Page 1

FRESH FACTS NEWS

HOW DEMOCRATS CHOSE A NEW SENATE NOMINEE

OUR ANNUAL GUIDE TO LIVIN’ THE GOOD LIFE IN THE GARDEN CITY

ARTS

LUCY CAPEHART HELPS OPEN RADIUS GALLERY

MUSIC

SAM BUSH READIES TO ROCK THE RIVER CITY ROOTS FEST


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


FRESH FACTS NEWS

HOW DEMOCRATS CHOSE A NEW SENATE NOMINEE

OUR ANNUAL GUIDE TO LIVIN’ THE GOOD LIFE IN THE GARDEN CITY

ARTS

LUCY CAPEHART HELPS OPEN RADIUS GALLERY

MUSIC

SAM BUSH READIES TO ROCK THE RIVER CITY ROOTS FEST


P.J.’s Organics ORGANIC BURRITOS 6 oz.

$2.19 R.W. Knudsen ORGANIC JUICE

Hilary’s Eat Well VEGGIE BURGERS

Selected varieties. 32 oz.

40% off

6.4 oz.

$2.29 Clif Bar ENERGY & MOJO BARS

Koyo RAMEN

Selected varieties. 1.59 to 2.4 oz.

99¢

2 to 2.1 oz.

79¢

Black Coffee Roasting Co. ORGANIC COFFEE In bulk.

$2.50 off/lb.

Food For Life GENESIS 1:29 SPROUTED GRAIN AND SEED BREAD 24 oz.

$3.99

Certified Organic

KADOTA, TURKISH & BLACK MISSION FIGS $3.99 pint

Honest Kids ORGANIC JUICE 8 pk.

$3.39

Kiss My Face OLIVE OIL SOAP

back to school, gfs style Fun, Challenging Courses & Delicious Homework

Barbara’s Bakery PUFFINS

Anyone who says it’s no fun to go back to school isn’t taking their classes at the Good Food Store. Here’s a little taste of what we have coming up, but stop by the GFS Customer Service Desk for our complete September schedule and to register.

10 to 11 oz.

$3.39

The Cuisine of Alaska’s Wild Kenai with Chef Tom Siegel Tom shares recipes he learned from Alaska’s locals this summer. Tuesday, September 9, 6:30 pm, $35

6 to 24 oz.

35% off

The Top Hat Brings Local Flavor to the Stage Top Hat Chef Erin Crobar shares Montana’s finest. Tuesday, September 16, 6:30 pm, $35 GFS Cookbook Club: Ottolenghi’s “Plenty” Vegetarian fare from this stunning cookbook. Thursday, September 18, 6:30 pm, $35

Kettle Foods POTATO CHIPS

Selected varieties. 5 oz.

$1.79

Beef Dishes of the Middle East Exotic flavors with grass-fed Montana beef. Tuesday, September 30, 6:30 pm, $30 |

1600 S. 3rd St. West

[2] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

2 for $5

The Greek Gods GREEK YOGURT

Canning & Preservation Tips from Home Acres’ Pam Clevenger Thursday, September 11, 6:30 pm, $5

www.goodfoodstore.com

8 oz.

|

541-3663

|

Sale prices effective through September 2, 2014


cover illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

News Voices/Letters Tea Party, wine and climbing ................................................................4 The Week in Review Total Fest, Bare As You Dare and pickleball ...............................6 Briefs Fur farm, fire truck and cable boxes...................................................................6 Etc. Billings should take a page from Missoula.............................................................7 News Remembering the founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign.................................8 News How the Democrats chose Amanda Curtis for U.S. Senate.................................9 Opinion Idaho, Montana megaload corridor reveals the true conservatives.............10 Feature The Answers Issue .........................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts In Lucy Capehart’s photos, clothing hints at bodies from the past ....................18 Music Shinyribs, Confluence and Hogan & Moss.......................................................19 Music Sam Bush on Missoula and guitar players........................................................20 Film Frank’s mask almost overstays its welcome .......................................................21 Film The Dog reveals the true story of Pacino’s character ..........................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ....................................................23 Flash in the Pan Mind your manners.........................................................................24 Happiest Hour Raising the Dead at the Top Hat........................................................26 8 Days a Week I’m thinking of an animal ….............................................................27 Mountain High Backcountry Hunters and Anglers 10th anniversary party................33 Agenda Ruby’s Bluegrass, Barbecue and Family Fun fundraiser................................34

Exclusives

Street Talk.....................................................................................................................4 In Other News ............................................................................................................12 Classifieds .................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess.................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y ..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle.....................................................................................................C-6 Camp Sleepover .....................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World ................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Ted McDermott COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua GRAPHIC DESIGNER Pumpernickel Stewart CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Jule Banville, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2014 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [3]


[voices]

Tea Party pooper

STREET TALK

by Alex Sakariassen

Asked Tuesday, Aug. 19, in downtown Missoula What is something you’ve always wondered about Missoula but were too afraid to ask? Follow-up: What’s your favorite local factoid you use to impress visitors? Parker Duncan: I remember being curious why the streets are so screwy. What’s the mythology behind the brothers I hear about? Maybe it reflects some of the quirky mannerisms of Missoula. (Editor’s note: Check out page 14.) Eco-bragging: It’s one of the greenest small cities in the West, I’m pretty sure. It’s very ecofriendly. I definitely like to talk that up.

Stefanie Marshall: I don’t know. I’ve lived here all my life. Most stuff doesn’t baffle me because I just embrace the usual with the strange. Never boring: I just like to tell people that there’s always something going on and there’s always something for everyone’s taste. That’s one thing I love about Missoula.

Colton Swibold: The tunnels underneath the U. I’ve always been curious about those. They’re everywhere, but where do they go? The simple things: Not saying the “M.” I always say two rivers and a mountain. That’s all you need.

Anna Wallace: I’ve always wondered if there was some significance to the XXXX sculpture. I’ve driven past it a lot. Is it art or what? Trails and tunes: When I’m talking to my friends and trying to convince them to come visit Missoula, I always talk about the awesome music scene. We have so many high-caliber musicians and bands.

Cody Sorenson: I really don’t know. I haven’t really been afraid to ask anything. Good eating: I haven’t had too many visitors yet. Mainly I’ve just been trying to show them good places to eat. I’m still obviously in the process of finding all the good local places.

[4] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

In July we got the Tea Party/Americans for Prosperity-Montana claptrap of Joe Balyeat (see “Letters to the Editor,” July 10). What with Balyeat using “freedom” 30 times in two columns of text, it reads like the petulant whining of a 17-year-old whose mommy just won’t let him do what he wants. Since one man’s “freedom” can be another man’s “I’ve been robbed!,” freedom requires responsibility. As to responsibility, Balyeat allows, “I won’t go so far as to say there’s no place for government social programs or regulations,” but then he listed 17 forms of regulation, implying impropriety by the sheer number. Now in August we get new Tea Party/Americans for Prosperity-Montana claptrap from Henry Kriegel (see “Far from dead,” Aug. 7). Kriegel cites a poll that Tea Party members are “somewhat better educated” than the rest of us. Really? Even with the “Keep your government hands off my Medicare!” signs that Tea Party demonstrators are infamous for? Kriegel says that while the U.S. ranked third in “economic freedom” in 2000, by 2012 we’d dropped to 18th place—due, he claims, to massive government overspending. But he “forgets” much after 2000: two huge Bush tax cuts; both unfunded, massive Bush wars; forbidding Medicare to negotiate drug prices; the 2007 recession; and so on. Many involved either cutting taxes or failing to tax (the others involved failing to regulate; hear that Balyeat?), and yet the “Taxed Enough Already” Party must blindly deny what’s obviously needed to ameliorate our debt: taxing those who used to, and should, pay more. Kriegel’s as bad on regulation as Balyeat. He cites the EPA’s proposed “Waters of the U.S.” rule that the EPA says expands exemptions for farmers and ranchers; but Kriegel’s content to go with merely “many believe” it won’t! It must be wonderful to be so much “better educated” that you don’t have to show any evidence of it! William H. Clark Missoula

Climbing questions From the newspaper we learned that Michael Moore and Dane Scott of Missoula are developing Mill Creek in the Bitterroot as a climbing destination (see “On belay,” June 4). A blogger, Ken Turley, also promotes the area via a website (Millcreek.blogspot.com). As local residents we see changes to the landscape. We’ve observed illegally created trails with severe erosion problems that would never meet Forest Service standards. We’ve observed route information written on walls in chalk and climbing equipment left hanging on cliffs. We’ve packed out trash. We’ve

seen belay stations, made with 3-4 foot rebar pounded into the base of climbing walls, often exposed, creating a hazard, or left lying around. The base of one wall (about 20-by-100 on an approximate 35percent grade) once covered with lush vegetation, has become devoid of plant life from overuse. We’ve observed a parking area designed for about three vehicles near Pinesdale, crowded with up to 12 vehicles. Michael and Dane demonstrate great energy at developing the area. Newspa-

“It reads like the petulant whining of a 17-year-old whose mommy just won’t let him

No one is trying to stop climbing. Climbing is a long established tradition in the Bitterroots. Blodgett Canyon has been climbed for decades with minimal impacts compared to what Mill now suffers from. The development in Mill seems more appropriate for a climbing gym. We believe the “right” to develop an area comes with a moral and ethical responsibility to ensure an area’s natural integrity and to minimize impacts to locals. So far, however, we’re seeing a lot of damage. Having a sustainable, low-impact plan helps protect this beautiful place, and will protect climbing. Until a collaborative sustainable plan is developed, we hope climbers will tread lightly on this already degraded area. We hope that Dane and Michael will consider meeting with us. As locals, we’ll listen, and share our concerns in a respectful manner. The Stevensville District office has our contact information. Gary Milner (and 23 other concerned residents) Corvallis

do what he wants.” Missed the boat pers, websites and even a guidebook online attest to this. However, there seems little thought of a sustainable plan compatible with the area. Their website focuses on access and “rights” to climb, but we don’t see any substantial messages on carrying capacities, environmental damage, impacts to local residents or a sustainable plan for the area. We’d hoped that ethical, low impact standards, involving local people, would have been in place before development began. The Access Fund (a national climbing organization) provides a Climbing Management Plan that addresses low impact techniques and collaboration. We encourage the developers of the area to read the CMP. Many ethical climbers support and adhere to these guidelines. It’s a good starting point to protect the sport, address local concerns and safeguard the canyon’s fragile beauty. To those developing the area, what is your current and long-term plan to promote low-impact, ethical climbing and protect the plants and animals in the area? What is planned regarding road maintenance and dust abatement for local families living along the approach roads? Will locals pay for this? How will increased traffic impact our quality of life? Regarding route density, what is the area’s carrying capacity? How will parking needs be met to ensure the needs of hikers, horse riders and others? How will impacts over time to roads and to plants/animals be monitored? Should we expect so much climbing equipment left hanging on the cliffs? Will increased use influence hunting opportunities? Is this how you plan to develop other canyons in the Bitterroot? These are a few of our questions.

After reading last week’s “Real talk about wine” (see “What’s Good Here,” Aug. 14), I must say that both Jule Banville and her wine-shop buddies have really “missed the boat” on their evaluation of Montana wines. There are, in fact, hundreds of people who enjoy these wines and have been buying them for years. More importantly, people really knowledgable (professional wine judges) are now giving accolades to several of the newer Montana wines made from coldhardy hybrid grapes. Several Montana commercial wineries have recently obtained gold, silver and bronze medals in regional, national and international competitions. We have personally received a gold medal for a Marquette red wine at the 2014 International Amateur Winemakers Competition and in 2012 received a silver medal for Frontenac Gris, another cold-hardy hybrid. We rely more on the unbiased evaluations of professional wine judges than on retail wineshop people with their own individual preferences. Yes, good wines are now being produced in the Bitterroot, Missoula and all the way up past Flathead Lake. There is even a quality winery in Miles City. More good news is that we now have a newly formed MT Grape and Wine Producers Organization, and plantings of cold-hardy hybrids are going in throughout Ravalli, Missoula, Lake, Flathead and Sanders counties. Within 10 years, we predict a wine trail in Montana where you can taste and buy a lot of quality wines. The Kalispell area already has a mini version of this. And that, folks, is the real talk about wine. Al and Selma Putnam Corvallis


missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Robin Carleton

Wednesday, August 13 Christopher Lee Stiles and Sandra Lee Cantrell appear via video in Missoula County Justice Court to face homicide charges in the death of Mark Robert Mullan, a Butte man whose body was found near Dillon over the weekend.

Thursday, August 14 Missoula’s three-day, all-ages, volunteerrun music extravaganza, Total Fest, kicks off at the Zootown Arts Community Center, where punk and rock bands from near and far play on a trio of stages custom designed by local artists.

Friday, August 15 Sixty-seven competitive pickleballers descend on Fort Missoula for the inaugural Montana Open Pickleball Tournament. Pickelball is played on a badminton-sized court with ping-pong-like paddles and a Wiffle ball.

Saturday, August 16 Local writer and environmentalist Rick Bass is handcuffed, removed and cited for disorderly conduct and criminal trespass during a protest in Missoula against coal extraction and exportation. Three other protesters were also cited and released.

Sunday, August 17 Some 300 nude and semi-nude bicyclists pedal through downtown Missoula during the Bare As You Dare bike ride. Despite intense criticism directed at the ride’s organizer and city officials for granting her a permit, no protests occur and no citations are issued.

Monday, August 18 U.S. Sen. John Walsh distributes almost $180,000 in leftover campaign funds to Montana Democrats two days after delegates pick Amanda Curtis to replace him as the party’s candidate in November’s general election. Federal rules limit Walsh’s contribution to Curtis to $2,000.

Tuesday, August 19 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces that conservation efforts have brought Montana’s population of arctic graylings back from the brink of extinction and removed the need for the fish’s protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Following an evening of intense thunderstorms, the sun sets Aug. 15 over Spotted Bear Road near Hungry Horse.

Funding

Putting out financial fires Since 2009, the Missoula Fire Department has been asking the mayor and city council for more than $1 million to replace a deteriorating ladder truck built in 1990. Those requests were always deferred—until Monday night, when Fire Chief Jason Diehl went before council and argued the need was now “an emergency.” The emergency began Aug. 12, when Diehl took the truck out of commission due to unsafe wear of the truck’s boom. Without that truck, Diehl explained, the department is down to a single ladder truck—and that one also needs repairs. Though no one was happy about how the purchase came about or what it indicated about the state of the city’s finances, the council voted unanimously to buy the $966,225 truck. The city will use its reserves to pay for the truck now and will find a way to repay itself in the near future, either by passing a general obligation bond or a citywide special tax district. A bond would levy a onetime tax on city residents, whereas a special tax district would create a permanent revenue stream to help meet the fire and police departments’ ongoing

[6] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

needs. Mayor John Engen referred to the fiscal maneuvering as “borrowing from ourselves.” The mayor and some council members would prefer a special district. In fact, the city proposed the Public Safety and Justice District No. 1 earlier this year. It was scrapped, however, due to protest from property owners wary of giving the city the power to tax residents for an indeterminate period of time, at an unspecified rate. Bruce Bender, the city’s chief administrative officer, says such criticism is misguided. A special district “gives you that flexibility to make an annual decision based upon condition,” he says, rather than keep issuing bonds for specific items on a schedule that doesn’t account for changing circumstances. Councilman Adam Hertz, however, believes a new special tax district would only exacerbate the city’s problem with “frivolously” overspending. He objects to the idea that the city needs a citywide special tax district to afford critical services. “Well, it’s just not true,” he says. “We can’t afford a fire truck because we have wasted money on other things.” As for the new truck, it should be in service in about a month. When it is, Diehl says, repair of the department’s other ladder truck will begin. Ted McDermott

Animals

Fur farm for Roy? A proposal to open a new fur farm outside of Roy that would house bobcats in 4-by-6 pens before the animals are harvested for their pelts is prompting outrage from animal rights activists. “As an animal rights activist, I know what goes on at fur farms,” says Missoula County resident Kathleen Stachowski, who operates OtherNationsJustice.org, a website dedicated to raising awareness about animal cruelty. “The general public, for the most part, doesn’t understand.” In July, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks invited public comment on a fur farm proposed by Larry Schultz for the central Montana town, located 35 miles northeast of Lewistown. According to FWP’s environmental assessment, bobcats would live in breeding and weaning pens with attached nesting boxes “at all times.” In the wild, mature bobcats inhabit territories of up to 30 square miles and weigh an average of 20 pounds. Stachowski says they are sensitive animals, unable to handle lifetime confinement. “They think and


[news] feel and experience emotions just like we do,” she says. In fact, Schultz says it’s the animals’ sensitivity that’s prompting him and his wife to move their business from Arnegard, N.D, about 30 miles south of Williston. The noise caused by nearby oil drilling disturbs the bobcats, he says, and “the mothers kill their babies.” After FWP’s comment period opened, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and other groups issued alerts urging opponents to contact FWP. FWP’s Mike Lee says the agency has received roughly 2,000 comments on the farm proposal, as well as an online petition that garnered 12,000 signatures. “That’s a lot for a fur farm,” Lee says. In its environmental assessment, FWP recommends granting Schultz a permit. Lee notes the agency is soliciting public comment that directly relates to how the farm could affect its physical surroundings, rather than outrage over Schultz’s business itself. Montana law permits such operations. Currently 16 fur farms operate statewide. In March, radical activists targeted the Fraser Fur Farm in Ronan, which is among the largest in the country. Extremists then attempted to free dozens of bobcats, but according to a release posted online by the Animal Liberation Front they “were run off-site.” FWP is accepting comments on its environmental assessment through Aug. 29. Jessica Mayrer

ited basic subscribers who qualify for Medicaid will get their boxes free for 5 years.) Subscribers to more expansive plans get a free box or two for only one year. For every extra box and for every box after the grace period has ended, Charter will charge customers $6.99 a month. The boxes cannot be bought, only rented in perpetuity. Though the boxes have created some inconvenience and will ultimately raise cable costs for some customers, the removal of analog signals will free up bandwidth. That means access to more television channels and faster Internet speeds later this year, when the transition is complete. Charter also plans to reshuffle channels in order to group stations with similar content into blocks.

ph

ot o

Television

by Ca th r ine

Concerns in a box As the Aug. 26 date for Charter Communications’ switch to an all-digital cable network grows closer, lines at the company’s Third Street location have grown longer. Occasionally, they have even extended out the door and down the sidewalk. The queues are mostly made up of elderly customers who go in empty handed and come out with a small, black box. On a recent afternoon, Gerald Mueller exited the store. “You live here, you do this,” he says, holding up his new box. “So, here I am.” The boxes are digital receivers. Not all Charter customers need them, but those whose televisions connect directly to a coaxial cable without passing through a Charter-issued digital device do. In compliance with a Federal Communications Commission rule, Charter is giving the boxes out for free—but they won’t be free forever. According to Brian Anderson, the company’s director of regional communications, limited basic cable subscribers are allowed two free boxes for two years. (In addition, courtesy of another FCC rule, lim-

L. Wa lters

“There are so many channels now that, trying to find us, I had to get a magnifying glass,” says Joel Baird, Missoula Community Access Television’s general manager, who will see his station moved from channels 7 and 11 to 189 and 190. “Of course I’m bummed.” At Charter’s Third Street location, Mueller says he’s resigned about the actions of the area’s only cable provider. “I don’t know if this is progress, but this is what’s happening,” Mueller says. “We don’t have a choice about which cable companies to take.” Ted McDermott

Wolverines

A moral question Thirteen environmental groups informed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last week that, in light of its recent refusal to extend Endangered Species Act protections to wolverines, they intend to file suit

BY THE NUMBERS

100

Welcome bags delivered to newly arrived University District residents this week by the Associated Students of the University of Montana. The bags include information about renters’ rights and a “smart party guide.”

against the agency. The Western Environmental Law Center, which is spearheading the effort, accused FWS of ignoring the recommendations of its own scientists in withdrawing a listing proposal for the species. “The Service knows the house is on fire, but is deciding to wait until it is absolutely certain which room will burn first before doing anything to put out the blaze,” Nick Cady, legal director for Eugene, Ore.based Cascadia Wildlands, said in a statement. The concern is no less in western Montana. Among the plaintiffs pursuing legal action is Hamilton-based Friends of the Bitterroot. The group has been fighting for the protection of wildlife—particularly threatened and endangered species—for almost 26 years, and president Jim Miller believes FWS’s unwillingness to acknowledge the potential impacts to wolverines from climate change is a violation of the agency’s primary mission. “The biologists in their own agency recognized the current threat to wolverine and they’re ignoring that science,” Miller says. “The Fish and Wildlife Service is entrusted by the American people to ensure the survival of wildlife in our country, and they’re failing to do that.” Miller says the Friends of the Bitterroot fight is personal. Montana serves as the home range for many of the 250-300 wolverines in the lower 48 states, and the species is a known presence on the Bitterroot National Forest. Montana was also one of only two states that allowed limited wolverine harvest through trapping; Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has kept that season closed since a state district court judge issued a temporary restraining order blocking wolverine trapping in 2012. In justifying the withdrawal of its listing proposal, FWS cited not only increased sightings of wolverines outside formerly known habitat since 2008, but also the unreliability of climate-changemodel forecasts. The groups prepping to sue, however, argue that FWS is now ignoring prior findings of scientists. Ultimately, Miller feels the issue boils down to a moral question. “There are difficult times ahead,” he says. “As a species, can’t we do more to protect the plants and animals that we share this planet with?” Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Missoula City Attorney Jim Nugent doesn’t often concern himself with the happenings of the Billings City Council, but that city’s recent debate over a proposed nondiscrimination ordinance couldn’t help but catch his attention. The council voted 6-5 on Aug. 12 to table the legislation, which, similar to a Missoula measure passed in 2010, would have made it illegal to deny housing, employment or services to people based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Nugent heard about a long line of Billings residents who warned that passing such an ordinance would enable cross-dressing predators to flood bathrooms and locker rooms, where they would victimize women and children. Opponents also predicted queers would file “frivolous” lawsuits against family friendly retailers, landlords and bosses who denied them services, housing or employment. One letter stated “all peoples safety will be in jeopardy, especially young children, women, etc. Men should go in men’s bathrooms and locker rooms … As far as trangenders, there is no such thing. God either makes male or female.” All of this caught Nugent’s attention because four years ago he heard the same sorts of fears in Missoula—and not a single one came true. “It doesn’t surprise me that they’re using the same arguments,” Nugent says, “because they’re easy and convenient arguments to throw out and muddy the water.” For starters, no Montana law governs who uses what bathroom. “Who’s ever heard of a law about bathrooms?” Nugent asks incredulously. Secondly, despite warnings that the ordinance would make people who discriminate the target of legal claims, Nugent says there have been no complaints filed under Missoula’s anti-discrimination ordinance to date, let alone lawsuits. Nugent remembers these arguments so well because he had to go toe-to-toe with the unfortunately named opposition group Not My Bathroom in the months after Missoula passed its ordinance, as they attempted to overturn the law in court. He rattles off a list of Montana constitutional guarantees, including those ensuring equal treatment under the law, when explaining Missoula’s rationale for creating the first ordinance of its kind in the state. “I guess I just don’t believe that anyone should be discriminated against,” he says. Nugent typically likes to stay behind the scenes. In this instance, however, he openly questions Billings’ decision to table a law that would help ensure all of its residents feel safe. “It’s disappointing to see when the leaders and the people who should be the leaders in a community,” he says, “basically fail to lead.”

Times Run 8/22/14 - 8/28/14

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Boyhood

Sarah Eastlund

Nightly at 7 Sat at 1

Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

Magic in the Moonlight Nightly at 7 & 9 Sat at 1 & 3

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

thewilma.com

Leather Goods – Great Footwear Downtown – 543-1128 www.hideandsole.com

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [7]


[news]

Life’s work Remembering the founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign by Jessica Mayrer

Last Downtown ToNight for 2014!

Aug. 28 Salsa Loca Family Activity

Montana Wilderness Association

Last Out to Lunch for 2014!

Aug. 27 Three Eared Dog Family Activity

Girl Scouts of MT & WY

'RQ¡WGXPSLW³ '21$7(,7 :HQRZRIIHUSLFNXSVRI\RXUODUJH GRQDWLRQLWHPV&DOOIRU LQIRUPDWLRQRUVFKHGXOLQJ

6KRS'RQDWH9ROXQWHHU :\RPLQJ6W_ZZZ+RPH5H6RXUFHRUJ

[8] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Roughly 1,000 friends, family mem- migrating out of Yellowstone National Nations continued coordinating tribal opbers and allies came together this past Park to help curb the transmission of bru- position to the slaughter, while BFC weekend to celebrate Buffalo Field Cam- cellosis, a contagious disease that causes brought on-the-ground resistance and paign cofounder Rosalie Little Thunder’s ungulates, including buffalo, cattle and documented the killing to help raise life and to mourn her death. She was elk, to miscarry. MDOL’s efforts horrified awareness. Brister estimates 6,500 people have buried in a bison robe in a cemetery atop Little Thunder and prompted her to act. She said the U.S. government’s efforts volunteered with BFC during the past 17 a hill on South Dakota’s Rosebud Indian to eradicate bison already left them nearly years, each of them taking part in Little Reservation. “It’s going to be really hard without extinct. Little Thunder and other hunt op- Thunder’s legacy. Among BFC’s guiding her,â€? says Buffalo Field Campaign Execu- ponents also argued then, as they do now, principles is one articulated by Little Thunder: Bison are a cortive Director Dan Brister. nerstone species, she The guidance Little said, and a barometer of Thunder provided BFC overall environmental volunteers such as Brister health. Allowing them to prompted them to call her be killed off would con“Mom.â€? Little Thunder stitute not just a blow to died Aug. 9, at age 64, after Plains Indians, but to the suffering a stroke. Despite planet. weathering a series of Despite the estimated health challenges, includ650 bison being captured ing triple bypass surgery in and killed outside the 2007, Little Thunder conpark this winter, Brister tinued working to protect sees BFC continuing to the environment and her make slow progress. For Lakota culture until the example, he says there’s a day she died. pending proposal from “She was really fired state agencies to allow up about continuing to photo courtesy of Darrell Geist/Buffalo Field Campaign work and sharing ideas,â€? Buffalo Field Campaign cofounder Rosalie Little Thunder leads a bison to roam on up to Brister says. prayer ceremony to honor slaughtered Yellowstone National Park 421,000 acres of federal, state and private lands Little Thunder’s friends bison. The activist died on Aug. 9 at the age of 64. outside of the park. Brister say that attitude was typical. After all, she still had a lot left to ac- that there’s never been a proven transmis- also notes that rather than gunning down complish. She was a lifelong teacher of the sion of brucellosis from wild bison to cat- the animals outright, as MDOL did in the Lakota language. This spring, she worked tle. Aiming to preserve the species, Little 1990s, it’s more likely now to chase the anwith the Cheyenne River Sioux to stop Thunder invited a delegation of American imals back into the park. BFC doesn’t supconstruction of the Keystone XL oil Indians, including Sioux holy man Arvol port hazing, but Brister still calls it “one pipeline. Though she was active on multi- Looking Horse, to join her on March 6, definite difference.â€? Looking back on BFC’s past 17 years, ple fronts, Little Thunder spent decades 1997, in Gardiner for a national day of trying to end the slaughter of North Amer- prayer. The sound of gun shots inter- Brister concedes the fight has been longer than he expected. When the campaign ica’s last genetically pure free-roaming rupted the ceremony. “It turns out that 14 buffalo were first launched, volunteers spoke hopefully bison herd. The Yellowstone National Park killed less than two miles away from about immediate goals. herd today totals some 4,600 animals. “Back then, I think we were pretty “The buffalo were her family,â€? Brister where the prayer was being conducted,â€? naĂŻve,â€? he says. “We had this idea that says. “It’s kind of hard for us in our culture recalls BFC cofounder Mike Mease. When Mease, Little Thunder and oth- our being here with the video cameras to wrap our minds around that, but their culers tracked the shots, they found bison and telling the world—showing the ture was literally built around the buffalo.â€? Before white settlers arrived to North corpses and MDOL employees. Little world what’s happening—you know, America, bison were central to Lakota ex- Thunder later wrote of the scene, “Cast ‘We’re going to stop this in two or three istence. In 1500, roughly 45 million bison aside in the mud and blood was an un- years.’â€? Little Thunder, however, knew the inhabited the region and nearly every as- born calf, gutted from the mother.â€? Law enforcement threatened Little battle wouldn’t be over so quickly. Brister pect of life for the Plains Indians depended on the animal. Its brain matter Thunder with arrest when she attempted remembers what she said in response to was used to tan buffalo hides, which were to walk onto private property to pray over BFC volunteer enthusiasm. He thinks transformed into robes and teepees. the downed animals. She went anyway about it often, he says, because what she said then still motivates him to continue Sinew was used for sewing; bones as and was cited for trespassing. MDOL killed nearly 1,100 bison in the work she started. tools. What little remained of the animal “She looked at us and said, ‘This is a was returned to the earth, as Little Thun- the winter of 1996-’97. To prevent the der wrote in a 1997 letter, “in prayer and slaughter from happening again, Mease life’s work,’â€? Brister recalls. “This may not and Little Thunder formed what was then even be accomplished in our lifetimes.’â€? gratitude for Creator’s gifts.â€? In winter 1996, the Montana Depart- called Buffalo Nations, which later crement of Livestock began hunting bison ated the Buffalo Field Campaign. Buffalo jmayrer@missoulanews.com


[news]

New nominee How the Democrats chose Amanda Curtis for U.S. Senate by Alex Sakariassen

Amanda Curtis says she slept well the on the day’s outcome, repeatedly referenc- took the comparison even further. She fonight before the Montana Democratic ing the need to select the strongest candi- cused much of her nominee speech on Party’s Aug. 16 special nominating conven- date to defeat the Republican competition the key issues her campaign would focus tion in Helena. The state representative in November. “We’re ready to take on Steve on—affordable public education, protecfrom Butte was the perceived frontrunner Daines and his special agenda,” Larson said tion of public lands, equality for Montana’s LGBT community—but leveled a in the push to replace Sen. John Walsh, who after gaveling the convention to order. Democrats made short work of select- number of pointed attacks at the party’s dropped off the November ballot following a plagiarism scandal in late June. Curtis ing their top choices, and the morning opposition. “This election could decide who conspent the days leading up to the convention came down to two contenders—Adams drumming up support from voting dele- and Curtis. In seconding Adams’ nomina- trols the U.S. Senate,” she said. “I don’t mean gates, but as she entered the party’s pro- tion, Louise Bruce cited his recent work the Republicans versus the Democrats; I on the primary campaign trail. “We will mean the millionaires versus the middle ceedings she felt a strange sense of calm. class. This is the funda“I’m not the one that mental difference between has been asking for this,” Steve Daines and me. He she says. “There have seems like a nice guy with been people who said, a wonderful family, but ‘We want this and we’re I’m pretty sure he doesn’t working for this.’ That understand what life is like just gave me an incredible for the rest of us.” peace of mind, knowing Adams’ own nomithat it’s not Amanda Curnee speech included tis. It’s a movement.” promises to campaign on The list of potential high-speed fiber optic nominees had already cable in Montana, childdwindled significantly becare for kids under 4 and fore Saturday’s vote. photo by Alex Sakariassen cleanup efforts at the Gone were the heavy-hitters like former Gov. Amanda Curtis and Dirk Adams sit at the head of the Montana Berkeley Pit. While he Brian Schweitzer. Intrigu- Democratic Party’s nominating convention in Helena Aug. 16. did make the occasional Curtis defeated Adams by a nearly two-to-one margin. jab at Daines—“Here in ing prospects including state Superintendent Denise Juneau, for- win this race with Dirk Adams,” she said. Montana,” he jested, “we’re just so fortumer NARAL Pro-Choice America President “This race is about substance, not image.” nate to have a Republican candidate who Nancy Keenan and longtime state Sen. In nominating Curtis, state Sen. Robyn takes Genesis literally and the Gospels as David Wanzenried had all withdrawn Driscoll said the Butte High School math merely advisory”—Adams took equal aim themselves from consideration. Efforts to teacher “understands everyday Montanans at Walsh, his one-time primary opponent draft actor Jeff Bridges made for several because she is one of us. She knows strong with no more presence in the race. Curtis’ 82-46 vote victory over Adams days of entertaining speculation, but ulti- public education can be the path out of came as little shock to those at the convenpoverty because that’s her life story. “ mately proved ineffective. For nearly half an hour, party dele- tion. As the delegates adjourned, Adams A few remaining possibilities appeared in the wings at the Saturday morning con- gates lined up at the microphone to make made his way to the back of the building, vention. Wilsall rancher Dirk Adams and a case for Adams or for Curtis. Several vowing to support Curtis however he former Lt. Gov. John Bohlinger hung back praised Adams’ experience as a former could and confirming this wouldn’t be the in the public section, occasionally leaning bank CEO—a credential that garnered last time he runs for office. “Where deover the partition to shake hands and chat some criticism early in his initial cam- pends on where I’m needed,” he said. As for Curtis, she wasted little time in with the party’s voting delegates. Both had paign—and came to his defense regarding lost to Walsh in the Democratic primary, earlier statements that he supported the hitting the campaign trail. Hours after the and both had voiced a desire to step into Citizens United ruling. Others under- convention, she was in Caras Park to celthe candidacy in the wake of Walsh’s exit scored the need for younger leaders like ebrate the 10-year anniversary of Forward from the race. On the other side of that par- Curtis, the 34-year-old who posted daily Montana—the nonprofit that knocked tition, Curtis roamed about the delegate ta- YouTube videos from the 2013 Montana doors for her 2012 legislative campaign. bles. Her bid for the nomination had won Legislature. Curtis was described as “bold,” Her Senate bid is still considered a longthe backing just days before of both MEA- “inspiring, “fearless” and “a quick study.” shot, but she walked out of Saturday’s “If you nominate Amanda Curtis convention with optimism. MFT and the AFL-CIO—Montana’s two “It was my honor to represent my largest unions; several Curtis supporters, today, you’re going to have a fighter in signs and all, had even set up shop in the there,” said Kelly McCarthy, chair of the neighbors in Butte,” she told the Indy, Yellowstone County Democrats. “If you “and the idea of getting to represent my convention parking lot. The event itself was historic enough. nominate Amanda Curtis today, I’ve got a friends and coworkers and neighbors The U.S. Senate Historical Office report- sympathy card for Steve Daines that we all from all across the state—east, west, agriculture, mining—is an incredible, incrededly only found one other example of a can sign. I feel sorry for him.” The stark contrast between Curtis ible opportunity.” Senate candidate resigning after a primary but before a general election. But MDP and Daines became the central talking Chairman Jim Larson placed added weight point for numerous delegates, and Curtis asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Beer Drinkers’ Profile "Full House"

Just About Everybody

What brings you to the Iron Horse today? It's a long list: delicious food, great location, snazzy atmosphere, an outstanding beverage selection, friendly service, and tables with a view! You get the picture . . . Do I need reservations? You're kidding, right?

Beverage of choice? You name it!

Enjoy River City Roots Festival. Welcome back UM Students & Staff! Where There Is Always Someone You'll Know 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 • ironhorsebrewpub.com

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Highway robbery Megaload corridor debate reveals the true conservatives by Pat Ford

(406) 541-2886

MontanaSmiles.com

Appointments available evenings and Saturdays Southgate Mall (Next to Dillards) • Missoula, Mt Independent dentists since 1983

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has worked hard for six years to turn the state’s Highway 12 into a corridor for sending massive, 200-foot-long megaloads of heavy equipment to Alberta, Canada, for tar sands extraction. But it’s not working out. First, state court verdicts in Idaho and Montana, plus botched operations by megaload haulers, held things up. Then a federal court verdict late last year extended the delay another year or more. Oil companies began searching for other routes, and in May, heavy-equipment manufacturer Harris Thermal announced it would open a new plant in Bonner, Mont., giving it a straight shot north for its giant equipment, bypassing Highway 12. Americans may know Highway 12 as the route of the Lewis and Clark and Nez Perce trails. Many Idahoans and Montanans know it as their main access to the wild and bountiful Clearwater Country. For locals, it is the narrow winding river road they use every day for work, recreation and family activities. It is their fastest, and in many cases only, access to medical care and other community resources in Lewiston and Missoula. It bisects the Nez Perce Reservation and ceded tribal lands, and runs right next to the site of the tribe’s creation story. Because the area’s economy relies on recreation, fish, wildlife, forests and tribal resources, everyday use of Highway 12—which megaloads would upend—remains a necessity of life. Which leads to the question: Why have Gov. Otter and his Transportation Department spent six years, and at least $1 million of Idahoans’ money, trying to turn it into something resembling a semiprivate access road for Big Oil? One answer is that the Army Corps of Engineers’ lower Snake waterway and Idaho’s “seaport” at Lewiston desperately need megaload barge traffic. The waterway’s use by growers and manufac-

turers, never large, has for a decade been melting away to more flexible transportation options, even as American and Lewiston taxpayers pay steadily increasing subsidies for it. Otter supports the waterway despite its rising costs and vanishing benefits. But his megaload mania also signals that he has lost contact with the conservative “Idaho values” he constantly proclaims. Instead, the genuine conservatives

“Why have they spent six years and at least $1 million trying to turn it into something resembling a semi-private access road for Big Oil?” here, the real defenders of Idaho values, are the Nez Perce people, who are fighting the megaloads. The Nez Perce are defending their homeland, which they have inhabited and husbanded for centuries. During decades of dispossession and disrespect, they protected their homeland, working steadily to reclaim their traditional ways and liberties while being good neighbors to the children of their dispossessors. No Idahoans are more rooted to their home and faith. Contrast that with Exxon and the other agents of Big Oil that Otter has

aligned with—radical, rootless, sharp-elbowed bullies, for whom homelands are “corridors,” sacred places coordinates on computer screens, and the people of those lands abstract units defined solely by financial transactions. Nez Perce words and actions have been consistent. However, Exxon has repeatedly misled the public and changed its stories to get access to Highway 12. Otter has been silent about or party to these deceptions. For Big Oil, Alberta’s northern forests are overburden to bulldoze. The Nez Perce, knowing those forests are home to people and the ecosystems that sustain them, have invited these people to visit Idaho and describe what the mining is doing to them. Otter has never consulted these people. The Nez Perce have considered the accelerating harm that global warming will cause their children’s children, and see its connection to mining the Canadian tar sands. Otter has apparently not thought about it. When Nez Perce leaders decided to blockade one megaload shipment through tribal lands—a shipment Idaho permitted over the tribe’s objection—they accepted the consequences of their civil disobedience and were arrested peacefully by the tribe’s own police. When a federal judge halted further megaload traffic, in part due to the state’s failure to consult the tribe, Otter responded—not by legally appealing the verdict—but by attacking the judge for failing to share what he calls the conservative values of Idaho. Otter is not the first Western conservative to act like nothing of the kind. Fortunately for Idaho, the Nez Perce Tribe is the genuine article. Pat Ford is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a column service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He has worked in Idaho conservation for 36 years and lives in Boise.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014


Tito’s Vodka Flathead Lake Brewing Company Montana Buds Anne Jablonski First Security Bank The Green Light

Boom Swagger Salon School of Extended & Lifelong Learning UM Missoula Morgenroth Music BioLife Plasma Services Rhinoceros

Hot Saucer Sandwiches Dickey’s BBQ Bitterroot Bison Burns St. Bistro Chicken Bacon Tater missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [11]


OUR SPECIAL NONPROFIT GUESTS: Tues 8/26 vs Helena Brewers Adventure Cycling

Fri 8/29 vs Billings Mustangs Missoula Aging Services

Wed 8/27 vs Helena Brewers Arthritis Foundation

Sat 8/30 vs Billings Mustangs NCBI

Thurs 8/28 vs Billings Mustangs Missoula Housing Authority

Sun 8/31 vs Billings Mustangs HCBS

To get your organization signed up, for Community Corner, send a written request on your organization's letterhead to: Missoula Osprey c/o Community Corner MSO Hub 140 N. Higgins, Missoula 59802 or call 543-3300

Sponsored by

[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Police in Bloomsburg, Pa., arrested Jacob Close, 25, for jumping bail after he took part in the local newspaper’s “Your Opinion” feature and allowed his photo to be published. An officer noticed Close’s photo and tracked him down. (Associated Press) After Quamier Claiborne, 20, asked a passerby for a coat hanger, explaining that he was locked out of his car in Linden, N.J., the passerby notified police. Officers found Claiborne standing near a 2009 Volkswagen Passat that he claimed he’d borrowed from his aunt. A check found the vehicle had been reported stolen, and he was arrested. (Newark’s The Star-Ledger) GETTING TO BE A HABIT – Engine trouble forced the pilot of a small plane to make an emergency landing on a highway near East Moriches, N.Y. A week later, he made another emergency landing on the same highway. “It wasn’t one of my better landings,” Frank Fierro, 75, said, adding, “My wife is going to kill me.” (New York’s WCBS-TV) FACEBOOK FOLLIES – Oscar Otero Aguilar, 21, who Mexican authorities described as obsessed with taking impressive photos of himself to post on social media, borrowed a gun and was waving it around while he took pictures with his cellphone when he accidentally shot himself in the head. (Britain’s Mirror) HOW THE GREAT UNWASHED LIVE – New York City’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved a proposed apartment building with separate entrances for rich and poor residents. The 33-story complex will have 219 luxury units overlooking the Hudson River and 55 units facing the street for low-income families. Including affordable housing nets Extell Development Company a tax break and the right to erect a larger building than would normally be allowed. As for what critics call the “poor door,” fellow developer David Von Spreckelsen of Toll Brothers explained, “I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood.” (New York Post and Britain’s Daily Mail) A San Francisco nonprofit group equipped a former public transit bus to offer free showers to homeless people. The Lava Mae mobile shower bus features two full private bathrooms with clean toilets, shampoo, soap and towels. Founder Doniece Sandoval explained that the bus can reach homeless people scattered throughout the city, plus it avoids high rents that a fixed location would entail. (Associated Press) MOTHER OF THE YEAR – Florida authorities who charged Kayla R. Oxenham, 23, with intentionally branding her two children, ages 5 and 7, said she told the children that she burned them with a hot stick so she could identify them as hers. The Port Charlotte woman added that she “forgot how much she loved fire.” (Fort Myers’s WBBH-TV) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES – Heath Vanek, 35, the firearms instructor for the Hewitt, Texas, Police Department, accidentally shot himself in the hand while using his personal 9mm semi-automatic pistol to teach his family to shoot. (Waco Tribune-Herald) A 37-year-old New York man was shot by another man during an argument while filming a rap video. “They were fighting over who’s the star, who’s better,” said witness Ali Abdul. “They were drunk. They spit at each other, then one guy pulled out a gun and shot the other guy five times.” Police said the victim was critically injured, and the shooter fled. (New York Daily News) Alaska authorities said Carl Timothy Forester, 50, tried to commit suicide at his Skagway home by putting his shotgun in his mouth. His girlfriend tried to stop him by hitting him in the head with the butt of another gun, but the blow caused him to involuntarily squeeze the trigger of his gun and shoot her in the upper chest, permanently disfiguring her. (Juneau Empire) IRS special agents fire their guns accidentally more than they fire them intentionally, according to an investigation by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Between 2009 and 2011, the report found, “there were a total of eight firearm discharges classified as intentional use of force incidents and 11 discharges classified as accidental.” (CNSNews.com) SHOCKING DISCOVERY – People would rather be doing something, even if that’s hurting themselves, than being alone with their thoughts, according to researchers at the University of Virginia. When they gave 18 men a 15-minute “thinking” session, with the option of administering a mild electric shock, 12 of them gave themselves at least one electric shock. By comparison six of 24 women shocked themselves. Prior to the sessions, all of the participants had received a sample of the shock and indicated they would pay not to be shocked again. “Simply being alone with their own thoughts for 15 minutes,” the investigators reported in the journal Science, “was apparently so aversive that it drove many participants to self-administer an electric shock that they had earlier said they would pay to avoid.” (University of Virginia press release) VICTIM OF THE WEEK – British authorities reported that a 54-year-old man was trying to force open a toilet door on a train in Essex when the door opened and six women in miniskirts emerged, shouting. Police Sgt. Emma Weir said one of the women punched and kicked him onto the station platform, where he fell on another woman, who accused him of trying to steal her purse and punched him in the face. The man suffered a broken nose and two black eyes, according to Weir, who offered no explanation why six women were in the same toilet. (BBC News) CHEATER, CHEATER – Karen Trant, 51, received disability benefits totaling 130,000 pounds ($218,100) for 13 years by claiming she was too scared to leave her house, but a British court sentenced her to two years in prison after an investigation found that she used the money to vacation for up to five months a year in Goa and for a string of cosmetic procedures. (Britain’s The Telegraph) Lawrence S. Herman, 47, was sentenced to five months in prison after pleading guilty to submitting a bogus personal injury claim for $60,000 to an insurance company. When the company didn’t honor his claim, Herman, a chiropractor in Waynesboro, Pa., hired a lawyer and demanded payment for back and neck injuries. Meanwhile, federal investigators found that he participated in several races, including marathons and halfmarathons. Herman admitted fabricating his injuries and treatment records. (Harrisburg’s WHTM-TV)

[12] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014


Taken or single, come mingle.

GREAT DRINK SPECIALS $4.95 Taco & Tot Basket 4pm-9pm

KARAOKE CONTEST EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

Fall Leagues Start in September. Sign Up Today. 

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [13]


Q A

: Why does Missoula have so many urban deer? : Mike Thompson, wildlife manager for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Region 2, has been fielding calls about urban deer since he started working with the agency in Missoula back in 1987. He doesn’t have any firm numbers for how many whitetail and mule deer are living inside the city limits. “I did a back-of-the-napkin a few years ago,” he says, “and I don’t want to be wrong about what I came up with.” But he confirms the population is bigger now than in years past. “Just in the numbers of deer people see, the distribution of deer around town, the fact that there are a lot of

ago. Two good-sized bucks had gotten their antlers locked together and were thrashing around violently. “Since they were pretty well occupied with each other, we were able to jump on them, tackle them, and then we sawed off the antlers, which really was depressing to the bucks that were relying on their antlers for their status,” Thompson says. “They just kind of slunk off after that. Boy, that was a bundle of energy and testosterone, I tell you what.”

Q A

: What’s with all the ringing bells on the University of Montana Oval every weekday at noon? : It would be easy to assume that something like UM’s clock tower, which plays music at the predictable hour of noon each weekday, would be automated like one of those pre-programmed player-pianos. But it’s an actual musician who climbs 72 stairs to the belfry and sits in front of a 47-bell instrument called a carillon to perform for the masses. UM music professor Nancy Cooper has long held the responsibility, but she injured her hand in the spring. Now Barbara Ballas pounds her fists on the stick-like keys that activate the bells. There are even occasional guest carillonneurs, like Tin-Shi Tam, an Iowa State University professor who played a recital in May.

H

ave you seen them yet? Oh, you know who we’re talking about—them. They’ve been arriving the last few days with boxes under their arms, parents or friends in tow, a look of anticipation and hope plastered across their faces. Soon they will be choking the bar scene, filling our favorite restaurants and partying well past our latenight neighborhood potlucks. That’s right, the students are back, and they’ve brought with them duffel bags full of youthful things, like ignorance. Not that this is a bad thing. Every late August, as a fresh crop of coeds shuffles into town, the Indy publishes its Fresh Facts guide (it’s that glossy covered thing in this week’s print issue). This give us a chance to introduce newbies to—and remind longtime locals of—the nuances that make Missoula, well, Missoula. This isn’t your average college town, nor mountain getaway, nor Montana destination, so it requires a wee bit of guidance to firmly get one’s feet planted on the ground. During that reporting, we inevitably dig up a few facts that strike even natives as surprising. We also inevitably land on a few issues that leave us needing to dig a little deeper to figure out why or how something out of the ordinary came to be. That brings us to this, the Answers Issue. We’ve spent the past month exploring some of Missoula’s peculiarities, from standard conversation starters like the whole letters-on-mountains thing to less talked about issues like our city’s lack of racial diversity. We developed our own list of questions. We also asked newcomers and longtime residents for additional WTFs. Then we set out to find experts who could shed some light on these things, dispel any longstanding myths and help us get to know Missoula a little better.

mule deer now where there didn’t used to be in addition to the whitetail deer—yeah, by every indication, anecdotally I’d have to think that there’s more.” Missoula’s surrounded on all sides by miles and miles of wild country, the kind that most folks would assume provides prime habitat for deer. However, the city limits offer a food-rich and predator-free paradise for the species, even if they run the risk of getting antlers caught on the occasional volleyball net or garden fence. “Once deer get to a point where they become habituated, where they learn that humans are not a threat, this is absolutely ideal for them,” Thompson says. (Note: It’s actually illegal to feed deer, and FWP encourages residents to minimize attractants in their yards.) Back in 2003, the Montana Legislature passed a measure granting cities in the state authority to manage wildlife species for public safety. And in recent years, some have actually turned to that law to cull urban deer populations; in winter 2012-13, for example, police in Helena killed roughly 140. Discussion of a similar effort in Missoula has come up several times, reaching a point in spring 2012 where city council considered culling measures of its own. But it was the debate—not the deer—that died. Beyond chomping through gardens and freaking out motorists, urban deer can present a public safety risk, Thompson says. High concentrations of deer pose the potential to attract predators like mountain lions. Even deer themselves are unpredictable and possibly dangerous at times, particularly during the rut. Thompson remembers a call he got up the Rattlesnake about 10 years

[14] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Q A

: Why is Missoula called the Garden City?

: Missoula has plenty of nicknames, like Zootown, River City, Griz Nation and the “blue oasis in a red state,” but it has only one official nickname: the Garden City. The nickname goes all the way back to before the town was incorporated, according to historian Allan Mathews, author of A Guide to Historic Missoula. Back when the valley was undeveloped, the main road into town led past large gardens owned by the McQuirk brothers, on land across from what’s now the Missoula Public Library. “Every time anyone would come into Missoula, they would go by those gardens,” Mathews says. The entryway provided the nickname, and the nickname stuck. Missoula reinforced its Garden City moniker at the turn of the century when it became a hub for processing and distributing produce, particularly Bitterroot apples that were sent east via railroad to feed miners in the booming town of Butte. Mathews adds that the currentday Northside Kettlehouse was a warehouse for processing some of those fruits.

Q A

: Why do we have an entire “Slant Streets” section of town? : Philip Maechling, who served as the city’s historic preservation officer before leaving the position last

year, attributes the geometrically unique Slant Street neighborhood to a late 19th century rift among the town’s founding fathers. In 1889, two attorneys, W.J. Stephens and W.M. Bickford, acquired 320 acres on the south side of the Clark Fork and set to work planning what the new community would look like. “They platted what they thought would be the town of South Missoula,” Maechling says. Because Stephens and Bickford wanted to align their new town with the railroad, which went south to Fort Missoula and the Bitterroot Valley, they set their design on a 45-degree angle, rather than on a traditional north-south grid. Meanwhile, Stephens and Bickford’s landowning neighbors had more traditional notions about how the city should develop. The neighbors, including Judge Hiram Knowles, the Higgins family and Andrew B. Hammond, all followed a north-south grid when developing their land. The result left the South Missoula addition isolated by its own geometry. “That’s what we call the Slant Street neighborhood now,” Maechling says. Just as those grids were being platted, a debate raged among the same powerful families about where best to build a new bridge across the Clark Fork. The Higgins family and the Hammonds wanted the bridge to run north-south, as it does today along Higgins Avenue. Stephens and Bickford, however, wanted the bridge to cut west and connect with their new neighborhood. “That didn’t happen,” Maechling says. Brooks Street evolved as a primary thoroughfare for the Slant Street neighborhood. Brooks Street’s emergence, in turn, led to another Missoula oddity: the intersection of Russell, Brooks and South streets, better known as Malfunction Junction. A Google search for “Malfunction Junction” turns up a Wikimap with a post that says, “Seriously, a tangle of asphalt you don’t want to be involved in if you can avoid it.” Up until 10 years ago, locals traversing Malfunction Junction experienced painfully long red lights and gridlock. The mess of traffic also produced vehicle emissions that routinely violated federal clean air standards. Aiming to clear the air and ease the congestion, the Montana Department of Transportation and the city of Missoula in 2005 rerouted South Avenue around the intersection. It solved the issue of congestion and carbon emissions, but Maechling notes it also eliminated the only direct route linking east and west Missoula. “Now we don’t have any,” he says.

Q A

: What’s with the random railroad depot below the Higgins Avenue bridge? : The castle-like brick depot belonged to the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railway, which laid track across Montana from 1907 to 1909. The Milwaukee Road, as it was commonly called, played a pivotal role in building Missoula’s urban status. The depot itself was designed by architect J.A. Linstrand and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Boone and Crockett Club purchased the building in the mid-1990s to serve as its national headquarters. The Milwaukee Road itself was retired in the 1980s when the rail company went bankrupt. Portions of it were later converted to pedestrian and bike trails, including the Kim Williams Nature Trail and the 15-mile Route of the Hiawatha on the Idaho border.

Q A

: Why is the disc golf course up Pattee Canyon closed until July 1? : The early season closure at the Pattee Canyon folf course dates back to 2007, when the U.S. Forest Service brought together various user groups to discuss


ongoing conflicts and resource concerns in the area. At the time, says Missoula Ranger District recreation specialist Al Hilshey, alcohol use and vandalism were serious concerns. The agency didn’t see many families using the bike trails or picnic grounds. Organizations like the Friends of Pattee Canyon, the Garden City Flyers and Montana Conservation Corps concluded that a disc golf season beginning July 1 and ending Nov. 1 offered the best solution. On the resource management side, Hilshey explains there are a number of elements at play up Pattee Canyon. The first two holes of the disc golf course, as well as the 18th hole, are located on part of a wet camas meadow that can be damaged by plant trampling and wet soil compaction. The upper portions of the course also serve as a drain field for that meadow, and the Forest Service wants to be sure the area has ample time to dry out. “By the end of the summer, those [upper] fairways tend to get pretty wide, and it’s due to vegetation loss, trampling, compaction,” Hilshey says. “If we can rest the folf course during that time of year—especially in the spring—those plants can have time to grow, it increases plant vigor and we’re more apt to have more vegetative cover in the future and less erosion.” The limited disc golf season has helped to balance public use too, Hilshey adds. The groups involved in the initial discussion had to roll out an extensive outreach campaign to educate the public when the closure first went into effect. People have since grown accustomed to the rules, and Pattee Canyon is a wildly popular spot for all sorts of recreation. When the disc golf course finally does open on July 1, Hilshey says, “people are really excited to go and play the course … It turns into almost like an event.”

Q A

: Why are there so many casinos and video gaming machines around town? : According to the Montana Department of Justice’s Gambling Control Division, there are more than 17,000 video gambling machines in the state. It only seems like 16,999 of them are in Missoula.

In fact, as of June 30, there were 1,210 video gambling machines within the city limits. But they appear ubiquitous, and not just limited to casinos. They’re also tucked into restaurants, bars and bowling alleys. This proliferation isn’t an accident, according to Ronda Wiggers, lobbyist for the Montana Coin Machine Operators Association, which represents those who lease and operate many of the gambling machines, pool tables and jukeboxes around the state. “In 1985, when [the state legislature] legalized gambling in Montana, they didn’t want it to become like Vegas gambling,” Wiggers says. “They wanted it to be something that was in our local bars, so they limited the number of machines any one establishment can have. That’s why, unlike driving down the strip in Vegas, where there’s 15 huge casinos, we intentionally designed the law so that all small locations can participate.” State law limits locations to having 20 machines. It also requires a location to have a liquor license in order to procure a gambling license. Liquor licenses are issued on a quota system: Only a certain number are allowed in each county, and the number issued is based on population. As a result, liquor licenses are highly valuable and very difficult to get, especially in larger communities like Missoula. Because liquor licenses are rare and expensive, and because liquor-license holders have a lock on the gambling market, those who hold them—whether it’s Al’s & Vic’s or the Missoula International Airport— have a big incentive to install a bank of lucrative gambling machines. (The Ole’s chain of convenience stores is an extremely rare exception to the liquor-license rule: Though Ole’s stores do not sell liquor to drink on-site, they were grandfathered into the system when state regulation of gambling machines took effect.) When you consider that gambling machines generate some $380 million a year, according to the Gambling Control Division, it doesn’t take much math to see how the profit margin on Missoula’s 1,210 machines translates into their omnipresence.

Q A

:

What’s with all the coffee huts?

: Those who’ve lived here for the last 20 or so years probably think nothing of the cozy coffee stands that

dot our neighborhood streets, parking lots and busy intersections. But confused newcomers and visitors are as quick to ask about these convenient caffeine stations as they are about Missoula’s abundance of casinos. The answer turns out to be quite simple, says Malcolm Lowe, owner of Loose Caboose coffee huts. Lowe opened his first Missoula location back in 1994. At the time, Missoula had just one coffee hut—Mountain Time, on Stephens Avenue—and a new wave of java popularity was sweeping the nation. Lowe saw an opportunity. “Cities were seeing more coffee shops, or office buildings were putting stands in the lobbies of their buildings,” he says. “Well, Missoula is not a pedestrian culture. We’re more of an automotive culture. And in areas of inclement weather, coffee huts make sense ... Montana cowboys want good, strong coffee, and they don’t want to get out of their trucks to get it.” Lowe, who says he had to educate customers “quite a bit” after first opening, has now expanded to five locations, plus a stand at the Clark Fork Farmers Market. Florence Coffee Company and Liquid Planet also operate a string of local coffee huts, and there are dozens of individual operations scattered throughout town. “They’re a part of the local culture now,” Lowe says, noting similar popularity in other inland northwest cities like Spokane. “It’s just a part of people’s morning routine.”

Q A

: How did Caras Park get its name?

: The spot under the Higgins Avenue bridge where locals now gather for rallies, concerts, car shows, craft fairs, brew fests and just about everything else was underwater not so long ago. The Clark Fork once lapped at the foot of the Wilma, which led to a reclamation effort in the 1960s to prevent the building from getting flooded, according to historian Allan Mathews. The reclaimed land was named Caras Park after prominent landowner George Caras. You probably know Caras by the Third Street nursery that also carries his family’s name. Caras Park started to become a cultural focal point in the late ’80s, when the Montana Rep Riverfront Summer Theatre put on performances under a brown-andorange-striped tent bought from a circus. The park’s white pavilion was built in 1997, and a Missoula Down-

town Association campaign from 2010 to 2012 paid for the new band shell below the bridge. As for the iconic carousel in Caras Park, the idea originated in 1991 when local cabinet-maker Chuck Kaparich told city council, “If you will give it a home, and promise no one will ever take it apart, I will build A Carousel for Missoula.” A few years and hundreds of hours of volunteer labor later, the carousel opened in 1995 with 38 hand-carved ponies, still ridden today.

Q A

: Why doesn’t Missoula recycle glass?

: It’s certainly not for lack of trying. Allied Waste, Garden City Recycling, i.e. Recycling and even the Target store on Reserve Street are among those who have collected and accepted used glass in Missoula over the years. The problem has always been about what to do with the glass once it’s collected. Essentially, there are two options: find a local use for it or ship the glass to where the demand exists. Both tactics have been tried, but neither has worked—at least not on a broad, sustainable scale. “It’s always been really hard to recycle here, because we are just not finding a lot of end uses,” says Paul Driscoll, public information officer for the Planning, Prevention and Assistance Division of the Montana Department of Environmental Quality. Most applications for recycled glass require that it be pulverized into smooth pieces that are as small as grains of sand—and that’s not easy to do. It requires an expensive pulverizer and a lot of energy. Once it’s been pulverized, the most obvious use for the glass is in cement or asphalt. It works, but it can’t compete with gravel or other commercial aggregates in terms of cost or availability. There are other uses for pulverized glass—for example, i.e. Recycling briefly partnered with a man who used glass to make retaining-wall blocks—but they are generally specialized and don’t provide a large enough market for Missoula’s considerable supply. In the absence of a more substantial local market for cleaned or pulverized glass, people have looked else-

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [15]


where to ship all our old beer bottles and jam jars. That also poses challenges. “One challenge with glass recycling that’s pretty pertinent to Missoula, and really a lot of places, is the way glass is recycled is a lot different than say cardboard, plastic or cans, as far as those items are compactable,” says Matt Elsaesser, director of Recycle Montana. “So if you think of your recycling processing facilities in Missoula, they can bale about anything. They can’t bale glass. Glass is crushed.” And crushed glass is difficult to transport, because it’s heavy and it’s difficult to contain. For a while, glass collected at the Target on Reserve Street was shipped to Oregon, where it was reused. When that proved too costly, Target contracted with Republic Services, Missoula’s main waste-management company, to handle its glass recycling program. However, as various media outlets reported earlier this year, little—if any—of that glass was actually getting recycled. It was too contaminated for reuse, according to Republic, so it was sent to the landfill. Despite these issues, smaller Montana cities have managed to find ways to get their used glass to the appropriate facility. Bozeman crushes some of its glass and sends it to Salt Lake City for processing. Helena sends its collected glass to a cement plant in nearby Montana City, where it’s incorporated for use in concrete. Here in the Garden City, efforts to recycle glass are ongoing. One successful, smallscale example is Bayern Brewing’s Ecopack program, which allows the brewery to buy back and reuse its beer bottles. While the brewery’s effort and investment definitely reduces the amount of glass that ends up in area landfills, it’s only handling a fraction of our used glass.

Q A

: Why do we insist on putting letters on mountains? : Long story short: School spirit.

The “M” on Mount Sentinel—a symbol of pride for UM—was the first to appear. According to a 1926 Kaimin article, it’s been around in one form or another since 1908 (this is the topic of some debate) and was replaced by a wooden sign around 1912. That letter lasted a few years, only to be replaced with whitewashed rocks in April 1916. In 1968, the university built a concrete version that measures 125 feet tall, 100 feet across and appears 2,100 feet up the mountainside. For years, male freshmen students were responsible for the maintenance of the “M,” but that tradition ended with the concrete version. Nowadays the men’s basketball team sometimes makes a well-publicized trek up Mount Sentinel for some cleansing. The “L” on Mount Jumbo stands for Loyola Sacred Heart High School. It was built in 1961 at the behest of private landowners Joseph and Florence Smith, and Loyola retained access when the property was given to the city. The school maintains responsibility for the letter today.

Q A

: Why are there so many white people here? : It’s not uncommon to hear people lament the lack of racial diversity in Missoula, especially if they’re used to a metropolitan lifestyle. To be fair, there are pockets of ethnic diversity. Missoula has a rich

[16] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

history of Hmong and Russian families. The University of Montana offers small-scale cultural variety among its student and faculty population. There is also a growing community of Native Americans in Missoula in part due to the seven reservations situated within the state. However, while the state of Montana is getting just a little more racially diverse—it’s 89 percent white today, as opposed to 90 percent a decade ago, according to the U.S. Census Bureau—Missoula is heading the opposite direction. During the same time period, the Census reports Missoula has gone from 92 percent white to 93 percent. So, why? The answer can be complicated, but Rosalyn La Pier, a Blackfeet professor of environmental studies at UM, boils it down to one word: racism. Missoula is white because two centuries ago white settlers traveled West and, with the help of the U.S. government, churches and schools, killed off or forcibly displaced Native Americans. Even today, those Native populations feel as if they don’t always belong. “There is a community that exists,” La Pier says, “but it’s this invisible population partly because it’s a small population. And Natives who live in Missoula, even if they’re permanent, they are connected to their home communities so they continue to go back home [to reservations] to have social and family activities. So there’s that whole dynamic that exists in the state that people don’t realize.” La Pier also stresses that racism exists today in Missoula and contributes to keeping the Native population away. “I think the city of Missoula likes to pride itself on being a tolerant, inclusive community within the state of Montana,” La Pier adds. “But I think if you come from a mi-

nority population many of those people would tell you pretty quickly that there is racism here.” George Price, a history professor at UM who is part Native American, part AfricanAmerican, also mentions racism, as well as simple geography. After the emancipation, the majority of the country’s African-American population returned to the Deep South. When homesteaders traveled West, they were predominantly white, and they brought with them a racist worldview. “The last 30 years before slavery ended there was this very aggressive and energetic defense of slavery,” Price says. “It happened in the universities, and in the public media it was standard practice. It carried over into the Jim Crow eras after slavery ended and it wasn’t a fringe view, it was mainstream. So they bring those popular attitudes out West and one of the first things the first states and territories did was, almost as soon as they began forming legislatures, they were discussing exclusion laws [toward] African-Americans.” Despite those challenges, Price says large African-American populations did form in places like Great Falls and Helena in the early 1900s. But during the Great Depression, African-Americans were seen as “taking jobs” from white people and left for places with better employment prospects, like Seattle and Portland. “The longer those diverse workers are allowed or welcomed to stay, the more they establish roots, invite or encourage relatives from their places of origin to come live there,” Price says. “The diversity then becomes ‘normalized’ and generally accepted.” In other words, Missoula hasn’t built up enough racial diversity to attract more racial diversity. And, while a lot of people in Mis-

soula voice an interest in creating more of a local melting pot, there are many who don’t care for it. “There’s a cultural tendency among most U.S. Americans to identify themselves and bond with others based on these culturally manufactured ‘racial’ identities,” Price says. “What bothers me more than the lack of diversity in Missoula and other places in Montana is that some people actually find comfort and some kind of satisfaction in that lack.”

Q A

: Why can’t you float Rock Creek after July 1? : Rock Creek is arguably the most popular fly-fishing spot in the greater Missoula area. Maybe it’s the waterway’s official Blue Ribbon status, or the fact that it’s a mere 20-minute drive east of town on Interstate 90. Regardless, anglers flock to Rock Creek’s slow riffles and deep pools like pilgrims on some holy summertime mission. And yet the stream closes to float-fishing every year at the same time: July 1. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Fisheries Manager Pat Saffel says the reason is simple: Wade fishermen use Rock Creek heavily once the water level drops, creating the potential for recreational conflict. “It becomes much more accessible to wade angling [after July 1],” Saffel says, “and it’s a small enough waterbody or creek that if you’re float-fishing through there or floating, you’re going to disturb wade anglers. There’s just not enough space really.” Obviously some years are different than others, depending on snowpack and runoff. FWP considered extending floatfishing for three weeks after the typical closure date in 2011; high flows had limited spring floating opportunities that


year. In the end, however, significant public comment prompted the agency to abandon the proposal and stick with the existing regulation.

Q A

: Why doesn’t Missoula have more sidewalks? : Missoula Chief Administrative Officer Bruce Bender can’t help but feel defensive when asked why the city doesn’t have more sidewalks. “If you’d come here 30 years ago,” Bender says, “you’d be shocked at what we’ve accomplished.” While newcomers may bemoan Missoula’s lack of sidewalks, Bender says it’s important to take history into account when examining the connectivity gap. When Bender arrived in the 1980s, major corridors such as Brooks Street lacked paved walkways, as did residential areas to the west of Russell Street. Those areas and others were originally under the sole jurisdiction of Missoula County, which didn’t mandate new subdivisions be built with sidewalks. As the city annexed those lands, bringing areas west of Russell and north of Brooks into the municipality, for instance, officials set to work devising ways to install sidewalks. Since then, the city’s drawn from federal funds to pave walkways on Brooks and South streets, and successfully lobbied the Montana Department of Transportation to make North Reserve Street more pedestrian friendly. “We pushed for sidewalks and even boulevard sidewalks,” Bender says. In recent years, the city’s taken an even more aggressive approach. Prior to 2012, property owners complained the costs of installing walkways were prohibitive, with projects easily reaching $10,000 and more. In an effort to ease the financial

strain, the Missoula City Council that year created a new funding mechanism called the “City First Equal Share Model,” which offsets installation expenses for individual landowners. The city estimates it’s growing its sidewalk system by roughly eight miles annually. But even with the aggressive approach, Bender acknowledges that Missoula’s sidewalk system will take “many decades to finish.”

Q A

: What’s with all the potholes?

: Back to Bender, who knows just as much about city roads as he does city sidewalks. The first part of the pothole answer comes down to simple science. Potholes form when water seeps through road surfaces via pores and cracks. As temperatures dip, that water freezes and expands, leaving holes that resemble everything from a pockmark to a crater. Bender says wet winters converging with extreme cold snaps create an opportune environment for ruts to form in the road. “The weaknesses just pop,” he says. While weather plays a powerful role, Bender says funding also factors into Missoula’s challenges. “It really is a budgetary issue,” he says. Road improvements such as asphalt overlays and chip seal applications insulate thoroughfares from the elements, thereby fending off potholes. Bender says Missoula simply doesn’t have enough money to sufficiently insulate city streets. Funding for road repairs is generated largely by the federal gas tax, which, as Bender notes, “has not changed since 1983.” editor@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [17]


[arts]

Underneath it all In Lucy Capehart’s photographs, clothing hints at people from her past by Sarah Aswell

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

W

hen Lucy Capehart opened the boxes containing her parents’ clothing from over 50 years ago, it was too real and too overwhelming for her to process. There, in one pile, was a black and white flower print dress that she recognized as her mother’s. In another pile was a suit coat of her father’s. Some of the clothing she recognized from longago snapshots of her family, some she recognized from childhood memories. Many times, though, she couldn’t be sure if she was remembering a piece of clothing from real events, or if it was a trick her mind played—memories she created from years of looking at photographs. In 1960, when she was 7, Capehart’s parents were killed in a plane crash. She and her siblings were raised by her aunt, who preserved, boxed up and stored her parents’ things carefully. But besieged by grief, the family didn’t talk much about the incident for decades. Recently, though, Capehart’s brother discovered some old home movies. The feelings and memories they triggered led Capehart back to the boxes. “When I first looked at the clothes, I was treating them as sacred objects—they held a lot of intimate power,” she says. “It was a little scary.” Capehart was, of course, no longer that 7-yearold. She had grown up to study anthropology, fall in love with art and gain notoriety in Missoula as a photographer. Her fascination with the study of humans, along with her knowledge that creating art can help us better understand ourselves, convinced her to

photograph the clothing. But the project immediately proved difficult. “A straight photograph would have been too direct,” she says. “I had to figure out how to transform the pieces into meaningful art. It’s tricky to do art about your life and your family. You don’t want to abuse it or take advantage of it. It has to be treated very delicately.” She found her answer in cyanotype print—a photographic printing process that doesn’t involve a camera, only chemically treated paper and sunlight. The process is almost as old as photography itself. Objects are placed on a blue paper, which filters UV rays from the sun over time. The opaque materials of the object filter out more light than sheer ones. The result is a series of ethereal, shadowy blueprints of her family’s clothing—mysterious, poetic and oddly suggestive of the people who once wore them. Her mother’s black and white print dress looks strangely three-dimensional, occupied and personal. Her sister’s baby dress is delicate, indistinct and sheer, but at the same time somehow more tangible than a traditional photograph. “Cyanotype prints are spontaneous and unpredictable,” Capehart says. “And very hands-on. I work in digital, too, but this is so satisfying and tactile. You are working on paper, with no computer. Clothing has such magic about it. It is enough to suggest the body. I wanted to make the prints have movement

[18] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

and life. They are more than paper doll cutouts.” The final prints are currently on display at the new Radius Gallery in downtown Missoula, along with art from Melissa Bangs, Courtney Blazon, Susan Carlson, Rick Gendron, Karen Kemp, Louise Lamontagne, Bobbie McKibbin and Megan Moore. Gallery owners Lisa Simon and Jason Neal have created a simple and cleanly presented space with interior walls that can be easily rolled out of sight to make way for other types of events, such as readings and salons. “We want to showcase art that both embraces and transcends traditional notions of traditional Western art,” Simon says. “Across all of the works that we pick, you can always see the hand of the artist.” Walking through the gallery and stopping at Capehart’s prints against the back wall, it is clear how Simon and Neal saw “the hand of the artist” and chose to showcase the work. But for Capehart, the project was about more than just the end product. What she learned about her life, both past and present, is changing the course of her artwork as a whole. “It was a little scary at first,” she says. “Then it became very cathartic. I forgot about the scariness. It was great to make something out of something that happened to you in your life. It’s a way of having some control or at least attempting to work with memory instead of being bowled over by it.” Capehart, who has traditionally captured other people’s identities through photographing their

homes and possessions, is now turning the camera in a different direction. She may also be realizing why she was so interested in possessions—or “evidence,” as she calls it—as well as identity and memory. “I never did personal work,” she says. “I focused on other people’s lives. Finally, after all of these years, I am getting to my story. It’s transforming something that represents sadness and loss and turning it into something new and alive. Now that I’ve begun, I’m branching out to me and my siblings.” Though the prints are meaningful to her, though those who know the story are affected by the pieces, the viewer doesn’t need to know about the hard history, the 7-year-old girl or the carefully kept boxes. The emotion is hidden among the evidence, just as the bodies are implied by the clothing. “I just want viewers to see the fragility of life—that nothing lasts forever,” she says. “Photography stops time. This dress is evidence of someone who lived a long time ago. I want viewers to have the experience of seeing the evidence of a human form. These are each about an individual, not a piece of clothing.” For the inaugural exhibit that includes Lucy Capehart’s prints, the Radius Gallery hosts an open house Thu., Aug. 21, from 3 to 5 PM and a Grand Opening Fri., Aug. 22, from 5 to 8 PM. 114 E. Main Street. Free. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Sparkle soul Kevin Russell brings it with Shinyribs On Shinyribs’ first album, 2010’s Well After Awhile, Kevin Russell doesn’t branch out much from his roots as a founding member of The Gourds. Songs like “(If You Need The) 442” and “East TX Rust” carry on the whimsical alt-country tradition Russell started slinging two decades ago. Blending electric and acoustic guitars, upbeat rhythms and infectious lyrics, the Texan is a great listen under any moniker. “My husband sleeps hard from

Shinyribs

his years on the run/ My daddy sleeps a lot from his years in the war/ and the cats outside sleep all right,” he sings on “442” with a touch of twang and a range as long as his silver beard. But since that album, Russell hasn’t limited himself solely to satisfying cravings for more Gourds, who went on hiatus last year. On 2013’s Gulf Coast Museum, Shinyribs’ slow and soulful songs resonate best as Russell takes further advantage of the opportunity to be a lead

writer. “Limpia Hotel (Chihuahua Desert)” is as pensive and spacious as a drive across West Texas, and “Sweet Potato” gives the listener a bluesy falsetto to chew on. Shinyribs started as a side project, with Russell playing solo shows once a month for extra cash. He quickly picked up former Gourds drummer Keith Langford, bass player Jeff Brown and Winfield Cheek on the keys and shifted more attention to his new

Photo courtesy of Joe Winston

band. A live video of them playing the catchy “Bolshevik Sugarcane” in Austin shows an animated group of friends doing what they obviously love. With the Gourds gone we need that energy. Shinyribs will bring it to Missoula and, if we’re lucky, keep bringing it for years to come. (Brooks Johnson) Shinyribs plays the Top Hat Thu., Aug. 21, at 8 PM. $15/$12 in advance.

Confluence The art for Confluence’s single “Awaiting” looks sort of like the famous Japanese woodcut “The Great Wave,” scrambled and assembled into a chaotic collage. It’s an apt metaphor for the Denver-based band’s music, which hits the ear in sonic buildup, crest and crash. Like a lot of math rock, a single, short Confluence song—three recent singles all clock in under 4:45—can have several tempos and feels. The effect is to turn the whole band into a rhythm section: Every instrument falls into place and helps keep time. In the opening section of “Awaiting,” the drums seem to trip over the guitar and bass lines, tap out ingenious rhythms as they accelerate toward the ground,

then catch themselves at the last moment, ready to keep playing. It’s the sign of a band that’s incredibly tight. Standout single “The Only Thing Constant” is all over the place: It starts with a funk groove. It mutates seamlessly into herky-jerky prog territory. It lands on a palm-muted guitar figure reminiscent of Pinback. All the while, lead singer Ian Gassman’s voice glides above it, repeating the lyrical motif, “A constant sense…,” calm and clear like a cerulean sky above churning waves. (Kevin Dupzyk) Confluence plays the Palace Fri., Aug. 22, along with FUULS and Catamount. Doors at 9 PM. $7/$5 advance. 18-plus.

Hogan & Moss, Reuben’s Train Branding your music with a name like “scorch folk,” as Jon Hogan and Maria Moss have done, makes a statement. It’s an evocative description, a little mysterious. Will it be somber folk lyrics over warp-speed music? A fire-and-brimstone take on folk? The title song on the duo’s new album, Reuben’s Train, establishes the ethos of the style. The vocal is aggressive, the oldtime instrumentation propelling and the lyrical question presented, “Who’ll rock the cradle when I’m gone?” is a question folk music implicitly asks. Is another revival around the corner, or will the style fade

away? The problem with the album as a whole is that the vocals and lyrics aren’t quite strong enough to support an answer. The more interesting songs have less scorch, and often are written with or by other songwriters. The music on the Hogan-penned “Leaky Tent” is great, especially the blistering fiddle solo, but it fades in contrast with a cover of the well-worn traditional “Coo Coo” that comes two tracks later, with its intriguing prosody and metaphorical heft. It may be that Hogan & Moss’ foremost talent isn’t composition or genre-coining, but interpretation. (Kevin Dupzyk)

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [19]


[music]

Newgrass roots Sam Bush on vinyl, guitar players and going west by Melissa Mylchreest

Mandolin player Sam Bush, 62, is best known as one of the originators of newgrass, the electrified bluegrass style that borrows influences from rock and jazz. He adroitly blurs the lines between bluegrass and other genres, and has been doing so since founding the band New Grass Revival in 1971. The three-time Grammy winner, recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the Americana Music Association and a regular collaborator with the likes of Bela Fleck, Emmylou Harris, Bill Monroe and Lyle Lovett, shows up this week to play in Missoula’s streets for the two-day River City Roots Festival. We caught up with him to talk about his love for the West and what new newgrass bands he is excited about.

Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

Energy-Efficient Features: LED Site Lighting Energy Star Appliances High-Grade Insulation Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

4000 Mullan Road • Missoula • 406 543 0060

mullanreserveapartments.com

[20] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

If you could play with anybody, living or dead, who would it be? SB: Eric Clapton. See, I’m one of those mandolin players. I suffer from the mandolin-players’ disease: We all think we can play guitar. In high school, I was a rock-and-roll guitar player. And I still play it, I just know that it’s not my calling in life. Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, John McLaughlin. Can you tell I love guitar players? But, in the world of acoustic and bluegrass, I’ve been fortunate to play with so many people. One person I never got to play a note with was Lester Flatt. I wish I could have gotten to play a few songs with him. But I want to mention the guys in the band, too … they’re my favorite people I get to play with.

This summer you played your 40th-consecuIt’s been 10 years tive Telluride Bluegrass since you last played in Festival. You’ve won GramMissoula. Are you looking mies and played with the forward to coming back? biggest names in the busiSB: Are you kidding? ness. What’s next? I’m very much looking forSam Bush: I haven’t ward to it. I love playing in made a record in a few Montana. I love coming years. It’s been so long out West. I started coming since I made one that we out there when I was 14, still call them records! when I first went to the fidHowever … people are redle contest in Weiser, ally enjoying spinning Idaho. It’s majestic. And some vinyl again—and I this festival is a free-to-thelike that. I’ve got a big vinyl public thing, right? I love collection. So I’m just gearthose! It’s always a great ing up for that, in the opportunity to play for process of writing songs Sam Bush headlines Missoula’s River City people who haven’t heard with friends. Roots Festival you before. We’re a good Who are the up-and-coming bluegrass bands that band for that—we know what to do. Bring it on! people should be paying attention to? Did traveling out West when you were young inSB: I’m always afraid I’m going to leave out somebody that I really like. I like the Infamous Stringdusters, fluence your growth as a musician? SB: I wish everyone could get to see the West. My Greensky Bluegrass, Steep Canyon Rangers, Uncle Earl and the ones that are still young bands but you might family almost moved from Kentucky to Wyoming when not think of them that way, like Yonder Mountain I was 10. And I would’ve loved living out there, but String Band and Leftover Salmon. I still love those guys. musically speaking, I’m glad I got to stay within 60 And I’m fortunate that sometimes I get to go out on miles of Nashville, because I grew up being able to listhe road and play with them. As my wife says, “You ten to the Grand Old Opry with good reception. Also, I had WLAC, which in the evenings was possibly the gotta get out and play with the young guys!” So I do. greatest R&B station in America. I also feel fortunate What’s one of the strangest shows or venues that music was encouraged around our household. We grew up on a farm, and our parents wanted us to have you’ve ever played? SB: Well, about 1972, the New Grass Revival an easier time and not work as hard as they did. And I played in Anderson, Ind., at the coon-hunters lodge. haven’t—I’ve played music. And I’ve never enjoyed it Nice bunch of people, just not our normal crowd. more than I do now. Every once in a while we’ll still end up playing in places Sam Bush plays the River City Roots Festival that surprise me. I thought we’d played at every beer Sat., Aug. 23, from 8:30 to 10:30 PM. The festival joint in America, but no. And thinking back, the first runs through Sun., Aug. 24. Visit rivercityrootsfestime we played in Telluride in 1975, the streets weren’t tival.com for the full schedule of music and activieven paved yet, and it really was a step back in time. ties. Free. That town is now a place you can safely raise your kids. Back then it was just outlaws and trust-funders. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

So qrky Frank’s mask almost overstays its welcome by Molly Laich

Plastic surgery gone awry.

If nothing else, Frank is an eccentric, befuddling document. That’s more than I can say for most films these days, even if I can’t entirely recommend this one. Lenny Abrahamson directs the screenplay written by Jon Ronson and Peter Straughan. At the film’s center we have Jon Burroughs (Domhnall Gleeson), a shy Irish musician who writes boring tweets that flash across the screen: “Time to eat, #nomnomnom.” He’s one of those blank canvas characters that the movie will project colorful events onto, and so it does when Jon happens upon the suicide attempt of a wayward keyboardist in the ocean. The band will need a replacement, and before long, Jon finds himself a full-fledged member of the experimental pop rock band Soronprfbs, who immediately steal away to a cottage in the Irish countryside to record an album together. The weirdest thing about the band, I guess, is its frontman Frank, who wears a gigantic papier-mâché head every moment of his life. Jon finds the mask perplexing and who can blame him? He asks one of the other band members the questions the audience is undoubtedly thinking, like: How does he eat? Does he sleep in the mask? Why would anyone do that? And so on. “Just go with it,” the band member says. “Submit to our ridiculous conceit,” the film rather non-subtly seems to wink at the camera and say. Maggie Gyllenhaal plays Clara, the band’s theremin player and possibly Frank’s love interest. Clara spends the movie hating success while inexplicably terrorizing the new keyboardist, even though he seems like a good musician and he’s putting up the money for their interminable recording session. Somewhere in the murk of quirky happenings, the band manages to calm down and perform an actual song together, and it’s an astounding, inspiring bit of music. Frank gives a vocal performance through his big-head mask reminiscent of Jim Morrison, backed by disjointed, half-melodies. The song plainly establishes the band as both likable and uncompromising, so much so it makes the side plot of Frank and Jon’s attempt to write poppy little melodies seem sort of dumb and irrelevant. Throughout the 11 months of continuously perfecting the band’s sound, a central conflict arises over just how accessible Soronprfbs music should be. After many years of integrity-fueled obscurity, Frank seems ready to break out a mainstream hit with a kind of

manic enthusiasm reminiscent of Brian Wilson, Daniel Johnston and other tortured musicians of our time. Meanwhile, Jon has been recording the band’s antics for YouTube, which infuriates the members who wanted to keep writing music nobody would ever want to listen to in a cabin in Ireland forever. Nevertheless, the online exposure leads to a gig playing on one of the small stages at the Austin music festival South by Southwest. Pressures from the gig lead to that inevitable point in the movie when the band breaks off into different factions, find that they can’t make it on their own and then come back together again, probably stronger than before. (That’s only a spoiler if this is the first movie you’ve ever watched about a band.) About this eccentric frontman: He’s played by a famous and revered actor of our time, and I’ve purposefully chosen not to name him. If you’ve read anything about the movie or walked by the poster or seen any promotional material, then you know who plays Frank. But I wish I hadn’t and feel no good can come from knowing, since so much of the movie invites you to wonder what he looks like under there. Frank is played by an empirically handsome man with a Hollywoodgroomed body, so to keep the illusion going, you have to imagine a tortured genius who also lifts weights and gets up early to run by the river. The mask is supposed to symbolize mental illness, or maybe it’s simply an exploration of what happens when jokes are taken too far. For me, it’s just too dumb a metaphor to get over. It’s a Jack in the Box commercial that goes about 94 minutes too long. Critics have been hailing the lead’s acting performance as a great achievement, but that’s insane, right? All of his lines come out muffled behind the mask and we can’t see his face! Frank is a near miss for me. I appreciate its dogged commitment to strangeness, and there are some genuinely funny moments, like how Clara’s new band is called Oeccscclhjhn. If you think that joke is funny, there just might be something in this weird little movie for you after all. Frank screens at the Roxy Fri., Aug. 22–Sun., Aug. 24, and Fri., Aug. 29–Sun., Aug. 31, at 7:15 and 9:15 PM nightly.

arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [21]


[film]

Old tricks The Dog reveals the true story of Pacino’s character by Migizi Pensoneau

That’s, like, maybe $3.50.

In the 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon, Al Pacino plays a gay man who robs a bank to fund his lover’s sex change operation. The robbery goes wrong, and during the ensuing stand-off with the cops, Pacino’s character becomes the ringleader of a media circus. The acting is superb, and the film is widely considered a classic. It humanized one aspect of alternative sexualities by showcasing Pacino’s relationship struggles with his lover, played wonderfully by Chris Sarandon. So at first glance, The Dog, a documentary directed by Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren, about the bank robber who inspired Dog Day Afternoon, seems like an unnecessary movie. The fictionalized version said enough about Wojtowicz’s life—why make a documentary about the short-lived glory of “that guy that that movie was based on”? And for the first half of The Dog, that question goes unanswered. Where Pacino’s character is a guy just trying to do a good thing by bad means, the real man, John Wojtowicz, is unabashedly sleazy, smug, unapologetic and overly proud of the attention garnered by his story. He loves talking about himself, and even when talking about the terrible things he’s done, he’s always convinced that he’s in the right. The doc traces Wojtowicz’s life through the early ’80s, punctuated with current interviews and reflections, focusing primarily on the rise of Wojtowicz’s fame. It’s supplemented by fascinating archival video and pictures from early days, always focusing on Wojtowicz, even if he’s not in the center of the actual picture. The film is gleefully narrated by Wojtowicz himself, and occasionally by his mother, Theresa, who often counterpoints and flat-out negates her son’s views. He is vulgar and crass, and completely unlike the character you love in Dog Day Afternoon. Theresa is a good-humored, elderly lady, at home in the stereotype of being a fussy New York Italian mother, complete with spaghetti for all of Wojtowicz’s homeless friends. It’s amusing, though very little insight is given regarding Wojtowicz’s life that isn’t implied by Pacino’s character work in Dog Day Afternoon. So mostly, watching The Dog is like

[22] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

watching a decent behind-the-scenes video on a DVD— interesting but not enlightening. Not at first. Fortunately, after the first half hour, layers are finally revealed, and Wojtowicz’s bragging, self-satisfied veneer starts to thin. We meet Tony, Wojtowicz’s epileptic brother, who brings incredible and unexpected emotional weight to the story. Suddenly, the entire mood shifts, and instead of a doc about a guy in love with his own legend, the film is about a rounded character, desperately trying to live off that legend and keep it going. The film flies through the bank robbery and through Wojtowicz’s incarceration and eventual parole, bullet-pointing his relationships with his several spouses, including Liz Eden, the lover from Dog Day Afternoon, and George Heath, who Wojtowicz married in prison. But the interviews with his myriad of lovers and acquaintances give the doc a subtle turn, showing Wojtowicz in a sympathetic light, as they talk with resigned sadness about someone they couldn’t help or change. The 1970s footage of Wojtowicz trying to get as much exposure and money as he could from being “The Dog” of Dog Day Afternoon, makes for a hard-towatch look at someone who became a reality star before there were reality stars. It’s absolutely a film worth watching. The doc deftly depicts the chasm between Wojtowicz’s perception of himself as a hero and what everyone else knows—that he was a novelty. Wojtowicz was a user and an opportunist, and everyone knew it, including him, to some degree. He smiles while talking about selling his story, and laughs while talking about how, in the end, he “won,” because, yes, Liz got the sex change. His story is somewhat heraldic to our times, and well told. After all, how many reality stars and faux-famous people have we seen publicly crash and burn? Wojtowicz was just one of many, and one of the first. The Dog screens at the Roxy Fri., Aug. 22, through Sun., Aug. 24, at 9:15 PM nightly. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK DOG DAY AFTERNOON A man’s plan to rob a bank to pay for his lover’s gender reassignment goes awry. Starring Al Pacino, John Cazale and Penelope Allen. Rated R. Screening at the Roxy Aug. 22-24 at 7 PM as part of a double feature with The Dog. THE DOG The polarizing figure of John Wojtowicz, who inspired the Oscar-winning film Dog Day Afternoon, is portrayed in this documentary. Not rated. Screening at the Roxy Aug. 22-24 at 9:15 PM as part of a double-feature. (See Film.)

sued by whimsical adults. Starring Jared Gilman, Kara Hayward and Bruce Willis. Rated PG-13. Screening Thu., Aug. 21 at 8 PM as part of the Roxy’s Wes Anderson series.

for the testosterone-fest with explosions and bad guys. Plus Kelsey Grammer. Starring Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham and Jet Li. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL Fall must be coming, ‘cuz here’s a feel-good sports movie based on the real life of a football coach who led the De La Salle Spartans to a 151-game winning streak. Starring Jim Caviezel, Alexander Ludwig and Michael Chiklis. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Entertainer.

THE GIVER Lois Lowry’s intriguing classic novel gets the bigpicture treatment, because eventually, Hollywood will ruin every book you ever loved. Starring Brenton Thwaites, Jeff Bridges and Meryl Streep. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

FRANK An indie band is led by a enigmatic man who never removes his giant fake head. Starring [spoiler alert, sorry Molly Laich] Michael Fa s s b e n d e r, D o m h n a l l Gleeson and Maggie Gyllenhaal. Rated R. Screening at the Roxy Aug. 22-24 and Aug. 29-31 at 7:15 and 9:15 PM. (See Film.)

INTO THE STORM A town is plagued by a bizarre onslaught of cyclones in a single day. Reviews indicate that the plot kind of... blows. Starring Richard Armitage, Sarah Wayne Callies and Matt Walsh. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. LET’S BE COPS Count how many felonies these dudes commit as they pose as police officers and fumble with weapons. Starring Jake Johnson, Damon Wayans Jr., and Rob Riggle. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT Colin Firth plays an Englishman wrapped up in screwball romantic shenanigans, in Woody Allen’s latest picture that critics so far have described as “watchable.” Also starring Antonia Clarke and Emma Stone. Rated PG-13. Wilma. SLUGTERRA: RETURN OF THE ELEMENTALS Slugslingers gotta use that Slug Fu to unite against an evil alliance in this family friendly anime. Not rated. Screening at Carmike 12 on Saturday and Sunday at noon.

FRANK MILLER’S SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR The action gets more hardboiled than a deviled egg in a collection of tales based on Miller’s comic books. Starring Mickey Rourke, Jessica Alba and Josh Brolin. Not rated. Carmike 12. IF I STAY After a car accident puts a young girl into a coma, she has an out-of-body experience where she has to make the biggest decision of her life. (Dude, the same thing totally happened to me after I ate too many Red Vines one time.) Starring Chloë Grace Moretz, Mireille Enos and Jamie Blackley. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

with an upstart ethnic family eatery. Starring Helen Mirren, Om Puri and Manish Dayal. Rated PG. Carmike 12.

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES Because nothing is sacred, now the turtles are getting the CGI-and-explosions Michael Bay treatment. Starring Megan Fox, Will Arnett and William Fichtner. Rated PG13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat. Lost in the Slant Streets again, dammit. Sin City: A Dame to Kill For opens Friday at Carmike 12.

LOW AND CLEAR Two estranged friends reunite for one last fly-fishing trip. Screening at the Top Hat Mon., Aug. 25 at 8 PM as part of the Big Sky Film Series. MOONRISE KINGDOM Two 12-year-olds fall in love, run away and are pur-

NOW PLAYING BOYHOOD Watch a kid literally grow up in Richard Linklater’s 12-years-in-the-making epic. Starring Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke. Rated R. Wilma.

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Basically, imagine Andy from “Parks and Rec” as a space pilot goofball leading a team of misfits. Totally excellent. Starring Chris Pratt, Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

THE EXPENDABLES 3 Every mega-ultra-dudebro you can think of is here

THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY The owner of a prissy French restaurant clashes

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [23]


[dish]

Mind your manners by Ari LeVaux Amy Alkon, aka The Advice Goddess, writes a nationally syndicated advice column that appears, among other places, in the Independent. She’s also the author of a new book, Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck, which includes a chapter titled “Eating, Drinking, Socializing.” I spoke with Alkon by phone about some of the content in that chapter, including the dynamics between restaurant server and customer. Let’s talk about tipping. Amy Alkon: People believe that they tip solely based on the quality of the server or the service. And the truth is that some people do, but a whole lot just believe they do. We like to believe that we’re rational and do things for good reasons. But because our brains like to conserve energy where they can, we have a lot of cognitive biases that lead us to act automatically, in ways that aren’t wholly rational. For example: If you’re male, you’re likely to tip bigger if your waitress is blond, if she’s wearing red lipstick, a red dress, or has a flower in her hair, according to research by French behavioral scientist Nicolas Gueguen. Other customers will leave bigger tips if the server does things to create the feeling of a familiar relationship between server and customer, like if the server squats down at the table, coming to the customer’s eye level and making conversation seem more intimate. This, in research by Cornell University’s Michael Lynn and colleagues, increased the tip amount by 20 percent for a waiter and 25 percent for a waitress. Giving chocolates or mints with the check also increases the tip. So all of these people who think ‘I’m fair, I’m rational, I just tip according to the service,’ the truth is probably eh, not so much. What if the service is truly terrible? AA: If you don’t tip at all, it makes you look bad if you’re with dining companions, and the server can pretend that it’s on you, that you were the terrible one. So if the service is egregiously bad, use an idea I borrowed from my pal Steve Dublanica, author of Keep The Change, and give your tip to the busboy instead. This means you haven’t cheaped out, but you haven’t also gone all Stockholm Syndrome and rewarded someone for treating you terribly ... Approaching the situation with compassion is counterintuitive but very helpful. Look for clues as to why you’re getting bad service. Is this person having a bad day? Are they covering three sections? Or are they just a person who thinks, ‘Ha ha, you’re going to wait for your lunch’? Even if you end up giving someone more of a benefit of the doubt than they deserve, you’ll feel better if you call up compassion and say, ‘Okay, maybe this person isn’t trying to screw me over. Maybe there’s something wrong.’ And by the way, don’t blame the waiter if the kitchen doesn’t make food you like. Don’t find ways to be cheap.

[24] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

FLASH IN THE PAN

What do you do if a friend serves you something that’s absolutely disgusting and you don’t want to eat it, or it conflicts with your dietary regimen? AA: This is America, we’re all getting regular meals. So if you have one meal that’s kind of a bummer, you’ll survive. It’s better not to make the host feel bad, make some kind of scene at the table. Just push the food around on your plate, and hit the Burger King drive-thru on the way home. So no direct, honest communication about how you really feel? AA: No. No, no, no. People have this mistaken idea that honesty is the best policy. And it is, except when lying your ass off is a better policy. For example, it does not help the host in that moment to learn that you think they are a terrible cook. It’s also not your job to tell them. As somebody who gives advice for a living, I have to say, it is really rude to give unsolicited advice. Besides, criticizing people does not make them want to change. It makes them hate you, or want to clobber you, or both. What if you’re on a date and he or she cooks you something inedible? AA: Just make something up that preserves their feelings: ‘Forgive me, I’m not that hungry’ or ‘I had a late lunch.’ The point is making them feel good in the moment, and then, if you continue seeing them, covertly trying to find a way to improve their cooking, like taking cooking classes together. What about if your date is doing something weird at the table? AA: I had a question from a reader, a woman whose date was licking his fingers repeatedly—all of his fingers—at a sushi restaurant. It’s really incredible that people can reach adulthood and not understand that you don’t lick your fingers at the dinner table. I base the advice I give in my book about what behaviors are and aren’t acceptable at the dinner table on research on disgust by evolutionary psychologists Joshua Tybur and Debra Lieberman. Disgust seems to have evolved to help us avoid disease-causing microorganisms. It’s basically a psychological keep-out sign that pops up when we encounter a substance that can infect us like poo, bodily fluids, spoiled food, decomposing bodies. If you think about how pathogens are spread from person to person, one big way is that something is airborne. So, my rule goes like so: If something you’re doing at the table could cause some speck of something to be airborne, it’s bathroom behavior. Nose blowing, finger licking, ear digging, eyebrow plucking, removing your fake eye, all are no-gos. Get thee to the restroom.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Bernice's Bakery has been a Missoula Landmark business since 1978. If you haven't been in, you should! If you come in every day you should know what we're talkin' about: freshly made and baked croissants daily, iced coffee to die for, a cup o'joe like no other, crazy cheap lunches, and treats, upon treats, upon treats. If you haven't had a Vegan Pumpkin Muffin lately then you don't know what you're missing. Sit inside one of Missoula's homiest of atmospheres or scoot out back to enjoy a view of downtown Missoula at one of the picnic tables. Need a special dessert? Plan ahead! We've got plenty in stock, but if you want a special flavor of cake we need 48 hours. Call ahead and place your order. Heck, skip that. There is a lot of hard rollin' action around this joint. Just come on in and see what we're talking about. xoxo bernice $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns: Thursday 8/21 Big Brains Trivia 8-10 pm. Friday 8/22 Live Music with Blue Moon 6-9 pm. Monday 8/25 Martini Mania $4 Martinis. Tuesday 8/26 Burger + Beer $8. Wednesday 8/27 $2 Wells & $2 PBR Tall Boys. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Burns Street Bistro 1500 Burns St. • 543-0719 burnsstbistro.com We cook the freshest local ingredients as a matter of pride. Our relationship with local farmers, ranchers and other businesses allows us to bring quality, scratch cooking and fresh-brewed Black Coffee Roasting Co. coffee and espresso to Missoula’s historic westside neighborhood. Handmade breads & pastries, soups, salads & sandwiches change with the seasons, but our commitment to delicious, affordable food and over-the-top fun and friendly service does not. Mon-Fri 7 AM – 2 PM. Sat and Sun Brunch 9 AM – 2 PM. Reservations for Prix Fixe dinners on Fri and Sat nights. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 42 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh cof-

$…Under $5

fees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$

COOL

AUGUST

COFFEE

COFFEE SPECIAL

ICE CREAMS

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 11am-5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/lb.

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

Bring in this coupon for

$5 off any purchase of $10 or more. Expires 9/20/14

2101 Brooks • 926-2578 • www.cafezydeco.com Mon 9am - 3pm • Tues-Sat 11am - 8 pm • Closed Sundays missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [25]


[dish]

Raising the Dead at the Top Hat HAPPIEST HOUR What you’re doing: What you’re listening Raising the Dead isn’t a to: On Monday nights from passive event. Hirshberg 5 to 7, talented Missoula often approaches tables bard Larry Hirshberg treats and offers listeners a the Top Hat Lounge’s Happy chance to guess Grateful Hour patrons to live recordDead songs—you listen ings of Grateful Dead shows. through the headphones As the curator of Raising the to a short snippet—for a Dead, Hirshberg edits the recordings and projects aniphoto photo by by Cathrine Cathrine L. L. Walters Walters free drink token. mation and other visual cuWhy you go even if you don’t like The riosities onto a screen to accompany the music. On a recent Monday, Hirshberg played the set Dead: Besides hanging out with the dry-witted Hirshberg, the main reason is the Deadfrom the band’s 1974 Missoula show. head punch card. Each night you attend What you’re drinking: During Happy Raising the Dead Happy Hour and order a Hour, Blackfoot Single Malt IPA runs $3.75, Happy Hour item, you get your card punched. draft beers are $2.75, Santa Rita red and white After six visits/hole punches, a cardholder is wines are $3.50 and well drinks go for $2.50. entitled to one free ticket to any Top Hat concert. That’s a big deal considering the venue’s What you’re munching on: The Happy propensity for bringing in big-name acts and Hour menu changes with the seasons, but it underground favorites that appeal to Deadcurrently features $4 items like lamb em- heads and anti-Deadheads alike. panadas, zucchini and carrot fritters, Caesar Where to go: The Top Hat, 134 W. Front. salad and stone-fired flatbreads including —Erika Fredrickson smoked salmon, antipasto and bacon-date. Who you’re hanging out with: Young and old Deadheads, hippies and suits, plus unsuspecting patrons who came for the Happy Hour specials and stayed for the tunes.

Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Lucky Strike Sports Bar. Casino. Restaurant 1515 Dearborn Ave. 406-549-4152 Our restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Are you looking for Delivery without all the extra charges? Call 549-4152 and talk to Jacquie or Judy for more details. You can also get lunch and Coffee from Bold Coffee in the parking lot. Come into the casino for your chance to play Plinko, Spin the Wheel, or Roll the Dice for machine play. Open Mon-Sun 7am-2am. $-$$ Market on Front 201 E. Front St. marketonfront.com The Market on Front is more than a market with a restaurant. It is an energetic marketplace which offers an epicurean experience to excite the senses. It is also an energetic, vibrant marketplace creating an opportunity to taste and take home the products of artisans who create excellent products at awesome prices. This community centered specialty food destination features gourmet yet traditional prepared foods, sandwiches, salads, specialty cheeses, charcuterie, local brews, wines, espresso and so much more! $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$

Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an allencompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 South Orange St. 406-543-3188 www.orangestreetfoodfarm.com Experience The Farm today!!! Voted number one Supermarket & Retail Beer Selection. Fried chicken, fresh meat, great produce, vegan, gluten free, all natural, a HUGE beer and wine selection, and ROCKIN' music. What deal will you find today? $-$$$

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Parkers’ Restaurant 32 East Front Street Exit 153, Drummond 406-288-2333 Find us on Facebook, Yelp or Foursquare. Offering over 125 different Burgers. Parker’s burgers are ground fresh daily. We patty them 1/4 pound at a time. We also have 1/2 pound and pound burgers! Most burgers are available all the time too, except for seasonal items. We’re open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am to 8 pm. We’ve also got Steaks, Pastas, Salads, Daily Specials and NOT the usual variety of home made desserts. Private parties and catering available. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


August 21–August 28, 2014

You can wear any color, so long as it’s black. Supersuckers play Stage 112 Wed., Aug. 27, along with Bird's Mile Home and Total Combined Weight. 9 PM. $15-$18, tickets available at stage112.com.

THURSDAYAUG21

The spiffy new Radius Gallery celebrates

Nato Coles and the Blue Diamond Band never saw a Springsteen reference they didn’t like and these Minneapolis dudes are worth partying with anyhow. Playing the Palace along with Callow, starting at 9 PM. No cover.

Courtney Bazon and Lucy Capehart at 114

featured artists including Melissa Bangs, East Main St. Open house on Aug. 21 from 3-5 PM, grand opening on Aug. 22 from 5-8 PM. (See Arts.)

nightlife The Rebelution will not be televised, so best head to the Big Sky Amphitheater for the Count Me In Summer Tour, along with Iration, The Green and Stick Figure. Doors at 5 PM, show at 6:30. $30/$27.50. Tickets at Big

Sky’s taproom, Rockin Rudy’s or knitting factory.com. Thursday is the new Friday, so let’s get the weekend started with Downtown ToNight, wherein an array of local music, food and beverage is available for your afternoon enjoyment at Caras Park. 5:30-8:30 PM.

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [27]


[calendar]

Their hair is full of secrets. Amanda X rocks out at the ZACC Mon., Aug. 25, along with Holt Bodish and Ex-Cocaine. 7 PM. $5. All ages.

The sweeties at Garden City Harvest present the Farm Party, out at the PEAS Farm, with freshpicked produce, burgers, beer and wine and live music from Mudslide Charley and Lil’ Smokies. 5:30-9:30 PM. $20/$10 kids, or $15/$5 for kids if purchased in advance. Visit eventbrite.com or the Garden City Harvest Facebook page. J. Bradley and Jimmy Rogers team up to deliver the goods at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover. Post up and have a brew while post-pop singer-songwriter Luke Dowler plays tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Bust out a little geetar at the Open Mic with Cheree at the Eagles Lodge Missoula, 2420 South Ave. W. Runs 7:30-10:30 PM. Have a real gourd time when Shinyribs plays the Top Hat, along with John Adam Smith. Doors at 9 PM, show at 9:30. $15/$12 in advance at tophatlounge.com. (See Music.) Scoot that ba-donka-donk on down to the Sunrise Saloon, where the Dark Horse Country Band plays tunes into the night. 9 PM. No cover. Bottoms up at the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot beats, cheap drinkies and people of assorted genders shaking their tailfeathers. Monk’s Bar. 9 PM. $2 for dudes, no cover for women. (Hey, gotta make up for that wage gap somehow.)

[28] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Do them dirty deeds dirt cheap when the Badlander hosts the TNT dance party, featuring hot Top 40 trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $2 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. No cover.

FRIDAYAUG22 The spiffy new Radius Gallery celebrates featured artists including Melissa Bangs, Courtney Bazon and Lucy Capehart at 114 East Main St. Grand opening from 5-8 PM. (See Arts.) You’ll be in stitches at Yarns at the Library, the fiber-arts craft group that meets at the Missoula Public Library from noon-2 PM Fridays.

nightlife Hot town, summer in the city, find a girl and dance all night at the River City Roots Festival in downtown Missoula, Aug. 22-24. Sam Bush Band headlines Saturday night. Free. Check out missouladowntown.com. (See Music.) It’ll be a cheesy evening at Zootown Improv sketch comedy and improv evening at the Stensrud Playhouse, 314 N. First St. W. Doors at 6:30 PM for improv at 7, followed by main show from 7:30-9, and another dose of raw improv from 9:30-10:30. Beer, wine and Tarantino’s pizza available. $12/$22 for two if purchased online. Tickets at stensrudplayhouse.com.

Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 68 PM, with a rotating group of live, local musicians. No cover. Montana Shakespeare in the Parks presents As You Like It at the Double Arrow Lodge in Seeley Lake. 6 PM. Free, and concessions available. The Inter-Tribal Playwright Center of Arlee hosts a reading of Frog’s Dance, a play by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr., at the Hangin Art Gallery in Arlee. Pre-show discussion with the author and cast at 6 PM, play at 7 PM. Donations accepted at the door. Visit hanginartgallery.com. Pete Fromm reads from his latest novel of modern Western life, If Not For This, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Amp-free is the way to be at the Open House hosted by the Montana A Capella Society, where all singers are welcome to come find out how to be a member. Winter season practices are Tuesday nights starting in late August. 280 Cartwright Way, Hamilton. 7 to 9 PM. The Cold Hard Cash Show walks the line at Caras Park, starting at 7 PM. No cover. Proceeds benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Missoula County. Kira Means means business when she plays tunes at the outdoor terrace at The Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive. 7-10 PM. No cover.


[calendar] Cut a rug when the Golden Age Club hosts dancing and live music in an alcohol-free environment. 727 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. 6-10 PM. $3. Call 240-9617 to learn more. Make as many wishes as you like when stargazing at the Blue Mountain Observatory’s public night, where families and kids are welcome to chat with astronomers and learn how to look through telescopes. Starts about an hour after sunset, so bring a warm jacket and a flashlight for the walk from the parking lot. Public nights are July 25, Aug. 22 and Sept. 19. Due to congestion, advance registration is required at eventbrite.com/e/blue-mountainobservatory-open-house-tickets12579809549. Prepare for the “best yodeling this side of the Alps” when Wylie and the Wild West play cowboyin’ tunes at the Rex Theatre in beautiful Thompson Falls. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25/$20 in advance by calling 827-4810. Perk up your ears at the Fox Den’s Foxxy Friday, featuring local DJs and $4 Stoli-Red Bulls at the Badlander. 9 PM. No cover. Mathy angst and melody collide when Denver’s Confluence plays the Palace, along with FUULS and Catamount. 9 PM. $7/$5 in advance at icketfly.com/purchase/ event/633345. 18-plus. Montana Standard Time plays boot-scootin tunes at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., around 8:30 PM. No cover. Take a cutie-pie by the hand when Joan Zen Band plays the Union Club. Tunes start around 9:30 PM. No cover. I’ll start walking your way if you start walking mine when the Zac Hacker Band plays country-fried tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, starting at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Locksaw Cartel busts a groove or two at the Top Hat, along with Baby and Bukowski. 10 PM. $5.

Prime people-watching is available for the Missoula People’s Market, which features all kindsa arts and crafts and tasty treats on the street at E. Pine and Higgins. Saturday mornings through September.

mad for plaid

Learn the non-invasive healing art of reiki at Reiki I with Cynthia Aten, where students can then go forth and practice on others. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. 9 AM-4:30 PM. $95. Registration required in advance at redwillowlearning.org.

Scotland and Ireland have given us many excellent things, including kilts, Craig Ferguson, scotch and and Lord of the Dance. (Since you’re not supposed to say anything at all if you can’t say anything nice, I’m gonna avoid the topic of bagpipes entirely.) The Bitterroot Scottish-Irish Festival celebrates all of those things and more, with a weekend of Celtic revelry out at the historic Daly mansion in Hamilton, hosted by the Montana Gaelic Cultural Society. Things begin on Saturday with clan gatherings, music from the Montana Reel and Strathspey Society, Missoula Irish Dancers, tours of Daly mansion, pipe and drum competitions and much more, lasting through Sunday afternoon. The Highland Games include all the good stuff like the caber toss and stone put, and I heartily endorse perusing through the festival’s website if you enjoy photos of beefy, kilt-wearing men and ladies engaged in athletic pursuits.

Let the creativity (and the drinks) flow at Art on Tap, a social painting class led by an instructor, with materials provided. Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. $32. 12:30-3 PM. Visit artontapmissoula.com for tickets and more info.

WHAT: Bitterroot Scottish-Irish Festival WHERE: Daly Mansion in Hamilton WHEN: $5-$15

The Bisceglia Family featuring the Whispering Roses photo courtesy of Jack Barry

HOW MUCH: $20/$10 kids, or $15/$5 for kids if purchased in advance

arrange a ride or, if you’re a Bitterrooter, take advantage of the free shuttle that departs from Hamilton High School periodically.

MORE INFO: bitterrootscottishirishfestival.org

Oh, and there’s scotch and mead tasting throughout the weekend, where you can really get into the Celtic spirit of things—but just maybe

SATURDAYAUG23 The Inter-Tribal Playwright Center of Arlee hosts a reading of Frog’s Dance, a play by William S. Yellow Robe, Jr., at the Hangin Art Gallery in Arlee. Pre-show discussion with the author and cast at 6 PM, play at 7 PM. Donations accepted at the door. Visit hanginartgallery.com.

And, yes, as is fitting any Celtic festival, there will be bagpipes. But for some of us, the scotch totally makes up for it. –Kate Whittle

Get hot coffee, baked treats, fresh produce and bump into all the friendly acquaintances you can handle at the Missoula Farmers Market, now running for 42 years. 8 AM-1 PM.

Marcus Daly Mansion in Hamilton, Aug. 23-24. $15 for adult weekend pass/$8-$10 for single-day entry, with discounts for kids and military. Check out bitterrootscottishirishfestival.org. (See Spotlight.)

Everybody’s mad for plaid at the Bitterroot Scottish-Irish Festival, which features Highland games, clan gathering, music, something called a ceilidh and, importantly, mead and scotch tastings. (Scotch tasting is $30, FYI.) It all goes down out at the

Early rising produce-seekers, occasional walk-of-shamers and waffle sandwich lovers rejoice, the Clark Fork Market is back in action under the Higgins Bridge. Saturdays through October from 8 AM-1 PM.

Montana’ Montana’s s Exclusive Airstr Airstream eam Dealer

The third annual Ruby’s Bluegrass, Barbecue and Family Fun fundraiser brings tasty dinner, tunes and a live dessert auction to Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. 4 PM. $12/$10 in advance for adults, $10/$8 in advance for kids. Proceeds benefit Dress For Success Missoula. Tickets at dressforsuccess.org/missoula. (See Agenda.)

nightlife Hot town, summer in the city, find a girl and dance all night at the River City Roots Festival in downtown Missoula, Aug. 22-24. Sam Bush Band headlines Saturday night. Free. Check out missouladowntown.com. (See Music.) The beer’ll cost you, but good vibes are free when Sista Otis plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover. Mudslide Charley delivers the groove to Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 6-8:30 PM. No cover. Folks will be drawn like moths to a lightbulb to Phototaxis, a slideshow of curated photography projected on the side of a barn at FarmRd in Polson. 7-11 PM. Free/$10 to submit your own work. Visit phototaxismt.org.

406-541-4800 www.BretzRV.com www w.Br . re etzR RV..com .c

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [29]


[calendar]

nightlife Local Deadheads have got you covered when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a curated broadcast of two hours of Jerry Garcia and co. from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Philly post-punk trio Amanda X rocks out at the ZACC, along with Holt Bodish and Ex-Cocaine, AKA Bryan Ramirez and Mike Casler’s dealio that, according to the SF Weekly, is like “they smoked a phatty while taking a blowtorch to Neil Young’s proto-grunge epic ‘Cortez the Killer.’” 7 PM. $5. All ages. Let your imagination take flight when WildEarth Guardians present a narrated slideshow of photography by Noppadol Paothong, which captures the mating rituals of greater sage grouse, Gunnison sage grouse and lesser prairie chicken. Roxy, 7-9 PM. Free. Enjoy a rarefied evening when Blue Moon plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. inside the Florence Building, from 7-10 PM. No cover. Take a bow. WildEarth Guardians present a narrated slideshow of grouse photography by Noppadol Paothong at the Roxy Mon., Aug. 25, from 7-9 PM. Free.

Get hot to trot with the Missoula Tango’s dance, on the fourth Saturday of every month at Red Bird. 7:30 to 10 PM. No cover, with impromptu lessons for beginners. Learn more at tangomissoula.com. Missoula Outdoor Cinema showcases Persepolis, the poignant animated tale of an Iranian girl based on a graphic novel, at Head Start, 1001 Worden Ave. It’s rated PG-13, as a heads up. Screening begins at dusk, around 8:32 PM. $5. Check out missoulaoutdoorcinema.org. You can be positively sure that Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo will juice up the joint at

the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. Now free. Black Sabbath comes sprinkled on top when the Wild Chickens reunite to play their partying bar band rock at the Dark Horse, corner of Strand and Regent. 9 PM. No cover. I’ll start walking your way if you start walking mine when the Zac Hacker Band plays country-fried tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, starting at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Zeppo MT busts out the melodies while you bust a move at the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Everybody’s fave homegrown

wieners The Lil’ Smokies play the Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. The River City Roots unofficial afterparty heads to Monk’s, where Ear Phunk gets all the wax out at 10 PM. No cover.

SUNDAYAUG24 Admire the fine china at the Clay Studio’s Summertime High Tea, with treats by Margaret Ambrose-Barton, tea from Lake Missoula Tea Company, coffee, wine and live music from Ellie Nuño. Hosted by Katie Heath at 2405 Dodd Ranch Road. $50. Registration required in advance at 543-0509 or info@theclaystudioofmissoula.org. The Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival gets all strung-out in Bigfork from Aug. 24-30, with featured performers like Shelby Lynne and outdoor stages. Visit cocguitar foundation.tix.com or call 855-8555900. The Target Range Farmers Market gets into the swing of the season with several local produce vendors, out at 4095 South Ave. W. 10 AM-2 PM, Sundays through Sept. 28.

nightlife Hot town, summer in the city, find a girl and dance all night at the

[30] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

River City Roots Festival in downtown Missoula, Aug. 22-24. Sam Bush Band headlines Saturday night. Free. Check out missouladowntown.com. (See Music.) Stop, drop, rock ‘n roll when Bob ‘n Weave play tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover. Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free.

MONDAYAUG25 Me and my ex, we were just like Romeo and Juliet, until it all turned to tragedy. Shakespeare in the Parks presents this timeless tale of horny teenagers on the UM Oval at 6 PM. Free. Visit shakespeareintheparks.org. Hope you’re brushed up on readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic, ‘cuz fall semester classes start today at UM.

Open mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes and shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. To tantalize those neurons, here’s a question: Which country invented whisky? Find answer in tomorrow’s nightlife. Live in SIN at the Service Industry Night at Plonk, with DJ Amory spinning tunes and a special menu. 322 N. Higgins Ave. 10 PM-1:30 AM. Just ask a server for the SIN menu. No cover.

TUESDAYAUG26 Montana Shakespeare in the Parks presents As You Like It, about an exiled woman disguising herself as a man and finding safety in a forest, in a production set in 1917 Montana. UM Oval. 6 PM. Free. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free.


[calendar] Learn to peruse the amber waves of grain and purple mountain majesty when Montana State geography professor William Wyckoff reads from his new work, How to Read the American West: A Field Guide. Shakespeare and Co, 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM.

Put a lid on it at the St. Patrick Helmet Sale, which features bike, ski and equestrian helmets for $8$23, plus $5 bike lights. Garden City Medical Building, 601 W. Spruce, Suite G. Noon-3 PM. Cash or check only. Cancer survivors at any stage of recovery are invited to the Yoga Beyond Cancer class with Dena Saedi, which focuses on gentle stretching, meditation, breath work and body scanning. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. 45 PM. $40. Students must have doctor’s okay.

Rock outfit The Boston Boys, who are from Brooklyn, funny enough, play the Top Hat at 8 PM. Free. (Trivia answer: China. It was then distilled by Irish monks in the 1400s before spreading to Scotland.)

nightlife Dangit, you slept in on Saturday again, but have no fear, the Missoula Farmers Market sets up on Tuesday evenings at the XXXXs to provide flowers, baked goods and all the servings of fruit and veg you layabouts need. 5:30-7 PM. EBT, WIC and senior vouchers accepted. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, out on the corner of Third and Reserve, presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30-8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Put on your red shoes and dance at the Country Dance Lessons, Tuesdays at the Hamilton Senior Center. The shindig steps off at 6 PM with a line dance, followed by 7 PM two-step and 8 PM country cha-cha. Get double the fun when Boris Fishman reads from his debut novel, Replacement Life, and IraniAmerican Dina Nayeri reads from Teaspoon of Earth and Sea. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Take down the Athenian hegemony but pass on the hemlock tea at the Socrates Cafe, in which facilitator Kris Bayer encourages philosophical discussion. Bitterroot Public Library. 7-9 PM.

Punk’s not dead. Missoula Outdoor Cinema showcases Persepolis at Head Start, 1001 Worden Ave, Sat., Aug. 23. 8:32 PM. $5. Check out missoulaoutdoorcinema.org.

Find that creative outlet ye seek at the Open Mic Night at Stage 112, starting about 9 PM. Call Mike at 207-7097 after 4 PM on Monday to sign yourself up. Andy, Cameron and Jesse of The Lil’ Smokies team up to play tunes at the Top Hat. 8 PM. 21-plus after 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAYAUG27 The SBC Green Movie Night presents the Pop-Up Film Festival with the winners of the first Real Food Media Contest, featuring short films on sustainable ag and eating. Roxy Theater, 7 PM. $5-$7, includes appetizers provided by local purveyors. Live those “American Idol” fantasies at the Wednesday night karaoke at Eagles

Lodge Missoula, 2420 South Ave. W, with drink specials. 7:30-10:30 PM. No cover. Get a calming start to the morning with the Weekly Sit Meditation at the Learning Center at Red Willow. Wednesdays, 7:30-8:15 AM. Previous experience meditating is helpful. $35 for four weeks/$8 drop-in. Hold all my calls, Sally, for I’m stepping down to Caras Park for Out to Lunch, which runs from 11 AM2 PM on Wednesdays with live local music and all manner of tasty things served out of food trucks. Quit surfing Facebook on lunch break and take a chill pill with the Reduce Stress, Restore Balance class led by Michelle Voigt. Meets at the Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave., from noon1 PM. Wednesdays through Sept. 10. $40.

Beat the heat with the classic flicks showing at Missoula Public Library’s free matinee, every second and fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 PM. Visit missoulapubliclibrary.org or pop your head in their lobby to see what’s playing. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market presents wholesome produce, tasty baked goods and general cheer at the parking lot of the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. 4-7 PM on Wednesdays.

nightlife Pull your bangs over one eye, emo kid, before Hawthorne Heights and Red Jumpsuit Apparatus play Monk’s. Doors at 6:30 PM, show at 7:30. $19. Tickets at redtieconcerts.com. 18-plus. Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the Top Hat’s weekly Jazz Night, featuring a rotating lineup of local jazz enthusiasts. 7 PM. Free, all ages.

Have a super-duper time when Supersuckers rock out at Stage 112, along with the flighty Bird’s Mile Home and heavy-hitting Total Combined Weight. 9 PM. $15$18, tickets available at stage112.com. Local DJs do the heavy lifting while you kick back at Milkcrate Wednesday down in the Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus PBR pitcher special. Find this week’s lineup and info at facebook.com/ milkcrateproductions.

THURSDAYAUG28 Knock back some ales, ye scullions and fustilarians, when Shakespeare Under the Influence hosts a reading of an abbreviated version of Much Ado About Nothing at the Badlander. 7:30 PM. No cover.

nightlife Tom Catmull slings tunes while y’all slug beers at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-7 PM. No cover.

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [31]


[calendar]

Taking a stand. Rebelution plays the Big Sky Amphitheater Thu., Aug. 21, along with Iration, The Green and Stick Figure. Doors at 5 PM. $30/$27.50. Tickets at Big Sky's taproom, Rockin Rudy's or knittingfactory.com

Thursday is the new Friday, so let’s get the weekend started with Downtown ToNight, wherein an array of local music, food and beverage is available for your afternoon enjoyment at Caras Park. 5:30-8:30 PM. Bust out a little geetar at the Open Mic with Cheree at the Eagles Lodge Missoula, 2420 South Ave. W. Runs 7:30-10:30 PM. Nashville 406 plays all the right dance numbers at the Sunrise Saloon, corner of Strand and Regent. 9 PM.

Bottoms up at the Drop Culture Dance Party, featuring hot beats, cheap drinkies and people of assorted genders shaking their tailfeathers. Monk’s Bar. 9 PM. $2 for dudes, no cover for women. (Hey, gotta make up for that wage gap somehow.) Do them dirty deeds dirt cheap when the Badlander hosts the TNT dance party, featuring hot Top 40 trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $2 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. No cover. Mudslide Charley and the Dodgy Mountain Men roll into

Tuesday, Aug. 26 VS Helena Brewers

Bike to the Ballpark

MissoulaOsprey.com

Submit events to Calapatra the Calendar Mistress at calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.

Wednesday, Aug. 27 VS Helena Brewers

Wiener Wednesday

2-for-1 Tickets for anyone who bikes to the game

$1 Hot Dogs all game long

Brought to you by Missoula in Motion, PacificSource Health Plans & Trail 103.3 Gates: 6:30; Game at 7:05

Sponsored by One Main Financial & Jack FM Gates: 6:30; game at 7:05

Thursday, Aug. 28 VS Billings Mustangs

Friday, Aug. 29 VS Billings Mustangs

College Tickets are going fast! For tickets, visit the MSO Hub Box Office, call 543-3300 or log onto

the Top Hat to boogie at 10 PM. No cover.

Colors Night $5 reserved tickets for anyone wearing their favorite college team’s gear. Sponsored by the Bookstore at UM Gates: 6:30; game at 7:05

[32] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Baseball, Hotdogs, And Fireworks! Come out for the game and stay for a low-level postgame Fireworks Extravaganza, brought to you by the Missoula Osprey. Gates: 5:30; game at 6:35


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH People who love delving into the wilderness are not often excessively sociable types. But in order to preserve wilderness, people who love it sometimes have to get together in more urban settings to advocate for conservation. The national Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, founded in 2004, make it their business to advocate for what they see as the best solutions to preserving the habitat that supports their passion. That includes educational outreach, activism against irresponsible development and defending public access to wilderness. The Montana chapter of BHA celebrates the organization’s 10 year anniversary with an out-

doorsy shindig on the lawn at Draught Works. There are contests like the Guide Challenge, to see who can set up a fly rod the fastest, plus a casting competition and pull-ups. Motivational beverages from Draught Works will be on hand, plus food from the Burns St. Bistro and Clove Cart trucks. And heck yes, there will be a slip ‘n slide, so bring your swimsuit. —Kate Whittle Backcountry Hunters and Anglers celebrates its 10-year anniversary with a Sip 'n Slide Lawn Party at Draught Works Wed., Aug. 27, with food, beer and games. 5-9 PM. Free to attend.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY AUGUST 21 It’s hard to forget what month features the Augúst Road Race. This longtime Helena event, celebrating its 49th year, is a friendly, no-frills 3.8mile point-to-point contest to support high school cross-country programs. 7:15 PM. Entry fee is an “exorbitant” $5. Check out vigilanterunning.org.

FRIDAY AUGUST 22 Climb a buncha peaks and party down with the Rocky Mountaineers at the 10th annual Glacier Classic, which convenes at Many Glacier on the east side of Glacier Park. Most folks arrive Friday Aug. 22 through Sunday. Contact Forest Dean, 240-7612, to learn about group camping and carpooling opportunities.

SATURDAY AUGUST 23 Migratory shorebirds galore are the topic of today’s Five Valleys Audubon field trip, which meets at the northwest corner of the Adams Center parking lot at 8 AM for carpool to the old Smurfit-Stone site in Frenchtown for a six-hour trip. Call Terry at 214-1194. The Missoulians on Bicycles venture in pursuit of lunch at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton today. Meet at McCormick Park at 9 AM for carpool to the Super 1 in Stevi, and then ride quiet paved roads. Visit missoulabike.org. Play in the mud all you want at the fourth annual Bozemonster Challenge, which features 19 obstacles like the Mud Hill Mayhem Climb and Hor-

rendously High Haystack Hurdles over 5K in Bozeman. Dress up in a monstrously cool costume, too. 11 AM. Proceeds benefit Gallatin County Regional Park. The new Roots Fest SUP Cup convenes in front of the Boone and Crockett Club with five- and onemile races upriver and around buoys. 11 AM. $50. Register at rivercityrootsfestival.com.

TUESDAY AUGUST 26 The always down-to-earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 27 Backcountry Hunters and Anglers celebrate 10 years of outdoorsyness with a Sip ‘n Slide Lawn Party at Draught Works, with food, beer and games like a fly tying and pull-up competition. 5-9 PM. No cover.

THURSDAY AUGUST 28 The Great Burn Study Group hosts citizen science backpacking junkets into the Great Burn Proposed Wilderness Area, lasting 3-5 days each. You gotta supply the gear and supplies, but trip leadership is provided and it’s free to join in. Trips run July 24-27, Aug. 1-3, 7-10, 20-24 and 28-30. Visit greatburnstudygroup.org to learn more, or call Val at 978-831-2373. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [33]


[community]

these are the good old days.

EAT-BIKE-SLEEP-REPEAT for just $70 */person Includes 1 Day Bike Lift Pass, Hibernation House lodging & a full breakfast to fuel your day! *Valid through August 31st. Rate is per person, per night. Based on double occupancy & two night minimum stay. Subject to availability. Other restrictions may apply. Promo code: EBSR.

SKIWHITEFISH.COM 877-SKI-FISH Partially Located on National Forest Lands Photo © Noah Couser

Guilty confession time: When I have an evening at home to myself, I marathon episodes of TLC’s “What Not to Wear.” It’s not the most intellectual stimulation, but I never get tired of the big reveal, when a little makeup and outfit change shows just how much better people can look and feel about themselves. A simple wardrobe change can make a difference for someone searching for a job or trying to improve her life. That’s the idea behind Dress For Success, the national nonprofit that helps outfit women with professional clothing and career counseling. The Missoula chapter of DFS benefits from the third annual Ruby’s Bluegrass fundraiser on Saturday. The event includes dinner by the Wild Wee-

nie, tunes from the Ruby Jewel Band, silent auction, prizes, glitter tattoos for kids and a live dessert auction officiated by J.R. Strand. (If chocolate cake is involved, that’s one auction where I’d get awfully competitive.) Making a difference doesn’t require a $5,000 shopping spree in New York. —Kate Whittle The third annual Ruby’s Bluegrass, Barbecue and Family Fun fundraiser, Sat., Aug. 23, brings tasty dinner, tunes and a live dessert auction to Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. 4 PM. $12/$10 in advance for adults, $10/$8 in advance for kids. Proceeds benefit Dress For Success Missoula. Tickets at dressforsuccess.org/missoula.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY AUGUST 21

n #18 life lesso

Registration is open for the NAMI Family to Family Education Course, a 12-week series for the family and friends of people with serious psychiatric illnesses like depression, PTSD, bipolar and schizpophrenia. First class meets Wed., Sept. 3 from 6:30-9 PM. Free, but advance registration required by calling 542-0236. Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

IF OPPORTUNITY DOESN’T KNOCK, BUILD A DOOR. The most successful business owners see opportunities and build on them. They also develop relationships with experienced business banking experts at First Security Bank. If you’re starting a business or growing one to make a better future, come meet your expert business banker today.

www.fsbmsla.com

[34] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

mission to help pay the medical bills of young children with serious illnesses.

MONDAY AUGUST 25 The Right Question Project: Parent Involvement In Schools invites parents to prep for the school year at Council Groves Community Center, 1904 S. Third St. W., 2-4 PM. Back-to-school backpack giveaway to follow. Free childcare and refreshments provided. Register by contacting Erica at 543-3550 ext 211, or edeforrest@wordinc.org.

TUESDAY AUGUST 26 Lend a hand at the weekly volunteer workday at the new Freedom Gardens, a community garden space on the Western Montana Fairgrounds. 6-8 PM. Bring gloves, sunscreen and a water bottle. Visit missoulacultures.blogspot.com or call 284-1780 to learn more.

Blue Mountain Clinic hosts another edition of Sex in the Zoo: Abortion, where local women and men share their personal experiences. Stage 112. Doors at 6:30 PM, speakers from 7:30-9:30. Visit the Blue Mountain Clinic Family Practice Facebook page to find the event listing and contact info to submit your own story.

THURSDAY AUGUST 28

SATURDAY AUGUST 23

Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Habitat for Humanity of Missoula hosts a donation drive to help stock its future nonprofit home improvement store. Drop off new or gently used household goods and building materials at 3655 Highway 200 East from 10 AM-4 PM. Call 549-8210 with any questions. The Grill Your Axe Off! barbecue fundraiser includes kick-ass food, chef competition, prizes and live tunes from Mark Duboise. Axemen, three miles west of the Missoula airport on Highway 10. Proceeds benefit the Jadyn Fred Foundation and its

The Vestibular Dysfunction Local Support Group meets every third Thursday of the month to share experiences and increase awareness at Element Physical Therapy, 2455 Dixon Ave. Noon-1 PM. Visit elementpt.com.

You don’t have to be a time lord or a doctor to check out the Missoula Time Bank, in which members exchange skills and services instead of money. Orientations at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center on the fourth Thursdays of the month. 7 PM. RSVP required at info@missoulatimebank.org. Check out missoulatimebank.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 HANNAH• Hannah is a 2-3 year-old

Basenji mix that desperately needs a home. She is great with kids and cats but does need to be the ONLY dog in the home. Once you meet her, your heart will melt. There has to be a home out there that will be content with owning one dog and one dog only. Is that you?

COLBY•Colby is an 11-month-old male pitbull mix. He was found running loose with a seatbelt tied to his neck. It took us a week to gain his trust and now he acts like a typical puppy with staff. He is warming up to strangers but men seem a little scary to him still. With patience and love, he can and will be a wonderful pet.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

HONDO•Hondo is a male pit bull. He was abandoned by his owner with another female pit. The female was adopted and now Hondo is left looking for his forever South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 home. He came to the shelter with one of 2330 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) the worst ear infections that we have seen in a long time. Now he is healthy, happy 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) and ready to get out of the shelter. You Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat) won't go wrong with Hondo.

TURNER•Turner is a 3-year-old male orange cat. Turner's owner had to move to a nursing home so he was brought to the shelter. He likes to spend his days roaming around our cat room. When people come in, he will seek out their attention. He would do best in a home with no young children because he does like to "play bite."

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

TAIWAN•Taiwan is a male orange and white cat. He is very cuddly, even with children. He loves to rub his head on you when he wants attention. Taiwan is also quite the talker when he is asking for attention. He will make you fall in love with him at first glance.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

ABE• Abe is a male 6-year-old cat. He came to us from another shelter that was overrun with cats. Abe had been living at that shelter since 2010. He is quiet, mellow and looking for a home that will provide great places to lounge about. He doesn't require much except a good brushing every now and then, and love.

www.dolack.com Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 TAMARACK• Are

you ready for a beautiful hike through The Resort at Paws Up (on Sept. 21st)? So is Tamarack! She loves to hike and meet new friends. Tamarack is a 3-year-old outgoing Chihuahua/Doxi mix (Chiweenie!). Come adopt her today!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

CLYDE• Did you say catnip? Clyde can be a little shy when he first meets you, but he is very friendly and loves to snuggle. This 6-year-old boy loves chicken treats and a quiet place to relax. If you would like to meet Clyde, come to The Humane Society of Western Montana today!

ISIS•Isis is a special 3-legged girl who enjoys hiking, going for walks and being with people. This sweet pup is patiently waiting to find her forever home. Adopt Isis and sign up for the Canine Classic at The Resort at Paws Up Ranch on September 21st!

BUDDHA•Looking for a big, goofy boy? Then Buddha's the guy for you! Buddha is a fun-loving boy who loves to play and be active with his people. He's one smart cookie and would make for an excellent hiking partner! Come meet him at the shelter today and fall in love!

CASEY• Casey is an 11-years-young lady who came to the shelter because her owner got sick and was not able to care for her any longer. She prefers to be inside most of the time; she can be a bit of a lap cat, but is also independent and content by herself! Casey's adoption is waived for adopter's 60 and older as part of our Seniors-for-Seniors adoption program.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 South Russell • North Reserve

EMMA• Emma, the Manx, may have a short tail, but she has a big personality! This friendly feline enjoys being brushed and playing with toys.She also likes to show you her tummy for belly rubs. Emma is currently living in our Pod Area and likes to spend her time soaking up the sunshine on our cat deck, or lounging in the laps of volunteers and showing off her purr. missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

August 21-August 28, 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360-840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

LOST & FOUND FOUND 26” mountain bike near Super Walmart on Mullan/N Reserve on Tue Jul 22 2014 around 1130am. Frame is

primarily silver. Call/txt 406544-3103 to identify. STOLEN GIANT BIKE- REWARD— $100 IT IS A BLUE W/ GREEN STRIPES 3 DAY OLD LARGE GIANT TALON. IT HAD A ODOMETER, LIGHTS, AND BACK FENDER ON IT. IT WAS STOLEN OFF MY FRIEND’S PORCH ON 14TH AND RUSSELL FRIDAY NIGHT (18TH). (406) 269-0054

TO GIVE AWAY Answers to your sexual health questions via text message. It’s FREE! Text 66746, Type ASKMAP (space) ur sexual health question. Confidential, Free and Easy to Use. For more information visit ASKMAP.INFO or BlueMountainClinic.org

benefits that Emu offer from oil and skin care products to eggs, steaks, filets and ground meat. Wild Rose Emu Ranch. (406) 363-1710. wildroseemuranch.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS D’Vine Palette - PAINT . SIP . LEARN. *Pick painting *Tell friends to come *Drink & paint. 4 LOCATIONS! MISSOULA’S FIRST PAINT & SIP STUDIO. WWW.DVINEPALETTE.COM. 406.239.6856

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring

DRIVING LESSONS M&M Driving School Call or Text

317-3272

missouladrivingschool.com

agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

“I found a brighter world, I found Unity” 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C4 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C6

Ken's Barber Shop

Camp Sleepover . . . .C11

Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9

This Modern World . .C12

1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

FREE SAMPLES of Emu Oil. Learn more about the many health

Fletch Law, PLLC

HYPNOSIS

A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

ADOPTION

FREE

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Walk it.

Estimates

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

YWCA Thrift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 920 Kensington

Social Security Disability Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

I BUY

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

327-0300 ANY TIME

“Regret for wasted time is more wasted time." -Mason Cooley

317 S. Orange

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Peanut is a sweet, playful girl who loves endless afternoons of playing fetch, swimming in the river and snuggling with her best friend (she hopes that may be you!). Peanut is currently a Paws Ahead dog, which means dedicated and knowledgeable volunteers spend extra time teaching her basic manners like sit, down and stay. Come meet Peanut today; we’re pretty sure you will fall in love with her. Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 www.myHSWM.org


EMPLOYMENT

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon EMPTY SHELLY My girlfriend of a year is really pretty and sweet, and we love all the same outdoor activities. However, I feel there's a ceiling on our connection because she lacks a strong personality of her own. Whenever we discuss something to do, she defers to me. Also, I care deeply about politics and ideas, but she doesn't read newspapers or books or develop her own opinions. Two days ago, I asked about something we'd just heard on the news, and she basically parroted my opinion back to me. I pressed her, saying, "But what do YOU think?" She couldn't answer. This led to my suggesting that maybe she needs to see a therapist to learn to open up more. She was pretty offended, and we haven't talked much since. —Politically Concerned When you say to your girlfriend "So, what are your thoughts on the Middle East?" you'd rather she didn't respond, "Like, you mean, Philadelphia?" It is nice that you both enjoy the same outdoor activities. Having shared interests can sometimes be essential. For example, a guy who lives to sail would find it a downer to date me. As I wrote in "Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck," I have motion sickness issues, "which is to say I get carsick on any street with more than five turns in it—for example, the winding mountain roads of Washington, D.C." But barring an obsessive attachment by one partner to a sport that, say, makes the other hurl her insides into the ocean for days, people put too much emphasis on having a lot of interests in common. You just need to have enough in common. And in addition to physical chemistry, you need to have what I call a crush on your partner as a human being. This means having respect and admiration for them and a sense of excitement about who they are and how they go about life. Respect is the opposite of contempt—the sneering disgust for a partner that marriage researcher John Gottman finds is the biggest predictor a couple will divorce. And unfortunately, respect is also the antithesis of what you, as a guy who cares about politics, have for a woman whose favorite Supreme Court justice is probably Judge Judy. The reality is, your girlfriend isn't going to lean back on some therapist's couch and find her opinion between the pillows— at least not any time soon. Chances are, she has little innate curiosity and has

maybe spent much of her life under the mistaken impression that you can keep a man by keeping mum and nodding yes. In the future, when you meet a woman, instead of just taking stock of all the reasons you'd work as a couple, look for reasons you wouldn't—like if her peers as political thinkers appear to be your hamster and the paperweight that fell behind your desk. A woman who's right for you will take your thoughts, political and otherwise, and run with them and sometimes bring back something better—making you better for being with her instead of making you suspect her skull contains only a goldfish swimming around a little castle and a couple of plastic plants.

GRATE EXPECTATIONS I am dating a guy in his early 20s who is very nice, very fun, very cute—and very much in the habit of mentioning that he went to Harvard. He finds a way to weave it into all sorts of conversations it really has no place in. —Not Impressed He probably mentions Harvard a lot because it seems more tasteful than the alternative—having his diploma laminated and wearing it around his neck. Guys in their early 20s have it rough. Just as girls their age are coming into their prime hotitude, the guys are entering a work environment where they are the gum on the pavement that the 30-year-old successful guy runs over in his Mercedes. If your guy is feeling this way, it may explain why no subject is too far-flung or random to connect to a reminder of where he went to school. ("Pass the milk? I sometimes passed the milk at Harvard.") Ask whether you can give him your opinion about something you've noticed. Assuming he says yes, say something like, "I have no doubt you're going places, but you seem to mention Harvard a lot. This might make you sound like you need to ride on the name, which you clearly don't." If he's got more than school smarts, he'll recognize that it says something about him that he went to Harvard, but not when he advertises it so often that it starts to sound like the DeVry of the Ivy League.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com.

[C2] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others and create a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply now! 269.591.0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org General helper wanted, downtown Missoula. 25 to 35 hrs per week. Flexible Hrs, informal atmosphere. Learn to make a futon mattress. Some heavy lifting. Small Wonders Futons 721-2090 Help Assemble Furniture 40-60 Hrs Week, for several weeks to possibly several months, depending on Production Orders to help assemble school furniture. Current hours are 6:00am-4:30pm Monday through Friday AND Saturdays 6:00 am - 2:30 p.m. Some familiarity with power tools and ability to lift up to 50#, good physical condition, standing on feet all day. $8.00/hr + OT @ $12.00/hr applications: NORCO Products, 4985 Blue Mountain Road, Missoula, MT 59804 (across from the Peak Athletic Club) KAMP IMPLEMENT FARM EQUIPMENT, TRUCK DEALERSHIP has immediate F/T opening for an experienced Parts Counter person. Pay DOE. Benefits. Parts & computer experience required. Belgrade 406-388-4295 Looking for an experienced part time cook. Must be reliable, punctual, and able to work independently. Will train the right person. Two positions available evenings and weekends. Pay D.O.E. Apply in person at the Silvertip Casino, 680 SW Higgins Ave. Missoula.

PART-TIME PROCUREMENT ASSISTANT Primarily responsible to support the Procurement Agents I, as well as support for Project Manager. Assist PA’s to input merchandise orders into Purchase Order Database for all model homes and sales offices. Follow up with suppliers regarding order status as needed petersgrath@outlook.com Tel: (406) 549-5668 Sec/Admi Assistants Needed Secretaries and administrative assistants needed to organize files, draft messages, schedule appointments, and support other staff. Call: 406-8522919 or email Breanna: bgbreanagray@hotmail.com

PROFESSIONAL CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS • Local hauls • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required Call 406-4937876 9am-5pm M-F. LIVESTOCK OPERATIONS MANAGER NORTHERN AGRICUL-

TURAL RESEARCH CENTER Havre, MT. For complete job announcement and application procedures, go to: https://jobs.montana.edu/ postings/622 AA/ADA/EEO/Vet Pref Employer Membership Marketing Coordinator Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, well-organized, and detail-oriented person to fill the role of Membership Marketing Coordinator in the Membership Department. This is a unique opportunity for a self-starter with initiative to join a growing membership program. We seek a team player, with a marketing background with an enthusiasm for cycling and bicycle travel. The position is based at Adventure Cycling’s headquarters in beautiful and bike-friendly Missoula, Montana.Please submit a resume and cover letter to Adventure Cycling, c/o Sheila Snyder, P.O. Box 8308, Missoula, MT 59807. You may also submit your application electronically to ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. We will review resumes and interview candidates beginning September 1, 2014.

SKILLED LABOR START A CAREER IN TRUCKING TODAY! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class” training. New Academy Classes Weekly. No Money Down or Credit Check. Certified Mentors Ready and Available. Paid (While Training With Mentor). Regional and Dedicated Opportunities. Great Career Path. Excellent Benefits Package. Please Call: (520) 375-9632 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

HEALTH Medical Office Manager Energetic, organized, efficient office manager to direct a 3

$100 HIRING BONUS EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2014

(TO BE PAID AFTER 30 DAYS OF EMPLOYMENT)

CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED • Local hauls • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits  • 2 years exp. required

Call 406-493-7876 9am-5pm M-F.

YOU WILL MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT …..by assisting severely developmentally/intellectually disabled adults live meaningful and healthy lives in our group home settings throughout Missoula. You’ll experience challenging and rewarding work at the same time.

Carpenters and Journeyman Carpenters needed immediately. Previous experience required. Must be able to pass background check and have valid driver’s license. Full benefit package including, medical, retirement and 401K is available. Send resume or application as follows: fax to 406-542-3515, or email to jobs@jacksoncontractorgroup.com.

Applications are available on our website at www.jacksoncontractorgroup.com.

NEW PROGRESSIVE WAGE SCALE IN JULY: Start at $9.35/hr. with no experience, or $9.75/hr. with proven experience. Then, watch your wage grow after that! We provide extensive paid training to help you be successful in your work with our clients. We have a variety of shifts available for evenings and graveyards. We also offer relief staffing positions that offer more flexibility with your busy schedule. All positions that are 30+ hours per week offer full benefits and generous paid time off.


EMPLOYMENT provider clinic. Possible expansion. Competent with ICD9, CPT, HIPPA, Insurance Billing. Computer skills, Excel, Word, Quickbooks. Leadership and great people skills a must. Downtown Missoula. drsammydo@ gmail.com. (406) 327-0269

MARKETPLACE

IT’S A CALLING. GoANG.com/MT 800-TO-GO-ANG

GIVE BACK. GET MORE. Donate life-saving plasma.

RECEIVE RECEI EC IV VE UP U TO $ $380 38 YOUR 1st MONTH! ª'REATª.ORTHERNª!VEªsª-ISSOULA ª-4ª 406.721.2584

CUSTOMER SUPPORT SPECIALIST Learn to use our specialty software products to assist and educate our local government clients in our high volume support services office. We are seeking candidates with experience and/or education pertaining to common processes used in business or by local governments to manage accounting functions such as accounts payable, payroll, budgeting and financial reporting. We will consider other experience and/or education. Salary, dependent on qualifications, is between $25,000 and $40,000. This is an in office position in our Polson, MT office. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Simple IRA, health insurance, flexible benefit plan and the potential for profit sharing. Applicants must submit a cover letter and a resume to be considered. The cover letter and resume should be emailed to hiring@blackmountainsoftware.com Application deadline is August 23, 2014.

SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT AT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM

$250

CREW SUP – Janitorial – FT position providing supervisory support to a janitorial crew. Supervisory and Janitorial experience preferred.  M – F: 3pm – 11pm.  $9.95/hr - $10.20/hr. Closes Tuesday, 9/2/14, 5pm. CREW SUP – FLOAT – FT position providing supervisory support to a variety of work crews. Supervisory and Customer Service experience preferred.  M – F: Days. $9.95/hr - $10.20/hr. Closes Tuesday, 8/26/14, 5pm. CREW SUP – Housekeeping – FT position responsible for coordination of work and supervision of employee Housekeeping Crew. Maintain quality control and complete work to customer satisfaction.  Housekeeping experience preferred.  Must be able to perform housekeeping tasks.  Sun – Th: 8am – 4pm.  $9.95/hr $10.20/hr. Closes Tuesday, 8/26/14, 5pm.

adopted. For more information call AniMeals at 721-4710.

Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Fosters needed! AniMeals is in desperate need of foster families for kittens. Fostering is a 1-2 month commitment, AniMeals supplies the food, litter, and other supplies, and you supply the love. Call 721-4710 or visit http://animeals.com/FOSTER.html for more information.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS AniMeals Seniors for Seniors program waives the adoption fee for anyone 65 and older adopting a cat 9 years old and older. All cats are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped free of cost before they’re

WANTED TO BUY WANTED: Old glass or porcelain insulators. Big or small, wild colors a plus. The funkier it is, the better it is. Call 239-1646

Gear Up! Get Outside! 111 S. 3rd W. • 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T DONATED IN FIVE MONTHS OR MORE, PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE $250 IN JUST FOUR DONATIONS.

Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a total of $50 on your first, a total of $75 on your second, a total of $50 on your third, and a total of $75 on your fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 8.31.14 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

MUSIC

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

ENGINEERING TECH

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Allie’s Summer Breeze

We are looking for an individual who enjoys a variety of challenges. You will be asked to wear several hats during your work week, all of which will require solid problem solving skills. We are seeking candidates with solid network management and software configuration skills. We will consider other experience and/or education. Salary is dependent upon experience and qualifications. This is an in-office position at our Polson MT location. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Simple IRA, health insurance, a flexible benefit plan and the potential for profit sharing. Applicants must submit a cover letter and a resume to be considered. The cover letter and resume should be emailed to HiringEng@blackmountainsoftware.com Application deadline is August 23, 2014.

BACK TO SCHOOL SALE!

1 1/2 oz. Triple Sec 1 oz. Vodka 3 oz. Orange Juice 3 oz. Lemonade

20% OFF

Mix ingredients & pour over ice. Credit: Randall Klein

AUGUST 21-24

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Affordable, quality addiction counseling in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere. Stepping Stone Counseling, PLLC. Shari Rigg, LAC • 406-9261453. Skype sessions available Answers to your sexual health questions via text message. It’s FREE! Text 66746, Type ASKMAP (space) ur sexual health question. Confidential, Free and Easy to Use. For more information visit

ASKMAP.INFO or BlueMountainClinic.org Awakenings Massage and Bodywork. Some of the more common benefits our patients experience are: reduced pain, reduced stiffness and motion limitations, reduced stiffness and motion limitations. Awakenings Massage and Bodywork. Tami Beich L.M.T. 2409 Dearborn Ave. 406-207-0016. massagemissoula.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

SHIFT SUPERVISOR – FT (3) positions supporting persons with disabilities in a residential/community setting. $9.80/hr - $10.00/hr.  Closes Tuesday, 8/26/14, 5pm.

Must Have: Valid Mt driver license, No history of neglect, abuse or exploitation Applications available at

OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online: orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

A natural healing art based on the principle that there are reflex points on the feet, hands & ears that are actually "reflections" of the body systems & organs. Using gentle acupressure, your reflexologist is able to stimulate the body's own natural ability to achieve better overall balance and energy. It's a perfect complement to traditional health care routines... and you get to keep your clothes on!!

Please call or email for appt. 406-830-7276 mountainreflexology@gmail.com 127 N. Higgins, Ste. 308

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An eagle does not catch flies. A lion won't hunt for mice. A gourmet chef shuns recipes that call for canned soup and potato chips. And I trust that you won't indulge a hankering for non-nutritious sweets and treats that would spoil your appetite for more robust sustenance. You understand I'm not just talking about your literal eating habits, right? Interpret this oracle metaphorically, please.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now is an excellent time to phase out fantasies that bog you down or drag you backward. Are you up for that challenge? Can you summon the courage to leave the mediocre past behind? If so, here are your assignments: Wean yourself of longings to reconstruct bygone pleasures. Forget about trying to be like the person you used to be and to have the keys you used to have. Stop feeding the feelings that keep you affixed to obsolete goals. Break any taboo that makes you scared to change what needs to be changed.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The artist Amedeo Modigliani lived in Paris from 1906 until his death in 1920. For most of that time, he was destitute. Proprietors of local stores and restaurants sometimes accepted his art work as payment in lieu of actual money. They didn't necessarily appreciate it, though. One food seller used Modigliani's drawings as wraps for the fried potatoes he sold. Another stashed the artist's paintings in his cellar, where they turned into feasts for rodents. Too bad for these short-sighted people and their heirs: The worth of Modigliani's works eventually increased, and some sold for millions of dollars. In the weeks ahead, Leo, don't be like those food sellers. Know the value of what you have, even if it's still latent.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I've got three new vocabulary words for you. I need them to provide you with the proper oracle. First is the German term Schwellenangst. It refers to timidity or nervousness about crossing a threshold and heading into unknown territory. The second word is a new English term, "strikhedonia." It means the joy that rises up when you feel the courage to say "to hell with it." The third word is from Portuguese: desenrascanço. It means the spontaneous improvisation of haphazard but ultimately effective plans. Now let's put them all together: To conquer your Schwellenangst, you must summon a bolt of strikhedonia and have faith in your ability to carry out desenrascanço. (Thanks to otherwordly.tumblr.com for the new words.)

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Desire can conquer fear. Love trumps cowardice. The power that your tenderness affords you may not completely dissolve your doubt and worry, but it will quiet them down so much that they will lose their ability to paralyze you. These truths are always good to keep in mind, of course, but they are especially useful to you right now. No obstacle will faze you, no shadow will intimidate you, as long as you feed your holy longing and unshakable compassion.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On August 2, 1830, Louis Antoine, Duke of Angoulême, was King of France for 20 minutes. (It's a long story.) I offer this to you as a cautionary tale. A few weeks from now, I don't want to have to be comparing you to him. If you hope to hold your new position or continue to wield your added clout for longer than just a little while, you should take all necessary steps. How? Nurture the web of support that will sustain you, for example. Don't burn a single bridge. Cultivate real empathy, not just the showy kind. Avoid manipulative behavior, even if you think you can get away with it. Be a skillful gatherer of information.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Golda Meir was Prime Minister of Israel from 1969 to 1974. Her admirers described her as "strong-willed, straight-talking, grey-bunned grandmother of the Jewish people." She had a good sense of humor, too. "Let me tell you the one thing I have against Moses," she said. "He took us forty years into the desert in order to bring us to the one place in the Middle East that has no oil." I bring this up as a teaching story for you, Sagittarius. If you plan to make any big moves, transitions, or journeys in the coming months, I suggest you choose destinations that will allow you to gain access to wealth-building resources.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Do you know what phase of your cycle it is? Here are a few hints. It doesn't come around often. It's not characterized by predictable events or boring certainties. And it may allow you, even encourage you, to take a break from being your usual self. Give up? OK. I'll tell you. You have entered the Nicholas Cage Phase of your cycle. Cage is a Capricorn, but not a typical one. He's eccentric and manic and certifiably batty. He refers to his acting technique as "Nouveau Shamanic," once lived in a fake castle, and owns a Lamborghini that belonged to the legendary tyrant, the Shah of Iran. For our current purposes, he has also testified, "I am not a demon. I am a lizard, a shark, a heat-seeking panther. I want to be Bob Denver on acid playing the accordion."

Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage Physician’s Building #2 • Community Medical Center • 2831 Fort Missoula Road, Ste. 105

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are about to make the transition from plodding to skipping; from moping to exulting. You will no longer be bogged down by cloudy doubt, but will instead be buoyed by giddy hope. To what do we owe this imminent turnaround in your fortunes? One reason is that it's Justifiable Narcissism Week—for Tauruses only. During this jubilee, the Free Will Astrology Council on Extreme Self-Esteem authorizes you to engage in unabashed self-worship—and to corral a host of other people who want to join in celebrating you, praising you, and helping you.

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): An American named Kevin Shelley accomplished a feat worthy of inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records. While wearing a blue satin martial arts outfit, he smashed 46 wooden toilet seats over his head in just one minute. Some observers may be inclined to dismiss his efforts as frivolous and ridiculous. But I admire how he playfully mocked his own competitiveness while fully expressing his competitiveness. He satirized his ego's drive to be first and best even as achieved the goal of being first and best. I recommend you try something similar. You're entering a phase when you'll be wise to add a bit of humility to your bold self-presentation.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here's one of my goals in life, Aquarius: to show you a type of astrology that does not infringe on your free will, but rather clarifies your options. In this horoscope, for instance, I will outline your alternatives so that you will be fully informed as you determine what course of action will be most closely aligned with your high ideals. Ponder the following question, and then briskly exert your freedom of choice: Would you prefer to have love make your head spin, knock you off your feet, tickle your X-factor, kick you gently but firmly in the ass, or all of the above?

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): "God changes caterpillars into butterflies, sand into pearls, and coal into diamonds by using time and pressure," says pastor Rick Warren. "He is working on you, too." Let's make that idea your meditation, Pisces. If the word "God" doesn't suit you, substitute "life," "nature" or "Wakan Tanka," the Lakotan term for "The Great Mystery." The essential point is that you are being worked on and shaped by forces beyond your conscious awareness. Some of them are vast and impersonal, like your culture, the media, and the entertainment industry. Others are intimate and close at hand, like your genes, your childhood imprints, and the characters you encounter daily. Now is an excellent time to contemplate all the influences that make you who you are. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES.

[C4] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

406.542.2147 MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

Couples Attunements Please call to schedule The Hummingbird is joy, beauty in all situations, unconditional love and hope for all time. $100 per couple.

at Garden Mother Herbs

(406) 529-3834 Space is limited. Please call to reserve space.

PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-14-170 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOYCE ANN SPRINGER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above�named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to LARRY EUGENE SPRINGER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 13th day of August, 2014. /s/ Larry Eugene Springer, Personal Representative REELY LAW FIRM, P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201 Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ Shane N. Reely, Esq. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, Missoula County Cause No. DV-14-780 Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Tina Reinicke-Schmaus, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Tina Gay Reinicke-Schmaus to Tina Gay Reinicke. The hearing will be on September 9, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 7/23/2014. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Heather Olean, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JU-

DICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP14-162 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EMMA BELLE JACOBSON, a/k/a EMMA B. JACOBSON, a/k/a EMILY BELLE JACOBSON, a/k/a EMILY B. JACOBSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lori Lee Jacobson, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, P.O. Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 31st day of July, 2014. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true, accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge and belief. DATED this 31st day of July, 2014. /s/ Lori Lee Jacobson, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DP14-147 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MITTIE M. CARROLL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to

MNAXLP Glenda J. Carroll, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, P.O. Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of July, 2014. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Don C. St. Peter I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true, accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge and belief. DATED this 15th day of July, 2014. /s/ Glenda J. Carroll, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-14-132 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF: ZACKARY L. MORRIS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Charlotte Morris has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Charlotte Morris, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of June, 2014. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. BY: /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 25th day of June, 2014. /s/ Charlotte Morris, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate


PUBLIC NOTICES No. DP-14-165 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF  DUANE A. ERICKSON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Dorothy D. Erickson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 8th day of August, 2014, at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Dorothy D. Erickson BOONE KARLBERG P.C. /s/ By Robert J. Sullivan, Esq. P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-14-130 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF: ESTHER H. STEVENS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jeffrey T. Stevens has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jeffrey T. Stevens, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 23rd day of June, 2014. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. BY: /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 23rd day of June, 2014. /s/ Jeffrey T. Stevens, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-14-163 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MERLE SELLERS THOMAS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sandra A. Mielke and Dean Kromarek, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State o Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 7th day of August, 2014. /s/ Sandra A. Mielke, Co-

Personal Representative /s/ Dean R. Kromarek, Co-Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative By: /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-14-150 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL GENE MCLATCHY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PATRICK H. MCLATCHY, has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PATRICK H. MCLATCHY, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at c/o Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney at Law, 200 University Plaza, 100 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Date: 7/29/2014 Place: Missoula /s/ Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney For Patrick H. McLatchy, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200628154 Bk: 786 Pg: 347, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Charles R. Abell & Karen R. Abell, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 and the West 23.5 feet of Lot 14 in Block 62 of School Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 613 of Micro Records at Page 1056. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201208407 Bk: 893 Pg: 884, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 19, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $186,092.27. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,194.87, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued

MNAXLP escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 27, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.110044) 1002.268297-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/04/12, recorded as Instrument No. 201208270 Bk: 893 Pg: 747 and re-recorded on 10/25/13 Bk: 921 Pg: 375, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Michael K. Fitzpatrick, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 16 of Certificate of Survey No 370, located in the Southeast one-quarter of Section 11, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment pay-

ments due thereafter. As of June 19, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $210,111.81. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $198,263.89, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, City of Missoula on October 28, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.110048) 1002.268321-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/17/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200608980 BK 772 Pg 2229, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Betty C. Melton was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The East one-half of Lot 16 and all of Lot 17 in Block 118 of Town Company’s Addition, a Platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat of Record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 17. Recording Reference: Book 435 of Micro Records at Page 1373. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s death and is grounds for acceleration on the Deed of Trust under paragraph 9 (a) (i) A borrower

dies and the Property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving Borrower. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due in full. As of June 19, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $167,205.78. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $161,508.24, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 30, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.108101) 1002.262819-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/20/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200427413, Bk 740, Pg 649, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Paul H. Greenwood and Kimberly B. Greenwood, husband and wife as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Surface rights only in a portion of the N1/2 S1/2 SE1/4, Section 12, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the SE-SE 1/64 corner of said Sec-

tion 12, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., thence N. 34 degrees 26’ 56’’ W., 582.85 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence N. 00 degrees 05’ 16’’ E., 180.00 feet; thence N. 89 degrees 53’ 34’’ W., 472.00 feet to the Easterly right-of-way of Montana Rail Link Railroad; thence on and along a curve to the right with a central angle of 2 degrees 42’ 26’’ and a radius of 3919.83 feet for an arc length of 185.21 feet; thence S. 89 degrees 53’ 34’’ E., 515.58 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with the right of ingress and egress over and across the N2 NW4 SE4 SE 4 for a width of 30 feet. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201020233, Bk 867, Pg 926, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 23, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $227,087.66. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $158,012.17, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 3, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Fore-

closure.com. (TS# 7023.73147) 1002.270420-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/27/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200432291 Bk: 743 Pg: 820, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which David M. Philips was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 5 and 6 in Block 55 of Daly’s Addition, a Platted Subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/02/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 23, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $157,281.52. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,705.96, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 31, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014 [C5]


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Bebop"--try to keep up! by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 "Cast Away" carrier 5 Is willing to 10 Cyberbidder's site 14 Scat legend Fitzgerald 15 Film score composer Morricone 16 "The Joy of Cooking" author Rombauer 17 Packing the wrong clothes for the shore? 19 Comic-Con attendee, probably 20 Participate in charades 21 Kyle's little brother on "South Park" 22 Coop matriarchs 23 Valentine offering 25 Cracker with seven holes 27 Dance music with slow shifting bass sounds 31 Artists using acid 34 Word following who, what, when or how 35 Beatnik's bro 37 Pen name? 38 Give a hint to 40 "___ have something stuck in my teeth?" 41 Prefix with trafficking 43 CTRL-___-DEL 44 Throws out 47 Social finesse 48 Early rock nickname, with "The" 50 The O in "Jackie O" 52 Sty reply 53 Alumnus 54 Like cotton candy 56 Fish in Japanese cuisine 58 Imposed limits on 63 Gymnastics legend Korbut 64 Part of the neighborhood where all the downers live? 66 "James and the Giant Peach" author Roald 67 Half a Danny Elfman band 68 Second word in fairy tales 69 Chip that starts a pot 70 Element from the Greek word for "strange" 71 "Jeopardy!" owner

DOWN

1 Country's McEntire 2 "30 Rock" star Baldwin 3 Half step lower, in music 4 Stuffed shell food 5 Like platypuses 6 Palindromic experimentalist 7 Get the knots out 8 Enjoy a scoop 9 Shannen of "90210" 10 Half of half of half 11 Undergarments that allow for air flow? 12 "Agreed!" 13 Runs off at the mouth 18 Johnny Cash cover of a Nine Inch Nails song 24 "Boston Legal" actor 26 Double-clicked symbol 27 "Unleaded" beverage 28 Dangly lobe in the throat 29 Report from a slow vegetable-purchasing day? 30 ___ Lanka 31 Tabloid worker 32 Christina of "Black Snake Moan" 33 Glasgow residents 36 Dwarf with glasses 39 Vegas night sight 42 E-mail address symbols 45 Diner player 46 Eat, as pretzels 49 Series ender 51 Very little, as of ointment 53 Oldest man in space John 54 Club or cream follower 55 Stratagem 57 Mario of the NBA 59 Favorable factor 60 The cops, in slang 61 MBA's course 62 Fashion initials 65 Earlier than now

Last week’s solution

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

PUBLIC NOTICES accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.110292) 1002.270248-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/28/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200821411 Bk: 826 Pg: 595, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Jeffrey R. Neville and Tresa L. Neville, husband, tenants and not as tenants in common was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and First American Title Ins Co was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Ins Co as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A Tract of Land located in the E1/2 of Section 16, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract 3D of Certificate of Survey No. 4057. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/04/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 3, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $309,424.93. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $268,286.39, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 7, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be

[C6] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.110640) 1002.270637-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/03/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201102369 B: 873 P: 784, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Nancy K. Coleman, A Married Woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank, a Washington Corporation, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principle Meridian, Montana. More Accurately Described As: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201118745 B:885 P:372, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 1, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $351,313.87. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $293,547.41, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West

MNAXLP Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 13, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.18019) 1002.264905-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 14, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 7 AND 8 IN BLOCK 12 OF BECK’S HOME ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Judy D. Larson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 23, 2005 and recorded September 30, 2005 in Book 761, on Page 642, under Document No. 200525872. The beneficial interest is currently held by Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”). First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,233.40, beginning April 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 6, 2014 is $182,833.19 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $12,948.60, escrow advances of $3,103.15, suspense balance of $-518.00 and other fees and expenses ad-

vanced of $2,492.77, plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.05 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 10, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 10 day of June, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 17, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main

Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: South 20 feet of Lot 12, and the North 50 feet of Lot 13, Block B of Rainbow Ranch Homes Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Phoebe J Patterson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 30, 2003 and recorded June 9, 2003 in Book 708 page 713 under Document No. 200320092. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee, in trust for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2003-4. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $767.58, beginning January 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 30, 2014 is $104,397.27 principal, interest at the rate of 6.475% now totaling $10,483.26, late charges in the amount of $276.46, escrow advances of $3,106.88, and other fees and expenses advanced of $256.05, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the


PUBLIC NOTICES trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 11, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 11th day of June, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Select Portfolio V. Patterson 42085.026 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 29, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tax ID Number 3626500 Land situated in the County of Missoula in the State of MT Lot 12, of MONTANA VISTA PHASE 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded plat thereof. Bryce J. Finn and Jennifer K. Finn, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Source, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 21, 2006 and recorded July 17, 2006 Book 778, Page 1481 as Document No. 200617421. The beneficial interest is currently held by Ally Bank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $542.54, beginning November 1, 2012, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 5, 2014 is $192,904.73 principal, interest at the rate of 3.375% now totaling $10,922.15, escrow advances of $7,705.24, and other fees and

expenses advanced of $6,194.45, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 23, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 23rd day of May, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Gmac/finn – 42061.026 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 30, 2014, at 11:00

MNAXLP o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 1, 2, AND 3 IN BLOCK 80 OF SOUTH MISSOULA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David O Larson, and Theresa J Larson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 11, 2007 and recorded January 18, 2007 in Book 790 Page 982 under Document No 200701444; Modification Agreement recorded May 20, 2013, Book 913, Page 253 under Document No 201309687 Modification Agreement recorded May 23, 2013, Book 913, Page 448 under Document No 201309882. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $917.92, beginning January 1, 2014, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 21, 2014 is $209,402.43 principal, interest at the rate of 4.25% now totaling $4,195.80, escrow advances of $7,349.31, suspense balance of $-46.07 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,367.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.72 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being

made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 28, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 28th day of May, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Bac V Larson 42104.051 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEFS SALE on September 26, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 6 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5796, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH EASEMENTS ACROSS TRACT 4 AND TRACT 8 FOR ACCESS AND SEPTIC DRAIN FIELD AND UTILITY SITE AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5796 William J Cleek and Michelle L Cleek, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on December 17, 2007 and recorded on December 27, 2007 on Book 810 and Page 1440 as Document No. 200733112; Loan Modification dated June 24, 2013 and recorded September 3, 2013, Book 918, Page 1255 under Document No. 201317689. The beneficial inter-

est is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,139.85, beginning July 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 31, 2014 is $253,838.10 principal, interest at the rate of 3.5% now totaling $8,884.32, late charges in the amount of $125.98, escrow advances of $4,674.56, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,534.81, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the

sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMA-

TION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 22, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 22nd day of May, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2014 Chase V Cleek 41954.955

SUSTAINAFIEDS Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing ecofriendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com Natural Housebuilders and Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using

solar thermal and solar PV. 3690940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders & Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal & solar PV.

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 239, 395, 478 and 629. Units can contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday August 25, 2014. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday August 28, 2014 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

%montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014

[C7]


RENTALS

SERVICES CONTRACTORS Mannix Construction. Residential • Light Commercial • Remodels. 549-4540

CHILDCARE Fall preschool openings! Iddy Biddies is taking applications for full time openings in our FALL 19month-2year old class, our 3yr old class, and our preschool 4-5 class. Cost is $140/week. A deposit will be required to hold these spots. At Iddy Biddies we strive to work in conjunction with families, providing a well-rounded education to a small group of inspired young individuals by encouraging a love for nature, adventure, and the arts. Our thoughtfully planned, rich environment makes learning inevitably fun! Please stop by 2901 Eaton St., or call 406-728-5055 anytime to view our loving facility. We look forward to meeting you! Fall preschool openings! Iddy Biddies is taking applications for full time openings in our FALL 19month-2year old class, our 3yr old class, and our preschool 4-5 class. Cost is $140/week. A deposit will be required to hold these spots. At Iddy Biddies we strive to work in conjunction with families, providing a wellrounded education to a small group of inspired young individuals by encouraging a love for nature, adventure, and the arts. Our thoughtfully planned, rich environment makes learning inevitably fun! Please stop by 2901 Eaton St., or call 406-728-5055 anytime to view our loving facil-

ity. We look forward to meeting you!

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders and Terry Davenport Design, Inc. Building net zero energy custom homes using solar thermal and solar PV. 3690940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar specializes in design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. Serving all of Western Montana. www.SBSlink.com

MISCELLANEOUS Piano Lessons in Your Home ...depending on where you live. 20 plus years experience. All ages and levels. Give me a call and we’ll work out the details. I also teach in my home. Tina. (406)214-5873

PAINTING LIGHTEN UP PAINTING. Celebrating 30 glorious years of painting! Lics’d/ insured free estimates. Carrie 207-9255

REAL ESTATE Downsizing • New mortgage options • Housing options for 55+ or 62+ • Life estates • Antique & collectible estimates. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com

ARCHIE’S

BACKYARD BIKE SHOP UBI Certified Bicycle Technician

728-5882 www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

’‡…‹ƒŽ‹œ‹‰ ‘•– ”ƒ‡—‹Ž†‹‰• ’‡…‹ƒŽ‹œ‹‰ ‘•– ”ƒ‡—‹Ž†‹‰•

ƒŽŽˆ‘” ”‡‡•–‹ƒ–‡• ƒŽŽˆ‘” ”‡‡•–‹ƒ–‡•

(855) MQS B BARN ARN (677-2276)

30’x60‘x12’ 30’x60‘x12’ –‘”ƒ‰‡—‹Ž†‹‰  –‘”ƒ‰‡—‹Ž†‹‰ •1-60’ •1-60’ ‹†‡™ƒŽŽ’‡ ‹†‡™ƒŽŽ’‡  •5-12’ Bays Bays •5-12’ 40’x60’x12’ •3’ Overhang Overhang •3’ Garage/Hobby Gar age/Hobby Shop On Front Front •2-10x10 $14,900 Garage Gar age Doors

•–ƒŽŽ‡† •1-3’ Entry Door ‘ˆϐ‹–Ȁƒ‹•…‘–  ‘ˆϐ‹–Ȁƒ‹•…‘– ’–‹‘ƒŽ  ’–‹‘ƒŽ $22,600

•–ƒŽŽ‡†

™™™Ǥ“•„ƒ”Ǥ…‘ ™™™Ǥ“•„ƒ”Ǥ…‘ Pric Prices es based on a 40 lb. sno snow w load - De Delivery liverry ffees ee e s may apply

[C8] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $600, Downtown, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $650, walkin closet, open concept, DW, W/D hookups, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $675, Off Broadway, Newer Complex, Walk-in closet, A/C, open concept, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 7287333 1024 Stephens Ave. #12. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

healing practitioner(s), etc. Cat ok. Cooperative farm/Temple. 207-1171

able to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-2736034

320 Knowles: 2 Bedroom, Second floor, Nice condition, Hookups, Deck entry, Heat paid, Cat OK, $795. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

DUPLEXES

720 Turner St. “D” 3 bed/1.5 bath Northside, pet? $900 Grizzly Property Management 5422060 808 Kemp: 1 Bedroom, Second floor, Large storage, Newer carpet & lino, A/C, Cat OK, All paid, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? westernmontana.narpm.org NEW COMPLEX!! Behind Missoula. Federal Credit Union off Russell. 1 Bedroom units for $625, hardwood laminate flooring, A/C, DW, new appliances, coin op laundry, storage and offstreet parking. W/S/G paid. 1 Bedroom units have large walkin closets. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. westernmontana.narpm.org Owners: looking for a professional to take care of your investment? Relax and leave it to the best in the business: Western Montana Chapter of NARPM westernmontana.narpm.org Rent from the best Property Managers in Western Montana westernmontana.narpm.org

2318 55th St. #2. 2 bed/1 bath, South Hills, off-street parking. $600. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2bd Miller Creek farm APT. 2 bed, 1 bath apt. UPPER Miller Creek in Missoula - ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED: $1200. Perfect for students, small family,

2423 55th St. “B” 3 bed/1bath, W/D hookups, garage, $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 1518 W. Central Ave 4 bed/1 bath, double garage, pet? $1325. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 20265 Remount: 2 Bedroom, Ninemile Valley, Fireplace, Hookups, Wood flr, Double garage, Pet Ok, $890. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106 2415 Mary Ave. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, central location, $1000. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 4 bedroom, 2 bath home $1,400, 2 living rooms, 2 fireplaces, microwave, DW, garage, deck, fenced back yard w/kennel S/G paid Pets on Approval, No Smoking GATEWEST 728-7333 4 bedroom, 2 bath home $1,500, vaulted ceilings w/fan, microwave, DW, granite countertops, 2 car garage, fenced back

Lolo 1/4 acre lot, nice park, $300/mo. Water, sewer, and garbage paid. No dogs. 2736034 Lolo RV Park Spaces avail-

MHA Management manages 13 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

1914 S. 14th St. “A”. Newer studio, central, W/D, A/C. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2314 Hillview: 2 Bedroom, Storage, Southhills, Hook-ups, Big shared yard, Parking, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106

2205 38th St. 2 bed/1bath, W/D hookups, garage $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

109 Turner Ct. #4 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, near park, pet? $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1 bath home $850, w/d hookups, fenced backyard, garage. S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking GATEWEST 728-7333

1710 Scott St. “B”. 1 bed/1 bath, all utilities included, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

yard S/G paid No Pets, No Smoking GATEWEST 728-7333 Is your Property Manager a NARPM Member? Our members are: licensed, educated, professional, bound by a code of ethics, and have a duty to provide the best possible service. www.westernmontana.narpm.or g Professional Property Management. Find Yourself at Home in the Missoula Rental Market with PPM. 1511 S Russell • (406) 721-8990 • www.professionalproperty.com WHO CARES? We do, in good times & bad... Auto; SR-22; Renters; Homeowners. JT Zinn Insurance. 406-549-8201. 321 SW Higgins. Find us on Facebook.

RENTAL WANTED Senior Lady in need of 1st floor 1-2 bedroom, large rental with some grass and WD hookups. 406-721-3759

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website!

www.alpharealestate.com

FIDELITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $695/ month Visit our website at

fidelityproperty.com


RENTALS

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

$265,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Sha-Ron river access. $330,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

1020 Stoddard. 2 bed, 1 bath Craftsman on the Northside. Hardwood floors & deck. $208,550. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential MIssoula 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

2116 West Kent. Charming 2 story, 3 bed, 1.5 bath home with single garage. Low-maintenance front yard & garden in back. $174,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

5614 Gharrett. 4 bed, 3 bath with deck, Bitterroot views & 2 car garage. Mary Louise ZappKnapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 4 0 6 - 4 5 6 - 2 2 6 0 . mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

10955 Cedar Ridge. Loft bedroom, 1 bath on 20+ acres with guest house & sauna near Blue Mountain Recreation Area. $300,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

124 Bridger Court. 3 bed, 2 bath split-level with Missoula & mountain views and double garage. $209,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 1290 Lena Lane. 3 bed, 3 bath with 3 car garage near fishing access in Target Range. $249,900. Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 544-8700 chrishonzel@lambrosera.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

1297 Big Flat. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Montana Craftsman on 7+ acres with fenced pasture & pond. $499,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

"Let us tend your den"

137 Tower. 3 bed, 2 bath on .397 acres near river trail. $229,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

11864 O’Keefe Creek. 5 bed, 3 bath on 20 fenced acres with tack shed, hay barn & horse stalls. $389,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

Finalist

Finalist

1633 South 4th West. 1920’s style 4 bed, 2 bath on new foundation & roof, fenced yard, patio & covered front porch. $299,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $299,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $149,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath, Rose Park home with commercial space.

2264 Grape Arbor Court. 6 bed, 3 bath in Target Range. $660,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties 2000.com 2515 Klondike Court. 4 bed, 3 bath ranch style in Grant Creek with 2 car garage. $365,000. Chris Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 544-8700. chrishonzel@lambrosera.com 2970 Sandalwood Court. 4 bed, 2 bath in Big Flat neighborhood with Clark Fork River access. $582,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. Five acres bordering DNRC in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 309 Plymouth. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Craftsman bungalow with wood floors, sky lights, patio and claw foot tub. 1 bed, 1 bath apartment in lower level. $329,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 3411 Paxson. 4 bed, 3 bath recently remodeled with fenced yard & double garage. $285,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 3748 Brandon. 5 bed, 3 bath with 2 car garage in Linda Vista. $363,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Lower Miller Creek home on 1 acre. $230,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4415 Shepard Lane, East Missoula. 3 bed, 3 bath on 1 acre near Canyon River Golf Course &

experience helping clients buy and sell real estate in Missoula and surrounding areas. You can find her at www.MoveMontana.com Are your housing needs changing? We can help you explore

your options. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 728-2621. www.clarkforkrealty.com Buying or selling homes? Let me help you find your way home. David Loewenwarter. Prudential

5619 Prospect. 5 bed, 4 bath well-maintained Grant Creek home with 3 car garage. $404,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 6 Greenbrier. Upper Rattlesnake 2 bed, 2 bath with 1 bed, 1 bath lower level apartment. Close to Rattlesnake Wilderness Area. $310,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 6200 St. Thomas. 5 bed, 4 bath on 1+ acre in Miller Creek neighborhood. $359,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 655 Woodworth. 3 bed, 3 bath 1940’s bungalow two blocks to UM. $355,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com

We’re W e’ e re her here e to LIPT]SYLSQI LIPT]SYLSQI

716 South 6th West. 3 bed, 2 bath with wood floors, arched doorways, fireplace & fenced yard with deck. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 720 Ben Hogan Drive. 5 bed, 4 bath on 4 Farviews acres with Pattee Canyon views. $750,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 720 West Sussex. 5 bed, 2 bath ranch style home with many upgrades. $247,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath with mother-in-law apartment on 5 view acres. $395,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com Anne Jablonski, Realtor with Portico Real Estate, recently obtained her Montana State Broker license. Anne has 12 years of

(EZI.EGSFWSR:46IWMHIRXMEP6IEP)WXEXI0SER1EREKIV (EZI.EGSFWSR:46IWMHIRXMEP6IEP)WXEXI0SER1EREKIV H NEGSFWSR$JWFQWPEGSQ 21079- 2 1079- HNEGSFWSR$JWFQWPEGSQ

Real Estate Lending Center +EV½IPH%ZIRYI`  +EV½IPH%ZIRYI` fsbmsla.com

Bank NMLS  

1420D Stoddard • $162,500 • Very cool 2 bed, 1.5 bath Westside condo • 2 story with 1000+ sq.ft. of living space • Great front porch, fenced yard & garage • All appliances & A/C

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014

[C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES 1633 South 4th West. 1920’s style 4 bed, 2 bath on new foundation & roof, fenced yard, patio & covered front porch. $299,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $299,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1815 South 4th West. 3 bed, 2 bath artistically remodeled with half-wrap porch, fruit trees & art studio. $279,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653

Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-456-2260. mlzappknapp @lambrosera.com 6 Greenbrier. Upper Rattlesnake 2 bed, 2 bath with 1 bed, 1 bath lower level apartment. Close to Rattlesnake Wilderness Area. $322,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath with mother-in-law apartment on 5 view acres. $395,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com Anne Jablonski, Realtor with Portico Real Estate, recently obtained her Montana State Broker license. Anne has 12 years

of experience helping clients buy and sell real estate in Missoula and surrounding areas. You can find her at www.MoveMontana.com Are your housing needs changing? We can help you explore your options. Clark Fork Realty. 512 E. Broadway. (406) 7282621. www.clarkforkrealty.com Buying or selling homes? Let me help you find your way home. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406-241-3321 “Find your way home” with David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321

I can help you find your new home! Celia Grohmann @ Banana Belt Realty. 406-550-1014 • celiamontana@gmail.com. Visit my website at www.on93.com Let me help save you time and energy. I know about Missoula and have lived here 30+ years. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321 Lolo - 3 bed, 1.5 bath, 2042 sq ft, garage, full basement, living & family rooms, fireplace, deck, large yard with garden area and UG sprinklers. $179,900. 113 Dallas. Brent 619-990-6870 More than 35 years of Sales & Marketing experience. JAY

1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $149,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com

Attention first time home buyers and parents of college students~ this is the place to call home!

2 Bdr, 2 Bath, Rose Park home with commercial space. $265,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit mindypalmer.com

Low maintenance 2 bedroom condo. Near the University and shopping. Gas fireplace. Updated Bathroom.

2304 River Road. Energy-efficient 2 bed, 2 bath with solar system. Close to Milwaukee Trail. $215,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. Five acres bordering DNRC in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Lower Miller Creek home on 1 acre. $230,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit mindypalmer.com 5614 Gharrett. 4 bed, 3 bath with deck, Bitterroot views & 2 car garage. Mary Louise Zapp-

[C10] Missoula Independent • August 21–August 28, 2014

Put my experience and dedication to work for you. JAY GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • jay.getz@prumt.com • www.JayGetzMissoula.com

$109,000

2264 Grape Arbor Court. 6 bed, 3 bath in Target Range. $660,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties 2000.com

3411 Paxson. 4 bed, 3 bath recently remodeled with fenced yard & double garage. $285,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

Newer 2 bed, 1 bath 1200 sq. ft. home on 1.02 acre lot. 1200 sq. ft. attached garage, recently fenced, new roof sealant. Easy to maintain. Bring you own landscaping ideas to this wonderful home. It’s easy to live in this semiremote area with quiet and views. Only 10 Miles from Reserve Street. David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana 329-2059. loewenwarter.com

MLS# 20141595

2116 West Kent. Charming 2 story, 3 bed, 1.5 bath home with single garage. Low-maintenance front yard & garden in back. $174,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

309 Plymouth. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Craftsman bungalow with wood floors, sky lights, patio and claw foot tub. 1 bed, 1 bath apartment in lower level. $329,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@ properties2000.com

GETZ, Prudential Montana Real Estate. (406) 214-4016 • j a y. g e t z @ p r u m t . c o m • www.JayGetzMissoula.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

RE/MAX All Stars; combining local ownership, experienced agents, and the power of #1 RE/MAX. Complimentary real estate advice. Call 406-542-8644 Slant Street Charmer 733 Marshall $225,000. Slant Street charmer with lots of light, a wonderful yard with raised beds, and an awesome shop all in a convenient location and ready to move in to. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Wonderful Westside 1722 Defoe. 2 bedroom, 1 bonus, 2 bathroom home on the Wonderful Westside with awesome gardens in the fenced yard. A home with character! $189,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1400 Burns Street #15. $150,000. A rare, spacious 3 bedroom unit in the awesome Burns Street Commons! This upstairs corner unit is all on one level with a secure private entrance and a balcony. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com


REAL ESTATE 1861 East Broadway. 3 bed, 2.5 condo with deck & single garage. $199,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 324B North Grant. 3 bed, 2 bath condo with fenced yard & 2 car garage. $169,900. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com Uniquely Missoula! 619 Phillips and 633 Phillips. $165,000 each. The former MUD demonstration site on the Northside. Many outbuildings on each and so many possibilities. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room

and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. 2 bedroom units for $119,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND 1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com Building lot north of Philipsburg with power 1/2 mile away & no covenants. $150,000. Pintlar Territories R.E. 406-859-3522. pintlarterritories.com Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

Lambros ERA Real Estate. 5329296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Raymond. .62 acre in Lower Rattlesnake bordering Missoula Open Space. $148,000. David Loewenwarter. Prudential Montana Real Estate. LOEWENWARTER.COM. 406241-3321

COMMERCIAL 101 Church Street, Stevensville. Currently Mission Bistro Restaurant, but zoned for commercial or residential. $255,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula. 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. Commercial or Residential. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN

109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 3 bed, 1 bath with library, parlor & fantastic front porch. $139,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate, 5329283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 1229 Iron Cap, Stevensville. 4 bed, 3 bath ranchette on 15.33 fenced acres. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 406-456-2260 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Bonner area home close to Blackfoot River & public lands. $324,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Historic Stevensville home. $236,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Lolo area home home. $229,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or

PERFECT PICKS Silcox Place Lot 35, Thompson Falls • $78,000 Mission Bay, Polson • $69,750 2070 Cooper #614 • $219,000 2200 Garland #30 • $112,500

6 TIPS

FOR BUYING MORE FOR LESS 512 E. Broadway 406-728-2621 matt@clarkforkrealty.com

NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp,

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014

[C11]


REAL ESTATE 377 Grizzly Dr, Seeley Lake $189,900

3 bed/2 bath cabin on Clearwater River. 2 acres w/state land lease. Large kitchen w/open floor plan, gas fireplace.

visit mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Stevensville area home on 3.2 acres. $529,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 5 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit mindypalmer.com

7725 Moe Road, Lolo. Octagon House on 9.7 acres. 5 bed, 3 bath, private office, 3300 sf, views, dead-end road and a great backyard! $519,000 Celia Grohmann Banana Belt Realty 406-550-1014 celiamontana@gmail.com Easy access to the highway and the river. 17430 Six-Mile, $250,000. Historic 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home in great condition on stunning 12.51 acre setting with views, fruit trees, tons of gardening space and so much more! KD 240-5227 portico-

realestate.com St. Ignatius Price Reduced! Beautiful newer 2 bed, 1.5 bath home with office. 6+ gravity irrigated acres in new pasture grass seeding. Big kitchen with vaulted T&G ceilings, propane heat stove. Nicely decorated, generous windows, Breathtaking Mission Mtn Views. Carport/storage building, lilacs & young fruit trees. Paved road, minimal covenants, well @ 30gpm when drilled. MOTIVATED SELLER!Bring offers!Price reduced to $199,500.

Call Trudy @ 406-360-5860 for more information.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-258-7522 or Cell: 406-550-3587

EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance & Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

2116 West Kent Charming 3 bed, 1.5 bath with great front porch and back patio. Low maintenance front yard and garden in back. 1200 sq.ft. of living space & all appliances. Single garage

$174,000

309 Plymouth $329,000 1930's Craftsman Bungalow 4 bed, 2.5 bath with wood floors, fireplace, skylights & claw foot tub. 1 bed, 1 bath lower level apartment

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com missoulanews.com • August 21–August 28, 2014

[C12]


Profile for Independent Publishing

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

Advertisement