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LOST IN TIME: DAVE MARTENS TRACKS DOWN MONTANA’S OLDEST ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC

CANDIDATE NEWS JUDGE OMITS PAST DUI

STILL NEED OPINION WOLVES OUR PROTECTION

FARE: HISTORY FOOD FAIR OF THE TATER PIG


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


ARTS

LOST IN TIME: DAVE MARTENS TRACKS DOWN MONTANA’S OLDEST ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC

CANDIDATE NEWS JUDGE OMITS PAST DUI

STILL NEED OPINION WOLVES OUR PROTECTION

FARE: HISTORY FOOD FAIR OF THE TATER PIG


[2] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013


cover photo courtesy of Daniel Dickey

News Voices/Letters Kudos, dams and politics ...........................................................................4 The Week in Review Rivers, rollovers and Denise Juneau ...............................................6 Briefs Megaloads, omissions and a cell tower ...................................................................6 Etc. Milltown State Park’s long wait ...................................................................................7 News Imperial Sovereign Court does more than just drag shows.....................................8 News Western Montana Fair welcomes new carnival to town ...........................................9 Opinion Why wolves still need our protection ...............................................................10 Feature Darko Butorac is making classical music cool again ..........................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Dave Martens tracks down Montana’s oldest rock and roll music...........................18 Music Vintage Trouble, GRMLN, The Polyphonic Spree and Dragons ............................19 Books Bass finds lyrical force in a harsh landscape.........................................................20 Film Los Wild Ones captures a record label stuck in the past .........................................21 Film The Way Way Back swaps cynicism for tenderness .................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Coriander curry....................................................................................24 Hangriest Hour Tater Pigs ...............................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Working all week to Carmen ..................................................................27 Mountain High The Morganzo 55...................................................................................33 Agenda Orchard Gardens Outreach Tour ........................................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters PHOTO INTERN Tommy Martino CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Dameon Pesanti COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle EDITORIAL INTERN Eben Wragge-Keller ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Tommy Martino

Asked Tuesday, Aug. 6, outside the Orange Street Food Farm. Would you say you’re a classical music fan, not a fan, or have no idea what we’re are talking about? Follow-up: What’s your most memorable piece of classical music?

Trish Egelano: Yes, I love classical music. I grew up playing the violin. I’m really bummed I won’t be here for Darko’s show. “Night on Bald Mountain”?: I can’t think of the name but my favorite is Darko’s piece from Fantasia.

Patrick Yeder: More or less, yes. I don’t have any on my iPod though. Orbital pleasure: Yeah, there are pieces from movies but I don’t like it when they get overused. I like the composer who made The Planets because it makes me feel like I’m in space.

Patty Gosselin: I do like classical music. I took a class that covered a lot of different areas of music that included classical. Punk roque: I like Baroque. It kind of sounds punk-y, loud, and showcases the instruments in a cool way.

Zoey Farber: Yes. I like the complexity and history of it. Rach star: Rachmaninoff composed a difficult piano piece I learned for my senior recital.

Christina Rovira-González: Yes, I do. I played the piano from the age of 7 to 18 and stopped when I came to college. “Ninth Symphony”: I like A Clockwork Orange’s music. I believe it was by Beethoven. I also like Wagner.

[4] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

Enormously impressed I want to compliment Indy reporter Jessica Mayrer on her deliberate and careful characterization of homelessness in Missoula (see “Camp cleanup challenges,” Aug. 1). What could have been a negative and sensational spotlight or a mostly stereotypical and divisive piece on the Reserve Street bridge cleanup and the costs associated with our chronically homeless, instead is an article reporting the facts and serves to educate the public by distinguishing the types and needs of our community’s most vulnerable. All poor people aren’t the same. In case you missed her piece, “Rough estimates hold that approximately 11 percent of any given homeless population is chronically homeless. Though not representative of the working poor and single mothers that compose the vast majority of people living on the streets, in cars and area encampments, the chronically homeless often suffer from addiction problems and, as such, consume 50 percent or more of all resources dedicated to helping the houseless.” As someone who has long worked in this area, I am enormously impressed and appreciative. We don’t see it often. It is a fine example of truly responsible journalism. State Rep. Ellie Hill Missoula

have been impossible for horses to negotiate, as the Forest Service maintained, and for sure there seemed no need for dynamite to “widen the trail,” as they also claimed. We also observed manure all along the trail up very close to the dam itself, so clearly some horses were able to make it up there fairly recently, as we figured nobody would helicopter in manure.

“This principle is fundamental to the very concept of Wilderness, which we are lucky enough to have around us in all directions here

Straight to the source

in Missoula.”

After reading your article “A dam dilemma” ( July 11), my fiancée and I decided to hike up to the Fred Burr Dam in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness to see what all the fuss was about. I’m 74 years old and she’s from New York, had only camped once in her life and had never backpacked, but we were powerfully curious. The first night we packed in to a campsite 7.5 miles up Fred Burr Creek. That day we saw two other backpackers, but the next two days we saw no human being and enjoyed the quiet found only in Wilderness. By lunchtime of the second day we were at the dam. We noticed straight off that the partly collapsed catwalk that Fred Burr High Lake Inc. wanted to repair by using a helicopter to bring in 682 pounds of boards, etc., was constructed from on-site trees, not from sawn lumber. The dam itself, which doesn’t need repairs, was also made from on-site material. We wondered why the catwalk couldn’t just be repaired using local materials again, as there were plenty of trees and deadfalls around. There was a spillway to take care of any overflow, so the judge’s assertion that “leaving Fred Burr Dam un-repaired could do more damage to the Wilderness than a single helicopter” didn’t make much sense either. Hiking up to the dam we crawled over or ducked under some deadfalls, but these needed only to be cut with crosscut saws as a matter of routine trail maintenance for both horses and people to pass easily. At no point did we see switchbacks that would

Later we read Renee Morley’s letter to the Independent (July 18) in which Morley agreed, as just about everybody does, that “unnecessary helicopter flights are detrimental to Wilderness and degrade the law.” Then Morley reversed course and let the Forest Service off the hook due to their lack of funds to maintain trails so that horses can pass. Still later we learned that the Forest Service had spent tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars on an Environmental Assessment required by Fred Burr High Lake Inc.’s 2010 request for use of a helicopter in Wilderness. This expenditure wouldn’t have been necessary had the Forest Service simply insisted in the first place that the corporation, which owns the dam and water rights, obey the Wilderness Act. This would require either packing in repair materials or using on-site materials, as had been done in the past. More importantly, it raises the serious question of why the Forest Service is spending taxpayers’ money to analyze a private company’s project on its private dam? Now the Forest Service is having to spend more of our taxpayer money to defend against litigation brought against them for failing to uphold the law. Since these funds, which Congress appropriates to the Forest Service to manage Wilderness, are

being wasted, maybe that’s why there’s not enough money left to hire crews to maintain the hiking trails in Wilderness or to build new trails, which was not the case in the past.The Wilderness Act of 1964 (we will celebrate its 50th anniversary next year) is very clear about prohibiting any motorized equipment such as helicopters in Wilderness whatsoever except for rare life and death rescue situations. This principle is fundamental to the very concept of Wilderness, which we are lucky enough to have around us in all directions here in Missoula. Maybe the Forest Service needs to take another look at the law and spend our taxpayer money more wisely. That could go a long way towards untangling the so-called “dam dilemmas” throughout Wilderness. Jerome Walker National Board Wilderness Watch Missoula

Lead the way These days, Congress has developed a reputation for intransigence and a startling inability to produce results. Representatives often speak of the need for compromise and bipartisan support, but when the time to act arrives, they usually squander the opportunity. Here in Montana, we pride ourselves on being able to work together to find common sense solutions. With this in mind, we should take it upon ourselves to lead the way. Recently, Sens. Jon Tester and Max Baucus testified in front of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on behalf of their respective bills, the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act and the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act. Both pieces of legislation are Montana-made, collaborative solutions that bring together a diverse range of interests to keep Montana the special place that it is. Historically, forest management has been a contentious issue in this state, but as Tester repeated throughout his testimony, these are bills that “break through the gridlock” and create lasting solutions for timber, sportsmen and conservationists. Both bills represent Montana’s capacity for working together and compromising for the good of the state, and they give us a chance to be a role model for the rest of the country. But the time to act is now. Tester’s bill has been around since 2009, and this is the second year for the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act. Especially considering Baucus will be retiring in a little more than a year, we must seize the opportunity to preserve our heritage and reinforce our reputation for staying above the fray. Be sure to write Tester and Baucus, as well as Rep. Steve Daines, and let them know that Montana needs these bills now. Michael Dax Missoula


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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Tommy Martino

Wednesday, July 31 The city of Missoula lowers the speed limit on Mullan Road between West Broadway and Reserve Street from 45 mph to 35. On April 1, Chance Geery, 18, was hit by a car while walking along a sidewalk next to the road.

Thursday, August 1 Shaun Lee, 30, of South Carolina, drives his vehicle off a rural Ninemile Valley Road, sustaining serious injuries. He remains stuck there for more than a day before he’s found and taken to the hospital.

Friday, August 2 Missoula is named one of the country’s top 10 college towns by Livability.com. The website states, “Missoula’s cultural attractions and entertainment options are surprisingly urban for a place founded by miners, timber companies and farmers.”

Saturday, August 3 Caras Park fills with food vendors, live music and craft brews for Missoula River Fest, a celebration of conservation efforts on the Clark Fork. The event also features surfers on Brennan’s Wave and a one-mile stand-up paddleboarding race.

Competitors take part in a mile-long stand-up paddleboard race as part of Missoula River Fest on Sat., Aug. 3. The event, presented by the Clark Fork Coalition and Friends of the Civic Stadium, also featured a surf jam, live music and brew fest.

Sunday, August 4 Former Montana First Lady Betty Babcock dies at the age of 91. She served as a delegate during the 1972 Montana Constitutional Convention and, in 1975, the Montana House of Representatives. She was also married to former Gov. Tim Babcock.

Monday, August 5 Montana Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau ends speculation that she could run for U.S. Senate in 2014. Juneau announces via social media that she has more work to do in her current position and will not attempt to fill Sen. Max Baucus’ seat.

Tuesday, August 6 Glacier National Park closes the Rising Sun Campground after a black bear two days earlier laid on an occupied tent. The Great Falls Tribune reports that earlier this season what is likely the same bear took a pillow from a sleeping camper.

Megaloads

Nez Perce, feds railroaded A megaload bound for the Alberta tar sands ground to a halt at the Nez Perce Reservation border along U.S. Highway 12 in Idaho early Tuesday morning, stopped by a blockade of Nez Perce tribal members. The protest stalled shipper Omega Morgan for nearly two hours before tribal police took 19 individuals into custody, including eight of the nine members of the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee. The Idaho Transportation Department officially issued Omega Morgan’s megaload permit Aug. 5, and warned motorists to expect delays starting late that same night. The agency cautioned Omega Morgan that the U.S. Forest Service had jurisdiction to review the permit, an oversight role established in a court ruling earlier this year. Nez Perce National Forest Supervisor Rick Brazell had already voiced frustration with ITD’s “ad hoc process” of authorizing megaloads on Highway 12, which crosses his district and the Nez Perce Reserva-

We don’t define family, we ARE family! There’s more to our care than you might think.

[6] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

tion. Brazell repeatedly asked ITD not to approve Omega Morgan’s request until his office had formally consulted with the tribe and completed a full study of potential impacts. Nez Perce tribal officials took emergency action Aug. 4 in opposing state approval of Omega Morgan’s 255-foot, 644,000-pound shipment. In a statement, Tribal Chairman Silas C. Whitman said the tribe was “shocked by Omega Morgan’s audacity.” Whitman encouraged the Forest Service to assert its authority, “in court if necessary.” “The tribe will not stand idly by and allow Omega Morgan to create false urgency and provoke unnecessary conflict,” Whitman said. “Actions beyond mere words may be necessary, in order to have the Nez Perce Tribe’s voice heard.” Whitman was among those arrested for blocking the load Aug. 6. Environmentalists in Idaho quickly called out Omega Morgan for a “lack of respect for the Nez Perce people,” as well as for the U.S. Forest Service’s authority over megaload permits. Brazell balked at the load’s sudden movement.

“While no timelines for review were specified, you surmised that less than one business day would be adequate for our review,” Brazell wrote in a letter to Omega Morgan President and CEO John McCalla. He accused the company of promoting a litany of “false impressions” about its exchanges with his office in recent weeks. Omega Morgan’s megaload is expected to reach Lolo Pass by the end of the week. Duane Williams with the Montana Department of Transportation says the company has submitted an application to ship the load through Montana, but has not yet requested a permit. The company has a second load awaiting ITD approval at the Port of Lewiston. Alex Sakariassen

Elections

Judge candidate omits arrest When current Missoula Municipal Court candidate Mark McLaverty applied to become a city judge in 2011, he was asked if he had ever been found guilty of a crime,


[news] regulation or ordinance that carried a jail sentence. He answered, “No.” “That wouldn’t be correct,” says Missoula Senior Deputy Attorney Gary Henricks, who prosecuted McLaverty for misdemeanor driving under the influence in 2003. McLaverty was found guilty and, as Hendricks says, the charge “carries with it a minimum 24-hour sentence.” McLaverty says that he sticks by his answer because he doesn’t remember serving any jail time as a result of the DUI. “I never spent time in a cell, or anything that I can recollect,” he says. McLaverty first attempted to be appointed to the city court’s bench in 2011. That’s when McLaverty filled out a municipal judge application asking him to list any arrests or convictions, along with traffic citations, that carried a jail sentence. In June of this year, McLaverty again threw his hat in the ring to unseat Missoula Municipal Court Judge Kathleen Jenks in the upcoming November election. According to court filings resulting from the Jan. 27, 2003, DUI charge, law enforcement accused McLaverty of refusing to submit to a Breathalyzer test after he was stopped for failing to yield to an emergency vehicle, failing to obey a traffic signal and turning without giving a proper signal. He was found guilty and ordered to pay a $395 fine and complete a substance abuse treatment program. Court records show McLaverty completed such a program in August 2003. On Feb. 7, 2003, McLaverty petitioned the Montana Department of Justice to reinstate his driver’s license. The license had been revoked for McLaverty’s alleged failure to submit to a Breathlyzer test. In the petition, McLaverty claimed that the revocation was unlawful because, “Petitioner did not refuse to take a breath test or was physically or mentally incapable of refusing a breath test.” Henricks explains that in some instances prosecutors will sign off on such an agreement, as Henricks did in this case, if a defendant agrees to plead guilty. “Ultimately it was resolved,” Henricks says. On Feb. 10, 2003, a District Court judge reinstated McLaverty’s license. McLaverty notes that he hasn’t been cited for any other alcohol-related infractions since 2003. “I learned my lesson,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Cellphones

Tower on tap in Hot Springs Not everyone is excited about improving cellphone service in northwest Montana. Plans for a cell tower outside Hot Springs has a group of residents concerned that it will ruin the character of their town, and they feel that they’re being kept out of the planning process.

“We don’t know what’s going on and we want to be part of the dialogue,” resident Susan Hagen says. “We have a vision for this place and we don’t want to change our way of life.” Hot Springs, with a population of roughly 550, is currently one of the few communities in the nation without cellphone service or a tower, a fact some residents take pride in. They argue that the tower’s radiation is unhealthy and the rest of the world is too wired. They consider living in a community without cellphones a privilege. Just as troubling as the proposed tower, however, is how the community learned about it. Jeff Miller says

he found out via an internet search, not a public meeting. “There’s no paper trail,” Miller says. “It shouldn’t just be left for private people to decide―and not one elected official.” Sanders County doesn’t currently have zoning ordinances that require public discussion about cellphone towers. Additionally, the tower is slated for land County Commissioner Glen Magera owned before being elected. Plans for the tower started when AT&T leased private property from Magera in 2011 and again in 2012. Magera says he was paid to hold the property but won’t receive lease payments until construction begins. He did not say how much money he has received or will receive. Records show AT&T cleared the tower with the necessary federal agencies, and AT&T Public Affairs spokesperson Timi Aguire says a building permit for the site has been approved by the state of Montana. Magera defends his part in the tower’s construction and says he did nothing wrong. “I’m not big on technology of any kind. I hate computers,” says Magera. “But if I turn them down they’ll find another spot and come anyway.” Dameon Pesanti

BY THE NUMBERS

ETC.

Approximate temperature of the Bitterroot River near Missoula Aug. 5. Montana Trout Unlimited encouraged anglers this week to “take a break from fishing” to help reduce the stress on fish caused by high temperatures and low stream flows.

Nearly 150 people showed up at Milltown State Park last Saturday to bask on the banks of the fabled confluence. Some toted tubes, others simply strolled along the Clark Fork. Montana State Parks and the nonprofit Friends of Two Rivers teamed up to host a barbecue. The Clark Fork Coalition rekindled its long-dormant Milltown-to-Downtown Float. Everyone arrived to enjoy a single day of something that’s pretty much a given everywhere else in Montana: public access. For more than five years now—since the removal of the Milltown Dam—the confluence has been closed to all but a select few. The reason is pretty obvious: It’s a Superfund site, a toxic mess left behind by Montana’s copper kings. Millions of dollars have been poured into cleanup and restoration. Train car after train car of tainted sediment has disappeared upriver to Opportunity. And the Clark Fork finally opened to river traffic past its meeting point with the Blackfoot this spring, an event many welcomed with a sense of closure. Yet Milltown State Park itself remains closed. There’s no parking lot, no ranger station and a final site plan is still on the horizon. Save for one day last weekend, the park continues to spark frustration among officials and locals. “In the spring, I had a few requests from folks who wanted to host other events out there,” says Milltown State Park Manager Mike Kustudia. “I kindly but firmly said no, we’re just not prepared for it. It was a big deal for us to be able to host this, because I had to bring in help from other parks to make sure it was staffed properly.” As state park manager, Milltown State Park is Kustudia’s baby. He understands the frustrations, as well as the anticipation. He spent most of Saturday giving tours and explaining what it will look like when it opens, hopefully next year. But the one-day-only teaser could come at a risk. By allowing the public brief access to the site, Kustudia says there was some fear of people forgetting or even ignoring the fact that it’s still closed. “We had long discussions about it, like, ‘Won’t people think it’s open, or want to be in there all the time?’ Hopefully people understand … we’re still working on getting things developed.” More than 100 people have now visited the future park. Odds are they’re thirsting for a return already, along with anyone who didn’t attend. Kustudia gets it. “We’re going to get there,” he says. “It’s been an exercise in patience for me, too.”

70

Politics

Run once, run twice In early July, Rep. David “Doc” Moore, R-Missoula, made a bit of a “last minute” decision. He noticed that only one candidate—Annelise Hedahl—had entered the race for Dick Haines’ Ward 5 seat on the Missoula City Council. He decided to throw his name in the ring, despite being up for reelection to the state House in 2014. “Too often we see too many races in Missoula where there’s only one person on the ballot,” Moore says. “The Missoula County Democrats have endorsed whoever my opponent is, and so has the outgoing incumbent … I just want people to have a choice.” Now Moore is planning the end of his summer around candidate forums and yard signs. He’s crafting a message that focuses not just on Missoula issues like zoning and accessory dwelling units, but how those discussions impact the city’s rural neighbors. And he singles out one town as an example: Seeley Lake. After running an unsuccessful 2010 bid to topple incumbent Tim Furey in the largely rural House District 91—a Democratic stronghold for more than a decade— Moore managed to win the seat by just 22 votes last year. Already the boundaries of his district have shifted, due to the legislature’s recent redistricting. It’s no longer HD 91. It’s HD 92. “It takes Rock Creek out of my district, which is terrible,” Moore says. “No man should have a Blue Ribbon trout stream taken from his district.” Moore does point to one benefit. He picked up the town of Seeley Lake, one of the area’s more conservative pockets, where his talking points for this fall’s council election will no doubt gain attention in advance of his 2014 legislative race. “That area will definitely be important for reelection,” Moore says. “It would be impossible to win without it.” Moore acknowledges that his council race will give him a leg up toward retaining his legislative seat, but only if he doesn’t win in Ward 5. If he does win there, Montana law will require him to step down prior to taking his new office. Moore jokes that he’s “not too worried about that,” given the uphill battle he faces for city council. He already filed a financial reporting form for his reelection campaign, and says it’s “assumed that I’ll run again.” Alex Sakariassen

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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [7]


[news]

Local royalty Imperial Sovereign Court does more than just drag shows by Jessica Mayrer

Beer Drinkers’ Profile Chad & Laura

Summer Travel With A Ring To It

What brings you to the Iron Horse? Our hotel recommended this place. We're glad they did. We're riding the Street Glide from Seattle to Sturgis and back again. That sounds righteous. It was. The ride out was great; saw some family and a few bands–and we got engaged! Beverages of choice? Eddy Out and a Rosemary Roundabout

The Iron Horse: Where There's Always Someone You'll Know, Or Someone You Want To Know Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

[8] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

Robert Taylor is a big man. He’s nearly press I Jose, or the “Widow Norton,” as are court scholarships, awards of $500 or bald but sports a tidy white goatee. A tat- she’s called, dedicated the court to per- more granted annually. Blake notes that too on his right forearm reads, “Carpe forming good deeds. While many rightfully since the court launched the scholarship diem.” On a recent Sunday afternoon the think of drag shows as filled with bawdy program in 2006, it has assisted at least 47-year-old Montana native and U.S. Navy humor and hyper-sexual parodies, the Im- two individuals who went on to complete veteran acknowledges that he might not fit perial Sovereign Court’s mission goes far medical school. Last year, the court awarded 22-yeardeeper. Internationally, it has demonthe typical description of a drag queen. “I may not be the prettiest drag queen strated a commitment to donating pro- old Dustin Satterfield of Roundup $500. “I in the world,” Taylor says. “But I’m not the ceeds generated from drag shows to used the scholarship to complete my last community-minded organizations, such as year of school,” says Satterfield, who gradugliest by far.” After performing for two decades in those that conduct HIV-prevention efforts, uated last fall with a bachelor’s in sociolMontana and Las Vegas, Taylor has earned promote anti-hate crime education and ogy and women and gender studies. She the right to brag. He paid his dues learning work to mobilize the LGBT vote. Today, the plans on returning to UM this month to how to walk in high heels, apply eyeliner Imperial Sovereign Court engages in such begin a master’s degree in sociology. Satterfield learned about the scholarand making other painstaking—and efforts in more than 65 communities across ship while performing with the court as a painful—performance preparations. the United States, Canada and Mexico. diminutive drag king named “There’s shaving that’s in“Leon Bones.” She apprecivolved, which is terrible,” he ates the assistance and is says. “I hate to shave.” pleased that her performOn stage, Taylor transances are contributing to the forms into a larger-than-life court’s ongoing philanthropic woman named “Angelique efforts. LaRose DeLa Luna Kennady “I don’t think of it as volSmith.” During next month’s unteering,” she says. “I just Imperial Sovereign Court think of it as going out to a Coronation in Missoula, show and having a good time LaRose DeLa Luna Kennady ... You’re raising money just Smith aspires to be elected emby performing. You’re getting press. The title brings not only more tips, and that’s more bragging rights as the state’s money they can put back into highest ranking drag queen, the community, so (court but also the responsibility of members) can keep doing representing the state’s LGBT what they do.” community at home and in neighboring states. That honor The Imperial Sovereign would make Taylor the face of Court of the State of Monan organization with deep philtana will select its Ms. Gay photo courtesy of Edan Satterfield anthropic roots that stretch far Big Sky West title holder, a Dustin Satterfield, aka drag king “Leon Bones,” received role considered a stepping beyond the stage. a scholarship last year from the Imperial Sovereign Court DeLa Luna Kennady Smith of the State of Montana. Bones, center, is flanked here stone toward becoming royisn’t nervous about winning by Fawn Ovamae, left, and London Dahling, right. alty, at the Eagles Lodge in the title. For one, she appears Kalispell on Aug. 10. That In Montana, Board President John event precedes the Sept. 14 Coronation to be running unopposed. She also has a strong platform for her candidacy. In ad- “Equality” Blake says the court funds at Ruby’s Inn in Missoula, where the dition to furthering the court’s charitable scholarships that assist LGBT students court will elect next year’s royalty. The endeavors, she aims to bridge what she and pro-equality allies. It also assists or- public is invited to both events and Monsees as a divide between the state’s gay and ganizations including the Missoula Food tana residents are permitted to cast votes lesbian populations. “I think we should all Bank, Blue Mountain Clinic and the Na- in the elections. tional Coalition Building Institute with be on a united front,” she says. As for Taylor, aka DeLa Luna Kennady While the court presents itself as a cash donations. Smith, he’s just as interested in discussing Blake, a 27-year-old University of Mon- his goals as empress as the particulars of his monarchy, overseen by an emperor and empress who are assisted by a prince and tana student earning a bachelor’s in public act on stage. At the top of his to-do list is princess, it’s governed by a board of direc- administration, notes that the court’s work growing the court’s scholarship program tors. The board is charged with promoting is sincere, as well as strategic. and, in doing so, further encouraging edu“An essential foundation of our mis- cation among LGBT youth. “The big thing the monarchy by hosting shows, as well as choosing which local organizations and sion … is to, in plain language, commu- is community and kids,” Taylor says, before nicate that LGBT folks care about the same heading to a pre-Coronation interview with causes to lend its colorful support. The Imperial Court’s history dates things as everyone else,” he says. “We care the court’s board of directors. It goes to back to 1965, when Jose Julio Sarria, a about education. We care about families. show the royal responsibilities start even beWorld War II veteran and an irrepressible We care about feeding the homeless.” fore anyone is crowned. Among the community contributions drag queen, proclaimed herself Empress of the Imperial Court de San Francisco. Em- that Blake and Taylor are most proud of jmayrer@missoulanews.com


[news]

Step right up Western Montana Fair welcomes new carnival to town by Dameon Pesanti

Last year’s Western Montana Fair didn’t go exactly to plan. Blisteringly hot temperatures and a midweek thunderstorm helped push attendance numbers down. Of the people who did go, many complained that the attractions weren’t worth the entrance fees. There were fewer vendors than in years past, leaving many empty booths inside the Commercial Building. Some lamented the loss of horse racing. But nothing disappointed like the carnival. Faced with a myriad of problems including an ownership conflict and personnel shortages, Royal West Amusements and Inland Empire Shows arrived late and couldn’t open with the fair on the first day. “I’m sure that it had a big effect on last

Star Amusements of Billings and Cody, Wyo., won the rights. For the first time in 54 years, the Missoula County Fair has a new carnival. “We’re pretty excited,” says Earle. “They had great local references and we’re expecting a good turnout.” North Star promises to bring at least 31 rides and a minimum of 20 games. “A lot of people have basically the same rides but we have a lot of bigger ones,” says North Star office manager Arlene Lauer. Included in the lineup are usual staples like the Zipper, Typhoon, Gravitron, Kamikaze and, of course, a Ferris wheel. Among the newer rides in north Star’s repertoire is Pharaoh’s Fury, a giant boat

looking to take in the carnival. She suggests starting with a game that’ll guarantee a prize, such as the balloon pop or bottle bust, and then riding one of the classic attractions, like the Kamikaze or ferris wheel. Candied apples or cotton candy is a must. If you have little kids, she says stick to the easy stuff—especially if they’re easily spooked. “It’s crazy but they always like the simplest stuff,” Barnes says. “They’ll wear themselves out in the glass houses and obstacle courses. The most popular of all though is the super slide, which is cool because parents can ride it too without feeling silly.” For kids feeling a little braver, try the

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After last year’s poor showing, the Western Montana Fair decided to contract a new company for its carnival for the first time in 54 years. North Star Amusements won the bid and began setting up rides earlier this week.

year’s attendance,” says Missoula County Fairgrounds Director Steve Earle. “We had kids lined up out here bawling.” Once the company did set up, Earle saw holes in the midway. Of the required 31 rides, Royal West/Inland Empire only had 22 or 23. To make matters worse, several of the most popular rides were broken and closed for most or all of the fair. “It looked good from the outside, looked like a bunch of shrubs in a circle,” says Earle. “But then you walked into a little amphitheater and you were like, ‘Hey man, looks like something goes here.’” Due to the company’s poor performance, carnival revenues were down and the fair lost $7,500 after it negotiated a settlement to cover the losses. Coincidentally, Royal West/Inland Empires’ contract with the fair expired in 2012. Despite an invitation to rebid, the company declined. Five new offers to provide the Western Montana Fair’s carnival came from as far away as California and Texas, but North

that swings through the air as King Tut’s face looks out from the twin bows. The Tilt-AWhirl has a plaque that explains the ride’s history as a carnival classic. Second-generation carny Kenny Andrade says the Zipper has been his favorite ride for his entire life. Now that he’s operating the ride, he’s “living the dream.” Known as one of the most nauseating attractions at the carnival, Andrade assures that he usually take it easy on the controls, unless someone really wants a wild experience. “Lots of people act tough before they get on, but halfway through and they’re done,” he says. “I’ve seen a grown man cry and puke at the same time on this thing.” Becky Barnes retired from the carnival business after 13 years, only to come back as a food vendor because she missed the people so much. “I couldn’t get away, going to certain towns just feels like coming home,” she says. Based on her years of experience, Barnes offers a classic itinerary for those

Bear Affair. It’s a family ride where up to six people at a time sit inside the belly of an enormous bear that could pass for Smokey’s cousin. The game area offers attractions that guarantee prizes every time to ones so hard that the carnies themselves swear they’re impossible. Wacky Wire is similar to the board game Operation. To win, players have to slide a metal ring down a twisted and spinning wire without the two touching. “It’s easily the hardest one we have,” says game operator Mike Holcomb. “I don’t know how anyone can beat it.” Earle, who is stepping down as fairgrounds director later this summer, is anxious to see how the new carnival plays out. But that nervous energy will not translate to him getting in line. “It looks fun,” he says. “ But I don’t think I’ll be out there riding anything.”

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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Not so fast Why wolves still need our protection by Paul VanDevelder

When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reintroduced 66 gray wolves into Yellowstone National Park and adjacent wilderness areas in Idaho back in 1995-1996, conservationists and ranchers squared off across a fence and hurled insults at each other for months. By then, both sides had had plenty of practice in the art of verbal warfare from previous battles over buffalo harvests and the ever-popular “elk shoots,” wherein surplus animals were herded by helicopters into a funnel of “hunters,” who thinned the herd back to manageable numbers in a hail of lead. To call that a hunt would be akin to calling Wounded Knee a fair fight. I never met anyone who participated in one of those culling events who wasn’t sickened by the slaughter. When wolves began again to hunt prey in Yellowstone, many ranchers argued that Canis lupus would soon be lining up at their livestock operations like teenagers at a takeout window. Here was an endless supply of Happy Meals for the taking. As mitigation for those meals, the conservation group Defenders of Wildlife has spent $1.5 million (and counting) since 1987 compensating ranchers for their losses— though this has failed to mollify ranchers. The argument for restoring wolves, however, was unassailable. When the last wolf was finally killed in Yellowstone back in 1926, the elk population soared and the ecosystem fell out of balance. The park’s riparian areas and aspen stands were devastated by the 8,000-plus elk herds, and an inventory of the park’s wildlife in the early 1970s failed to turn up more than a handful of deer. These, and dozens of other critters, could not compete with the elk. By the mid-1990s, alarmed biologists told Congress that something had to be

[10] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

done. According to William J. Ripple, a leading researcher on the effect of wolves on the Yellowstone ecosystem who is based at the University of Oregon, bringing back wolves, the alpha predators, was the right move. Since 1996, Yellowstone’s elk population has been cut by two-thirds. The number of beaver and birds has increased, along with deer and red foxes, and the aspen and riparian areas once devastated by overgrazing are making a slow but steady recovery.

“In two years, 1,175 wolves have been killed by hunters, including 10 ‘research wolves’” But Ripple cautions: “We think this is just the start of the restoration process. We have to sit back and wait for the ecosystem to continue responding. We call this ‘passive restoration,’ because the ecosystem, with the wolf as a key component at the apex of the predator pyramid, is only now emerging. The aspens, the berry-bearing bushes, the riparian areas, they all seem to be responding, but we went 70 years without the wolves in Yellowstone. … It’s much too early to draw conclusions." For those and many other reasons, the federal government’s decision this summer to remove the gray wolf from the endan-

gered species list was not roundly applauded. Though Dan Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, declared the decision to be “the next step forward in wolf conservation,” many questioned its wisdom. Anticipating the inevitable storm of controversy, the agency invited the public to weigh in on whether wolves should be removed from the endangered species list. The deadline for comments is Sept. 11. When Congress removed the Endangered Species Act protections from the gray wolf in 2011, it turned wolf recovery projects over to the states. In minutes, Idaho legalized the hunting of wolves. In two years, 1,175 wolves have been killed by hunters, including 10 “research wolves” that wandered out of protected zones in Yellowstone National Park. Battles over restoring and protecting salmon and other endangered species have shown—time and again—that politicians can be quick to sacrifice science to political self-interest. At the very least, many conservationists argue that wolves need a large “no-hunting” buffer around Yellowstone Park. “If the packs are persecuted,” Ripple asks, “what will happen to the social structure of those remaining? Do they still provide an ecologically beneficial function? We don’t know. This research is in its infancy. We need to err on the side of caution until we learn more about the role of the wolf in these ecosystems.” The basic question remains: As a society, how far are we willing to go and what are we willing to sacrifice to preserve the wild? Paul VanDevelder is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a writer in Corvallis, Ore.


missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Three masked men failed to break through the roof of the Gator Guns & Pawn shop in West Palm Beach, Fla., with a pickaxe, so they returned the next night with a sledgehammer. The store’s surveillance video had recorded their first attempt, however, and sheriff’s deputies were waiting when the trio returned. They arrested Gabriel Crowe, 20, Marcello Jeter, 19, and a juvenile accomplice. (South Florida’s Sun Sentinel) When Derrick Mosley, 22, brandished a baseball bat while trying to rob Discount Gun Sales in Beaverton, Ore., the store manager pulled out his personal firearm and ordered Mosley to drop the bat. He held the suspect at gunpoint until sheriff’s deputies arrived. (Portland’s KATU-TV)

HOW GOVERNMENT WORKS - Contracting and budget officers at the Defense Department’s Defense Information Systems Agency urged their colleagues to set an aggressive spending timetable to use up all of the DISA’s $2 billion budget before the end of the fiscal year. “It is critical in our efforts to [spend] 100 percent of our available resources this fiscal year,” budget officer Sannadean Sims and procurement officer Kathleen Miller said in an email to their colleagues. (The Washington Post) Contractors for the Environmental Protection Agency maintained a warehouse containing secret man caves, according to an audit by the EPA’s inspector general. Contractors used partitions, screens and piledup boxes to hide the rooms from security cameras in the 70,000-square-foot building in Landover, Md. “The warehouse contained multiple unauthorized and hidden personal spaces created by and for the workers that included televisions, refrigerators, radios, microwaves, chairs and couches,” the report said. “These spaces contained personal items, including photos, pin ups, calendars, clothing, books, magazines and videos.” The responsible contractor, Apex Logistics, has received $5.3 million while operating under the contract. (Washington’s Government Executive)

SMOKING HAZARD - A jogger told police in Bowling Green, Ky., that two men robbed him while he stopped for a cigarette break on his evening run. The assailants took $7 and the jogger’s remaining cigarettes. (Bowling Green Daily News)

HIDDEN COSTS - U.S. military services have spent more than $12 million to design 10 new camouflage patterns for their uniforms, and millions more to buy, stock and ship them, according to the General Accountability Office. Eleven years ago, the military had two camouflage patterns: a green one for woods and a brown one for the desert. Then the Marine Corps implemented two new patterns, followed by the Army, Air Force and eventually even the Navy, which developed water-colored uniforms that some sailors objected to because it made them hard to spot if they fell in the water. The Air Force eventually ordered its personnel in Afghanistan to switch to the Army camouflage because it worked better in battle conditions. (The Washington Post) After tests by the Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility determined that the camouflage working uniforms most sailors wear at sea are flammable and would “burn robustly,” fleet commanders announced that all sailors afloat would be issued fire-retardant clothing. Submarine crews will continue to wear the flammable polyester and cotton coveralls because of low-lint requirements. (Navy Times)

FORBIDDEN FRUIT - When a KFC franchise opened in El Arish, Egypt, Khalil Efrangi, 31, organized a delivery service to smuggle meals into Gaza, where the entry and exit of goods and people are restricted. Efrangi, who operates a legitimate delivery service called Yamama in Gaza City, waits until he gets enough orders to make the venture profitable—usually 30—and then phones the KFC in El Arish and wires payment. Using two taxis and one of the scores of tunnels connecting Gaza and Egypt, Efrangi collects the contraband and delivers it to his Palestinian customers by motorcycle. The entire journey takes about four hours. “It’s our right to enjoy that taste the other people all over the world enjoy,” said Efrangi, who nets about $6 profit per meal. (The New York Times) Seattle butcher William von Schneidau teamed up with a medical marijuana grower to feed the remnants of pot plants to his pigs. Von Schneidau, who operates BB Ranch Meats in Pike Place Market, said the meat, including pot-infused bacon, “tasted savory.” (Seattle’s KOMO-TV)

SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Steve Faler, the president of American Legacy Firearms, defended the inclusion of the Kennedy Memorial on his company’s “Dallas Heritage Rifle.” Calling John F. Kennedy’s assassination one of the city’s most significant events, along with the Dallas Cowboys, he explained, “I do things that are historically … things that happened … and they’re not always good.” He pointed out he has produced commemorative guns for more than 130 cities and even sold one after Sept. 11, 2001, that featured the Pentagon and the still-standing twin towers. Ads for his Denver rifle appeared within days of the deadly theater shooting in Aurora, Colo. (Dallas’ WFAA-TV) A 5-year-old boy shot and killed his 2-year-old sister at their home in Cumberland County, Ky., while playing with a .22-caliber rifle he’d been given last year. “It’s a Crickett,” coroner Gary White said. “It’s a little rifle for a kid.” The maker, Keystone Sporting Arms, describes the weapon as “My First Rifle,” intended to “instill safety in the minds of youth shooters.” White said the gun was kept in a corner of the family’s mobile home, but nobody realized it was loaded. (The Lexington Herald Leader) Police said a 48-year-old man in Beavercreek, Ohio, shot himself in the chest with a pistol he bought on the street. He explained that he was unfamiliar with handling firearms and pointed the .22-caliber revolver at himself while checking to see whether it was loaded. (Dayton’s WHIO-TV)

ALIEN SEX - Pakistan leads the world in homophobia, according to a report by the American Pew Research Center, and, according to Google, search requests for same-sex pornography. (International Business Times) An Indian court ruled that adult couples who have slept together should be considered legally married. The verdict in Tamil Nadu state involved a woman who sued a man for alimony after living with him for five years and bearing two children; he countered that they weren’t legally married. “If any couple choose to consummate their sexual cravings, then the act becomes a total commitment with adherence to all consequences that may follow,” Justice C.S. Karnan said. The news portal Firstpost.com called the ruling “groundbreaking,” observing, “It’s not often that a High Court judgment can be used as both a punch line and a pickup line.” (The Washington Post)

[12] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013


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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [13]


arko Butorac takes a sheet of cooked pizza dough off the grill and sets it before his guests. “Tear! Tear!” he says boisterously when someone tries to daintily poke the dough with a fork. “Use your fingers. We’re not being fancy here.” The Le Petit Outre dough has been mixed with yogurt to form a naan-like bread that can be dipped in hummus. It’s a dish Butorac was inspired to make after visiting Istanbul the week before, when he was working as a guest conductor. He grabs a piece for himself and quickly pours a glass of wine before getting down to more important business: music. He opens his iTunes library on the big-screen television in his living room, revealing thousands of classical tracks. Scrolling through the list he stops on one: Giuseppe Verdi’s “Dies Irae.” “Let’s listen to something big and bombastic,” he says. “Why not?” He clicks “play” and the first minor chord blasts from the speakers.

“Too quiet,” he says, and turns up the volume. The orchestral music crescendos and then spirals downward as the voices of the choir urgently wail like ghosts in a cathedral. It’s a terrifying piece, just one part in Verdi’s opera, Messa da Requiem. The title translates to “Days of Wrath” and it’s the story of the mass of the dead, when souls rise from their graves to be judged. You might recognize “Dies Irae” from the 2000 Japanese thriller Battle Royale or from an “essentials” classical music compilation. But it’s also just as likely you’ve never heard it before. For Butorac, the thought of someone missing out on it is a shame. “If ever I remember a piece that was played to me for the first time, it’s this one,” Butorac says, yelling over the horns. “I remember the moment. I was 17 years old and I went to my friend’s house. He said, ‘You’ve got to listen to this.’ And

when I did I was so blown away, I immediately went out to buy it. Remember the Maxell commercial for tapes with the guy in the chair being blown back [by the sound]? That’s what this music is.” Butorac gestures in time with the song, grinning, his 6-foot-5 frame still looming though he sits on a stool in the middle of the room. He throws his large hands into the air as the sound of trumpets builds and the voices grow ever more hysterical. His dark hair swings loosely past his ears. Even in his casual polo, khaki pants and flip flops you can see that he carries a serious passion and knowledge of classical composition, and he’s unafraid to be caught up by music in the presence of others. This is the soundtrack that has buoyed him throughout his life, through transcontinental moves and teenage rebellion and unsettled young adulthood. All he wants to do is share the music with others, and the best way he knows how is by displaying his own passion for it. But the 35-year-old music director for the Missoula Symphony Orchestra knows that turning on new listeners to cen-

turies-old music is easier said than done. While gray-haired crowds funnel into the symphony’s concert halls, younger audiences tend to stay away. He’s keenly aware that his generation and those that have followed tend to ignore classical music. That’s why he’s made it his mission since he arrived in Missoula six years ago to dispel the notion that the symphony is stuffy and antiquated and, therefore, irrelevant. “It is Don Quixote against the windmills,” says Butorac. “But my belief is that

[14] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

what we do—what the music offers—is something special. It does require time and patience. But no pain, no gain. If ever there was a great American proverb, it’s that.” The great American proverb is just one of Butorac’s pitches. Listen to him long enough and you hear, like a salesman, that he’s trying out dozens of different lines in the hope that one sticks. And like any salesman, his biggest challenge is getting a whole segment of the population to buy into something they don’t even know they’re missing.

I

n the marketing world, no matter how good the product, image makes the first impression. When the uninitiated see classical music, they imagine a concert hall full of nicely pressed tuxedos and formal dresses. They hear song titles like “Symphony No. 2” or “String Quartet No. 12” and yawn. That they might like one of those pieces doesn’t matter because often they don’t even get that far. “It’s very difficult to advertise classical music,” Butorac says. “If I tell you ‘Mahler Symphony No. 2,’ the average person is like ‘What? How do you spell Mahler?’ They have no clue. To a classical musician it’s like, ‘Oh my god, yes!’ If ‘Mahler No. 2’ was playing in town, I would be at that concert. It’s a huge piece with a choir and orchestra, 200 people on stage. It’s a total cut-your-veins, bleed-out, heart-on-sleeve type of piece. Leaves you shaking to the end. One of the most inspiring pieces ever written by man. But you don’t know it because it’s just ‘Mahler No. 2.’” Butorac’s greatest asset is an ability to talk about classical music in a way that puts it on the same level as more mainstream references. He never disparages other types of music, but instead insists that classical can be considered the same way as pop, hip-hop, punk or folk. “You ask anybody what their favorite songs are and they are the pieces they listened to when they were teenagers,” Butorac says. “Music is not something we listen to independently of our lives. We tie music to emotional periods in our life. You remember the exact evening, you remember the exact color of the night, you remember the scent, the temperature, the


season, who you’re with. Everything is a big deal. ‘Oh my god, she called me’ or ‘She didn’t call me!’ You listen to some music. You weep and cry or be exalted and jump up and down. And so those are the pieces that form you.” Along with teenage heartbreak comes teenage rebellion. When Butorac thinks about rebellion, he doesn’t necessarily think of anarchists whipping around in a mosh pit to Black Flag. He thinks of Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 5,” which he first got to play when he was 16. It’s a 45minute piece that was written in 1936 in Soviet Russia, when Stalin was killing hundreds of people per day. Shostakovich had al-

musicians of their time. How cool would it be if we had pieces composed by Yo Yo Ma, Bela Fleck, Itzhak Perlman? But they are performers not composers. And composers went into academia. There is a rift, starting from 1913. And the composer begins to care less and less about the audience, and so the audience says, ‘Goodbye. Roll over Beethoven. Chuck Berry, hello.’”

W

hen you are a classical musician, you know the climaxes of a particular requiem or the last note of a chaconne. You

hope that people come for the music, but I know people come for Darko.” Butorac’s ability to woo audiences and musicians and energize a concert hall stems from a life that includes both loss and opportunity. Butorac grew up in Yugoslavia. He recalls it being one of the more liberal of the communist countries at the time; as long as you didn’t talk too much against the state you were free to do what you liked—and people liked listening to and playing music.

Exhibition, side by side with my mom’s LPs of the Beatles, side by side with my first LP of Falco—‘Rock Me Amadeus.’ I still have it. There was never a conflict between classical music, folk music and pop music, no stigma with ‘This kind of people listens to that’ and ‘That kind of people listens to this.’ It was all just music.” When he was 10, Butorac’s mother applied to graduate school in Seattle on a whim.

“It’s a traumatic experience anyway as a kid to emigrate from a very different system,” he says. “At the same time, what you grew up with—what everybody told you was the way—you realize isn’t.” The magnet school he attended had the best school orchestra in the city. He played cello. While other school orches-

rs L. Walte Cathrine photos by

ready written one opera—a racy, avant-garde composition filled with sex and blood—and Stalin went to see it. “He hated it. He found it very decadent,” Butorac says. “For the composer, this was like having a death warrant on his head, so he lived in his house with a suitcase packed so ... he would be ready to go.” Shostakovich then wrote “Symphony No. 5,” which felt like a traditional romantic work—one that Stalin would like—but that had a subversive message. As the piece ends you can hear the “bom bom bom” of drums indicating triumph. But, especially during a live performance, Butorac says you can see that the triumph is false. The conductor keeps his gestures conservative as the drums pound. It’s mechanical. Brutal. Unemotional. And to the Russian audience it was a familiar tone, like the sound of oppression. “For people who were there, they understood the message,” Butorac says. “But it appeased the government because the piece was done in the traditional style.” When Butorac thinks of experimental artists he might not bring up Frank Zappa or Lydia Lunch, but he will talk of Igor Stravinsky. The composer’s technically difficult piece, “Rite of Spring,” is so chaotic, so barbaric, that when it was first played in 1913, in a Paris hall, it incited a riot between those who loved it and those who thought it was ugly. “This is a composer who wanted to shock people,” Butorac says. “He was like Madonna. He always changed his styles and he made lots of money.” These days, musicians are in the spotlight, not composers. “Classical music has shot itself in the foot because it has not allowed composers of our time to come through,” he says. “If you look at the old masters—Beethoven, Mozart, Bach—these people were the best

know that there’s an exciting horn solo five minutes in, or that the light tone in one section will eventually come to a dark turn. Sarah Solie, an MSO cellist, says Butorac inspires the musicians by picking works that are challenging but attainable. He also inspires because of his infectious attitude. “I talk about him being charismatic in rehearsals, but he is so, so good in concerts about reaching out to the audience and making them feel involved,” she says. “He has a very charming stage presence. I

“There was a great love of music in that part of the world,” Butorac says. “You were born to it, you lived to it and you died to it.” Besides a grand uncle who was a successful folk musician, no one in Butorac’s family played an instrument. His grandfather, however, was a classical music record distributor and so Butorac’s home was filled with classical LPs, along with popular recordings. “I heard music all the time, and all kinds,” he says. “I loved listening to my LP of [Modest Mussorgsky’s] Pictures at an

“My brilliant mother,” he says. “She had the inspired idea, literally as a joke, to apply for a master’s degree in statistics, and then, to her surprise, she got in with a full scholarship and full ride.” The family moved to the Emerald City in 1988. Butorac’s mother saw it as a temporary stint, an opportunity for her son to learn English while she got her degree. Meanwhile, the Yugoslav wars were breaking out and, by 1991, Yugoslavia had disappeared. Back in Seattle, Butorac was dealing with the culture shock of a new place, as well as the knowledge that his homeland would never be the same.

photo courtesy of Nada Pleskonjic

Top: Darko Butorac, 35, demonstrates the “characters of harmony,” wherein a different emotion applies to each note. Above: Symphony musicians who play under Butorac’s direction say his energy is infectious. “I hope that people come for the music,” says cellist Sarah Solie, “but I know they come for Darko.”

tras were playing basic arrangements, his was pulling off the music that city orchestras were tackling—big romantic pieces, like Verdi’s Requiem. The more grandiose, the more Butorac liked it. “Who doesn’t like the feeling of being physically moved by sound?” he asks. “And besides, subtlety is not exactly a game for youth.” By the time Butorac reached high school, Seattle was fully infected with the grunge scene. While kids in flannel shirts and 20-hole combat boots traded Soundgarden and Nirvana tapes in Pioneer Square, Butorac was discovering Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden Quartet” and Tchaikovsky’s “Symphony No. 4.” It wasn’t that he was unaware of other music (he had a Dr. Dre cassette, for instance), he just didn’t care for grunge. And to rebel, he says, he immersed himself into classical even more. Butorac didn’t have any intentions at the time to turn music into a career. It was a high school hobby and an easy thing to do at a school where the orchestra was actually celebrated. But the nurturing environment exposed him to rare performances not typical among most teenagers. His first opera was Madama Butterfly. He also had the chance to experience Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle, an epic 16 hours of music spread across a week. “It was the coolest thing ever,” he says. “People buy airplane tickets to see it halfway across the world, plus shelling out serious cash because it’s so rare.” By the end of high school, Butorac had played nearly 60 pieces from the core classical music repertoire. Then, during his senior year, he discovered conducting. He recalls renting videotapes of the great Austrian conductor Carlos Kleiber, whose quick, playful gestures made him look like a magician. “He’s able to tell stories with his gestures and that’s what all conductors aspire to,” Butorac says. “The bug bit me. I got addicted to it and I decided to pursue.” Over the next few years, while in college at Indiana University for instrumental conducting, Butorac went back to visit his homeland. He saw that Serbia wasn’t the Yugoslavia that he’d left. The wars had gutted the econ-

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [15]


omy and tattered the social fabric. It was traumatic, he says. But it was also a lesson on impermanence and a catalyst for how he would approach his life and his music. “There’s no steadiness, life is fluid,” he says. “A lot of great music deals with the subject of loss. I had a teacher who said, ‘You want to grow as a musician? Feel pain. Seek it because it will make you understand.’”

W

hen Executive Director John Driscoll started working for the Missoula Symphony Orchestra in 1999, it was a different organization. People who liked symphonic music went to the MSO concerts and everyone else didn’t really know they were happening. The organization was seeing about 900 to 1,100 audience members per weekend, which could pack one concert hall. With two shows per weekend, that number spread thin. “We were doing a nice job of playing great classical music for our core audience,” Driscoll says. “But if I wasn’t a musician [in the orchestra] I wouldn’t have known about them.” Driscoll first met Butorac at the Missoula International Airport in 2006. Butorac, then the director of orchestras at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, was in town for a two-week audition for the position of MSO music director, replacing the revered Joseph Henry, who was retiring after 20 years. “The first thing we did was go out to dinner,” Driscoll says. “He was gregarious and super outgoing, really friendly and very talkative. All [of the conductors] who we invited to Missoula were very friendly when they came off the plane, all in different ways. But during that process the two weeks were so intense that the person you put back on the plane was a very different person from the person you met. Darko went back on the plane just as buoyant and energetic as when he got off the plane.” That new energy was what the MSO was looking for, and Butorac was hired within a few months. Joe Nickell had been writing about the symphony since he came to Missoula

photo courtesy of Darko Butorac

One of Butorac’s greatest assets is being able to discuss classical music in a way that’s accessible and fun. “This is a composer who wanted to shock people,” he says of Igor Stravinsky. “He was like Madonna.”

in 1997, and he was among those surprised by the hire. Butorac was so young— just 29—and it seemed like a gamble. When Nickell attended one of the first concerts with Butorac at the helm, he was even more skeptical. The symphony was performing Jean Sibelius’ “Valse Triste,” which requires delicate precision. Nickell, a music critic for the Missoulian at the time, waited for it to unravel. “It’s a really beautiful piece that’s supposed to be played very quietly,” Nickell says. “That was not a strength I’d recognized in this orchestra previously. But Darko managed to get the orchestra to play the piece with intense quietude.” After leaving the Missoulian, Nickell ended up joining MSO last year as a percussionist. As more symphony fans began noticing the new conductor, MSO started ramping up the outreach efforts that Henry had initiated and finding new ways to connect with its au-

dience. Butorac hit the downtown streets wearing safari gear and pretending to tame a lion in order to get families interested in the annual children’s concert. He drove the Big Dipper Ice Cream truck around Bonner Park to promote the Bachalette ice cream, a coffee and chocolate flavor made specifically for the symphony. In 2009, he started giving pre-concert talks in the Dennison Theatre, where people could gather 30 minutes before the symphony concert to hear the stories behind that night’s selections and ask Butorac questions. Butorac and a handful of musicians sometimes showed up at the farmers markets or at First Friday galleries to play to unsuspecting crowds. It was Butorac’s idea to start a podcast, but Driscoll encouraged him to pair up with radio personality Leah Lewis. In 2010, the duo kicked it off with a conversation about Maurice Ravel’s “Bolero.” Rather than sticking with a straight talk about the piece, Butorac and Lewis let the discussion

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Butorac began his music career in Seattle where he learned to love bombastic pieces like Giuseppe Verdi’s “Dies Irae” from Messa de Requiem.

[16] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

wind its way through Bolero’s connection with seemingly disparate subjects such as Bo Derek, frontotemporal dementia, the Sarajevo Olympics and Dudley Moore. “She’s a perfect foil for him,” Driscoll says of Lewis. “You need somebody strong to stand up to a conductor.” The DownBeat DownLow, as the podcast is called, developed a following. “It’s tough to gauge how many ticket sales have come directly from the podcasts,” Driscoll says. “But clearly people are listening. And that’s what I’m proud of— that we were able to find a forum to allow Darko to be who he is. He’s super educated and smart and communicative about his area of expertise, but also in a way that is appropriate for his generation, too.” As part of the larger outreach efforts, Butorac visited local schools to talk about and perform classical music. In May, the symphony visited Ovando and played to a group of 30 people including students,

their parents and grandparents. They played Dvorˇák’s “American String Quartet,” a song that was inspired by the American West. Unlike the bombastic leaps of Verdi’s Requiem or the experimental cacophony of “Rite of Spring,” this one was something that, to Butorac, might speak more to people surrounded by a rural landscape. “The piece has a kind of frontier feel to it,” he says. “It’s almost a little lonely, like being alone in the prairie. And people got it. You see it in their faces.” Driscoll says the symphony looked for ways to appeal to new audiences without shutting out its core. High-end, high-ticket benefits were still a major focus for the organization, but they added a new fundraiser, too: The Ovando Gran Fondo, an off-road, endurance bike ride that seemed tailormade to a place as outdoorsy as Missoula. Perhaps the most effective, wide-reaching attempt at getting new listeners has been the symphony’s free concert at Caras Park, which was started in 2005 by MSO, and garners 5,000 to 6,000 attendees each summer. Initially, the concert played classical greats. Butorac has taken the idea and made it a little wilder. Performances have movie themes and other popular music that people recognize. This year’s concert is scheduled for Sun., Aug., 11, at 7 p.m., and, in addition to classics, includes “Night on Bald Mountain” from Fantasia and music from Saturday Night Fever. “I think Symphony in the Park is my favorite concert,” Butorac says. “Everybody comes out and everybody knows about it. I feel like a rock star with so many people there. And they get to share in the music, the humanity of it. The audience that comes to the park doesn’t always come to the regular concerts.” Driscoll says the symphony has gone out of its way to be goofy for the last several years in an effort to bring in new audiences. But now that the community has gotten a taste for how accessible MSO can be, the organization wants to start introducing the classics again, but in a new light. You like John Williams’ Indiana Jones theme? Perhaps you’ll like Bela Bartok.

photo courtesy of Darko Butorac

As a child in the former Yugoslavia, Butorac, pictured here at age 4 with his grandfather, learned to appreciate classical records along with his parents’ Beatles albums.


“Our marketing campaign has been offbeat for years,” Driscoll says. “We’ve gone a little more traditional this year, but we can. We’ve broken through that stuffiness barrier. Now we can go back to the idea that this is great music.” For some people, Butorac says, that transition from stuffiness to simply great music is still hard to make if it means walking into a concert hall where the musicians wear tuxes and the question of when to clap is still shrouded in mystery. “All of a sudden you take the atmosphere from sitting in a field having a picnic, having wine, to sitting in a seat in a concert hall next to people you don’t know,” he says. “And people become afraid. That’s the fear I try to break down.”

B

utorac is candid about the problems that classical music culture has created for itself. The conservative dress of a symphony isn’t going to entice a punk rock crowd to sit down for a listen. And image has become part of how we identify with music. For instance, he says, if you take the Ramones, dress them in tuxes and put them in Carnegie Hall, it’s going to be weird, even if they play the same music they always do. “So imagine if the orchestra was painted in Kiss makeup standing on a stage with crazy lights and fog machines,” he says. “It would be ridiculous. People would laugh at it the same way you would laugh at the Ramones. It wouldn’t be honest. So let’s just talk about the music.” As Butorac works to make classical

music more accessible to the average person, he is emerging among the conducting ranks. He recently took on the position of music director for the Tallahassee Symphony. His announcement on Facebook brought a flurry of concern and sadness that he might be leaving Missoula. But Butorac quickly corrected the comments: He wasn’t leaving Missoula, he’d be doing both jobs. During the summer, when MSO isn’t performing, he travels through Europe as a guest conductor. This is where he gets to see a wide range of audiences and how they react to symphonic music. He recently had a performance in Faenza, Italy, of the opera La Traviata. The city had been hit by an earthquake and the theater was closed, but they managed to fit the production inside a community center. About 500 people showed up, mostly elderly men and women who play cards and chess at the center. “It was their music and they knew every word, knew what was going to happen,” he says. “They were singing along, they were crying along, crying in the middle of it! They cheered after the arias. The energy was unbelievable.” In Serbia, his former homeland, he played in a 15th century fortress to an audience that had not had a classical music concert in 40 years. Butorac had scheduled three encores for the show. After the third one, they brought the orchestra off the stage. But the audience kept clapping. “So we brought the orchestra back on stage and played four more encores,” he says, smiling. “Seven encores in a concert! That was amazing. You live for those moments.”

Being in Serbia reminded him of the person he was before the fall of Yugoslavia and the person he became as a conductor, when he fell in love with classical music. “I come from a place that is very old fashioned in its attitudes,” he says. “For example we’re deathly afraid of the draft— of moving air. If I sit in a doorway and there’s cold air moving, I will catch pneumonia and die within days. This is a national fear. There is a certain rigidness. And so it’s so beautiful to live in America where you can do anything.” Deciding not to be afraid of change is what has helped Butorac let go of his former country and embrace another. He

brings that boldness to his conducting style and his life, and he’s searching for just the right way to get other people to do the same. “One must have the courage to say, ‘What’s the worst that could happen?’” he says. “You might go and hear a piece you���ve never heard before and you might hate it. That’s the worst thing. What’s the best thing that could happen? You could go and discover a whole new art form you never knew existed—a magic you never knew existed—and be moved by it. And that’s what’s more likely to happen.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Listen up: Darko Butorac provides an introduction to classical music with playlists for the big and small moments of your life on the Indy’s Green Room blog at missoulanews.com.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Outside of the symphony’s concert hall, Butorac strives to make classical music more accessible by recording a podcast and hosting pre-concert talks with audience members.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [17]


[arts]

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Posters of Montana garage rock bands from the 1960s feature in the Lost Sounds exhibit at the Zootown Arts Community Center.

Lost in time Dave Martens tracks down Montana’s oldest rock and roll music by Erika Fredrickson

D

ave Martens doesn’t remember exactly how he first found out about Montana’s connection to “The Hippy Hippy Shake.” He just recalls hearing that the popular 1959 tune—eventually covered by the Beatles, Davy Jones of the Monkees and the Georgia Satellites—was written by a 17-year-old Billings kid. The kid, Chan Romero, grew up in a family of migrant farm workers. Inspired by the style of Ritchie Valens, Romero wrote several songs and one of them, “The Hippy Hippy Shake,” eventually made it into the hands of Valens’ record label, Delphi. “I couldn’t believe it,” Martens says. “But I looked it up and it was true.” Martens, a Missoula musician with The Best Westerns, and who grew up in Havre, started getting interested in Montana’s rock and roll history three years ago. That was when he discovered a 45 by the 1970s Missoula band The Initial Shock in his uncle’s record collection. He wondered about all the other bands that had pioneered rock and roll in the state— and then he heard about “The Hippy Hippy Shake” and his curiosity mounted. Right away, he started digging around for more remnants of early Montana bands, and in the process he turned it into a project called Lost Sounds Montana. Martens’ mission is to unearth as many band posters, records, newspaper articles and photographs that he can find of Montana bands dating back to the 1950s on up through the 1980s. His goal is to create a website that documents the history of the bands and that also gathers comments from people who

might have memories to share from the way-back files. And, finally, he hopes to collect all the recordings he can find from the state’s rock history and turn them into record compilations. Technically, Lost Sounds started three years ago, but Martens, who is busy in school at the University of Montana earning a degree in speech pathology, has taken it slow. He’s chipped away at the task by sending out Facebook messages to old record labels. He’s gathered a small group of friends and volunteers who are helping him organize the material, seek nonprofit status for the project and keep the ball rolling. And he’s gotten in touch with band members whenever possible. That part hasn’t always been easy. One musician Martens tried to track down was Kim Sherman from Billings band The Frantics, which broke up in the late 1970s. Martens heard from several sources that Sherman, now in his mid-60s, was a bit of a hoarder and that he had possibly squirreled away an incredible collection of Montana music paraphernalia. The problem was, no one knew how to get a hold of him. “He was in Hawaii as far as I knew,” Martens says. “But his other bandmates couldn’t find him.” A couple of years went by with no luck. Finally, in the course of digging around for info on other bands, Martens finally found an email for Sherman. He emailed the musician and Sherman gave him a phone number. But when Martens finally called a week later, Sherman had passed away. Martens never found out exactly what happened, but a few months later he got a phone call from Kit Sherman, Kim’s

[18] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

brother. Kit had heard about the Lost Sounds project and, after talking with the other members of The Frantics, he’d decided to share with Martens the posters and records that Kim had collected. “He said, ‘Hey, I heard you were doing this project. I’m having Kim’s stuff shipped over and you can have first pass at it,’” Martens says. “All the other band members had vouched for me. They appreciated the project. They see that I’m not out to, like, make a killing.” He laughs. “There’s no killing to be made!” Martens has also been lucky enough to successfully connect with musicians from some of the bands. Members of the surf band The Vulcans sent him $400 so he could transfer their songs—early recordings from shows at The Florence Hotel—from reel-to-reel. His digging has also connected band members with each other. The Initial Shock and The Renegades have both talked lightly about doing reunion shows. Others, like George Crowe of the band Yellowstone and a roadie for The Chosen Few and The Initial Shock, have helped Martens with stories about the bands. Relics from Crowe and Kim Sherman’s collection, as well as several other found and loaned posters will be on display at the Zootown Arts Community Center starting Friday. Martens also tracked down Romero, who is now a preacher on a reservation in Palm Springs. He still records music, though he’s not a rocker anymore, Marten says. He also agreed to loan out some of his music for the exhibit, including the original recording of “The Hippy Hippy Shake,” which was—before it got the LA treatment—recorded in a Billings studio. The exhibit focuses specifically on Mon-

tana’s 1960s psychedelic garage era and features about 20 groups with names like Burch Ray and the Walkers (Miles City), Thor and the Thundergods (Helena), The Chosen Few and The Vulcans (both Missoula). Colin Pruitt, host of the KBGA show “Ink Mathematics,” will play recordings from the bands and a couple of the band members will make an appearance. Talking with Martens you get a sense that there’s an urgency to Lost Sounds. This is an exercise in searching blindly, and for trying to pin down events through memory. Some musicians have left the state for unknown destinations. Some are dead. Records have been sold off in garage sales. Reel-to-reel recordings have disappeared over time. Martens is hoping more people will step forward with leads on other musicians and their work. If all goes well, Martens is looking to host more exhibits to cover Montana’s music in the 1970s, 1980s and even the 1990s. He also wants to expand the idea and document the lost sounds of other places. “If it’s possible, we could use the same model with some of these other under-represented states like Wyoming,” Martens says. “Early rock and roll had to have happened in those places, too. There were kids there, so there had to have been something.” Dave Martens and Lost Sounds present A 1960s Psychedelic Garage Rock Explosion exhibit at the Zootown Arts Community Center Fri., Aug. 9, at 5:30 PM. Best Westerns show to follow at 8:30 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Hip shakers Vintage Trouble gives retro a twist Vinyl is on its way back and so, too, are the shiny shoes and smart suits of “Mad Men.” It’s perhaps one of the reasons Vintage Trouble seems like the obvious next step. Here’s a sharply dressed LA band that’s bringing back blues rock, in style. It’s a band for those who like the sound of the Rolling Stones, and the look of Motown. On stage, frontman Ty Taylor spins in circles, snatches up the microphone and twists his feet to the rhythm like a smooth operator. That smoothness covers up the fact that there are a few bland songs here and there—mostly off the band’s only album, the 2011 Bomb Shelter Sessions. “Nancy Lee,” for instance, deals in the most cliché of blues chords, with lyrics that seem about as deep as a Cocoa Cola commercial. Other songs, though not profound, at least feel fiery. “Pelvis Pusher,” where Taylor sings a call-andresponse line of “One, two, three! Push your pelvis with me!” and then cat-calls “wow!”, is of the James Brown, sex-machine variety. But even better is “Blues Hand Me Down,” which features angular guitar riffs that just barely give away the otherwise retro band’s

contemporary reality. This is like the Supersuckers meets Chuck Berry, and the crispness of the instrumentation is irresistible. Taylor is the cherry on top. His impeccable timing—with a coy smile here, a snap of the hand there, a hip twist in between—is why you’d want to see the band play rather than just hear the album. The band has been making huge waves in just a few years. Taylor recently fronted Queen for a party honoring Freddie Mercury’s 65th birthday. They don’t give that role away to just anybody. (Erika Fredrickson) Vintage Trouble plays the Missoula Winery Thu., Aug. 8, at 7 PM. $15/$13 advance at ticketfly.

GRMLN As an older person, I found two things exciting about the GRMLN song “Teenage Rhythm.” The first was how catchy and heartfelt it is. It genuinely rocks in a way that my tri-genarian nervous system found fun and satisfying. I enjoyed listening to it so much on YouTube, via the enormous headphones I need now to hear music, that it took me a minute to notice the second exciting thing—that the video itself is about old people having fun. The old people are very old, like my parents’ age, but they wear clothes and yell-talk at parties in a manner typically associated with young people such as

GRMLN, aka Yoodoo Park. I’m not sure what the song means, except that you can still enjoy music and have fun at parties by re-enacting the same flawed personality you had in college, only better. GRMLN is my favorite surprise of the summer because he reenacts the same flawed pop-punk I liked in college, only better. His hat is as flat as the tractless sea, and his clothes fit in a way that I recognize but cannot articulate. He makes me think that music will still be good when I am even older. (Dan Brooks) GRMLN opens for Geographer at Stage 112 Mon., Aug. 12, at 8 PM. $12/$10 advance.

The Polyphonic Spree, Yes, It’s True The Polyphonic Spree’s new Yes, It’s True will probably surprise listeners, even if they have never heard the band before. The Polyphonic Spree is weird. One of the first things people will tell you about them is that they are not a cult, and the affirming, mass-harmonized songs on Yes, It’s True recall the darker outcomes of psychedelia in a way that is simultaneously exhilarating and creepy. The final chorus of “Popular By Design” is backwards, for example. It made me want to lie down in a dry bathtub. But what’s really weird is that The Polyphonic Spree used to be even weirder. Yes, It’s True is so pop-pitched that acknowledging it seems trivial. Not only do the songs have choruses—and those choruses are not simply

chanted for the entirety of the song—but they also have snappy basslines. There’s a drum set. The whole thing sounds like Matthew Sweet, albeit if Matthew Sweet got into some questionable drugs/belief systems. Is that bad? Only if you were really attached to the weird niche music they made before this weird pop album. In that case, I may have identified the source of the cultiness. The rest of us can be glad The Polyphonic Spree sound different from other pop music, and even from themselves. (Dan Brooks) The Polyphonic Spree plays the Top Hat Tue., Aug. 13, at 8:30 PM. $20/$15 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com.

Dragons, Musical Witchcraft Dragons’ laidback, somewhat lo-fi pop is a perfect mood-setter for a relaxed summer evening; energetic enough to accompany late-night chore-accomplishing, mellow enough not to wake a roommate. The Arizona band describes itself as “lovingly rockin’” on its Facebook, which seems pretty apt. Musical Witchcraft, a full-length released last month, manages to stay relaxed, though it’s a three-piece rock band with two singers and occasional appearances from a coronet and sax. And maybe “pleasant” can be damning with faint praise to some musicians, but Dragons’ recordings are, well, pretty pleasant, particularly when the listener is recovering from

the crash-boom-bang excitement of loud parties and summer shenanigans. Dragons injects its aesthetic and lyrics with a little twee cuteness that might turn some people off, with lyrics like, “The mighty spirit of music, it’s not dead, it’s just sleeping.” And any mild pop-rock song backed with sax runs the risk of sounding like Muzak. But every time I get a whiff of that from Dragons, the guitars pick up the pace again and the dreamy dual vocals return it to an indie basement vibe. Musical witchcraft, indeed. (Kate Whittle) Dragons, along with Valis, Boys and The AllHail play the VFW, 245 W. Main St., Sat., Aug. 10, at 10 PM. $4.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [19]


[books]

Desert drift Bass brilliantly navigates a harsh landscape by Molly Laich

There are times when a good novel starts to be- know the love shared between man and harpoon, come the thing that it’s about, and such is the case you’re prepared to make it through these passages. In Book Two, Richard and Marie venture back with Rick Bass’s latest, All the Land to Hold Us. The prose stretches out and burns steady like a meadow into town and become entangled without ever fully on fire. It meanders whether you want it to or not. realizing it. But it’s enough that the reader and the But for every new piece of landscape traveled, the narrator know. In Mormon Springs, we meet an iconreader will feel as though they’ve accomplished oclastic Mormon teacher, an older Herbert, an older Marie and a mysteriously knowledgable orphan girl. something extraordinary just to have witnessed it. The story takes place in and around the inhos- After so long in the desert, the last hundred pages are pitable deserts and salt flats of Odessa, Texas. The like a tall glass of water. desert teems with human skulls and weird animals, either dead or marching toward it. Like the detached narration, it is expansive, impartial and all-knowing. “The landscape gathered all men, across the ages, as the anguished, hungry, confused blood of man surged this way and that, sloshing around in the soft human vessels as if such blood no more belonged to them than a flock of wild birds, bright birds, would belong in a wire cage.” The story begins with a young geologist named Richard and his girlfriend Clarissa, who spend the summer of 1966 touring the desert for fossils and treasures that they can later sell at market to Herbert Mix, a onelegged eccentric collector. Of Clarissa, we are told her hair “was as black as a Comanche’s, and her eyes were a pale green. She had thick arching eyebrows that could give one who did not know her the impression of perpetual surprise, and flawless, pale skin.” She wants to use the money they make from their treasure hunt to leave her tiny hometown for good, so it’s one of the book’s great ironies that her best shot at money waits for her under the unforgiving sun. “She was certain that thirty seconds’ exposure to the lake would fry her creamy All the Land to Hold Us skin to the color of an iron skillet.” When Rick Bass the weather finally catches up with her, it hardcover, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt might be the most dramatic sunburn of all 336 pages, $25 time. For Richard, the summer of ’66 is This is the novel to bring on a long backpacking spent clinging to a girl who is, long before her death, trip. There isn’t an ordinary sentence in the lot. Cona ghost. Some 30 years earlier, Max Omo, his wife Marie sider Clarissa’s dream: “She dreamed of writhing serand their children become the first family crazy pents, of pistols that would not fire; dreamed of enough to build a permanent home so far from the burning rings of fire, and of bears, and wolves, and conveniences of civilization, out in the salt. They drink lions—once of buffalo, and another time, of an eleunpalatable brine water and steadily go through the phant—but never was there any fear in the dreams: 100 cases of gifted white wine from their wedding day, only a lucid luminous unscrolling of images so wonknowing full well that like the wine, their marriage drous in their beauty that they could not possibly have has an expiration date. Still, even after the wine turns anything to do with her own sleeping life; and she slept well, drinking in the vibrancy of the dreams, and awoke to vinegar they keep drinking until it’s gone. All the Land to Hold Us is divided into two sec- feeling rested and refreshed for having had them.” All the Land to Hold Us is a satisfying read withtions, Book One and Book Two. For Book One, readers should prepare themselves for lengthy out being easy or sentimental. It lingers in the space descriptions of all the men who have collapsed and between life and death, between its characters’ hopes died in the salt flats, and of the slow death of ele- and dreams and a bittersweet reality. Rick Bass reads from All the Land to Hold Us phants, newlyweds and giant catfish. This is a novel preoccupied with death throes and the many ways at Shakespeare & Co. Mon., Aug. 12, at 7 PM. the living face them. The fallen become statues, then Free. dust, and then a pile of bones waiting to be uncovered and collected. If you’ve read Moby Dick and arts@missoulanews.com

[20] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013


[film]

Time warp Los Wild Ones captures a retro record label by Jason McMackin

While many of us spend the summer jamming sums up the downer that is returning to real life: to Icona Pop’s thoroughly modern electro hotstep- “Your boss tells you, ‘blah, blah, blah’ and your life per, “I Love It,” the folks featured in Los Wild Ones is shit, and you think, I was just autographing exist in a musical world that has more in common boobs.” Arriaga goes on to pick through a massive with Ritchie Valens. The film documents the life and sack of bills, some opened, some not. Most of Wild’s artists are Hispanic. The film times of the small, independent label Wild Records, which was founded by the compact and independ- doesn’t get into why young Hispanics are drawn to ent-minded Irishman Reb Kennedy. Kennedy’s pas- rockabilly music and culture, which is a bit disapsion for early rock and roll is evident in the music pointing for those of us interested in cultural phehe releases and in his haircut: buzzed sides, longer nomena. (Is It Really So Strange?, a documentary up top, slicked back with a generous application of about Morrissey fandom in Hispanic culture is infipomade. Rockabilly music dominates the label’s lineup. For those not in the know, rockabilly is a portmanteau made up of the words “rock and roll” and “hillbilly.” Guitars drip with reverb and echo while standup bass strings are slapped hard and abused. During performances vocalists wail their throats raw. While Wild’s musicians may not necessarily look the hillbilly part, they often ape the vocal hiccups and twang of country music. Think Sun Records-era Elvis Presley on his seminal track, “That’s All Right.” Wild ones in their natural environment. Wild artists record with Kennedy and engineer/artist Omar nitely fascinating). Most likely, filmmaker Elise Romero in Kennedy’s refurbished garage in a subur- Solomon knew that unpacking the “how” and “why” ban southern California neighborhood. The record- would take some time, and perhaps take away from ings are done on tape in one-day sessions, warts and the emotional center of the film—the family that has all, which means you get everything from miscues to grown up around Wild Records. outright mistakes to the gurgle of whiskey by the Successful documentaries often let the audidrummer before a song begins. The film follows ence see how families work, and Los Wild Ones Kennedy as he seeks to recapture old time rock and does this well. Because the Wild Records story is a roll, which often leads to disputes with the younger continuing one, there is no great catharsis for viewRomero, who seems to see Kennedy as a father figure. ers. Instead, we get a peek into an alternate uniThe artists also urge Kennedy to modernize (but only verse, a time-warp where the Beatles never when he’s not around) and make their music avail- happened. We see talented musicians throw away able for download on iTunes. Kennedy’s inability to their skills in favor of drink; we see them struggle cede control of any aspect of Wild is frustrating for as single parents; we see them passed out on a the musicians. sidewalk in broad daylight; we see them persevere The most emotionally resonant point in the and find success, both musically and personally. film comes when the musicians talk about how Through all of this Reb Kennedy is there giving out well they are treated in Europe, where rockabilly loans and giving out hugs. He books shows and arhas a much larger following. Thousands of fans gues with promoters over the phone. In Kennedy flock to three-day festivals where big-finned cars we see an example of how to be passionate and obfrom the ’50s, poodle skirts and crimson-lipped sessed without being vainglorious. He is a man who pin-up girls are on display. The touring acts make believes music can solve all of life’s problems and thousands of dollars and everything is free for who is willing to spend his entire life trying to them including booze, food and beds. When prove it. they’re there, it’s as if the last half of the 20th cenLos Wild Ones screens at the Top Hat Mon., tury never happened. Rock and roll is new again. Aug. 12, at 8 PM. Free. Then they return home to their day jobs. Luis Arriaga of the bands Lil’ Luis and Los Wild Teens arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [21]


[film]

Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

Energy-Efficient Features: LED Site Lighting Energy Star Appliances High-Grade Insulation

Wonder years The Way Way Back swaps cynicism for tenderness by Molly Laich

The Way Way Back is a sweet coming-of-age comedy, which, even in its darkest moments, manages to be far less cynical than me. I hesitate to use the expression “coming-of-age,” but there’s simply no better way to put this film. The story belongs to 14-year-old Duncan, played by Liam James with a laudably authentic awkwardness. The adults are easily recognizable: There’s Duncan’s recently divorced mom Pam (Toni Collette), her new boyfriend Trent (Steve Carrell) and his daughter

he wanders in, as if led there by destiny, and sits fully clothed on a picnic table, waiting to be swooped up. This is where my cynicism as a disgruntled movie critic needs to make a graceful exit. In real life, I think this kid would sit there unnoticed forever. Like so many young boys just like him, he would spend that summer going further and further into himself. The neglect of his mother would begin to shape his opinion of all women, while the humiliation suffered at the hands of a thoughtless stepfather would get

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Steph (Zoe Levin). They’re off to spend the summer at the beach for some modern family bonding, whether they like it or not. Next door lives Betty, a boozy single mother on a permanent vacation from life. Allison Janney plays this part so convincingly that one starts to wonder if these characters are total clichés or if it is life itself that’s so derivative. Betty has a son with a lazy eye named Peter and a bored, impossibly beautiful teenage daughter named Susanna (AnnaSophia Robb) who seems to have been plucked from the sky and placed at Duncan’s feet in order to be crushed on. Another set of grownups, the couple Kip and Joan (Rob Corrdry and Amanda Peet), show up with weed and booze to stir the pot even further. Susanna tells Duncan that this beach community is “like spring break for grownups,” which is both true and a nice moment—movies don’t always remember that teenagers are often brilliant. Duncan is shy and ineffectual; the kid wears pants and socks on the beach. Carrell is a kind of villain and a bully, but when he callously tells Duncan that he could use a little more personality, I couldn’t help but agree. What the film decides Duncan needs is a secret summer job at a water park that time forgot, and so

[22] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

pushed down inside until he became a passive aggressive, cancerous adult. But what am I saying? This is a summer comedy. Instead of all that, Duncan is adopted by the gregarious Owen, played by Sam Rockwell in an effortless and well-written comedic performance. Owen is a big kid himself and naturally gravitates toward other kids for friends. The park’s manager is Caitlin (Maya Rudolph), who doesn’t always want to be a den mother but graciously accepts the role anyway. The friendship between Owen and Duncan is tender and beautiful, and that allows me to forgive the fact that it comes out of nowhere for no good reason. Not that anybody reads movie reviews looking for literature recommendations, but if you see this film, and it moves you and you want to take the feeling further, I recommend Charles D’Ambrosio’s short story, “The Point.” It’s similar in setting, character and theme, but with an added grit and weight that will ruin your life, in a good way. The Way Way Back has its heaviness, but in the end it floats to the surface and lodges. Like a pleasant cancer. In your heart. The Way Way Back continues at the Carmike 12. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME The legendary Memphis band Big Star was deemed a commercial failure, but tell that to the people who listened to it and then founded bands like Replacements and Flaming Lips. This documentary uncovers the legend. Includes interviews with Jon Auer, Chris Bell and Alex Chilton. PG-13. Roxy Theatre, showing at 7 and 9:30 PM Aug. 8-11. Visit theroxytheater.org. ELYSIUM It’s the year 2154, and rich people live on a space station while the poors live down on the ruined earth. It’s up to Jason Bourne, er, Matt Damon I mean, to bridge the two worlds. Also starring Jodie Foster and Sharlto Copley. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. LOVELACE Amanda Seyfried stars as Linda Lovelace, the woman who appeared in the infamous Deep Throat. Years later Lovelace condemned the film and said she was coerced by her abusive husband. We suggest checking out the Inside Deep Throat documentary on Netflix before seeing the film. Also starring Peter Sarsgaard and Juno Temple. Rated R. Wilma. OFF LABEL Documentarians Michael Palmieri and Donal Mosher seek to expose the extent of off-label drug use in America, speaking with people ranging from a PTSD-suffering Army medic to the family of a suicide victim who’d been taking antidepressants. Unrated. Roxy Theatre, showing at 7:15 and 9:15 PM, Aug. 8-11. Visit theroxytheater.org. PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS In this sequel to 2010’s Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, good ol’ Percy and crew must find the Golden Fleece and, presumably, throw it into Mordor to prevent evil from taking over the world. Starring Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario and Brandon T. Jackson. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex. PLANES The makers of Cars bring you Planes, in which Dusty, a plucky cropduster, longs to compete in a famous race, but is afraid of heights. Wah-wah. We look forward to the inevitable sequels; Boats, Trains, Amish Buggies and Rickshaws. Starring the voices of Dane Cook, Stacy Keach and Brad Garrett. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Entertainer, Pharaohplex. WE’RE THE MILLERS A drug dealer asks oddballs to pretend to be his family to avoid suspicion while moving a large

Baby, you can drive my car. Lovelace opens this week at the Wilma.

amount of weed over the U.S/Canada border. Dude, strippers look like normal women when they put pants on! Lolz! Starring Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis and Emma Roberts. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING 2 GUNS Don’t you love discovering the things you have in common with buddies, like, say, being undercover agents? I suspect there won’t be many BFF necklaces, though, when a DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer form a shaky alliance after trying to sneak into a drug cartel. Starring Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg and Paula Patton. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

voices of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig and Miranda Cosgrove. Rated PG. Carmike 12. THE HEAT An uptight FBI agent teams up with a rambunctious Boston police officer in this buddy-cop romp. The twist: They’re ladeez! Yes, even women can cuss, wear pants, hold guns and star in formulaic comedies. Starring Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy and Demián Bichir. Rated R. Carmike 12. THE KINGS OF SUMMER Three teen boys say to hell with society, run away to the woods and try to live off the land all summer. Here’s hoping this works out more like My Side of the Mountain and less like Into the Wild. Starring Nick Robinson, Gabriel Basso and Moises Arias. Rated R. Wilma.

THE CONJURING You can bet your Milk Duds it’s not the cat knocking stuff over this time. Paranormal investigators arrive to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their home. Starring Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson and Lili Taylor. Rated R. Carmike 12.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Joss Whedon uses modern costuming to retell this classic Shakespeare comedy about romantic confusion. Iambic pentameter really gets the ladies going, I hear. Starring Amy Acker, Alexis Denisof and Fran Kranz (and watch for the everadorable Nathan Fillion). Rated PG-13. Wilma.

DESPICABLE ME 2 The somewhat inept but well-meaning Gru is put to work for the Anti-Villain league to fight a new super criminal in the follow-up to the 2010 family friendly animated comedy. Starring the

THE SMURFS 2 Papa, Clumsy, Grouchy and Vanity must join forces with humans to rescue Smurfette from the clutches of the evil sorcerer Gargamel. Official film tagline, which I am not making up: “Get

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ready to get naughty!” Starring the voices of Hank Azaria, Neil Patrick Harris and Jayma Mays. Rated PG. Village 6, Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. THE WAY, WAY BACK A 14-year-old boy having a rough summer vacation strikes up an unusual friendship with the manager of a water park. Brought to you from the makers of Little Miss Sunshine and Juno. Starring Steve Carell, Toni Collette and Allison Janney. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. (See Film.) THE WOLVERINE Hugh Jackman is back as everyone’s favorite rendition of the large, carnivorous species of the weasel family. This time Wolverine must travel to Japan to battle bad guys and his personal demons in the process. Also starring Rila Fukushima and Will Yun Lee. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [23]


[dish]

photo by Ari LeVaux

Coriander curry by Ari LeVaux Coriander is the seedpod of the cilantro plant. This is why, in most of the English-speaking world, cilantro is called “coriander leaf,” or simply “coriander.” While Americans tend to ignore the seedpod in favor of the leaf, elsewhere in the world the reverse is often true. In the respected classic French culinary encyclopedia, Larousse Gastronomique, no mention is made that the leaves of the coriander plant are even eaten. The spice that we call coriander typically comes in the form of brown, dry hard balls that are crushed or ground into powder before use. Gardeners, their friends and customers of savvy growers and grocers also have an opportunity to cook with green coriander seeds. After the delicate petals drop from a flower, that flower’s ovary develops into a seedpod, which contains two cilantro seeds. These swollen, green pearls are tender, succulent and spicy. The flavor, not surprisingly, is somewhere between cilantro and coriander. If you’re a person who’s hardwired to hate cilantro—it tastes soapy to some—then green cilantro seeds might not be your thing. The rest of us should feel free to toss them in our food with experimental abandon, and see what happens. The seeds are spicy, and have a distinct aromatic flavor, with less of that citrusy flavor that puts off cilantro haters. Last week I went to the garden to fetch some cilantro for a batch of guacamole. This time of year the cilantro plants, like many leafy plants in my garden, are bolting— aka, going to seed. Generally, when plants that are eaten for their leaves bolt, the leaves become too bitter for most palates. Cilantro leaves don’t actually really change flavor, but they shrink and grow skinny when the plant bolts. My spindly and sparse cilantro leaves didn’t amount to enough material to flavor my guacamole, but some of the flowers had already morphed into seedpods, so I harvested a small handful of these instead. I beat them in a mortar and pestle with garlic, and stirred the resulting light green paste into mashed avocado, and stirred in chopped onion, salt, pepper, ripe tomato chunks and lime juice. The coriander pods shifted the guacamole flavor a few degrees brighter and more exotic than it would have been with cilantro leaves. The next evening I continued my green coriander research by making more paste with garlic and smearing it on a piece of salmon, over which I poured soy sauce, and baked. It was splendid, but the salmon seemed to absorb much of the green coriander flavor. Next, I tried the same size handful with a filet of Alaskan cod, a milder fish. I fried a small handful of green coriander in butter, then added the fish, along with some chopped garlic. When the fish was almost done, I added a squeeze of lime juice and salt. That pretty much nailed it for me. There are reports that green coriander goes well in cucumber pickles, as a replacement for dill. I know

[24] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

FLASH IN THE PAN

from personal experience it can find a happy home in soups, chutneys and stir-fries. But perhaps my favorite way of using them is in a garden vegetable-oriented, Thai-style coconut curry. As an added bonus, you can, and should, use the root as well. In Thailand, cilantro root is used in many dishes, including curry. The root is skinny and woody, with a mild, celery-like flavor. Summer Green Curry This recipe can be served as a soup or over rice, and can incorporate most any vegetable from your garden that can be stir-fried. Ingredients: Fresh garden veggies (zucchini, beans, basil, carrots, broccoli, peas, string beans, etc.) Green coriander seeds One medium onion, chopped Three garlic cloves, minced One can of full-fat coconut milk Three tablespoons green curry paste Protein, if you wish, such as slow-fried tofu, or some kind of meat or fish One lime, cut and ready to squeeze Soy sauce Cooking oil (I like rice bran oil) Fish sauce (optional, stinky—and awesome) Chicken bullion (optional) Cilantro root, washed and minced Your choice of chili for heat In a pan or wok, heat cooking oil on medium. Add chopped onion and brown it, stirring often. Add vegetables in reverse order of how long it takes them to cook. For example, start with sliced carrots, then wait a few minutes, then zucchini rounds, garlic and sliced cilantro root. A few minutes later, mushrooms, along with your aleady cooked proteins. Stir in two-three tablespoons curry paste, an appropriate amount of chili heat, and chicken bullion if you feel like cheating a little. Add water, if necessary, to make sure nothing sticks or burns. Pour in a can of coconut milk and stir, and then fill the can halfway with water and swish it around to recover all the coconut milk from the side of the can, and pour it in the curry, and stir again. Season with soy sauce, fish sauce and lime, and adjust the chili heat. If you want more liquid, add water and then readjust the seasonings. Add your extra delicate veggies, like broccoli, string beans, peas and basil, in that order. Cook until all the veggies are perfect. Garnish with green onion, and sprinkle green coriander seeds into each bowl at serving time, so they float on top of everything.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area’s most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Bernice's Bakery has been a Missoula Landmark since 1978. If you haven't been you should! If you come every day you know what we're talkin' about: Huckleberry Danishes, fresh baked breads daily, crazy cheap lunches showcasing delicious flavors, one of the nation's top cupcakes, handmade croissants and so much more. Sit inside in one of Missoula's homiest of atmospheres or scoot out back to enjoy a view of downtown Missoula at one of the picnic tables. And don't forget to try the best cup o'joe around or Bernice's toddy brewed iced coffee. There is a lot of hard rollin' action around this joint. Come and see just what we're talkin' about. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, deli-

$…Under $5

cious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

531 S. Higgins

541-4622

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

8am - 4pm

(Breakfast all day)

Times Run 8/9/13 - 8/15/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. • 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$

Lovelace (R) Nightly at 7 and 9 The Kings of Summer (R) Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 and 3 Much Ado about Nothing

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD he GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall • 728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am-2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 97:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

$–$$…$5–$15

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(PG-13)

Nightly at 7 and 9 Sat matinee at 1 and 3

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Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

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missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Tater Pigs HANGRIEST HOUR What you’re eating: The Western Montana Fair’s plethora of rich and tasty grub makes it tough to choose just one item. There are Vikings, battered and deepfried meatballs served in the shape of a sausage and sold on a stick. There’s fry bread, served warm and sweetened with powdered sugar. There are deep-fried cheese curds served with ranch dressing. We enjoy those delicacies and many others, but our first stop for fair food is always the Tater Pig booth.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

What it is: A Tater Pig is a baked potato with a sausage stuffed in the middle and topped with butter, cheese and sour cream. Why you’re eating it: For one, it’s delicious. Secondly, because the Rocky Mountainaires Barbershop Chorus has patented the Tater Pig and the fair is the only place that one can find it in Missoula. Proceeds generated from Pig sales benefit the nonprofit choral group, which supports music scholarships. “It’s a great introduction to barbershop harmony,” says John Robinson from the Mountainaires. What’s almost as good as the Pig itself is the fact that, when prompted, Mountainaires manning the Tater Pig booth will sing you a song about it. The tune goes like this, “There’s a sausage peeking out of the middle of my tater,

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

photo courtesy of John Rettenmayer

middle of my tater … hot off the griddle, sausage in the middle … oink, oink, oink.” Where to find it: At the Western Montana Fair, off South Avenue. The Tater Pig booth is set up near the race track and not far from the beer garden. The fair runs through Aug. 11. —Jessica Mayrer Hangriest Hour serves up fresh details on western Montana eats. To recommend a restaurant, dish or chef for Hangriest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: 24/6. Tues–Sun 6:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Winebar Hours: Tues–Sun 11:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

August 8–August 15, 2013

nightlife Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Discuss how to become a real leader in your community when the Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club meets to discuss Deepak Chopra’s The Soul of Leadership: Unlocking Your Potential for Greatness. 6-7:30 PM. Email jacostant@gmail.com for more info. Those cheeky Hasslers play indie rock and Americana at Draught Works Brewery from 6-8 PM. Free.

photo by Chad Harder th

“If you want to destroy my sweater...” Missoula’s own Skin Flowers help kick off the first day of the 12 annual Total Fest, starting at the Top Hat Thu., Aug. 15 at 7:30 PM, with The Narrows, Benny the Jet Rodriguez, Vile Blue Shades and many more. $15 for Thursday night pass/$20 for Friday or Saturday night passes/$50 for three-day pass. Check out totalfest.org for the full schedule. All ages.

THURSDAYAUGUST08 You might wanna brush up on your algebra before Fareed Haque’s Mathgames comes to town, bringing Mr. Haque’s guitar virtuosity with ‘em. Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $10/$7 in advance at Ear Candy or ticketfly.com.

If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to ages 7 to adult. Call 363-1203 for schedule and info.

Take a lis-zen when Joan Zen Jazz group plays Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

The Western Montana Fair and Rodeo is the jam every summer: vikings to nosh on, sheep to pet, bulls to battle, Zipper rides and flirtin’ with boys. But you know what? The demo derby is where things get really real. Check it all out at the Western

The Missoula Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets the second Thursday of each month at the Montana First Credit Union, 3708 N. Reserve St. Call Cindy Cone at 728-8283 or Ann Houston at 543-8939 for more info. Free.

Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave., today through Sun., Aug. 11. Visit missoulafairgrounds.com.

Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner, by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All showings at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org. “Sensational, soulful” four-man band Vintage Trouble brings a retro-rock-n-roll vibe to the Missoula Winery and Event Center, 5646 Harrier St. 7 PM. $15/$13 in advance. Check out ticketfly.com. Fierce two-piece Erin and the Project plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM. Free, all ages. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [27]


[calendar] During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. I am not, I am not going to stand on the wall, I will dance, I will dance, I will break that ass off to the hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, life-long memories for free, y’all. You won’t get your teeth knocked out, but your socks will surely be knocked off when Hockey, Saint Motel and Swimm play Stage 112, at 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $15/$10 in advance. 18-plus. Check out stageonetwelve.com. Continue your Fair Week country fun when The Ryan Larsen Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 9 PM to close. No cover. Fiddlers’ fingers will be a flyin’ when Lil’ Smokies and Colorado string band Finnders & Youngberg play the Top Hat. 9:30 PM. $5. Guard your Darjeeling before heading to the VFW tonight, where Boston Tea Party, Boys, Rocks (a new band from Gavin of the Skurfs) and Hagface throw down for a night of rock. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. Cover TBA.

August 15

August 22

Jelly Bread

Dead Winter Carpenters

Family Activity

Family Activity

Historical Museum at Fort Missoula

Great Griz Encounter

August 14

August 21

Gladys Friday

Full Grown Men

Family Activity

Family Activity

spectrUM Science Center

Championship Training

FRIDAYAUGUST09 Get stoked for the fall season when The Hunting Film Tour comes to the Wilma, featuring a number of films about adrenalineraising real-life hunts. Doors at 6 PM, show at 7. $10/$8 in advance at Bob Ward’s. If the summer daze has a hold on you, get up on your feet and head to the Jazz and African Dance Workshop at River Street Dance Theater, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton. Workshop is open to ages 7 to adult. Call 363-1203 for schedule and info. Pop another beer and load another bowl, it’s time for the Traff the Wiz and Shmed Maynes album release party that’s been years in the making. Openers include Hemingway, Sincerely Grown and DJs Brand One and Kris Moon. Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. $5, 21-plus. (See Spotlight.) Stop on by the Meadow Peak Skydiving Drop Zone in Marion today to check out the arts and crafts sale benefiting the Joel Atkinson Memorial Scholarship for Skydivers. Proceeds benefit beginner skydivers. 9 AM-7 PM. Learn more at The Joel Fund Facebook page.

nightlife Discover the history of bands in Montucky with the Second Friday Gallery Opening for Lost Sounds Montana, which is archiving and preserving bands before they

get lost in the sands of time. This gallery chronicles 1960s psychedelic and garage rock with old flyers, articles and pictures. Collin Pruitt, AKA Ink Mathematics, spins the vinyl, too. ZACC, 235 N. First St. 5:30 PM, with live show from the Best Westerns in the basement at 8:30 PM. Try a whiskey sour when Blue Hour plays the Top Hat from 6-8 PM. Free, all ages. Enjoy zee cinema at Missoula Public Library’s World Wide Cinema night, the second Friday of every month. The series showcases indie and foreign films. Doors open at 6:45, show at 7 PM. Check missoulapublibrary.org for info. Free. Npustin’s KwKwusm Theatre Project presents the Third Annual Native American Playwriting Festival, Aug. 5-9, which kicks off with Trickster and Dirty Corner, by Victor A. Charlo and Zan Agzigian, and includes The Hell Gate Treaty: We Are This Land by Jennifer Finley and The Dink Brothers, by Julie Cajune and Jennifer Finley. All showings at 7 PM at the Hangin’ Art Gallery in Arlee. Free will donation. Check out npustin.org. Nosh on a taste of the good life while Andrea Harsall and Leia Sky play the outdoor terrace at The Keep Restaurant, 102 Ben Hogan Drive. 7-10 PM. No cover. Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North. Continue your Fair Week country fun when The Ryan Larsen

Flower power. Singer-songwriter Jeanne Jolly plays Stage 112, 112 Pattee St., Tue., Aug. 13. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $10/$8 in advance at Rockin Rudy's, Ear Candy and stageonetwelve.com.

[28] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013


[calendar]

power couple History is full of unlikely partners, seemingly very different people who made their mark on the world together. FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. Jay and Silent Bob. Regis and Kelly. Posh and Becks. Ren and Stimpy. So take Traff the Wiz, a rapper from Troy, of all places, and Ryan “Shmed” Maynes, bellwether of the Missoula rock scene, record producer at Club Shmed. Put them together for a collaboration on a hip-hop album that will wind up taking five years.

WHAT: Traff the Wiz/Shmed Maynes album release WHERE: Monk’s Bar

photo by Chad Harder

WHEN: Fri., Aug 9, at 9 PM HOW MUCH: $5, CDs available for $10

And the result? An entirely creative, fun and catchy album, full of clever lines and beats to make you dance in your seat at work or shake your butt around the house. These Things Take Time might have been a while in the making, but, given the current popularity of ��ber-catchy, poppy rap a la Macklemore, it sounds perfectly of-the-now. Take the funky intro groove and candy-coated hook of the

Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 9 PM to close. No cover. All shall be revealed to be bodacious when Russ Nasset and the Revelators play the Union Club. 9 PM. No cover. Don’t get exiled in guyville, check your head and I’ll bring you the love when you head on down to the Palace tonight for another installment of Dead Hipster’s I Heart the ‘90s. Costumes encouraged. $3, with the infamous $1 well drink special from 9 PM to midnight. Hang out and celebrate an album long in the making when Traff the Wiz and Shmed Maynes release the These Things Take Time CD. Miller Creek and DJ Brand One will perform with Traff. Openers include Hemingway, Sincerely Grown and DJ Kris Moon. Monk’s Bar. 9 PM. $5. CDs available for $10. (See Spotlight.) John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up.

second track, “1986,” which will endear itself to anyone born in the late ’80s in Montana and reminds me of the post-punk laptop rap of MC Lars. These Things is also full of shout-outs to Zootown, which you certainly won’t find on many other hip-hop records. And who knew that “Hardin” and “Darwin” totally rhyme? So really, it makes total sense that combining the expertise of a producer who spent years in LA and a rapper whose brain seems to be bursting with creativity would make for a good result. Traff and Shmed are an excellent dynamic duo. —Kate Whittle

David Raitt and the Baja Boogie Band play some piquant bluesy rock at the Top Hat tonight, starting at 10 PM. No cover. (Raitt, BTDubs, is Bonnie Raitt’s brother.)

SATURDAYAUGUST10 The Grammy-nominated Infamous Stringdusters bring their newgrass jamz to the Wilma. Polecat and American Jubilee open. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $25 at Rockin Rudy’s or at KnittingFactory.com. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine Street (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com) and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM.

Pipe down, guys, it’s the 42nd annual Sandpiper Art Festival on the Lake County Courthouse Lawn on Fourth Avenue East in Polson. More than 90 vendors with fine arts and crafts will be on deck, plus live entertainment. 10 AM-5 PM. Visit sandpiperartgallery.com or call 883-5956 for more info. Marie Estar reads from The Woman and the Butterfly: A Journey From The Heart, an inspirational fable for grownups. 11 AM-12:30 PM. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Find out if art galleries are the hangover cure we’ve all been looking for when The Missoula Art Museum hosts a tour every Saturday at noon. Various exhibiting artists, guides and teachers host. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org to find out schedule details. Free. Drought be damned, we’ll party anyway at the third annual Riverfest in the Root, at Kiwanis Park in Hamilton. Educational activities, animal show, Run For the River 5K, food and bluegrass music are all on tap. 3-9 PM.

nightlife Mudslide Charley keeps it sweet at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [29]


[calendar] Actor, stuntman, musician and stage engineer Richard Lane takes off the beret and puts on a cowboy hat to dazzle y’all with rock and country acoustic tunes. Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. It’s back y’all, so get to steppin’ at the Bitterroot Contra Dance which takes place at the Church of the Nazarene Gym, Victor (Fifth Ave and A Street). Leave the cologne and hairspray at home, hombres. Lessons at 6:30 PM, dance 7–9:30 PM. $5/$10 per family. Call 642-3601.

No experience or roses in the teeth necessary (but hey, why not?) at the August Tango Night at the Brick Room in the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Dance lesson at 8 PM, social dance from 9 to midnight. $10/$16 for couples. Some proceeds for this month go to the Montana Repertory Theater. Check out ddcmontana.com. Martin Scorcese’s peek into the cocaine-fueled (I’m looking at you, Neil Young) and ego-driven (Robbie Robertson) lives of The Band during its final performance is on tap when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents The Last Waltz, at nightfall on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873 or visit missoulaoutdoorcinema.org. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. You just might learn exactly what “third base” really means during Sex Education 2, a night of house music with Las Vegas DJ Danny Glover Jr., plus locals Kount Dubula and Jnglehaus. Palace. 9 PM. No cover, drink specials to be announced. Strike gold when Paydirt plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1100 Strand, from 9:30 PM to close. No cover.

DOWNTOWN MISSOULA & SUNDAY MUSIC STAGE ON MAIN STREET SATURDAY SATURDAY, AUGUST 24TH

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 25TH

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Every minute. Every day.

WWW.RIVERCITYROOTSFESTIVAL.COM [30] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

Let Flagstaff’s Dragons lovingly rock you with its magic when it plays the VFW, along with Helena-by-way-of-Poland’s Valis, plus Missoula’s own Boys and The All-Hail. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $4. (See Music.)

The real contest here will be having the most fun when Shodown plays the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free. Take a chill pill and ride a pony during the Carousel Sunday Market, every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. Produce, psychic readings, live food, music, kids’ activities and, yes, pony rides, are all going down.

SUNDAYAUGUST11 Coloradoans Elephant Revival shall trumpet forth with gypsy folk and Celtic rock at the Top Hat. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15/$13 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. Wind down your wild weekend when Garret Smith and Dave Erickson play instruments that I strongly guess will be guitar-related at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 4-7 PM. Free.

nightlife The Ed Norton Big Band puts some swing in the month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6– 8 PM. $5. Visit missoulawinery.com.


[calendar] Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. It’s a mile high invasion when Dever singer-songwriter Carson Allen, along with indie-rockers Ashtree come to town, with guest openers. $10, advance tickets at etix.com and Rockin Rudy’s.

The Statue of Liberty—no, not that one, but rather the Americana band from Boulder—is in town for a special dinner show at Sean Kelly’s downtown. 8 PM. No cover. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main,

at the Families First Children’s Museum. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. The Missoula Art Museum presents the Picture Perfect Storytelling class, for ages 12-16. Tricia Opstad and Josh Quick will lead fun activities like improv theater, draw-

day Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black

The winningest USian will get a $25 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $25 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM.

hay wails

MONDAYAUGUST12 Santa Cruz indie rockers GRMLN and San Fran band Geographer are gonna map out some fun at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 8 PM. $12/$10 in advance. Check out stageonetwelve.com. (See Music.)

Montana is a dusty, soulful, wild west, where bears and wildlife are as much a part of the landscape as tumbleweeds and old brick storefronts. Whether or not you fancy yourself one of them “country folk” or a true-blue, earth-loving hippie, chances are you found yourself in this beautiful state for the same reason. It's 50 years behind the times, and we love it that way.

Singer-songwriter Jeanne Jolly plays a heavenly tune for y’all when she stops in town as part of her national tour supporting her new album Angels. Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $10/$8 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, Ear Candy and stageonetwelve.com.

WHO: Max Hay and Phil Edgeley

The Missoula Art Museum presents the Picture Perfect Storytelling class, for ages 12-16. Tricia Opstad and Josh Quick will lead fun activities like improv theater, drawing a storyboard and creating worlds via the imagination. Noon-2 PM. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. Arizona’s Run-On Sunshine plays a capella or cassettebacked songs about “cats, wanderlust, and other important things!” at a special in-store Ear Candy show today, along with Javier Ryan. 6-8 PM. Free. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Sit a spell and listen to a legendary storyteller when Rick Bass reads from his new novel, All the Land to Hold Us, at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. (See Books.) Spit out that gum before joining the Missoula City Band rehearsal, every Monday from 7-9 PM in the Sentinel High School band room. All players welcome. Learn more at missoulacityband.org. Beat the honky-tonk blues with a little sip o’ red when Russ Nasset plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7-10 PM. Los Wild Ones portrays the struggles and successes of an indie label in LA, Wild Records, with a roster of young, Hispanic rockabilly musicians. Showing at the Top Hat at 8 PM. Free. (See Film.)

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: What was the title of Mozart’s last composition before he died of rheumatic fever? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

WHERE: Monk's Bar

WEDNESDAYAUGUST14

WHEN: Fri., Aug. 9, 7-9 PM HOW MUCH: Free

Max Hay has been a fixture in the bar scene around the state for some time, playing an upbeat country-folk sound and blowing into a harmonica so fast it would make most people dizzy. He performs like a slightly less punk-influenced and lovesick Frank Turner, with a country simplicity to his lyrics. Hay sings through a leathery but smooth voice, covering everything from Tom Waits to the Pogues. He also manages to play frantic guitar progressions while simultaneously hyperventilating into a harmonica. On this particular tour of Big Sky Country he will be joined by Phil Edgeley, an Australian blues guitarist who plays more down-tempo, soulful delta blues, with an Australian twang. Edgeley tears

seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAYAUGUST13 By golly, four veteran Montana singer-songwriters will all be in the same place when Susan Gibson, Tom Catmull, Jenn Adams and John Floridis play the Crystal, 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. Cover $12. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga

through the frets with exhausting rigidity, throwing a few plucks in between fast, full-neck slides, and dry, sharp chords. It’s no wonder that some country and blues legends, from George Jones to Buddy Guy, have made stops in Montana over the years. The atmosphere of a hot, dry summer night is just added effect to lyrics like Hay’s about feeling like “a broke-down engine” or wanting to get your “sweet mama” back.

ing a storyboard and creating worlds via the imagination. Noon-2 PM. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

nightlife Don’t need to be a lover nor a sinner, just a picker to join Brian Herbel and friends for an open picking session at Montgomery Distillery. 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Brian Herbel and co. present an old-timey picking session at Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St. String players are invited to join in. 5:30 PM. If early morning grub grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tues-

—Eben Wragge-Keller

Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. So, who wants to let the band crash at their house after Polyphonic Spree, a 19-piece ensemble, plays its near-legendary choral symphonic rock at the Top Hat? I call “not it!” Doors at 7 PM, show at 8:30. $20/$15 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, the Top Hat and tophatlounge.com. 18-plus. (See Music.) The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 549-7933 for more information.

Rapper/producer Blueprint, one of the esteemed Rhymesayers, comes to town along with Illogic and our own Mateo Mblem to shake things up at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 8 PM. $14/$12 in advance. 18-plus. Check out stageonetwelve.com. Put on your 10-gallon hat and ask that nice gal to join you for the Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo in Kalispell, with horse racing, concerts, carnival rides, craft exhibits and more. $5, seniors and kids free every day. Food served out of a truck always tastes better, so check out the goods at Out to Lunch in Caras Park, from 11 AM–2 PM. Free to hang out and people-watch, food will cost you. The Missoula Art Museum presents the Picture Perfect Storytelling class, for ages 12-16. Tricia Opstad and Josh Quick will lead fun activities like improv theater, drawing a storyboard and creating worlds via the imagination. Noon-2 PM. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market offers treats, produce, tunes and more in The Hangin Art Gallery parking lot, 92555 Highway 93 in Arlee, from 4-7 PM. For more information or to become a vendor, call Kelley at 726-5550.

nightlife The Littlest Birds, a cello and banjo duo, make a whole lotta soulful woodsy sound when they play the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., starting at 6 PM. No cover.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [31]


[calendar] Don’t Bogart that plate of chips, but pass it when Russ Nasset plays the Top Hat. 7-9 PM. Free. Let me tell you something I learned the hard way: Meatloaf songs are not appropriate for karaoke. Now go forth to Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Don’t fix it if it ain’t broke at Breaks Quarterly, a night of breakbeat tunes with DJs Redd, Milkcrate Mechanic, Geeter Tron and Ty Son. Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus $6 Pabst pitchers and free pool.

Put on your 10-gallon hat and ask that nice gal to join you for the Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo in Kalispell, with horse racing, concerts, carnival rides, craft exhibits and more. $5, seniors and kids free every day. The Missoula Art Museum presents the Picture Perfect Storytelling class, for ages 12-16. Tricia Opstad and Josh Quick will lead fun activities like improv theater, drawing a storyboard and creating worlds via the imagination. Noon-2 PM. Check out missoulaartmuseum.org.

deners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montana naturalist.org.

John Floridis plays folk rock whilst you sip some tasty beverages at the Higherground Brewery in Hamilton. 6 PM. No cover.

nightlife

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

You betcha it’ll be fresh and sweet when Garden City Harvest presents the annual Farm Party on the PEAS Farm, 3010 Duncan Drive up in the Rattlesnake. Tunes from Mudslide Charley

THURSDAY AUGUST 8

You can set your watch by Mountain Standard Time when this “freegrass” band outta Colorado plays the Top Hat. $7. 10 PM. (Triva answer: Requiem, which was completed by one of his students after his death.)

Go on and get sticky-sweet when Honey and the Bear play Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., 6-8 PM. Free. Betty and the Boy, Eugene-based songwriters originally from Montucky, promise to “steal your heart with memorable and haunting ballads about love and loss” at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton tonight. 68:30 PM.

THURSDAYAUGUST15 I’m just a bill, sitting here on Capitol Hill, waitin’ for Schoolhouse Rock Live to start at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, as part of the Performing Arts Camp. The live show is indeed based on the Saturday morning cartoon that taught you and I how the political process is ‘sposed to work. Nightly performances at 8 PM, plus matinee performances on Sat., Aug. 17 at 1 and 4 PM. Check out mctinc.org or call 728-7529 for more info.

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30– 10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free.

As the Lord Jesus did sayeth to Peter, Paul and Mary: Do good works and rock out. (Right? It’s been a while since I looked at a bible.) Christian hard rockers The Letter Black and The Protest are in town to spread the gospel of guitar along with Kingsdown, Spoken and Missoula’s own High Voltage. Palace. 9 PM. $5.

I am not, I am not going to stand on the wall, I will dance, I will dance, I will break that ass off to the hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, life-long memories for free, y’all.

Have your world expanded out to the edges during the Missoula Fringe Festival, with over 60 uncensored, non-juried performances, including art, theatre, film and dance. 70 for all-festival access/$40 for allday acess/$12 for individual events. See missoulafringefestival.com for schedule and ticket purchasing. Mah gawd, Gorilla, Total Fest is back once again and itchin’ to drop the elbows on all comers, Verne Gagne’s goons bedamned. This three-day rawk fest is more than just a rawk fest. It features the kind of music Granny H can really can get into: loud, soft, duos, shirtless, black-shirted, covered in tires, on fire, reckless, oh-so-farking heavy. Headliners include Red Fang, Guantanamo Baywatch, Vile Blue Shades and more. For a full list of bands, venues and costs visit totalfest.org. Tell ‘em Gary Glitter sent ya.

Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

Quenby and the West of Wayland Band do the boot-scoot-boogie all night long at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM.

Learn about how affordable housing can be beautiful, too, at the Orchard Gardens Outreach Tour sponsored by Homeword. Orchard Gardens has 1.5 acres of gardens, a solar panel, straw bale barn and housing units for low-to-moderate incomes. Noon-1 PM. 210 N. Grove St. Lunch provided. RSVP to Jeannine@homeword.org. Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gar-

[32] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013

and Lil’ Smokies, plus food, drinks and dancing. $20/$20 for kids ages 2-10, or $15/$5 for kids in advance at gardencityharvest.org, Rockin Rudy’s or MSO Hub. Check out gardencityharvest.org. Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

See y’all in the pit at Total Fest. Submit events by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Include the who-what-when-where-why and a picture, if you would be so kind. Alternately, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events online. Just head to the arts section of our website, scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link on the left that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

T

he Morganzo 55: Double Nickels on the Grime sounds like a rather punk rock mountain bike race, what with the Minutemen reference and how it’s unsupported and mostly known by word of mouth. According to Kirk Ahlberg, cycling blogger for The Bozeman Fix, at last year’s inaugural race, about seven friends competed in a low-key, friendly manner. The prizes included the first-place “overall unsupported badass cyclist” and the “Troll Trophy for slaying the hilly Morganzo on only 8 gears.” (Ahlberg says the name is partly a tribute to the Almanzo, a cycling race in Minnesota, and the Morgan family that predominantly lives in the Belgrade area.) This year, The race launches at 9 AM at a rural intersection near Belgrade. The Morganzo features 55 miles of riding on gravel roads, with an elevation climb a tad over 3,000 feet. It’s self supported, but water re-

fills are available at Pass Creek Elementary around mile 40. The round-trip route swings north, winding along rolling hills on the west side of the Bridger Mountain Range toward the town of Maudlow and back down to the finish. And as Ahlberg writes on Bozeman Fix, “First one done gets first crack at the beer, so bring a few to share.” —Kate Whittle The Morganzo 55: Double Nickels On the Grime, an unsupported 55-mile ride on gravel throughout Belgrade, starts on the corner of Dry Creek and Theisen roads at 9 AM Sat., Aug 10. Find cue sheet and ride info at thebozemanfix.blogspot.com or email thebozemanfix@gmail.com.

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THURSDAY AUGUST 8 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY AUGUST 9 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit. Find out how Plains Indians got around before the Spanish showed up with their ponies when author Kae Cheatham presents, “Before the Horse: Northern Rockies Lifestyle” at Beavertail Hill State Park, outside Clinton. 8 PM. Hang out just for the evening, or stick around and camp out for the night. Free.

SATURDAY AUGUST 10 If you’ve always wanted to learn kayaking, there’s no time like the present and the water is fine. Zoo Town Surfers present a two-day introductory clinic taught by certified American Canoe Association instructors who are experts in whitewater kayaking. Classes start at Frenchtown Pond or Sandy Beaches to go over the basics, and then move to a Class I section of the Blackfoot or Clark Fork rivers. $200. Call 546-0370 to sign up.

You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

TUESDAY AUGUST 13 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM on Tuesdays for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 15 If hanging out in the Pintlers backcountry sounds like something you’d do anyway, The Wilderness Institute seeks volunteers to help monitor environmental health in the Anaconda Pintler Wilderness. Dinners are provided daily, transportation available from Missoula and adjacent towns. Find out more and register at citizenscience@cfc.umt.edu. The miniNaturalists Pre-K Program is aces for outdoorsy learning for ye childrens. The Montana Natural History Center. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. Visit montananaturalist.org. The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [33]


[community]

An Onion story currently getting a lot of play on my Facebook feed, titled, “Something Wrong With Literally Everything in Apartment,” lists the numerous problems in a fictional home. “Although Kelly and Epting admitted that the discoloration behind the kitchen sink was spreading and that the lock on the apartment’s front door had grown increasingly ‘temperamental,’ they said that the apartment was in a great location and well worth the $1,400 rent.” It certainly strikes a chord with me and a lot of my fellow 20-somethings. Missoula’s housing situation is better off than other places in the country, but it’s still tough to find a decent place that’s affordable. This goes doubly so for folks who might be struggling to find enough work or a job at all. Some people land a nice job and mortgage their dream home, only to lose their job and face foreclosure. This is where Homeword comes in. The nonprofit is responsible for many of the innovative housing com-

plexes around town, like Orchard Gardens, and serves low-to-middle income people, including those undergoing foreclosure. The 35-unit property boasts a 1.5acre community garden, covered bike parking, dual flush toilets, Energy Star appliances and many more sustainable features. Homeword is hosting a tour of Orchard Gardens for anyone who’s interested in checking it out, and not just people who might want to rent there. Households must make less than 50 percent of the area median income to qualify to live in Orchard Gardens (roughly $32,000 in 2009, according to the Census). You can find out more at homeword.org. —Kate Whittle The Orchard Gardens Outreach Tour, sponsored by Homeword, is Thu., Aug. 15 from Noon-1 PM. 210 N. Grove St. Lunch provided. RSVP to Jeannine@homeword.org.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY AUGUST 8 Hey, Missoula families, if you’re a decent kinda person and want to show off the glories of America to a foreigner, EF Foundation applications are open now for folks to host high school exchange students for this upcoming school year. Contact Katie Zuck at 406-830-8518 or email katiezuck@gmail.com for more info. You can also check out effoundation.org. Take care of yourself today at the Walgreens Way to Well Health Tour, which offers free health tests measuring the important stuff like blood pressure, metabolism and glucose levels. Must be 18-plus, tests take about 20 minutes. Walgreens locations throughout town. 11 AM. Losing a pet is losing a friend. Hospice of Missoula presents Pet Bereavement Support, an opportunity to work through your grief with others in the community. The four-week group meets Thursday evenings at 6:30 PM at Natural Grocers, 2530 S. Third St. W. Free, but call Hospice of Missoula to register and learn more at 543-4408.

SATURDAY AUGUST 10 Need help paying for daycare for the kiddos? Child Care Resources has new guidelines for eligibility, so contact ‘em now to find out if you qualify. A family of three earning less than $2,386 a month has a shot. Call 728-6446 or see childcareresource.org to learn more.

MONDAY AUGUST 12 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Florence School kids and their families are invited to a pulled pork sandwich potluck for the sports and cheerleading programs in the old gym. Freshmen and sophomores are asked to bring sides or salads, juniors bring desserts, seniors bring chips at 6 PM. Parent meeting to follow at 7 PM.

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays. What is the sound of one hand clapping? Perhaps you’ll contemplate this and other mysteries at Total Empowerment! Education in the True Nature of Mind: Introductory Training with Cheyenne Rivers and Balanced View, hosted at Hot House Yoga from 7-9 PM. Register at balancedview.org. Suggested donation $25-$100.

TUESDAY AUGUST 13 If you found out you have rheumatoid arthritis and you’re wondering what’s next, RA Just Diagnosed at 337 Stephens Ave. 5:30 PM. For more information or to register, call Carrie at 203-3020 or email cstrike@arthritis.org. Free, but registration is required. The Missoula Patriots meeting tonight features Tonya Shellnut speaking on the Common Core education standards and Lloyd Phillips on DOMA. Valley Christian School Auditorium, 2526 Sunset Lane. 7 PM. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 15 Come chat with knowledgeable folks during Access Denied: A MontPIRG forum on Privacy, with panelists including a constitutional law professor, a state representative, SubSector Solutions company CEO and City Councilman Jason Wiener. Badlander. 5:30 PM. Honor your connection to the earth and the glorious array of life on it during the Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins, enter through back alley door. 7 PM. Free will offering.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • August 8–August 15, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 BONNIE• Bonnie is a young dog with lots of energy and a smile that could light up our whole kennel. She seems to love everyone, so we know she could fit into almost any kind of household. She just wants a family of her own to love her and keep her happy.

CALLIE•Callie was rescued by a game warden who found her all by herself in the forest. She is quite well-behaved in the kennel, but it's easy to see that she'd rather be in a home than living with us. She's a great size, has a lovely coat, and loves to play.

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it's time to feature him again. He's such a great dog that everyone at the shelter really loves him, but he just doesn't attract the at- 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 tention of potential adopters. He can be a bit Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) barky in his kennel, but once he's out, he's 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 nothing but wonderful. Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri)

SALEM•Salem is a big, handsome declawed fellow who loves gentle attention and belly rubs. He'd like an adult home, since he's not fond of surprises (and children are full of them). Remember, anyone who adopts a black or a black and white cat this month will get a delicious treat from Black Cat Bake Shop. IZZY•Izzy is just a youngster, and we think she's been on her own for a while because she's a bit shy and doesn't know how to play with toys. She has a lovely orange tigerstriped coat, big beautiful eyes, and no tail! She needs a home with loving people who will help her relax and enjoy life.

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TILLY•Tilly is a big cat with interesting

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markings and a truly regal bearing. She's also quite independent and isn't shy about letting people know that they've done something annoying. She would be great in an adult home where she could reign as queen and get all the respect that goes along with being royalty.

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These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 BEN HUR•Meet Ben Hur, a sweet tan coated 2-year-old Chihuahua mix who is looking for a forever home. Originally a stray, he’s a tad bashful at first, but warms up for a good play, or even a snuggle. Ben Hur enjoys exercising and would relish hiking with you. Best with adults, he plays nicely with older kids too. Come say hi today! BRAVEHEART•Such a ‘brave’ boy, this Chihuahua mix is 2 years young and hails from California. Already well traveled, Braveheart is eager to be adopted. A bit shy at first, he warms up quickly (especially to men), and enjoys playing with other dogs. Do you have some room in your family for some bravery? Come meet this sweet boy today! FEDERICO• Happy and energetic Federico is only 2 years old, and quite a handsome Chihuahua mix. A pup who enjoys time with adults, kids and other dogs, he is independent and yet feels a need to belong. A social boy, he enjoys going for walks on a leash and is eager to learn new things. Come adopt him today!

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SNOW WHITE•This sweet lady, and her dwarf “brothers & sisters,” are all up for adoption. Their owner passed away and they’re looking for forever homes, preferably indoors. Snow White (albeit not white in color) is 8 years young, and of course enjoys human interaction. Head butts, brushing, and petting are most welcomed and solicited. Come meet this charming lady today. DOPEY•Dopey, a beautiful grey & black Persian girl, is definitely smart. Having lived 8 years, she knows that life as an indoor cat is ideal, that sitting in a person’s lap is awesome, and that having her own place to scope out is superb. If she’s adopted by a senior, her adoption fee is waived – a purrfect reason to come meet her.

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DOC•This sweet guy named Doc could be the medicine you need. A kind boy who loves a lap, head rubs, treats and brushing, he is 10 years old and friendly, if not a little shy. Doc’s person passed away and therefore, he, Snow White and Dopey (along with a few other ‘dwarfs’) are looking for their forever home. Come meet them all today!

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 TABITHA•Tabitha is a 4-year-old female

orange tabby who has been with AniMeals for two years. She is a very sweet girl; however, she will need a single cat home and a patient owner. She is shy upon first introduction, but once she gets to know you, she is very loving.

GALENA•Galena

is a 3-year-old female, long-haired tabby. She is playful and full of energy. She is looking for an indoor/outdoor environment and would do well in a multiple-pet home, as long as she has her own space.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

ROCKY• Rocky is a large 5-year-old male tabby. He is declawed on the front, extremely loving and prefers to live with other female cats. He is tentative and cautious around men, but instantly cuddles with women.

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LEONA•Leona is a 6-year-old female lilac

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tortoiseshell who has been at the shelter since January of 2012. She gets along well with children and other cats but is often overlooked because of her quiet, calm disposition.

missoulanews.com • August 8–August 15, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

August 8 - August 15, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

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Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon MYSTERY MEET A man my friend was crazy for just broke up with her. I kind of saw the breakup coming, as I thought they were too different, but she thinks he just falsely advertised who he really is. They met online, and he made himself out to be this guy who loves art and culture, which to her means going to museums, shows, and lectures and to him means staying home and making things. She now insists that the only way to meet people is in the activity you want them to be doing. For example, if you want a guy who likes art museums and going to cultural events (which she does), you'd better hang out in an art museum to find a date. I think it's a mistake for her not to keep online dating, because I think she'll meet a lot more men. —Friend Of Stubborn Woman People try to put their best foot forward on dating sites, and rather often, it turns out it's not actually their foot. Of course, deceptive self-marketing is not exclusive to online dating, and online dating does offer certain efficiencies that trying to meet a man at an art museum or cultural event does not. For example, people join a dating site specifically because they are looking for a partner. Some man you spot in a museum may also be looking for a partner—his wife, who was right behind him just a room ago. It sounds like your friend is blaming the Internet because a guy she liked didn't like her back. They maybe both projected what they wanted on each other and needed to dig deeper to find out who the person they were dating really was. This is what dating is for. It's supposed to be a process of finding out about a person, not "I baited the hook; I caught the fish; now let's decide what's for dinner at the wedding!" We often don't need anybody to go to the trouble of deceiving us. We do that really well on our own, like by telling ourselves we've found the "perfect person" and ignoring any evidence to the contrary. Instead, there needs to be a vetting process, whether you meet a man online or at an artwalk. It involves asking questions and looking to see who he is and being willing to find out that he isn't right for you. This vetting is essential because, wherever you meet men, there's one thing many will have in common: insisting they're interested in whatever you are if they think you're hot. Try to help your

friend see that holing up in the art museum isn't the answer. Sure, it might be kismet that Mr. Dreamypants is standing in the lobby right next to her favorite sculpture, or he might just be waiting to enjoy the work of Sir John Harrington, the guy who invented the flush toilet found in the free public bathroom.

The Missoula Manor Homes Annual White Elephant Sale is Friday August 23 from 9 AM to 2 PM and Saturday August 24 from 9 AM to 12 Noon. In addition to great bargains on jewelry, furniture, books, small appliances and electronics, we will also have our popular cinnamon

The dream was tall, dark, and handsome. Not elfish, dark, and handsome. Still, the problem here could be seen another way: You need to be shorter. Unfortunately, accomplishing that is the less practical solution, as it would require a saw. It might help to understand that you want him to be taller not because you're a bad person but because you're a product of human evolution. In our ancestral past, height in a man likely had mating and survival advantages. (The short caveman would have been less able to reach the lion with his spear: "Take that, you big meanie!") As for what to do in the present, elevator shoes might be the solution you're both looking for. While lifts are inserts stuck into the shoe, mainly raising the heel, elevator shoes, which can be custom-made by a podiatrist, have a hidden platform built in throughout the shoe. The latest models are cleverly designed and appear to be normal footwear. This means that a man needn't suffer the discomfort of tromping around in heels just to be attractive to his partner. (Next thing you know, he'll be complaining about the scratchy red lace and underwire digging into his flesh.)

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

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Fletch Law, PLLC

POST 27 HALL

Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

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Social Security Disability

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BARTENDING

$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Customer Service Representative Candidate must have experience in customer service including answering phones, taking orders, troubleshooting issues, and tracking orders. Must be detail oriented and have good communication skills both written and verbal. Full time M-F 8am - 5pm. $11/hour. Job# 9979345. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Delivery Driver MUST have a clean driving record. Some heavy lifting. The duties of this job include driving to various locations and unloading/loading food products into a truck. $11.00 Hourly. JOB# 9979377, Missoula Job Service 728-7060

HAIR SALON. Looking for booth renters. Full or part-time. Only pay for the days you work. 5463846 NEED A JOB NOW? Our company currently operates over 200 websites and a call center located in Missoula Must have phone, email, computer and internet skills. We offer paid training at $320 per week and commissions based pay to our trained sales people. Average wage is $18/HR +plus benefits and bonuses. For interviews call 406.329.7662 Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 Personal Care Attendant A local area, in-home health care service has a parttime job opening for a personal care attendant. The location of the job is in the Philipsburg, MT area. The personal care attendant will work in private resi-

dences to provide care and inhome services to clients whose chronic health issues cause them to be functionally limited in performing activities of daily living. Benefits are available and will be discussed at interview. Days and hours worked will vary depending on client needs. $10.63 Hourly. Job# 9979328. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Pest Control Technician Employee will be engaged in pest control application procedures in residential homes. Previous experience not needed will train the right individual. Will be provided with appropriate PPE and insecticide safety training. Must have clean criminal background as well and clean driving record. Potential commission after sucessful completion of probationary/training period. $10.00 Hourly. Job# 9979325. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 7287060 Development Coordinator Adventure Cycling Association seeks an energetic, well-organized, and detail-oriented person to fill the role of Development Coordinator in our Development Department. This is a unique opportunity for a selfstarter with initiative to join a fast-growing development program. We seek a team player, with some development or client-


EMPLOYMENT services background with an enthusiasm for cycling. Please send a cover letter, writing sample and resume to ssnyder@adventurecycling.org. To see full job description go to adventurecycling.org Electrical Project Manager Must be organized and able to organize others. Each project truly is a team effort. JOB# 9979363, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HVAC Control System Application Engineer Responsible for the design of temperature controls systems and related products for HVAC systems, engineering documentation, and providing technical support for Project Managers and Field Technicians. JOB# 9979361, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Purchasing Agent Candidate MUST have at least 3 YEARS of Purchasing experience. Duties include working with vendors, ordering products, and buying inventory. Must be detail oriented and have dealt with marketing programs in the past preferably. M-F 8am-5pm. $15.00/hour to start. Job# 9979347. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 T R A N S P O R TAT I O N MANAGER – $28.3602 $32.9770/hour, regular, full time, exempt. The City of Missoula Development Services Department is seeking and individual to oversee the administration of the Transportation Division; oversee transportation planning, serve as staff to the Missoula Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and

oversee transportation demand management efforts, including the Missoula in Motion and Bicycle/Pedestrian programs. Requirements include a Bachelor’s degree in planning, urban studies, environmental science, geography or public administration, and four years of planning and transportation development experience including two years of supervisory experience. Master’s degree and AICP certification preferred. Complete job description and required City application available at City of Missoula Human Resources Dept., 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297, (406) 552-6130 or apply on-line at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/ jobs. Closing Date: 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20, 2013. EEO/AA/ADA Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and handicapped individuals are strongly encouraged to apply.

Hiring Part-Time

Service Coordinator

HEALTH CAREERS Physician Assistant Missoula, MT Under the medical supervision of the Medical Director and day to day supervision by the Health Center Manager, the Physician Assistant will function as the primary provider of medical services for male and female patients. Job# 9979333. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, MT. is seeking to fill the following positions: Registered Nurse - Intensive Care Unit JOB# 9644551; Housekeeper JOB# 9644550; Analyst 2 JOB# 9644549; Registered Nurse - Medical Oncology JOB# 9644548; Registered Nurse - Emergency Services Job# 9644547; Patient Services Representative JOB# 9644546; Inventory Specialist - Job# 9644544. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Now Hiring for

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for Missoula area $10/Hour Must be able to work weekends.

Training provided. Flexible shifts available.

For more information please call 291-0732

For more information please call 291-0732

SALES Customer Service/Sales Success oriented achievers: do you enjoy having your efforts reflect on your paycheck? This sales position doesn’t require experience, but a desire to learn. Compensation is a base wage, plus a commission. Benefits include health, dental and vision insurance, health savings account, 401k, profit sharing, employee discounts and paid time off. $1,400.00 - $2,500.00 Monthly. JOB# 9979365, Missoula Job Service 728-7060 INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Office Suite. Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills. New or non-traditional media sales experience a plus. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA • Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

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DRIVERS WANTED The Missoula Independent is looking for drivers to deliver the paper on Thursday mornings. Must have a valid driver's license, insurance and a reliable vehicle that can handle several bundles of papers. For more information and/or to apply, email biz@missoulanews.com. No phone calls, please.

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MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Persian X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3255 Torbie(red/grey), Persian X, SF, 2yrs; # 3313 Flame Point, Siamese, SF, 6yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3429 White/grey, Siamese/DSH, 12yrs; #3454 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3468 Black, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3477 Black, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3527 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3540 Black Torti, Persian X, SF, 6yrs; #3576 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 1yr; #3581 Grey/Torti, DSH, SF, 6yrs; #3612 Grey/Blk/Whi, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #3638 Orange/white, DSH, NM, 8yrs; #3639 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3649 Black, DMH, SF, 2yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311

www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3432 Blk/white, Pit, NM, 3yrs; #3455 Tri, Beagle, SF, 10yrs; #3485 White/blk, Pointer/Pit X, NM, 2yrs; #3488 B&W, Pointer, NM, 2yrs; #3489 Blk/tan, Shepherd X, NM, 2yrs; #3490 Golden, Pit X, NM, 3yrs; #3503 Black/tan, Rott/Shep X, NM, 9 mo; #3575 Blk/white, BC/Heeler, SF, 8yrs; #3588 Yellow, Lab, NM, 6yrs; #3602 White w/brown, English Setter, SF, 5yrs; #3606 Grey/white, Pointer/Pit, SF, 3yrs; # 3 6 2 1 Ta n / w h i t e / b r o w n ,

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photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 8– August 15, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): "You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestation of your own blessings," says author Elizabeth Gilbert. I recommend that you experiment with this subversive idea, Aries. Just for a week, see what happens if you devote yourself to making yourself feel really good. I mean risk going to extremes as you pursue happiness with focused zeal. Try this: Draw up a list of experiences that you know will give you intense pleasure, and indulge in them all without apology. And please don't fret about the possible consequences of getting crazed with joy. Be assured that the cosmos is providing you with more slack than usual.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): "I am not washed and beautiful, in control of a shining world in which everything fits," writes Taurus author Annie Dillard, "but instead am wandering awed about on a splintered wreck I've come to care for, whose gnawed trees breathe a delicate air." I recommend you try on her perspective for size. For now, just forget about scrambling after perfection. At least temporarily, surrender any longing you might have for smooth propriety. Be willing to live without neat containment and polite decorum. Instead, be easy and breezy. Feel a generous acceptance for the messy beauty you're embedded in. Love your life exactly as it is, with all of its paradoxes and mysteries. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Studies show that when you're driving a car, your safest speed is five miles per hour higher than the average rate of traffic. Faster than that, though, and the danger level rises. Traveling more slowly than everyone else on the road also increases your risk of having an accident. Applying these ideas metaphorically, I'd like to suggest you take a similar approach as you weave your way through life's challenges in the coming week. Don't dawdle and plod. Move a little swifter than everyone else, but don't race along at a breakneck pace.

Pay-WhatYou-Can Plan

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The key theme this week is relaxed intensification. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to heighten and strengthen your devotion to things that are important to you—but in ways that make you feel more serene and self-possessed. To accomplish this, you will have to ignore the conventional wisdom, which falsely asserts that going deeper and giving more of yourself require you to increase your stress levels. You do indeed have a great potential for going deeper and giving more of yourself, but only if you also become more at peace with yourself and more at home in the world.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Last year a young Nebraskan entrepreneur changed his name from Tyler Gold to Tyrannosaurus Rex Gold. He said it was a way of giving him greater name recognition as he worked to build his career. Do you have any interest in making a bold move like that, Leo? The coming weeks would be a good time for you to think about adding a new twist to your nickname or title or self-image. But I recommend something less sensationalistic and more in line with the qualities you'd actually like to cultivate in the future. I'm thinking of something like Laughing Tiger or Lucky Lion or Wily Wildcat.

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c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): African-American jazz singer Billie Holiday was the great-granddaughter of a slave. By the time she was born in 1915, black people in the American South were no longer "owned" by white "masters," but their predicament was still extreme. Racism was acute and debilitating. Here's what Billie wrote in her autobiography: "You can be up to your boobies in white satin, with gardenias in your hair and no sugar cane for miles, but you can still be working on a plantation." Nothing you experience is remotely as oppressive as what Billie experienced, Virgo. But I'm wondering if you might suffer from a milder version of it. Is any part of you oppressed and inhibited even though your outward circumstances are technically unconstrained? If so, now's the time to push for more freedom.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What resounding triumphs and subtle transformations have you accomplished since your last birthday? How have you grown and changed? Are there any ways you have dwindled or drooped? The next few weeks will be an excellent time to take inventory of these things. Your own evaluations will be most important, of course. You've got to be the ultimate judge of your own character. But you should also solicit the feedback of people you trust. They may be able to help you see clues you've missed. If, after weighing all the evidence, you decide you're pleased with how your life has unfolded these past ten to eleven months, I suggest you celebrate your success. Throw yourself a party or buy yourself a reward or climb to the top of a mountain and unleash a victory cry.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Monmouth Park in New Jersey hosts regular horse races from May through November. During one such event in 2010, a horse named Thewifenoseeverything finished first, just ahead of another nag named Thewifedoesntknow. I suspect that there'll be a comparable outcome in your life sometime soon. Revelation will trump secrecy. Whoever is hiding information will lose out to anyone who sees and expresses the truth. I advise you to bet on the option that's forthcoming and communicative, not the one that's furtive and withholding.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You have both a poetic and a cosmic license to stretch yourself further. It's best not to go too far, of course. You should stop yourself before you obliterate all boundaries and break all taboos and smash all precedents. But you've certainly got the blessings of fate if you seek to disregard some boundaries and shatter some taboos and outgrow some precedents. While you're at it, you might also want to shed a few pinched expectations and escape an irrelevant limitation or two. It's time to get as big and brave and brazen as you dare.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When I was 19, a thug shot me in the butt with a shotgun at close range. To this day, my body contains the 43 pellets he pumped into me. They have caused some minor health problems, and I'm always queasy when I see a gun. But I don't experience any routine suffering from the wound. Its original impact no longer plagues me. What's your own personal equivalent of my trauma, Capricorn? A sickness that racked you when you were young? A difficult break-up with your first love? The death of someone you cared about? Whatever it was, I suspect you now have the power to reach a new level of freedom from that old pain.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Want to take full advantage of the sexy vibes that are swirling around in your vicinity? One thing you could do is whisper the following provocations in the ear of anyone who would respond well to a dose of boisterous magic: 1) "Corrupt me with your raw purity, baby; beguile me with your raucous honesty." 2) "I finally figured out that one of the keys to eternal happiness is to be easily amused. Want me to show you how that works?" 3) "I dare you to quench my thirst for spiritual sensuality." 4) "Let's trade clothes and pretend we're each other's higher selves."

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some people put their faith in religion or science or political ideologies. English novelist J.G. Ballard placed his faith elsewhere: in the imagination. "I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world," he wrote, "to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the confidences of madmen." As you make your adjustments and reconfigure your plans, Pisces, I suggest you put your faith where Ballard did. Your imagination is far more potent and dynamic than you realize—especially right now. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 p.m., August 20th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Cemetery Trailer Mounted Diesel Powered Air Compressor. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Cemetery Trailer Mounted Air Compressor, Closing 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City re-

Section 3 PUBLIC NOTICE Missoula County and the City of Missoula, on behalf of the Poverello Center, Inc. have received notice of the award of Community Development Block Grant funds from the Montana Department of Commerce, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Poverello Center, Inc. will soon commence the implementation of the new emergency homeless shelter and soup kitchen project for Poverello Center residents and staff operations. The project will consist of construction of a new twostory building consisting of two group and 16 semi-private sleeping rooms and a soup kitchen to meet the needs of the homeless population including veterans, elderly, and those with disabilities to be built at 1110 West Broadway, in Missoula, Montana. CDBG regulations governing the grants require that to the greatest extent feasible, opportunities for training and employment arising in connection with this CDBG-assisted project will be extended to local lower-income residents. Further, to the greatest extent feasible, business concerns located in or substantially owned by residents of the project area (Missoula County) and minority or women-owned businesses are encouraged to be utilized. For more information, please contact Jean Harte or Melissa Gordon, Department of Grants and Community Programs, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, 59802 or call (406) 258-3712, or (406) 258-4980.

serves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials that best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 p.m., August 20th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Jack Reidy Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Parks Department Tractor. Bidders shall bid by City

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, August 26, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 202 E Main St – Tavern and Casino Conditional Use Request from p38 Investments, LLC for approval of a Tavern and Casino Conditional Use at 202 E Main St. (see Map U),

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Parks Department Tractor, Closing 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will

furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials that best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid

Advertisement for Bids HRC Cottages, Inc. (HRC) is requesting proposals for the following maintenance items: Cedar Grove and Willow Creek Apartments Maintenance Contracts: Package 01 – Site Paving Package 02 – Carpentry Package 03 – Flooring Package 04 – HVAC Package 05 – Electrical Package 06 – Plumbing Package 07 - Re-Roofing Package 08 – Appliances Package 09 - Gutters Package 10 – Metal Fabrication/Install The Apartments are located at the following addresses:

Cedar Grove Apartments

233 Willow Creek • Corvallis, MT 59828

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6638. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 p.m., August 20th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Jack Reidy Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Cemetery Utility Vehicle. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Cemetery Utility Vehicle, Closing 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each

the work, and the BIDDER shall furnish to HRC all such information and data for this purpose as HRC may request. HRC reserves the right to reject any BID if the evidence submitted by, or investigation of, such BIDDER fails to satisfy HRC that such BIDDER is properly qualified to carry out the obligations of the CONTRACT and to complete the work contemplated therein. A conditional or qualified BID will not be accepted. Award will be made to the lowest responsible BIDDER. This project is funded by a loan from the USDA-Rural Development office. Standard USDA-RD contracting forms will be used and will be made available to Contractor(s) prior to bid. These are NOT Davis-Bacon or Montana Prevailing Wage contract(s). A pre-bid walk-through for all Maintenance Contracts will be held on the following dates: August 15, 2013 (exterior only) @ 2:00 pm Starting at the Cedar Grove Apartments and then moving to the Willow Creek Apartments

750 5th Avenue • Victor, MT 59875

Willow Creek Apartments

zoned CBD (Central Business District). The applicant requests the Tavern and Casino Conditional use to build a restaurant and bar with casino. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6638 for further assistance.

announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk

The Architect’s estimate of the value of the work to be performed will vary from $1,000 to $25,000 depending on the contract. Each BID must be submitted in a sealed envelope, addressed to Robert Robinson, Staff Architect, HRC at 1801 S. Higgins Ave., Missoula, MT 59801, & received no later than 3:00 pm, September 4, 2013. Each sealed envelope containing a BID must be plainly marked on the outside as "Cedar Grove and Willow Creek Apartments Maintenance Contracts, Package XX (insert correct package number)" and the envelope should bear on the outside the name of the BIDDER, his or her address. If forwarded by mail, the sealed envelope containing the BID must be enclosed in another envelope addressed to HRC Cottages at 1801 S. Higgins Ave., Missoula, MT 59801. Contractors & sub-contractors are free and encouraged to bid on any or all maintenance packages they wish as long as they have the proper State of Montana contracting licenses to perform the work. Time line for the start and completion of work will be negotiable. HRC may make such investigations as he or she deems necessary to determine the ability of the BIDDER to perform

August 22, 2013 (interior and exterior) @ 2:00 pm Starting at the Willow Creek Apartments and then moving to the Cedar Grove Apartments Plans specs will be available starting 10:00 a.m., August 5, 2013. Digital copies of the plans will be available at the Missoula & Hamilton plans exchange or by contacting Staff Architect Robert Robinson at brobinsonarchitect@bresnan.net. A hardcopy of the contract packages will be available to view at the office of HRC in Missoula. Hardcopies of the contract packages may be obtain and paid for by the contractor. Missoula • HRC 1801 S. Higgins • Missoula, Montana 59801 Hamilton • Allegra Printing 1151 N 1st St • Hamilton, MT 59840 HRC reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, to waive irregularities, to evaluate the bids submitted and to accept the proposal which best serves the interest of HRC. HRC is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. The OWNER is: HRC Cottages, Inc. Address: 1801 S. Higgins Ave., Missoula, MT 59801 Phone: (406) 728-3710

"Tee Off"–songs that lost their #1 position. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 "___ me a river!" 4 "Back to the Future" nickname 7 Pillager 13 "Welcome to Hawaii" gift 14 Folkie Guthrie 16 Become a success 17 Elvis song about a whirlpoolloving grizzly? 19 Ace a test 20 Attaches 21 2008 Mariah Carey song in dire need of painkillers? 23 Part of a bridal outfit 24 "Barbarella" actor Milo 25 "One ___ Beyond" 26 Threesome per inning? 27 Portland-to-Las Vegas dir. 28 "Don't touch my squeaky toy!" 30 Pretty much out of fuel, according to the gas gauge 31 "Kazaam" star, familiarly 33 Close election aftermaths 35 Cyndi Lauper song that's full of regret? 38 Handlebar, e.g. 41 Per unit 44 Interloper on a blanket 45 Female in a forest 46 Board head: abbr. 48 Gypsy, more correctly 50 Actor Luke of "Kung Fu" 52 Boxer Ali 54 Not for here 55 With 59-across, Taylor Swift song about medicine leaking during a jam session? 57 1993 Texas standoff city 58 Dictation taker, for short 59 See 55-across 61 National park in Alaska 62 "High" places for pirates 63 Paris's ___ de la Cite 64 "Be right with you!" 65 "The Chronic" Dr. 66 "Happy Days" setting

DOWN

1 Do a hatchet job on 2 Gets flushed 3 Language "bubkes" comes from 4 Bit of Vaseline 5 Discontinued black-and-white cookie cereal 6 Contract provision 7 Main section of Venice 8 "Aren't you ___ of sunshine today" 9 Night spots for tots 10 Unit of a huge explosion 11 Clearly visible 12 Enters a password again 15 Conductor's group: abbr. 18 Armani competitor, initially 22 "The Philosophy of Right" philosopher 27 Cheerleading unit 29 "Air Music" composer Ned 32 "But is it ___?" 33 Fish eggs 34 Network named for a nation 36 Environmental 37 Tawdry 38 Gets by with less 39 Left on the plate 40 Compound in disposable coffee cups 42 European country whose capital is Zagreb 43 "Sooooooooey!" e.g. 46 Was overly sweet 47 Airport shed 49 Michael, Mandy and Roger 51 Actress Best and writer Ferber 53 Belief systems 54 "Light" opening 56 The R in LARP 60 Draw upon

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 8– August 15, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials that best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 20th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Jack Reidy Conference Room, 140 W. Pine St., Missoula for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Project 10-027 Curb and Sidewalk Improvements S. 3rd Street W. –Ph. I: Russell to Garfield This project consists of installing approximately 2,700 lineal feet of new curb, 20,000 square feet of sidewalk/driveway, detectable warning surfaces, topsoil, seeding and other miscellaneous work. The City Streets Division will be completing the demolition, excavation and grading, drainage structures, paving, striping and signage, and other miscellaneous work. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10-027 S. 3rd Street W. – Ph. I: Russell to Garfield curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the

amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from Development Services, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on August 20, 2013. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON STREET VACATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, passed Resolution Number 7807 at their regular meeting held on August 5, 2013. A resolution declaring it to be the intention of the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, to close and vacate road easements between Old Highway 93 and Brooks on the Lithia Toyota dealership as shown on Deed Exhibit 1328 and certificate of survey 390. (located in Section 31, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M). The City Council will hear all matters pertaining to the proposed street vacation at its regular meeting on August 19, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St. The full resolution is on file and open for inspection in the City Clerk’s Office from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at City Hall, 435 Ryman, Second Floor. For more information, contact Jessica Miller, Public Works at 552-6347. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on August 12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on an application for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant funds (JAG lX) in the amount of $55,221 for the City of Missoula Police Department. Missoula County’s portion will be $22,008. For further information contact Mike Brady, Assistant Police Chief, at 552-6278. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. An Ordinance to Amend Title 20 City Zoning: Proposed 2013 Maintenance Amendments This is a consideration of proposed annual maintenance amendments to the City of Missoula Title 20 Zoning Ordinance. The proposed amendments were drafted after consideration of comments from interested parties and city agencies. Thirteen proposed amendments are intended to correct and clarify various sections throughout the ordinance. The amendments and agenda can be viewed at Development Services, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, (406) 552-6630 or at http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/index .aspx?nid=1149 The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on this item on a date yet to be determined. DECLARATION OF LAND PATENT Notice is hereby given to interested parties that the following property: S11, T13N, 19W, Lot one (1) and ten (10) of Block 2 of Amended Plat of MARTINWOOD ADDITION NO. THREE (3) is being brought up under United States patent #924. No claim is made herein that claimant has been assigned the entire tract described in the original patent. The filing of this Declaration of Land Patent shall not deny or infringe on any right, privilege or immunity of any other assignee to any portion of land covered in the described patent #924. Submit any questions to the Claimant: Lovella V. Torp, 3116 Old Pond Rd., Missoula, Montana 59802 GARDEN CITY STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 3, 12. Units contain furniture, clothes, kitchen supplies,

[C6] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

tools, sports equipment, hunting equipment, & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Friday 8/9 All auction units will only be shown each day at 10:00 A.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 2310 Fairview Missoula, MT 59801 prior to Tuesday, August, 13, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final. Jason J. Henderson, Esq. Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701-225-6878 jhenderson@mackoff.com MT Bar #11414 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY BANK OF America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. F/K/A Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, Plaintiff, v. LARAMIE D. LOEWEN, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-D, AND COLLECTION BUREAU SERVICES, INC., Defendants. ))))))))))))))))))))) Cause No. DV-13-28 Dept. 1 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, GREETINGS: LARAMIE D. LOEWEN YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an action to rescind the Trustee’s Sale and Trustee’s Deed and to reinstate a Note and Deed of Trust covering property situated in Missoula County, in the State of Montana and described as follows: LOT 21A OF SOUTH MISSOULA, BLOCK 77, LOTS 21A & 22A, AN AMENDED SUBDIVISION PLAT IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court this 30th day of July 2013. Clerk of District Court, Shirley E. Faust BY: Laura M Driscoll (SEAL) Deputy Clerk Dated this 19th day of July, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for the Plaintiff 38 Second Avenue East Dickinson, North Dakota 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 By: Jason J. Henderson, Attorney #11414 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MacArthur, Means & Wells, Architects, PC Poverello Center, Inc. 1110 W. Broadway Project #: 13.011 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that separate sealed BIDS for the Poverello Center, 1110 W. Broadway Property, will be received by the Poverello Center, Inc., c/o MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 PM on August 29, 2013, at which time bids will be publicly opened and read aloud for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for the construction of the following. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications prepared by MMW Architects. The project consists of construction of a new soup kitchen and homeless shelter. The contract is being funded with federal funds through the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program and administered by the Montana

Department of Commerce and the County and City of Missoula, and is subject to all federal laws and regulations as specified under the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. Bids shall be submitted on the form provided with the Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained at the office of MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 upon payment of $200.00 refundable deposit for each set and a nonrefundable shipping and handling fee of $45/set. The documents will be available @ MMW on Monday, August 5, 2013 after 1:00 PM. In addition, Contract Document will also be available at several plans rooms within the State of Montana, including the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. Any BIDDER, upon returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS promptly and in good condition, will be refunded their payment, and any NONBIDDER upon so returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS will be refunded $200.00. Any shipping and handling fee will not be refunded. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968. The contractor will ensure that to the greatest extent feasible opportunities for training and employment arising in connection with this CDBG-assisted project will be extended to lower income project area residents. Further, the contractor will, to the greatest extent feasible, utilize business concerns located in or substantially owned by residents of the project area, in the award of contracts and purchase of services and supplies. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Requirements: Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) requirements of federal Executive Order 11246 are applicable to CDBG-funded construction contracts and procedures for compliance should be followed and documented. The current Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Directory may be used to locate qualified DBE firms in your area. The DBE/WBE Directory can be accessed via the MDT’s internet website: http://www.mdt.mt.gov/business/contracting/civil/dbe.shtml — or by contacting MDT’s DBE Program Bureau at (800) 883-5811 or 406.444.6337 TTY: 800.335.7592 | Fax: 406.444.7685 The site is currently vacant; no pre-bid walkthrough is scheduled. Each Bid or Proposal must be accompanied by a cashiers check, certified check, or Bid Bond payable Poverello Center, Inc., issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana, in the amount of not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid and must be in the form specified in MCA 18-1-201 through 206. The bid bond or other security shall protect and indemnify Poverello Center, Inc. against the failure or refusal of the bidder to enter into the contract within 90 days of bid acceptance. Bid security will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders as soon as practicable after the opening of the bids. The bid bond of the successful bidder will be retained until the payment bond and the performance bond have been executed and approved, after which it will be returned. Bids must be signed by an authorized representative of the bidder. Bidders must satisfy themselves of the accuracy of the estimated quantities in the bid schedule by examination of the site and a review of the drawings and specifications, including Addenda. After bids have been submitted, the bidder shall not assert that there was a misunderstanding concerning the quantities of work or of the nature of the work to be done. Each bidder is responsible for inspecting the site and for reading and being thoroughly familiar with the Contract Documents. The failure or omission of any bidder to do any of the foregoing shall in no way relieve any bidder from any obligation to his or her bid. The Contract Documents contain the provisions required for the construction of the project. Information obtained from an officer, agent, or employee of the Poverello Center, or any other person, shall not affect the risks or obligations assumed by the Contractor or relieve him or her from fulfilling any of the conditions of the contract. No oral interpretations will be made to any bidder as to the meaning of the Contract Documents or any part thereof. Every request for such an interpretation shall be made in writing to the Architect. Any inquiry received seven (7) or more calendar days prior to the date fixed for opening of bids will be given consideration. Every interpretation made to a bidder will be in the form of an Addendum to the Contract Documents, and, when issued, will be on file in the office of the Architect and emailed to each person holding Contract Documents at least five (5) calendar days

before bids are opened but it is the bidder’s responsibility to make inquiry as to the Addenda issued and to obtain such Addenda prior to submitting his or her proposal. All Addenda shall become part of the Contract and all bidders shall be bound by such Addenda. Successful bidders shall furnish an approved performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Attorneys-in-fact who sign bid bonds or payment bonds must file with each bond a certified and effective dated copy of their power of attorney. Bonds, insurance certificates, and a signed contract shall be delivered to the Poverello Center, Inc. within ten (10) calendar days from the date when Notice of Award and contract is delivered to the bidder. In the case of failure of the bidder to execute the contract, the Poverello Center may at his or her option consider the bidder in default, in which case the bid bond accompanying the proposal shall become the property of the Poverello Center. The Notice to Proceed shall be issued within ten (10) calendar days of the execution of the contract by the Poverello Center. Should there be reasons why the Notice to Proceed cannot be issued within such period, the time may be extended by mutual agreement of all parties. If the Notice to Proceed has not been issued within the ten (10) day period or within the period mutually agreed upon, the Contractor may terminate the contract without further liability on the part of either party. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race or color, national origin, religion, sex or gender, familial status, physical or mental handicap, creed, marital status, or age. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. Contractors must make positive efforts to use disadvantaged businesses, including small businesses, minority-owned firms, women’s business enterprises, and firms in labor surplus areas, whenever possible. Contractor shall abide by all applicable laws, ordinances, and the rules and regulations of all authorities having jurisdiction over construction of the project throughout the term of the contract. The Poverello Center may make such investigations as deemed necessary to determine the ability of the bidder to perform the work, and the bidder shall furnish to the Poverello Center all such information and data for this purpose. The Poverello Center reserves the right to waive informalities, to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid, which is in the best interest of the owner, to reject any and all proposals received, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award, as in the judgment of its officials, best meets the County’s and City’s and owner’s requirements. Federal DavisBacon Act Prevailing Wage Rates for Building Construction 2013 apply to this project. Modifications to applicable wage rate determinations for the project that are posted by HUD at the Davis-Bacon website ten days before bid opening need to be utilized. Contracts shall not be made to any person debarred or suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs. The cost plus a percentage of cost and percentage of construction cost method of contracting shall not be used. The responsible low bidder shall supply the names and addresses of major material suppliers and subcontractors when requested to do so by the Missoula County or City or the Poverello Center. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is indicated above. Late bids will not be accepted and will automatically be disqualified from further consideration. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and plainly marked “Proposals for Poverello Center – 1110 W. Broadway Property, c/o MMW Architects” and addressed to: Poverello Center, Inc. c/o

MMW Architects 125 West Alder Street Missoula, MT 59802 The envelopes shall also be marked on the outside with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. No bids shall be considered that do not carry the bidder’s Montana Contractor’s Registration number on the bid and on the envelope containing the bid. If forwarded by mail, the sealed envelope containing the bid must be enclosed in another envelope addressed to MMW. The County and City of Missoula and Poverello Center, Inc. are equal opportunity employers. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. The County and City of Missoula and Poverello Center, Inc. make reasonable accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with an applicant’s ability to compete in the recruitment and selection process or the Contractor’s ability to perform the essential duties of the job. In order for Missoula County and City and Poverello Center, Inc. to make such accommodations, the applicant must make known any needed accommodation. Persons using a TDD may call the Montana Relay Service: (800) 253-4091. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form by August 9, 2013, with MMW Architects prior to the bid opening. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-148 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF SHIRLEY C. NYSTROM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jacqueline R. Flottmann and Stephen M. Cruze have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jacqueline R. Flotmann and Stephen M. Cruze, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Anne Blanche Adams, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of July, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-151 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARNOLD KOBER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Vicki Lee Kober, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 19th day of July, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Vicki Lee Kober, Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-132 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PATRICIA A. MCBRIDE, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jon M. McBride, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 5th day of July, 2013. /s/ Jon M. McBride, Personal Representative DATED this 9th day of July, 2013. ST. PETER LAW OFFICES, P.C. /s/ Rochelle L. Loveland STATE OF MONTANA ):ss County of Flathead) I, Jon M. McBride, declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Jon M. McBride, Personal Representative SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO before me this 5th day of July, 2013. /s/ Amanda S. Piilola Notary Pubic for the State of Montana, Residing at Columbia


PUBLIC NOTICES Falls, Montana My Commission Expires: January 30, 2017 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-150 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD ALLEN MARCURE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Stephan Edward Marcure and Andre Alverd Marcure, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 25th day of July, 2013. /s/ Stephan Edward Marcure, Personal Representative /s/ Andre Alverd Marcure I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Stephan Edward Marcure I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Andre Alverd, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-145 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ESTHER L. ENGLAND, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia England Brown, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Ryan Law Offices, PLLC, PO Box 9453, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 22nd day of July, 2013. /s/ Patricia England Brown, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-155 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE B. EVERINGHAM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Bishop Skillman Everingham, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Ryan Law Offices, PLLC, PO Box 9453, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of August, 2013. /s/ Bishop Skillman Everingham, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/29/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200411846 Bk-731 Pg-707, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew D. Campbell and Judith R. Campbell was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Title Services Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 of Southpointe, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201304550 B:909 P:716, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $210,814.60. This amount in-

cludes the outstanding principal balance of $202,932.91, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105993) 1002.251321-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/27/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200710258 Bk: 796 Pg: 300, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Amy C Ganguli, and Christian M Leibbrandt was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc, it successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J. Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J. Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 of Drew Creek Addition - Phase VII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201202745 Bk: 889 Pg: 822, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 31, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $201,961.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,560.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-

is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16158) 1002.251043-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/27/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201112523, Bk:880, Pg: 1138, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which George L. Frisby and Kathy L. Frisby, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The S1/2 SE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 27, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana.. Recording Reference: Book 663 Micro Records at Page 251 Together with an Easement for Ingress & egress 60’ in width from County Road across the Northerly boundary of Lots 11, 13 and 14 Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $174,365.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $165,214.29, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 23, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105868) 1002.251679-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/10/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200808297, Bk 817, Pg 0074, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert D. Hughes was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County,

Inc., a corporation was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., a corporation as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 in Block 2 of Elms Addition No. 1, to the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201209706, BK 894, Pg. 783, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 14, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $236,143.75. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,235.66, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 24, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103345) 1002.238946-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200711278 Bk-796 Pg-1320, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Roy A. Spain & Lavena L. Spain, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5B of Bean Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the Official Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201115939 Bk. 883, Pg. 366, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 15, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $160,621.69. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance

of $151,882.46, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 23, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105861) 1002.251676-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200920963, B: 846, P: 408, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joshua A. Johnson, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3A of Carlton Tracts No. 4, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 10, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $249,976.67. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $240,860.29, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in

Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106063) 1002.251585-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/08/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199900837 Bk 568 Pg 2221, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard A. Sandefur and Wendy L. Sandefur, husband and wife was Grantor, North American Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 of Huson Heights, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704460, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $98,461.53. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $90,081.56, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.106495) 1002.252209-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200917604, Bk 843, Pg 1246, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jhawn D. Thompson and Misty J. Thompson, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 57, together with the Northerly half of vacated Bedard Street adjoining

said Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown as vacated by Resolution recorded April 7, 1966 in Book 2 of Micro Records at Page 533. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201119250, Bk 885, Pg 877, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $190,304.99. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,856.94, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97589) 1002.207163-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 7, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT C-50 OF WINDSOR PARK PHASE IV, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: 4278683 Jamie L Kirschenheiter, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank- Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 28, 2008 and recorded December 1, 2008 in Book 830, Page 48 under Document No. 200826460. The beneficial interest is currently held by DLJ Mortgage Capital, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $977.36, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the properly or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 1, 2013 is $159,960.54 principal, interest at the rate of 6.000% now totaling $27,434.57, late charges in the amount of $1,401.29, escrow advances of $8,135.79, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,576.12, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.29 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 8– August 15, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 29, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 29th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed

the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Sps V Kirschenheiter 41477.284 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 23, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND IN THE NE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 20 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, MORE SUBSTANTIALLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE TRACT WHICH IS A 24 INCH CAR AXLE FROM WHICH THE CENTER QUARTER OF SECTION 7 BEARS N.56°20’E., 1,228.4 FEET; THENCE S. 24°45’E., 300 FEET TO A 24 INCH CAR AXLE ; THENCE S.89° 47’ W., 180.75 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE; THENCE S.89° 47’ W., 87.8 FEET; THENCE N. 14° 48’ W., 53.7 FEET; THENCE N.14°48’W, 228.3 FEET; THENCE N.89°47’ E., 215 FEET THE POINT OF BEGINNING. RECORDING REFERENCE: DEED EXHIBIT NO. 2479 AND BOOK 364 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 821 Scott B. Jungers, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 5, 2004 and recorded November 5, 2004 in Book 742, Page 1458, under Document No. 200431445. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as Successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT 2005-1. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,091.39, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 14, 2013 is

$169,447.01 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $30,246.72, late charges in the amount of $491.13, escrow advances of $8,374.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,352.06, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 17, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Succes-

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[C8] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

sor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Jungers 41916.656 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 23, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 1 and 2 in Block 6 of the SOUTHSIDE ADDITION to the City of Missoula, according to the official map or plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Missoula, State of Montana Sharon A Lowry, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on September 16, 2009 and recorded on September 21, 2009, Book 847, Page M 915, as Document No. 200922869. The beneficial interest is currently held by One West Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to death of the borrower on March 11, 2012. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 4, 2013 is $144,319.54 principal, interest at the rate of .0556% now totaling $24,239.03, and other fees and expenses advanced of $6,959.77, plus accruing interest at the rate of $.22 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the

proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 17, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Financial Freedom Vs Lowry 41742.486

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 47 OF MALONEY RANCH PHASE VI, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Chad M. Bauer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 15, 2007 and recorded October 15, 2007 in Book 807, on Page 612, under Document No. 200727252. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,388.38, beginning January 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 12, 2013 is $302,691.07 principal, interest at the rate of 4.625% now totaling $6,255.00, late charges in the amount of $277.68, escrow advances of $3,010.61, and other fees and expenses advanced of $18.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.35 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in

cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 22, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 22nd day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 NationstarVs. Bauer 41706.508

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744


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RENTALS APARTMENTS

hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

4972A Potter Park Loop. 3 bed/1.5 bath condo, newer unit, close to shopping. Double garage, yard, pet? $1200. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 921 Helen: 1 bedroom, By the University, 2nd floor, laundry, free cable, $725 GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! Equinox Apartments. 1 bedroom $517. 2 bedroom $479 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113,

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Garden District. 2 bedroom $711 w/s/g paid. Washer/dryer included. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-549-4113, ext. 127., jlyons@missoulahousing.org

Palace Apartments. (2) 1 bedrooms $438-$556. (1) 2 bedrooms $575-$668. h/w/s/g paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org

Gold Dust Apartments. Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bedroom $691 all utilities paid. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406549-4113, ext. 127 or jlyons@missoulahousing.org

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 8– August 15, 2013 [C9]


RENTALS Quiet, private 1 bedroom 8 miles from town with Bitterroot River access. NS/NP. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV & Internet. 273-2382

DUPLEXES 205 1/2 W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared yard, all utilities included. $600. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Solstice Apartments. Solstice Apartments. 1 bedroom $517. (2) 2 bedrooms $620-$751 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org

2207 38th Street 2 bed/1bath, shared yard, single car garage, W/D hookups. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

2423 55th St. “A” 3 bed/1 bath, shared yard, single garage, South Hills. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

HOUSES

AGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 120 South Ave East. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1944 S. 8th W. 2 bed, 1 bath on two lots. Wood floors, garden & front deck. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2017 W. Sussex: 3 Bedroom house, 1 1/2 Baths, 2-story,

107 E. Kent. 2 bed/1.5 bath, single garage, fenced back yard, extra storage. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 119 Cotter Court: 5 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Family room, Double garage, Deck, Small pet, $1495. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MAN-

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549-7711 Check our website!

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RENTALS OUT OF TOWN 20230 Ninemile: 2 Bedroom house, Full unfinished basement, Garage stall, Hook-ups, Pet OK, $825. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

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722 1/2 Bulwer. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared fenced yard, pet? $525. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

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544-1274

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REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $179,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1716 Schilling. Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath in central Missoula. Patio & double garage. $190,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355 milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $319,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1926 S 6th W $169,000 Centrally located 2BD/1BA private home with large front yard. Call Nora 880-7508 MLS 20134144 2 Bdr, 1 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 216 Tower. Cute 2 bed, 1 bath on 1/2 acre close to Clark Fork River. 750 sq.ft garage/shop. $185,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 2316 Craftsman. 3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story on quiet cul-de-sac near Milwaukee Trail. $232,500. Tory Dai-

ley, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 2401 Gilbert. 3 bed, 2 bath with attached single garage in Upper Rattlesnake. $298,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 2398350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 2550 Pattee Canyon. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 8 acres. Gourmet kitchen, deck, patio, 2 car garage. $495,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-desac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $449,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2808 Rustler Drive. 5 bed, 3 bath Edgell home on Ranch Club Golf Course. $539,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Windor Park home. $195,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $451,250. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Wye area home on 3+ acres. $255,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Central Missoula home. $259,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4449 Johnsrud Park Road. Incredible 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.52 acres along the Blackfoot River. $675,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605 4475 Quaking Aspen. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Prairie-style home on almost one Rattlesnake acre. Built by professional woodworker with lots of natural light and beautiful details. $639,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com 4834 Scott Allen Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath 4-level on approximately 1/3 beautifully landscaped acre. $372,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 509 Simons. 6 bed, 3 bath Farviews home with 2 car garage. Backs Mountain Water owned park, City Park & open space. $385,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 521 North 1st West. 2 bed, 1 bath with front & back decks, fenced yard & garage. $189,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 524 Spanish Peaks Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Mansion Heights home with 3 car garage near park & common area. $585,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5606 Hillview. 2 bed, 2 bath with fireplace and deck & 2 car garage. $219,000. Tory Dailey,

[C10] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Central Business District Home! 426 Alder. $244,900. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Gorgeous little

home blocks from downtown. Can be used for residential or professional office space. Refinished hardwoods, new paint/windows/doors. Ton of storage space. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Cute Westside Home 1312 Phillips. $189,900. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Established garden and fruit trees. Close to downtown, parks, bike trails. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Grant Creek Frontage. 4 bed, 3 bath with open floor plan, fireplace, deck & 2 car garage. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7365 milyardhomes@yahoo.com Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2

bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $208,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com LOWERED $15,000 MUST SEE STEVENSVILLE; 3 BEDROOMS AND 2 BATHS ON ONE LEVEL. CUSTOM HIGH-END RE-MODEL AND UPDATING DONE IN 2012 ON THIS 12 YEAR OLD HOME. Call: 310-889-4448. PRICE JUST LOWERED $15,000 TO $199,999. Missoula Home Inspections Complete residential inspection and renovation design services. Insured • Licensed • Experienced. 203(k) Approved Consultant. Visit www.missosulahomeinspections.co m or call 406-531-6693

Rose Park Beauty 403 Mount. 4bed, 1bath. New windows, refinished floors, newer roof and furnace. MLS# 20133900 $227,500 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com WESTBROOK Property Management WANTED! Residential Rentals in Missoula, Lolo and Florence. 544-1274 www.westbrookpm.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1545C Cooley upper level 2 bedroom condo with views and close to the food co-op and town. Excellent condition, well maintained, great neighborhood and affordable! KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice • 240-6503

Ronan, Montana 406 Main Street SE

$249,900 PRICED BELOW MARKET VALUE

Beautiful large family custom built home.

This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, wrap around covered porch, triple car garage, large fenced yard with lots of trees. There is separate living quarters with its own bath and kitchenette. Judy Coulter, GRI • Wright Real Estate Co. • 406.249.4101

1716 Schilling $190,000 Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath on huge lot. Fir & tiles floors, granite countertops Patio & double garage

4834 Scott Allen Dr. $372,500 4 bed, 3 bath multilevel on almost 1/3 acre landscaped, fenced. Light & bright 3500 sq.ft. floor plan 2 car garage & 3 storage sheds

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Large secure units with affordable HOA dues Starting at $144,900

5905 Ocean View $300,000 4 bed 3 bath on 1.63 acres in Turah. 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage & many updates


REAL ESTATE 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $158,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7288270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $159,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 2121B West Kent. Immaculate, energy-efficient 3 bed, 1.5 bath with covered front porch, fenced backyard & single garage. $172,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 5108 Village View #6. 2 bed, 2 bath with private deck, patio and single garage. $165,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 5510 Creekstone #3. Cottonwood Condo 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. Vickie Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net Burns Street Commons 1400 Burns St. #15. $159,9000. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Coveted 3 bedroom home in the Burns St. Commons, next to the Burns St. Bistro and the Missoula Community Coop. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Bistro cafe and Missoula Food Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

LAND FOR SALE 531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net East Missoula Building Lot Sweet lot with mature trees and a great middle of town location. $55,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Uptown Flats. From $155,000. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with

NHN Edgewood, East Missoula. 3.5 acres bare land. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, LambrosERA Real Estate 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties.2000.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 40+ acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $199,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com NHN Old Freight Road. Approximately 11 acres with Mission Mountain Views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com

95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $868,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7289270. glasgow@montana.com

11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. Cute 2 bed, 2 bath farmhouse on nearly 1 acre. $230,000. Rita Gray, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 532-9283 ritagray@lambrosera.com

OUT OF TOWN

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $244,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $237,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $445,000. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded

by conservation easement land. $949,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

COMMERCIAL Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building with

Housing Discrimination is Illegal! In the state of Montana, it is illegal to discriminate in any housing transaction against any persons because of their Race, Color, Religion, Sex, Disability, Familial Status, National Origin, Marital Status, Age, and/or Creed.

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For more information about discrimination in housing, contact:

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Montana Fair Housing (406) 782-2573 / MT Relay: 711 1-800-929-2611 519 East Front Street Butte, MT 59701 e-mail: inquiry@montanafairhousing.org website: www.montanafairhousing.org FAIR HOUSING - Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your right, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your responsibility, and

IT'S THE LAW!!! The work that provided the basis for this publication was supported by funding under a grant with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The substance and findings of the work are dedicated to the public. The author and publisher are solely responsible for the accuracy of the statements and interpretations contained in this publication. Such interpretations do not necessarily reflect the views of the Federal Governm

missoulanews.com â&#x20AC;˘ August 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 15, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE 19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath log/timber home on 15 acres with pond, fenced pasture, 2 car garage & 1 bed rental. $319,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Arlee area home on 1.12 acres. $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $495,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

439 Hidden Valley, Florence. 3 bed, 2 bath remodeled ranch home with green house, chicken coop, 2 car garage & room for horses. $229,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Florence area home on 12.6 irrigated acres. $500,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Mountain views, hay barn & 2 car garage. $349,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $269,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

5905 Ocean View, Clinton. 4 bed, 3 bath on 1.63 acres with 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage and many new improvements. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

2121B West Kent $167,000

FOR SALE BY OWNER—SEELEY LAKE. 2070 sq.ft. log home, 2.3 acres on Double Arrow. 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Recently renovated kitchen and baths. 2 stone fireplaces. Includes appliances, pool table, large screen TV. 2 car garage. 24x32 pole barn. $245,000. 406-677-6748 or 406544-6748 Gorgeous Wooded Property Bordering Forest Service Land 17290 Remount, Huson. $190,000. 2 bedroom, 3 bath, 2.4 acres. Remodeled bedrooms with laminate floors, updated bathroom, newer windows and added insulation. A hop skip and a

Immaculate, energy-efficient 3 bed, 1.5 bath townhome • Open floor plan with lots of natural light • Covered front porch & fenced backyard • Single attached garage

$158,000

1944 S. 8th W.

REMODELED • 2 bed, 1 bath • 2 lots on cul-de-sac • Newer roof & Pat McCormick windows Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience • Front deck, fenced yard with pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653) garden shed

Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • August 8– August 15, 2013

jump from the freeway. KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com LotB MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

Potomac Log Cabin 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $200,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Lightfilled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer with a great little sled hill in the winter! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

509 Simons Drive $385,000

6 bed, 3.5 bath adjacent to city park & open space. Gas fireplace. Storage. Wraparound deck. 2 car garage.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite

A2, Missoula. Office: 406-2587522 or Cell: 406-550-3587

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Missoula Independent