Pikuni-Blackfeet people.

L

Within the Badger-Two Medicine, there are numerous landmarks whose narratives form the foundation of our Pikuni Sun Dance, which is a central religious ceremony in our tribe. For traditional Blackfeet, its promise of renewal can be likened to the role of Easter within Christianity. Two of these landmark mountains are Feather Woman and Scarface. Feather Woman connects us to a long ago union between an Earth woman and Morning Star. She is entrusted with celestial teachings and subsequently returns to her Earth people. These teachings are manifest within our Sun Dance.

“Remember these votes. They voted against you. Vote against them.”

From the union of Feather Woman and Morning Star there survived a son, Scarface. He ventures, courageously, to the Lodge of the Sun. On route, he is assisted by Wolf, Grizzly, Badger, Wolverine and, finally, Trumpeter Swans. In communion with the Sun, Scarface gains additional rites that further complement our Sun Dance. The odyssey of Scarface is forever memorialized by the mountain sentinels of the Badger-Two Medicine. These parables are but a fragment of the ancient narratives associated within the landscape in which Sidney Longwell, the Louisiana “purchaser,” intends to drill. The drilling lease that Mr. Longwell clings to is the soiled residue of an egregious error made by the U.S. government more than 30 years ago. Under the Treaty of 1855 and the Agreement of 1895, our people reserved traditional rights in this area that include pre-existent religious freedoms. Pilgrimages, within social and individual settings, are fully incompatible with the industrialization of these watersheds. The most considerate option for Mr. Longwell is following the path of other energy speculators who have found mutually beneficial alternatives, relinquishing their leases in our Badger-Two Medicine. Mr. Longwell would deliver our people a compliment by abandoning his lawsuit. I en-

couraged him to work with both the federal government and with Montana’s congressional delegation to capitalize on the 2006 lease withdrawal legislation. There is still time for him to exchange his claim for opportunities elsewhere. The Badger-Two Medicine region is a refuge for our Blackfeet, one of the last geographical strongholds for our ancient culture. The site of his lease, Hall Creek, is a pristine component of that refuge. I am invested in its protection, for it serves as a keystone in our cultural memory. I conveyed to Mr. Longwell that my spiritual perspective springs from twin sources. From my Blackfeet grandmother, I inherited the parables of my ancestors. My recollection of her faith challenges me to place principle before personality, profit or pride. As a matter of principle, I maintain it is immoral to vandalize the headwaters of our cultural identity for the sake of profit or pride. In the Judeo-Christian tradition I inherited from my Euro-American ancestors, Old Testament prophets respectfully removed their shoes when standing before God. If sandals are to be shed upon sacred ground, then how can bulldozers, fracking rigs and flare stacks be deemed acceptable? Recently, a Native elder reminded me, “Our way is to venture into the mountains to converse with God.” I cherish the poetic essence of both of these time-honored traditions. I have invited Sidney Longwell to the “Backbone of the World,” where we can deepen our understanding of each other’s motives and visions regarding this land we both treasure. As of Sept. 23, there has been no response from Mr. Longwell, who dwells in the state where Montana’s waters fold into the Gulf of Mexico. Jack Wallace Gladstone Kalispell Corrections: In last week’s cover story, “Scary prognosis,” the cost of fighting the Lolo Complex Fire was inaccurate. The correct figure is $1.5 million. In addition, mountain pine beetle research conducted in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem should have been attributed to a team led by Wally MacFarlane and Jesse Logan. A news story in the same issue, “Addition by subtraction,” failed to specify that the CSKT has targeted adult lake trout for removal from Flathead Lake. The correct number of fish that could be affected is 142,446. The Indy regrets the errors.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, September 18 Forest Service administrators issue a closure order to trucks hauling big and wide loads on the section of U.S. Highway 12 that passes through the Lochsa-Clearwater Wild and Scenic River corridor. The order comes a few days after a federal judge in Boise blocked a megaload shipment from traveling through the same area.

Thursday, September 19 Former Gov. Brian Schweitzer sends a letter to the Montana Board of Pardons and Parole recommending Barry Beach be released from prison, calling his sentence “simply unnecessary.” Beach is serving 100 years without parole at Montana State Prison after being convicted of a 1979 murder.

Friday, September 20 Despite public outcry at an early morning meeting, Ravalli County Commissioners choose not to revisit a vote that denied Title X family planning funding to more than 400 local women.

Saturday, September 21 The Griz beat a school nobody has ever heard of by a score so lopsided that hardly anyone seems to care. More interestingly, starting safety Matt Hermanson celebrates the blowout by getting so drunk that he thought he was in South Dakota while vandalizing Fort Missoula property. He’s charged and suspended for the next game.

Sunday, September 22 The Indy receives an angry phone call from a woman frustrated that her Sunday paper has not been delivered again. When contacted the next day, the woman asks what she is supposed to do next time this happens. “Um, call the right paper?”

Monday, September 23 Outgoing Missoula City Councilman Dave Strohmaier announces his candidacy for the Montana Legislature in House District 92. While on council, Strohmaier crafted several laws, including one that now bans cyclists or motorists from using a hand-held phone.

Tuesday, September 24 A woman crashes her minivan into the Wal-Mart off Brooks Street. KPAX reports that the driver lost control of the vehicle as she pulled into the store parking lot, jumped a curb and then careened into the store’s Garden Center. The woman sustains minor injuries, but no one else is hurt.

The Missoula Police Department and Missoula County Sheriff’s Department engaged in a 20-hour standoff with an armed resident at the Westside’s Hollywood Trailer Court that began early Sept. 23. The suspect’s mother eventually assisted police in negotiations that led to a peaceful surrender.

Business

Overseas help dries up Unless Congress acts soon, most small Montana businesses will be on their own if they want to sell their products overseas. The Montana International Marketing Assistance Program is a reimbursement grant created with funds from the Small Business Administration and designed to make entering a foreign market easier and more affordable for small companies. However, the threeyear pilot program is set to end Sept. 30 unless Congress renews the funding as part of the federal budget. “It’s been wildly successful,” says Lonie Stimac of the Montana Department of Commerce. “In the first year we saw a return on investment of 4,100 percent.” IMAP is a rebranding of the State Trade and Export Promotion, a three-year trade and export program offered by the federal government to help small businesses expand into new markets. All 50 states were eligible to apply for some of the roughly $30 million offered each year from the Small Business Administration. Once awarded, the states were required

to contribute a 25 or 35 percent match to what funds they received. In its first year, Stimac says Montana received $244,567 and contributed $117,993 in the form of two state employees to administer the program. Thirty firms participated and reported $14.6 million in sales. The program was created as part of the state’s larger effort to get local businesses and products into international markets. The reimbursement grant covered half the cost for a business to go to an international trade show, translate their materials into another language or do market research. To be eligible companies had to have less than 500 employees, show a profit, exist for at least a year and provide a plan for exporting. “What we’ve heard anecdotally is that without this program a lot of companies that have gone abroad and have used this fund, in part ... would not have done so,” says Carey Hester, director of the U.S. Export Assistance Center of Missoula. “If this goes away I think we’ll find a lot less activity when we look at the number of firms looking to go abroad to grow their business.” Dameon Pesanti

Justice

Himes vows to appeal On Sept. 20, Rev. Harris Himes, who’s best known for lobbying lawmakers against any advancements toward gay equality, appeared to choke back tears while defending himself in court against charges that he helped bilk a Bitterrooter out of $150,000. “I have a lot on the line here, there’s no question about it,” said Himes, who’s 71 and faced six felony counts ranging from fraud to theft. “I want my ministry back that these folks have stolen from me … I want to go back to the legislature.” For more than a decade, Himes has presented himself as a moral arbiter from the helm of his Big Sky Christian Center ministry in Hamilton. During closing arguments at the end of his five-day trial, however, prosecutor Jesse Laslovich painted a wholly different picture of Himes, one of a religious leader who used his pulpit to victimize. “This is a pretty straightforward story about trust,” Laslovich said. The prosecution alleged that Himes worked with another pastor, James “Jeb” Bryant, to steal the $150,000 inheritance of a man referred to in court documents as

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[6] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013


[news] G.S. Laslovich said Himes led G.S. to believe that investing in Duratherm Building Systems, a construction goods manufacturing company based in Mexico, would provide him an opportunity to reap financial returns. It didn’t end up that way. When G.S. arrived in Mexico to inspect a glue machine that Himes and Bryant told him would be purchased with his money, he found the machine rusty and worn. Rather than a $150,000 piece of equipment, as G.S. expected, it appeared the machine was worth not more than $8,000. G.S. was similarly disappointed in Duratherm’s “factory,” which, Laslovich said, looked more like a shack than an industrial operation. Not long after the Mexico trip, G.S. wrote to Himes requesting his money back. It never came. Himes responded to the charges by stating that he was the victim. He said he’s had his reputation smeared by G.S.’s untrue claims. All G.S. had to do was wait and he would have gotten his money back. Himes further denied personally benefitting from G.S.’s inheritance. “There’s no deception,” he said. The jury didn’t buy it. After five hours of deliberation, it acquitted Himes of theft, but found him guilty of failure to register as a salesperson, failure to register a security, and fraudulent practices, all felonies. Himes faces 30 years in prison. Minutes after the jury presented the verdict, Himes vowed to appeal. Jessica Mayrer

of water since 1953, including the Clark Fork, Bitterroot and Clearwater drainages. Pike have contributed to the decline of bull trout in numerous waterways. Smallies are particularly adept at navigating river systems, and their sudden appearance in Seeley Lake could tip the natural balance even further for native trout downstream. “I really don’t see it being very long before you see smallmouth bass in lots and lots of different places unless we can really get a handle on what’s hopefully an isolated population right now,” says

80

Expected beers on tap at the fifth annual Montana Brewers Fall Festival in Caras Park Sept. 28. The lineup includes several festival releases and Bitter Root’s new Citra IPA.

Nature

Botanicals in the Swan

Fisheries

No small problem A local angler contacted Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks several weeks back with a troubling story. While fishing on Seeley Lake, the individual caught at least one smallmouth bass, a predatory fish foreign to the Clearwater drainage. The report led officials to a simple and increasingly common conclusion: Someone illegally introduced a non-native species to a popular Montana waterway. FWP was unable to track down a second angler rumored to have reeled in smallies, says Region 2 Fisheries Manager Pat Saffel. But the primary question the agency now faces is exactly how bad the situation is at Seeley Lake. “This time of year, they start moving to wintering grounds and they can be kind of hard to access when you sample,” Saffel says. “We’re thinking we may not be able to answer that question very well until next spring or summer.” Illegal introductions are nothing new in Montana. According to FWP, northern pike alone have spread to or been illegally released in more than 50 bodies

BY THE NUMBERS

Mark Aagenes, conservation director for Montana Trout Unlimited. “The opportunity to impact a really important local fishery is incredible with this.” Aagenes adds that smallies could even “wash down to the Blackfoot” if a population is given the chance to establish itself. MTU and other conservation nonprofits have dedicated considerable resources to restoring bull trout and westslope cutthroat in the Blackfoot and Clearwater. FWP has worked to modify a fish barrier to accommodate bull trout passage into the West Fork of the Clearwater, and spent roughly $18 million acquiring the Marshall Creek Wildlife Management Area partly to preserve critical bull trout habitat. The agency is now offering a $1,000 reward for tips leading to a conviction in the Seeley Lake case. Aagenes says MTU is currently discussing ways to help bolster FWP’s investigation. Saffel says a conviction may not be a realistic end, but even if the guilty party is caught, “you’re still stuck with the problem.” Alex Sakariassen

Historically, American Indians traveled throughout the Swan Valley to collect medicinal plants, sometimes doing so for several months at a time. But as the area’s inhabitants have changed, Anne Dahl, director of the Swan Ecosystem Center, worries the local botanical knowledge might disappear. “When you start looking into it, you realize just about every plant has a use of some kind, but a lot of people don’t realize that,” Dahl says. “The native plants are part of our historic culture. One way to celebrate them is to do a workshop.” A five-hour introductory class on Sept. 26 is the first of what organizers hope will be several educational sessions designed to highlight the variety of medicinal plants available in the Swan Valley. Led by Missoula-based clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn, participants will have a chance to learn the basics of how to use the plants, then hike the area and identify them in the wild. Botanical medicine has been used for thousands of years and some of modern medicine’s most commonly used drugs are synthesized from chemicals found in plants. Aspirin, for example, was inspired by the pain-relieving effects of willow bark. But herbalists like Bloedorn say that there are many other beneficial chemicals inside plants that aren’t found in medications. Part of the advantages of making an extract or a tincture is that several herbs can be combined to address the cause of an illness rather than just treat its symptoms.She says often people who use herbal supplements have no idea that the extracts they’re buying come from plants that grow nearby. “Like arnica, balsamroot and horsetails—those are just some of the many growing throughout western Montana,” Bloedorn says. “I think more often than not many people are surprised by the wealth of medicinal plants we have around us. It’s empowering information.” Dameon Pesanti

ETC. Don’t look now, but election season has arrived. We know this because our neighbors’ yards are filled with campaign signs, our email inbox is filled with solicitations for donations and our schedule is starting to fill up with candidate interviews for endorsements (look for ’em to hit these pages in mid-October). During the first batch of those candidate interviews all anyone wanted to talk about was water. Specifically, the candidates pointed to Missoula City Council and Mayor John Engen’s pledge to purchase Mountain Water Co. from the Carlyle Group as their main priority, if elected. At Monday night’s council meeting, Engen, who’s running for re-election, officially opened the water talk spigot by introducing a draft ordinance that would authorize negotiations with Carlyle Group and look to finalize a deal within six months. If negotiations fail, Engen said he would “pursue condemnation,” otherwise known as eminent domain. By suggesting a time limit and threatening legal action, Engen essentially dropped a cannonball in the middle of Carlyle Group’s dainty pool party. (We’ll let that image sink in for a moment.) The global equity firm has said it’s not interested in selling Mountain Water, but that doesn’t seem to matter. Substantial local interest and current market value (and maybe those upcoming elections) do. “Management of that fundamental resource should not be the province of a private corporation beholden to distant investors or stockholders, but rather a public utility,” said Engen in a memo that accompanied his draft ordinance. “I, and many other City of Missoula elected officials and citizens, strongly believe that a community’s water system is a public asset that is best owned and operated by the public, through municipal government.” It’s hard to argue with Engen’s logic. Locals already pay more for water than in any other Montana city. The average metered water user in Helena, for example, pays roughly $41.49 a month. In Butte, it’s about $37. In Billings, $35. And Missoula? Metered water users in singlefamily homes pay on average $43.95. And with the Carlyle Group at the helm, odds are that trend will continue. In fact, just seven months after the firm purchased Missoula’s water supply, Mountain Water asked the Public Service Commission for permission to bump up rates an additional $2.61. They made a similar request, which was approved, in 2010. Engen’s announcement certainly made a splash, but he’s only just initiated what may be a long and contentious process. A public hearing on Oct. 21 will be the next chance to gauge whether his bold move will sink or swim.

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missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [7]


[news]

Proving ground Montana—and John Morrison—brace for Obamacare rollout by Alex Sakariassen

Oct. 1 is a big day for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Health insurance customers nationwide will finally begin reviewing available insurers through an online exchange and choosing from tiered insurance options before an individual insurance mandate kicks in next year. The date also marks a ribbon-cutting of sorts for 24 nonprofit health insurance cooperatives nationwide, as they start competing in a market previously dominated by private insurers. For Helena attorney and self-proclaimed “health care policy wonk” John Morrison, it’s the culmination of more than two years of work. “There’s a lot of uncharted territory out there for the health co-ops and for, frankly, everybody else,” says Morrison, president of the National Alliance of State Health COOPs. “But we’ll begin to see what it looks like Oct. 1 as we see how many people come forward to use the exchanges and what insurance carriers they choose to sign up for and whether the tax credits that are offered to people below a certain income level are sufficient to create an incentive to get people to buy health coverage.” The co-ops themselves are a product of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which mandated the establishment of at least one nonprofit health insurance issuer in every state as a bipartisan alternative to the single payer option. Some critics initially speculated that such a mandate might birth insurance cooperatives backed by hospitals or major corporations, prompting language that required each co-op be entirely governed by its consumers. The co-ops quickly attracted a variety of personalities, from business leaders to labor organizations to community activists, in what Morrison calls a “nationwide groundswell of grassroots support.” Montana was one of the first states to give rise to a co-op effort in 2011. That summer, Helena-based health insurance consultants Jim Edwards and Richard Miltenberger began discussing how to establish a state cooperative, and the duo pulled Morrison into the conversation early on. Morrison had served eight years as the state auditor and insurance commissioner for Montana. During that time, he authored two statewide health initiatives— Insure Montana, a program designed to offer comprehensive health coverage for small businesses, and Healthy Montana Kids, a nonprofit created by Ballot Initiative 155 in 2008 that offers affordable coverage for uninsured children in the state. Morrison ran unsuccessfully against Jon Tester in the Democratic primary for U.S.

[8] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Senate in 2006, and his campaign became embroiled in controversy when the story broke of an extramarital affair and alleged ethical misconduct while in office. Morrison dropped out of the news after 2008, but maintained a keen interest in influencing additional health care reform—something he calls a “hobby.” Morrison, Edwards and Miltenberger became three of the founders of the Montana Health Cooperative, which was among the first seven co-ops nationwide to apply for

co-ops. Congress reduced that funding to $3.8 billion in 2011, and in the midst of last year’s fiscal cliff negotiations, cut the funding again by more than $1.4 billion. The Montana Health Cooperative managed to secure $60 million in loans, and 23 other co-ops were already under contract by the end of 2012. But the fiscal cliff deal effectively halted ACA loan activity with nearly 40 other applicants waiting at the gate. The open exchange launched next week will be the first of many tests for both

John Morrison, pictured here speaking as president of the National Alliance of State Health CO-OPs at a 2011 conference, says he’s excited to see how the nonprofit health insurance movement fairs starting Oct. 1.

loans through the ACA. The trio also worked to launch the National Alliance of State Health CO-OPs—NASHCO—in the interests of banding together and improving the chances of success in the new marketplace. NASHCO took the lead during negotiations with Congress, and Morrison began conducting regular Wednesday conference calls with representatives of every startup co-op in the country. Those calls are still a weekly part of NASHCO’s operations. “We knew that if there was going to be any chance of these tadpoles that are entering the stream surviving and accomplishing what we hope to accomplish, that we had to be able to work together,” Morrison says. “We had to be able to share information, we had to be able to join together to achieve scaled business deals, and we had to work to serve each other’s customers so consumers have good provider access wherever they roam.” If co-ops like the Montana Health Cooperative are looking forward to Oct. 1, it’s in part due to the hurdles overcome so far. The ACA initially budgeted $6 billion to fund two types of federal loans for the new

the ACA and the co-ops. If successful, the co-ops could completely reshape the health insurance industry. If they fail, they’ll join the ranks of other taxpayerfunded controversies like solar panel manufacturer Solyndra, which received a $535 million loan from the U.S. Energy Department before going bankrupt in 2011. But the next few months aren’t just a proving ground for the 24 established coops in the country. The success or failure of those opening their doors Oct. 1 could influence the decision to open funding for new co-ops down the road. And while Morrison himself will be stepping down from his NASHCO presidency next spring, he’ll be keeping a watchful eye on how the co-op movement fairs in the coming years. “If co-ops are able to offer consumers the kind of transparent, low-cost, member-governed nonprofit health coverage that they want,” Morrison says, “and if they attract consumers and do well in that way, I think the funds will be restored and co-ops will continue to be launched in the rest of the states across the country.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

On the run Flathead man continues to fight charges 20 years later by Jessica Mayrer

For nearly seven years, Dale Hanson son, called A.G. in court documents, tes- failure to submit the audio recordings. has been on the run. The once avid out- tify that Hanson forced A.G. to perform Specifically, Renz accuses Flathead County doorsman who’s spent most of his life in oral sex on him. Hanson was the only per- Sheriff Detective Maxine Lamb, who investigated Hanson’s case, of engaging in “exthe Flathead Valley stays inside much of son to testify on his behalf. Hanson says that he told his attorney treme misconductâ€? when telling potential the time. He’s worried that if he goes out, even to the grocery store, law enforce- about answering machine messages that character witnesses, including a neighbor ment will find him and send him back to he had kept that captured Emily G. threat- with two young sons who believed HanMontana State Prison, where he’s already ening to “fucking get evenâ€? with him after son innocent, that they couldn’t attend served 10 years for a crime he insists he the breakup. But those recordings were Hanson’s trial. Renz also claims that when the owner never submitted during Hanson’s trial. didn’t commit. Once incarcerated, Hanson appealed of the Whitefish trailer park Hanson and “I’m always, constantly, looking over the guilty verdict to the Montana Supreme Emily G. lived in told Lamb that Emily G. my shoulder,â€? Hanson says. Hanson, 62, is hiding because he re- Court and the Ninth Circuit Court of Ap- engaged in “bizarre behavior,â€? had a “reputation for dishonestyâ€? and a fuses to register as a sex of“habit of trying to get others fender, a condition of a 1995 who angered her in trouble ‌ sexual assault conviction Lamb did not want to hear any handed down by the Flathead of this.â€? County District Court. Lamb died in 2007. FlatHanson’s refusal to admit head County Attorney Ed Corriwrongdoing has made an algan now oversees the office that ready difficult situation even prosecuted Hanson. Corrigan tougher. While in prison, for insays that despite claims raised stance, Hanson would not atby Hanson’s legal team this year, tend the sex offender treatment he remains convinced of Hanprogram required to qualify for son’s guilt. “I will say that I have parole, prompting corrections no reason to doubt the jury’s officials to keep him incarcerated for the entire 10-year sen- Dale Hanson maintains that he did not sexually assault verdict in this matter,â€? he says. Corrigan acknowledges tence. In 2005, when Hanson his ex-girlfriend’s 5-year-old son, a charge he was convicted of in 1995. that Hanson’s attorney didn’t inwas released from prison, the troduce audiotapes of Emily Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Sheriff was waiting for him at MSP’s recep- peals. In 2006, Ninth Circuit Judge Betty G.’s threats, but says the threats were distion unit, aiming to register him as a sex Fletcher emboldened Hanson’s claims cussed during Hanson’s trial. Hanson disoffender. Again, Hanson refused. That when she opined that if the jury had heard putes that account. “The jury heard that testimony,â€? Corstance garnered him another 11 months the recordings of Emily G., as she had, it rigan says. “But more importantly, they might have rendered a different verdict. in the county jail. “The tapes, had they been placed into heard the little boy testify—and (they) obFor Hanson, the issue boils down to evidence, could have influenced the jury’s viously conclude(d) that his testimony principle. “I am not a criminal,â€? he says. For the past 20 years Hanson has told decision regarding Hanson’s guilt,â€? Fletcher was more credible than Hanson’s.â€? This summer, Corrigan’s office offered anyone who will listen that he did not sex- wrote. “Hanson’s trial counsel never sought ually abuse his ex-girlfriend’s 5-year-old son. to introduce the messages; under the cir- Hanson a deal. In exchange for dropping his By all accounts, Hanson’s relationship cumstances, that failure may have consti- petition for post-conviction relief, the county would waive the sex offender registration rewith his ex, referred to as Emily G. in court tuted ineffective assistance of counsel.â€? Despite those findings, Fletcher quirement. Hanson says that because the documents, was tumultuous. The couple dated and lived together in the early stated that the Ninth Circuit could not in- criminal conviction would have remained 1990s. During that time, Hanson says tervene. “This appeal illustrates the con- on his record, he refused the deal. It remains to be seen how the court sequences—often tragic—that result from Emily G. became increasingly jealous. Unwilling to stomach her temper, procedural failures, as cases proceed from will handle Hanson’s current petition to Hanson ended the relationship in 1992. trial to appeal to post-conviction proceed- have the conviction overturned. In the meantime, next March will mark the 20th According to court documents filed on ings,â€? she wrote. In 2011, Hanson secured another anniversary of Hanson’s arrest. After losHanson’s behalf, Emily G. then vowed to make “Hanson’s life a living hell.â€? Nearly small victory when University of Montana ing two decades, time that Hanson says two years after the relationship ended, School of Law professor Jeffrey Renz should have been spent working and savEmily G. reported to law enforcement that agreed to help him with his attempts to ing for retirement, he’s angry about the overturn the conviction. The Montana In- past and worried about the future. Hanson had molested her son. When Emily G. came forward, Han- nocence Project is also providing Hanson “I’ve had 20 years of my life destroyed son was in his 40s, working as a carpenter legal services. Renz cited pending litigation and stolen from me for something I didn’t and, aside from a charge of driving under when declining to comment for this story. even do,â€? he says. “There’s no redoes in Hanson’s attorneys say in briefs sub- this lifetime...That’s one-third of my life the influence, had a clean criminal record. In 1995, Hanson pleaded not guilty mitted to the Flathead County District that they’ve taken from me.â€? to sexual assault and deviant sexual con- Court this year that Hanson’s trial was duct. The jury heard Emily G. and her botched even beyond his trial counsel’s jmayrer@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Symbolic gestures What message is Rep. Steve Daines trying to send? by Dan Brooks

Last week I got a letter from Montana’s at-large Rep. Steve Daines, in which he thanked me for signing his petition opposing United States intervention in Syria. Lucky guess, congressman. I am against bombing Syria, but I did not sign any petition, for fear of leaking my address to Nigerian con artists and/or Steve Daines. I do not hold the congressman’s letter against him, though. He is in the business of sharing my opinion on as many issues as possible, and he has to get his message out. Just last week, he voted for two House bills that stand zero chance of becoming laws. One of them he even sponsored. They were symbolic legislation designed to send a message, but what message did he send? The first of the two bills would cut $40 billion from SNAP—informally known as food stamps—over the next 10 years. It requires people between ages 18 and 50 without minor children to find jobs or enter work training programs to keep receiving benefits, and it limits those benefits to three months. In order to selectively please or enrage everyone, it also requires beneficiaries to undergo mandatory drug testing. Shortly after the Census Bureau reported that 47 million Americans live in poverty—a number that approaches the highest level in 20 years—217 members of the House voted to cut food stamps. The representative from Montana was one of them. That’s okay. The House bill has no chance of passing the Senate, and so Daines can send a strong message of fiscal responsibility and shrinking of the welfare state, without actually reducing the amount of food we buy for people without jobs. It was a symbolic gesture, and in making it he let his constituents know where he stands. The next day, the House passed HR 1526, the cheerfully named Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act. Daines co-sponsored the bill, which mandates logging on 50 percent of available U.S. Forest Service land. He also of-

[10] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

fered two amendments shortly before the bill passed: one requiring the Forest Service to produce a one-page statement of timber revenues every year, and another prohibiting judges from issuing temporary injunctions against timber projects that are challenged in court. I think I speak for all of us when I say, a whole page? Also, don’t worry. The bill that the Wilderness Society described as a “radical measure [requiring] logging with-

“Daines should reconsider his message, because one of these days he might have to make a law for real.” out laws” stands no chance. President Barack Obama promised to veto it before it even passed. Even Daines agreed that HB 1526 wouldn’t make it through the Senate. “The Senate hasn’t produced a forest initiative,” he told the Missoulian. “The House just did today. The final product across the president’s desk would likely be different.” So that was the week for Rep. Daines: Two pieces of theoretical legislation that expressed his desire to cut food stamps/trees but did not, strictly speaking, pertain to the future laws of the United States. They did, however, send a message from our man in Washington. But what was it? According to Daines, the message is jobs. Citing the Congressional Budget Office, he estimated that the Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act would create 5,000 jobs in Montana. That’s good.

It would also be a cash bonanza for logging companies, but presumably that is a mere byproduct of those 5,000 jobs. Meanwhile, 129,000 Montanans receive SNAP assistance. In November, when the 2009 stimulus expires, their benefits will decrease by $13 million across the state. The House bill would significantly reduce funding and the number of Montanans who benefit from it, so in our hypothetical world of Daines’ law, let’s call that decrease $14 million. According to the Montana Department of Health and Human Services, every dollar spent on SNAP benefits generates about $1.84 in community spending. That means the imaginary law that Daines sent a message by supporting would leave nearly a $26 million hole in the Montana economy next year. Most of it will come out of the pockets of people on food stamps. The good news is that 4 percent of them could maybe get timber jobs, if we passed Daines’ mandatory logging bill. The very good news is that neither of these bills will ever become law, and Daines only voted for them to send a message. But the message seems to be a lot more friendly to timber companies than to the people he was elected to represent. It’s a good idea to add jobs to the Montana economy, and it’s a better idea for those jobs to come from within the state than from federal dollars. But as Daines signals his support for fiscal responsibility and the timber industry, he might consider how his policies affect our larger economy. Improving lives in Montana is not as simple as applying our favorite broad economic and social principles. Cutting welfare and selling trees may not always solve our problems. Daines should reconsider his message, because one of these days he might have to make a law for real. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and lying at combatblog.net. His column appears every other week in the Independent.


[opinion]

Fleeting moment In defense of That Burning Guy Thing in the Desert by Dennis Hinkamp

I seldom talk about what I do on vacation because the place I visit carries more baggage than it takes to go there for a week. So I use a set of euphemisms instead, referring to it vaguely as “That Thing in The Desert,” “That Burning Guy” or “The Festival 90 Miles North of Reno.” Its copyrighted name is Burning Man. Its un-copyrighted description is usually “that hippie, bacchanalian, drug, alternative, naked rave fest.” So when I tell people what I did on my summer vacation I have to talk them down from the ledge of titillation about a legendary exotic event they never have attended. Or I just flash an evil knowing grin and whisper, “You have no idea.” The sad truth is Burning Man is becoming middle-aged and most of the wilder rumors are akin to an old athlete’s embellished stories about how good it all used to be. There is nothing to be ashamed of in this; after all, none of us will ever be as young again as we are right now. This year there was a Taco Bell commercial featuring Burning Man, and George Clooney’s girlfriend blabbed about it on some talk show, so I guess it has lost most of its subversive cachet. I have the same wistful illusion about Amsterdam, a place where all illegal things become magically legal. From all accounts even Amsterdam isn’t Amsterdam anymore. There is no perfect “free place” where you can be and do whatever you want, except maybe in the deep sludge of your imagination, or, for the truly desperate, the backstreets of Las Vegas. And that is probably what Burning Man is for most people—an imaginary place where everyone is having more fun than you have ever dreamed of. These truths should be self-evident: Anarchy really isn’t much fun for anyone except the anarchists, following your bliss costs a lot of money, and every free spirit needs par-

ents with a basement. There is no pure freedom. So why do 69,614 people—this year’s attendance—keep going? I’ve been participating for 15 consecutive years, which makes me about as obsessive-compulsive about it as any other thing in my life. I have become a Burning Man carnie of sorts. I get there early to help set up, watch the people come in, glance at their

“The sad truth is Burning Man is becoming middle-aged and most of the wilder rumors are akin to an old athlete’s embellished stories about how good it all used to be.” faces to see if they are having a good time, and then I leave. Like the circus, Burning Man is temporary. A month before the event there was nothing there and a month after the event there is nothing there. In between, thousands of volunteers build a complete city with a fire station, hospitals, police force, internet service, limited electrical grid, sanitation and a commissary. For a brief time it is the fourth-largest city in Nevada.

My particular project is building a corral and sanctuary for the 400-plus members of the media, who come each year to write or film the most original story ever created about Burning Man. My role as a builder is part of Burning Man’s ethos of letting you be someone else, if only for eight days. In real life, I work in academe and dabble in home improvement. At That Thing in the Desert, I can strap on a tool belt and be the captain and campground host of my own temporary arcade. This 40foot-by-20-foot structure complete with a deck is called Media Mecca. The tired, dusty, huddled media masses come by in search of happy hour, battery chargers, interview appointments, high-speed internet and all the red-carpet treatment they are accustomed to in the real world. What we give them are plywood benches, cold cups of water, shade and directions to the nearest port-o-potty. Here, there are no backstage privileges for the camera-wielding hordes. That Thing 90 Miles North of Reno is hot, dusty and in the middle of nowhere, but it is a nowhere that becomes a reunion and a home for people from all over the world. It’s sort of like a homecoming where you burn down the campus afterwards and then rebuild it in time for next year. The parts are all packed in shipping containers where they will overwinter until we build it all back again in August 2014. Burning Man highlights the fact that all things are temporary. Maybe it’s a monument to that moment when the electricity flickers, and you suddenly realize you should have saved your document five seconds ago.

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missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – While neighboring groups of campers at Scotland’s Loch Earn argued, Barry McCutcheon, 25, who was camping between them, asked them to calm down, prosecutor John Malpass told a Perth court, “and that wasn’t received kindly.” Then someone in one group yelled, “Bring the hatchets.” McCutcheon fled but was stabbed in the back several times with a hatchet. Investigators identified Craig Shaw as the attacker after finding a receipt for the hatchets that led them to a store surveillance video, which showed Shaw. (Scotland’s STV) James Patrick Andrews, 43, tried to withdraw money from a Bank of America ATM in St. Petersburg, Fla., but after the machine informed him that his account had a negative balance, he robbed the bank. Police reported that Andrews made off with $1,000, but they had his photo from the ATM and the getaway car’s license number and arrested him. (Tampa Bay Times) REVENGE OF THE DEAD – A 51-year-old hunter who shot an elk outside Vernal, Utah, was trying to roll the 600- to 700-pound animal over when one of its antlers punctured his neck behind the jaw. Uintah County Undersheriff John Larson said the victim phoned for help and was airlifted to the hospital. (Associated Press) BETTER THAN ARMED GUARDS – The Glendale, Calif., school district paid a private firm $40,500 to monitor 14,000 middle and high school students’ posts on Facebook, Twitter and other social media. School officials insist the purpose isn’t snooping but student safety. The contractor, Geo Listening, which has other school clients, searches public postings, looking for possible violence, drug use, bullying, truancy and suicide threats. “We enforce the code of student conduct for every school we serve” by compiling a daily report to send each principal,” CEO Chris Frydrych said. The firm employs 10 full-time staffers and hires freelance workers to work no more than four hours a day, Frydrych said, because “the content they read is so dark and heavy.” The firm intends expanding its monitoring capacity by offering a smartphone app that lets students and parents notify school officials of conduct violations. (CNN) DEFLATED PROTEST – After British police stopped a chartered party bus for carrying nine passengers instead of the allowed eight, driver Bash Ali, 41, objected, pointing out that the ninth passenger was actually a blow-up doll. Lacking money for a lawyer, however, Ali pleaded guilty in Manchester court, which ruled “that the vehicle was overloaded and that they were all human beings.” Ordered to pay $688.86 in fines and cost, Ali declared, “I have no faith in the justice system.” (United Press International) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Earl Morgan III, 29, tried to kill himself by drilling into his head with a power drill, according to police in Anderson, Ind. Police official Joel Sandefur said that Morgan was in serious condition at an Indianapolis hospital. (Associated Press) After Steven Lowe, 41, resigned from the Wisconsin Rapids, Wis., police department because of allegations that he impersonated a teenage girl online to entice young boys to send him nude pictures, authorities said he committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest “multiple times” with a nail gun. (Associated Press) LEST WE REMEMBER – Among this year’s ill-conceived attempts to honor the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks: AT&T published a photo on Twitter and Facebook showing the World Trade Center memorial lights through an AT&T-enabled smartphone with the message, “Never Forget.” After being accused of tackiness, the company deleted the photo and apologized “to anyone who felt our post was in poor taste.” The San Diego Marriott Mission Valley hotel posted a sign in the lobby: “In remembrance of those we lost on 9/11, the hotel will provide complimentary coffee and mini muffins from 8:45 to 9:15. The hotel apologized to anyone who “misunderstood the intent of the offer.” Esquire magazine published a photo on its website of a World Trade Center victim falling from the building next to what it said was the wrong copy: “Making Your Morning Commute More Stylish: Look good on your way to work.” The magazine pulled the photo and apologized. Tumbledown Trails Golf Course outside Madison, Wis., offered a September 11 special: nine holes (with cart) for $9.11. The golf course apologized, said it would honor the advertised rates and promised to donate a portion of sales to the 9/11 Memorial. Noting that this is the third year the course has offered these rates, general manager Marc Watts said, “This is the first time we’ve had any negative comments. So many people have come in and said, ‘What a unique way to put that out there so people don’t forget.’” Long Island-based Natasha’s Equine Clipping Spa shaved the image of the Manhattan skyline on the side of a horse, with the World Trade Center towers on its hindquarters, and then posted the tribute on its Facebook page. (Yahoo) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – A chess match between neighbors got out of hand when the host pulled a gun and threatened his guest, who fled the apartment in Bellevue, Wash. When police arrived, the man held them off for eight hours before finally waving a white flag out the window and surrendering. (Seattle Times) Wal-Mart clerk Justine Boyd, 46, shot and wounded a 56-year-old co-worker in the store’s liquor section because “the defendant was upset that the victim got a position in the liquor store, an easier cash register,” Winnebago County, Wis., prosecutor Scott Ceman said. After shooting the victim, Boyd returned to her cash register and resumed working until she was arrested and charged. (Appleton Post-Crescent) Douglas Yim, 33, was found guilty of shooting and killing a 25-year-old friend after the two argued the existence of God. Yim was for; Dzuy Duhn Phan, against. (Associated Press) PERILS OF PUBLICITY – When Joseph Derrico resigned from the Hamilton Township, N.J., police force after being indicted on a charge of receiving stolen property, he applied for and was granted a tax-free disability pension of $69,703 a year. New Jersey’s Police and Firemen’s Retirement System board of trustees voted unanimously to revoke Derrico’s pension after he appeared on “Bear Swamp Recovery,” a truTV cable network reality show about vehicle repossessions by the “baddest towing team in Jersey.” During one episode, Derrico runs after a truck, pulls a man down from the driver’s seat, throws him to the ground and climbs into the cab. Another scene shows Derrico wrestling with opponents. (The Times of Trenton)

[12] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013


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missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [13]


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T

he Missoula field office for the Montana Department of Justice’s Gambling Control Division on Palmer Street is hardly inviting to the uninitiated. A solid, windowless door separates the office from the main foyer of Suite D. After knocking to request information about treatment for problem gamblers in Missoula, the woman answering the door provides only two phone numbers. One is for a 1-800 helpline. The other, she says, is a local extension to a Gamblers Anonymous group. Call the local number and a familiar tone greets you, “We’re sorry. The number you have dialed has been disconnected or is no longer in service.” After hearing that the local number she gave is to a dead line, the woman from the field office shrugs. “Oh, okay. We never use it, so thanks for letting us know,” she says as she swings the door shut.

ttt Less than a mile away at Valor House off Mullan Road, a handful of people are spending their Labor

Day evening talking to one another about their struggles with gambling. Valor House is a transitional housing facility for homeless veterans run by the Poverello Center. But on Monday evenings they allow this Gamblers Anonymous group to meet in the common kitchen area. Ron is one of the first people to arrive, and says he has been attending GA in Missoula since 1989. Mitch and Pamela, also regulars, walk in and take seats. On most nights the group attracts between four and 10, but given the holiday no one is terribly surprised by the weak turnout. Then, just before things are set to begin, a greenhorn named Allen walks in. He’s a 20-year-old who started gambling when he was 18. Within two years of regularly hitting the casinos, he says he has gotten to the point where he needs to reach out. Allen says he’s often waited for his paycheck from work to be directly deposited into his account at 12:01 a.m. so that he can head to the casino at 12:02. He

[14] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

once won $950 on a machine after just five minutes, only to sit and play out the money until it was gone. Last night, he says he had a meltdown. He showed up at the meeting because he wants to make that a milestone rather than another broken promise. “I gambled for my last time last night,” he says. Mitch, who usually sits and listens to everybody else’s stories, folds his arms across the table and leans in toward Allen to tell him a story. One night near the holidays he listened to a woman sob over a machine about how she blew all of the money set aside for her children’s Christmas presents. Mitch felt sick to his stomach, and swore he was done. But within a week he was right back at the machines. Over a period of seven or eight years, Mitch says he was basically flying below the radar, meaning he was never in danger of losing his home or jeopardizing his livelihood in a public way, but still lost about $150,000. Those losses, he warns Allen, will catch up eventually.

Cathrine L.

Walters

“Can I say something to you?” he asks Allen politely. “The very first thing I learned from coming to these meetings is that you never trust yourself.” The meetings provide people like Mitch and Allen a support network that can help them be accountable in their recovery. The Monday gathering at Valor House is one of at least three different Gamblers Anonymous groups in Missoula, each of which follow the 12-step platform established by Alcoholics Anonymous. Most groups, including the one at Valor House, are led by volunteers. The state limits who can treat gambling addiction, meaning a significant number of licensed addiction counselors are not legally permitted to treat gamblers. Pamela, a group regular who has been clean for two and a half years, says she feels the state of Montana should provide more to those who struggle with this problem, and chides it for using the money instead to support the state’s “dysfunctional budget.”


“I don’t think we’ve ever figured,” Pamela says, “how many casinos are there in this town?” Allen pulls out an iPhone and begins to Google “Missoula casinos” as Pamela starts thumbing through a phone book. Within a few minutes, Allen comes up with the results. “There’re 44 that are within three miles of here,” he says. In fact, the Gambling Control Division reported last year that there were 81 gambling locations in the city of Missoula, in which about 1,300 individual video gaming machines were operating. The machines in Missoula alone generated $4,157,666 in tax revenue in 2012; video gaming machines statewide last year brought Montana $54 million in taxes. Not a dime of that money goes toward treatment of any sort for gambling addiction. Instead, the Montana Tavern Association, along with several other groups representing state gaming interests, provides funding for the Montana Council on Problem Gambling. The MTCPG provides training to qualified counselors in the state, but there are only three in Missoula with the credentials to treat gambling addiction. MTCPG Chairman Mark Kennedy says the council is a private nonprofit, and that the decision to designate it as such was made more than 15 years ago after consulting with the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. He says it was recommended because accepting state funds would be much slower than working directly with the gaming industry. “It was a business decision,” Kennedy says. The Valor House group is led by Kathy Bordner, a recovering gambling addict herself. The group receives no funding from anyone and is completely self-sustained. For the vast majority of people recovering from gambling addiction in Montana, who have no cash to afford private counseling or inpatient treatment programs, groups like these are their only option for recovery.

ttt Before Kathy Bordner, 44, starts a GA meeting, she pulls out a book to pass around for attendees to sign in. As the book makes its way around the two dining tables, the members sign their name next to the date of their last bet. By her name, Bordner signs 5-13-10. Three days after that, according to documents filed with the Missoula County Attorney’s Office, Missoula police received a call from the UPS Store on Brooks Street reporting suspicions that Bordner had been embezzling large sums of cash from the business. “I seriously can tell you how many casinos are on any street in Missoula,” Bordner says. Her eyes sometimes well with tears as she recounts how she went from carrying a steady job to felony charges, but she says she wants to share her story so that others may learn from her mistakes. Bordner had always gambled off and on without issue up until around 2008. Wanting to fit in with a new social group, she says she started going out drinking with them at the casinos around town. She would hang out and drink with her new friends, but would always stay behind to gamble at the machines. She slowly got hooked. Nearly everything she did was designed around gambling and chasing the fleeting rush that came from every occasional win. “It’s like when you win you get a hot flash from your feet to your head. I don’t know how else to explain it,” Bordner says. “I would go to Wendy’s before I would go gamble because I knew when I was done gambling I’d be broke.” Many times, Bordner says, she would write hundreds of dollars in checks to a casino in one night. Sometimes, she says she saw staff holding checks for other gamblers behind the counter, allowing them to buy the checks back at the end of the night depending on their winnings. According to the Montana Gambling Control Division, check holding is a form of credit gambling, and is illegal.

Back at the GA meeting at Valor House, Pamela says staff at some local casinos would let her buy her checks back before she stopped gambling more than two years ago. Rules were bent as long as she developed a rapport with the staff. “Once they got to know me, it wasn’t a problem,” she says. Around 2008, Bordner says she began stealing from work in order to spend the cash on video gaming machines. In July 2010, Bordner confessed to a Missoula Police detective that she had indeed been changing the deposit slips at UPS to cover up money she had stolen over the years. According to charging documents, Bordner tearfully told the detective that her gambling addiction drove her to steal from the business, and that she had also borrowed money from friends all while trying to hide her problem from her husband. According to the forensic accountant’s estimate in the charging documents, Bordner had embezzled almost $39,000. She pleaded guilty to one felony theft charge, a fraction of the alleged total, but made Alford pleas to the rest, meaning she did not admit guilt but acknowledged there was enough evidence to convict her. When she was sentenced in early 2012, Bordner received two six-year sentences for two felony theft charges. All but 30 days were suspended, and she was ordered to spend that time in the Missoula County Detention Facility. While locked up, unable to go outside and not allowed to take showers alone, Bordner says she battled depression and panic attacks. She tried unsuccessfully to have her jail sentence commuted to house arrest. “One day would have been enough for me. I was so scared,” she says. “For the first two weeks I basically hid under the stairway and cried.” In the time following her release from jail, Bordner has received counseling for gambling in Missoula and has taken opportunities to share her experiences with others. She occasionally gives talks to classes at the University of Montana and Hellgate High School, and eventually

came to lead her own GA group in Missoula. Bordner feels as though she is on the upswing and on top of her addiction, but wary of the fact that the need to gamble could sneak up on her at any time. “I thought I was a bad person,” she tells GA attendees. “And now I know I’m not a bad person. I just made a piss-poor decision.”

ttt Bordner’s counselor, Quinton Hehn, has a second floor office in West Central Missoula. He pulls out a drawer of files covering dozens of people he is seeing for gambling or a combination of that and other addictions. Over the years he has helped steer hundreds toward recovery. Hehn, known by most in the community as Dr. Q, is one of only three local licensed professionals trained to treat gambling addiction and who offer it in a free group setting. One of the things he has noticed about people with an addiction to gambling is that most of them seem to come from a higher socioeconomic status, and often exhibit higher intelligence than those suffering from other addictions. “Successful people go into their trances doing what they do,” Hehn says. “It’s very much like a meditation. A trance effect. There’s no problems in the world. Everything is perfect. And then when they walk out the casino door, all the problems are back.” The endorphin rush achieved from the occasional win makes the cycle of dependence in gambling even more difficult to shake. “You could drop a bomb beside them and they wouldn’t notice it,” he says. This hook comes during this first stage of gambling, when Hehn says the potential addict starts out by seeking that one big “bonanza.” This, he says, is a ruse that looms over the addiction until that person reaches stage two, which is defined by the need for the gambler to win back losses and cover debts incurred. The final stage, Hehn says, comes when the gambler resigns to merely sit at a machine and play every penny they have until it’s gone, no matter

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [15]


how much is won, and walk away broke every single time. “They just kind of live in that sad life with nothing,” he says. The world can get even darker for a gambler at the end of their rope. Lucky Lil’s casinos have their own collections system to chase down debts, and can leave some with destroyed credit, Hehn says. He’s also seen his fair share of people getting into trouble over sports betting in town. He recalls one young man associated with Griz football who wound up in his office after he started to dole out tips to sports gamblers whenever, for example, a player had a bad knee that could affect the score. He suffered harassment when he stopped being so forthcoming with his information. Hehn notes that every game in town—televised or live—could have a bet riding on it. “I’ve seen people talking about losing 70, 80 bucks on a golf game,” he says. When a gambler reaches the breaking point, the majority of them, by nature, don’t have a penny left to afford treatment out of pocket. This is why so many turn to independent GA meetings led by people like Bordner. Hehn’s sessions are made affordable on a sliding scale, and he even makes the occasional house call. As a licensed clinical professional counselor, Hehn is eligible to receive funding from the Montana Council on Problem Gambling, whose main office is based in Great Falls. MTCPG Director Bonnie Huestis says that the effects of gambling addiction on the brain are profound, and quite similar to heroin. The risks for leaving problem gamblers without access to treatment in Montana can be sudden and devastating. “In our field we say the highest suicide rate of any addiction is with gamblers,” Huestis says. “I have had so many family members come in and say, ‘I was just blindsided. I had no idea my spouse was gambling, and now we’re in debt about $100,000.’” Historically, gambling has been treated in the medical world as a compulsive disorder, like nail biting, and not a behavioral disorder, like alcoholism. This distinction has prevented a great deal of gambling addicts from being able to receive health insurance coverage for costly inpatient treatment facilities, of which there is only one in Montana. Some folks at Bordner’s meetings have said that in order to qualify for inpatient treatment in the past, they have had to exaggerate their difficulties with other substance addictions or straight-up lie about them just to gain entry and have their gambling issues addressed. The American Psychiatric Association recently decided to change the way it views pathological gambling, which it will now refer to as “disordered gambling.” They have concluded that disordered gambling shares strong commonalities with substance abuse disorders. Subsequently, their Substance-Related Disorders category has been renamed Addiction and Related Disorders to include gambling. Counselors who are accredited with the title of licensed addiction counselor have not been legally allowed to provide treatment to people suffering from gambling addiction, but the new distinction from the APA allows room for that to change. In April, Gov. Steve Bullock also signed House Bill 61 into law, which allows for licensed addictions counselors to treat gambling addictions in Montana. The new law goes into effect Oct. 1 and could open up a greater pool of qualified counselors to receive training from the MTCPG—and offer more options to problem gamblers across the state.

ttt During another one of Bordner’s GA meetings, Jay LaPlante, a 51-year-old Montana native, listens as an older woman in a denim jacket explains how she used to go to casinos on tribal reservations about once a year, before she moved to Missoula and got swept up in video gambling. She

says she would justify the rez trips by telling herself that if she ended up losing, her money would be going to the less fortunate tribal members who needed it more. LaPlante, a member of the Blackfeet Tribe, abashedly concurs with her. “Well, I’m an Indian and I was just paying Indians back for what the white man did to us,” he says, laughing. LaPlante has been “off the bet” for a year now, but has battled multiple addictions all his life. He says he quit drinking for good in his early 20s, but found himself checking out casinos a few years later on his down time from a job that requires lots of travel around the country, often through tribal lands and their casinos. “When I decided to get sober I just went to AA and I stopped. With gambling it took me 15 years to stop,” he says. “I liked it. That was when money actually dropped out of the machines and you could hear it.” The casino visits eventually ate into his other costs. He was late on bills and started dipping into his savings accounts. His success with AA led him once again to seek help from others like himself. When support groups specifically catering to gambling were too tough to find, he sought help from others back at AA meetings, but that only backfired. “I’d go to AA and I’d tell them, ‘I’m a gambler,’ and they’re like , ‘Oh, next time you go to the casino I’ll go with you.” Having been seasoned in both AA and GA, LaPlante has found the two groups to be very different environments. AA meetings, he says, are usually filled with sociable people who are okay with laughing at themselves and sharing their experiences. Gamblers are much harder to reach. “When you’re gambling, you’re not really interacting. In fact, you don’t really like people around you,” LaPlante says. “I just find gamblers to be more serious.” In 2011, he made a plan that had doom written all over it. He moved in with a friend in Las Vegas. His logic told him that the city held nearly 100 GA meetings a week, and he would have the biggest support network to steer his recovery. The plan didn’t work. He eventually stopped looking for meetings and waltzed right back in to the casinos. When he erroneously made bets on a company card, he decided to come clean with his employer. He says they have supported his desire to get better. The disgrace of relapsing hangs over him. The possibility of another slip-up is never far away, and last struck LaPlante one year ago when he made his last bet. “Eventually shame will go away. It has to for a person to recover,” LaPlante says. “To be sober and then to engage in another addiction, that’s part of the shame I feel. Like I should have known better.” LaPlante continues to go to GA meetings on a weekly basis. In regards to the lack of a phone number to a functioning GA group in the local Gambling Control Division office, he’s not surprised. He doesn’t have any expectations from the state. It’s the individual group’s responsibility to maintain its own exposure and availability to addicts in town. “It would be great if those people would reach out to (GA groups), but it’s not really their responsibility to do that,” he says. The system puts the onus on the addict, and LaPlante knows that as well as anyone. He says work will be sending him to Las Vegas once again later this month. He plans to stay with a friend north of the city, far from the main strip. If he can’t handle himself, he says he will simply get in his car and leave the city, probably for the last time. The names of some Gamblers Anonymous attendees have been changed. Missoula meetings occur Mondays (214-1863), Wednesdays (542-0900) and Thursdays (728-5224). editor@missoulanews.com

[16] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Jay LaPlante has been “off the bet” for a year now, but has battled multiple addictions all his life. “When I decided to get sober I just went to AA and I stopped. With gambling it took me 15 years to stop,” he says.

Photo by Chad Harder

Quinton Hehn, better known as Dr. Q, is one of only three local licensed professionals trained to treat gambling addiction. He says addicts often enter a “trance” while gambling, where everything seems perfect. “And then when they walk out the casino door, all the problems are back,” he says.


OU SEE Y AR! YE T X E N

POSTER DESIGN BY NOTEWORTHY* PAPER & PRESS missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Wrangling cats

Shakewell’s nine-member lineup keeps Missoula in the groove by Gaaby Patterson

S

hakewell holds practice in a 6-foot-by-6-foot basement space, a blanket draped like a circus tent from the ceiling to cover the pipes, lest the band members be dripped on. There’s just enough room for a drum kit and the laundry; the humidity from the dryer is so thick it curls your hair. If all the members show up to practice, some of them are forced to play standing on the rickety wooden steps. Sure, a nine-piece funk band would fit better upstairs, but the neighbors might complain. The practice space is just one of the challenges for a big band. Having so many members—nine egos and nine schedules for nine early 20-somethings—isn’t easy. As a result, the band changes bass players like they change their socks, and it’s never clear who’s going to show up for a gig. It’s by sheer force of will that Shakewell’s core members—lead guitarist Emmet Ore, drummer Jake Smith and percussionist/vocalist Colter Dykman—herd all these cats. The three of them have

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

been playing together since they were kids, which adds some stability to an otherwise chaotic situation. Despite being constantly in flux, Shakewell has managed to garner high praise for a band that’s only been together for one-and-a-half years. Earlier this spring, Shakewell placed third at Sean Kelly’s Top of the Mic and in July it celebrated winning Best New Band in the Indy’s Best of Missoula contest. Yet, despite spending much of this summer in competition with other musicians, the band insists its local success has everything to do with the tight Missoula music community. “Missoula has a cooperative scene, rather than competitive,” Ore says. The Missoula band began playing in February 2012, getting gigs with the help of Ore’s older brother Sam, who is something of a staple in Missoula’s music scene. In fact, many of Shakewell’s members have ties to other local favorites, including Three-Eared Dog, Reverend Slanky and Kung Fu Kongress, either playing in those

[18] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

bands or being related to someone who does. They also have a lot of friends—devoted friends willing to follow them to every venue, every weekend, crowding the floor to dance with arms flailing, sweating all over each other, holding beers high. That fanbase supported them this past weekend at the Shine Intergalactic Festival, traveling to Haugan to weather the long sets of electronica music in order to hear the band play. To be fair, it’s not all nepotism and crazed college kids carrying this band. Shakewell plays some covers, but the group has an album’s worth of strong, original music written mostly by Ore. The songs are full of coming-of-age lyrics about the need to leave home, broken hearts and, in “Soothsayer,” that heady feeling of discovering your own powers of seduction. The sound smacks of something more mature than one might expect from a young group—reminiscent of the funky surf of Donovan Frankenreiter and the hippie-soul of Allen Stone. Even if they can’t always fit everybody on a stage,

Shakewell knows how to groove. You can hear it in the break in the middle of “Movin’” when the musicians flip from the “wacka wacka” guitar and lilting harmonies of the ’70s to a slow, muted little Incubus riff. It’s also in the jam band jaunt during “Soothsayer” that’s chock full of bongos, horn and harmony, and in the Marvin-Gayesmooth backup vocals on “Color Blind.” Shakewell’s orchestration is complex, but the sound is clear-cut. “It’s so simple,” Dykman says. “It’s like small talk.” And he’s right. You don’t really have to know what you’re listening to or what the lyrics mean. From the moment you lay ears on Shakewell’s groove, all you want to do is get down. Shakewell plays the Top Hat Sat., Sept. 28, at 10 PM. Free. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Fun to do Buddy Jackson plays it feisty The best punk rock is the kind you play really hard while screaming. That kind of music is like sex: fun to do, but hardly anybody wants to watch. There’s a little of the hard screaming at the end of “Babar,” the first track on Buddy Jackson’s new Bridge Over Idaho split 7”, but what I like is the chord that keeps resolving the verses. That chord sounds just right to me. It is the signal in the noise, the pilot’s voice. He’s going to turn the crash into a ride. Bridge Over Idaho is full of such pleasing reversals. “(Gacked Out &) Priceless” starts as a well-done exercise and becomes something more affecting with the husky second vocal. “Warren G.” takes a similar lunge into deep feeling midway through. It’s a testament to Buddy Jackson’s craft that the band can achieve such shifts in twominute songs. Bridge Over Idaho is a short ride, but it’s got a lot of climbs and drops. It doesn’t walk the line between punk expressionism and pop pleasure so much as jump

back and forth for sport. It sounds like it was fun music to make, and it is great to listen to. (Dan Brooks) Buddy Jackson plays a release party at Stage 112 Fri., Sept. 27, at 9:30 PM with Total Combined Weight, Frederick Krueger and the Sweet Dreamers, and The Whoopass Girls. $3.

Piñata Protest, El Valiente In the American Southwest, punk thrives alongside centuries-old Mexican traditions. Combining the two isn’t a gimmick so much as an inevitability. Take San Antonio’s Piñata Protest, which marries traditional norteño with power chords and shouty vocals. “Punk rock like abuela used to make,” according to the band’s website. Lead singer Alvaro Del Norte sports a cowboy hat and a patch-covered black vest, playing accordion with swagger. Songs on the El Valiente EP move between ranchero classics with a touch of edge, like the cover of “Volver, Volver,” to bilingual party anthems with lyrics like, “Vatos perrones, we won’t go away, live for today.” I’m most

partial to Piñata Protest’s occasional blasts of hardcore, which get me all nostalgic for Los Crudos. Not everything in Piñata Protest’s repertoire is a stand-out, and some songs are excessively repetitive. I still can’t decide if the lightning-fast version of “La Cucaracha” is awesome or obnoxious. Either way, it will be stuck in your head for days, and being both hilarious and annoying is pretty much as punk rock as it gets. (Kate Whittle) Piñata Protest plays the Top Hat Thu., Oct. 3, at 10 PM with Agent Orange and Guttermouth. $18/$16 advance.

Cody Beebe & The Crooks, Out Here The problem with many bands who crowd a stage with five or more hippie-looking dudes and musically mine the blues/roots/soul thread is that, for all the extra hearts and pumping blood and sweat and floating hair, they often come off sounding limp. Especially on record. When I looked at a few pictures of Seattle’s Cody Beebe & The Crooks in preparation for listening to their latest album, Out Here, I noticed the lead singer/guitarist, Beebe, with a Les Paul in hand making guitar face in one shot and shredding a Flying V in another. I thought, “Man, if you’re going to wrangle these Gibson axes, you better not be limp.” Thankfully, this band is not.

What immediately struck me with the opening tracks, “Alleyway” and “Hold the Line,” is the guitar tone. It’s thick, loud and stinky with big, fat riffs and leads that make me pull a guitar face just listening to them. The record changes musical directions here and there the rest of the way, but it never veers from the momentum established out of the gate. I suspect these cats take it up a notch or two live, as well. Ignore any talk about this being “Southern rock” from the Northwest. This is groove-heavy music for people who can handle a winter north of I-70. (Chris La Tray) Cody Beebe & the Crooks play the Top Hat Thu., Sept. 26, at 10 PM. Free.

Jeffrey Foucault and Kris Delmhorst Of his musical/domestic partnership with heralded songwriter Kris Delmhorst, the equally-lauded Jeffrey Foucault said recently: “Kris and I started talking on a night-flight to London [in 2003] and never stopped. Every minute that we weren’t driving we’d uncase the guitars in the hotel room and trade songs.” Nowadays, touring separately upwards of 150 nights a year, the two rarely swap tunes before live audiences, though, accompanied by former Morphine drummer and Foucault band-mate Billy Conway, they plan to for their Missoula show. The artists have a certain durability, which is to say that listeners who were reared on such lasting songwriters as Townes Van Zandt and Joni Mitchell—listeners, in other words, who aren’t entirely Trapped by the Blitzens

or certain they want to spend an entire Weekend with the Vampires—will relish the density of inspiration the two produce. Equipped with literate, nuanced poetics, both artists are comfortable in a diverse range of modes—from the narrative to the mythic, the dreamily impressionistic to the politically epigramistic—and prove that there are still a few songs out there full of sustenance that the discriminating listener can live by. Or, as Foucault sings in “Northbound 35”: “Flashes that we own / little snapshots made of breath and of bone.” (Chris Dombrowski) Jeffrey Foucault and Kris Delmhorst play the Crystal Theatre Thu., Sept. 26, at 7:30 PM with John Floridis. $15/$12 advance.

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [19]


[books]

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[20] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Fade to light Greta Wrolstad’s posthumous poems shine by Erika Fredrickson

There is often a harshness in Greta Wrolstad’s po- self than most 24-year-olds. You can hear that in the etry that brings on a dreaded feeling. In her most way Wrolstad crafts lines with a calm strength, as in renowned poem, “Notes on Sea and Shore,” she her poem “This One is About Pain,” where she writes, writes: “You were in your room overlooking the bay/ “I was propositioned in the thin hallway of Alaska, and never once glanced at the water, stayed/ with the and left/ his fingers dislocated and empty.” blinds drawn, waited in the crowded/ rooms of your The poems in Night is Simply a Shadow were seskull...” Later in the poem, she begins a stanza with, lected by Klink and poets Michael McGriff and Britta “Once again I am huddled under the freighted Ameel, who were friends with Wrolstad. McGriff and Carl ocean,” and ends another with a gruesome image: Adamshick, both editors at the Portland publishing com“When land appeared it was inhabited by men gnaw- pany Tavern Books, released the collection. It’s not a ing on the remains of other men.” comprehensive look at her work, and McGriff says it Night is Simply a Shadow, the new collection of leaves out some of Wrolstad’s accomplished poems in Wrolstad’s poems, includes “Notes on Sea and order to serve the trajectory of the book. This is the issue Shore.” It also includes other pieces with harrowing of posthumous books. It’s lines best described in the fora fragile process. How do mer University of you know what an author Montana MFA stuwould have wanted in dent’s own poetry their absence? as “not terror” but Some lines are difa “lullaby from ficult to read without which the danger is thinking of Wrolstad’s waking.” Most of death: “Discover me. the darkness is Let me be carried from couched in terms of this cold radiance/To the natural world— feel at least one more the way the ocean is human hand.” But it unforgivable but not, seems important to perhaps, evil. Or the try to read her work way we project our without letting it be feeling of loneliness overshadowed. Othon an “unlit lamp.” erwise you miss That darkness, though how good it is. And striking, is thankfully you might also contrasted with breathmiss the more celtaking moments of ebratory images light—“veins of gold spiand phrasing that dering the corneal speak to immorcurve, bright/ threads tality, like in “Geshifting, untrappable”— ography” when and weird surprises such she writes, “In as in the poem “St. Pethe dark-light I tersburg,” where she Night is Simply a Shadow know we are writes, “My mouth tastes Greta Wrolstad parceled: every paperback, Tavern Books of almonds, paper/ clips, 56 pages, $15 body is bound someone else’s tongue.” countless times It’s impossible to inside itself.” read Night is Simply a Shadow without some sorrow. What’s great about the title Night is Simply a Its release this August comes eight years after Wrol- Shadow—which comes from a line in “Geography”— stad, at the age of 24, died in a car accident on High- is that it illustrates the tone of Wrolstad’s work. It acway 200. She had just finished her first year of knowledges the beautiful darkness of some of her graduate school at UM. In her short time in the cre- writing but it also, with the word “simply,” swiftly reative writing program, she served as a co-editor for assures that night is nothing to fear. The Tavern ediCut Bank literary magazine. She spent time in St. Pe- tors and Wrolstad’s poet friends have curated the tersburg, Russia, attending summer literary seminars, collection to reflect that in an elegant way. By the and her work reflects her time there. Poet and pro- final poem, “Fontaine De Vaucluse,” which ends with, fessor Joanna Klink got to know Wrolstad during her “the season of rain is coming, hold out your hand,” year at UM. Klink says Wrolstad’s poetry has a signa- you will feel less sorrowful and more lucky to have ture “swerve” where it goes from “bloodless” to “a her words to read over again. sudden specific warmth.” Carl Adamshick, Joanna Klink and Ed Skoog Klink recalls that Wrolstad had a quiet but strong read from Greta Wrolstad’s Night is Simply a presence. Shadow at Shakespeare & Co. Tue., Oct. 1, at 8 “I thought she was shy at first,” Klink tells me. PM. Free. “But she wasn’t. She was observing.” Klink describes Wrolstad as more at home in herefredrickson@missoulanews.com


[film]

One-track mind Fruitvale Station needs a few more layers

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Officer not friendly.

In the early hours of New Year’s Day, 2009, two days before I moved back to Missoula from San Francisco, a 22-year-old Oscar Grant was fatally shot by a police officer in the Fruitvale BART station in front of dozens of witnesses, many of whom captured the whole thing on their phones. Grant, a young black man, was unarmed and restrained by another officer. He was facedown on the floor. I seem to have a vague memory of hearing about a shooting at the time, and about subsequent riots in Oakland. It didn’t stick in my mind. I was on my way out and too tied up in my own life to pay much attention. One thing humans aren’t super awesome at is paying attention. Ryan Coogler’s debut feature film, Fruitvale Station, dramatizes the last day of Grant’s life. The first scene opens with actual cellphone footage, then flashes back to Grant, who starts his morning in a little apartment with his girlfriend and daughter. It’s all pretty straightforward from there, as Coogler takes us through Grant’s struggles with escaping his criminal past and finding a fresh start with his family. The result is a provocative but far from perfect film. The best moments—the real moments—are soft and quiet, where invested actors breathe big life into casual details. Michael B. Johnson (“Friday Night Lights” and “The Wire”) convincingly plays Grant, demonstrating formidable range from tender to violent emotions, and delivering a truly complex character. The supporting cast is solid, managing to work the camera with a light-enough touch to make more-or-less underdeveloped secondary characters feel full and real. But Coogler tries way too hard way too often. The raw number of isolated heavy hands piling up through the narrative makes it tricky to stay lost inside the story. There’s this brutal scene where a dog gets killed by a negligent driver, and as soon as you feel the horrible feeling that anyone with half a soul is going to feel, you then suddenly start to suspect that you’ve just been manipulated. It breaks the spell. Coogler uses the dog as a symbol and storytelling device. As a viewer you don’t want your eyes to roll the minute they start to tear up. Then there’s the girl Oscar meets in the morning and the flashback-introduced ex-con, both of whom show up again all too conveniently that night on the train. Over-

wrought decisions, such as Oscar dumping a bag of weed into the ocean to indicate his tragically ironic desire to reform, caricature an otherwise genuine humanity that pulses through the story. But as the final act opens, everything wonderful and right about Coogler’s filmmaking comes back into focus. The reel plunges into an emotional space that finally feels earned, and you’re almost able to see the earlier flaws in a new light. Events like this happen every day. Negligence kills dogs, people randomly encounter people from their past, strangers who just met reconnect abruptly. Coincidences are hard to handle in storytelling not because they’re absurd, but because they really do happen. Sometimes you’re walking along minding your own business and life drags you into a seemingly random chain of events. Sometimes people get killed for no reason at all, or reasons that can’t ever be fully sussed out. The dramatization of coincidence is a reminder that our fragile lives can break open at any moment. The Bay Area was an interesting place to live at the end of 2008. We were just about to inaugurate our first black president, and celebrating NYE in the Castro was pretty wild despite Prop 8’s temporary victory. The shooting of Oscar Grant in an environment of civil rights consciousness isn’t something I should have missed. I wasn’t paying attention. And now, in the wake of the Zimmerman trial, here comes Coogler’s film. Oscar Grant’s story could have been a documentary, rather than a dramatic narrative. Coogler’s intention, however, was to direct our attention toward the underprivileged side of this tale at the risk of further polarizing the problem. The question of whether Grant’s death was due to negligence or racial prejudice is too important to leave solely in one arena, and Fruitvale Station could have gone further in awakening our attention. I would have liked to see Coogler take us not only through Grant’s day, but also through the day of the policeman who shot him. It would have revealed more completely how these different worlds can converge in tragedy and it would’ve been a braver film that way. Harder, but braver. Fruitvale Station continues at the Wilma Theatre. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [21]


[film]

Safe ride Rush takes its foot off the pedal by Scott Renshaw

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[22] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Always a bridesmaid...

Rivalries—the kind that go down in history, like the one Ron Howard’s Rush is based on—are almost always grounded in contrast. Machine-like Björn Borg vs. combustible John McEnroe; flashy Magic Johnson vs. steady Larry Bird; dancing, brash Ali vs. lumbering, stolid Foreman—all of them captivated audiences because they were as much about style as talent. Winning wasn’t really the only thing; people could also argue over whether it was important how you looked while you were doing it. Rush, however, takes its cues less from the great sports rivalries than from one based in the arts: the Mozart vs. Salieri dynamic of Amadeus. And in so doing, the film inadvertently manages to say as much about the reputation of its director as it does about the story at hand. Because if Howard is likely to be compared with either of the key players in this fact-based tale of the mid’70s Formula 1 racing rivalry between cocky, daring James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and diligent, risk-averse Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl), it’s the latter. Despite being an Oscar winner for A Beautiful Mind—or, depending on your cynicism, because he’s an Oscar winner—Howard’s reputation among cinephiles ranges from “generally competent” to “workmanlike.” He’s the guy who’s going to take whatever story you give him and deliver something perfectly watchable, but you’re never going to go to one of his movies for the privilege of seeing a master direct the hell out of a motion picture. This story is exactly the kind at which Howard has proven most adept, using the framework of real-life characters as he did so effectively with A Beautiful Mind, Cinderella Man and Frost/Nixon. The action begins with a crucial race in 1976, before flashing back to the early years of the rivalry between Hunt and Lauda on the minorleagues of the European racing circuit. Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan—who collaborated on Frost/Nixon—effectively set up the initial parallel between the two men as children of privilege who rebel against the expectations of their families, before focusing on the clash of styles that differentiated them. Mostly though, there’s racing—a lot of racing—and Howard shows some flash in those scenes that hasn’t

been typical of him in the past. Working with Danny Boyle’s longtime cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle, Howard finds the kinetic appeal of racing without resorting merely to two-second edits—although it’s hard for him to get past the fact that one shot of a car moving very fast around a track looks a lot like the previous shot, and the one before that, and so forth. There’s also some great material in Rush about the connection that develops between people whose greatest pleasure is beating one another. After a crash appears to sideline Lauda for the remainder of a season, he endures grueling rehabilitation—all while watching Hunt catch up to him in the season standings—motivated by the need to defend his title. And when a reporter insults Lauda during a press conference, it’s Hunt who comes to his defense with surprising brutality. Brühl’s performance is considerably more compelling than Hemsworth’s. He perfectly captures the pique of a guy who genuinely can’t understand people who don’t see the world as rationally as he does. But both actors capture the competitive respect that has always driven the great sports legends. Rush offers plenty to like in its study of the drive to win, and in the performances that anchor that study; it just doesn’t offer much to love. Like so many of Howard’s films over the years, it’s content to hit its marks—the montages, the character-arc peaks and valleys, the action beats—without ever finding a way to elevate the material. So we get the scenes of the two men wooing and interacting with their wives (Olivia Wilde and Alexandra Maria Lara) that rarely feel anything more than perfunctory, and add little to the distinction between their personalities. We get story-advancing scenes that might as well have “this is a story-advancing scene” written somewhere on the screen. Rush works, and maybe that’s rare enough that it’s not worth nit-picking. But as Salieri learned in Amadeus, there’s a great divide between art that works and art that wows. Rush opens Fri., Sept. 27, at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK

son. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6.

8 1/2 Director Frederico Fellini created this complex, meta masterpiece in 1963 about a famous filmmaker suffering from creative block. Starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimée and Claudia Cardinale. Not rated. Showing at the Roxy Theater Fri., Sept. 27-Sun., Sept. 30 at 7:15 PM.

PRISONERS Families are torn and parents are driven to extreme deeds when two young girls go missing. Starring Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal and Viola Davis. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS A Texas outlaw breaks out of prison and sets off to find the woman he loves and the daughter he’s never met. Starring Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck and Ben Foster. Rated R. Wilma.

RIDDICK Revenge will be served colder than the vacuum of space in this latest installment of the Riddick series. Starring Vin Diesel, Karl Urban and Katee Sackhoff. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 Watch out for shrimpanzees, apple pie-thons and snarling tacodiles when inventor Flint Lockwood finds out a machine he’s created is churning out mutant food-beasts. Voiced by Bill Hader, Anna Faris and Will Forte. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharoahplex, Entertainer. DON JON A young porn-addicted dude in New Jersey tries to find his own “happy ending,” and learns some unexpected lessons along the way. Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore. Rated R. Carmike 12. GOOD OL’ FREDA Discover the woman who stood behind the men when Freda Kelly looks back on 50 years working as a secretary for the Beatles. Rated PG. Showing at the Roxy Theater Fri., Sept. 27-Sun., Sept. 30 at 7 and 9 PM. RUSH Fast cars, fast women and slick hairdos feature in Ron Howard’s drama based on the real-life rivalry between Formula One racers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Brühl and Olivia Wilde. Rated R. Carmike 12. (See Film.) SIXTEEN CANDLES Molly Ringwald is a forgotten birthday girl in John Hughes’ 1984 classic. Rated R. Showing at the Roxy Theater Thu., Sept. 26 at 7 PM as part of the theater’s birthday celebration.

NOW PLAYING AUSTENLAND A Pride and Prejudice-obsessed single woman visits a Jane Austen theme park; maybe, just maybe, she’ll find her own unlikely Mr. Darcy. Starring Keri Russell, Jennifer Coolidge and Bret McKenzie. Rated PG-13. Wilma.

THIS IS THE END “Drug and penis humor” earned This Is The End its rating, which Not your average fangirl. Good Ol’ Freda screens at the Roxy Fri., Sept. 27–Sun., Sept. 30 at 7 and 9 PM. is probably all some of protection program, but not so great at staying you need to know. James Franco, Jonah Hill and BATTLE OF THE YEAR It’s time for a bunch of young upstart Americans on the DL. Sacre bleu! Also starring Dianna Seth Rogen take comedic turns in a comedy to let their feet do the talking at an annual Agron. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, about the end of the world. Rated R. Village 6. worldwide dance competition. Starring Josh Hol- Showboat. WE’RE THE MILLERS loway, Laz Alonso and Josh Peck. Rated PG-13. FRUITVALE STATION A drug dealer asks oddballs to pretend to be his Carmike 12. On Dec. 31, 2008, unarmed Oakland resident family to avoid suspicion while moving a large Oscar Grant was shot in the back and killed by amount of weed over the U.S/Canada border. BLUE JASMINE Woody Allen brings us this tale of a narcissistic a BART police officer. Michael B. Jordan portrays Dude, strippers look like normal women when socialite, played by Cate Blanchett, who under- the last day of Grant’s not-so-simple life. Also they put pants on! Lolz! Starring Jennifer Aniston, goes a nervous breakdown and transformation starring Melonie Diaz and Octavia Spencer. Jason Sudeikis and Emma Roberts. Rated R. after her life hits rock bottom. Also starring Alec Rated R. Wilma. (See Film.) Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex. Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Rated PG-13. INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 THE WORLD’S END Wilma. The Lambert family must uncover what evil Five buddies on an epic pub crawl have no idea presence is terrorizing them and possibly inhab- they’re about to join a really epic battle for huDESPICABLE ME 2 The somewhat inept but well-meaning Gru is iting their kiddo. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose manity’s survival. Brought to you by the Shaun put to work for the Anti-Villain league to fight a Byrne and Barbara Hershey. Rated PG-13. of the Dead and Hot Fuzz dudes, so British witnew super criminal in the follow-up to the 2010 Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Village 6. ticisms and smashed pint glasses abound. Starfamily friendly animated comedy. Starring the ring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Martin voices of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig and Miranda MONSTERS UNIVERSITY Freeman. Rated R. Village 6, Pharaohplex. This prequel to 2001’s Monsters, Inc., visits SulCosgrove. Rated PG. Carmike 12. ley and Mike during their college days. I bet they Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. threw some beastly frat parties. Starring the ELYSIUM It’s the year 2154, and rich people live on a voices of Billy Crystal, John Goodman and Steve Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit space station while the poors live down on the Buscemi. Rated G. Village 6. missoulanews.com’s arts section to find ruined earth. It’s up to Jason Bourne, er, Matt up-to-date movie times for theaters in the PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS Damon I mean, to bridge the two worlds. Also area. You can also contact theaters to spare In this sequel to 2010’s Percy Jackson and the starring Jodie Foster and Sharlto Copley. Rated yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Olympians: The Lightning Thief, good ol’ Percy R. Carmike 12, Village 6. and crew must find the Golden Fleece and, pre- Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village sumably, throw it into Mordor to prevent evil 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; PharaohTHE FAMILY Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer star as a from taking over the world. Starring Logan Ler- plex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polmafia couple that’s in France under the witness man, Alexandra Daddario and Brandon T. Jack- son and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

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missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [23]


[dish]

SUSHI TUESDAYS 5pm to close • Reservations accepted.

Veggie options, too!

photo by Ari LeVaux

The lost hens by Ari LeVaux

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

An unintended side-effect of the backyard chicken craze has been the creation of a generation of homeless hens. A typical layer will produce for three years at most, but may live a decade longer. Not all backyard chicken keepers have the space or money to feed a growing flock of old hens until they die of natural causes. It doesn’t help that elderly hens have a reputation for being Kevlar—tough, and thus culinarily worthless. But in this tangled man-versus-chicken drama, the edibility of old chicken is one problem, at least, that is imminently solvable. More on this in a moment. Killing an animal that you have gotten to know, perhaps named and grown to love can be a complex emotional process that, until recently, only people who grew up on farms had to deal with. It’s hard enough to put an old dog to sleep. But to kill an otherwise healthy pet, pull out her guts, pluck her feathers and chop off her feet and head, takes the pet/owner relationship to new places. And it doesn’t always inspire much appetite. So instead of giving Mrs. Buttercuppy the snuff when she stops laying, some urban chicken keepers are simply abandoning her. Animal shelters from coast to coast are dealing with unprecedented numbers of discarded chickens, often roosters prohibited by city codes. Animal control officers are picking them up off the street. Small flocks are being left in cages at shelter doors under cover of night. I’m going to leave the question of killing pets for food between you and your therapist. If you can’t do it, you’re morally stuck with the bird unless you can find a willing adopter. Should you choose the lethal option, I recommend The Small Scale Poultry Flock, by Harvey Ussery, a far better source than me for how to properly kill and butcher a chicken. There are numerous online tutorials to walk you through the process as well. But I can speak to the myth that old birds are too tough to bother with in the kitchen. Cooked properly they will be tender and delicious, and full of valuable nutrients. Many culinary opportunities will open with this knowledge, which boils down to little more than simmering the bird until it’s tender. If you add wine along the way, you will essentially be making coq au vin, which in its bare bucolic essence means cooking the bird in wine and water until edible. Knowing how to butcher chicken, along with understanding how to cook a tough old bird, should be standard skills for every chicken farmer, and any lover of chicken soup or coq au vin. If you don’t keep chickens yourself, maybe your hipster friends will let you kill theirs. One place you won’t have much luck scoring a chicken for the pot is Chicken Run Rescue, in Min-

FLASH IN THE PAN

neapolis. “If your interest is anything other than the companionship of a chicken, please stop here,” warns the website. In order to adopt a chicken from Chicken Run Rescue, you must promise not to slaughter it or make it fight or use it in ritual sacrifice. My old hen ritual begins with browning the bird in the oven for an hour or so at 300 degrees. Then I put it in a big pot, either whole or in pieces. For broth with the most marrow and other bony attributes, cut the long bones with pruning shears before simmering. Given how long it can take to cook the meat— two to 10 hours—a countertop Crock-Pot works well. As the chicken cooks, maintain the fluid level with water and wine. A bottle per chicken is a good rule of thumb. I add red wine, but white wine works well too, resulting in a lighter-colored chicken that tastes almost identical. Add some bay leaves and a whole peeled onion and skim off any scum that floats to the surface. When the bird is finally tender, turn off the heat and let the pot cool. Then put it in the fridge overnight, covered. Ussery calls this post-cooking period “passive extraction,” and says it allows more nutrients to leach from the bones into the broth. In the morning, skim the fat if you wish and remove the chicken. Remove the flesh from the bones and add it back to the pot. You now have a chicken soup kit, which you can reheat in many ways. Most contemporary recipes call for cooking storebought chicken for 20 or so minutes to get the chicken to a state of similar chewability. They call for ingredients like bacon, butter, flour and other fatteners and thickeners to make a decadent stew. While I’m adding wine, I’m thinking of this as chicken soup as much as coq au vin, and I like to keep the broth on the thin side. Sometimes I will thicken with potatoes, cooked separately until near-falling apart. In addition ushering the dish from soup to stew, potatoes add bellyfilling body. Re-heat the soup with whatever veggies you want, adding water as necessary. For coq, I add a mirepoixlike mix of carrots, celery, parsnip, garlic and onions, along with bay leaves herbs de Provence. Mushrooms are nice. And potatoes if I want it thicker. As it heats, add salt, and more wine, to taste. A few bites of spent hen au vin could steer a lot of backyard chicken keepers away from abandonment and into the realm of responsible slaughter, while giving them a new level of appreciation for their beloved birds. Your hens lived immeasurably better lives than the average chicken. It was a good thing. It came to an end. Now eat some coq au vin.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Welcome Back Students!! Happy Fall!! Fall is Bernice’s time of year. The smell of fresh baked goods waft around the Hip Strip as Bernice’s prepares to serve a rockin’ cup of joe, danishes, cookies, croissants, muffins, and a whole lot more. The crisp Missoula air is the perfect complement to a slice of apple pie in the afternoon or a warm Tipus Chai around 6pm. Fall BBQ’s are topped off with Bernice's Parkerhouse Rolls, Curried Chicken Salad and an 8” Chocolate Chocolate cake for dessert. Stop by the UC, COT and Book Exchange to see what goodies Bernice’s is showcasing this school year. A spinach croissant just before class is a great wake-me-up! xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). FRIDAY 9/27: Mike Bader 6-9 pm. SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$

$…Under $5

Dickey’s Barbecue Pit 143 W. Broadway Downtown Missoula • 203.1557 Taste why Dickey’s Barbecue is the world’s best barbecue since 1941! Try our 8 juicy hot pit smoked meats, like our southern pulled pork or our family recipe polish sausage. We even offer 11 home-style sides, like our creamy cole slaw and fried okra. Don’t forget we’re also your catering experts! Any event, any size – let Dickey’s do the cooking, and you can take the credit. Graduation parties, weddings, office functions, you name it! Dickey’s Barbecue is the perfect catering choice for groups of all sizes – from 10 to 10,000! Don’t forget-Kids Eat Free Sundays & everyone enjoys FREE ice cream every day! Dickey’s Barbecue. Seriously, Pit Smoked. Open 7 days a week. Offering a full liquor bar. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 97:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

SEPTEMBER

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [25]


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Bitter Root cans HAPPIEST HOUR The scoop: One of the state’s oldest breweries has jumped on board with one of craft brewing’s newest trends: canned beer. Bitter Root Brewing, which opened in 1998, started canning its Sawtooth Ridge Golden Ale, Blown Out Brown Ale and Bitter Root Single Hop a couple weeks ago. The first limited runs have started to show up on local shelves in six-packs, alongside Bitter Root’s standard 22-ounce bomber bottles. The plan: Owner and founder Tim Bozik says the brewery made the decision a year ago during the annual Montana Brewers Association event in Missoula. “It was time,” he says. “The 22-ounce packaging is great, but it just doesn’t allow the same market diversity.” After making the decision, Bozik set in motion a plan to expand the Hamilton brewery, add more brew tanks and purchase a canning machine. “This is the responsible thing to do,” he says. “You’re not going to toss four 22-ounce bottles in your backpack and go climb a mountain, then carry your empties back. But cans are a different story.” The future: In addition to the three beers now available, Bozik says they’re working on reformulating an IPA and hope to have it canned by spring or summer. The 22-ouncers will continue “as long as demand remains” with all of Bitter Root’s seasonal

caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$

photo by Skylar Browning

favorites, including the Last Cast Black IPA, Red Dread Imperial Red Ale and Huckleberry Honey Ale. Where to get them: We scored a Sawtooth six-pack at Good Food Store, but multiple other Missoula locations stock Bitter Root cans, including Orange Street Food Farm. Bozik says production is limited at the start—some shelves have been missing the Single Hop—but will increase in coming weeks. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 • pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 • sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins • 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$

Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$

Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions.

Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: 24/6. Tues–Sun 6:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Winebar Hours: Tues–Sun 11:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays.

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 whole-

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

some ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


September 26–October 3, 2013

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Stuck in limbo. UM’s School of Theatre and Dance presents Avenue Q at the Montana Theatre Tue., Oct. 1–Sat., Oct 5 and Tue., Oct 8–Sat., Oct. 12, at 7:30 PM nightly. $20/$16 for seniors and students. Tickets at the UMArts Box Office.

THURSDAYSEPT26 Discover your local bibliophiles in a new light when the ZACC hosts Celebrity Sketchy: Librarian Night, in which participants will draw portraits of Missoula librarians whilst enjoying wine and helpful instruction. 235 N. First St. W. 6 PM. $12/$10 for members, all materials included.

Bust out your castanets, amigos, the Ballet Arts Academy hosts the four-day flamenco workshop with Maestro Teo Morca. Includes guitar, singing and dancing workshops, culminating in a performance at the Stensrud on Sept. 29 at 7 PM. 1620 Rodgers. Register at flamencomt.com, or call 542-9270. UM students can safely engage in discussion on some heavy topics at Bridging Dialogues Across Cultures, a guided event

that covers race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion and ability. 4-6 PM, Phyllis J. Washington College of Education and Human Sciences Room 241. Held on Sept. 26, Oct. 10 and 24, Nov. 7 and 21 and Dec. 5.

nightlife Saddle up for a taste of the Wild West when Eric Pierpoint signs The Last Ride of Caleb O’Toole, a historical young adult novel. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 5-7 PM.

Start your engines, Bitterroot book aficiondados, it’s the 2013 Friends of the Bitterroot Public Library Used Book Sale, running through Sept. 28. Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. John Smith plays solo acoustic tunes for your evening’s pleasure at Montgomery Distillery, starting around 6 PM. Free. Pass the fries basket when Russ Nasset plays the Top Hat dinner show from 7–9 PM. Free, all ages. Massachusetts singer-songwriters and real-life lovebirds Jeffrey Foucault and Kris Delmhorst play a rare duo show of their lo-fi indie pop and rock, with John Floridis opening. Crystal Theatre. 7:30 PM. $15/$12 in advance; call 542-6603. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Get a little lucky this evening when UM’s Irish Studies Program presents an Irish harp concert with award-winning Gráinne Hambly and Scottish harpist Billy Jackson for a full-on Celtic shindig. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $20/$15 for students and Friends of Irish Studies members/free for kids under 12. Tickets online at Griztix outlets. Drop the bass and join the junket when Canadian EDM duo Adventure Club brings the worb to Stage 112, along with Kai Wachi and Lecture. 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $26/$22 in advance. 18-plus. Check out stageonetwelve.com. Get weird when Monks on Fire play their genre-defying experimental rock at the Palace, along with heavyweights Shramana, starting at 9 PM. Free. If alcohol just makes you smarter by killing off the weakest brain cells, go prove your mettle at KBGA’s boozy Spelling Bee at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $2. 21-plus. I am a champion and you’re gonna hear me roar when carousing to hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, lifelong memories for free. Get swindled into a good time when Cody Beebe and the Crooks play the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [27]


[calendar] Milltown State Park staff need good eggs to help plant 500 native pines along the floodplain at the confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork. Bring gloves, wear sturdy shoes and meet at the Missoula County Sheriff’s Posse Ground located on Highway 210 in Piltzville at 11 AM. From Missoula, drive toward Bonner and follow Highway 200 to the junction with Highway 210. Continue 2/10 of a mile and look for the National Public Lands Day sign. Call 880-0571 to learn more.

nightlife

Thinking outside the screen. Country outfit Wesley Hartley and the Traveling Trees play the Palace Sat., Sept. 28, along with the Boxcutters, starting at 9 PM. Free.

FRIDAYSEPT27 Celebrate Active Aging Week and get inspired when Missoula Public Library hosts a screening of Age of Champions, the awardwinning documentary about competitors at the National Senior Olympics. 2 PM. Free. Celebrate American Indian Heritage Day at UM today, kicking off with a sunrise ceremony at 7 AM outside the Payne Family Native American Center, and followed by events including a noon president’s proclamation, indigenous menu at the Food Zoo’s lunch, info and craft tables and teepee race on the Oval. Visit umt.edu/events to learn more. Bust out your castanets, amigos, the Ballet Arts Academy hosts the four-day flamenco workshop with Maestro Teo Morca, plus internationally known musicians Carlos Lomas and Vicente Griego. Includes guitar, singing and dancing workshops, culminating in a performance at the Stensrud on Sept. 29 at 7 PM. 1620 Rodgers. Register at flamencomt.com, or call 542-9270.

nightlife Encourage the chilluns’ inner dance lord when Cootehill plays Family Friendly Friday, with Irish dancers and music. Top Hat. 6-8 PM. Free. Get your monkeys for nothin’ and your chimps for free when

the Discount Quartet plays the terrace at the Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive. 7-10 PM. No cover. Shenanigans are in store during Teresa Waldorf’s production of Wonder of the World, a screwball comedy by David Lindsay-Abaire. Cass Harris discovers her husband’s disturbing secret, heads to Niagara Falls and encounters nutcases along the way. Showing at Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 7:30 PM. $15/$12 in advance/$10 for students. Tickets at ddcmontana.com. Be a real globe-trotter at The Barn Movement Studio’s international folk dance classes led by Michael Sweet, where newcomers can explore the folk traditions from the Eastern Europe and Middle East. Partners not necessary. 2926 S. Third St. W. Classes meet on selected Fridays through December from 7:30-9 PM. $3 donation. Wear comfortable sneakers; leave the street shoes at home. Call 5437060 to learn more. Light up your life when Zeppo MT plays the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. Daddy likes when Buddy Jackson shakes their wee-wee at a 7-inch release party, along with the wellcoiffed Total Combined Weight, well-coiffed-er Frederick Krueger & the Sweet Dreamers and those scalawags the Whoopass Girls. Stage 112. 9 PM. $3. Smooth your fur and perk up your ears when the Badlander

[28] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

presents Foxy Friday, with music from Jason Root, Myrth and others. 9 PM. Free. Get a taste of the alphabet soup at the LGBTQ-friendly Queer Party, with DJs Tim Carrey, Tyger Lily and Owlie at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. It’ll be electrifyin’ when High Voltage and Erin and the Project play Sean Kelly’s downtown, starting at 9 PM. Free. Black Mountain Moan and Sista Otis play Monk’s Bar tonight, starting at 9 PM. Free. Jameson and the Sordid Seeds play the Top Hat, 10 PM. Free.

SATURDAYSEPT28 I look forward to spirited debate about the best IPA at the fifth annual Montana Brewers Fall Festival, featuring dozens of tasty beers and special festival releases, plus live music and food. Caras Park. 1-8 PM. $15 gets you a glass and three beer tickets, additional tickets are $1. Bust out your castanets, amigos, the Ballet Arts Academy hosts the four-day flamenco workshop with Maestro Teo Morca, plus internationally known musicians Carlos Lomas and Vicente Griego. Includes guitar, singing and dancing workshops, culminating in a performance at the Stensrud on Sept. 29 at

7 PM. 1620 Rodgers. Register at flamencomt.com, or call 542-9270. The Missoula Art Museum joins in the national Smithsonian Museum Day, with activities for the whole family from 10 AM-5 PM. Free. Other participating museums in the area include the Ravalli County Museum and Daly Mansion; visit smithsonianmag.com/museumday to learn more. Let your child foster her inner Toni Morrison or Joyce Carol Oates during The Place Where You Live creative writing workshops aimed at ages 8-12, taught by Missoula Writing Collaborative’s Micah Fields and Rachel Mindell. Fort Missoula, Officer’s Row, No. 28, second floor. 10 AM-2 PM on Saturdays through Sept. 28. Kids are welcome to come to as many classes as they like. Free. Get some produce in your sights and head to the Target Range Farmers Market, Sundays in the east parking lot of Target Range School. 10 AM. Multi-talented Missoulians, here is your battle: Brains and Brawn Headwaters’ Race to the Treasure, a trivia and race event wherein teams of 3-5 people must solve clues, answer questions about Missoula history and run, bike and boat along the way. First prize is $1,000, beeyotches. Departs from A Carousel For Missoula at 10 AM for recreational gamers and 11 AM for the elite athletes. Limited to 40 teams, so visit headwatersdance.net to register.

Those Canucks won’t know what hit ‘em when the Hellgate Rollergirls present a double-header bout with the Hellgate Hellions vs. the Greater Edmonton Junior Roller Derby Association and the Rollergirls vs. the Oil City Allstars. Glacier Ice Rink. Doors at 6 PM, first bout at 6:30, second at 8. $10/$8 in advance. Visit hellgaterollergirls.com. Shenanigans are in store during Teresa Waldorf’s production of Wonder of the World, a screwball comedy by David Lindsay-Abaire. Cass Harris discovers her husband’s disturbing secret, heads to Niagara Falls and encounters nutcases along the way. Showing at Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 7:30 PM. $15/$12 in advance/$10 for students. Tickets at ddcmontana.com. Get that Norwegian glow when Missoula Symphony Orchestra presents Nordic Lights, the first concert of the season, with pianist Martina Filjak and music director Darko Butorac. Dennison Theatre. Showing Saturday and Sunday at 7:30 PM, plus 3 PM matinee on Sunday. $10$40. For tickets, call 721-3194, visit missoulasymphony.org or stop by the box office at 320 E. Main St. Lis-zen up when Joan Zen brings her five-piece funky soul and reggae band to the Union Club tonight. 9 PM. No cover. Get down with the weirdness when electronica artist Little People, AKA Laurent Clerc, plays Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $12/$10 in advance. 18-plus. Country outfit Wesley Hartley and the Traveling Trees plays their ‘Merican tunes tonight, along with the Boxcutters, starting at 9 PM. Palace. Free. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. Bite the bat and go off the rails on a crazy train when Crack Sabbath, the “world’s greatest Black Sabbath tribute band,” plays the Hellgate Rollergirls after-party at the VFW. 9:30 PM. $3/$5 for ages 18-20.


[calendar]

hey jealousy Modern dress can add dimension and delight to a Shakespeare production, though it rarely amounts to much more than an amusing device. But Sir Nicholas Hytner’s startlingly contemporary production of Othello at London’s National Theatre elevates the device beyond artifice, creating an utterly arresting and painfully relevant tragedy swollen with domestic violence, racial tensions, bitter professional rivalries and martial priorities that seem all too familiar to the 21st century. From the outset, when blaring rock ’n’ roll heralds Rory Kinnear’s Iago, Rory Kinnear and Adrian Lester star in the Londan National Thewearing an ordinary blue windbreaker atre’s Othello. as he spills out of a pub with a lit cigarette and can of beer, the audience born for it. He’s gracious, if grandiloquent, utterly never gets a chance to imagine the play in any other confident in his character, his accomplishments, and moment. As played by Kinnear, Iago’s a balding, his appeal to his sexy young bride, Desdemona. overlooked officer who’s too clever for his station, Once the action reaches Cyprus, where Othello has accepted a charge to battle the Turks, the set transitions to concrete and razor wire lit by the orWHAT: Broadcast of London National ange glow of sodium lights. It’s one thing to listen to Theatre’s live production of Othello 400-year-old dialogue from an actor in military faWHERE: Roxy Theater tigues, but another entirely to see it performed in what appears to be the U.S. base at Bagram. The WHEN: Showing Tue., Oct 1 and Tue., arid stage design underscores the mood of the charOct. 8 at 7:30 PM acters—elementally fierce and anxious—uncertain of the threats beyond the walls, and ultimately within HOW MUCH: $16/$14 for seniors/$11 for them, too. The pivotal scene of Othello eavesdropstudents and children ping on Cassio, who supposedly boasts of his conLEARN MORE: theroxytheater.org quest of Desdemona, takes place in a latrine, with Othello hiding in a stall. too proud to put up with it, and too mean to care about the casualties of his viscious crusade for rank. Think of him as a cruelly manipulative soccer hooligan. Adrian Lester’s Othello, by contrast, strides like a master of the universe, first in a stylish business suit during a Venetian war counsel, then as battlefield commander, wearing his desert camo like he was Sista Otis rocks your socks off at the Alcan Bar in Frenchtown, starting at 9:30 PM. Free. The contents won’t settle when groovy-dance lovers Shakewell play the Top Hat. 10 PM. Free.

By the time the Moor strangles Desdemona in their sparse Cypriot quarters, the commingling of Shakespeare’s language and the modern production sound a timeless chord. A pretty young thing in a combat zone arouses desperate feelings in any age. And a warrior undone by jealousy careens as wildly today as in the 17th century.

10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time

–Matt Gibson country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free.

SUNDAYSEPT29 Climb into that funky spaceship and blast off for the Party Galaxy when Dark Star Orchestra plays the Wilma. Doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $25. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and vootie.com. Get some produce in your sights and head to the Target Range Farmers Market, Sundays in the east parking lot of Target Range School. 10 AM. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of

Come join Forward Montana for an out-of-the box candidate forum. Witness 11 of the bravest candidates for City Council and Mayor prove their ability to serve Missoula through tests of courage, skill, and intellect.

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [29]


[calendar]

nightlife Get that Norwegian glow when Missoula Symphony Orchestra presents Nordic Lights, the first concert of the season, with pianist Martina Filjak and music director Darko Butorac. Dennison Theatre. Showing Saturday and Sunday at 7:30 PM, plus 3 PM matinee on Sunday. $10$40. For tickets, call 721-3194, visit missoulasymphony.org or stop by the box office at 320 E. Main St. Put some fun in your Sunday when Sista Otis plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. Free. Get the 411 when Nashville 406 plays the Top Hat dinner show. 7 PM. Free, all ages. Shenanigans are in store during Teresa Waldorf’s production of Wonder of the World, a screwball comedy by David Lindsay-Abaire. Cass Harris discovers her husband’s disturbing secret, heads to Niagara Falls and encounters nutcases along the way. Showing at Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 7:30 PM. $15/$12 in advance/$10 for students. Tickets at ddcmontana.com. Check out the finest flamenco performers around at the Flamenco Montana Festival’s performance at the Stensrud, 314 N. First St. Doors at 8 PM for general audiences. $15/$20 for two. A limited number of tickets are available to the public. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Calling all taco-slingers and Walter White fans, the VFW presents a Service Industry Night with drink specials, plus they’ll be tuned in to “Breaking Bad� on AMC. 9 PM.

MONDAYSEPT30 Prove you really can go home again at the annual UM Homecoming Week, where alumni, students and the community are invited to celebrate the university and the spirit of learning. Check events.umt.edu for a full schedule. Just ‘cause school’s out today for the kiddos, doesn’t mean they can’t get out of the house (and your hair) with the Camp ‘MoFun’s games and gymnastics. The full day for ages 4 and up runs from 9 AM-4 PM, the half-day for ages 3 and up goes from 9 AMnoon or 12:30 PM-4 PM. $22-$33. 1900 W. Broadway. Check out mismogym.com for deets. Learn what they might have not taught ya in school when the Missoula Art Museum presents a workshop on how to look at traditional and contemporary Native American art, intended for educators, with artist Sara Siestreem. Missoula Art Museum. Noon-3:30 PM, beginning with an informal lunch and followed by lecture and practice. $15/$20 with lunch.

nightlife Deadheads shall rejoice when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a broadcast of two hours of Grateful Dead tunes from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Transition Missoula hosts a showing of Hungry For Change, a documentary about the ways that the diet and food industries are harmful to people’s health. Missoula Public Library large meeting room. 6 PM. Free. The one and only Tom Catmull plays tunes to relax your manic

Monday at Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7-10 PM. Free. Find an Abe’s Cabe and let’s ankle to Monk’s for Jazz Mondays with the four-piece Basement Boys kicking things off at 7 PM. Jazz jam at 9. $5 suggested donation. Celebrate the one love when the Top Hat presents Marley, the life story of the one and only Bob Marley, for Monday Movie Night. 7:30 PM. Free, all ages. Portland blues guitarist Marisa Anderson plays the VFW, 245 W. Main St., with special guests. 10 PM. $3/$5 for ages 18-20.

TUESDAYOCT01 Respect your percussionists when drum and bass outfit Bock’s Elder plays its last show. Badlander. 9 PM. Free. Prove you really can go home again at the annual UM Homecoming Week, where alumni, students and the community are invited to celebrate the university and the spirit of learning. Check events.umt.edu for a full schedule. Chicago draughtsman Don Colley gives a demonstration of how he uses markers to draw realistic portraits and images at the UM Bookstore’s art department. 11 AM. Free. Check out Colley’s website, buttnekkiddoodles.com.

nightlife If you’re taking care of business, every way, every day, scoot on over to the the Missoula Chamber of Commerce’s 2013 Business Trade Show at the Doubletree Hotel. 5 PM. Attendees must be chamber members or guests of members. Learn more about registering at 543-6623.

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[calendar] Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. The award-winning irreverent musical Avenue Q is presented by the UM schools of Music and Theatre & Dance. These puppets are cute, but they ain’t kid friendly, remember. Montana Theatre. 7:30 PM. $20/$16 for seniors and students. Tickets at the UMArts Box Office. The winningest USian will get a $25 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $25 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. Celebrate the life and legacy of poet Greta Wrolstad (19812005) at the reading of her posthumous collection Night is Simply A Shadow, with Carl Adamshick, Joanna Klink and Ed Skoog. Shakespeare and Co. 8 PM. (See Books.) Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Oct. 1 is the birthday of Dame Julie Andrews. She won an Academy Award for her performance in what film? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Have a tropical Tuesday when Oahu’s Natural Vibes (or Natty Vibes, yo) play reggae-rock tunes at the Top Hat, along with the Latininfused B-Side Players. 9:30 PM. $8. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and online at tophatlounge.com

WEDNESDAYOCT02 See young girls from the Pine Ridge reservation connect with their incarcerated father during a showing of the documentary Video Letters From Prison, part of the Indigenous Film Series at the Payne Family Native American Center, room 201. 4:30-6:30 PM. Visit life.umt.edu/aiss for full film series schedule.

nightlife Pianoman Dave Manning, recently featured in the documentary The BUS, busts out with some tunes at Higherground Brewing in Hamilton today. 6 PM. No cover. Mark your calendars for the bluegrass-inspired picking circle at Tangled Tones, now every week on Wednesday. Bring anything from your violin to your accordion, as long as it’s got “strings or buttons that you don’t plug in.” All skill levels welcome, listeners too. 2005 South Ave. W. 6 PM. Free. Watch politicians engage in thrilling contests of, uh,

Come and join the party, every day. Grateful Dead tribute band Dark Star Orchestra plays the Wilma Sun., Sept. 29. Doors at 7:30 PM, show at 8. $25. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and vootie.com.

thoughtful discussion when Forward Montana presents Fear Factor: Candidate Edition, a forum with city council and mayoral candidates, at the Top Hat. 6 PM. Tech N9ne, who deserves an honorary degree from UM at this point, brings the love back to Missoula again, along with Krizz Kaliko, Ces Cru, Stevie Stone, Prozak and Mayday for the Something Else Tour. Wilma, doors at 6 PM. $35, available at Rockin’ Rudy’s, by calling 866468-7624 or knittingfactory.com. If alls you know about folk art is what they’re always appraising on “Antiques Roadshow,” check out curator Tom Patterson’s Folk Art Lecture at Missoula Art Museum about Rev. Howard Finster and Saint EOM. 6:30 PM. Free. If you’ve got parsley and basil and rosemary growing out your ears, check out the Herbal Infusions, Decoctions and Syrups class at Meadowsweet Herbs, where herbalist John Goicovich will cover growing, harvesting and storing the useful varieties of various plants. 180 S. Third St. W. 6:30-8:30 PM. $20, plus $6 if you want to bring home a syrup. Make sure the pets are spayed or neutered before coming on down to the “Price Is Right” live stage show at the Adams Center. Get the chance to win trips, gear or even a new car! while playing the classic games like Pinko, Cliffhangers and the Showcase. (Drew Carey not included, near as I can tell.)

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [31]


[calendar]

(406) 546-5317 • leitchmt@gmail.com HEART RACING

SURREAL soaring

MAGNETIC

EXPR EX PR P RES ESS SIIVE VE

Going green. Pianist Martina Filjak features in Missoula Symphony Orchestra’s Nordic Lights concert at the Dennison Theatre Sat., Sept. 28 at 7:30 PM and Sun., Sept. 29 at 3 and 7:30 PM. $10-$40. For tickets, call 721-3194 or visit missoulasymphony.org. PHOTO P HOTO BY C CRACKLE RACKL PHOTOGRAPHY

dynamic

GOOS GOO OOS OSEBUM EBUM EB BUMPS PS

Registration at 4:30 PM, show at 7:30. $45/$25 for students. Tickets at all Griz Tix outlets. Check out umt.edu/griztix. The award-winning irreverent musical Avenue Q is presented by the UM schools of Music and Theatre & Dance. These puppets are cute, but they ain’t kid friendly, remember. Montana Theatre. 7:30 PM. $20/$16 for seniors and students. Tickets at the UMArts Box Office. Red Solo cup, I fill you up. Let’s have a party at Stage 112’s Solo Cup Wednesdays with live music. One American dollar, plus $3 cup fee, gets you a beer or well drink. 9 PM.. Cash For Junkers play western swing, country and jazz for y’all to kick up your boots to at the Top Hat. 9:30 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: Mary Poppins, in 1954.)

THURSDAYOCT03 FEATURING

Martina Filjak, PIANO SOLOIST

SATURDAY 7:30 PM

SEPT

28

SUNDAY

SEPT

3:00 PM

29

D E N N I S O N T H E AT R E

TICKETS: $10 to $40. Buy tickets at www.missoulasymphony.org

or call 721-3194 or visit us at 320 E. Main Street. SPONSORED BY

Guest Artist Sponsor: George & Dolores Bandow

[32] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Composer and guitarist Andy McKee brings his magical fingers to the stage this evening with folk, instrumental and fingerpickin’ tunes. Dennison Theatre on campus. $30/$20 for students, or $28/$18 students in advance at Griz Tix outlets.

nightlife SCAN FOR MORE INFORMAT INFO RMATION ION INFORMATION

Thursday is the new Saturday, so start your weekend off right with Tom Catmull and his hot tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-8 PM. No cover. Get inspired at the eighth annual Reel Rock tour, featuring the neatest climbing

and adventure films from the past year, sponsored by UM’s Outdoor Program and showing at the University Center Theater. 8 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Call 243-5172 to learn more. The award-winning irreverent musical Avenue Q is presented by the UM schools of Music and Theatre & Dance. These puppets are cute, but they ain’t kid friendly, remember. Montana Theatre. 7:30 PM. $20/$16 for seniors and students. Tickets at the UMArts Box Office. It’ll be reefer madness when Denver reggae/dub group Coral Thief Band plays the Palace. 9 PM. $5. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign up by 9:30 PM to perform. Free. You can make me grow old, but I don’t havta grow up, and so it is that California punx Guttermouth and Agent Orange play the Top Hat, along with San Antonio’s Piñata Protest. Music at 10 PM. $18/$16 in advance at Ear Candy, Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat or tophatlounge.com. 21-plus. Shut up and get rad. Submit events by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Include the who-what-when-where-why and a picture, if you would be so kind. Alternately, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events online. Just go to missoulanews.com.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

T

here’s a quote that I like from California Rep. John Garamendi: “Maybe you weren’t born with a silver spoon in your mouth, but like every American, you carry a deed to 635 million acres of public lands. That's right. Even if you don't own a house or the latest computer on the market, you own Yosemite, Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and many other natural treasures.” That’s a tad problematic statement if you live in inner-city America without access to a car, but I still admire the sentiment. It’s a marvelous thing that we live in a country beautiful and expansive enough to designate natural treasures as available to all. So it makes sense to help maintain these areas, and you might gain an appreciation for how much work it is

to support native species and build trails. National Public Lands Day invites people to come give a hand in taking care of recreation areas; events on Sept. 28 include a tree planting at Milltown State Park and projects at Fort Missoula and Mt. Jumbo. There’s others, too; so spend a few hours of a crisp fall day outside, enjoying what is rightfully yours. —Kate Whittle National Public Lands Day, Sat., Sept. 28, includes volunteering events, and there's no fee to enter areas managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the Bureau of Land Management. Visit publiclandsday.org and umt.edu/conservationcalendar for opportunities to volunteer.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 26 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basketweaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 27 The three-day PEAK Tennis Pro-Am matches pros and amateurs together and includes adult and junior clinics, plus luncheon, all to benefit Watson Children’s Shelter. Competition at PEAK Health and Wellness Center, 5000 Blue Mountain Road. Visit peaktennisproam.com for full schedule. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 28 Celebrate our nation’s giant playgrounds during National Public Lands Day, where volunteering opportunities abound and there’s no fee to enter areas managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the Bureau of Land Management. Visit publiclandsday.org and umt.edu/conservationcalendar. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Paddle up and head to the second annual Pickleball Palooza with the Zoo Town Pickleballers at the Fort Missoula tennis courts. All ages

and experience levels are invited to come learn to play this game, which is similar to badminton and table tennis. 10 AM-2 PM. Free, equipment provided. Visit missoulaparks.org or call 721-PARK to learn more.

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 29 No need for the iPod at the Third Annual Rockin’ Race for AIDS Awareness, in which local bands set up and play throughout the race course. Includes 5K, 10K and volunteering opportunities. Hosted by the Open Aid Alliance of Missoula; proceeds benefit people with HIV/AIDS. 10:30 AM start. Check out openaidalliance.org or call 406543-4770 to register.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 1 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 3 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Sundays for underwater basketweaving. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations. Get inspired at the eighth annual Reel Rock tour, featuring the neatest climbing and adventure films from the past year, sponsored by UM’s Outdoor Program and showing at the University Center Theater. 8 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Call 243-5172 to learn more. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [33]


[community]

There’s a Christopher Keelty cartoon circulating on my Facebook feed called “Breaking Bad: Anywhere But America Edition,” which shows Walter White learning that he has lung cancer. “But... how will I pay for my medical treatments? This will bankrupt my family!” he says. To which the doctor responds, “Nonsense! The government will pay your medical bills, taxpayer! What kind of barbaric society would allow medical care to hinge on a person’s wealth?” Walter breaths a sigh of relief and goes back to teaching chemistry. It’s a new and still-controversial idea to many Americans: Human beings are entitled to health care, no matter what. The Affordable Care Act brought this to the forefront of our public discourse. While the end result is far from perfect and mired in complexity, we’re already reaping the benefits. I can’t pretend to be objective about this: I would not have health insurance right now, were it not for the provision allowing me to stay on my parents’ plan until I’m 26. I know young people who think they don’t need insurance

because they’re healthy. I consider myself pretty healthy, too, but I’ve still had minor surgery and been in a car accident this year; the costs would be devastating if not for our insurance plan. My 26th birthday is a while away but looms pretty large on the horizon, and as I learn to navigate insurance claims and copays and deductibles on my own, it all seems pretty daunting. But as more of the act’s regulations kick in, there’s more places to find answers; on Sept. 30, Montana Insurance Commissioner Monica Lindeen stops in Missoula on a tour answering questions about Obamacare. Filling out paperwork, getting coverage and regular care don’t make for a very exciting story, and that is the way I’d like to keep it. —Kate Whittle The “Obamacare in Montana: What You Need to Know forum” with Montana Insurance Commissioner Monica Lindeen is in University Center Room 223 Mon., Sept. 30, at 6 PM. Free.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 26 Prof. Robin Kundis Craig presents “Public Trust in a Time of Climate Change, and Post-PPL MT Implications,” a Jestrab lecture, at the UM School of Law, room 201. 11:30 AM-1:15 PM. UM students can safely engage in discussion on some heavy topics at Bridging Dialogues Across Cultures, a guided event that covers race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion and ability. 4-6 PM, Phyllis J. Washington College of Education and Human Sciences Room 241. Held on Sept. 26, Oct. 10 and 24, Nov. 7 and 21 and Dec. 5.

Work. Learn. Thrive. Short, non-credit courses, open to the public. ĊČĎĘęĊė ēđĎēĊ ĔĉĆĞ

You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations are at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. Enter through the alley door. 7 PM. Learn more at missoulatimebank.org.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 27 Celebrate Active Aging Week and get inspired when Missoula Public Library hosts a screening of Age of Champions, the award-winning documentary about competitors at the National Senior Olympics. 2 PM. Free.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 28

ĒĕđĔĞĊėĘ - sponsor your employee for any

Professional Development course and receive a registration in any course of equal or lesser value for ċėĊĊ.

umt.edu/profdev School of Extended & Lifelong Learning

[34] Missoula Independent • September 26–October 3, 2013

Try not to get all syrupy when the Florence Carlton Music Boosters host their annual pancake breakfast at the high school in the old gym. Starts immediately following the 10 AM Homecoming parade. $3/$2 for students/$10 for families.

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 29 Nogales, Mex.-based missionary Scott Nicholson presents a talk on immigration, “Border Journeys: Walls and Bridges,” at the Fireside Room at University Congregational Church. 11:45 AM. Free. The Yoga Fitness Center hosts a meditation and asana practice in memory of the late teacher Georg Feuerstein, led by Marina. 123 W. Alder St.

Noon-1:30 PM. Donations requested. Learn more by calling 327-0775.

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 30 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Transition Missoula hosts a showing of Hungry For Change, a documentary about the ways that the diet and food industries are harmful to people’s health. Missoula Public Library large meeting room. 6 PM. Free. The “Obamacare in Montana: What You Need to Know” forum with Montana Insurance Commissioner Monica Lindeen will take your questions and offer some answers. University Center room 332. 6 PM. Free. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 1 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 2 Celebrate the antidote to corporate power at the Montana Nonprofit Association’s annual conference, held this year at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 Reserve St. Featured speakers include author Barbara Bonner and professor Andy Stefanovich. Visit mtnonprofit.org to learn more. Watch politicians engage in thrilling contests of, uh, thoughtful discussion when Forward Montana presents Fear Factor: Candidate Edition, a forum with city council and mayoral candidates, at the Top Hat. 6 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


WE WILL MAKE THE JOURNEY YOU WILL EXPERIENCE WORLD-CLASS ARTISTRY We will be closed October 19th ~ 21st to attend this incredible event, and look forward to seeing you back on October 22nd!

missoulanews.com • September 26–October 3, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

September 26 - October 3, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org NATIONAL ALPACA FARM DAYS 9/28-29-13 Call today to schedule your visit to Hellgate Suri Alpaca’s Farm in Missoula, MT 406-274-1422

DRIVING LESSONS M&M Driving School

542-1023

missouladrivingschool.com

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

LOST & FOUND Reward for Lost Siamese Lost Siamese cat, July 4th in the Whitaker street area. Pink collar & tag, if missing she is micro chipped. Her name is Lucy, 3 yrs old. We love her & miss her, please call 406-370-8781. $150 reward. Reward. Lost or Taken Cat Loki: Orange & white male cat missing in

lower Pattee Canyon area. Side view looks like a bull’s eye in orange & white fur. Purple collar and chip with current information. Call 543-9417

TO GIVE AWAY Free For All First Fridays. Free haircuts for everyone. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-546-3846. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula. Find us on Facebook Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering

FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at

Guitar • Banjo Mandolin Classes forming soon. Bennett's Music Studio

721-0190

3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

Table of contents

Positive. Practical. Casual. Comfortable. And, it's a church.

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5

BennettsMusicStudio.com

HYPNOSIS

A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

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P L AC E YOUR AD:

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9

Walk it. 317 S. Orange

1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

( : I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

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543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Sierra Smart Sierra just adores people! This sweet Dutch Shepherd is looking for a new human buddy. Sierra is an active 7 year old who likes to go running, walks nicely on a leash, and loves to be outside. She will be waiting for you at HSWM’s Pets, Plants and Painting event at Caras Park on Friday, September 27. Humane Society of Western Montana. 549-9864 myHSWM.org

“Life is a great big canvas; throw all the paint on it you can.” – Danny Kaye

Talk it.


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN

By Amy Alkon

ANNOUNCEMENTS

BUY MEETS GIRL My previous relationship was passionate but was with an emotionally abusive man. I've been dating a new man for five months. I wasn't initially attracted to him, but he ended up sweeping me off my feet because he's the most generous man I've ever met. He's all about me. He goes out of his way to do so many nice things for me—even buying me things I can't afford. We've had fun, but I've had doubts creeping in, like about how he's still not my physical type. Also, I'm not sure we share enough interests or, quite frankly, are on the same level intellectually. Then again, I know he'd go along with anything I wanted to do, because he just wants to make me happy. I'm just not sure that's enough. Because of all the pros about him and my previous bad choices, I made myself give him a chance. Perhaps I'm just sabotaging things because subconsciously I don't feel I deserve all this kindness. —Hesitant

Wanting to want someone isn't enough. Eventually, when he starts getting all smoochy-feely, your head will lecture your retreating funparts, "Come on...he's so nice. You should want to get it on," and your body will counter with, "Unfortunately, you'd rather have your face eaten off by a raccoon." If only one of the "many nice things" this guy does for you could be transforming himself into somebody you're actually attracted to. You, like many well-meaning but misguided idealists, want to believe you can become attracted to somebody the way you can learn to fly-fish or bartend. Sure, great people sometimes get more attractive as you get to know them. But for them to get attractive enough for you to want to get naked with them, they have to have enough of the stuff you need in a person to go "hubba-hubba" instead of "yawna-yawna" or worse: "Get away from me, or I'll scream." You say you've had doubts creeping in, and around the top of the list should be, "Is he a man or a purse dog?" It's a bad sign if he really would "go along with anything (you) wanted to do." His unflagging eagerness to please suggests he's one of those guys who think they have to buy a woman's company with their cash and compliance. On a more positive note, this pleaserhood does resolve the matching interests issue, since one big thing you have in common is that he likes whatever you like. (Have you nicknamed him "Xerox"?)

If you don't feel you deserve a nice guy, that's something to address, but not by bolting yourself to some all-weather Santa you find borderline dumb and about as sexy as grout. You need to hold out for physical, emotional, intellectual, and best friend-ly chemistry. A guy should also be enough of a person to sometimes find what you want to do hellishly boring or excruciatingly girly and suggest you do it alone or with a friend. If he's right for you, at times when he isn't right there with you, you'll probably find yourself wandering off into fantasies about him—and not the sort in which the guy gets kidnapped immediately after paying for dinner.

GROIN PAINS I'm 21, and I've just gotten my first girlfriend, this amazing girl I've known since high school. I lost my virginity to her, and I've since started having sex dreams about my female friends. Two of these girls are recently single and have been hanging with me a lot and using me for a shoulder to cry on. I love my girlfriend, but the opportunity for stepping out, combined with my overactive libido, has me worried. —Itchy When you're a 21-year-old guy who has just discovered sex and is looking to remain faithful, loving someone deeply is a start. It also helps to pay someone to knock you unconscious and encase you in a block of ice. Welcome to the 20-something male libido. In other words, of course you're having sex dreams about your female friends. (You were expecting recurring thoughts about stenciling wall art in the front room?) Life consists of tradeoffs. You can have a girlfriend or a sex buffet. Pick one. And be realistic. Your heart might belong to your girlfriend, but if other parts of you are raring to go all Dora the Explorer, you may need to have a bunch of sex friends before you're one woman's boyfriend. If you do choose love, be mindful about how easy it is to succumb to temptation. Keep yourself out of harm's way with some fidelity-promoting rules, like that you aren't allowed to be alone with lonely single women, except maybe those who'd have a hard time catching you because they are 90 and didn't get the motorized scooter that goes up to turbo.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013

100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744 CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744

classroom. Tutors pick time and location, 1 hour to 1 per week, M-F 830am-330pm. Contact Ben Brewster 543-3550 Ext 218 or bbrewster@wordinc.org

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877492-3059

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

VOLUNTEERS WORD is looking for Volunteer Tutors. Help provide academic assistance and mentorship to a child at-risk. Openings in Elementary and Middle schools, working in the

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

IS CLOSING SOON HURRY DOWN FOR THE

BEST

50

% OFF!

SELECTION EVERYTHING Couples-Friendly Shopping OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 137 E MAIN • 543-3423

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BARTENDING

$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 OCCASIONAL PART-TIME HELP. Some yard work and other small jobs. Must have lawn mower, weed eater, reliable vehicle, phone & be capable of doing various types of small jobs. Time worked varies. $10/hour. Call 542-5098 East Missoula area

PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 7287060 DRIVERS: Bozeman, MT. Local Reefer runs $52k, year-round, stable work. Relocation bonus offered. Apply: www.goelc.com Estenson Logistics LLC. 1-866-336-9642. FARMERS UNION OIL COMPANY at Worden, MT is seeking a qualified General Manager. This successful energy / agronomy cooperative with annual sales of $20 million. Agricultural business management experience desired. Send or fax (866-6535527) resume ASAP to: Larry Fuller, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck, ND 58503, Email larry.fuller@chsinc.com

Mobile Phlebotomist Job# 9981602. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Larry and set up an interview today. Glasgow Implement, Glasgow, MT. 800-345-6042. 406-228-9341.

PARTS SPECIALIST-GLASGOW, MT. We are looking for a friendly, motivated and outgoing individual to join our team as a Parts Specialist. Applicant should have good organization & computer skills and successfully help customers identify and fulfill their parts & accessory needs. Experience in Ag desired. We offer competitive wages, 401k retirement plan, health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, short-term & long-term disability insurance, life insurance, paid vacation, eight paid holidays and job training. If you are ready to work in a great environment with great people, email your resume to kbuddy01@hotmail.com or call

Store Manager Job# 9981599. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Verizon Wireless Retailer $1,600.00 - $3,000.00 Monthly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060. Job # 9981589

SKILLED LABOR Electrician $20.00 - $28.00 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 7287060. Job # 9981582 TREATMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN $10.25/hour, plus benefit package. Missoula Job Service 728-7060. Job # 2985417

CUSTOMER SUPPORT SPECIALIST Learn to use our specialty software products to assist and educate our local government clients in our high volume support services office. We are seeking candidates with experience and/or education pertaining to common processes used in business or by local governments to manage accounting functions such as accounts payable, payroll, budgeting and financial reporting. We will consider other experience and/or education. Salary, dependent on qualifications, is between $25,000 and $40,000. This is an in office position in our Polson, MT office. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Simple IRA, health insurance, flexible benefit plan and the potential for profit sharing. Applicants must submit a cover letter and a resume to be considered. The cover letter and resume should be emailed to

hiring@blackmountainsoftware.com Application deadline is October 6, 2013.


EMPLOYMENT TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

NUTRITION EDUCATOR Sanders/Mineral Cntys $10.50 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060. Job # 9981584

NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class” training. •New Academy Classes weekly. •No money down or credit check. •Certified Mentors ready and available. •Paid (while training with mentor). •Regional and Dedicated Opportunities. •Great career path. •Excellent Benefits Package. Please call: (866)975-8141.

Physical Therapist Job# 9981619. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

HEALTH CAREERS Home Health Aide Job# 9981618. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

RN Home Health (Branch) Job# 9981620. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

RN - Hospice Job# 9981621. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES

RN - Hospice (Weekend) Job#9981622. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Office Suite. Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills. New or non-traditional media

RN - On-Call Job#9981623. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RN/Case Manager (Hospice) Job#9981625 . Missoula Job Service 728-7060

FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA

406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only

GIVE BACK. GET MORE.

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Send résumés, including salary expectations, to

Publisher, P. O. Box 8275, Missoula, MT 59807 or email to LFoland@missoulanews.com. EOE

P/T Wireless Sales Consultant Job# 9981596. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PUT A SMILE ON A DESERVING FACE! Many rewarding experiences await you by assisting severely intellectually and developmentally disabled adult clients live healthy and well-meaning lives in our group home settings. It’s challenging and fun to help clients with daily tasks, take them into the community, and help them prepare meals, do laundry and house cleaning. And, check out our new progressive wage scale. Start at $9.20 per hour without experience or $9.60 per hour with proven experience. Then, watch your wage grow after that! We also provide extensive paid training to help you be successful in your work.

• Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

The Missoula Independent, Montana’s premier weekly newspaper, seeks a professional, highly motivated Sales Manager. We’re looking for a skilled leader to supervise a staff of display and classified sales reps, cultivate vital prospects and also provide some hands-on account management. Applicants should have a background in media, be goal-oriented, an excellent communicator, creative and driven to succeed. Sales management experience strongly preferred. This job opening represents an extraordinary opportunity for a strong leader looking to work in a stimulating, fun environment.

sales experience a plus. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

All shifts available – Days (Mon.-Fri), Evenings, and Graveyards, working from 24 to 40 hours per week. Openings for Relief Staff offer more off-weekend flexibility, but requires ability to work at least 2 shifts per week and be flexible to work any shift with notice. Anyone working 30+ hours per week is eligible for our extensive health/dental benefits and paid time off package.

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Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a $20 bonus on your second successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 10.31.13 and second donation within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

Must have high school diploma or GED, pass background check and drug screen, and ability to obtain valid MT Driver’s License. If interested, apply at 1005 Marshall St., Missoula, or complete on-line application at www.mdscmt.org and click on Find a Job.

Questions? Call Misty at 728-5484. EOE.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA ENROLL FOR FALL 2013 CLASS

*Online Curriculum *Hands-On Class 1-Weekend/Month 500 Hr Certification for MT License

(406) 250-9616 • Kalispell, MT www.mtimontana.com montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 26 – October 3, 2013

[C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I bet your normal paranoia levels will decline in the coming weeks. Fears you take for granted won't make nearly as much sense as they usually seem to. As a result, you'll be tempted to wriggle free from your defense mechanisms. Useful ideas that your mind has been closed to may suddenly tantalize your curiosity. I won't be surprised if you start tuning into catalysts that had previously been invisible to you. But here are my questions: Can you deal with losing the motivational force that fear gives you? Will you be able to get inspired by grace and pleasure rather than anxiety and agitation? I advise you to work hard on raising your trust levels.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "Sometimes people have nothing to say because they’re too empty," writes author Yasmin Mogahed, "and sometimes people have nothing to say because they’re too full." By my reckoning, Cancerian, you will soon be in the latter category. A big silence is settling over you as new amusements and amazements rise up within you. It will be understandable if you feel reluctant to blab about them. They need more time to ripen. You should trust your impulse to remain a secret and a mystery for a while.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): "Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads," says author Malcolm Gladwell. "It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out." Take that as a constructive warning, Leo. On the one hand, I believe you will soon glimpse quite a few new understandings of how the world works and what you could do to make it serve you better. On the other hand, you've got to be extra alert for these new understandings and committed to capturing them the moment they pop up. Articulate them immediately. If you're alone, talk to yourself about them. Maybe even write them down. Don't just assume you will be able to remember them perfectly later when it's more convenient.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): After a storm, British wildlife lover Gary Zammit found a baby heron cowering in a broken nest. Its parents were dead. Zammit took the orphan under his wing. He named it Dude, and cared for it as it grew. Eventually he realized that Dude was never going to learn to fly unless he intervened. Filling his pockets full of the food that Dude loved, Zammit launched a series of flying lessons—waving his arms and squawking as he ran along a flat meadow that served as a runway. Dude imitated his human dad, and soon mastered the art of flight. Can you see ways in which this story might have metaphorical resemblances to your own life, Virgo? I think it does. It's time for your mind to teach your body an instinctual skill or self-care habit that it has never quite gotten right.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For four days twice a year, the East China Sea recedes to create a narrow strip of land between two Korean islands, Jindo and Modo. People celebrate the "SeaParting Festival" by strolling back and forth along the temporary path. The phenomenon has been called the "Korean version of Moses' miracle," although it's more reasonably explained by the action of the tides. I foresee some sweet marvel akin to this one occurring in your life very soon, Libra. Be ready to take advantage of a special dispensation.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The desire for revenge is a favorite theme of the entertainment industry. It's presented as being glamorous and stirring and even noble. How many action films build their plots around the hero seeking payback against his enemies? Personally, I see revenge as one of the top three worst emotions. In real life, it rarely has redeeming value. People who actively express it often wreak pain and ruin on both others and themselves. Even those who merely stew in it may wound themselves by doing so. I bring this up, Scorpio, because now is an excellent time for you to shed desires for revenge. Dissolve them, get rid of them, talk yourself out of indulging in them. The reward for doing so will be a great liberation.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Just for a few days, would you be willing to put your attention on the needs of others more than on your own? The weird thing is, your selfish interests will be best served by being as unselfish and empathetic and compassionate as you can stand to be. I don't mean that you should allow yourself to be abused or taken advantage of. Your task is to express an abundance of creative generosity as you bestow your unique blessings in ways that make you feel powerful. In the words of theologian Frederick Buechner, you should go "to the place where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Imagine a scenario like this: The CEOs of five crazily rich U.S. corporations, including a major defense contractor, stage a press conference to announce that in the future they will turn down the massive welfare benefits and tax breaks the federal government has been doling out to them all these years. Now picture this: The Pope issues a statement declaring that since Jesus Christ never had a single bad word to say about homosexuals, the Catholic Church is withdrawing its resistance to gay rights. I am envisioning a comparable reversal in your life, Capricorn—a flip-flop that seems equally improbable. But unlike the two I named, yours will actually unfold in the course of the next eight months. If it hasn't already started yet, it will soon.

Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Would you be willing to go to extraordinary lengths to transform aspects of your life that you have felt are hard to transform? Now would be a good time to do that. Luck will flow your way if you work on healing your number one wound. Unexpected help and inspiration will appear if you administer tough love to any part of you that's addicted, immature, or unconscious. Barriers will crumple if you brainstorm about new ways to satisfy your frustrated yearnings.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I've got a good feeling about your relationship with intimacy in the coming weeks. Judging from the astrological omens, I think you will have a good instinct about how to drum up interesting fun with your most important allies. You'll just naturally know what to do to make your collaborative efforts synergistic. So by all means cash in on this potential. Don't just sit back and hope for the best; rather, call on your imagination to provide you with original ideas about how to make it all happen.

Ellen Singleton, God-Gifted Psychic. Helps relationships, stops divorce, cheating, solves severe problems. Free 15-minute reading. (832) 884-9714

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Matteo Ricci was an Italian Jesuit priest who lived from 1552 to 1610. For his last 28 years, he worked as a missionary in China. Corresponding with his friends and family back home required a lot of patience. News traveled very slowly. Whenever he sent out a letter, he was aware that there'd be no response for seven years. What would you express about your life right now if you knew your dear ones wouldn't learn of it until 2017? Imagine describing to them in an old-fashioned letter what your plans will be between now and then . . . what you hope to accomplish and how you will transform yourself. Right now is an excellent time to take inventory of your long-term future.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The cosmos is granting you a poetic license to practice the art of apodyopsis with great relish. You know what apodyopsis is, right? It refers to the act of envisioning people naked—mentally undressing them so as to picture them in their raw state. So, yes, by all means, Pisces, enjoy this creative use of your imagination without apology. It should generate many fine ramifications. For instance, it will prime you to penetrate beneath the surface of things. It will encourage you to see through everyone's social masks and tune in to what's really going on in their depths. You need to do that right now. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013

Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office at 127 N Higgins or in your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

Call our Therapist Bernie Kneefe, MSW, LCSW today!

721-1646 bluemountainclinic.org

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS TIMBER FRAME BARNS, #1&BTR-DF, Reclaimed Timber & Barnwood. Complete Packages, Installed. Standard Plans Free. www.bitterroottimberframes.com Brett 406-581-3014. 2yr Warranty.

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

(406) 542-2147 2204 Dixon, Missoula MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

Is it time for you?

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin,

and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3527 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3540 Black Torti, Persian X, SF, 6yrs; #3712 Orange/white, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #3719 Grey Tabby, ASH, SF, 3 mo; #3720 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #3802 Blk/white, DSH, NM, 10yrs; #3803 Blk/white, DSH, NM, 8yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3488 B&W, Pointer, NM, 2yrs; #3489 Blk/tan, Shepherd X, NM, 2yrs; #3490 Golden, Pit X, NM, 3yrs; #3575 Blk/white, BC/Heeler, SF, 8yrs; #3667 Brindle, Pit, NM, 5yr; #3689 Hound X, SF, 2yr; #3823 Golden, Golden Retriever, NM, 9mo. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. HEAVY LARGE ROUND BALES of nice horse quality Northern Montana GrassAlfalfa, Delivered in 25 to 30 ton lots. Priced by the ton. 406-823-0442.

TOOLS STEEL BUILDINGS: 6 only: 20x24, 25x30, 30x48, 40x60, 45x62, 60x140. Selling for balance owed! Must move


MARKETPLACE now! Still crated/free delivery! 1-800741-9262, Ext.221.

AUTOMOBILE

GUNS

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

GUN & ANTIQUE SHOW. The 1st Annual Gun & Antique Show will be held in Chinook at the Blaine County Fairgrounds October 4-6. Pay once for all 3 days. Buys, Sell, or Trade!

WANTED TO BUY WANT TO BUY HIGH PERCENTAGE good quality alfalfa-big rounds, big squares. First, second, third cutting with high RFV and high protein desirable. 406-374-2464. 406-738-4509.

OUTDOOR GEAR The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

78 DATSUN 280Z. Auto transmission. 164K. Good condition. $4800. 2732382

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!

Bennett’s Music Studio

111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

TERRA KIDS

TELESCOPE PORTABLE CASE INCLUDES 10X LENS, COMPASS & LINKS FOR KEYS. OBSERVE NATURE WHEREVER YOU GO!

Thift Stores 829 S. Higgins 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

NICKEL AUTO GROUP 3906 Brooks • MSLA • Call Rob 360-8230 01 GMC Denali • 9,995 plus doc Loaded • AWD • Only 115k miles 98 Jeep Grand Cherokee • 3,895 plus doc 4x4 Laredo • Loaded • Sunroof 07 Jeep Liberty 4x4 • 12,888 plus doc Low Low miles • only 53k miles 93 Chevy Conversion van as low as 488 down 91 Ford Explorer 4x4 as low as 88 down 87 Toyota Flatbed 4x4 as low as 128 down

GOOMBAY SMASH #3 3/4 oz. Bacardi Spice Rum 1/2 oz. Bacardi Light Rum 1/4 oz. Apricot Brandy 1/2 oz. Coconut Cream • 2 oz. Pineapple Juice Shake with ice & strain into cocktail glass

Blood Drive for the Red Cross 9-16-2013 come down to register or call 251-5803. Free BBQ and Coupon for $100 off any purchase at Nickel Auto Group with donation.

PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 1:00 p.m., on September 30, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for the following services: City of Missoula Project Tree Removal FY 2014 The projects consists of tree removals at various public rights of way locations throughout the City of Missoula, Montana ISA certified firms or individuals are qualified to bid on this contract. Qualified bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Bid request addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Tree Removal FY 2014” The project is divided into 26 separate work orders. A bidder may bid on all, one or multiple work orders. Bids will be awarded in priority order to the low qualified bidder for each identified tree pruning and removal work order listed - until all available funds are obligated. The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number, if available. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be re-

quired of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents will be furnished to vendors from the Office of the City Forester, 100 Hickory Street, Missoula, Montana. Successful vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 1:00 p.m. on September 30, 2013. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. In the case of documents, recordings or verbal presentations, alternative accessible formats will be provided. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6080. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE CITY OF MISSOULA HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m., THURSDAY October 3rd, 2013, Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: The City of Missoula Development Services has received a request from Ian and Joann Lange for an Historic Preservation Permit for alterations to the Roosevelt Block: 422 Roosevelt Avenue, Missoula, Montana. The property is zoned B1-1 with a PUD (Roosevelt Block Planned Unit Development) Overlay and Boulevard Overlay zones, and is legally described as: Lots 614, Block 1, South Missoula Addition (the Roosevelt Block); Section 22, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian Montana, Missoula County, Montana. The request is for the following: Replacement of original, double-hung, wood-sash, 9-over-1 windows with Jeld-Wen Traditional Plus Wood Double Hung, Auralast Pine, Premium Pocket Unit windows having insulated, low-E Annealed glass with preserve-film, argon-filled, doublepaned units. Additional details can be found in a complete application on file with Development Services, City of Missoula. The goal of the project is to increase the energy efficiency of the apartment and reduce overall noise infiltration from the street. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the City of Missoula Development Services at 406-552-6038. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services. For additional information regarding the Historic Preservation Permit request you may contact Leslie Schwab at the 552-6638 or email Lschwab@ci.missoula.mt.us.

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on October 7, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance to consider the 2013 proposed maintenance amendments to the City of Missoula’s Title 20 City Zoning Code. The proposed amendments to Title 20 include, but are not limited to: Chapter 20.01 Introductory Provisions 20.01.060.B Minimum Requirements; Compliance with other Applicable Regulations Chapter 20.10 Business and Commercial Districts 20.10.20F Allowed Uses; Chapter 20.40 Use and Building-Specific Standards 20.40.160 Wireless Communications 20.40.160E Historic Overlay Zones Chapter 20.45 Accessory Uses and Structures 20.45.020.B2 Parcel and Building Standards in Residential Districts; Chapter 20.60 Parking and Access 20.60.090D.1.c. Bicycle Parking Chapter 20.65 Landscaping 20.65.020B.2. General Site Landscaping Chapter 20.70 Miscellaneous Regulations Chapter 20.75 Signs 20.75.070H Pump Top Unit, Service Stations Chapter 20.90 Administration 20.90.090D.4, 20.90.030D.4.c, and 20.90.030G Historic Preservation Commission Chapter 20.95 Violations, Penalties and Enforcement 20.95.050A and 20.95.050E Remedies and Enforcement Powers Chapter 20.100 Terminology 20.100.010 Pump Top Unit Chapter 20.105 Use Classifications 20.105.040A.1 Commercial Use Group Chapter 20.110 Measurements and Expectations 20.100.050E Features allowed to encroach in required setbacks. A copy of the ordinance is on file at the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Jen Gress, Development Services at 552-6626. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk,

435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF MISSOULA Probate No. DP-13-176 Dept. No. 1 Judge: Ed McLean NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD I. MCCARTY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Eileen McCarty, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Bruce O. Bekkedahl, Patten, Peterman, Bekkedahl & Green, P.L.L.C., 2817 2nd Ave. N. Suite 300, Billings, MT 59101, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED August 26, 2013 /s/ Eileen McCarty, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-694 Dept. No. 4 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION STAN D. RATLIFF, Individually and as Trustee of the RATLIFF TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. GLORIA M. SCHLEINZ, SALLIE DRUCILLA ACORD, RICARDA JOHNSON and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint or any part thereof adverse to Plaintiffs ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiffs title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA sends greetings to Gloria M. Schleinz and Ricarda Johnson and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint or any part thereof adverse to Plaintiff's ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff's title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you in the county wherein you reside and to file your Response and serve a copy thereof upon the Plain-

tiff's Attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or respond, judgment will be taken against you, by default, for the relief prayed for in the Complaint. This action seeks to quiet title to real property located in the County of Missoula, State of Montana and which is more particularly described as follows: Tract 2 of COS 4569, located in the SE 1/4 of S12, T20N, R17W, P.M.M, Missoula County, Montana. Witness my hand and the Seal of said Court August 7, 2013. /s/ Shirely E. Faust, Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Casie Kragh, Deputy Clerk SNYDER LAW OFFICE, P.C. Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. BOX 717, BIGFORK, MONTANA 59911 (406) 837-4383 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-175 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARY D. PADILLA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kathleen Roseetti, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, 2809 Great Northern Loop, Ste. 100, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 9th day of September, 20013. /s/ Kathleen Rosetti, Personal Representative. Bjornson Law Offices, PLLC By: /s/ R. Nick Jones Attorneys for Rosetti, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-13-178 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: PASCAL A. VAN NIEUWENHUYSE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Vanessa Atkins, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Bjornson Law

Offices, PLLC, 2809 Great Northern Loop, Suite 100, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 10th day of September, 2013. /s/ Vanessa Atkins, Personal Representative Bjornson Law Offices, PLLC By: /s/ Craig Mungas Attorneys for Vanessa Atkins, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-174 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: D. JEAN HEMPHILL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Curtis Hemphill, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Bjornson Law Offices, PLLC, 2809 Great Northern Loop, Suite 100, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 10th day of September, 2013. /s/ Curtis Hemphill, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-13-179 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NYLA S. KIMMEL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Douglas R. Kimmel, Eddie H. Kimmel, Jr. and Arnold E. Kimmel, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 4th day of September, 2013. /s/ Douglas R. Kimmel, Co-Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Douglas R. Kimmel DATED this 4th day of September, 2013. /s/ Arnold E. Kimmel Co-Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 26 – October 3, 2013

[C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Arnold E. Kimmel DATED this 4th day of September, 2013. /s/ Eddie H. Kimmel, Jr. Co-Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Eddie H. Kimmel, Jr. WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Gail M. Haviland MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-136 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JANIS T. SKILLMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jesse Wohlfeil, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 9th day of July, 2013. /s/ Jesse Wohlfeil, Personal Representative I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Jesse Wohlfeil WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 26, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 56 of Avalon Meadows, Phase 2 and 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Casey T. Weitz and Andreah M. Weitz, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 8, 2009 and recorded October 14, 2009 in Book 849, Page 114, under Document No. 200924866. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,147.86, beginning September 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 16, 2013 is $211,474.13 principal, interest at the rate of 5.000% now totaling $32,155.57, late charges in the amount of $172.17, escrow advances of $6,653.44, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,936.40, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.97 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 17, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of

Bingham ) On this 17th day of July, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Nationstar Vs. Weitz 41706.900 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to § 71-1-301, et. seq., of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned hereby gives notice of a Trustee Sale to be held on the 7th day of November, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., at the west entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT, the following described property located in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 1 of Block 13 of Certificate of Survey No. 5303, located in the SE1/4NW1/4 and the SW1/4NE1/4 of Section 21, Township 13 North, Range 18 West, P.M.M., in Missoula County, Montana. Jesse K. Mitchell, Grantor, conveyed the above described property, and improvements situated thereon, if any, to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Eugene Hansen and Karen Hansen, who were designated as beneficiaries in an Assignment of Montana Trust Indenture dated June 7, 2007 and recorded under in Book No. 798 at Page No. 1404 of Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana. The obligations secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture are now in default and the required payments on the Promissory Note secured by the Trust Indenture have not been made as required. As of May 15, 2013, the sum of $104,775.94 was past due. The principal balance as of that date was the sum of $89,154.76, with interest accruing thereon at a rate of 6% per annum, with a daily interest accrual of $14.66 per day, and together with costs and attorney’s fees incurred. In addition, Grantor is in also default for failing to pay taxes before becoming delinquent. In accordance with the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the beneficiary has elected to accelerate the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Trust Indenture and note and elected to sell the interest of Jesse K. Mitchell. the original Grantor, his successors and assigns, in and to the afore described property, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances,, or covenants existing of record or evident on the property at the time of sale to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiary has directed David J. Steele II, a licensed Montana attorney, as successor Trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The sale noticed herein may be terminated and the Trust Indenture and note obligation be reinstated by the tender to the successor Trustee of all amounts in arrears to the date of payment, together with all fees, costs and expenses of sale as incurred. Trustee is unaware of any party in possession of claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATE this 10th day of June, 2013. /s/ David J. Steele II, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 10th day of June, 2013, by David J. Steele II. (SEAL) /s/ Katie M. Lilje, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, MT My Commission Expires July 28, 2015 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/04/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200431745 Bk-743 Pg-274, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Gerald Whitehead, and Terri Whitehead, Husband and Wife as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Title Services Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 2 of Linda Vista Tenth Supplement Phase I, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200922721, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWABS, Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-12. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/07 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 26, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $417,446.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $267,746.13, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to com-

mence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16094) 1002.254193-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/12/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200911526 BK 839 Pg 764, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ross Miller was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, a Washington Stock Savings Bank was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot B56 of Canyon East Phase 5, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201311244 BK 914 Pg 410, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 9, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $166,664.63. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $160,797.33, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.107055) 1002.255316File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/21/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200531141 Bk-764 Pg-1125, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mavis H Vaillancourt, an unmarried woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Insured Titles LLC was

[C6] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013

Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Truman Meadows, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201117646 Bk: 884 Pg: 673, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Capital One, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 26, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $199,122.88. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,882.87, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on January 6, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16132) 1002.256045-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT A8 OF ALLOMONT PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Aaron K. Bell and Taunia R. Bell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 16, 2008 and recorded June 18, 2008 in Book 821, on Page 156 under Document No. 200813977. The beneficial interest is currently held by Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,146.68, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 1, 2013 is $236,312.51 principal, interest at the rate of 3.875% now totaling $7,630.90, late charges in the amount of $61.44, escrow advances of $3,713.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,037.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may

bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 3, 2013 Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho) )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 3rd day of July, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 GmacVBell 41965.361 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE NORTH 50 FEET OF LOTS 29, 30, 31 AND 32 IN BLOCK 63 OF DALY’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICAIL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Kenneth Wabaunsee and Jill Wabaunsee, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage Co. dba Accubanc Mortgage, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 5, 2001 and recorded November 9, 2001 in Book 670, Page 1776 as Document No 200128305. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Bank, National Association successor by merger to National City Mortgage Co. dba Accubanc Mortgage. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $665.46, beginning April 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 25, 2013 is $84,816.81 principal, interest at the rate of 6.750% now totaling $1,807.72, late charges in the amount of $99.81, escrow advances of $257.11, and other fees and expenses advanced of $95.10, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.69 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may

pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 5, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of July, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5-26-2015 Pnc Vs. Wabaunsee 41230.820 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 18, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot A52 of Canyon Creek Village, Phase 3 and 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. RANDALL E. SHIELDS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 19, 2007 and recorded July 23, 2007 in Book 802, Page 40 under Document No. 200718638. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $748.13, beginning October 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 27, 2013 is $134,344.23 principal, interest at the rate of 2.000% now totaling $2,206.58, late charges in the amount of $328.12, escrow advances of $1,911.04, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,593.98, plus accruing interest at the rate of $7.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 11, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 11th day of July, 2013, before me, a no-

tary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Citimortgage Vs. Shields 42011.319 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 19, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5396 LOCATED IN THE SE1/4 OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Robert S. Lafley and Christine R. Lafley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated on October 6, 2009 and recorded on October 13, 2009 in Book 849 Page 45 as Document No. 200924797. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,054.46, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 1, 2013 is $178,335.68 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5% now totaling $9,808.44, escrow advances of $1,073.49, and other fees and expenses advanced of $183.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.87 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 16, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 16th day of July, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Lafley 42062.142 SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of McCauley Butte Ditch Improvement Project will be received by the MISSOULA IRRIGATION DISTRICT, MONTANA at the office of the ENGINEER, Morrison – Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808, until 4:00 P.M. local time on October 11, 2013, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each bid shall be submitted in a sealed en-


PUBLIC NOTICES velope. The envelope shall be clearly marked as follows: “BID PROPOSAL” “McCAULEY BUTTE DITCH IMPROVEMENT PROJECT” “MISSOULA IRRIGATION DISTRICT” The project generally consists of, but is not necessarily limited to, the installation of 1,200 lineal feet of 24-inch diameter corrugated plastic half-pipe (CPP) cut in half and construction of a 6 foot by 5 foot concrete division structure. The half pipe will be used to convey water through the project area and the division structure will direct flows to end irrigators. The Contract Documents consisting of half size Drawings and Project Manual may be examined or obtained at the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808. Required deposit is $75 per set, which is not refundable, by regular mail or United Parcel Service (UPS). Payment of an $25 is required for express mail. Added full size drawings may be purchased for an additional $50, non-refundable. There will be a Pre-Bid Conference at the office of the Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, Montana 59808, at 1:00 P.M. on October 3, 2013. In-

Blue Mountain Mini Storage 5900 HWY 93 South, Missoula, MT 59803 Will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units but not limited to: B6, B15, B26. Units contain misc. household goods, furniture, toys, clothes, tools and other misc. items. We will hold a live auction starting at 2:00PM on Friday, October 4, 2013. Payment will be due immediately at acknowledgement of winning bid. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Unit must be emptied by buyer at least 10 business days from day of sale. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final. Please contact Grizzly Property Management, Inc. at (406) 542-2060 or rentals@grizzlypm.com with any questions.

BITTERROOT MINI STORAGE 6415 Mormon Creek Rd., Lolo, MT 59847 Will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 27, 80. Units may contain misc. household goods, furniture, toys, clothes, tools and other misc. items. We will hold a live auction starting at 1:00 p.m. on Friday, October 4, 2013. Payment will be due immediately at acknowledgment of winning bid. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Unit must be emptied by buyer at least 10 business days from day of sale. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final. Please contact Grizzly Property Management, Inc. at (406) 542-2060 or rentals@grizzlypm.com with any questions.

terested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. A tour of the project site(s) will be conducted. CONTRACTOR(s) and any of the CONTRACTOR's subcontractors bidding on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. Forms for registration can also be obtained online at MT.Contractor.Com. CONTRACTOR's are required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR(s) or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of the state of Montana in accordance with the schedule of Montana Prevailing Wage Rates established by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry included in the Project Manual. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier's Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula Irrigation District in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Construction Performance Bond and a Construction (Labor and Materials) Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. This project is funded in part or in whole with grant/loan funding from the DNRC-RRGL Program. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of the Bids specified above within a period of 60 days. The right is reserved to reject any or all Proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60), and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the Missoula Irrigation District. NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED To: DAY, ROY A., 14450 US HWY 12 W., LOLO, MT. 59847-9486 DAY, PATRICIA J., 14550 US HWY 12

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, October 15, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Rezoning Request – Amend Mill Site Special Zoning District Standards A request from Millsite Revitalization Project, LLC, represented by Nick Kaufman of WGM Group, Inc., to amend the standards of the Mill Site Special Zoning District. See Map A.

The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on this item at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, November 4, 2013, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the City of Missoula Development Services office, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 552-6638. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 5526638. Development Services will provide auxiliary aids and services.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Thinking of View"–so listen carefully.

$158,000

by Matt Jones

REMODELED

1944 S. 8th W.

• 2 bed, 1 bath • 2 lots on Zoned RM1-45 • Newer roof & windows Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker • Front deck, Real Estate With Real Experience fenced yard with pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653) garden shed Properties2000.com

W., LOLO, MT. 59847-9486 CURRENT OCCUPANT, 17500 LOLO CREEK RD., LOLO, MT. 59847 MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, 200 W. BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, 1200 S. RESERVE ST., MISSOULA, MT 59801 BENEFICAL MONTANA INC. dba BENEFICAL MORTGAGE CO., 2880 GRAND AVE., BILLINGS, MT 591026525 Persuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: LOLO VIEW ACRES #1,S35, T12N, R21W, LOT 4. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 6-1-2010. 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 7-16-2010. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 716-2010 by Missoula County whose ad-

dress is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $6,105.88 Penalty & Interest: $609.68 Costs: Total: $6,715.56 7. the date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, October 7, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 2230 McDonald – Microbrewery Conditional Use

The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, October 7, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 230 Daly Ave – Accessory Dwelling Unit Conditional Use Request from Molly Bennett for a Conditional Use approval at 230 Daly Avenue (see Map Q), zoned R5.4 (Residential, single-dwelling).

Request from Triple Divide Brewing for a Conditional Use approval at 2230 McDonald (see Map X), zoned C1-4 (Neighborhood Commercial). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to open a Microbrewery at this location. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6630 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to allow a detached accessory dwelling unit on the property. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6630 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, MIssoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 M.I.P. Assets, LLC

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 7217744

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, October 9, 2013 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications:A request from Pacific Neon Company; Signs as Part of Building for Boot Barn, located at 3666 Brooks St. (SEE MAP C).

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to kcolenso@ci.missoula.mt.us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Development Services at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 552-6636. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services.

ACROSS

1 AMA members 4 Defiant stayer's stance 11 Race participant? 14 Black Eyed Peas singer will.___ 15 Place for a friend to crash 16 SOS part 17 Bed linen where bad stuff goes on? 19 Hosp. diagnostic 20 "___ fair in love and war" 21 Smooth fabric 22 Random link from some stranger, say 23 Late comedian Phyllis 26 Island show 28 Planner square 29 "West Side Story" actor Tamblyn 32 Site to search for stomach remedies 36 Drinkware crafted between the mountains? 40 "In ___ of flowers..." 42 Clearer, as the sky 43 "Silver Spoons" actress Gray 44 What sports car engines have? 47 Put at, as a price 48 Sinn ___ 49 "But ___ Cheerleader" (Natasha Lyonne movie) 52 "The Georgia Peach" 55 "Primal Fear" actor Edward 57 Roo, for one 60 Disaster relief org. 63 Better Than ___ 64 Major miner concern? 65 Technical genius at filmmaking? 68 Animation studio drawing 69 D, E and F, but not F#, on a piano 70 Quit fasting 71 Daily ___ (political blog)

Last week’s solution

72 Instant coffee brand 73 Common omelet ingredient

DOWN

1 Total one's totals? 2 Mexico's national flower 3 Reason for insoles, maybe 4 "Was ___ das?" 5 Pursue with passion 6 Deep-sixes, to a thug 7 Language spoken in "Avatar" 8 Government IOU of sorts 9 Lizard that pitches insurance 10 Kind of poem 11 Easy win 12 A psychic may claim to see it 13 Barber's quick job 18 Adult ed. course 22 "Jackass" crewmate once on "Dancing with the Stars" 24 Pitching stat 25 Rough game on a pitch 27 Abbr. in personal ads 30 Toby Keith's "Red ___ Cup" 31 Tobacco type 33 Event where 13 is a good number 34 1051, to Caesar 35 Opium lounge 37 Utter madness 38 Late golfer Ballesteros 39 Senator Hatch 40 Jazzophile's collection, often 41 Detroit suburb Grosse ___ 45 General ___'s chicken 46 "Bed-In" participant 50 Pat of "The Karate Kid" 51 Headwear of yore 53 Bingo call 54 Jeff who bought the Washington Post in 2013 56 Court judge 57 Sporty stereotype 58 Brand with a "Triple Double" variety 59 Slippery critters 61 "Walking in Memphis" singer Cohn 62 Coloratura's offering 65 Earn a title 66 Cool, to the Fresh Prince 67 Suffix for sugars

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 26 – October 3, 2013 [C7]


SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Able Garden Design & Services LLC Summer is winding down and it is time to think about scheduling your fall clean ups and irrigation winterizations. Residential and Commercial services available. Call Rik 406-549-3667

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

SUSTAINAFIEDS

MASSAGE

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings,

$35/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

WINDOWS

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Specializing In Post Frame and Portable Buildings (855)MQS-BARN (677-2276)

Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

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solar heating. 369-0940 or 6426863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

www.mqsbarn.com FREE ESTIMATES $21,400 Installed

40’x60’x12’ x Garage/Hobby Shop x 2-10x10 Garage Doors x 1-3’ Entry Door Soffit and Wainscot Optional

PRICED FOR A 40 LB. SNOW LOAD – Delivery Fees May Apply

30’x60’x12’ x x x x

$14,500 Installed

Storage Building 1-60’ Sidewall Open 5-12’ Bays 3’ Overhang On Front

406-241-2432

[C8] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013

Building the energy-efficient

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath $550 W/S/G paid, across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, newer complex, open concept, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 106 Camelot: 1 Bedroom, Onsite Laundry, Microwave, Heat & Cable paid, $625; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP+$100 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE!! 121 Ridgeway: Lolo, 2 Bedroom, On-site coin-op laundry, Fenced yard, Parking, $495. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 1213 Cleveland “B” 1bd/1ba, central location, off-street pkng, HEAT PAID. $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1324 S. 2nd St. W. “B”. 3 bed/2 bath, central location, shared

yard, W/D hookups, DW. $1025. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1502 #4 Ernest 1 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, recent remodeling, central location. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1509 S. 10th St. W.: 1 Bedroom, Dining area, Onsite laundry, Central, Heat & cable paid, $675, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP+$100 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE!! 1885 Mount Ave. #2. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, storage, central location. $550. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1905 Mount: 2 Bedroom, Storage, Laundry facilities, Dishwasher, Fenced, $595; GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO

MEMBERSHIP+$100 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE!! 2 bedroom, 1 bath $615, coinop laundry, storage, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Gold Dust Apartments. One Month Free Rent. 2 bedroom $691 all utilities paid. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-5494113, ext. 130 or mreed@missoulahousing.org

2 bedroom, 1 bath $675 W/S/G paid, DW, W/D hookups, off-street parking. free standing gas stove. Cat upon approval. No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Palace Apartments. One Month Free Rent (1) Studio $407. (4) 1 bedrooms $438. (1) 2 bedrooms $527. h/w/s/g paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org

2 bedroom, 1 bath $695, quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op lndry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Quiet, private 1 bedroom 8 miles from town with Bitterroot River access. NS/NP. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV & Internet. 273-2382

825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

RSA 2-bedroom $650 available first week of October. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-5494113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 1708 Scott St. “A”. 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, all utilities included, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 205 1/2 W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared yard, all utilities included. $600. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 321 W. Spruce 2 bed/1 bath, downtown, W/D hookups, offstreet parking. $875. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

117 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $510/month

www.alpharealestate.com

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $660/month

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

fidelityproperty.com

Visit our website at

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

119 Cotter Ct.: 5 Bedroom, 2 Baths, Den, Deck, Hookups, Dishwasher, Double garage, Small pet, $1350. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 120 South Ave East. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3+ bedroom, 2 bath house $1,450. Garage, DW, W/D hookups, lawn care provided, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 3+ bedroom, 3 bath house $1,200. Garage, DW, W/D

To lease in Florence 2 BDRM house with bonus room, fireplace, all appliances, 2 car garage with RV space, dog allowed. $945/month. Damage deposit required. 406-880-5261

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com

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Management Services, Inc.

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

GardenCity

HOUSES

hookups, lawn care provided, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

FIDELITY

549-7711 Check our website!

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

817 Monroe. 1 bed/1 bath near Rattlesnake Creek, carport, W/D hookups. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • September 26 – October 3, 2013 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $319,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 S. 8th W. 2 bed, 1 bath on two lots. Wood floors, garden & front deck. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

Grant Creek Frontage. 4 bed, 3 bath with open floor plan, fireplace, deck & 2 car garage. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7365 milyardhomes@yahoo.com Lewis and Clark Area Home! 839 W Central. $220,000 MLS# 20136229. 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Double detached garage and many other sweet features. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com LotB MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 2406503 riceteam@bigsky.net

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1 Bdr, 1 Bath, University District Condo. $210,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $155,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com

ferred Properties. montpref@bigsky.net

880-4749.

Burns Street Commons 1400 Burns St. #15. $159,9000. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Coveted 3 bedroom home in the Burns St. Commons, next to the Burns St. Bistro and the Missoula Community Coop. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Condo With Views 1545 Cooley, Apt C. 2 bed, 1 bath Westside condo close to downtown, Burns Street Bistro & Missoula Community Co-op. $128,500 MLS# 20134747 KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #103. 1 bed, 1 bath with W/D, patio and handicap accessible features. $155,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $149,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Pre-

1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath Rattlesnake home with 2 kitchens & 3 garages. $339,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

2 Bdr, 1 Bath North Missoula home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 216 Tower. Cute 2 bed, 1 bath on 1/2 acre close to Clark Fork River. 750 sq.ft garage/shop. $185,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

RICE TEAM

2320 West Crescent. 4 bed, 2 bath with hardwood floors, fenced yard with fruit trees & single garage. $214,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $239,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Historic Stevensville home. $250,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $451,250. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Miller Creek home on 1 acre. $250,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

UPTOWN FLATS #306

• Log & frame 3 bed, 2 bath on 15 acres • Mother-in-law apartment • Oversize garage with 1 bed, 1 bath apt.

$162,000 Call Anne for more details

546-5816

MLS #20131347

Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

12646 Conestoga, Lolo $565,000 •

MLS# 20135424

6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

Cute Westside Home 1312 Phillips. $185,900. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Established garden and fruit trees. Close to downtown, parks, bike trails. KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

NEW LISTING! • SELLER MOTIVATED! 19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown $319,900

Air conditioned 1 bed, 1 bath third floor corner unit. Community room, deck with grill & fitness center

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

Robin Rice 240-6503

Stensrud Building Downtown Missoula • $868,000 FIRST TIME ON THE MARKET! With it's Excellence in Historic Preservation Award. Lovingly and completely renovated by Mark Kersting, this turn key building offers a tasty treat for the discerning history buff! Mark has kept the original flare and flavor of this 1890's building alive and beautiful. The zoning designation offers many varied uses from residential to commercial, and many other uses in between. The back 900 sq ft area is ADA compliant.

1845 B West Central $155,000

4 bed, 4 bath, 4400 sqft, Beyer Meadows. Beautifully landscaped, with views in all directions. Custom home, top of the line finishes throughout. Basement is a private sanctuary with large family room and service bar complete with stainless appliances and black granite counter. Full theater room! The back patio is massive, made of stamped and stained concrete. Completely new paint, both exterior and interior. New plush, deep carpeting on all levels.

3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story townhome with open floor plan on quiet cul-de-sac. AC, UG sprinklers, patio & garage. No HOA fees!

GREAT LOLO PROPERTY 11082 Cherokee Lane $237,900. Well-maintained 3 bed, 3 bath. Large kitchen & dining area. Large deck with great view of the Lolo Valley

PROGRAM FEATURES • No required down payment

406-360-0364 • curtis.semenza@prumt.com [C10] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013

100% VA FINANCING AVAILABLE

a good credit history)

• Seller can pay up to 4% towards • Manufactured Homes allowed closing costs • No Prepayment Penalty

(require a 680 FICO score)

All loans are subject to underwriter approval; terms and conditions apply. Subject to change without notice. Equal Housing Lender. Company NMLS #3274 Branch NMLS #398152

Call Team Astrid Today!

MLS# 20132764

Astrid Oliver NMLS 395211 O: 406-258-7522 M: 406-550-3587 F: 1-800-584-4218 aoliver@guildmortgage.net

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

Keri Lunak O: 406-258-7528 M: 406-258-7528 F: 1-877-261-1195 klunak@guildmortgage.net

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

HOME & SMALL BUSINESS 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville $283,000 3 bed, 2 bath, Landscaped. Zoned commercial for small business. Shop is 48' by 30' w/three 10 x 9' doors

• Must be a Veteran, Active duty or • Credit scores down to 600 FICO Reserve member to be eligible • Borrowers may be eligible to purchase a home two years after a Bankruptcy • No Monthly Private Mortgage discharge (Borrower must reestablish Insurance

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Curtis Semenza

SELLER MOTIVATED! BRING OFFER! 13465 Crystal Creek $244,000 3 bed, 2 bath. Two wood stoves, large deck & bonus room for small shop. Near Turah fishing access

Astrid • Keri

1001 S. Higgins Ave, Suite 2A, Missoula, MT 59801


REAL ESTATE Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $155,000. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND East Missoula Lot At 559 Speedway (Next Door) $55,000. 4,800 square feet. Mature trees, sewer available. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Florence Acres 944 Pathfinder. 330 gorgeous acres with 1 bed cabin and

double garage. This little slice of perfection can be yours! Build your dream home here. $650,000 MLS# 20134863, 20134864 KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties.2000.com NHN Ryans Lane Tract B. 103+/- treed acres with year-round creek near Evaro Hill. $517,250. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890’s building with 95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $868,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-9270. glasgow@montana.com

Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 7287262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

OUT OF TOWN

19655 Mullan, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath with 1 bed, 1 bath rental on 15 acres. $319,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath zoned commercial with 48x30 shop. $283,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $130,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

COMMERCIAL Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $225,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

15305 Spring Hill, Frenchtown. 4 bed, 3 bath cedar-sided home bordering Forest Service. $430,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Florence area home on 12.6 irrigated acres. $500,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-

6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Corner Lot in East Missoula! 450 Speedway. 1 bed, 1 bath, garage with attached workspace. Mature trees, easy access to downtown and the UofM. MLS# 20135333 $139,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Potomac Log Cabin 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $195,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Light-filled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer with a great little sled hill in the winter! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NON-OWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-

721-1444 or finance.com

visit

www.creative-

Looking for a local mortgage lender? Call Lisa Holcomb, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Cell: 406370-8792 or Office: 258-7519

Ronan, Montana 406 Main Street SE

$249,900 PRICED BELOW MARKET VALUE

Beautiful large family custom built home.

This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, wrap around covered porch, triple car garage, large fenced yard with lots of trees. There is separate living quarters with its own bath and kitchenette. Judy Coulter, GRI • Wright Real Estate Co. • 406.249.4101

Homes: 839 W. Central . 1965 Raymond 1515 Van Buren 508 Evan Kelly 406 Aspen View 2607 View Dr. . 450 Speedway .

. . . . . . .

.Solid & Sweet! . . . . . . . . . . .Rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Kitchen in Basement . . .Almost 1/2 Acre in Rattlesnake .Polaris MT. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Many Upgrades . . . . . . . . . .Solid Charmer . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

.$220,000 .$339,000 .$279,500 .$399,900 .$375,000 .$239,500 .$139,500

Homes With Land: 1961 Blaine . . . .Potomac Log Home . . . . . . . . .$195,000 2348 River Road .2.23 Acres in Town . . . . . . . . .$535,000

Land: 330 Acres in the Bitterroot With Small Home . . . . .$650,000 East Missoula Building Lot With Trees . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000

Townhomes/Condos: 1400 Burns . . . . . . Cheaper Than Rent Uptown Flats #306. . .Third Floor Views! . Uptown Flats #103. . .ADA Configured . . 1545 Cooley #C. . . . .Rooms With a View!

. . . .From $79,000 . . . . . . .$162,000 . . . . . . .$155,000 . . . . . . .$128,500

Commercial: 1535 Liberty Lane New Lease Space . . . . . . . . . . .$11-$15

missoulanews.com • September 26 – October 3, 2013 [C11]


103 Benton, Missoula

$220,000

MLS# 20136151

Mary Marry

Prime Lewis and Clark location. Waiting for new owners to give it some TLC. Home has many built ins and has wood flooring under carpets. Basement is mostly unfinished and could provide more living space. This home is located on a 9,453 sq. ft. lot that is completely fenced and features apple and plum trees as well as a garden area.

544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

LLC

1520 S. 7th St. W, Missoula

Peggy Miller Owner/ Medical Herbalist (Chinese/Ayurvedic)

• Herbal Consults • Bulk Chinese/Ayurvedic Herbs

406-541-7577

The University of Montana’s Homecoming is a festive week for alumni, friends, students & community members.

wix.com/peggymiller/highlandwinds

SEPT. 29 – OCT. 5 Alumni return to campus to take part in the traditional Homecoming festivities, including the Hello Walk painting, Distinguished Alumni Award ceremony, Yell Night Pep Rally, All-Alumni Social and Dance, Homecoming Parade and Homecoming football game. N EW TH IS YEAR: The Alumni Homecoming Tailgate outdoors in the River Bowl from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Yell Night Pep Rally begins at 8 p.m. on Friday. The public is invited to join the Montana Grizzlies football team, marching band, cheerleaders and Monte to celebrate Homecoming Week with a bonfire, fireworks and the lighting of the M. This year's Homecoming theme – “Up With Montana!” – celebrates both the tradition and rising future of a great institution and its students, alumni, supporters, faculty, staff and friends. For a complete Homecoming event schedule, visit: www.grizalum.org/events/Homecoming

[C12] Missoula Independent • September 26 – October 3, 2013


UM Productions presents

An Evening with Andy McKee October 3, 7:30pm University Theatre "Meet your new favorite acoustic guitarist!" ~ Guitarist Magazine

Tickets available at Rudy's

Bitterroot Performing Arts Series Celebrating 10 Years of Artistic Adventures

presents

The Duhks Saturday, September 28, 8pm "Canada's premier neo-tradsters romp from world-beat to blues, urban-pop to old-timey..." ~ Scott Alarik, The Boston Globe

Info and tickets: bARTc.org 127 West Main, Hamilton

Molly Huffman, native Missoulian, mother, artist, volunteer, long-time Rockin Rudy's manager and all-around amazing person has been recently diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Please join us as Rockin Rudy's hosts a benefit for Molly to help with her everyday expenses and the mounting medical bills. Silent and live auctions, appetizers and drinks. Donations of any kind are being sought for auction at the event and can be dropped off at Rockin Rudy's during business hours. If you have an item to be picked up, or have any questions, please call Sandy at Rockin Rudy's: 542-0077. Cash donations are also accepted through the Rudy's website, rockinrudys.com, or on the Rockin Rudy's facebook page.


Missoula Independent