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UP FRONT

WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR? IT’S A WOLF IN DEMOCRAT’S CLOTHES!

GARY MARBUT DANGEROUS PEOPLE ESTATE CAN’T HAMPER NEWS GUN-TOTIN’ SCOPE RANGE WANTS TO REPRESENT YOU LIKE DANGEROUS JOBS WAITING FOR GODOT


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


UP FRONT

WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR? IT’S A WOLF IN DEMOCRAT’S CLOTHES!

GARY MARBUT DANGEROUS PEOPLE ESTATE CAN’T HAMPER NEWS GUN-TOTIN’ SCOPE RANGE WANTS TO REPRESENT YOU LIKE DANGEROUS JOBS WAITING FOR GODOT


Missoula Independent Page 2 April 12 – April 19, 2012


nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Chad Harder

University of Montana President Royce Engstrom shocked Griz Nation on the last Friday in March when he fired Athletic Director Jim O’Day and head football coach Robin Pflugrad. Engstrom gave no explanation other than a need to change leadership. The moves came in the wake of a rash of sexual assault allegations involving football players, including starting quarterback Jordan Johnson. But the team’s problems go back much further. As the program continued its long run of success on the field, issues emerged off it ..................14

News Letters Who’s afraid of fracking? .................................................................................4 The Week in Review City Council talks about cell phones .......................................6 Briefs Gun-totin’ Gary Marbut wants to represent you ..............................................6 Etc. Lake County vindication .......................................................................................7 Up Front Saving animals, one stitch at a time ............................................................8 Up Front Are Ravalli Republicans dressing like sheep? ..............................................9 Ochenski Ranchers show bad faith on bison ...........................................................10 Range Hyperactive? Dangerous work might suit you ...............................................11 Agenda Could You Quit Money?: Imagining a World Without Currency..................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Grind it yourself ............................................................................18 Happiest Hour Sierra Nevada Hoptimum ................................................................19 8 Days a Week Sometimes all you can say is “sorry” ...............................................21 Mountain High Le Tour De Dirtbag urban cyclo-cross race.....................................33 Scope Waiting For Godot survives despite restrictions ............................................34 Soundcheck Three-Eared Dog’s fourth-gen blues ...................................................35 Books Light on the Devils loses its way ....................................................................36 Film Shut up, you guys! I loved Titanic.....................................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ...................................................38

Jaque Ely Sheets Paradigm Shift Three Way Street Adrienne Elise My New Band

Brendan Ball Epoche The Steady Changes Sozin's Comet Darshan Pulse Grit

Fri. 4/13/12 at 10 PM Darah Fogarty & Ryan James Kristi Neumann The Chalfonts Sat. 4/14/12 at 10 PM

Darting Thru Traffic Lee Rizzo w/ Jordan Demander Daychild The Hasslers

Exclusives Street Talk.....................................................................................................................4 In Other News............................................................................................................13 Classifieds .................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess.................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y ..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle.....................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World ................................................................................................C-15 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Robert Meyerowitz PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITOR Ted McDermott PHOTO INTERN Michelle Gustafson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Azita Osanloo, Jamie Rogers, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks

Browning Lecture Thursday, April 12 at Noon Castles Center, School of Law Hosted by the Montana Law Review

Major General William K. Suter (Ret.) Clerk of the Supreme Court of the United States will speak on

Today’s Supreme Court Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

(Approved for 1.0 CLE Credit)

Supreme Court of the State of Montana Hearing Friday, April 13 at 9:30 a.m. University Theatre Donaldson & Guggenheim, et al. v. State of Montana Jan Donaldson and Mary Anne Guggenheim, and five other same-sex couples, bring a constitutional challenge against a variety of Montana laws under which same-sex couples cannot obtain the same public and private benefits provided to opposite-sex couples who marry. Both events are free and open to the public. w w w.umt.edu/law | 406.243.4311

Missoula Independent Page 3 April 12 – April 19, 2012


STREET TALK

by Michelle Gustafson

Asked Monday, April 8, on the oval at the University of Montana.

Last week, the University of Montana fired athletic director Jim O’Day and football coach Robin Pflugrad. What’s your reaction to the firings? Follow up: How important is it to you that the Griz win football games?

Cliff Stolk: I thought it was a good thing, just with what had recently happened. The football program lost control of the situation. Sorry, Harold Camping: It’s good, but not vitally important. It’s not like it’s the end of the world.

Shelby Skauge: I thought, “Uh-oh, the football team won’t be very good this year.” It’s hard to go through a lot of coaches in a short amount of time. It’s hard to adapt to having to start over. I understand the reasons why they were fired, but I don’t think it was the best way to handle it. Don’t worry, be happy: When the Griz win, everyone is in a good mood. It’s not fun to cheer for a team that’s a losing team. Kevin Barnett: I respect [UM President Royce Engstrom’s] decision. I’m sure he had a lot of information he was sitting on before making it. The athletic department is one of the big cogs in the wheel, so I’m sure it was super challenging, and for him to stick his neck out there is bold. Dry-eyed: It’s pretty low. I like seeing them win and seeing the people of Montana get behind them, but I don’t cry at night if they lose. Jesse Roods: I was in the military, so the same set of principles applies: If people are doing what they’re not supposed to be doing, it falls back on the leaders to do something about it. Daytrippers: I don’t watch a lot of the football games, but it’s important because a lot of the funding for the school comes from sports and it attracts tourists. Missoula is a cool town and it’s great when people come here.

Lindsey Myers: I think it’s good. I don’t pay attention to sports, and they get too much attention anyway. Hopefully, they replace them with someone better. I think more of the responsibility falls on the athletic system in that athletes get special privileges; the coaches don’t need to provide those privileges and boost their egos. I’m sane: Not at all. ’m sane: Not at all.

Missoula Independent Page 4 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Fracking’s good for Montana So what’s all the fuss about fracking? Its most vocal opponents charge that fracking will burn your water, pollute your air and cause the very ground to shift beneath you. The oil and gas industry obviously disagree. So who’s right? Well, not being a scientist I have to base my opinions on information I get from trusted sources, as do most of fracking’s detractors. And based on that information, my conclusion is that, just as the Keystone XL pipeline opposition isn’t about pipelines, coal dust alarmism isn’t about coal dust and mega-load obstructionism isn’t about megaloads, most of the fuss about fracking has little to do with the actual process and more to do with getting rid of fossil fuels. Let’s start with a simple, verifiable fact: In its 60-plus-year history, there has been no generally accepted peer-reviewed scientific study demonstrating negative impacts of fracking on water supplies. That’s zero, zip, nada. EPA administrator Lisa Jackson— hardly a fossil fuel advocate—told Congress just last year that there have been “no proven cases where the fracking process itself has affected water.” Sure, there are plenty of studies “proving” that fracking is either essential to mankind or, alternatively, to its inevitable downfall. Most of these tend to be a tad self-serving. As the old proverb says, a lie will go ’round the world while the truth pulls its boots on. But what have those who are actually responsible for public safety said about fracking? Dimock, Penn., and Pavilion, Wyo., have been under the fracking microscope for years and are good indicators. Residents in Dimock reported dirty water that was famously ignitable at times. But both state regulators and the EPA said claims relating those problems to fracking were unfounded and that the water posed “no immediate health concerns.” My humble abode is also over an aquifer that gets cloudy as melted snow enters the sandstone structure. It looks awful but is perfectly drinkable. We deal with it. And I can remember stories as a kid in northeast Montana of burning stock ponds as naturally occurring methane bubbled to the surface. It should come as no shock that methane gets into water wells in areas where there are also gas wells. That’s where the gas is. Relating the two is a common but dangerous trick that tries to confuse coincidence and causation. It’s just like my being cranky on days that end in “y” doesn’t necessarily mean the letter “y” makes me cranky. In the Wyoming case, the EPA came out with a 121-page draft report claiming that fracking contaminated ground water. But the report has not yet been peer reviewed and appears to leave some significant questions. It tested wells where hydrocarbons were already present and that were far deeper than drinking-water wells. Potential contamination could have come from “lega-

cy pits” or even the testing process itself. And it ignored the fact that organic chemicals were present in local water supplies long before fracking was employed. In short, the jury is still out on this one. A final report on fracking’s impact on drinking water is due later this year. But it’s likely to be anticlimactic. Fracking solutions are typically over 99 percent water and sand. If you’re worried about the remaining one percent, you can look up individual well ingredients yourself at www.fracfocus.org. So why all the fuss if the data is not all in and if what data there is proves no harm? It’s a fuss because for the zealots, this argu-

“If you care about global warming and affordable electricity, you should be a fracking fan.” ment is about fossil fuels and not fracking. Just like the Keystone pipeline, coal dust, mega-loads and so many other battles, this is about shutting down the fossil fuel industry, and facts are the first casualty in what is essentially a highly coordinated, well-financed public relations campaign. It’s also counterproductive. Cleaner, cheaper natural gas is rapidly replacing coal in the nation’s energy grid, already accounting for about 25 percent of power production. That would not be possible without fracking. If you care about global warming and affordable electricity, you should be a fracking fan. And finally, fracking’s good for Montana. It brings in jobs, prosperity and tax revenues. The economic benefits are measurable and immediate. And the smiling faces of mothers and fathers in eastern Montana watching their kids put on their boots and go to high-paying jobs close to home are a welcome change. Carl Graham Montana Policy Institute Helena

That so-called “green energy” The Montana economy has followed the direction of the nation, with maybe the exception of a couple of our neighboring states. This recession has been the result of many failed governmental policies that attempted to choose winners and losers, beginning with the government policy that everyone should own a home, which brought on the real estate collapse, followed immediately by the banking disaster. In most every case that I know of, every time the government makes a policy decision to benefit a particular industry, the end

result is that the American taxpayer ends up being on the hook for the “unintended consequences” of the failed experiment. This is the situation that we have now with the “green energy” movement and the new wind and solar power policies. On the national front we have the Solyndra fiasco, in which the Department of Energy guaranteed the loan over the better judgment of the agency that oversees the commitment of federal funds. In Montana, we have taxpayer money committed to provide tax credits for energy conservation, alternative fuel, alternative energy and geothermal energy. The total taxpayer money used for these programs adds up to more than $12 million. To add insult to injury, the energy produced by these installations are being forced into the power grid at a cost that is much higher than the power produced by the current facilities that use hydro and fossil fuels. The argument is that wind power is lower cost. But without the federal and state subsidies and lower tax rates, the cost remains significantly higher, and if we calculate the added cost of required back-up generation, the cost skyrockets. Don’t assume that I’m against utilizing the wind or the sun as an energy source. On the contrary, any and all viable sources must be considered. Whatever the source, it must be supplied at a competitive price without extraordinary subsidies or tax considerations. The cost of energy is a major factor for the recovery and future growth of our state. Consider Montana’s economy since deregulation and the resulting run-up on prices. Because of high energy rates, Montana has lost industries and the jobs that they create. Look at the closing of Simpson Lumber, Smurfit-Stone and Columbia Falls Aluminum. Among those hit hardest are our schools. Families uproot and districts lose tax revenue. I am positive that Montanans will welcome alternative forms of energy, but only if the source does not result in higher cost of either electricity or taxes. Alternative energy must compete without special considerations. Individuals who are elected to represent the consumer must have neither an agenda nor a passion for anything other than the lowest possible costs of energy for the consumer that is supplied by a public utility. Any attempt by the legislature, the Public Service Commission or a government agency to choose winners and losers will only result in inequities and an artificial economy that will constantly require additional support to survive. If allowed, the Montana economy will return to the strong and stable growth that we have enjoyed in the past—a strong economy that provides jobs for our families, a future for our young people and the revenue needed to support those programs that are needed by the citizens of Montana. Sen. Bob Lake Public Service Commission candidate Hamilton


Missoula Independent Page 5 April 12 – April 19, 2012


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, April 4

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Steele Williams

The Missoula City Council Public Safety and Health Committee begins another debate on whether to ban talking on cell phones while driving. Council passed such an ordinance in 2009, but Mayor John Engen allowed only the ban on texting while driving to become law.

• Thursday, April 5 Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock announces a settlement agreement with Greg Mortenson, founder of the Bozeman-based Central Asia Institute and author of Three Cups of Tea, after an investigation into asset mismanagement. Mortenson agrees to repay more than $1 million to the charity.

• Friday, April 6 An early morning fire breaks out in one of the apartments above Missoula’s Green Hanger laundromat on Woodford Avenue. Six residents escape without injury. The fire is reportedly caused by a problem with an exterior electrical fixture. Damages exceed $100,000.

• Saturday, April 7 Rick Tabish, 47, of Missoula, is arrested for driving under the influence in Boise. Law enforcement says Tabish was swerving and going 75 mph in a 55 mph zone. Tabish gained notoriety in 1998 for allegedly trying to kill Las Vegas casino executive Ted Binion and steal Binion’s silver. Tabish was acquitted on the murder charge and found guilty of attempting to steal the loot.

• Sunday, April 8 The University of Montana men’s tennis team hands Sacramento State, which has won four of the past five Big Sky championships, its first conference loss in more than two years, winning 4-3. The Griz improve to 6-0 in conference play (13-4 overall).

• Monday, April 9 A whooping cough outbreak in the Bitterroot prompts Pinesdale’s Pines Academy to close through April 13. The Ravalli County Health Department says there have been five confirmed cases in the Pinesdale area. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial infection that’s spread through respiratory fluids and causes uncontrollable coughing.

• Tuesday, April 10 Mick Delany oversees the first on-field practice under his watch as interim University of Montana Grizzly Football Team head coach. Delany is a school athletics veteran who had served as Griz running back coach before being tapped to replace outgoing head coach Robin Pflugrad. Pflugrad was fired two weeks ago, along with University of Montana Athletic Director Jim O’ Day.

Glass artist Derek Ballard heat-polishes a glass tube on Friday, April 6, at the grand opening of his new shop, Flame Tree Factories, on the corner of 3rd and South Orange.

Legislature Gun advocate aims for HD 99 It wasn’t much of a contest in House District 99 the last go-round. Betsy Hands, a Democrat, trounced Republican challenger Brian Barnett by nearly 800 votes, confirming the district’s liberal tilt. But Republican Gary Marbut, Montana’s top gunrights advocate, thinks he’s got a shot at the seat now. “The political spectrum ends up being something like a circle,” he says, “and the people who are very serious conservatives and people who are very serious liberals tend to have a lot in common.” On one issue, at least, Marbut, the director of the Montana Shooting Sports Association, stands in the center of that political Venn diagram: medical marijuana. He first found himself there last fall, in the wake of the federal medical marijuana raids, when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives declared that firearms dealers can’t sell to state-licensed medical marijuana patients—an “edict depriving 30,000 Montanans of a constitutional right,” Marbut says. He’s equally perturbed that several

gun-owning Montanans snared in the raids are facing federal drug-related gun charges. These Montanans, he wrote last month in a letter to the Missoulian, “have been forced through the knothole of a process powerfully rigged by zealous federal prosecutors and complicit … judges.” In a linear political spectrum, Marbut stands well to the right of Kimberly Dudik, an assistant attorney general, and Jonathan Dunbar, who will square of in the Democratic primary. Marbut has aggressively lobbied the legislature as director of the MSSA. Last session, he sought, unsuccessfully, to legalize the carrying of concealed firearms without a permit in cities and to nullify a 20-year-old list of locations, including government buildings and banks, where concealed weapons are forbidden. Outside the legislature, the MSSA joined the Western Tradition Partnership in challenging Montana’s century-old ban on corporate campaign spending. Marbut says he won’t hide from his reputation as a “fire-breathing political activist” in order to win in HD 99. But, he says, he’s eager to “show other parts of Gary Marbut than what people generally know from reading the headlines. I

want people to know that I’m an organic gardener, that I’m an amateur musician, that I’m a dog lover, that I have earned ‘guru’ credentials in energy conservation—that there are other aspects that may well appeal to the people of the district if they just know about them.” Matthew Frank

Wildlife City eyes culling deer Missoula City Councilman Dick Haines is asking his peers and the public to weigh in on whether the Garden City needs to curb its deer population. “Maybe it’s time to do something about it before someone gets hurt,” Haines says. Council often hears complaints about deer snacking on veggie gardens and defecating on lawns. But urban deer, those that have lost their fear of people, can also be dangerous, says Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Regional Manager Mike Thompson. Missoula’s white-tailed and mule deer popula-

Spring is here! And so is our new inventory! Come in and see all the new goodies arriving daily!

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Missoula Independent Page 6 April 12 – April 19, 2012


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tions have not been counted. But Thompson says that wildlife managers know they are growing. Mule deer in particular are becoming increasingly habituated to city life. And they can be particularly stubborn. “They will defend their personal space.” In 2008, Helena created the first urban deer management plan in the state. Mark Lerum, a Helena police officer who oversees the program, says city officials there took action because they were worried about public safety. “We’ve had quite a few people’s dogs stomped to death,” Lerum says. “We’ve also had people attacked.” Since 2008, Helena and FWP have annually evaluated how many animals should be taken to achieve an optimal population density of 25 deer per square mile. Police capture the designated number of deer in large metal traps that are placed on property belonging to cooperative private landowners. A bolt stunner gun, like those used in livestock operations, is used to euthanize the animals. Deer are butchered and the meat is donated to the local food bank, which pays for the processing costs. Helena has captured 531 deer since fall 2008. Haines says he isn’t necessarily sold on Helena’s plan or any other means to decrease Missoula’s deer population. However, he says, “We want to hear what the public has to say.”

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

torch.” The dairy shop caught fire, but crews from Victor and Stevensville arrived in time to put it out. “They were saying it was one of the largest structural fires in the last 10 years,” Harvey says. “A real barn burner.” Harvey says the fire likely started when a pig knocked over a heat lamp. Lifeline got lucky. The only animals lost were a sow pig and a few piglets— but none of the cows that provide the backbone for the dairy’s popular line of organic milk and cheese.

Jessica Mayrer

Bitterroot The night the barn burned Jennifer Holmes was milking cows at Lifeline Dairy in Victor when she noticed the blaze. It was 10:30 p.m., March 30, the warmest night that week, and Lifeline’s barn was clearly already lost. Holmes alerted her husband, Ernie Harvey, and the two scrambled to save what they could. The couple trained garden hoses on the dairy shop, hoping to keep the fire from spreading. Fire crews were on their way, but with the barn only 30 feet from the surrounding buildings, flames were already licking at the dairy’s milking facility. “It was working pretty good,” Harvey recalls—“until the acetylene blew.” The barn housed Harvey’s workshop, where he stored a number of propane tanks and some welding equipment. When the acetylene stores ignited, Harvey says the result was “like a blow

He and Holmes were back to work the following morning. He says he doesn’t anticipate any dent in production resulting from the fire. The financial burden will be considerable. The damage to the dairy shop and parlor was substantial enough that Lifeline will need to replace the buildings this spring. And Harvey says insurance will only cover a portion of the dairy’s repairs. Harvey thought the cleanup would be grueling. He was convinced it would take two weeks to clear away the debris. Lifeline’s been around for 44 years, and Harvey says he briefly considered just throwing in the towel. But on April 7, 60 friends, neighbors and complete strangers showed up to help. Now there’s nothing left but a bare concrete slab. “We’ve been around a long time,” Harvey says. “You get lulls like this and you think, ‘I’m too tired to keep going.’ That outpouring of support was like, ‘Of course we have to keep going.’” Alex Sakariassen

Agenda

News Quirks

Titanic

BY THE NUMBERS $79,109.90

A century later Shortly before midnight on April 14, 1912, Bertha Nelson was roused from her bunk in the steerage section of the RMS Titanic and instructed to board a lifeboat. She was given only moments to say goodbye to her cousin Ed Randberg before she and about 30 other women were lowered into the frigid North Atlantic. Her cousin perished along with 1,513 other passengers. Two weeks later, Nelson arrived—by train—in Missoula. Townsquare Media stumbled on Nelson’s century-old account of the Titanic’s sinking two months ago. It appeared in an April 29, 1912 Missoulian, dug up by a reference librarian at the Missoula Public Library. Townsquare was gathering research for its Titanic-themed dinner theatre, set for the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking this Saturday at the Hilton Garden Inn—an oddly removed spot, geographically, for a commemoration. Shawna Batt, Townsquare’s general manager, says the event was more serendipitous than anything else. Townsquare was already planning to host a themed dinner theater—the first, Batt adds, in a potentially annual series. The date they chose just happened to coincide with the Titanic anniversary, set to be celebrated around the world. “It doesn’t matter where you live,” says Fran Albrecht, executive director of the Watson Children’s Shelter, which Townsquare selected as the beneficiary of Saturday’s dinner. “There’s such intrigue and excitement around that 100th anniversary event.” Batt says Townsquare’s goal is to sell 150 tickets, at $55 a piece. The evening includes a five-course dinner based on the last meal served to first class passengers on the Titanic. Attendees will receive boarding passes with the names of passengers. “You’ll essentially, I guess, be that person that evening,” Batt says. Townsquare had sold just over 60 tickets as of press time. The first 50 also received tickets to the re-release of James Cameron’s Titanic in 3D. At least the fate of whomever ends up as Bertha Nelson won’t be a surprise. Nelson joined her sister, who worked as a maid in Missoula. She told local press that she never wanted to travel by sea again. Alex Sakariassen

Amount spent to date by the League of Conservation Voters supporting Sen. Jon Tester in the 2012 election.

etc. Last weekend, representatives of the Montana Public Safety Officer Standards and Training Council, or POST, the state agency that polices the police, came to Lake County to track down five current and former law enforcement officers, to serve them with certification revocation notices. Former Lake County Undersheriff Karey Reynolds, the subject of a state perjury investigation; Detective Mike Sargeant; Polson Police Chief Wade Nash and Officer Cory Anderson; and Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Officer Jason Nash all face POST hearings to determine whether to strip them of their ability to be cops in Montana. POST has been investigating misconduct among these and other Lake County law enforcement officers for a couple years now. POST Director Wayne Ternes told the Indy last December that the agency had received “numerous complaints filed by citizens up there in [Lake County] … It’s up and down the valley, including tribal officers.” In February, five current and former officers in the Lake County Sheriff’s Department filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that four of their colleagues— including Sheriff Jay Doyle, Undersheriff Dan Yonkin and Detective Sargeant—retaliated against them for bringing forward evidence of wrongdoing within the department, ranging from a deputy’s lies about serving as a U.S. Marine to several officers’ involvement in a poaching group known as “the Coyote Club.” Montana Fish, Wildlife and Park’s investigation of the Coyote Club has implicated Nash and Sargeant. Meanwhile, Terry Leonard, a former reserve deputy and deputy in Lake County and a plaintiff in the lawsuit, was preparing to begin his new job Monday as a sheriff’s deputy in another county. Leonard had been out of work for a couple years, since Lake County canned him for no apparent reason. Leonard was vocal about the misconduct in Lake County. In 2010, before the sheriff’s election, he tried to expose it through a website. For that, Lake County Attorney Mitch Young obtained a warrant to search Leonard’s home—for an alleged misdemeanor election law violation, for which Leonard was later exonerated. A couple weeks ago, Leonard graduated from the Montana Law Enforcement Academy. His peers elected him as their class representative, honoring him with the Don Williams Award. He gave a speech. Leonard also earned the Joe May Leadership Award, given to the officer who displays outstanding leadership. Enough said.

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Missoula Independent Page 7 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Doc unleashed Vet Jani Zirbel rescues animals a stitch at a time by Jessica Mayrer

Inside Animal Blessings Pet Hospital on a recent snowy spring morning, veterinarian Jani Zirbel, sometimes known as “Dr. Z,” uses a silver scalpel to make a small incision in the belly of Bianca, a white cat. Bianca lies supine and unconscious on Zirbel’s operating table in the pet hospital off Highway 93. A small monitor attached to the cat’s tongue beeps regularly, indicating that her heartbeat is steady. Moments ago, Zirbel shaved Bianca’s stomach, leaving the feline’s pink skin exposed. Because of the full ovarian hysterectomy Zirbel is donating to the Humane Society of Western Montana, which is caring for Bianca, this cat won’t have kittens. Zirbel, 54, worked for decades in emergency veterinary medicine in Virginia before purchasing Animal Blessings in 2005. She’s not one to brag, but she knows the implications of her work. Nonprofit and taxpayer-funded shelters are overrun with cats and dogs. Nationally, approximately 6 million companion animals enter such facilities every year. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 60 percent of those dogs and 70 percent of the cats are euthanized. Great Falls, for instance, is grappling with ways to handle its homeless pets. The community’s lone shelter euthanizes 41 percent of the animals that end up there. “Our rates are stinking,” says Nora Norum, a member of the Humane Society of Cascade County’s board of directors. “It’s just awful.” Volunteer efforts make Missoula different. In the case of healthy animals, says Humane Society of Western Montana Director Lora O’ Connor, euthanasia is “not an option.” HSWM works with veterinarians like Zirbel to provide care to more than 1,000 animals a year. The nonprofit finds homes for roughly 100 animals a month, a 98 percent adoption rate. Even Missoula County Animal Control, which serves as a shelter of last resort, euthanizes fewer than 4 percent of the animals it receives. “It’s an amazing community,” O’Connor says. Bianca’s surgery is one of hundreds Zirbel plans to donate or perform at a discount this year. The veterinarian, who has three dogs, three cats and two children, says she has no idea of the value of the time she’s donated. “You don’t really tally up the dollars.” Zirbel seems compelled to help, O’Connor says. “We always call her. It could be 4:30 on a Friday [afternoon]. And it can be Sunday afternoon.”

Missoula Independent Page 8 April 12 – April 19, 2012

It’s also common for Zirbel to contact O’Connor during off hours to tell her about an animal that she would like to care for and then have placed for adoption. O’Connor has a hard time counting the animals Zirbel has saved that way. There was Abbey, a four-month old Border collie with a broken leg. Abbey’s owners couldn’t afford surgery. They surrendered her to Zirbel, who made sure Abbey got the sur-

selecting Zirbel for this year’s award was working around the vet’s schedule. The society had to surreptitiously enlist another veterinarian to cover for Zirbel’s April 14 emergency shift. While odds are a homeless animal in another part of the country will be put down for want of care, O’Connor says, that’s not true in Missoula. “Animals come here and we make them better.

Photo by Chad Harder

Jani Zirbel operates on a cat last week. The veterinarian is one reason that so few animals are killed at area shelters.

gery she needed. The cattle dog now lives in the Nine Mile Valley with a family that’s involved in 4-H. Halley is a golden retriever whose shoulder and pelvis were crushed by a car. Zirbel had a cart built that let Halley scoot around. The dog went through months of physical therapy under Zirbel’s watch before being adopted. Zirbel’s work has earned her this year’s Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award from the Humane Society of Western Montana, which is given to those who help homeless animals. She’ll be honored at a society dinner April 14. O’ Connor says the hardest part of

And then we get them adopted. And a lot of that has to do with Dr. Z.” The Humane Society of Western Montana holds its 15th annual Ken Shughart Humanitarian Award and Auction Saturday, April 14. It includes a raffle in which winners will have their pets painted by Missoula Artist Kendahl Jan Jubb and featured in the nonprofit’s 2013 calendar. Winners also get to keep the original watercolor. For more information, go to www.myhswm.org. jmayrer@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

DINO is the game-o Are Bitterroot conservatives wearing sheep’s clothing? by Alex Sakariassen

Prior to the 2012 election filing deadline, in March, an ad from the Ravalli County Democratic Central Committee popped up in Bitterroot newspapers. It featured a rendering of Uncle Sam, the ominous words “Tick Tock...� and a request: Run for office. Jan Wisniewski did just that. He filed as a Democrat for House District 87 against Republican incumbent Pat Connell. He also filed for a position as a precinct captain with the Ravalli County Democratic Central Committee. Now he’s under fire. “I’ve been called a libertarian, I’ve been called a DINO [Democrat In Name Only]...I was called a Tea Partier, a rightwing conservative–they’ve called me everything but a Democrat,� Wisniewski says. “That’s what I am. I’ve voted Democrat more times in my life than I have Libertarian.� Wisniewski is one of seven local candidates now accused of being Republicans disguised as Democrats on the Bitterroot’s ballot. The evidence against some is fairly strong; for example, Donna Gibney, who filed for a position as a Democratic precinct captain, has written editorials in local media sounding off on conservative issues. Others seem to have appeared out of nowhere. “These folks were ones we’d never heard of before, never seen at any Democrat meetings or events,� says Ravalli County Democratic Committee Chair John Meakin. “In fact, we knew several of them who had participated at events for the extreme right. In other words, in our opinion they were not and are not Democrats.� Meakin adds he doesn’t believe Wisniewski and the others were responding to the committee’s ad. The phone number listed in the papers was his. He never received any inquiries, he says. The DINO problem is a new one for Ravalli County, but Republicans elsewhere have played a similar game. Earlier this month, news broke that six candidates in various recall elections in Wisconsin are actually GOP operatives picked to force Democratic incumbents into costly primaries. Republican leaders used the same tactic there in 2011. Wisconsin election attorney Jeremy Levinson, who issued a legal opinion on the matter last week, believes the

times are regularly posted on the Montana Democratic Party website. Locations aren’t listed, but the contact numbers for Meakin and Vice Chair Corrine Gant are. Wisniewski says he’s never contacted Meakin or Gant for details regarding committee meetings. The committee’s doubts about several supposed DINOs are founded on ties to right wing activity. Meakin says Democrats have seen folks like Wisniewski participating in conservative events, particularly meetings of the nowdefunct Hamilton group Celebrating Conservatism ( Wisniewski counters that he’s seen active Democrats such as Bill LaCroix at those same meetings). The most compelling evidence yet is the presence of three of the candidates’ signatures on an online Freedom and Liberty Tea Party petition demanding a recall of Democratic Sen. Max Baucus. The signatures belong to Gibney, precinct captain candidate Pamela Nearpass and Democratic county commission candidate Wayne Dunkin. The position of precinct captain may not sound as weighty as commissioner or legislator, but Meakin conPhoto by Chad Harder tends there’s serious cause for concern. Next year, those capMarch 12, none of them have contacted tains will be responsible for appointing a new party chair and vice chair in Ravalli any of us on the Central Committee.� Wisniewski, who currently serves as County. They’ll also be expected to supRavalli County’s planning board chair- port Democratic candidates, to show up man, says he filed for HD 87 because he at party functions and to “be the backfeels Rep. Connell isn’t “good on person- bone of the Central Committee.� “We’re going to do everything we can al property rights.� Wisniewski says Connell also bungled “that weed bill he to see that they are not seated or elected,� voted for,� meaning the state’s hotly con- Meakin says of the seven suspected tested medical marijuana reform. He DINOs. If any do make it to the commitdoesn’t believe the government has any tee, he adds, the party will “minimize business interfering with medical mari- exposure to things that could damage juana. “When I get elected, everything us—access to funds, strategy sessions with I’m going to judge will be judged with specific candidates, that kind of thing.� The candidates could be conservathe Constitution and people’s rights.� As for the bid for precinct captain, tives simply making mischief, Meakin Wisniewski says he aims to change how says. They could be attempting to disthe Democratic Party in the Bitterroot tract local Democratic resources from does business. He accuses the Central bigger statewide races. Or, as Wisniewski Committee of masking the locations of claims, they could just be answering an its meetings, of not operating in a trans- ad in a newspaper. “It’s supposed to be a free country, parent manner. “They’re pretty much a secretive society. They’ve been comman- isn’t it?� Wisniewski says. “There was deered by a handful of what I would call nothing illegal, unethical or immoral Marxist people, and I don’t believe they about what I did. They put an ad in the represent the Democrats in this county.� paper for Democrat positions.� The Ravalli County Democratic Central Committee’s meeting dates and asakariassen@missoulanews.com operatives have committed felony election fraud. Wisconsin’s Republican Party publicly acknowledged the tactic. Democrats in Ravalli County are still speaking out largely on speculation. And even if their suspicions about DINOs are true, there’s little the committee can do to prove it. The Montana Democratic Party’s bylaws clearly state that “no test of membership in, nor any oath of loyalty to the Democratic Party of Montana shall be required� from its members. Candidates are taken at their word. “If they are real Democrats, they cannot have avoided that their names have appeared in newspapers and that there’s a concern over this,� Meakin says. “I would expect if they really are [Democrats], they’ll come forward. Since

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Missoula Independent Page 9 April 12 – April 19, 2012


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Ranchers without honor When it comes to bison, they go back on their deals

invites you to the 2012 Dean Stone Lecture

Thomas Nybo, photographer, filmmaker and J-School graduate

“Danger Lessons: How Embracing Risk Can Lead to Job Security and Personal Fulfillment”

Thursday, April 19 • 7 p.m. • Free Gallagher Business Building Room 106

Missoula Independent Page 10 April 12 – April 19, 2012

The battle over what Montana can do with bison that wander beyond Yellowstone National Park’s borders continues. The primary antagonists are those who want to see bison returned to their historic home range on the Great Plains and those who want to keep them confined within Yellowstone’s borders. While news accounts refer to “brucellosis-free” bison that have been quarantined, the historic perspective and a deal cut by past legislatures seem to have been forgotten. The story goes all the way back to the near extermination of millions of bison that once roamed the plains. We can forego the sinister and tragic reasons for their slaughter and take up the tale as a remnant herd, cloistered within Yellowstone’s borders, grew to thousands of animals. Being bison, they sought to leave the park in spring each year to forage and birth their calves. Unfortunately, the primary path to greener pastures led directly to Paradise Valley, where the mighty Yellowstone has carved a wide and water-rich landscape of natural terraces well suited for cattle ranching. And like all such valleys in Montana, its lands and waters were long ago claimed by ranchers. Wandering bison were not seen as natural migrations of indigenous wildlife, but as unwanted competition for graze and carriers of the disease brucellosis, which can cause pregnant cattle or bison to abort. That the disease was introduced to Yellowstone’s wildlife by ranchers is largely ignored because brucellosis has been mostly eradicated, except in the park’s bison and elk. While there has never been a documented case of bison transmitting brucellosis to bison in the wild, the potential for disease transmission was enough for the ranching community to demand the slaughter of bison leaving the park. Bison, however, remain an iconic symbol of the West, and as pictures of bloodsplattered snow and dead bison made their way around the world, thousands of people vociferously condemned the killings, boycotted Montana’s tourism industry and demanded that Montana’s bison policy change. It was this driving force that moved the Republican-dominated legislature of the late ’90s to seek a solution and salvage Montana’s reputation while, as always, protecting the sacred cow. Their answer to the dilemma was to lay out a long-term policy centered around capturing bison that wandered outside the park, sending those that tested positive

for brucellosis to slaughter and quarantining others in a yet-to-be-built facility for eventual distribution to Montana’s Indian tribes, in order to repopulate the genetically pure bison that held both a sacred and practical role for thousands of years. As the lobbyist for the Intertribal Bison Cooperative, my job was to secure live, genetically-pure bison for distribu-

Schweitzer, in relocating the bison to tribes, is sticking to the deal agreed to by past legislatures. These moves by the ranching industry are duplicitous, if not outright shameful. tion to tribes, although with a Republican legislature and governor, it would obviously have to be on the cattle industry’s terms. Bison advocates’ great hope was that cattle ranchers would appreciate what genetics mean to their industry and understand that Yellowstone’s bison were the only genetically pure remnants in the nation. That battle was hard, but in the end an agreement was reached. The plan, which would require years of preparation, called for securing millions of dollars in federal funds to build quarantine facilities near Yellowstone’s border, where wandering bison could be captured and held for five years, until they were deemed “brucellosis free,” and then could be distributed to tribes that wanted them. Years passed in the quest for money to build the quarantine facilities, but eventually the funds were appropriated and the quarantine facilities were built and stocked with bison.

More years passed as the captured bison remained isolated to ensure no contact with brucellosis. But the capacity of the quarantine facilities was limited and the slaughter of thousands of wandering bison continued. More bison were killed during Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s term than under any governor before him, but Schweitzer sought to redeem that sad statistic through a variety of methods, including a request to allow hunting within Yellowstone’s borders, which was rejected out of hand by the federal government. In 2010, Schweitzer struck a deal to move 88 bison to Ted Turner’s ranch. The deal raised the hackles of bison advocates who saw it as privatizing publicly owned wildlife, but it spared the bison. The state also acquired thousands of acres of land near Avon known as the Spotted Dog Wildlife Management Area and sought to relocate bison there. But the 2011 legislature, again dominated by Republicans, rewrote the bison statutes to prohibit relocation without a statewide bison management plan. Exploiting what he believes is a loophole in the law, Schweitzer moved 38 bison to Fort Peck tribal lands recently. Stockgrowers filed an immediate court challenge to prohibit further relocations. Schweitzer, in relocating the bison to tribes, is sticking to the deal agreed to by past legislatures. These moves by the ranching industry are duplicitous, if not outright shameful. We hear much from the ranching community about “moving the goal posts” when it comes to wolf reintroduction. Now it appears that “moving the goal posts” somehow doesn’t apply to the long-term bison plans to which they formerly agreed. While it is the right of each legislature to write or rewrite laws, there must be a modicum of trust that, in the search for solutions to large public policy issues, a deal made is a deal kept. Right now, it’s the stockgrowers who are breaking that deal and putting the future of negotiated policy agreements in serious jeopardy. There’s still time for honorable voices to speak—but so far, the only sound we hear from ranchers is the swish of lawsuits being filed to break their former agreement. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Dead man working How hard is it to be hyperactive and safe? by Neil LaRubbio

There are plenty of ways for roughnecks to kill themselves. When I worked as a roofer in Deer Lodge, the guys on the crew would tell the same joke that’s been amended for every one of my blue-collar jobs: “If you fall off the roof, you’re fired before you hit the ground.” The joke drew smirks every time, but the perils were real. In Deer Lodge, the state contracted us to tear a 40-year-old roof off the high-security cellblocks of the Montana State Prison. Wind blowing off Mount Powell could push a 200pound man over the side. Fine dust, fiberglass and asbestos whipped around so fast it lacerated our eyeballs. Getting crushed by the forklift was also always a possibility; and from inside the prison or as they shuffled back from the yard, the inmates promised revenge for the months of disturbances we’d inflicted upon them. “I want to [expletive] kill you,” one said as I passed outside his window. I stared at the ground and continued picking up trash. I don’t think he really meant it. Many occupations in Western states operate with high risks, and some states are worse than others. As Timothy Ryan, former Wyoming state epidemiologist, put it, Wyoming lacks a culture of safety. He reported 62 deaths occurring in the oil and gas fields from 2001 to 2008, and he said that 96 percent of the fatalities happened while safety protocol wasn’t being followed. Ryan resigned Dec.19, 2011, after perceiving a lack of interest from the state legislature. But building a culture of safety can’t solve everything. Federal wildfire agencies, for example, aim to instill a robust safety ethic in their firefighters. “Fight fire aggressively, having provided for safety first” is a standard fire order. Yet safety can be complicated if you’re involved in life-threatening activity a long way from a hospital. Robert Palmer, who has been looking into the death of his firefighter brother, Andy, in 2008, found several problems that almost guaranteed that the medical evacuation team would come several hours too late to save him. Palmer’s research into the medical staffing for wildland firefighters brought to light some startling comparisons: For every eight to 16 soldiers in Afghanistan, for example, one emergency medical technician is assigned to

the group. For structural firefighters in cities, the ratio is 1-to-1. For wildland firefighters, the ratio is 499-to-1. From 1980 to 2010, an average of 17 firefighters died nationally each year, the majority in Western forests, six more on average than during the previous 30

Researchers at the University of Montana’s Department of Health and Human Performance found that 20 percent of wildland firefighters demonstrate symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. years. Yet no fire manager would say that safety awareness has become lax. No matter the agency’s culture, getting these roughnecks to act right in desperate situations can be the most maddening variable of all. Stacie McDonald, a safety consultant for the energy industry, lamented her frustration with reckless behavior in an opinion column on Jan. 17 for the Casper Star-Tribune: “Even as a safety person, I disagree that more rules will lead to less death or injury. I wish it were so, it would be so much easier just to create more laws and rules and enforce them. The inherent problem lies within

humans and their innate ability to think for themselves.” McDonald’s cynicism—perhaps you could call it realism—made me recall a sunny day in Big Sky. I’d just leveled a 50-foot ladder by propping up the bottom with a cairn of wallet-size flagstone. Then I climbed up and balanced on the top rung while holding 40 pounds of chinking equipment in my arms. As the ladder swayed, a reel of acrobatic escapes I could perform if things went to hell rolled through my mind. I didn’t fall, but I never forgot the feeling that I had been doing something deliberately stupid. Maybe I was just bored. Later on, I kept thinking, “What a stupid way to die.” What kind of worker is most likely to choose risk over reason? Researchers at the University of Montana’s Department of Health and Human Performance have come to some conclusions. They found that 20 percent of wildland firefighters demonstrate symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, compared to a national average of 9 percent. The researchers discovered similar statistics in miners, suggesting that people with ADHD gravitate toward high-risk jobs. Research like this may help industry mold environments that accommodate the risky ways in which some people unconsciously approach dangerous work. For example, according to the UM study, individuals with ADHD show higher rates of substance abuse, which may explain the unsparing quantities of alcohol my fire crew in Montana consumed, or the fairy-tale levels of meth that are said to circulate among short-haul oilfield truckers. People who work risky jobs have a responsibility to themselves, their coworkers and their families waiting at home. But cultivating a safe work environment takes some effort and a lot of education. Industry must prove to workers that their lives and limbs mean more than the stakes of competition, and government agencies must reconcile the logic of fighting wildfire with the science of letting it burn. Until safety really does come first, roughnecks better keep their heads on a swivel.

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Neil LaRubbio is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ), where he is an editorial fellow.

Missoula Independent Page 11 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

If you are a frequent reader of this publication, you might notice that I hate stuff. It may even seem as though I only find pleasure in entertainments by hating on them. It’s not true. Sometimes, it’s just more pleasurable to write about things you hate. Lucky for you optimists (weird), I have some positive news. Way back in 2011, we received an advanced copy of The Man Who Quit Money by part-time Missoula author Mark Sundeen. We receive a lot of books here and (¡Que sorprende!) I don’t care for many of them. But I read Sundeen’s 272-page story about Daniel Suelo in one sitting. Five hours of straight reading. For weeks, I found myself often thinking about the simple life Suelo lives. No ID, no stick-frame home, no money. A man and his cave, living without material wealth. The book quietly makes you reassess your relationship with money, minus diatribes, screeds or insistent nattering. Suelo sets the example; one can

choose whether or not to believe in his lifestyle. It matters little. In the spirit of Money, the publisher is giving away copies through the Missoula Public Library. Those who would like one should email events@missoulalib.mt.us and attend the Could You Quit Money? discussion with Sundeen, Suelo and Missoula community members at the Missoula Public Library. Perhaps you could quit money. Perhaps you don’t care to. Perhaps you should think about it now before you don’t have a choice. —Jason McMackin

THURSDAY APRIL 12

TUESDAY APRIL 17

The Riverfront Neighborhood Council Meeting and Soup Social takes place from 4:30–6 PM at the Montana Natural History Center. Let’s talk traffic and playground equipment. 120 Hickory.

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsoleck during Compassionate Communication Non-Violent Communication Weekly Practice Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free.

This Congressional Debate brought to you by NARAL, Pro-Choice Montana and the New Leaders Council-Montana will be full of truth and platitudes. The debaters include Kim Gillan, Sam Rankin, Diane Smith, Dave Strohmaier, Rob Stutz, Jason Ward and Franke Wilmer. University Center Theater. 5:30 PM. The latest installment of the Peace and Justice Film Series features Vanishing of the Bees, a film about professional beekeepers traveling the world to understand why the bees are disappearing. Guest speaker Jerry Bromenshenk. Gallagher Business Buiding, Rm. 122. 7 PM. Free.

FRIDAY APRIL 13 Hear the ladies, listen to the ladies at the YWCA’s Womens Voices Brown Bag Series. This week, outreach educator Angel Nordquist of Planned Parenthood Montana discusses family planning services. 1130 W. Broadway. Noon–1 PM. Free.

SATURDAY APRIL 14 Get them crazy kids out of class and on a field trip by sponsoring Sussex School’s Ecothon, a fundraiser and community service extravaganza. To donate, call Robin at 549-8327. Help shape the future of the Milltown State Park by attending the workshop to discuss idears for the interpretive area and whatnot. Hellgate Lions Barn, 1305 Haaglund Dr., West Riverside. 10 AM–3 PM. He of the “PAL E 8” license plate, Dr. Ira Byock, is in town to give a presentation and discussion called The Best Care Possible: Celebrating Medicine, Facing Death, Finding Life, which is based on his book of the same title. Christ the King Church, 1400 Gerald. 7 PM. Free.

SUNDAY APRIL 15 Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org.

Could You Quit Money?: Imagining a World Without Currency takes place at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., on Wed., Apr. 18, at 7 PM. Panelists include author Mark Sundeen, Daniel Suelo, Pastor Christian Cryder, Kate Keller, Bob Giardano and Josh Slotnick.

Those who are looking will know that the HOME-Co Meeting takes place in the small meeting rm. at the Missoula Public Library from noon–1:30 pm. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 115 S. 3rd St. W. 1-3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Missoula Aging Services offers a Caregiver Support Group. 337 Stephens. 4–5 PM. Free. YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts YWCA Support Groups for women every Tue. from 6:30–8 PM. An American Indian-led talking circle is also available, along with age-appropriate children’s groups. Free. Call 543-6691.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18 Sam McCracken tells The Nike N7 Story, and talks about his rise from working in the warehouse to becoming general manager of N7, a Nike brand that seeks to promote healthy living and physical activity in Native American communities. UM Skaggs Bldg., Rm. 169. 12:10 PM. Free. Honestly, author readings can be something else, but here we have a timely one with a panel and everything. Author of The Man Who Quit Money Mark Sundeen and the Man himself Daniel Suelo speak about the book and the experience. 7 PM. Free. Missoula Public Library. (See Agenda in this issue.)

THURSDAY APRIL 19 In a city saturated with nonprofits, you best check out the Missoula Nonprofit Network’s class Making the Pie Bigger: What Nonprofits Need to Know about Planned Giving & Bequests presented by Meredith Printz. Mountain Home Montana, 2606 South Ave. W. Park in back. 11:30 AM–1 PM. $10/Free for MNN members.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent Page 12 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Police searching for a stolen iPad used the tablet’s GPS to track it to an apartment in San Jose, Calif. The officers didn’t have a search warrant, but when they asked permission to enter the apartment, the occupants obliged. “They probably thought if they didn’t, we’d suspect something,” Santa Clara County Assistant District Attorney David Tomkins suggested. Once inside, the officers found 780 pounds of crystal meth, worth about $35 million. “I told my dad about the bust,” District Attorney Jeff Rosen said, “and he said, ‘They have $35 million, and they can’t go out and buy an iPad?’” (San Jose Mercury News) When a single-engine Cessna 182 strayed into the same Los Angeles airspace as a Marine helicopter carrying President Obama, the North American Aerospace Defense Command scrambled two Air Force fighter jets to intercept the aircraft in the no-fly zone and direct it to land at Long Beach Airport. Federal agents who questioned the pilot determined that he presented no security threat, but they also found 40 pounds of marijuana aboard the plane and turned him over to Long Beach police. (Associated Press) Police arrested a 17-year-old boy they said tried to burglarize a home in Belfast, Northern Ireland, after a patrol spotted the juvenile at the front door struggling to free his hand from the flap of a mail slot. He became stuck while trying to reach through the slot to unlock the door. (Associated Press) IMMODEST PROPOSALS - Missouri lawmakers voted to add gun owners to the list of groups protected against workplace discrimination. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Wanda Brown, said the measure was inspired by a constituent who runs a meat-packing plant in a bad neighborhood and “was told that if he didn’t quit carrying his gun, the USDA would not come and inspect his product,” meaning he couldn’t sell it. After the measure passed, 115 to 36, openly gay Rep. Mike Colona declared, “What this body has done is put protecting gun ownership above discriminating against somebody because of their sexual orientation.” (St. Louis’s KWMU-FM) Ohio Senate Bill 271 would allow telephone companies to stop providing landline service, potentially leaving a large number of Ohio residents without any phone service. The bill’s sponsor, Sen. Frank LaRose, said the measure frees phone companies to spend their time and money on new, highspeed connections. “Those resources are being wasted on vintage services customers are walking away from,” he explained. Among the bill’s opponents are seniors and people unable or unwilling to give up their landlines. “If you eliminate landlines,” Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly pointed out, “you would put these people out there without a means to report a crime.” (Springfield News-Sun) KEEPING IN TOUCH - Jacob Jock got kicked off a jury in a civil trial in Sarasota, Fla., after sending a Facebook friend request to one of the defendants within 20 minutes of being instructed by the judge not to contact anyone connected with the case. “I didn’t think it was a big deal,” Jock said, explaining that he sent the friend request while he was in the jury pool. “I didn’t think I would get picked for the jury.” But he was, and defendant Violette Milerman informed her attorney, who told the judge. (Sarasota Herald-Tribune) Authorities were called to rescue Bonnie Miller after she walked off a pier in St. Joseph, Mich., while texting. “I had set an appointment for the wrong time, and so I sent about three words,” Miller said. “Next thing you know, it was the water.” (South Bend’s WBND-TV) LOW PEOPLE IN HIGH PLACES - While serving as mayor of Hawthorne, Calif., Larry Guidi also worked as a warehouse operations manager for the Hawthorne School District. He was fired after a security camera recorded him loading a commercial food mixer into his pickup truck. He pleaded guilty to stealing the mixer, explaining that he took it so he could make dough for his home pizza oven. (Associated Press) Anwar El-Balkimy, an ultra-conservative Islamist member of the Egyptian parliament, told reporters from his hospital bed that masked gunmen robbed and beat him on a desert highway. Later, however, the employees of a plastic-surgery clinic in Giza said that El-Balkimy was covering his face in bandages to hide plastic surgery. El-Balkimy admitted he’d gotten a nose job and resigned from both the Salafist Nour Party and Parliament. (USA Today) HIGH PEOPLE IN LOW PLACES - Barely an hour into his 21st birthday, Damien Dasilveira Bittar was arrested for drunk driving after he crashed his car into an alcohol rehabilitation center in Eugene, Ore. Police said Bittar was trying to flee the scene when officers arrived. (Eugene’s KVAL-TV) HIGH PEOPLE IN HIGH PLACES - When sheriff’s deputies went to a home in Dickson County, Tenn., to notify Danielle Elks, the wife of Charlie Daniels band keyboardist Joel “Taz” Digregorio, that her husband had died in a car crash, they found the back door open and entered. They found what they suspected was marijuana on the kitchen table, as well as rolling papers. They also noted there was a sticker for the Governor’s Marijuana Eradication Task Force. Elks is the director of the state Alcoholic Beverage Commission, whose mission includes the eradication of marijuana. The deputies neither investigated nor arrested anyone. (Nashville’s WSMV-TV) WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Authorities accused Paul A. Broadwell, 22, of throwing a bowling ball at a man during an argument while bowling in Niagara Falls, N.Y. “That guy ducked,” Deputy District Attorney Doreen M. Hoffmann said. “The bowling ball hit this kid who was just minding his own business.” The 16-year-old victim suffered broken facial bones and needed four plates installed in his face to hold up his eyeball. (The Buffalo News) HOMELAND INSECURITY - While driving a $160,000 armored Chevy Suburban specifically designed to thwart high-velocity gunfire, fragmentation grenades and land mines, Immigration and Customs Enforcement Special Agent Jaime Zapata, 32, was ambushed in central Mexico by drug cartel gunmen. When they forced the vehicle off the road and surrounded it, Zapata confidently put the allegedly invulnerable vehicle in park. That’s when the door locks popped open, thanks to a consumer-friendly automatic setting installed in the vehicle. Assailants were then able to wrestle open the door enough for one to spray gunfire into the interior. U.S. officials acknowledged that “hundreds, if not thousands, of other U.S. government vehicles all over the world” might have the same vulnerability. (The Washington Post)

Missoula Independent Page 13 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Missoula Independent Page 14 April 12 – April 19, 2012 Nov. 5, 2007: Qwenton Freeman, running back Greg Coleman, defensive end Mike Shelton and running back Jeramy Pate are among seven masked men who break into a house near campus brandishing guns, looking to steal drugs and money. One victim is pistol-whipped and repeatedly tased, while another is duct taped. Police arrest Coleman, Shelton and Pate. Freeman flees to Oregon. They’re all eventually sent to prison.

June 23, 2007: Qwenton Freeman allegedly throws another beer bottle, this time at a man outside Stockman’s Bar. He’s charged with disorderly conduct and kicked off the football team.

November 2007: Montana finishes 11-1 and wins the Big Sky Conference. Its lone loss comes to Wofford in the first round of the FCS playoffs.

arrested for drunk driving. Quinn had a previous DUI arrest in 2005, at age 19, while playing for the Oklahoma Sooners. He left Oklahoma in 2006 after it was discovered that he and another player had been paid thousands of dollars for work they had not performed at a Norman, Okla., car dealership.

tions involving football players, UM President George Dennison defends football coach and “disciplinarian” Bobby Hauck. “I think he’s been doing a good job,” Dennison says.

June 27, 2007: Responding to a spate of allega-

February 2007: Athletic Director Jim O’Day announces the athletic department has eliminated a $1 million deficit two years ahead of schedule. The deficit was attributed in part to accounting errors under the direction of former AD Wayne Hogan, as well as extravagant football travel and high guaranteed payments to visiting football teams. A special committee appointed by the Commissioner of Higher Education found the budget had been “spiraling out of control” since the late 1990s. Retired judge Diane Barz headed the committee.

beer bottle at Westside Lanes. He would plead guilty to criminal mischief and receive a suspended sentence. Freeman also has two outstanding warrants from Arizona.

July 2006: Cornerback Qwenton Freeman throws a

July 22, 2007: Offensive lineman J.D. Quinn is

June 30, 2007: Qwenton Freeman allegedly chokes and hits his girlfriend. He’s also accused of pulling her hair and throwing her to the ground outside the University Village apartments. He’s charged with assault.

shoots to death his aunt’s boyfriend in California. Qwenton Freeman witnesses the shooting and would refuse to testify. Wilson spends two years in jail before a jury acquits him in July 2009.

June 2, 2007: Cornerback Jimmy Wilson allegedly

U

niversity of Montana President Royce Engstrom shocked Griz Nation on the last Friday in March when he fired Athletic Director Jim O’Day and head football coach Robin Pflugrad. Engstrom gave no explanation other than a need to change leadership. The moves came in the wake of a rash of sexual assault allegations involving football players, including starting quarterback Jordan Johnson. But the team’s problems go back much further. As the program had a long run of success on the field, issues emerged off it.


Missoula Independent Page 15 April 12 – April 19, 2012 December 2009: Bobby Hauck accepts the head coach position at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, ending his six-year run as one of Montana’s winningest and most controversial coaches. Hauck takes much of his staff from Missoula with him, including recruiting coordinator and linebackers coach Ty Gregorak. UNLV’s student newspaper questions the hire, considering Hauck’s tumultuous history at UM.

and Swink by benching them for the first game of the season. After that game, UM’s student paper, the Montana Kaimin, breaks the story about the alleged March assault. When a reporter asks Hauck about why the players didn’t compete, he reportedly says, “You’ll be done for the season if you keep bugging me about this thing that I’ve answered four fucking times.” Hauck then stonewalls Kaimin reporters for weeks.

September 2009: Coach Hauck punishes Johnson

Summer

October 2009: Hauck’s boycott of the Kaimin prompts Deadspin to declare him “a gaping vagina of the highest order.” Jeff Pearlman, a Sports Illustrated columnist, refers to Hauck as “egomaniacal” and a “bully.” ESPN college football reporter Pat Forde calls Hauck “The Bum of the first half of the season.” The Kaimin responds by covering Griz opponents.

next head coach; he’d served the previous season as the team’s wide receivers coach.

Dec. 31, 2009: UM hires Robin Pflugrad as its

December 2009: Montana wins the Big Sky Conference and reaches its second consecutive FCS Championship, but falls to Villanova, its only loss of the season.

March 2009: Cornerbacks Trumaine Johnson and Andrew Swink allegedly assault student Grady McCarthy at a frat party, fracturing his cheekbone. McCarthy does not press charges.

Summer 2008: Washington-Grizzly Stadium undergoes a $6.5 million expansion that features a 500-seat “Stadium Club.” It’s the second major renovation in five years, following a $3.5 million expansion in 2003 that adds approximately 4,000 seats to the north end zone. Capacity is now at 25,217. Montana would lead its division in average attendance in 2009.

May 22, 2008: J.D. Quinn is again arrested for drunk driving. He would plead guilty.

2009: The Grizzly Scholarship Association tops the $2 million mark in annual giving, more than double the amount raised in 2000.

December 2008: Montana reaches the FCS Championship only to lose to Richmond. The Griz finish the season 14-2 and share the Big Sky Conference title with Weber State.

Miller Hall records linebacker Andrew Douglass and defensive back Cody von Appen assaulting fellow student Jesse Johnson, who suffers a concussion, fractured jaw and chipped teeth. Safety Justin Montelius is also at the scene. All three would be kicked off the team and given deferred sentences.

Sept. 19, 2008: A surveillance camera outside

April 2008: The Atlanta Falcons draft Griz defensive lineman Kroy Biermann in the 5th round. The Miami Dolphins draft running back Lex Hilliard in the 6th round. They’re the first two UM players drafted by the NFL since 2004, and it’s the first time since 1988 that two Griz are drafted the same year.


Missoula Independent Page 16 April 12 – April 19, 2012 June 6, 2011: Tight end Kavario Middleton is arrested for drunken driving in Seattle.

December 2011: Montana returns to the top of the Big Sky Conference and the FCS playoffs, finishing the season 11-3. The Griz lose to Sam Houston State in the FCS semifinals, despite quarterback Jordan Johnson rushing for one touchdown and throwing for another.

ball players were allegedly involved in a gang rape, aided by a date-rape drug, of two students the previous weekend. UM hires former state Supreme Court Justice Diane Barz to investigate.

Dec. 16, 2011: The Missoulian reports that at least three foot-

police at a house party. They’re charged with obstructing a peace officer, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Coach Pflugrad would bench them for the first quarter of the next game. They would both plead no contest.

Dec. 31, 2011: Barz files a preliminary report stating that there is “evidence of non-consensual sex that is not being reported in the university system.”

August 2011: The Grizzly Scholarship Association tops the $2 million mark in annual giving for the third consecutive year.

April 2011: The Miami Dolphins draft Jimmy Wilson in the 7th round.

Oct. 23, 2011: Cornerback Trumaine Johnson and quarterback Gerald Kemp are tased by

NFL great Joe Montana, is arrested for drunken driving. He would plead guilty to reckless driving.

Montana misses the FCS playoffs for the first time in 17 years and finishes the season 7-4. The team also fails to share the Big Sky Conference title for the first time since 1997.

November 2010: President Engstrom announces Griz athletics will stay in the Big Sky Conference, declining an invitation to join the Western Athletic Conference. Engstrom says the school is better suited to compete against “mission-similar” (read: smaller) programs.

Feb. 8, 2011: Head coach Robin Pflugrad hires Ty Gregorak as the team’s new linebackers coach.

June 3, 2011: Quarterback Nate Montana, son of

Duncan is arrested for drunken driving. He would plead guilty.

arrested for drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident after he drove into a fence in the lower Rattlesnake.

Aug. 29, 2010: Linebacker Josh Stuberg is

being acquitted of murder charges, bites a woman’s leg. He would plead guilty to disorderly conduct.

Aug. 6, 2010: Jimmy Wilson, back on the team after

Shann Schillinger in the 6th round. The Tennessee Titans draft wide receiver Marc Mariani in the 7th round.

April 2010: The Atlanta Falcons draft Griz safety

November 2010: At the end of Pflugrad’s first season,

independent consulting firm to study the university’s options if it receives an offer from a Football Bowl Subdivision conference. A move up would give UM access to larger television contracts and bowl game invitations, but require a substantial financial investment into the school’s existing athletic facilities.

June 2010: Athletic Director Jim O’Day hires an

Oct. 15, 2010: Royce Engstrom is named the University of Montana’s 17th president, replacing George Dennison. Engstrom makes a point of mentioning that, while serving as UM’s provost and vice president of academic affairs, he attended almost every Griz home football game.

Jan. 29, 2011: Defensive tackle Roy Tyrone

Sept. 25, 2010: Running back Beau Donaldson, a Big Sky High School graduate, allegedly rapes a female friend sleeping on his couch. He would later admit to doing so during a police-monitored telephone conversation.

coach Ty Gregorak, now at UNLV with Bobby Hauck, for a bizarre series of events that begin outside a Colorado strip club. A police report alleges Gregorak was denied access to Club Nitro for being intoxicated and that he retaliated by stealing a .45-caliber Glock 36 handgun and a wallet from the bouncer’s Nissan Sentra. Gregorak returned the items to the bouncer the next day. The report also states that Gregorak had a Montana license that was revoked for driving while impaired on March 19. UNLV fires Gregorak. The charges, however, are later dropped after video shows it wasn’t Gregorak being turned away by the bouncer. The coach isn’t sure how the items ended up in his hotel room and claims he was drugged during the night in question.

May 7, 2010: Police arrest former UM assistant

Jan. 25, 2010: UM President George Dennison announces his retirement. A staunch supporter of Griz football (Dennison’s son is an NFL coach), he touts the expansion of Washington-Grizzly Stadium among his accomplishments over the last 20 years.


Missoula Independent Page 17 April 12 – April 19, 2012

is set to be played under the new, permanent lights at Washington-Grizzly Stadium, the third major addition to the stadium since 2003.

April 14, 2012: The football team’s spring scrimmage

March 30, 2012: UM President Royce Engstrom names Mick Delaney interim head coach of the football team through the 2012 season. Engstrom names senior associate athletic director Jean Gee the interim athletic director.

at cornerback in 2011, is arrested for allegedly assaulting a female friend. He pleads not guilty.

March 30, 2012: UM football players pen a letter to Griz Nation, saying, “We understand and accept the fact that a few of our teammates’ actions, whether intended and deserved or not, have contributed to this unfortunate situation.”

closes the sexual assault investigation. “The events of the past few months have delivered a critical message to the university,” he writes in a memo that outlines changes in school policies. “Now we must focus on the goal of eliminating sexual assault from our campus. I will expect and hold accountable every member of my administration and indeed every member of the campus as a whole to do his or her utmost to address that goal.”

March 28, 2012: Houston Roots, a senior starter

order against quarterback Jordan Johnson, alleging that he sexually assaulted her. The order is later dismissed and a civil agreement is reached ordering that Johnson and his accuser avoid contact. That allows Johnson to return to practice March 24, which “fired up” his teammates, Pflugrad reportedly said, noting Johnson’s “character and tremendous moral fiber.”

March 22, 2012: UM President Royce Enstrom

March 9, 2012: A woman files a temporary restraining

cornerback Trumaine Johnson and other players work out at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. The NFL has called Johnson “arguably one of the best and most polished NFL prospects to come out of the Big Sky Conference in quite some time.”

Jan. 31, 2012: Beau Donaldson pleads not guilty to rape.

March 29, 2012: UM decides “not to renew the contracts” of athletic director Jim O’Day and football coach Robin Pflugrad, effective immediately. The school gives no explanation for the dismissals.

M a r c h 15 , 2 012 : U M implements a ne w Student-Athlete Conduct Code, which includes an Athletic Conduct Team charged with enforcing code policies and imposing penalties on students who violate them.

drunk driving after rolling his truck on Hillview Way.

March 9, 2012: More than 20 NFL scouts watch

Feb. 26, 2012: Linebacker Brian Maus is arrested for

promotes Ty Gregorak to defensive coordinator.

Jan. 31, 2012: UM releases the findings of Barz’s investigation, which uncovered nine cases of alleged sexual assault between September 2010 and December 2011. “UM has a problem of sexual assault on and off campus and needs to take steps to address it to ensure the safety of all students as well as faculty, staff and guests,” the report states.

Feb. 12, 2012: Head coach Robin Pflugrad

President Royce Engstrom says the ongoing investigation into the recent spate of sexual assaults has “indicated an association with patterns of behavior of a small number of student athletes.”

Jan. 17, 2012: During a community forum, UM


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Now seems like a good time to point out how easy it is to grind your own burger in the food processor. Grill season is starting, pink slime is everywhere and, for once, wouldn’t it be nice to have a burger that isn’t basically mystery meat? And while most households don’t have meat grinders, your old La Machine or Cuisinart can get it done like a champ. The process is about as simple as making a smoothie. Cut a burger’s worth of meat—beef, venison, lamb, turkey, emu or any other dark meat—into one-inch cubes. Put the cubes in the food processor, along with spices and fat, as necessary. Push the “on” button. Run the blades until the ground meat gathers into a ball and bounces around the chamber like a Mexican jumping bean on Red Bull. It will take between ten seconds and a couple of minutes, depending on the meat, for this to happen. Food processors aren’t as good at cutting through sinew and connective tissue as a real meat grinder is, so be wary of tougher cuts like stew chunks, shoulder and flank, and forget about the likes of neck and shank. Do yourself a favor and include chopped garlic, salt and pepper in your home-burger. If you’re using lean meat, consider adding some kind of fat, like olive oil or bacon. Chopped onion is good, too. And there are many spice powders to be mixed and matched. But be careful: not all combinations are going to taste good. I’ve applied several sausage recipes to my homeburgers, with mixed results. My interpretation of bratwurst burger, alas, sounds more epic than I found it to be—though in fairness, I didn’t bathe my burger brats in Old Milwaukee. My favorite burger seasonings are a clove of chopped garlic and a pinch each of salt, black pepper, fennel seed, celery seed and nutmeg per patty. I like adding this modified Italian sausage mix to deer meat and chopped pieces of top-shelf bacon or side pork. Bacon integrates better with other meat if you chop and add it while still frozen. Speaking of cold meat, if you’re in the market for grass-fed beef or buffalo this time of year, frozen

by ARI LeVAUX

cook more. It’s going to be further deconstructed anyway, because when I eat home-burger, I tear it apart as I go, adorning the bite-sized pieces with any number of condiments. These include homemade catsup, fake mayo ( Vegenaise), chopped onions, chopped roasted green chile, avocado, tomato slices, bacon, sautéed mushrooms, roasted garlic, pickled peppers and pickled cucumbers, to name a few. I like to lather my broken chunks of burger with catsup and mayo, sprinkle them with chopped onions and attach (or balance) whatever else I can to them. I then follow these burger bites with nibbles of other condiments and sips of wine, beer or coffee, depending on the time of day. While I respect the hamburger sandwich, and have enjoyed my share, it’s important to remember that it’s not the only game in town. And personally, I have bun-related issues. For one, the hamburger sandwich gets progressively uglier and messier as you eat it. This isn’t a deal killer, but it’s not exactly a bonus, either. And I don’t want to alarm anyone, but a big, bun-bound burger—or any other big thing you might attempt to put in your mouth—can literally break your face. A Photo by Ari LeVaux group of Taiwanese dentists is campaigning against super-sized fast-food meals, citing an lions. That’s what you can get, even in winter, with increase in jaw dislocations attributed to burger lovers frozen grass-fed. And it’s a myth that fresh meat is fighting their own anatomy and opening too wide for their own good. More than eight centimeters—about intrinsically superior to properly frozen meat. Cheap cuts of steak, like flat iron or round, are three inches—in a food’s height, and you’re biting good choices for home-burgers. Sirloin burgers are into the mandibular danger zone, says professor Hsu popular in many restaurants. T-bone burger is either Ming-Iung of National Yang-Ming University in Taipei. Another reason I skip the bun is that I’m becoma waste of a great steak or the greatest burger you ing more and more convinced that wheat is bad for ever ate, depending on who’s cooking. I make my patties on the thick side. Cooking you. Or at least, bad for me—and I’m not even gluten meat over wood coals is ideal. But it’s almost as good intolerant. But that’s a story for a different day. If you must use bread, and I know you probably to simply broil the burgers at 500 in a cast-iron skillet, which holds heat and cooks the patty on both will, consider open-faced burger bites. A toasted slice sides, so no flipping is necessary. After 5 to 10 min- of bread can hold a lot of condiments, I’ll admit, and utes, a thick patty will begin contracting into a more I have to respect that. But the piece on top is overkill. And even if we differ on the pros and cons of rounded shape. Soon after, it’s ready. One could use a meat thermometer to check if wheat, I think we can all agree that the less bread it’s done, but I just break the burger in half and look. you eat, the more room you’ll have in your belly for If it’s raw in the middle, I put the two pieces back to the good stuff. is a much better option, provided it’s been packaged correctly. Frozen is typically cheaper than fresh, and this time of year you don’t want to eat fresh grass-fed beef anyway. The animals are skinny in winter, thanks to a diet of dried hay and whatever they can paw at through the snow. This is OK in the natural order of things—that’s just life on the high plains. But economically, cattle just aren’t worth slaughtering this time of year unless they’re fat on grain. On the other hand, no beef is better than that from a cow that was finished on green grass and dande-

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Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun.

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 When the sun shines, the trail along the Clark Fork beckons me for a stroll. As I pass Boone & Crockett I realize one quick side step up the hillside and I can stop at Bernice’s. Mmmm. Iced Coffee to help me kick into the last leg of my cruise and a chocolate chip cookie. Or an herb cream cheese hard roll and a loaf of Sourdough for tomorrows lunch. Tradition. While you kick into April remember Bernice’s can accent your spring adventure any time, any day. Open 6a – 8p seven days a week.

Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selec-

Missoula Independent Page 18 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-

ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Big Sky Drive In 1016 W. Broadway 549-5431 Big Sky Drive In opened June 2nd 1962. We feature soft serve ice cream, shakes, malts, spins, burger, hot dogs, pork chop sandwiches and breaded mushrooms all made to order. Enjoy our 23 shake and malt flavors or the orange twist ice cream. Drive thru or stay and enjoy your food in our outdoor seating area. Lunch and dinner, seven days a week. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty.


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The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins • 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$ Burger Shack 1900 Brooks • 549-2194 (Holiday Village) LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED! Come take a bite out of our ½ lb big & beefy burgers! We're the the only burger joint in Missoula serving 100% Certified Angus beef, hand-pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over 18 mouthwatering specialty burgers to choose from.Check out our Food Challenge: Eat a 6 patty, 6 cheese, 12 bacon burger OR a 2 foot Philly in 30 min. or less and win $100 in Free Food! Even the burps taste good! Open Monday thru Saturday 11am to 8pm. Call ahead or order to-go 549-2194. Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 39 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm ThursSat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. We deliver and we cater!

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. • 926-2038 The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-9pm Tuesday-Sunday. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. MTH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 41-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Brooks and Browns Trivia Night is back. $7 Bayern Pitchers plus appetizer specials. Every Thursday from 7-10pm. $50 Bar Tab to winning team. Warm up your chilly nights with our Hot Jalapeno Artichoke Dip. We have Classic French Onion Soup and hearty Bison chili made in house daily. Fall in love with our Bacon Cheeseburger Meatloafstuffed with crispy Daily’s bacon and cheddar cheese, served with cheddar mashed potatoes and corn. And finish the best meal in town with our New Orleans style Bread Pudding with warm caramel sauce and Big Dipper vanilla bean Ice cream. We still have Happy Hour from 4-7 every day and on game days we offer wings specials and all your favorite local micro-brews. Everyone loves our SUNDAY BINGO NIGHT! Sundays 6-9 pm at Brooks and Browns. Same happy Hour specials ($5 pulled pork sliders, ?

HAPPIESTHOUR Sierra Nevada Hoptimum Optimum hops: I’ve always enjoyed me some Sierra Nevada. So a few weeks ago, when the server at Sapore said a keg of Hoptimum, a limited offering from the Chico, Calif.-based brewery, had just arrived, I didn’t hesitate. She poured a friend and me the first two pints from the freshly tapped keg. And the third and fourth pints. And so on. Whoa: Which might have been a mistake, especially after having had a couple Blackfoot IPAs, because Hoptimum weighs in at an eyeglazing 10.4 percent ABV. A week later, my friend returned to Sapore and asked for more Hoptimum. Fresh out. Funny thing, though, the waiter said: Sapore had served the mighty brew in pint glasses, when they should have been pouring eight-ounce snifters. Ha! What it tastes like: Hoptimum is a whole-cone hop Imperial IPA, a 100 IBU “hurricane of flavor,” says Sierra Nevada. Its website continues: “The flavor follows the aroma with layers of aggressive hoppiness, featuring notes of grapefruit rind, rose, lilac, cedar and tropical fruit—all culminating in a dry and lasting finish.” I can’t say I remember enough from the evening to dispute that. I concur that the beer is very good.

Photo by Chad Harder

Where to find it: Last I checked, Sapore was still out. Worden’s first shipment of four-packs was plucked from the shelves in a couple days, but the downtown grocer has since restocked. —Matthew Frank Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

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Missoula Independent Page 19 April 12 – April 19, 2012


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BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

order wings, ? nachos; $6 Bud Lite pitchers) Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Rotating music and DJs. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5-10. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ The Mercantile Deli 119 S. Higgins Ave. • 721-6372 themercantiledeli.com Located next to the historic Wilma Theater, the Merc features a relaxed atmosphere, handcrafted Paninis, Sandwiches, and wholesome Soups and Salads. Try a Monte Cristo for breakfast, a Pork Love Panini for lunch, or have us cater your next company event. Open Monday – Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Downtown delivery available. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our allnew bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, and fresh fish daily. Delicious salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) • pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! Sapore 424 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-6695 Voted best new restaurant in the Missoula Independent's Best of Missoula, 2011. Located on Higgins Ave., across the street from Wordens.

Missoula Independent Page 20 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Serving progressive American food consisting of fresh housemade pastas every day, pizza, local beef, and fresh fish delivered from Taste of Alaska. New specials: burger & beer Sundays, 5-7 $9 ~ pizza & beer Tuesdays, 5-7 $10 ~ draft beers, Tuesday -Thursday, 5-6:30 $3. Business hours: Tues.- Sat. 5-10:30 pm., Sat. 10-3 pm., Sun. 5-10 pm. Authentic Thai Restaurant 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 sawaddeedowntown.com Sa Wa Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors- no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisine. Now serving beer and wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s Empire Grill 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sparkle Laundry 812 S. Higgins Ave. 721-5146 The big pizza joints have been hating on our $6, made-to-order, 12” pepperoni pizzas for a reason. They’re affordable and they’re good. Well, the cat’s out of the bag, boyee! We also have dogs, pretzels, muffins, bagels, ice cream and more. We do your laundry too. Since 1960. NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ YoWaffle Yogurt 216 W. Main St. • 543-6072 (Between Thai Spicy and The Shack) www.yowaffle.com YoWaffle is a self-serve frozen yogurt and Belgian waffle eatery offering 10 continuously changing flavors of yogurt, over 60 toppings, gluten free cones and waffles available, hot and cold beverages, and 2 soups daily. Indoor and outdoor seating. Meetings welcome. Open 7 days a week. Sun-Thurs 11 AM to 11 PM, Fri 11 AM to 12 AM, Sat. 10 AM to 12 AM. Free WiFi. Loyalty punch cards, gift cards and t-shirts available. UMONEY. Like us on facebook. Let YoWaffle host your next birthday party! $


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings April 12 – April 19, 2012

Mussy man. Kissable country crooner Dierks Bentley plays the Adams Center on Thu., Apr. 19, at 8 PM, with Eli Young and Will Hoge. $29–$39. griztix.com.

THURSDAY April

12

Leaders Council-Montana is bound to be full of promises and truth and platitudes. The debaters include Kim Gillan, Sam Rankin, Diane Smith, Dave Strohmaier, Rob Stutz, Jason Ward and Franke Wilmer. University Center Theater. 5:30 PM.

Certified hypnotherapist Michele Voigt hosts a discussion for those having difficulty conceiving a child called Addressing Infertility through Hypnosis. 725 W. Alder, Ste. 2. lotusproject.org.

Learn how to keep them teens injury free at the Sports Injury Prevention Presentation at Sapphire Physical Therapy. 6–7 PM. Free. RSVP by calling 549-5283.

William Suter, clerk of the US Supreme Court, gives a timely talk during the School of Law Browning Lecture. UM Law Building. Noon. Free.

I’ll be your Emmylou in a non-erotic fashion when the The Best Westerns play some country-flavored tunes down at the Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 6–8 PM. Free.

nightlife

Join the Montana Native Plant Society for a glimpse at some slides of Western Montana’s Forest Wildflowers. Gallagher Business Bldg., Rm. L09. 7:30 PM. Free.

This Congressional Debate brought to you by NARAL, Pro-Choice Montana and the New

Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. (See Scope in this issue.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11 performances. montanarep.org. (See Spotlight in this issue.) end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 13, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemander c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Missoula Independent Page 21 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and pop is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM–midnight. The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out each Thursday in the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Reggae-meisters Chele Bandulu get irie as the mansions of rastafari when they perform at Pulse inside the Press Box. And there’s a Flathead Lake Brewing Co. beer tasting, too? Now that is pleasing. 835 W. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. The beats are technotronic and the tunes are electronical at Synergy Sessions, with PDX’s Enzymes and locals Dubuddah, Tigerlily a n d L o g i s t i c a l o n e . Pa l a c e . 9 PM. Free. Be all oozy-oozy fresh ‘n’ bluesy with Three-Eared Dog at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. (See Soundcheck.) Electronical, freak-a-delic soundwave tweakers Modality drop walls of sound on dat backside during week one of their VFW Residency, with Skinny Legs and Boys. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. Grab a self-contained partying apparatus and head to basscamp with Crizzly and get all kinds of dusted up. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $12/$10 adv., plus $5 surcharge for those 18-20.

FRIDAY April

13

Hear the ladies, listen to the ladies at the YWCA’s Womens Voices Brown Bag Series. This week, outreach educator Angel Nordquist of Planned Parenthood Montana discusses family planning services. 1130 W. Broadway. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife Possible socialists The Workers perform music while you bougie folks listen and sip on vino at the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery. 4175 Rattlesnake. 5–9 PM. Free. Le Tour De Dirtbag Bicycle Race to Benefit UM grad Kyle Lehman takes place at Free Cycles. The race is an urban cyclo-cross style race with obstacles and awesomeness. Music by the Best Westerns and, of course, beer and prizes. 735 S. 1st W. 5:30 PM. $5 to race. (See Mountain High.) Test drive your million dollar T-shirt idea at the ZACC’s Free Silkscreen Night. Staffers conduct demos and guide you step-by-step in the art of being awesome. 235

Missoula Independent Page 22 April 12 – April 19, 2012


N. 1st St. 5:30–8:30 PM. All ages. Free. zootownarts.org. Brandon Reintjes’s print exhibition opening at the ZACC ain’t afraid of no Friday the 13th. The event doubles as a going away party for ZACC founder Hanna Hannan. 235 N. 1st. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free. This week’s kid wranglers at The Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday is acoustic duo Britchie. Godspeed. 6–8 PM. Poet Elizabeth Robinson is many things: a lady, an editor, a prize winner and the Hugo Visiting Writer for the UM Creative Writing Program. She reads tonight in the Dell Brown Room at Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. Assist those looking to defray the costs of adoption and attend Chords of Hope Fundraiser at the Missoula Alliance Church, where there is music and food and helpful eggs. 100 E. Foss. 7–8:30 PM. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. (See Scope.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. montanarep.org. (See Spotlight.) The Contact Improv Jam is back at the Downtown Dance Collective and it allows participants explore bodybased awareness via contact with the floor or with a partner. 121 W. Main. 7:30–9:30 PM. $15/$12 members. ddcmontana.com. The Soul City Cowboys do their thing down at the Eagles Aeirie. 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Ray Allen dishes some jazz standards and pop tunes for your chillaxing pleasure at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 8–10 PM. Pass the hat. Blue and the Vagus Nerve would you like you to do that dance quick, mama. Dark Horse Bar, 1805 Regent. 9 PM. Free. Shake a bone and dat ass at KBGA’s annual Fools Night Out Party, where things get electronical at the Badlander with DJs Jason Root, Keishie and Logisticalone, while the Palace does a bit of garage and indie pop and rock with Rooster Sauce, Sick Kids XOXO and Boys, not to mention shenanigans in the Central and raffles galore. Oh my, oh my. 9 PM. $2/$5 surcharge for those 18-20. “If it weren’t for bad luck, / I’d have no luck at all” seems like a lyric Cash for Junkers might sing when they play the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Dust off that mutton bustin’ buckle you won back in the day and check out County Line at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. This is not a threat: I’ll House You

with DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz does happen at The Jolly Cork’s. 112 N. Pattee St. (Front St. entrance). 10 PM. Free.

SATURDAY April

14

Get them crazy kids out of class and on a field trip (guaranteed Bridget will barf on the bus, though) by sponsoring Sussex School’s Ecothon, a fundraiser and community service extravaganza. To donate, call Robin at 549-8327. Learn how you (yes, you!) can help the youth of Florence succeed at Building Assets in Youth Presentation with Gloria Howell, teacher at Paxson School. 9–11 AM. Florence-Carlton School, New Gym. 9–11 AM. Be happier, healthier and hypnotzier at An Introduction to SelfHypnosis: The Mind-Body Connection at the Women’s Club. Led by Roberta Swartz. 2105 Bow. 9 AM–1:30 PM. $49. Call 375-0446 to register. Art, technology and Missoula collide at the 5th Annual Missoula BarCamp, an “unconference” where artists and technologists discuss ways to make Missoula radder. Payne Family Native American Center at UM. 8:30 AM–5 PM. $35. missoulabarcamp.org.

Ballroom at 12:30 PM. The rest of the shebang is in the UC from 10 AM–4:30 PM. Free. Totally rad: The Montana Super Skippers host the Region 12 USA Jump Rope Championships at Frenchtown High School. 10:30 AM. Free. montanasuperskippers.com. The Met Live in HD presents Verdi’s romantic tragedy La Traviata. Let’s hope the rich guy gets the lady below his station. Shoot, it’s tragedy so ... probably no. Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins. 11 AM. $16/$14 seniors/$11 students. Turn that photo of dad’s butt crack into art at the MAM’s Saturday Family Art Workshop: Hand Colored Photographs, with Melissa Madsen. Photos are scanned and transformed into art by parents and children. 335 N. Pattee. $5. Preregister at missoulaartmuseum.org. Let photog Lee Silliman give you the low-down on one of the bestest during his Ansel Adams Tour at the MAM. 335 N. Pattee. Noon. Free. Fact: Root beer is the best thing to drink with pizza. Learn how to make that fizzy goodness at the North Valley Family Center’s Family Fun Day: Make Your Own Root Beer. 5501 Hwy. 93 N. Ste. 3. Noon–3 PM. Free. Keep it real and live your locavore gimmick by joining MUD for a Plant Your Garden workshop with Garden City Garden Supply. Get dirty. 629 Phillips. 1–4 PM.

this week spectrUM

at

Public Hours: Thurs 4/12

Sat 4/14

Bubbles

Can you make a square bubble? bble? Find out at The Discovery Bench! 3:30pm – 7pm

Robot Mania Build robots then compete to see whose is the fastest and strongest! 11am – 4:30pm

spectrUM’s 2012 Summer Camp Line-Up is complete! ;isit our website to view our e]citing scienceÀlled summer!

more information? spectrum.umt.edu 243-4828

spectrUM

Get ‘em started you, the trees and the childrens, at Missoula Children and Nature’s Tree Planting, which takes place after Run for the Trees Kids’ Fun Run. There is also a lesson on tree ecology, a scavenger hunt and more. McCormick Park. 9:15 AM. Free. No room for a garden? No tools? No pollinators? No problem. Check out the Victor Community Garden / Edible Schoolyard Tour and Workday, where you can sign-up for a plot or see what is up in your ‘hood. 5th Ave., west of Chief Vicor Camp Rd. $20 per 20’ by 20’ plot. The Heirloom Winter Market still has plenty of local num-nums for you and yours, including farm-fresh eggs, butter, sausage, lavender, honey and more, more, more! Ceretana Gallery and Studios, 801 Sherwood. 10 AM–1 PM. Help shape the future of the Milltown State Park by attending the workshop to discuss idears for the interpretive area and whatnot. Hellgate Lions Barn, 1305 Haaglund Dr., West Riverside. 10 AM–3 PM. See and hear the smart kids at the 11th Annual Graduate and Faculty Research Conference, where 100 projects are available for viewing. The roundtable presentation Globalization and Cultural Heritage: The Changing Face of Anthropology in the 21st Century takes place in the UC

Missoula Independent Page 23 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Get your hands on Camo the Gopher Snake at the Montana Natural History Center’s Saturday Kids’ Activity: Super Cool Snakes. 120 Hickory. $3/$1 for members. montananaturalist.org.

Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting Godot is back, with a vengeance, at Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 1:30 PM 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs Shakespeare & Co. (See Scope.)

nightlife

Embrace Argentinian Tango at the Brick Room and help out a worthy cause. This month it’s Living Art of Montana. Lessons at 8 PM, melonga at 9 PM. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main. $16 couple/$10 ind. ddcmontana.com.

Don’t debunk dat dude Dan Dubuque when he performs tunes at Draught Works Brewery. 915 Toole. 5:30–8 PM. Free.

by Vote 9 May

Vote Online at Missoulanews.com

Complete your Best of Missoula ballot online to vote for all categories, including these WEB EXCLUSIVES:

VOTE NOW! Best Local Arts & Entertainment Album New Band Actor/Actress Artist Dancer

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Eyewear Hairstylist Tanning Salon

Best Local Food & Drink Coffee Hut Convenience Store Dish Liquor Store Pizza Delivery Place to Eat Alone Barista Caterer Chef Waiter/Waitress

Best Local Goods & Services Antiques Camera/Photo Store Car Wash Computer Repair Shop Florist Home Accessories Laundromat Lawyer Pawn Shop Property Management Company Real Estate Agent Pet Care/Boarding Veterinary Clinic/Hospital

Best Local Sports & Recreation

Optometrist Health Clinic Massage Therapist Physical Therapist Personal Trainer Yoga Instructor

Best Local Nightlife Bar DJ Bar to Hook Up Bartender Brew Poker Game

Best Local People & Media Athlete Journalist Meteorologist Politician Radio Personality Radio Station TV Newscast TV Personality UM Professor Blog Website

Best Uniquely Missoula Church Choir Festival Leader of the Revolution Nonprofit Organization Park Place for Kids' Fun Place for People Watching Place to Take Out-of-Towners Place to Walk Dogs View Way to Spend Your 21st B-Day Category We Forgot

Best Fishing Guide

Best Local Health & Wellness Doctor/Health Care Provider Alternative Health Care Provider Gynecologist Chiropractor Dentist Or you can still vote the old-fashioned way by completing the paper ballot on page 28

Missoula Independent Page 24 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Learn how the do-si-do kept us free at Promenading Toward Democracy: The Story of the Western Square Dance with Mark Mathews. Potluck at 5:30 PM, presentation at 6 PM. Rocky Mountain Grange, 1436 S. 1st in Hamilton. Free. Hey, sports fan, it’s time for the Grizzlies Football Spring Scrimmage at Wa-Griz Stadium. Check out the new lights and judge for yourself. 6 PM. $5. Wenches and willy stompers heed this notice: The Missoula Community Chorus presents A Magical Renaissance Evening, a gala fundraiser with auctions, troubadours, recorder consorts and renaissance brass. The Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 6–9 PM. $50. missoulachorus.org. Proud to Be Young and Free is a Diversity Day 2012 youth extravaganza sponsored by NCBI at Zoo City Apparel with T-shirt screening, a poetry slam, a hip-hop dance troupe, rock and roll and all stripes of tuneage. 139 E. Main. 6–11 PM. Free. ncbimissoula.org. The Swing Into Spring: Community Swing Dance Party is the next best thing after the Woodchopper’s Ball and includes free lessons from 6:30–7:15 PM. Martha Jane’s Uptown Dance, 1008 Burlington Ste. D. 6:30–9:30 PM. $7. C’mon down and be yourself at the Contra Dance held at the Rocky Mountain Grange, with Celtic Knots and lessons for you newbies. This is a fragrance-free event, so leave the Drakkar Noir and Charlie at home. Lessons at 6:30 PM, dance starts at 7. $10 per family/$5 ind. Call 642–3601. Be-bop guitarist and swinger (c’mon now) Sheryl Bailey brings her talents to DalyJazz for one evening of tunes with bassist Kelly Roberti. 7 PM. $35. RSVP at dalyjazz.com. He of the “PAL I 8” license plate, Dr. Ira Byock, is in town to give a presentation and discussion called The Best Care Possible: Celebrating Medicine, Facing Death, Finding Life, which is based on his book of the same title. Christ the King Church, 1400 Gerald. 7 PM. Free. The Heart to Heart Duo plays the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, so slide into them glad rags and show the youngsters how it’s done. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $5. Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. montanarep.org. (See Spotlight .) If you like the cars that go boom, check the sounds of the UM Percussion Ensembles and the Islanders Steel Band at the Spring Percussion Concert. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. The University Players love a challenge, so they have produced six plays in under 24 hours and present them to you for your pleasure. Urey Lecture Hall at the 24-Hour Play Festival. 7:30 PM. Free.

for the and and

Insurgent Theatre critiques the US prison system and collects money for the RedBird Prison Abolition group during their performance of In the Belly. The show contains nudity and violence. Freecycles, 732 S. 1st W. 8 PM. Donations accepted. Hardcore R&B fans and lovers of simpler times, stand up and rejoice as Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes play west of the Mississippi for the first time ever. I mean like ever. Here. In Missoula. At the Wilma. They are personal friends of The Boss. With Kira Means. 8 PM. $33. Tix available at Rockin Rudy’s and Ear Candy. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo smell the magic at Absolutely, a dance party featuring every style of rump-shaking tuneage. The Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2 for 1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. Free. No bad wolfs here, just the folk-rockin’ and reggae stylings of Polson’s Off in the Woods, who perform with Leif Christian and Will Peterson. Palace. 9 PM. $5. Get a dose of simpler times, back when we were young and VD was something that ended WWII, when Zeppo, MT plays the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Blues, rock and country stompers: that’s what Mudfoot and the Dirty Soles is all about. Monk’s Bar. 225 Ryman. 9 PM. $3. Dust off that mutton bustin’ buckle you won back in the day and check out County Line at the Sunrise Saloon. 1101 Strand. 9:30 PM. Free. Three-Eared Dog releases a three-sided album at their CD release party with The Chalfonts. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5. (See Soundcheck.)

SUNDAY April

15

Join photogs Kathy Eyster and/or Lee Silliman for the Ansel Adams Drop-In Tour at the MAM and get insider info on the bestknown photog of all-time. 335 N. Pattee St. Go with the jam when The Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 S. First St. south of Hamilton, hosts a weekly acoustic jam session for guitarists, mandolin players and others from 2–4 PM. Free. Call Clem at 961-4949. Occupy Missoula General Assembly takes place at the Union Hall. 208 E. Main St. 2–4 PM. occupymissoula.org. Dust off them discs and flex them wrists. It’s time to get high on life and help out the kids during Msla Folf Fling! at McCormick Park. The $5 entry fee per team aids the Paxson School garden. Coordinated by UM Recreation Management students. 3–6 PM. Darrah Fogerty and Ryan James keep it level at Draught Works Brewery while you


Missoula Independent Page 25 April 12 – April 19, 2012


while away your afternoon on their big ass deck. 915 Toole. 4–6 PM. Free.

drinking symposium in the Sentinel High School Auditorium. 901 South Ave. W. 6:30 PM.

nightlife

I love college lectures but, dudes, let’s go ahead and workshop some of these lecture titles. Por ejemplo, India Sandwiched Between the 17th and 21st Centuries: The Paradox of Co-Existent Mortar-Cement Technology and the Information Age by UM math prof. Bharath Sriraman. UM Stone Lecture Hall, Rm. 303. Noon–1 PM. Free.

Listen to some real live writers during the Second Wind Reading Series, where MFA students and teachers share their stories with the world. For this final reading until next fall, it’s Colin Post and David Gates. The Top Hat. 5 PM. Free. Playwright Wendy Woollett’s play The Montana Monologs is based on oral histories of Montana’s ranch women culled from years of research. Music by Paul Kelley. Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams. 5:30 PM. The 2nd Annual Polytana Sushi Social sounds pretty darn pretty, with male and female models covered in dee-lish sushi num-nums. Sushi Hana, 403 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $30. Tickets available at polytana.org. Klezmer ain’t only for suppertime, so check out Chutzpah and get your fix. The Top Hat. 7–10 PM. Free. The String Orchestra of the Rockies presents Swan Song, the final show of the season, which features up-and-coming violinist Tim Fain. UM Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $20/$10 student. sormt.org.

MONDAY April nightlife

16

The Herbal Medicine for Massage course taught by clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn focuses on the way herbs can aid in tissue work. Red Willow Learning Center, 825 W. Kent. 6–8:30 PM. $50. 721-0033. Enjoy a sip of fermented juice and some whatnots while Cash for Junkers plays the Red Bird Wine Bar. 111 N. Higgins. 7–10 PM. The UM Chamber Chorale uses diaphragms. To sing with el grosso! Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. Don’t just express yourself, be expressive at the ZACC’s weekly, one-hour poetry workshop. 235 N. 1st St. 8 PM. Free. Get sauced and saucy from the kittycat saucer of super-sassy milkmaids at Milkcrate Mondays’ Random Music for Random Kitties, with DJs Mikee Sev, Dre, Osiris and the Milkcrate Mechanic himself. Palace. 9 PM. Free, with free pool and $6 pitchers of PBR. Open Mic at the VFW seems like a fine idea, especially with 2 for 1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. Put the nomenclatures to rest, Mr. Tokyo Dreams, K. Flay is a hip-hop artist full of juice and all them good rhymes. She performs with locals Sick Kids XOXO. 10 PM. $10/$8 adv. and available at Ear Candy. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

TUESDAY April

17

Join the conversation about underage drinking in Missoula at the What Can We Do? underage

Missoula Independent Page 26 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Those who are looking will know that the HOME-Co Meeting takes place in the small meeting rm. at the Missoula Public Library from noon–1:30 pm.

nightlife The VFW hosts my kind of three-way during a night of Singers, Songwriters and Spaghetti, with food provided by the Blue Bison Grill. 245 W. Main St. 6 PM. Free. The best way to avoid the inevitable run-in with a Yucatan Knute is to join the Rattlesnake Watershed Group’s Wild in Our Backyard walking tour of Greenough Park. Meet at the park pavilion. 6–8 PM. Free. Shake off the rust, lube up and test your buns of steel during the Dirt Girls First Bike Ride. Meet at the UM footbridge and ride the Kim Williams Trail. 6 PM. Free. Become the chicken you always knew you were at the Hypnosis Workshop, sponsored by the UM Psychology Club. University Center, rm. 327. 6–9 PM. Free. Nationally recognized figurative ceramics artist Tip Toland talks technique and the totality of art. UM Social Sciences Bldg., Rm. 356. 6:10 PM. Free. I know Wrangler butts drive you nuts, so ride on down to the Rocky Mountain School of Photography’s lecture Photographing Cowboys and Rodeos, with Keith Graham. 216 N. Higgins. 7 PM. Free. Hear tales of copy-room humping and more at A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Newsroom, a “Moth Radio Hour-esque” storytelling night with journalists that benefits the Society of Professional Journalists Montana Pro Chapter. Badlander, 208 Ryman. 7 PM. Free. Take a load off while you get a load of some of the area’s better musicians during the Musician Showcase at Brooks and Browns in the Holiday Inn Downtown. $7 Big Sky pitchers and $2 pints. 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. montanarep.org. (See Spotlight.) The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams with wide-ranging styles and a grip of moves during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. In a traditional hangman’s noose, how many twists are in the rope and how many steps to the gallows? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Bow down to the sounds at Royal Reggae, featuring dancehall jams by DJs Supa, Smiley Banton and Oneness at the Palace at 9 PM. Free.


What beer do we drink when we’re done making beer? The one you’re about to enjoy in Shift. Canning this Nelson Sauvin hopped pale lager means everyone gets to reward their work. Or play. Or, if you’re like us, combine the two and surround yourself with drinking buddies. Clock out and crack one open.

Missoula Independent Page 27 April 12 – April 19, 2012


by Vote 9 May

2012 OFFICIAL BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT

It gets so tiresome having people tell you what’s best all the time, doesn’t it? Damn elitists.That’s why it’s your time. We’re begging you to tell us which burger is the hands-down juiciest in Missoula, where the best place is to buy shoes and which bar has the best pour.

New Car Dealer

We know you; we take your calls and pore over your letters and comments, and realize some of you are nothing if not opinionated. That Best of Missoula ballot below? It’s one big soapbox and it’s all yours.

Adult Store

(We’re just old-school enough that we still like paper and glitter pen, but if you want to get all high-tech about it, go to www.missoulanews.com to vote, where you’ll also find a slew of åonline-only categories.)

Ranch Supply Store

Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women’s Clothing Men’s Clothing Lingerie Place for a Men’s Haircut Place for a Women’s Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Best Local Food & Drink Asian Food Bakery Breakfast Budget Lunch Coffee Delicatessen Burger French Fries Desserts

Used Car Dealer New Retail Store Pet Supplies Plant Nursery Store for Gifts Home Appliances

Ice Cream Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop

Home Electronics

Seafood Steak Supermarket Fresh Produce Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food

Karaoke Bar

Best Local Goods & Services

Bike Shop

Auto Repair Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer

Bowling Alley

The rules are also pretty straightforward: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 40 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 9. Rest assured, your deep thought, diligent answering and exceptional penmanship will pay off in the form of an invite to the Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 12. Now, get to it. Missoula is counting on you.

Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Martini Casino Happy Hour Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Sports & Recreation Fly-fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Store for Paddle Sports Gear Place to Get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Name: __________________________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________

Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Burger Shack, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Draught Works Brewery, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Lucky Strike Sports Bar & Casino, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Sushi Hana,Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), UC Center Market,Westside Lanes,Worden's Market,Yo Waffle Missoula Independent Page 28 April 12 – April 19, 2012


SPOTLIGHT cut it

Photo courtesy wilsonleephotography.com

I have got some great news for all you all. I’m here to simplify your life. We’re doing away with some categorical nomenclatures we’ve become accustomed to in all art forms. Namely, you will no longer utter this sentence: “So and so is a great female artist.” That’s goes for any kind of artist. Guitarist, actor, rapper. Who gives a half-baked turkey if the artist is female or male? K. Flay consistently suffers from this treatment. Do you really care if your rapper is female? Went to Stanford? Is white? Not from the hood? No doubt the only people who do care are penguin-looking jerk-rods who curate old-white-guy land for magazines like Time. WHO: K. Flay with Sick Kids XOXO See, it turns out that we’ve been listening to hip-hop WHERE: The Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. for 35 years now. Youngsters like K. Flay grew up spitting rhymes the same way old white-guy writers WHEN: Mon., Apr. 16, at 10 PM grew up humming the theme to “Happy Days,” so rhyming and wordplay are rote to her; it’s what peoHOW MUCH: $10/$8 adv. at Ear Candy ple do. K. Flay’s rapid patter and clever winks at the angst of suburban life are as hook-filled as anything on the radio but less focused on brain-squashing choruses. The beats and samples sound fresh and modern but linger like limburger. Lines like “I have less sex than a mathlete” mark Flay as a rhymer who knows when she’s being funny and as one who knows her audience: music lovers, smart alecks and rump shakers. K. Flay’s not cocky, she’s just good and she knows it. –Jason McMackin

Fight for your right to make a jerk of yourself and win money doing it at Karaoke with DJ LRock at the Press Box. First place wins a $25 bar tab. On the last Tues. of the month, the winners battle for supremacy. 835 E. Broadway. 9 PM. Free. Heads are gonna roll when jam band rockers 3J Rap Sword plays the Badlander’s Live and Local Night, with TBA openers. Free. 10 PM. Shine on with Paper Diamond at The Top Hat, and learn the value of keeping cool under pressure. 10 PM. $16/$14 adv.

WEDNESDAY April

18

The Montana Natural History Center and Emily Harrington draw better specimens and show you how at Saturday Discovery Day: Science

Illustration. 120 Hickory. 9 AM–2 PM. $35/$30 members. montananaturalist.org. Art heals at Living Art of Montana’s third Wednesday of every month’s workshop Creative Connections for Cancer Survivors. 12–1:30 PM at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder, #17. Free. Call 549-5329. Sam McCracken tells The Nike N7 Story, and talks about his rise from working in the warehouse to becoming general manager of N7, a Nike brand that seeks to promote healthy living and physical activity in Native American communities. UM Skaggs Bldg., Rm. 169. 12:10 PM. Free.

nightlife Let them dance, or at least give it a try, during Kids’ Hip Hop (7–10 years old) at the Downtown Dance Collective. No dance experience is necessary and drop-ins are welcome. Just wear good clothes for dancing. 121 W. Main St. 5–6 PM. ddcmontana.com

Artists of all levels are invited to the MAM’s non-instructed Open Figure Drawing Class. This class gives artists the opportunity to draw from a for-real person. Ages 18 plus (you and the model). 335 N. Pattee St. 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. I wish I could stuff this job and only do the stuff the Flathead Audubon Society does, like their Bird Identification: By Song, Sight and Silhouette courses. This week’s class is A Closer Look at Bird Songs and Calls with Bruce Tannehill. 6–8 PM. Contact Debbie at Flathead High School at 751-3461 to register. Find out how to keep well-behaved chickens at the Backyard Chicken Workshop, facilitated by MSU Extension nutrition educator Virgina Chaffin. North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St. Stevi. 6:30–8:30 PM. Free. Honestly, author readings can be something else, but here we have a

Missoula Independent Page 29 April 12 – April 19, 2012


SALE ENDS 4/15/12

Missoula Independent Page 30 April 12 – April 19, 2012


timely one with a panel and everything. Author of The Man Who Quit Money Mark Sundeen and the Man himself Daniel Suelo speak about the book and the experience. 7 PM. Free. Missoula Public Library. (See Agenda.) Get your jökulhlaup on and attend the Montana Natural History Center’s Glacial Lake Missoula Spring Fling, an icy blast from the past. 120 Hickory. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation. Learn to read something other than words at Andrew McElroy’s archaeology talk The Sarpy Bison Kill: How Projectile Points Tell the Story. University Center, Rm. 333. 7 PM. Free. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. (See Scope.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Missoula’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. (See Spotlight.) The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams with wide-ranging styles and a grip of moves during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. If you are ready to laugh for a good cause, check out Pow-Wow Comedy Jammers Vaughn Eaglebear and Marc Yaffee perform at the Wilma Theatre as a benefit fundraiser for the Kerr Dam Memorial Fund. $25/$20 adv. and available at Ear Candy, Payne Native American Studies Center and People’s Center in Pablo. Real simple: University Choir Concert. Singing. With tons of people. At the same time. University Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 sen-

iors/$5 students. (Pub trivia answer: There are 13 twists in a traditional hangman’s noose and 13 steps to the gallows.) Burlesco commands you to baile to their eclectic mix of music we can all agree on, including tango, blues and gypsy jazz. A pip of belly dancing and the like to boot. The Top Hat. 10 PM. $5.

THURSDAY

19

April

In a city saturated with nonprofits, you best check out the Missoula Nonprofit Network’s class Making the Pie Bigger: What Nonprofits Need to Know about Planned Giving & Bequests presented by Meredith Printz. Mountain Home Montana, 2606 South Ave. W. Park in back. 11:30 AM–1 PM. $10/Free for MNN members.

nightlife Put the tall cans down and join UM Botanist Marilyn Marler for her Transplanting Perennials handson class at Ft. Missoula’s Native Plant Gardens. 5:30–7:30 PM. $. Three-Eared Dog warms it up and shuts it down for Dierks Bentley, sorta-kinda, by performing for your pleasure before and after Dierks’ show. Pulse inside the Press Box. 835 E. Broadway. 6 PM. Free. (See Soundcheck.)

Nybo’s Dean Stone Lecture, Danger Lessons: How Embracing Risk Can Lead to Job Security and Personal Fulfillment. Nybo is an int’l photog who has worked for everything that rips. Gallagher Business Bldg,, Rm. 106. 7 PM. Free. Samuel Becket’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is back, with a vengeance, at the Crystal Theatre. 515 S. Higgins. 7:30 PM. $12/$10 adv. at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co. (See Scope.) Have a rapturous time at the Montana Rep Montana’s production of the end times comedy End Days. UM Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16. (See Spotlight.) The UM School of Theatre & Dance presents 16 all-original dance jams with wide-ranging styles and a grip of moves during Dance New Works. The Open Space, UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $9/$6 students. Dierks Bentley is a good lookin’ son of a buck and one fine country singer, but he has a weak spot: little white tank tops. Check him out with openers The Eli Young Band at the Adams Center. 8 PM. $29.50-39.50. griztix.com. Get sweaty with all the beautiful people at the Dead Hipster Dance Party, where love and funk is in the air. Badlander. 208 Ryman St. $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM– midnight.

Get to the truthiness of the matter at Jack Metcalf’s and Brett Hargesheimer’s Artini exhibition Semantic Ascent, a crowd-participatory and multi-disciplinary event. Food, beers and music, too. 335 N. Pattee. 6–9 PM. Free.

Music that stays with you.

Aspiring badasses need leave your parents at home for Thomas

WESt SiDE StORy

Book by Arthur Laurents Music by Leonard Bernstein Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Based on conception of Jerome Robbins Based on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet Produced by special arrangement with 

The program, featuring Robert deMaine, cello soloist Un Sourire – Messiaen Cello Concerto No.1 – Saint-Saens Symphony No. 5 – Prokofiev

Music Theatre International

A timeless retelling of the world’s greatest love story

April 27 – May 13

SAT., APRIL 21, 7:30 P.M. SUN., APRIL 22, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $10 to $40 Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

MCT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS TICKETS ON SALE APRIL 9 AT 9:00 AM

• 728-7529 • www.mctinc.org

Sponsored by: Western States Insurance • NorthWestern Energy • First Security Bank MCT accommodates accessibility upon request. Some accommodations require advance notice.

Darko’s Pre-Concert Talk: One hour before showtime in the Gallagher Building next door.

Missoula Independent Page 31 April 12 – April 19, 2012


SPOTLIGHT armageddon it

Photo by Michelle Gustfason

For those of us of a certain age, our first run-in with the “end times” and “judgment day” came via the songs of the all-time great heavy metal bands: Black Sabbath’s “Heaven and Hell,” Megadeth’s “Countdown to Extinction,” Metallica’s “Four Horseman” and Iron Maiden’s lackadaisically titled “Judgement Day.” Teenagers embrace the macabre themes of these songs due either to an over abundance of depressive hormones or the belief that one is invincible and that these events will only effect much-deserving adults. Of course adults love the possibility of the rapture, too. It provides them with a way to cope with the perceived immorality of the world or to escape reality. The latter seems to be true of the protagonist of Deborah Laufer’s play End Days, a tragicomedy filled with imaginary friends such as Jesus Christ and Stephen Hawking, Elvis imperWHAT: End Days sonating boyfriends and an unhealthy obsession with WHO: Montana Rep Missoula Armageddon. The play was first WHERE: Masquer Theatre in UM’s read at the Missoula Colony 12, PARTV Center a gathering of emerging and professional writers held each sumWHEN: Thu., Apr. 12–Sat., Apr. 14, and Tue., mer since 1996, and has gone Apr. 17–Sat., 21, at 7:30 PM on to be performed throughout the country, including in Denver HOW MUCH: $16 Fri.–Sat./$11 Tue.-Thu. and New York City. Now, End Days has returned to Missoula and is being performed by Montana Rep Missoula. Whether you are the type to mock the evangelical obsession with the rapture or something inside you says that it’s nothing to joke about, the play speaks to both camps—but only in a play can both be right. –Jason McMackin

The battle continues, as some of MSO’s finest musical talents battle it out each Thursday in the Top o’ the Mic Trilogy competition to crown the champion of music at Sean Kelly’s. 130 W. Pine. 9 PM. Free. Grab the hot sauce from your fanny pack and splash some on your palm when underground hip-hoppers The Chicharones, featuring MCs Sleep and Josh Martinez, hit and quit it with LMNO, Bullhead and Enzymes. Palace. 9 PM. $8/$5 surcharge for those 18-20. Meet your old psych. prof. for a drink and possibly some role-playing while Blue and the Vagus Nerve play the soundtrack to your life. Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Three-Eared Dog continues their tour of Missoula with a show at Pulse inside the Press Box. 9 PM. Free. (See Soundcheck.) It’s beat street all over again when Modality brings a herd of donkeys to their knees during week two of their VFW Residency, with A

Missoula Independent Page 32 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Common Pigeon, Darshan Pulse and The Magpies. 245 W. Main. 9 PM. Free. Bring that old painting of the deer in the wintery forest down to the Union Club for IconoClashes and let some local art guildsters give it an upgrade. 9–10:30 PM. Free. Tea Leaf Green is the sweet goo in a p.b and jam band sandwich, with Silent Comedy. The Top Hat. 9 PM. $16/$14 adv. Remember, it’s bad luck to send me incomplete event info. anytime, but this week things could downright dangerous. Watch it when you walk down those stairs. Send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Apr. 13 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online at missoulanews.com.


MOUNTAIN HIGH C yclists are a strange and beautiful cult. I am not speaking of any old human with a bike. I’m talking about true cyclists. The type of people who will argue the merits of Time pedals versus Shimano SPD pedals. Cyclists fondly reminisce about the “good” Panaracer tires they made back in the early ’90s, or how Velociraptors flung mud like nobody’s business, even if you didn’t spray Pam on them. Don’t even get these people reminiscing about bar ends, titanium seat rails or the mustachioed genius of Ned Overend. For some, it’s difficult to tell where the person ends and the bike begins, the two are so entwined in daily commutes, afternoon trail rides or early morning road rides. UM graduate Kyle Lehman is a cyclist, no doubt. So much so that he and three of his friends embarked on a 5,000-mile bike trip across the US. If you need more proof that Lehman is a true cyclist, one need only read the group’s trip blog and his description of his “best bike experience,” which goes something like this,

“Crashing so hard while dirt jumping that I shit my pants.” That’s amazing and many of us can relate. Unfortunately, Lehman was struck by a minivan around mile 4,700, outside of Daytona Beach, Florida. He sustained traumatic brain injuries and the medical bills are piling up while he receives treatment. Le Tour De DirtBag is being held in his honor and the organizers hope to raise money for the medical bills. This is an urban cyclo-cross race with obstacles and the like. All styles of bikes and all levels and ages of riders are welcome. There will be beer and tunes by the Best Westerns for those not racing. Come by and and find out why Lehman loved to pedal. Le Tour De Dirtbag urban cyclo-cross race begins at Free Cycles, 732 S. 1st W., with registration at 5:30 PM and racing at 6 PM. Music by the Best Westerns and Zootown DJ. Beer and snacks available as well as raffle prizes. Search “Kyle Lehman Recovery Fund” on Facebook for more info.

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THURSDAY APRIL 12

MONDAY APRIL 16

Dudes, come get your climb on during Freestone Climbing’s Dude’s Night. 935 Toole Ave. 5–10 PM. $6.50/$5 students.

At Slacker Mondays, from 6 PM until close, slackline fans can come to Freestone Climbing Center at 935 Toole Ave. to test their balance. $13/$10 for students. Visit freestoneclimbing.com.

FRIDAY APRIL 13 Le Tour De Dirtbag Bicycle Race to Benefit UM grad Kyle Lehman takes place at Free Cycles. The race is an urban cyclo-cross style race with obstacles and awesomeness. Music by the Best Westerns and, of course, beer and prizes. 735 S. 1st W. 5:30 PM. $5 to race. (See Mtn. High.) Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s (formerly the Flathead Valley Over the Hill Gang) weekly meeting to talk about being awesome, past glories and upcoming activities. Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 7–8:30 PM. $40.

SATURDAY APRIL 14 Put your two or four cents in at the Annual Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex Public Meeting, where officials from the MT FWP and National Forest Wilderness Managers will discuss the third largest wilderness complex in the lower 48. Seeley Lake Community Meeting Hall. 10 AM–3 PM.

SUNDAY APRIL 15 Get back in shape and learn something new at Freestone Climbing Gym’s Intro. to Bouldering course, which introduces basic techniques, safety stuff, ethics and more. Class includes 1.5 hours of instruction and two weeks of unlimited climbing. 935 Toole. 12–1:30 PM. $40. Dust off them discs and flex them wrists. It’s time to get high on life and help out the kids during Msla Folf Fling! at McCormick Park. The $5 entry fee per team aids the Paxson School garden. Coordinated by UM Recreation Management students. 3–6 PM.

TUESDAY APRIL 17 The best way to avoid the inevitable run-in with a Yucatan Knute is to join the Rattlesnake Watershed Group’s Wild in Our Backyard walking tour of Greenough Park. Meet at the park pavilion. 6–8 PM. Free. Shake off the rust, lube up and test your buns of steel during the Dirt Girls First Bike Ride. Meet at the UM footbridge and ride the Kim Williams Trail. 6 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18 Find the ice axe of your dreams at a bargain price or unload that bivy bag Mee-Maw bought you at the UM Outdoor Program Used Gear Sale. Fifteen percent of the selling price goes to the program. Drop-off gear from 7–11 AM and pick it up from 5–7 PM; shop in between. University Center. Call 243-5172 for more info. I wish I could stuff this job and only do the stuff the Flathead Audubon Society does, like their Bird Identification: By Song, Sight and Silhouette courses. This week’s class is A Closer Look at Bird Songs and Calls with Bruce Tannehill. 6–8 PM. Contact Debbie at Flathead High School at 7513461 to register. Get your jökulhlaup on and attend the Montana Natural History Center’s Glacial Lake Missoula Spring Fling, an icy blast from the past. 120 Hickory. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation.

INFORMATIONAL MEETING Discuss Maclay Bridge Planning Study • Missoula County Tuesday, April 24, 2012 6:00 p.m. • Big Sky High School Multi-purpose Room • 3100 South Avenue W., Missoula, MT Missoula County, in partnership with the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), have initiated the development of the Maclay Bridge Planning Study to determine potential needs of the Maclay Bridge and connecting roadways within the area. The Maclay Bridge crosses the Bitterroot River approximately 2.75 miles west of Reserve Street via North Avenue. North Avenue connects to the existing bridge as the eastern approach, and River Pines Road serves as its western approach. The planning study will determine the needs of the Maclay Bridge and connecting roadways, and will identify feasible improvement options, if any, to address safety, geometric and environmental concerns based on needs presented by the community, study partners, resource agencies, and other interested parties. The purpose of the meeting is to present the study scope and solicit comments.

The meeting is open to the public and the public is encouraged to attend. Local governments attempt to provide accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person's participation in this meeting. For reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting, please contact Jeff Key, Robert Peccia & Assocs. Inc., at (406) 447-5000 at least two days before the meeting. For the hearing impaired, the TTY number is (406) 444-7696 or (800) 335-7592, or Montana Relay at 711. Alternative accessible formats of this information will be provided upon request.

THURSDAY APRIL 19 Drop the controller and check out this month’s theme at the Montana Natural History Center’s miniNaturalists Pre-K Program. This month’s theme is Osprey. Pliny the Elder would approve. 120 Hickory St. 10–11 AM. $3/$1 for members. montananaturalist.org.

Comments may be submitted in writing at the meeting, by mail to Sheila Ludlow, Project Manager, MDT, P.O. Box 201001, Helena, MT 59620-1001

or online at www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml Please indicate comments are for the Maclay Bridge Planning Study.

Missoula Independent Page 33 April 12 – April 19, 2012


scope

Waiting game The Missoula Actors’ Guild takes on Samuel Beckett’s Godot by Erika Fredrickson

When artist Nathan M. McTague decided to put on a production of Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett, he figured he’d make it a post-war fantasy like Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen: in a theater of luscious red curtains and junked antiquities. He wanted to decorate the stage with televisions piled on their sides and flickering with images of the performance. He wanted to reference American towns, update it all for modern audiences. But the Samuel Beckett estate is a hard nut to crack: You don’t do Godot that way. There are rules. You don’t change the lines or the genders, and you’re not allowed to add words. It’s even written into the script that the actors wear bowlers. The estate has shut down numer-

intrigued, but I just didn’t think of it as something that I was ready yet to do.” McTague began performing in plays with the Montana Actors’ Theatre, a professional company with a Missoula branch. He talked with Grant Olson, the artistic director, about producing Godot as part of the company’s season. Olson wanted to do it, McTague says, but they had two other Beckett plays on the docket: Play and Krapp’s Last Tape. “They didn’t think they could market another Beckett play, so it got shelved,” says McTague. McTague gave it another shot the next year, but he was out of town when the season was finalized and it didn’t make the cut. Finally, MAT’s Missoula chapter finished its season early and went on an indefinite hia-

Photo courtesy of Bjorn Bergson

Waiting for Godot stars, from left, Rev. Craig Domes, Nathan M. McTague, Jeff Medley and Justin Fatz.

ous productions of the classic play. The most recent incident: Waiting for Godot set in post-Katrina New Orleans came under fire by the estate in 2011. “I didn’t know about the Beckett estate before we started this process,” McTague says. “I was taking this play like any old play. You get it, you read it and you do what you want with it—like Shakespeare. There’s no latitude like that in any Beckett play. If you want to do anything different, you have to approach the Beckett estate and work with them to make that adaptation, down to the letter.” When he found out none of his changes would be possible, McTague almost decided not to do it. But McTague had been waiting to do Waiting for Godot for a long time. The first time he considered it was nine years ago. He had little theater experience then, though he did have actor friends who also liked the idea of putting on Godot. “I continued to keep it in the back of my mind as something I was interested in doing,” he says. “I was

Missoula Independent Page 34 April 12 – April 19, 2012

tus. That left McTague waiting again. Last year, he decided to wait no longer and, for Beckett’s 106th birthday this weekend, his Missoula Actors’ Guild production hits the Crystal Theatre. Waiting for Godot is an absurdist play about two characters, Vladimir and Estragon, who are waiting for someone named Godot to arrive. They are not sure what he looks like. To pass the time they eat, sleep, converse, play games and contemplate suicide. It’s often performed vaudeville-style—Robin Williams, Steve Martin, Ian McKellan and Patrick Stewart have all clowned around in the roles. Other performers have played it more naturalistically, taking it into the serious realm, which Beckett dismissed as misinterpretation. McTague, who plays Vladimir, cast actor Jeff Medley as Estragon. While volunteering for the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival in February, the two practiced their lines together and found out just how challenging the play really is.

“One thing that Beckett did beautifully is he uses certain lines as echoes,” says McTague. “And so there’s places where I deliver the same line day one and day two, or the same line throughout day one and day two. There are places where we trade lines. We would be walking around together doing lines back and forth, and we’d find ourselves in a loop. We’d realize ‘Oh no! We already did that part! How do we move forward?’” The challenge of doing the roles—which also include three other characters, Pozzo, Lucky and a boy—is one reason actors turn to this play despite its estate constraints. For audiences, the appeal is in the humor and the philosophical components. It’s an impenetrable play because it never admits to meaning. “Beckett set out a lot of points of meaning, what you might call the structure of an argument,” says McTague. “There’s some stuff about religion and there’s some stuff about relationships, there’s some stuff about waiting, there’s some stuff about the human condition, there’s some stuff about suffering … What people tend to do is say, ‘The meaning is all there and it’s this.’ What has actually happened is they’ve taken all those dots and made their own dot-to-dot out of it and that’s their version. Somebody else is going to do a totally different version of those same dots. And the achievement that constitutes in the theater world is unparalleled.” As for who this Godot person is, everyone tries to say he’s God or Jesus or capitalism or socialism, says McTague, but Beckett denied all those interpretations. “In the end, it really doesn’t matter,” says McTague. “Beckett was absolutely unclear about who he is. Outside of the play, he can represent anything we’re all waiting for. Inside of the play, he’s just a guy who’s supposed to arrive. There’s at least some evidence that he exists and they really are intending to meet him. But who he is or what he could give them, there isn't enough information to say.” McTague’s Waiting for Godot is by the book, with a few exceptions. He changed monetary units from francs to dollars (a common change not challenged by the estate), and some lines and blocking have been rearranged. He hints that Vladimir has a Southern air and Estragon a Midwestern one. It’s a naturalistic take, not slapstick, but it still ended up on the comedic end. McTague says he hopes it will feel like a brand new take. “Because it’s being held in this frozen state, it’s losing appeal to modern audiences,” he says. “The bowler doesn’t mean anything to us. Cackon country doesn’t mean anything to us. Bishop Berkeley doesn’t mean anything to us. So I think I may still, someday, try to work with the Beckett estate to do an adaptation. I don't know what that would involve. I’d like to do a version of Godot meets Dude, Where's My Car? You know, some stoner guys, like, ‘We’re waiting. Where is he? I don't know.’” Waiting for Godot opens at the Crystal Theatre Thur., April 12, at 8 PM for $12/$10 advance. The Fri., April 13, show is the grand opening gala celebration, beginning with live music at 7 PM and continuing with the show at 8 PM for $13/$10 advance. Godot continues Sat., April 14, and Wed., April 18, Sat., April 21, at 8 PM nightly and 2 PM matinees Sat. for $12/$10 advance. Tickets at Butterfly Herbs and Shakespeare & Co.


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Mountain blues Three-Eared Dog breeds rebellion and revelry by Maria Anderson

Spending months in bed healing from chronic to a wider audience in the 1960s and ’70s. From slow, at times desolate croons to more appendicitis is no way to start a band. Or is it? To beat the bed-rest boredom, Sam Ore turned to what he modernized, tangy, electric grooves, the album knew best: the blues. Ore teamed up with longtime shows off Three-Eared Dog’s ability to hit both soft blues player Aaron Hyatt and bassist Jordan Smith, and hard notes, sputtering and groaning, howling and Three-Eared Dog was born. Their debut EP, Stuck and hollering to the sway of a sweaty crowd marinatin the Mountains, for which they play a release party ed in moonshine. “Why Don’t You Leave Me” is a this week at The Top Hat, contains tracks such as “Gas mesmerizing, throaty tune that hits deep and makes Station Blues,” “Should Be a Crime” and “Why Don’t me think of that lone drunk girl swaying in the corYou Leave Me?” There’s grit here, the kind that sepa- ner of the room. “Time moves so slowly / When your love moves so fast / My heart is torn between / What rates lunchtime jogger from marathoner. I need and what I want.” Another line: “Delusions of What sort of breed is Three-Eared Dog? Before playing, they do five to 10 minutes of yoga grandeur give me hope of moving on.” There is to loosen up: A little downward dog, some child’s pose. Another quirk of theirs is using “Tone Foam,” an idea they borrowed from late Texas blues guitarist Freddie King to get more bass tone that involves sticking a chunk of Styrofoam under the strings. They break down the blues for me. “You’ve got your Mississippi sharecroppers, the field hollerers, first generation,” says Ore. “Next, Muddy Waters, more electrified. Then you’ve got people like Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor, third generation, and even more electricity. We’re fourth generation.” They combine elements of jazz, rock and pop, and work from a Photo courtesy of Dan Venturella basic blues template. “As a band, we’re embracing our multi- Three-Eared Dog generic, mono-cultural roots, and anticipation here, despite the depressive mood—or our first album strongly reflects this,” says Ore. Hyatt hails from Butte, while Ore and Smith are expectation, at least. “Gas Station Blues” is fast and cavorting: “I want small-town boys from Three Forks and Hamilton. Each made his way to Missoula, where all three a life that’s soft / And a body that’s hard / I want blueended up learning most of what they know on gui- collar friends / And a white-collar job.” “Tiger” is slowtar from the same guy. “At that point, he was 16, in er, and uses a throaty growl and quick-paced narrative college and the best guitarist I’d ever played with,” to tell the tale of a single mother and her only son: “You’re a tiger / The first born son of a freedom fightsays Ore. His name was Owen Ross. Ross and Ore played together in several proj- er.” It continues, “Well his granddaddy bought him an ects, and eventually linked up with Hyatt in a band AK47 / Every man needs a weapon.” It’s a modernized, called The One and Onlys. Ore switched from play- somber take on the old Mississippi Delta calls for ing bass to guitar and, together with Hyatt and rebellion by past blues players, and talks of the son Smith, learned a repertoire of jazz chords that growing up and lighting the world on fire. “What interests me most about music is not its shaped their songwriting and helped give ThreeEared Dog a common thread. “Learning from Owen history, cultural station, technological development really helped us jive and grow together,” says Smith. or anything else in the sociological sphere, but how it fits into the lives of individual people,” says Ore. Ross also plays keys on the EP. The songs on Stuck in the Mountains talk about “Compared to larger bands, our strength is going out the economic climate, being a soldier and the frus- and connecting with people one on one and playing tration of working in a job and never moving for- small shows. Of course, every mother thinks her brat ward. They all sing, and there’s no clear-cut front- is cutest, but I’m proud to say that we've created man. The songs are hard, honest examinations of the something that is distinctly by and for Montanans.” troubles around us, and several of the tunes refer to Three-Eared Dog plays The Top Hat for its war both as an abstract notion and as a reality. Strange to say, but war can do great things for music, album release party Sat., April 14, at 9 PM. $5. as with World War II, which acted as a catalyst for the blues’s shift from acoustic to electric, and brought it arts@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent Page 35 April 12 – April 19, 2012


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Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Logging memoir Light on the Devils needs more illumination by Michael Peck

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Missoula Independent Page 36 April 12 – April 19, 2012

In Light on the Devils, Louise Wagenknecht markable conversations with her sister and one entire explores growing up in a rugged culture of loggers chapter dedicated to an uneventful tennis season. There are a few sections in Light on the Devils and foresters in the boom of the logging industry and with the people who built that industry. The book that are absorbing. The tragic deaths of two classopens powerfully, beginning with the suicide of a mates and Wagenknecht's intimate knowledge of the Forest Ranger in the bust of the 1990s. “In some unil- interplay between logging companies and governlusioned corner of my mind,” Wagenknecht writes, “I ment conservation are told affectingly, and her use of had known for some time that the old world of log- journal entries from the early pioneers of the region illustrates the rigor of Wagenknecht’s eclectic mind. gers and endless realms of timber were gone.” As her life shuffles from adolescence through Wagenknecht’s hybrid memoir/natural history curio/genealogical survey—which follows her other the frustrating predicaments of menstruation and lumber town memoir, the 2003 book White Poplar, Black Locust—takes place in the Klamath Mountains of northwest California, mostly in and around Happy Camp and later in the Seiad Valley, where the devils of the title make their first appearance. Recounting her bluecollar life as a series of hikes, attending commonplace schools and voraciously reading whatever she can lay her hands on, Wagenknecht narrates her str uggles of entering womanhood and trying to win the acceptance of her stepfather—a “piss-fir” in the Forest Service. As a recollection of the conflicts of puberty and the messy ordeals of family, it is sporadically successful, but when it comes to probing the dissatisfactions of growing up female in a male-dominated mining town—or any kind of deeper context, really—Light on the Devils comes across as a fastidious study in marginalia. One of the problems is editorial: There is an Light on the Devils absence of any sort of fil- Louise Wagenknecht ter to sift out the fascinat- Oregon State University Press ing details of a vanishing 232 pages, $19.95 way of life from the tedious rehashing of everyday activities. Lengthy sen- school dances, Wagenknecht displays little connectences concerning the collective gutting of a fish are tion and less joy in what she is copiously recountgiven equal weight with the eruption of a massive ing. Though the beginning is powerful, the story wildfire threatening the community. Which isn’t terri- deflates by the time she recounts her departure for ble, as long as you enjoy reading about the collective Chico State College in the late 1960s. Wagenknecht is a capable writer, and Lights on the gutting of a fish. Much of Light on the Devils is stultifying, tone- Devils—with its intriguing title—has the potential to be lessly dictated in a sort of staccato chronology that a revealing portrait of a mining-town daughter. Without sounds more like the blueprint of a book than a book direction, though, it ends up feeling more like filler. itself. More and more, the story drags into hunting treks, compulsive inventories of tree names, unrearts@missoulanews.com


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Ship wrecked In defense of once loving Titanic by Molly Laich

Are you ready, Indy readers? Are you ready to go back to Titanic? Titanic first opened in December of 1997, amidst a lot of fanfare over its dreamy stars, the enormous budget and James Cameron’s manic enthusiasm. For 15 years, Titanic has oscillated in our hearts between admiration and ridicule, and now, on the 100-year anniversary of the Titanic’s sinking, the movie has been re-released in 3D.* A lot is made about the film’s glaring weaknesses, of which there are many. Cameron has a gift for writing absurdly one-dimensional villains. Lines such as “I’m flying, Jack!” and “I’m the king of the world!” are dumb and stand out in our memory, but dwelling on

es into the iceberg. Watching what follows is bigger than an ordinary movie; it’s a mind-body experience. Creating real suspense in cinema is not easy. We’re too smart. We either know what’s going to happen because of history or it’s just too soon in the plot for the characters to die or whatever—and yet. When Anders delivers the news of the ship’s sinking as a certainty, I felt hope replaced with dread, as though I were right there with them, hearing it for the first time. The film is at its best during the progression of scenes leading up to the sinking. The passengers are blasé. They don’t believe the ship can sink until it actually starts to, and what follows are a lot of confused, frightened people scrambling to not enough lifeboats.

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Deja vu.

these landmarks is a mistake. Titanic remains the best disaster film ever made. It’s a historical melodrama and careful period piece of unparalleled scope and vision, damn it, and it deserves your fear and respect. The romance: oh lord. Do you think Cameron understood what he was doing when he centered the drama on star-crossed teenagers? The real force behind the movie’s financial success came from so many repeat viewers like myself. In 1997, I was 15 years old. I saw the movie in theaters not once, but five times. To me, my obsession felt deeper than that of a crazed teenager clinging to whatever fad they were selling us that year. I was in love with stories. I wanted to make films. I wrote frantic posts on a burgeoning internet defending Leonardo DiCaprio, not as heartthrob but as serious actor. In 1997, I’d never been drunk or kissed a boy. I was acutely aware both of what I wanted and of what I was missing. Rose DeWitt Bukater (Kate Winslet) and Jack Dawson (Leo) showed me what romantic love looked like. Jack embodies a made-up perfection. He’s an artist who loves life. He’s kind to old people and children. Their romance has a repeating theme of salvation from the brink. “You jump, I jump, right?” they say to each other, again and again. “Promise me you’ll never let go.” Jack always says and does the right thing, and he always knows exactly what to do. He isn’t scared; he’s instructive. He somehow knows all about how the suction will suck the boat under, and he tells her to never let go of his hand, to kick her way up to the surface. It’s nearly two hours in before the ship even crash-

When the lights go out and the ship finally goes under, all that’s left are hundreds of doomed souls flailing in the freezing ocean. Trying to describe it here is pitiful and lame, but take my word for it: It’s one of the scariest and most devastating things I’ve ever seen. I’m 30 years old now. Jack Dawson is just a kid. Today, Rose’s evil fiancé, Cal Hockley (Billy Zane), is a lot more attractive to me, and maybe not just because he’s older. The film still moves me, but at different moments, in different ways. This time, when Rose pries her frozen hands from Jack’s and he fades down into the ocean, I don’t really care. I’ve kissed a lot of boys since 1997, and they’ve all let me down. I still want a strong man to pull me over the ship’s railing and navigate me through a disaster, but so what? It’s a hope as dumb as wishing the re-release will have tacked on a happy ending, in which the boat doesn’t sink. I know better. *The conversion to 3D is a non-event and hardly worth discussing. It’s an invention of marketing and adds nothing to the viewing experience except a mild distraction that’s quickly forgotten. The value here is the opportunity to see the movie again on the big screen. I recommend saving a couple bucks by seeing it in 2D, if it’s available. Titanic 3D continues at the Carmike 12 and Village 6. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent Page 37 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK CABIN IN THE WOODS Man, there is no doubt that this is more than some cruddy old cabin. There are secrets. And the friends who go there have secrets. And secrets mean power and weakness. Nuts. Starring Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford. Rated R. Carmike 12: Big D: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45 pm. LOCKOUT A question: What if the only way you could get out of some espionage charges was to rescue the president’s daughter from an outer-space prison that the inmates control? Starring Guy Pearce and Maggie Grace. Rated PG-13. Village 6: 4:15 and 7:15 pm, with matinees at 9:45 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1:15 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun.

Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum and Peter Deluise (jokes). Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 and 9:45 pm. Mountain: 4:30, 6:50 and 9 pm, with 2 pm matinees Fri.-Sun. AMERICAN REUNION See what happens when a bunch of people in their almost-40s attend their 13th high school reunion. Sex is my guess. Plus getting embarrassed. Starring Alyson Hannigan and Eugene Levy. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1, 4, 7 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:30 and 7:30 pm, with shows at 10 pm of Fri. and Sat. and 1:30 pm matinees on

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX Make Fox News angry and take your kids to this story of young boy’s love of a girl and the grumpy fella that protects the environment. Starring the voices of Taylor Swift and Danny Devito. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:30, 4:30, 6:45 and 9 pm. Midnight show on Fri. 3D: 1, 4, 6:30 and 8:45 pm. MIRROR MIRROR No way I’m buying Julia Roberts as the evil step-mother in this “update” of Snow White she’s so darn cute. Starring Lily Collins and Armie Hammer. Rated PG. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15 pm. Village 6:

THE WAY Emilio Estevez directs his dad Martin Sheen in the story of a man recovering the body of his estranged son. Let the allusions to real life do what they will. Showboat: 1:30 pm on Sat., Apr. 14, and Sun., Apr. 15. WRATH OF THE TITANS If you think Zeus is a jerk, you need to meet his extra-jerky Titan parents, Kronos and Rhea, who ruled the Golden Age. Anyway Perseus has to rescue Zeus from Hades, who unleashes the Titans on humanity. Starring Sam Worthington and

OPERA IN CINEMA: RIGOLETTA Assassins, hunchbacks, cuckolds, dukes, ladies and intrigue. Sounds like Verdi to me. Carmike 12: Tue., Apr. 17, at 12:30 pm. THE RAID: REDEMPTION A SWAT team becomes trapped inside a run-down apartment building that is under the complete control of a ruthless mob boss and it takes place in Jakarta? Can I get a “hell yeah”? Directed by Gareth Evans. Rated R. Carmike 12: 1:15, 4:45, 7:15 and 9:45 pm. THE THREE STOOGES At one point Sean Penn and Benicio Del Toro were attached to this tale about modern-day stooges run-amok on reality TV. If only. Starring Sean Hayes and Chris Diamantopoulos. Rated PG. Village 6: 4 and 7 pm, with matinees at 9:20 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Showboat: 4:15, 7 and 9 pm. TNA LOCKDOWN The former high-flyer Jeff Hardy battles the former WWE champ Kurt Angle. The Bischoffs are involved in a loser-leavetown match. What year is it? Carmike 12: Sun., Apr. 15, at 7:30 pm. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN Nobody says you have to love your kid, but this kid is particularly wicked and mom doesn’t know what to do about him. Starring Tilda Swinton and John C. Reilly. Rated R. Wilma: 7 and 9 pm nightly. No 7 pm show on Sat., Apr. 14 and Wed., Apr. 18.

CONTINUING 21 JUMP STREET Let’s jump into the story of a couple of dopey cops who go back to high school to foil an undercover drug ring. Starring

Casual Friday. Lockout opens Friday at the Village 6.

Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. THE HUNGER GAMES Oh lordy, in the future children are chosen by The Man to fight to the death on live TV. Wait, there’s TV in the future? Heinous. Starring Jennifer Lawrence and Stanley Tucci. PG-13. Carmike 12: 1, 1:30, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8:30, 9:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 4:10 and 7:20 pm, with matinees at 10:30 pm on Fri. and Sat. and 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:40 and 9:20 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Stadium 14: 12,12:30 1, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:45 and 10:15 pm, with midnight shows Fri. and Sat. Add’l shows at 2, 5:15 and 8:30 pm, Mon.-Thu. Mountain: 1:30, 4:15, 7 and 9:15 pm, Fri.-Sat. 1:30, 4:15, 7:15 pm, Sun. 4:15, 7 and 9:35 pm, Mon.-Thu. Entertainer: 4, 6:45 and 9:30 pm, with 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun.

Missoula Independent Page 38 April 12 – April 19, 2012

4:30 pm nightly, with 1:30 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. Pharaohplex: 6:50 and 9:10 pm, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. SALMON FISHING IN YEMEN A sheikh dreams of fly-fishing in that dry old Yemen, and British fisheries expert Ewan McGregor is brought in to help make it happen and most likely trawl for love with government aid Kristin Scott Thomas. Rated PG13. Wilma: 7 and 9 pm nightly. No 9 pm show on Sat., Apr. 14 and Wed., Apr. 18. TITANIC IN 3D Fall in love with Kate and Leo all over again...in 3D. Starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 5, and 9 pm. Village 6: 3D: 5:15 pm nightly, 1 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun. and 9:30 pm shows Fri. and Sat. Pharaohplex: 7 pm nightly, with 3 pm matinees on Sat. and Sun.

Liam Neeson. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12: 3D: 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30, 7, 7:30, 9:30 and 10 pm. Village 6: 7:30 pm nightly, with 10 pm shows on Fri. and Sat. Pharaohplex: 3D: 7 and 9 pm, with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 pm. Entertainer: 4, 7 and 9 pm. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Apr. 13. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–7282521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–7527804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent Page 39 April 12 – April 19, 2012


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I’ve lived in a one-story building for 50 years. Offering one-story cleaning service. $6.25/hour. Supplies extra. Ole 327-7859

Work and live in rural Buddhist center, California. Help make Buddhist books to donate in Asia. Includes housing, vegetarian meals, classes on Buddhism, living allowance. Must have sincere Buddhist interest, physical strength. Minimum age 22. For details, application call 510981-1987 Email contact@nyingma.org

MANURE AND WIFE My fiancee insists on having our wedding at “THE most magical place to get married,” this beautiful lake resort. Her family’s well-off, but having it there creates a financial hardship for my relatives and our friends, who are working crappy jobs in a terrible economy. Our guests mostly live in our hometown, and the lake is a four-hour drive each way, and there are no affordable places to stay. I’ve suggested that we have the wedding in this beautiful space on my uncle’s farm, just outside of town, but my fiancee, who’s typically unselfish, remains inflexible. She wants it to be “truly special” and says people who care about us will find a way to come. —Concerned She’s So Unyielding Brides-to-be can easily lose touch with reality. They start by pricing the VFW hall, and before long it’s “Oh, is the International Space Station booked? Okay then, we’ll rent the Grand Canyon for a white-water rafting wedding. Not to worry, Grandma—you can use your oxygen tank as a flotation device!” Destination weddings are great if you can send the private jet to pick up Grandpa Lou, Great-Auntie Myrtle, and all your Ph.D.-equipped barista friends and then put them up in a vast estate you rented for the wedding-ganza weekend. But, in a tough economy, maybe your special day doesn’t have to be other people’s special day to go bankrupt: “Please join us after the ceremony for dinner and dancing, followed by credit counseling.” Because boys don’t grow up having misty daydreams about someday being a groom, it can be hard for a man to understand how an otherwise sweet and reasonable woman can go all weddingzilla: “My dress must have a 50-foot train, trimmed with the skins of puppies!” The question is, is this just a case of bride fever—temporary blindness to all forms of sense and reason related to wedding planning—or is it that her true colors are graduating shades of bossy selfishness (one part Kim Kardashian and two parts Kim Jong Il)? When two “become as one,” decisions need to be a product of “we” and not “she” (as in, she decides and then tugs the leash for you to come along). A stumbling block to compromise is self-justification— the ego-protecting tendency to stubbornly defend ourselves, insisting we’re right and shoving away any information that suggests otherwise. (To err is human—as is doing everything in our power to avoid admitting we’ve erred.) Preventing this takes putting marriage before ego—and making a pact to resolve

conflicts by really listening to each other, putting yourselves in each other’s shoes, and working out solutions that work for you as a couple. Ask her to explain why this location is so special to her. Let her know that you truly appreciate her efforts, but that what’s special for you is having everybody there (and without feeling guilty about what it cost them to come). Offer to help her find someplace closer; maybe suggest having a pre-wedding photo shoot at Lake Perfectweddingspot. Since there’s no wiggle room for friends and relatives who are broke, let’s hope she’ll come to understand that your guests won’t cry fewer tears of joy if you’re saying your vows in your uncle’s pasture. As for what’s “truly special,” anybody can have a fancy hotel wedding; how many women get the opportunity to have bridesgoats?

DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS My normally very sweet boyfriend told me that the doctor who gave him his physical was hot and flirted like she was into him. I told him he could’ve kept all that to himself. He said that she just is hot and that if she were ugly, he would’ve told me that instead. Clearly, he was checking her out, and I think it’s disrespectful to tell me about it. —Dismayed A person might “get points for honesty,” but if he’s somebody’s boyfriend, he’ll get lots more points if his honesty involves statements like “The lady doctor who just palpated my groin was a ringer for Lou Ferrigno.” Most people get that merely having a thought isn’t reason to release it and let it bound around like a puppy. That’s a good thing, because contrary to what women want to believe, pretty much all men are checking out all women at all times. That said, if your boyfriend is a sweet guy, chances are his message wasn’t so much “She’s hot” as it was “I’m hot. Hot women want me.” The implication being “Better hang on to me!” Let him know that hanging on to you takes respecting what you don’t want to hear. As for the doctor’s intentions, considering the prospect of license revocation and men’s tendency to mistake friendliness for interest, it’s possible she saw something in him—and probable it was something like two benign polyps.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 April 12 – April 19, 2012

John Maxwell Team Youth Leadership Event. YOUTHMAX, May 6-12, 2012!! jmtyouthmax.com. These are the four areas of content: Fail Forward • Personal Character • Positive Self-Image • Stand-Up Be-Counted (bullying) The Missoula Centennial Rotary Club is hosting a pancake breakfast on Saturday, April 14th from 8am-12noon at the YMCA. All proceeds go to send kids to Y camp. Come Hungry - Leave Full! $5 per person or $15 per family.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

MISSOULA

Bennett’s Music Studio

Antiques & Flea Market

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Misso

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-ins Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard Trims-$4 8:30am - 5:30pm • Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT • 728-3957

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EMPLOYMENT

MARKETPLACE

MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

5yrs; #2245 Blk/white, Husky X, NM, 2yrs; #2278 Corgi/Terrier, Tri Color, NM, 10yrs; #2280 Grey/white, Pit Bull, NM, 7yrs; #2282 Tan/blk, Shep/Rhodi X, NM, 5yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yrs; #2286 Blue, Heeler/MinPin, SF, 1yr; #2290 Black, Lab, NM, 2yrs; #2303 Brown, Pug/Lab, SF, 5mo; #2306 Red/white/Blue, Aussie/Heeler X, SF, 6mo; ; #2308 Brown/white, Sheltie, SF, 5yrs; #2310 Blue, Heeler X, NM, 1yr; #2311 Yellow, Lab, SF, 2yrs; #2314 Blue Merle, Aussie, NM, 9yrs

PETS & ANIMALS

GARAGE SALES

CATS: #1230 White/Grey, Tabby, ALH, SF, 9yrs; #1623 Orange Tabby, DSH, SF, 2yr;#1948 Grey, DSH, SF, 10yrs; #2061 White/red, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2147 Grey, Maine Coon, NM, 2yrs; #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2171 Black Torti, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2190 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 14yrs; #2209 Dilute Calico, DSH, SF, 7yrs; #2242 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 5yrs; #2248 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 1yr; #2264 Cali/Rust/Grey, DLH, SF, 5yrs; #2287 Grey Tabby, ASH, NM, 7yrs; #2304 Orange/white, DMH, NM. 2yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2307 Blk/grey, Maine Coon X, SF, 3yrs; #2312 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 2yrs.

First Presbyterian Church Rummage Sale 235 South 5th Street West. Fri. April 13, 9 AM-5 PM Sat. April 14, 9AM-Noon Sat. 1 – 3 PM Bag Sale $3/bag Outdoor/sports, household, tools, toys, collectibles, boutique, clothing & more

MISC. GOODS

MUSIC

1st Interstate Pawn. 3110 South Reserve, is now open! Buying gold and silver. Buying, selling, and pawning items large and small. We pay more and sell for less. 406-721(PAWN)7296.

Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 7 2 1 - 0 1 9 0 BennettsMusicStudio.com

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation non-denominational 1-800-475-0876

AUCTIONS ROGER GUTHRIE ESTATE AUCTION. Fri. & Sat., April 27th & 28th. Best Western KwaTakNuk Resort, Polson, MT. Antiques, Guns, Watches, Clocks, Coins. w w w. S h o b e A u c t i o n . c o m Brochure @ 406-538-5125. United Country - Shobe Auction & Realty, Lewistown, MT

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

FURNITURE Donate good used furniture & appliances to help prevent child abuse. Free Pickup available. Donation Warehouse 240-4042.

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; Aussie, NM, 9yrs; #2214 White/tan, Lab/Pit X, SF, 1.5yrs; #2233 Blk/white, Heeler/Aussie X, NM, 3yrs; #2234 Blk/white, Border Collie X, NM, 2yrs; #2245A Blk/tan, Dobie X, SF,

WANTED TO BUY Always Buying, Jeff’s Auto Removal, cash today. No Tires - No Title - No Problem! Call 3969015

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Great Gear Great Prices 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056

GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CHINKING LABORERS. #2981587 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 DETENTION COOK. 32 hours/week. Missoula Detention Center #2981588 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 ELECTIONS AIDE. Temporary PT for Missoula County. #2981590 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FINE GARMENT PRESSER. PT $8.00-$9.00/hour. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Hamilton Farmers Market Info Booth Staff, paid PT, begins Apr. 18th. Call Job Service at 3631822 for more information. LIFE GUARDS & SWIMMING INSTRUCTORS. #2981596 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RETAIL CLERK. Local drug store. #9961537 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SECURITY OFFICER. #2981594 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL Construction Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent – Mutual Self Help. The Missoula Housing Authority seeks one full time and one half time person to perform duties of Construction Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent. Must have a demonstrated minimum of five years hands on experience in all phases of residential new home construction including layout, grading, foundations, framing, roofing,

finishing, siding, soffit and fascia, plumbing, electrical and knowledge of local building codes, estimating, reading blue prints, general contracting, materials and application of materials. Positions require strong interpersonal and communication skills and strong organizational skills. Successful candidates will be able to demonstrate strong teaching and mentoring skills while exercising patience and encouragement, be able to motivate volunteer builders and possess a strong ability to resolve conflict on the job site. Requires proven ability to supervise and work in a small team environment. Minimal local travel may be required. Working weekends and evenings will be required. For required application package contact Adam Ragsdale, Missoula Housing Authority, 1235 34th Street, Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 549-4113 x 128, aragsdale@missoulahousing.org, or go to http://missoulahousing.org/about/employment for additional information. Applications reviewed every Friday until position is filled. Development Coordinator Watson Children’s Shelter, Inc. seeks a FT Development Coordinator. For more information visit watsonchildrensshelter.org

SKILLED LABOR ASSISTANT CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR. #2981592 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 MOTORCYCLE MECHANIC. #2981586 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Wildland Fire Training; Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS RN-On-call. Hospice & Home Health Programs. #9961470 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES FT/PT Sales Exec Msla and Bitt. Sales exp. preferred. Send resume to MTN Broadcasting, PO Box 309, Msla, MT 59806 EEO Employer

OPPORTUNITIES Dream Again! Earn an income you deserve. Free online training, flexible hours. www.homebiz-2freedom.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com

The Community Dispute Resolution Center of Missoula County Executive Director (15 hours/week) to operate programs, spearhead fundraising efforts, represent us in the community and supervise a part-time volunteer coordinator/office manager. Please visit www.cdrcmissoula.org for a job description and application details. Apply by April 20.

Need a roommate? Check out our local online classifieds to find the perfect one.

Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments SEASONAL JOBS:

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 11, 33, 90, 94, 118, 134, 170, 216, 224, + OS45. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting April 23rd, 2012 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to April 26th, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Aquatics • Recreation Apply at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/jobs or stop by Currents in McCormick Park LIFEGUARDING COURSES BEGIN APRIL 9 & MAY 7

missoulaparks.org

STRONG COMMUNITY SPIRIT. TOP-NOTCH BENEFITS. SPECTACULAR COMMUTE.

At Community Medical Center in Missoula, we offer employees the same opportunities and benefits you'd find at all the big-city hospitals in other states. That's why we fill full- and part-time positions with hard-working professionals like you, with a great salary range and manageable shifts. For a full listing of positions, visit www.communitymed.org. EEO employer.

Apply online: www.communitymed.org 2827 Fort Missoula Road, Missoula, MT 59804 406-327-4244

From day one.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 April 12 – April 19, 2012


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Some people misunderstand the do-it-now fervor of the Aries tribe, thinking it must inevitably lead to carelessness. Please prove them wrong in the coming weeks. Launch into the interesting new possibilities with all your exuberance unfurled. Refuse to allow the natural energy to get hemmed in by theories and concepts. But also be sure not to mistake rash impatience for intuitive guidance. Consider the likelihood that your original vision of the future might need to be tinkered with a bit as you translate it into the concrete details. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): There is a possibility that a pot of gold sits at the end of the rainbow. The likelihood is small, true, but it’s not zero. On the other hand, the rainbow is definitely here and available for you to enjoy. Of course, you would have to do some more work on yourself in order to gather in the fullness of that enjoyment. Here’s the potential problem: You may be under the impression that the rainbow is less valuable than the pot of gold. So let me ask you: What if the rainbow’s the real prize? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “It’s eternity in a person that turns the crank handle,” said Franz Kafka. At least that should be the case, I would add. The unfortunate fact of the matter is that a lot of people let other, lesser things turn the crank handle—like the compulsive yearning for money, power, and love, for example. I challenge you to check in with yourself sometime soon and determine what exactly has been turning your crank handle. If it ain’t eternity, or whatever serves as eternity in your world view, get yourself adjusted. In the coming months, it’s crucial that you’re running on the cleanest, purest fuel.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For a white guy from 19th-century England, David Livingstone was unusually egalitarian. As he traveled in Africa, he referred to what were then called “witch doctors” as “my professional colleagues.” In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I encourage you to be inspired by Livingstone as you expand your notion of who your allies are. For example, consider people to be your colleagues if they simply try to influence the world in the same ways you do, even if they work in different jobs or spheres. What might be your version of Livingstone’s witch doctors? Go outside of your usual network as you scout around for confederates who might connect you to exotic new perspectives and resources you never imagined you could use.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The flag of California features the image of a grizzly bear, and the huge carnivore is the state’s official animal. And yet grizzly bears have been extinct in California since 1922, when the last one was shot and killed. Is there any discrepancy like that in your own life, Leo? Do you continue to act as if a particular symbol or icon is important to you even though it has no practical presence in your life? If so, this would be a good time to update your attitude.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The cartoon character Felix the Cat made his debut in 1919. He was a movie star in the era of silent films, and eventually appeared in his own comic strip and TV show. But it wasn’t until 1953, when he was 34 years old, that he first got his Magic Bag of Tricks, which allowed him to do many things he wasn’t able to do before. I bring this up, Virgo, because I believe you’re close to acquiring a magic bag of tricks that wasn’t on your radar until you had matured to the point where you are now. To ensure that you get that bag, though, you will have to ripen even a bit more.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist Susan Clarion RNC CA MATS 552-7919 Energy Balancing and Acupressure Meridians. Hand and foot reflexology. 493-6824 or 3994363 Garden Mother Herbs Spa Experience is NOW OPEN! Massage - Aromatherapy Music Therapy - Oxygen Pub Herbal Hand & Foot Soaks. Call 529-3834. 345 W. Front St, Suite C. LINDA BLAIR is offering computerized homeopathy and testing via the BodyScan 2010 for you

and your pets, as well as colonics. 28 years in holistic medicine. 406-471-9035 Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919 National Alliance on Mental Illness, Missoula Affiliate. WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS Family &

Louise Harvey Scents of Wellness Master Touch Reflexology foot treatments with Young Living essential oils.

721-5373 Hypnosis & Imagery * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109. Recovering? Call 552-5494 for meeting information. Past life regression. Find out what your soul has experienced in other lifetimes. It

MARSHA KIRCHNER 406-728-8458

mkirchner@centric.net

helps you understand your strengths, talents, fears and relationships. 406-961-4449. Serving Western Montana. Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 241-3405

ESCAPE with Massage and healing energy work. By Janet 207-7358

Backache?

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Never thought you’d be smiling after a counseling appointment?

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Call our Mental Health Counselor Bernie Kneefe, MSW, LCSW today!

Shamanic counseling Soul retrieval • Power retrieval Releasing attachments Marge Hulburt • 241-7260 www.BlueEagleWoman.com

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I have one child, a daughter, and raising her conscientiously has been one of the great privileges and joys of my life. Bonus: She has turned out to be a stellar human being. Every now and then, though, I get a bit envious of parents who’ve created bigger families. If bringing up one kid is so rewarding, maybe more would be even better. I asked an acquaintance of mine, a man with six kids, how he had managed to pull off that difficult feat. He told me quite candidly, “My secret is that I’m not a good father; I’m very neglectful.” I offer up this story as a way to encourage you, at this juncture in your development, to favor quality over quantity.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I expect there’ll be some curious goings-on this week. A seemingly uninspired idea could save you from a dumb decision, for example. An obvious secret may be the key to defeating a covert enemy. And a messy inconvenience might show up just in time to help you do the slightly uncool but eminently right thing. Can you deal with this much irony, Scorpio? Can you handle such big doses of the old flippety-flop and oopsie-loopsie? For extra credit, here are two additional odd blessings you could capitalize on: a humble teaching from an unlikely expert and a surge of motivation from an embarrassing excitement.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Some of our pagan forbears imagined they had a duty to assist with nature’s revival every spring by performing fertility rituals. And wouldn’t it be fun if it were even slightly true that you could help the crops germinate and bloom by making sweet love in the fields? At the very least, carrying out such a ceremony might stimulate your own personal creativity. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to slip away to a secluded outdoor spot, either by yourself or with a romantic companion. On a piece of paper, write down a project you’d like to make thrive in the coming months. Bury the note in the good earth, then enjoy an act of love right on top of it.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Once upon a time, I fell in love with a brilliant businesswoman named Loreen. I pursued her with all my wiles, hoping to win her amorous affection. After playing hard to get for two months, she shocked me with a brazen invitation: Would I like to accompany her on a whirlwind vacation to Paris? “I think I can swing it,” I told her. But there was a problem: I was flat broke. What to do? I decided to raise the funds by selling off a precious heirloom from childhood, my collection of 6,000 vintage baseball cards. Maybe this story will inspire you to do something comparable, Capricorn: Sacrifice an outmoded attachment or juvenile treasure or youthful fantasy so as to empower the future of love.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): We all know that spiders are talented little creatures. Spiders’ silk is as strong as steel, and their precisely geometric webs are engineering marvels. But even though they have admirable qualities I admire, I don’t expect to have an intimate connection with a spider any time soon. A similar situation is at work in the human realm. I know certain people who are amazing creators and leaders but don’t have the personal integrity or relationship skills that would make them trustworthy enough to seek out as close allies. Their beauty is best appreciated from afar. Consider the possibility that the ideas I’m articulating here would be good for you to meditate on right now, Aquarius.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Have you ever had the wind knocked out of you? It feels weird for a short time, but leaves no lasting damage. I’m expecting that you will experience a form of that phenomenon sometime soon. Metaphorically speaking, the wind will get knocked out of you. But wait—before you jump to conclusions and curse me out for predicting this, listen to the rest of my message. The wind that will get knocked out of you will be a wind that needed to be knocked out—a wind that was causing confusion in your gut-level intuition. In other words, you’ll be lucky to get that wind knocked out of you. You’ll feel much better afterwards, and you will see things more clearly.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 April 12 – April 19, 2012

An In-Depth Program in Herbal Medicine In this four month program, we will study medicinal plants, aromatherapy, using herbs for different body systems, medicine making and wild harvesting herbs. Join in our excitement as we explore the healing power of plants. Now approved for CEU’s for nurses and chiropractors! This continuing nursing education activity was approved by Montana Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Herbal Foundations has also been approved by the Montana Board of Chiropractors.

Msla Affiliate.

WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS

Family & Friends: Tues. 6:30 p.m.,Thurs. 10:00 a.m. Providence.Ctr., 902 N. Orange St., Rm. 109 Recovering?: Call 552-5494 for mtg. info


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

MITCHELL MASSAGE THERAPY

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

Find me on Facebook

406-207-9480 MitchellMassage.abmp.com

SERVICES CARPENTRY GENERAL CONSTRUCTION, commercial/residential, new/remodels, bathrooms, kitchens, additions, etc. FREE ESTIMATES, licensed and insured, 45 years experience, Kirtious Construction, Kirt Harding, 406580-8478 or email: kirtious1@gmail.com

CHILDCARE Iddy Biddies has openings! -At Iddy Biddies we strive to work in conjunction with families, providing a well-rounded education to a small group of inspired young individuals by encouraging a love for nature, adventure, and the arts. Our thoughtfully planned, rich en-

vironment makes learning inevitably fun! Please visit us at 2901 Eaton St., or call 406-728-5055 anytime to view our loving facility. We look forward to meeting you!

tanadisabilitylawyer.com or call 721-7744

CLEANING

HANDYWOMAN Painting, General Carpentry, Cleaning-Out, Tile. Reasonable, Reliable, Efficient. 30 Years. Call Debra D. 370-6710

Normal house cleaning Paying off loans and need a couple extra jobs. Generally: 3 -4 hours, around $50 ish, flexible schedule, dependable and honest. Jodie 2533305

FINANCIAL FREE Booklet and tips on appealing a denial of Social Security Disability Benefits. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.themon-

HANDYMAN

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

MISCELLANEOUS Errand and Grocery Shopping done for you. You need it done, give me a call. Lic. and Ins. Angie 406-690-3361

PETCARE House and Pet Sitting I will watch your home and animals. Dogs to exotics. Too busy? Daily

dog walking. Play and purr time, yard, litter, cage cleaning included. Angie 406-690-3361. Licensed and insured.

TRAVEL ND COMMUTERS UNITE! Ride from Williston kicking butt? Choose RNR Stagelines. Relax. Rest. Arrive rarin’ to go. 406-7777323

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes*

Licensed & Insured Interior & Exterior Painting Free Estimates

GPM HEATING COOLING & PLUMBING Furnace & A/C preseason check & clean

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Black’s Deck Finishing & Residential Painting

(406) 531-7872 blacksdfrpainting.com

$75 • Lawn Mowing • Trimming • Clean-up

Serving Missoula, Ravalli, and Mineral counties.

406-493-6824

406-241-2598

UMPHREY

1814 North Ave. W.

PHOTOGRAPHY & GALLERY Weddings Portraits • Birthdays

550-2375

Oriental & Fine Rug Cleaning

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

1522 S. Reserve 493-0874 www.umphreyphoto.com

Contact us to find out how you can save 20% on your Replacement windows.

728-3180 550 Hawthorne St. (Next to Safeway off Broadway)

AUTO CRUISEGENERAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

IMPORTS 2008 Toyota Scion xD $12500 Great car. 5 speed, 30mpg city 35 mpg hw. Under 27k miles. Selling below book. Studded snow tires. 406-3964355

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 April 12 – April 19, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Friday, May 4, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: CONSTRUCTION OF APPROXIMATELY 1072 SQUARE YARDS OF 4” ASPHALT, CONSTRUCTION OF 862 SQUARE YARDS OF 9” CONCRETE PAVEMENT WITH INTEGRAL CURB & GUTTER, PLACEMENT OF APPROXIMATELY 512 LINEAL FEET OF “TYPE L” CURB & GUTTER, AND PLACEMENT OF APPROXIMATELY 2452 SQUARE FEET OF 4” CONCRETE SIDEWALK NEAR THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA IN MISSOULA, MT. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the project manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula University of Montana CTEP opening Friday, May 4, 2012.” The envelopes shall also be plainly marked with the bidder’s name, address and Montana contractor’s registration number, if available, and the following words: Federal Aid Project #: STPE 8199(102) Project Name: CROSSWALK IMPRV - MSLA MDT UPN: 7485 The contract documents consisting of Plans and Specifications (Proposal) may be examined or obtained at the Engineer’s office: Territorial-Landworks, Inc.; 620 Addison, PO Box 3851; Missoula, MT 59806 The bid proposal will be available for a deposit of $60.00 per set, which is not refundable. A $10.00 shipping and handling fee will be charged if plans are mailed. In addition, the bid proposal may also be examined at the following locations: Missoula Plans Exchange (406) 549-5002 Flathead Builders Exchange (406) 755-5888 Helena Plans Report (406) 442-4162 Persons or firms desiring to qualify or bid on this construction on the basis of a joint venture shall declare their intention by executing a Declaration of Joint Venture and Power of Attorney. Joint Venture affidavits must be included with the Bid Proposal. There will be a non-mandatory Pre-bid Conference on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. Interested Contractors are encouraged to attend and shall convene at Mayor’s Conference Room, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana. Contractors and any of the Contractors’ subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800-5566694. Contractors are required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by Contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as set out in the bid proposal. Contractors are also required to include within their bid their special fuel user’s permit number. Any bids submitted without the bidder’s special fuel user’s permit number will be considered nonresponsive. Any contract entered into pursuant to this advertise-

ment is subject to all appropriate Federal Laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The City of Missoula hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this invitation; disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation. The Disadvantaged Business Enterprises’ contract goals are 0%. In accordance with Section 49-3207, MCA, Contractors agree that for this contract all hiring will be made on the basis of merit and qualifications and that there will be no discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, political ideas, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental disability, or national origin by the persons performing the contract. Each bid proposal must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier’s check, bank money order, bank draft, or bid bond payable to City of Missoula, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful bidder(s) shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a labor and materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a Certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided prior to issuance of the Notice of Award. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, May 4, 2012. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified on the first page in this Invitation to Bid. The City of Missoula reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the bid, which is in the best interests of the City of Missoula. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at 406-552-6080. City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m., on Tuesday, April 10, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Curb and Sidewalk Improvements Arthur Ave. – Beckwith Ave. to South Ave. City of Missoula Project 11-018 This project consists of removing and replacing approximately 2,000 square feet of monolithic curb/sidewalk, a 1,000 square feet of four and six inch sidewalk, 300 lineal feet of curb and associated improvements. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 11018 Arthur Ave. – Beckwith Ave. to South Ave. curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s

check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 2:00 p.m. on April 10, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 April 12 – April 19, 2012

interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 4:00 p.m., on Friday, April 27, 2012, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: Curb and Sidewalk Improvements S. 6th St. & Schilling St. – Kemp St. to S. 7th St. City of Missoula Project 10-035 This project consists of a base bid including approximately 2000 lineal feet of curb/gutter, 10,000 square feet of 4 & 6 inch sidewalk and topsoil with a bid alternate to complete street improvements including sumps, cut/fill, road sub-base &base, asphalt milling and installation of 3 inch asphalt. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 10035 S. 6th St. & Schilling St. – Kemp St. to S. 7th St. curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the

latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 4:00 p.m. on April 27, 2012. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406) 552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON MODIFICATION OF MISSOULA URBAN RENEWAL PLAN TO APPROVE A CERTAIN PROJECT AS AN URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council (the “Council”) of the City of Missoula, Montana (the “City”), will hold a public hearing on the modification of the City’s Urban Renewal District II Plan (the “Urban Renewal Plan”) to approve the Project as an urban renewal project on April 23, 2012 at 7:00 p.m., at the Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana. The Missoula Housing Authority (the “MHA”) owns the nearly 11-acre former Intermountain Lumber Site located in the District on Russell Street, generally between Wyoming Street and South 2nd Street (the “Intermountain Site”). The Farran Group, LLC, a Montana limited liability company (the “Developer”), has entered into an agreement with the MHA to purchase approximately 9.29 acres of the Intermountain Site (the “Project Site”), for private mixed-use development. As a first phase of development at the Project Site, the Developer proposes the construction of 196 market-rate apartments within seven, three-story, garden-style buildings, including a clubhouse, swimming pools and landscaped lawn areas (the “Project”). The estimated cost of the Project is $17.9 million. The City proposes to issue up to $1,370,000 of Tax Increment Urban Renewal Bonds (the “Bonds”), to be used to pay

the costs of eligible Project activities, including: construction of Milwaukee Way, including new curb, gutter and sidewalks; demolition and removal of concrete foundations and asphalt from the Project Site; improvements to Russell Street, including pedestrian lighting and other public improvements; extension of basic utilities to the Project Site, including water, storm water and wastewater main lines; the design, engineering, testing and survey work necessary to accomplish the foregoing; and amounts necessary to establish necessary reserves and to pay costs of the sale and issuance of the Bonds. The Bonds would be payable from the tax increment generated by the Project Site. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard or may file written comments with the City Clerk prior to such hearing. Dated: April 9, 2012 /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on April 23, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to amend the annual appropriations for the City of Missoula, as set forth in the Fiscal Year 2012 Budget and Capital Improvement Program that increases the total City budget by $1,938,479. A copy of the resolution is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WITH RESPECT TO PLEDGE OF REVOLVING FUND OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA TO POOLED SPECIAL SIDEWALK, CURB, GUTTER AND ALLEY APPROACH BONDS, SERIES 2009A CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 9, 2012, the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana (the “City”), adopted a Resolution Relating to Pooled Special Sidewalk, Curb, Gutter and Alley Approach Bonds, Series 2012A; Authorizing the Issuance of the Series 2012A Bonds and Making Certain Findings with Respect to the Pledge of the Revolving Fund of the City of Missoula to the Security Therefor (the “Resolution”). The City will issue its Pooled Special Sidewalk, Curb, Gutter and Alley Approach Bonds, Series 2012A (the “Series 2012A Bonds”), in an original aggregate principal amount estimated not to exceed $825,000, in order to (i) finance a portion of the costs of certain sidewalk, curb, gutter, and alley approach improvements throughout the City (the “Improvements”), (ii) fund a deposit to the Special Improvement District Revolving Fund of the City (the “Revolving Fund”), and (iii) pay certain costs associated with the issuance of the Series 2012A Bonds. Principal of and interest on the Series 2012A Bonds will be paid primarily from special assessments levied against the property located adjacent to the Improvements, as identified in the Resolution. Subject to the limitations of Montana Code Annotated, Section 7-12-4222, the general fund of the City may be used to provide loans to the Revolving Fund or a general tax levy may be imposed on all taxable property in the City to meet the financial requirements of the Revolving Fund. Pursuant to the Resolution, the City Council

found it to be in the public interest, and in the best interests of the City and the Improvements, to secure payment of principal of and interest on the Series 2012A Bonds by the Revolving Fund, and authorized the City to enter into undertakings and agreements therefor with respect to the Revolving Fund and the Series 2012A Bonds. On Monday, April 23, 2012, at or after 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers at Missoula City Hall, located at 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana, the City Council will conduct a public hearing on the pledge of the Revolving Fund to the above-referenced Series 2012A Bonds. Further information regarding the Improvements, the Revolving Fund, the Series 2012A Bonds or other matters in respect thereof may be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, or by telephone at (406) 552-6078. Dated: April 9, 2012. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MONTANA /s/ Marty Rehbein City Clerk IN JUSTICE COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA BEFORE JOHN E. ODLIN, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Cause No. CV-2012-0036514 AMENDED SUMMONS FOR COLLECTION OF A DEBT. REANNE INC., dba AXENT EDGE and AXENT GREEN, Plaintiff, vs. DEREK STEBNER, COPPER MOUNTAIN REAL ESTATE, INC., dba, GRAND CENTRAL APARTMENTS, MULLAN HEIGHTS APARTMENTS, and RIVERSIDE APARTMENTS, INGLEWOOD HOLDINGS, LLC, Series 5 Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, GREETINGS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed with the abovenamed Justice of the Peace, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the above-entitled Court and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff or Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service. If you fail to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in this Complaint. A $20.00 fee must be accompanied by the answer for each Defendant. WITNESS my hand this 22nd day of March, 2012. /s/ John E. Odlin, Justice of the Peace MISSOULA COUNTY Attention Lewis and Clark RSID 8918 and Sunset West RSID 8925: The Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, also known as the Consumer Confidence Report for the monitoring period of January 1st through December 31, 2011 is available upon request by calling Tami Quinn at 406-370-1838. MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Competitive Funding Opportunity Missoula County is currently accepting competitive applications from governmental or nonprofit organizations that are currently engaged in substance abuse prevention work in Missoula County. If your organization meets one or more of the following criteria you may be eligible for funding: (1) maintains a coalition that coordinates substance abuse prevention efforts; (2) provides community education about the risks and costs of abusing alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; (3) offers supervised non-school hour activities that give young people alternatives to drug use and opportunities for positive youth development; or (4) pro-


PUBLIC NOTICES vides early intervention to help youth and families address alcohol, tobacco and other drug problems. Activities must be research based. Funding will be for twelve months, beginning July 1, 2012 and ending June 30, 2013. For more information or to receive an application form, please call Peggy Seel, Senior Grants Administrator at 258-4743. Applications may be picked up at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, or on the web, http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/op gweb/Grants/. Deadline for submittal is Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 3:00 p.m. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION for the issuance of a MISSOULA CityCounty AIR QUALITY PERMIT Source: Wood Chipping Plant Applicant: Johnson Brothers Forest Products The Missoula City-County Health Department has received a complete application for an Air Quality Permit for a wood chipping plant to be operated at the following location: Section 28, Township 14 North, Range 20 West at 9405 Futurity Drive, Missoula County. Upon review of the permit application and other information, the Department finds that Johnson Brothers Forest Products has filed a complete application indicating the proposed facility is capable of meeting applicable requirements of the Air Pollution Control Program. Therefore, the Department hereby gives notice of the preliminary determination to issue an Air Quality Permit to Johnson Brothers Forest Products to operate the wood chipping plant. The permit will be issued with several conditions attached. The Department will make a final determination concerning the application on April 30th, 2012. Any interested person may review a copy of the application and proposed permit at the Environmental Health Division, 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. Written comments on the preliminary determination will be accepted until 5:00 PM April 27th, 2012. Comments should be sent to the attention of Benjamin Schmidt, Air Quality Specialist (email: bschmidt@co.missoula.mt.us ). MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE of Public Hearing Missoula County is preparing an application for a Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) Grant from the Montana Department of Commerce (DOC). TSEP grants are a state action subject to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). As required by the MEPA and DOC regulations, Missoula County has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment (EA) that evaluates the potential environmental effects and consequences of the proposed project. This notice announces the availability of the draft EA for public review and comments as well as the date and time of a Public Hearing regarding the proposed project. The proposed action generally consists of the replacement of the Riverview Drive Bridge crossing the Clearwater River approximately one mile west of Seeley Lake. Copies of the draft EA are available for review at the office of the Missoula Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808. Missoula County will consider all substantive comments received in response to the draft EA. The Missoula County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18th, 2012 at 199 West Pine, Basement Level Room B14, in order to discuss the draft EA and present the preliminary engineering research for the proposed project. At the Public Hearing,

the proposed project will be explained, including the purpose and proposed area of the project, activities, budget, environmental issues, and TSEP grant issues. After the hearing, all comments will be reviewed and considered and Missoula County will decide that either: 1.An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is necessary; 2.The Environmental Assessment did not adequately reflect the issues raised by the proposed action and must be revised; or 3.An EIS is not necessary, and make a final decision on the proposed action (submitting the application for TSEP funding). All interested persons will be given the opportunity and are encouraged to ask questions and to express their opinions regarding this proposed project and its environmental impacts. Comments may be given orally at the hearing or submitted in writing before 1:30 p.m. on April 18th, 2012. Written comments should be sent to: Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808. For further information, contact Erik Dickson, Missoula County Engineer, at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, or call (406) 2583772. /s/ Board of Commissioners, Missoula County. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Missoula Board County Commissioners will hold a public meeting for the purpose of obtaining views from the residents of the County regarding the Preliminary Engineering Reports and the submittal of a Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) application for the replacement of the Riverview Drive Bridge crossing the Clearwater River approximately one mile west of Seeley Lake. The Public Meeting will be held at 6:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, April 19, 2012, at the Seeley Lake Elementary School, Seeley Lake, Montana. The County is considering submitting an application to the Montana Department of Commerce for a TSEP Grant, and wants to obtain public comment on the proposal. The discussion at the meeting will be the purpose of the TSEP Program, the key components and costs of the proposal, and the estimated cost. At the public meeting everyone will be given the opportunity to express his or her opinion regarding the County’s proposal. Comments may be given orally at the meeting or submitted in writing before 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, 2012. Written comments should be sent to: Missoula County Board of Commissioners at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, 59802. After hearing public comment, the Commissioners will make decisions relative to the proposal. For further information, contact Erik Dickson, Missoula County Engineer, at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808, or call (406) 2583772. A copy of the TSEP Grant Application Guidelines is available for review at the office of the Missoula Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808 during regular office hours. MISSOULA COUNTY The Missoula City-County Health Board will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the Missoula City-County Health Code on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 12:15 p.m. or soon thereafter in the second floor conference room of the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The Department is proposing a new regulation regarding Drop-in Child Care Centers. The Board will take public comments at the hearing. Written comments may be submitted on or before April 18,

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s 2012 by mailing them to Health Code Comments, MCCHD, 301 W Alder St., Missoula, MT 59802; faxing them to (406) 2584781 or emailing them to envhealth@co.missoula.mt.us. For more information, a copy of the proposed regulations or to sign up for the Interested Parties mailing list, visit www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth or call 258-4755. MISSOULA COUNTY The Missoula City-County Health Board will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the Missoula City-County Health Code on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. or soon thereafter in the second floor conference room of the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The Department has proposed changes to the Alternative Systems Manual and a date change to Regulation 1 regarding wastewater treatment and disposal. The Board will take public comments at the hearing. Written comments may be submitted on or before April 18, 2012 by mailing them to Health Code Comments, MCCHD, 301 W Alder St., Missoula, MT 59802; faxing them to (406) 2584781 or emailing them to envhealth@co.missoula.mt.us. For more information, a copy of the proposed regulations or to sign up for the Interested Parties mailing list, visit www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth or call 258-4755. MISSOULA COUNTY The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) of 2701 Prospect Ave in Helena has requested a variance from the Missoula City-County Health Code, Regulation 1, which prohibits the use of holding tanks for wastewater disposal. MDT wants to use holding tanks to handle wastewater, primarily snow melt, from two shops at the Evaro Maintenance facility, located at 17185 HWY 93 N. The Missoula CityCounty Health Board has scheduled a hearing on this request for Thursday, April 19 in the second floor conference room at the Health Department at 301 West Alder in Missoula. The hearing will start at 1:00 p.m. or soon thereafter. Interested persons may present relevant information at the hearing. The application and other materials may be viewed online at www.co.missoula.mt.us/EnvHealth or at the Health Department at 301 West Alder. For more information, please call 2584755. Notice The Missoula Irrigation District will be holding a meeting on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 6 PM at Target Range School 4095 South Avenue West, Missoula, MT 59804. This meeting is held to discuss a canal repair project for a segment of canal located at the base of McCauley Butte. Public comment will be accepted on this item. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-61 Department No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT D. O'CONNER, DECEASED. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kathleen D. O'Conner, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 3110 Flynn Lane, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of

the District Court at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Dated this 27th day of March, 2012. /s/ Kathleen D. O'Conner, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Cause No. DV-11-1509 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. NORMAN E. TAYLOR Plaintiff, v. MAGDALENE L. WOLVERTON, EARL CHARLTON, WAVA CHARLTON AND RALPH F. GREEN, WALLACE PAULSON, J. VIOLA HERAK TRUST, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint, adverse to Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA to all persons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real property described in this summons or any part of the real property, defendants: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint for Quiet Title in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, within sixty (60) days after the first publication of this Summons, and set forth what interest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real property or any part of the real property situated in the county of Missoula, state of Montana as described as follows: That portion of Lot Twenty-five (25) of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Starting at the Southeast corner of said Lot Twentyfive (25), and thence running North along the East line of said Lot Twentyfive (25) a distance of 300 feet, thence at right angles and in a westerly direction a distance of 150 feet, thence at right angles and in a southerly direction 300 feet to the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25), and thence in an Easterly direction and along the South line of said Lot Twenty-five (25) a distance of 150 feet to the point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 598, Page 582 You are further notified that, unless you appear and answer, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the complaint as follows: 1. That the Court make a complete adjudication of the title to the above-described real property and that by Decree of the Court it be declared and adjudged that no Defendant has any estate or interest whatsoever in and to said land or lien or encumbrance thereon and that the title to the abovedescribed real property is quieted in Plaintiff; 2.That Defendants, Magdalena L. Wolverton, Earl Charlton, Wava Charlton and Ralph F. Green, their heirs and devisees and all other persons, known and unknown, be forever enjoined and barred from asserting

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 35, 306, 512, 538. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday April 23, 2012. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, April 26, 2012, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

any claim whatever in and to the within described real property, or any part thereof, adverse to Plaintiff; and 3. That Plaintiff have such other or further relief as the Court may deem proper. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court, the 29th day of February, 2012. /s/ Shirley E. Faust CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT Attorneys for Plaintiffs: GARLINGTON, LOHN & ROBINSON, PLLP 350 Ryman Street P. O. Box 7909 Missoula, MT 598077909 Telephone (406) 523-2500 Telefax (406) 523-2595 By: /s/ Jenny M. Jourdonnais March 22, March 29, April 5, April 12, April 19, 2012 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-12-49 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MARLA B. JENSEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Eli S. Napolitano has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed, return receipt requested, to Eli Napolitano, Personal Representative, c/o Cederberg Law Offices, P.C., PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 598078234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of March, 2012. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-12-327 Dept. No. 3 Judge John W. Larson Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Linda Michele Keener. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Linda Michele Keener to Michele Linda Keener. The hearing will be on 05/10/2012 at 9:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated: March 21, 2012 /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Nicole Borchers, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DP-11-219 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHRISTINE L. SHULL, Decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Von A. Dailey at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2820 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 5th day of December, 2011. /s/ Von A. Dailey, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP12-63 Karen S. Townsend, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RONALD G. DESCHAMPS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said

NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on May 8, 2012, a mail ballot election for the election of two trustees for the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District will be held. Drop off locations will open at 7:00 a.m. and will continue to be open until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. Dated this 27th day of February, 2012. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County

"Turn! Turn! Turn!"--prepare to get dizzy.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 CD section? 5 Former Anaheim Stadium football player 10 "Leave it in," in proofreading 14 Show opener 15 It may waft 16 No-no: var. 17 Withdraw (off) 18 Exorcist's target 19 Gave the go-ahead 20 Medical carriers 22 Metallic gray 24 Jumped (out) 25 Tommy Lee Jones, in "Men in Black" 26 Utah city near Arches National Park 28 Scrape reminder 29 Clown name 32 "Never ___ Give You Up" 34 Stratford-___-Avon 38 Scary spot in "Hansel and Gretel" 39 Part of CAT 40 Pretty pink 41 "She Blinded Me With Science" singer Thomas 43 Poli ___ 44 Ignores socially 45 Kenyan ethnic group that Barack Obama, Sr. was part of 46 Good buddy 47 Sinuous swimmer 48 What the four longest entries in this puzzle (except this one) are examples of 54 Get it and you're fired 55 ___ Lankan 56 That dude's 57 "Hi and Lois" cartoonist Browne 58 Russian war planes 60 Brave way to solve crosswords 62 Actress Ward 63 2007 #1 NBA draft pick Greg 64 Like contortionists 65 Attention from the cops 66 Infamous fiddler

67 Show with Stefon, the City Correspondent for New York City 68 Twice less than thrice

DOWN

1 University of Georgia sports fans 2 Put on a winter coat? 3 The shortest Beatle 4 Sweet breakfast 5 Billboard's 2010 Artist of the Year 6 God who sounds like a zodiac sign 7 Preferred term instead of "Gypsy" 8 "Famous" cookie guy 9 Like a bat out of hell 10 Surface for a pot of boiling water 11 Occupied 12 Guest commenter Roger on the 70th Anniversary DVD edition of "Casablanca" 13 Alan of "Suburgatory" 21 Favorite Brian of crossword writers 23 JFK alternative 27 They support sleepers 28 Slowpoke's home 29 Muscleman's asset 30 Cirque du Soleil show with eggs 31 Pouty actress Renee 33 Rechargeable battery type 35 Savannah-based TV chef 36 Planetoid 37 "The Legend of Zelda" console, for short 42 Shrill cries 44 Dos times tres 48 Matt stuck to Greg Kinnear in a Farrelly Brothers movie 49 Word after zinc or iron 50 Song for a diva 51 Car deodorizer scent 52 Light purple shade 53 Glide on a pond 59 ___-cone 61 Code at an ATM 62 "___ Nuff" (Black Crowes set)

Last week’s solution

©2012 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 April 12 – April 19, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Missoula County RSID 901 Lolo Water District 2011 Drinking Water Quality Report This report summarizes the system’s compliance with state and federal drinking water rules and regulations. The report will not be mailed to individual homes/consumers. Contact the office at (406) 273-2733 or sid901@montana.com if you have any questions or would like a copy of this report. Is my water safe? We are pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. This report is a snapshot of last year's water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. We are committed to pro- The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. The EPA or the State allows us to monitor for viding you with information because informed customers are our best allies. This report will not be certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. For contaminants that are not monitored yearly, we mailed to individual homes/consumers. have reviewed our records back five years. The presence of contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

Water Quality Data Table

Do I need to take special precautions? Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791). Where does my water come from? Our water source is groundwater from three wells. Two of the wells are located on Glacier Drive and draw from the Bitterroot Aquifer; the third well is located along Highway 12 and draws from the Lolo Creek Aquifer. Source water assessment and its availability. We have a source water protection plan available from our office that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination. Why are there contaminants in my drinking water? Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses; organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems; and radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. How can I get involved? We at Lolo Water are on duty around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources. Please call our office at 406-273-2733 if you have any questions. Additional Information for Lead. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County RSID901 - Lolo Water District is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Violations: We are pleased to report our system had no violations.

For more information please contact: Jasen Neese Address: PO Box 476 Lolo, MT 59847 • (406) 273-2733

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 April 12 – April 19, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Annual Drinking Water Quality Report, 2011 El Mar/New Meadows Water System/RSID 8916 PWSID#MT0000517 We’re very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from seven wells. We have completed a source water protection plan that provides more information such as potential sources of contamination to our drinking water supply. This plan can be found online at http://nris.state.mt.us/wis/swap/swapquery.asp. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. We’re pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Tami Quinn. She is a certified operator with years of experience and can be reached at 370-1838. At the present time the El Mar/New Meadows water system is owned by a Rural Special Improvement District and is managed by Missoula County. No regular meetings are held. El Mar Estates/New Meadows water system monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The table below shows the results of any detects in our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2011. For constituents that are not monitored yearly, we have reviewed our records back the last 5 years. We have monitored for lead and copper, and all of our samples are in compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. We now monitor for lead and copper every 3 years. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Missoula County is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

In the table below you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions: No Detects - ND- laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2000 years or a single penny in $10,000,000. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Action Level (AL) - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - (mandatory language) Treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - (mandatory language) The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - (mandatory language) The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)-picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Sample Date Contaminant

Violation

Highest Level Detected

Range

Units

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source

Nitrate+Nitrite As Nitrogen

No

7/5/11

1.52

0.89 to 1.52

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; As Nitrogen to 1.52 Leaching from septic tanks, Sewage; erosion of natural Deposits

Barium

No

7/5/11

0.5

0.4 to 0.5

ppm

2

2

Erosion of Natural deposits Discharge of drilling waste Discharge from metal refineries

Lead

No

6/28/11

0.001

ND to 0.001

ppm

0

0.015

Corrosion of household plumbing, Erosion of Natural Deposits

Copper

No

6/28/11

0.11

ND to 0.11

ppm

0

1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing, Erosion of Natural Deposits Leaching from wood preservatives

Inorganic Contaminants: Barium - Some people who drink water that contains barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure. Copper - Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water that contains copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson's disease should consult their personal doctor. Lead - Infants and children who drink water that contains lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. Nitrate - Infants below the age of six months who drink water that contains nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and if untreated could die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome. Our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future. If you have any questions or concerns about El Mar/New Meadows drinking water, please feel free to call Tami Quinn at 406-370-1838.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 April 12 – April 19, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICES Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Katherine D. Bush, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, PLLP, PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 30th day of March, 2012. /s/ Katherine D. Bush, Personal Representative. /s/ Douglas G. Skjelset, Attorney for the Estate Notice The Missoula Irrigation District will be holding a meeting on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 6 PM at Target Range School 4095 South Avenue West, Missoula, MT 59804. This meeting is held to discuss a canal repair project for a segment of canal located at the base of McCauley Butte. Public comment will be accepted on this item. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR PRIOR APPROVAL OF MERGER OF BANKS AND TO ESTABLISH BRANCH OFFICES Notice is hereby given by Community Bank, Inc., 63239 US Highway 93, Ronan, MT that it intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board and the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions for permission to merge with Community Bank- Missoula, Inc., 3010 American Way, Missoula, MT 59808. The Federal Reserve System considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of the banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application, to (1) the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, P.O. Box 291, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55480-0291, or (2) Commissioner of Banking and Financial Institutions, P.O. Box 200546, Helena, MT 59620. The comment period will not end before May 16, 2012, and may be somewhat longer. With respect to the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions, processing of the application will be completed no earlier than the 15th day, nor generally later than the 45th day following the date of the last required publication. The Federal Reserve Board’s Policy Statement regarding notice of applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Jacqueline G. King, Community Affairs Officer, at (612) 204-5470. The

Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The nonconfidential portion of the application file is available for inspection within one day following the request for such file. It may be inspected in the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions office during regular business hours. Photocopies of information in the nonconfidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request. A schedule of charges for such copies can be obtained from the Montana Division of Banking and Financial Institutions. Community Bank, Inc. By: /s/ Gordon Zimmerman Its: President NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER DEED OF TRUST TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 1. Notice is hereby given to the public and to the following: Nancy K. Coleman 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Nancy K. Coleman P.O. Box 280541 Northridge CA 91328 Nancy K. Coleman 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 Travis Coleman 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 Travis Coleman 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Pinnacle Holdings Montana, LLC 16460 Hashknife Way Missoula MT 59808 Pinnacle Holdings Montana, LLC 1821 South Ave. W. #408 Missoula MT 59801 2. Real Property. This Notice concerns the following described Real Property: Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana. 3. Loan Secured by the Real Property. First Interstate Bank made a loan to Nancy K. Coleman (“Coleman”). Coleman and Travis Colemen executed a Deed of Trust encumbering the Real Property to secure payment and satisfaction of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of $65,000.00. 4. Deed of Trust Securing the Loan Obligation. Grantors Coleman and Travis Coleman, executed and delivered to First Interstate Bank a Deed of Trust described as follows: Date: April 7, 2011 Grantor: Nancy K. Coleman and Travis Coleman Original Trustee: Stewart Title of Missoula County Lender/Beneficiary: First Interstate Bank Recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana, as follows: Date: April 7, 2011 Recording reference: Document No.201105918, Book: 876, Page: 133 Substitute Trustee. The

following was substituted as Trustee: Dean A. Stensland Boone Karlberg PC 201 West Main, Suite 300 P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, MT 59807-9199 Telephone: (406) 543-6646 Facsimile: (406) 549-6804 by a written document recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana as follows: Dated: January 10, 2012 Recorded: January 11, 2012 Recording reference: Document No. 201200710, Book: 888, Page: 187 5. Default. Coleman , is in default of the terms and obligations contained in the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust. Coleman is in default due to the failure to timely pay First Interstate Bank. 6. Amount Owing. The amounts owing are as follows: Principal: $63,591.20 Interest through 1/24/12: $2,639.47 Late charge balance: $75.00 Trustee’s Sale Guarantee: $340.00 TOTAL $66,645.67 Interest continues to accrue on this Promissory Note and loan at the daily rate of $13.0666 from January 25, 2012, until paid. The total balance due on this obligation secured by the Deed of Trust, is the sum of the above items, plus attorney fees and costs allowed by law. The exact amount owing as of the date of sale will be provided upon request made to the undersigned prior to the date of said sale. 7. Acceleration. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust previously elected to consider all principal and interest immediately due and payable as a consequence of the default under the Deed of Trust. 8. Notice of Sale. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust and the Trustee hereby elect to sell or cause to be sold the Real Property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. The sale will be held at the following date, time and place: Date: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: Missoula County Courthouse 200 West Broadway Missoula MT 59802 The Trustee will sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder, in cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of the sale. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. By: /s/ Dean A. Stensland Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA) : COUNTY OF MISSOULA) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 25th day of January, 2012, by Dean A. Stensland, Successor Trustee. /s/ Nancy Randazzo Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: March 1st, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of

Trust”) dated 10/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200728652 Bk-808 Pg289, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jonathon A. Gash, a married person and Jacquilan K. Gash, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot A124 of Windsor Park Phase IV, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 7, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $193,456.49. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $189,631.19, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 20, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (in-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 April 12 – April 19, 2012

cluding foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.98835) 1002.209151-File NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 7 AND 8 IN BLOCK 5 OF WEST RIVERSIDE, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF William D Ailport, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to New Century Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 18, 2005 and recorded on February 22, 2005 in Bk 748, Page 480 under Document No. 200504234. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee, for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-2. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $725.19, beginning December 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 16, 2011 is $100,675.69 principal, interest at the rate of 7.10% now totaling $8,029.23, late charges in the amount of $471.25, escrow advances of $1,156.45, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,072.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.58 per diem, late charges,

and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 16, 2012 /s/ Marti A Ottley First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339, Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 16th day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti A Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Sec-

retary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Fmc V. Ailport 41722.165 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 42 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. ONE, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Dawn Marie Harrell, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 18, 2009 and recorded on May 22, 2009 in Book 839 pg. 1265 as Document No. 200912027. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1049.42, beginning October 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 20, 2011 is $191356.95 principal, interest at the rate of 4.87500% now totaling $2,817.77, late charges in the amount of $157.41, escrow advances of $117.32, and other fees and expenses advanced of $92.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.56 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses


PUBLIC NOTICES to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 23, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho)) ss. County of Bingham) On this 23rd day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Marti A Ottley Notary Public Inkom, ID Commission expires: 8/15/2012 Everhome V Harrel 41470.254 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 29, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 74 OF MALONEY RANCH, PHASE VI, A PLATTED SUBDIVISON IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Josh Rohde and Erin Rohde, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 27, 2005 and Recorded on July 1, 2005 under Document # 200516377, in BK-755 Pg-425. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,723.05, beginning August 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 4, 2012 is $295,767.22 principal, interest at the rate of 4.75000% now totaling $7,139.97, late charges in the amount of $172.28, escrow advances of $2,676.88, and other fees and expenses advanced of $653.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.49 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include

the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 23, 2012 /s/ Marti A Ottley First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee First American Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 23rd day of January, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Marti A Ottley, know to me to be the Asst Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Blackfoot, ID Commission expires: 2/18/2014 PHHV Rohde 41392.587 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/10/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which TIMOTHY M. SOLEM AND LAURA I. SARMIENTO, AS JOINT TENANTS AND TO THE SURVIVOR OF SAID NAMED JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 10/04/2006 and recorded 10/23/2006, in document No. 200627466 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 785 at Page Number 1080 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 OF HAWTHORNE’S, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 22 OF PLATS AT PAGE 32 Property Address: 2118 INVERNESS PLACE, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC2. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of

which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $223,586.45 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.25% per annum from 09/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/28/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 11-0063718 FEI NO. 1006.140697 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/13/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which RANDELL J OPPEGAARD, AND LINDA M OPPEGAARD, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS AKA RANDALL J. OPPEGARD as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/09/2004 and recorded 07/06/2004, in document No. 200418680 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 735 at Page Number 987 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, BEING LOT 2 IN BLOCK 63 OF KNOWLES ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1413 S 4TH ST W, Missoula, MT 59801-2435. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-6. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER

WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $96,994.54 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.875% per annum from 11/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/02/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0016099 FEI NO. 1006.155130 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 06/29/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which WILLIAM C. SPARR, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 10/25/2006 and recorded 10/30/2006, in document No. 200628044 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 786 at Page Number 237 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 1 OF SUSAN ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 1005 PATTY ANN DRIVE, Missoula, MT 59804. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 20071, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $206,990.70 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 8.25% per annum from 03/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary antic-

ipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 02/22/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0012470 FEI NO. 1006.154172 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/11/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which TIMOTHY S. SULLIVAN AND KATHLEEN A. SULLIVAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SOURCE, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 05/16/2006 and recorded 05/25/2006, in document No. 200612039 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 775 at Page Number 2 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA IN THE STATE OF MT LOT 9 IN BLOCK 4, OF SPRING HILLS ADDITION NO. 6, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2306 HIGHWOOD DR, MISSOULA, MT 59803. Property Address: 2306 HIGHWOOD DR, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 10/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $156,950.48 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has

directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/02/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0016000 FEI NO. 1006.154923 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/16/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MARK C. MODERIE, ANTONIA B. MODERIE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/08/2006 and recorded 09/13/2006, in document No. 200623422 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 783 at Page Number 74 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 274 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 4018 YORKSHIRE PLACE, Missoula, MT 59808. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $168,759.08 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.75% per annum from 12/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/05/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120017817 FEI NO. 1006.155033 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 07/20/2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash,

the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JOHN P KELLY as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/19/2006 and recorded 01/24/2006, in document No. 200601754 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 767 at Page Number 1584 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 57 OF SOUTH MISSOULA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 700 CLEVELAND STREET, Missoula, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST 2006-3. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $144,276.14 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 2.50% per annum from 09/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 03/07/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 120018601 FEI NO. 1006.155146

LEGAL SERVICES Montana’s best injury and disability lawyers. Automobile accidents, bodily injury and disabilities, workers compensation, social security disability. Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 April 12 – April 19, 2012


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387

549-3934

LITTLE

Little was brought to the shelter because her family just had a new baby, and it became too overwhelming to take care of a newborn and a dog at the same time! She's a sweet little lady, just a bit shy, but quite playful and well-behaved.

S A LT

SASHA

Sasha's family lost their home, so now Sasha is also looking for a new home (as well as a new family). She's a quiet dog with good manners, and all she needs to be smiling once again is someone special to love and take care of her.

This 3-year-old shorthaired cat is quite the charmer! She gets along well with other cats and enjoys sitting on your lap. She was transferred to the Humane Society from another shelter so that she could find a loving home. Call (406)549-3934 for more information.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

BENTLEY

Bentley is full of energy and loves to play. In fact, we think he would play fetch for hours if he just had someone who could throw the ball that long! He has great instincts and needs just a bit of training to help him control all that enthusiasm. 2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

PICKLES

Pickles was once part of a feral cat colony. He's certainly not feral now, but he is very shy. He loves to be held and petted, but left on his own he will find a safe place to hide.

K R Y S TA L

Gorgeous Krystal has snowy white fur. Her eyes peer at you beseeching you to take her home! She's a sidekick. She loves to be petted but also has her own agenda to keep. She's a busy lady!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

D I VA

This petite cat has one of the sweetest faces and one of the screechiest meows we've ever heard! She really doesn't like living in a cage, and tells us that constantly. Outside her cage, however, she's quiet, mellow and ready to purr. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

ERIKA

Four-year-old Erika is super snuggly! She loves to be held. She is worried she will have to spend a long time at the shelter. She sees all the other cats for adoption and worries no one will pick her.

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

The Flower Bed

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

BEAR

KALLIE

This lovely lady was abandoned out in the country, where she was rescued by a caring family. She's very loving and friendly, so she's certainly already learned everything about being a good pet.

S AVA N N A H

Small in stature but big in heart, Savannah is a gentle one-year-old tortoiseshell. She loves to snuggle under the blankets. She purrs and purrs when you scratch her behind the ears.

This petite 5-year-old male gets along great with other cats. He enjoys playing, lounging in the sun, and circling your ankles to greet you. Bear is a "Private Investigator." Visit www.myhswm.org to view all adoptable animals at the Humane Society.

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

HONEY

Sweet as her name, Honey would love to be adopted with her brother Bear. She is a petite Maine Coon cross with the softest fur. Honey will meow politely for your attention and likes to curl in your lap.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 CELESTE

Celeste could very well become your own piece of heaven. She is a big, beautiful four-year-old who came to us in the Spring of 2011. Being that her name means “heavenly," we can’t think of a better angel for any household, and neither can she!

BOULDER

A boulder is defined as a large, smooth piece of rock detached from its place of origin. Boulder was detached from his place of origin as a kitten during our 2010 kitten season. He is a beautiful 1 1/2-year-old Tuxedo kitty. Equus & Paws, L.L.C.

NESSA

The epitome of glamour. This charming green-eyed five-year-old was born to be the star of her own show in her own home. Although she has called AniMeals home since June of 2011, she is not giving up hope that her forever family is coming to get her. 715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113 A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town 105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

2825 Stockyard Rd. www.equusandpaws.com • 406.552.2157

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 April 12 – April 19, 2012

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!

SERENA

Serena means calm or serene in Latin. I think that is pretty fitting for me considering I never get too worked up about anything. I just sit back and take life as it comes. If I’ve learned one thing in my five short years it’s that sweating the small stuff just isn’t worth the worry. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.


RENTAL

SUSTAINAFIEDS

APARTMENTS

Ask about our line of efficient and gas appliances. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com

1 bedroom downtown by Public Library. $525 W/S/G paid, coin-op laundry & off-street parking. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

Bulman Law Associates P.L.L.C. A coordinated team approach. People helping people recover from injuries. www.bulmanlaw.com or call 721-7744

1 bedroom in 4-plex near UM. All utilities paid. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. $475. GATEWEST 728-7333

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

1315 East Broadway #1. 1bed/1bath near University & on bus line. Carport, storage and coin-ops on site. $600. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1323 Grant St. “B” newer studio, semi-secluded, W/D in unit, A/C. $575 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Renewable Energy Supply and Design. Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com

1547 S. Higgins Ave. #5 1bed/1bath HEAT PAID! Centrally located near schools & shopping, features coin-ops on site, off-street parking, & A/C. $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Residential and commercial remote and utility-tied power systems and solar water pumping. Call us about your power project! Oasis Montana located in Western Montana, open weekdays. 406-777-4309. www.oasismontana.com Through creative partnerships and innovative development, the Missoula Housing Authority provides quality housing solutions for low and middle income households in Missoula and the surrounding area. Visit us at missoulahousing.org

Bicycle Repair Cycle-powered bike towing, same day, pickup & return bike repair service. UBI Certified Bicycle Technician. 728-5882. Archie’s Backyard Bike Shop

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The Environmentally Friendly Alternative in Local Cab Service! Green Taxi is a hybrid taxi service for Missoula County operating from 6:00 am to 3:00 am. Green Taxi provides citizens and guests of Missoula with a more fuel efficient, environmentally friendly, transportation option. Green Taxi uses a locally purchased Toyota Prius because of its low emissions and fuel efficiency. 406-728-8294 (TAXI) www.missoulagreentaxi.com

1914 S. 14th St. Brand new studios, central location, W/D, A/C, shared yard, garage space available. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

1301 MONTANA: NEWER STUDIOS, 2ND FLOOR WITH PRIVATE DECK OR SUNROOM, PERGO FLOORS!, * FREE CABLE *, *Garden City Property Management 549-6106

2 bedroom North Russell $595. H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

LAUNDRY, FULL KITCHEN W/ DISHWASHER, STORAGE, NO SMOKING OR PETS $625 & $675 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD! *Garden City Property Management 549-6106

2 bedroom 1 & bath condo, 2 years new! $850. Washer and dryer in unit, dishwasher, garbage paid, covered parking. CLEAN! No smoking. No pets. GATEWEST 728-7333 2339 Mary #3 2bed/1bath. HEAT PAID! New carpet & linoleum, shared yard, coin-ops, off-street parking, close to Reserve St. $600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1561 S. 12TH ST. W.: STUDIO, BIG WALK-IN CLOSET + ANOTHER! 2ND FLOOR, CENTRAL LOCATION, PARKING, FULL KITCHEN & BATHROOM, NO SMOKING OR DOGS CAT OK ! $425 * 1-YEAR COSTCO

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown www.alpharealestate.com

251-4707 Rent Incentive

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

professionalproperty.com

GardenCity

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Property Management

2 Bed Apt Uncle Robert Lane. $645/month Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority 2 bedroom fully accessible unit 1155 34th Street Rent: $625 Deposit: $650 Dishwasher, W/D hookups

1 Bedroom Walk to the U $525 W/G/S pd. Gas heat, coin-op laundry, off street parking, no smoking, no pets.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2 Bed Apt. 1309 Cooper $625/month

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

Office/retail space in Stephens Center. 950-2,170 sq. ft. $895-$1,990 + merchant fees.

1 Bed Apt. 528 Hickory $490/month

422 Madison • 549-6106

2 Bedroom North Russell $595 H/W/S/G/ paid, coin-op laundry, off street parking & storage.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

1409 S. 3RD ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, NEWER, MAIN FLR W/ PATIO, STORAGE, CENTRAL LOCATION – JUST OFF RUSSELL, * FREE CABLE *, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, ASSIGNED PARKING, NO SMOKING /PETS $595 *1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 5496106

FIDELITY

444 Washington 1bed/1bath, HEAT PAID, downtown, coin-ops on site. $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

549-7711 Check our website!

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

2 bedroom close to Good Food Store $695. H/W/S/G paid, dishwasher, coin-op laundry, off street parking, on a quiet cul-desac. CLEAN! No smoking, no pets. GATEWEST 728-7333

3 bedroom unit 1443 South 1st West Rent: $360 Deposit: $750 Very low income limits apply Dishwasher W/D hookups 149 West Broadway 1 bedroom apartments Rent: $475-$500 Deposit: $550 Convenient downtown location Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113 Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C13 April 12 – April 19, 2012


RENTAL 1805 PHILLIPS: 1 BEDROOM, SECOND FLR, DINING AREA, DECK-AREA, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, * SOME QUALIFICATIONS *, OFF STREET PARKING, NO SMOKING OR PETS $595 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD * Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1304 S. 1ST ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, SMALL PET OK !!, 2ND FLR, BREAKFAST BAR, NEW LINOLEUM!, STRG, PARKING, * FREE CABLE*, CENTRAL, SHARED YARD, NO SMOKING, $595 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 5496106 807 SW HIGGINS: 1 BEDROOM, BASE OF SOUTHHILLS, BIG CLOSETS, 2ND FLOOR, NEAR PATTEE ST. MARKET, SHARE BACK YARD, * FREE CABLE *, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT WELCOME ! $510 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1213 S. 6TH ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, GARDEN LEVEL W/ EGRESS, JUST OFF ORANGE ST, STORAGE, GOOD SIZE, SHARE BACK YARD, PARKING, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT

CONSIDERED ! $550 * 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $100.00 GIFT CARD *Garden City Property Management 5496106 1905 MOUNT: 1 BEDROOM, DISHWASHER, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, * FREE CABLE , PARKING, NEWER CARPET, STORAGE, FENCED BACK YARD, NO SMOKING OR PETS ALLOWED $495 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1925 S. 14TH ST. W.: 1 BEDROOM, * FREE CABLE *, CENTRAL LOCATION, STORAGE, OFF STREET PARKING, GARDEN LEVEL WITH BIG WINDOWS, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT CONSIDERED ! $525 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106 102 CAMELOT: 2 BEDROOM, CARPORT & BIG STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, ON-SITE COIN-OP LAUNDRY, BY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY & SPLASH MONTANA, NO SMOKING/DOGS, CAT OK $590 * 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP * Garden City Property Management 549-6106

MOBILE HOMES

pet, Near Good Food Store, Off street parking, On site laundry, No smoking or dogs allowed, Cat considered

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $400/month 406-273-6034

$100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $750, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

DUPLEXES 1016 Charlo #1 2bed/1bath, new carpet, freshly painted, offstreet parking, W/D hookups. $675 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bedroom duplex, W/D hookups, new interior, W/S/G paid. CLEAN! No pets, no smoking. $635. GATEWEST 7287333 218 Barclay “A” 2 bed, 1.5 bath, central Lolo location, all utilities paid. Shared yard, carport, DW & shared W/D. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

3901 O’Leary: Two bedroom, 2 story unit, Newer, Carport, Storage, Free cable, Private deck, #219 has washer and dryer, 1 1/2 bath, Dishwasher, No smoking or pets allowed $100.00 COSTCO GIFT CERTIFICATE GCPM , $825, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 824 Stoddard St. 4 bed/2.5 bath Northside home, recent remodeling, shared fenced yard, W/D hookups. $1400. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 825 SW Higgins #B2. 2bed/1bath. HEAT PAID. Single car garage. $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

HOUSES 1800 S. 4th W. #8 : Two bedroom, 2nd floor, Dining area, Big closets, Large unit, New Car-

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM.

Browse

hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN ALBERTON Petty Creek Exit. Older 2 bedroom 1.5 bath single wide on 1/2 acre. 1010 Lucinda Lane. $650/month, $650 deposit. Call Rob 602-499-4640

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No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 1 Bath Central Missoula home with a two car garage. Close to the Good Food Store. $189,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath Upper Rattlesnake home in a great neighborhood. $415,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Grant Creek/Prospect Meadows home next to open space. $322,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

6107 Brusett. 4 bed, 3 bath Martz home with 2 car garage & basement. Lower Miller Creek. MLS #20121397. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749 736 South 3rd West. Beautifully renovated 1920’s home. 5 bed, 1.5 bath. Currently used as office building. MLS #2116938. $429,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749 Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. NEW PRICES! 1400 Burns, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Character + and Ready to Move Into! Corner lot, close to schools, great trees, lots of upgrades, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, full basement, so much house for this price of $227,500. 2405227 2107 Park St. porticorealestate.com Energy-Efficient Sweet Bungalow in Slant Street ‘hood with double lot and raised beds ready to plant! 835 Rollins. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

4102 Melrose Place Landscaped corner lot. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 story. Top of line Frigidaire stainless steel appliances, fenced yard, UG sprinklers, 10 x 12 storage shed, 12 x 20 Trex deck in back, covered front Trex deck, 3 blocks from Hellgate Elementary School, $20/month HOA dues. $227,000. MLS#20111249. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Five bedroom, 4 bath townhome with 2 car garage on The Ranch Club golf course. Amazing views. Golf everyday! 2640B Tanbark Way MLS #20120690 $399,000. Call Anne for details. 546-5816 www.movemontana.com

541-547 South 2nd West. Wonderful 4-plex in great neighborhood. Suitable for condo conversion. Newer rubber membrane roof. $275,000. MLS #20120840 Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.541-547s2ndst.com

Four bed, 1-1/2 bath, 3 car garage home at 345 Brooks. Close to downtown, neighborhood coffee shop/restaurant, and university. Long time family home has potential to also have downstairs rental. Just $265,000 MLS 20117301 Call Anne 546-

5816 for details. www.movemontana.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-de-sac, 10 acres. Rodeo Rd. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Looking for a place to call home? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 5447507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Looking for homebuyer education? Call me! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 5447507. www.rochelleglasgow.com

Historic Preservation Award-winning Marshall House Beautiful professional building with great design for offices or home and awesome exposure for business. 436 S 3rd W. $395,000 2405227 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis, 2405227 porticorealestate.com I can help you sell your home! Rochelle Glasgow @ Prudential Missoula Properties. 544-7507. www.rochelleglasgow.com Immaculate Rose Park Area Home This light filled home offers a fantastic floorplan, 2 family rooms, large deck and nice backyard for entertaining. 300 Central, 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C14 April 12 – April 19, 2012

Mountain views, cute 3 bed, 2 bath, Philipsburg. ~2,000 sf., full basement. New carport, siding, windows. Large fenced yard. Walk to town, 20 minutes from Georgetown Lake, Discovery Basin. $135,000. 406-8591282. 406-529-5529.

RICE TEAM

Robin Rice 240-6503

Desirable 4-plex in a great neighborhood.

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

101 Boardwalk • 3 bed, 2 bath, 3 car garage • Zoned commercial with separate office • $320,000 MLS# 20116174

23645 Mullan • Beautiful 14 acre meadow w of Huson • Modulars/double wides on found. OK. • $169,900. MLS#20112135

NHN Peregrine Court • Almost 1/2 acre close to Ranch Club • Great views, fishing access, city sewer • $65,000 • MLS# 10007449

1641 Stoddard • Single-wide 2 bed, 2 bath 2 car garage • Fenced yard, lots of trees, covered deck • $99,500. MLS#20116883

102 Boardwalk • 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage • Zoned commercial with 48'x30' shop • $298,500 • MLS#20114242

2014 29th Avenue • 4 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • Lrg deck & basement • New furnace $225,000• MLS# 20110384

541-547 S 2nd W • Missoula $275,000 • MLS# 20120840 Newer rubber membrane roof. Owner has architectural drawings on file for condo conversion. Seller is motivated!

www.541-547s2ndst.com For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 BR, 2.5 ba stand alone super insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 2405227. porticorealestate.com PRICE REDUCED 4 bed 2 bath house on one full landscaped acre near Wye. Great Well at 30 gpm. 2 gas fireplaces, updated kitchen and bathrooms. $280,000. MLS #20120012. 9869 Lee’s Lane, Missoula. Call Anne 546-5816 for details. www.movemontana.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 2 Bdr, 1.5 Downtown Missoula condo. Zoned for Residential or Commercial use. $299,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com For a limited time a purchase of a condo at the Uptown Flats will include a large flat screen TV and assistance with up to $5000 Buyers closing costs!The Uptown Flats have two one bed one bath units at $149,900. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com Treehouse Feel in this fairly new condo with single garage. Great location close to school, bike trail, Good Food Store and town. 935B Garfield. $117,500. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND FOR SALE 10900 Crystal Creek Huge Price Reduction! Beautiful building site with 40x72 agricultural building.

Did you know? APosting a classified ad online is FREE! @ www.missoulanews.com

20.78 Acres. $230,000. MLS#20111015. 10900 Crystal Creek Road, Clinton. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 2951 Expo Parkway. 1.24 acres off I-90 between Motel 6 & Cracker Barrel. MLS #20120951, $399,000. Additional 1.57 acres at $499,000. MLS #201200952. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 552-2410 3.5 Acres on Petty Creek. Well in place, septic approved. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4,500 square foot lot on the Northside. Power & utilities in place, sewer available in alley. Zoned for single or multi-family use. $59,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 601 West Broadway. .58 acre along Clark Fork River. MLS #20120935, $1,700,000. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 552-2419 Twin Creek Road. Beautiful wooded 3.69 acres, 550 feet of Twin Creek frontage. Easy access from Hwy 200 on well-maintained county road. Modulars or manufactured homes on a permanent foundation allowed. Seller will carry contract with $50,000 down at 7 % interest. $184,900. MLS#10005586. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

COMMERCIAL 1510/1520/1530 Cooley. 54 unit 1, 2 and 3 bed apartment complex. MLS #20120934. $4,259,000. Jeremy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 552-2419 321 N. Higgins Commercial building on coveted downtown location with lots of foot traffic. Building only for sale. Call Anne 546-5816 for showing. www.movemontana.com

East Missoula Building Lot with great trees and a sweet ‘hood. $65,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN 15000 Neil Drive Enjoy country living close to town, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home. Large double detached garage with additional living quarters. Nice views and close to Forest Service land for horse back riding and hiking. $299,900. MLS#20115937. Will sell with adjacent 1.71 acre lot. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 19050 Trout Lane. Price Reduced! 5 bed, 2 bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor, large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $209,900 MLS#906641. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Florence area home on 10 acres with Bitterroot River frontage. Horse Barn, cross-fenced. $449,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Lolo End of Cul-de-sac Beauty Open, light, private, quiet and in immaculate condition. Huge yard, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with hardwood, tile and beautiful warm colors. 5697 Explorer Court. $225,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

MISSOULA’S CONDOS AT THEIR FINEST UPSCALE DOWNTOWN LIFESTYLE THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Starting at $149,900 OPEN HOUSE: Sunday Noon-4pm or call Jeff or Anne for Appointment

Jeff Ellis

Anne Jablonski

529-5087

546-5816 PORTICO REAL ESTATE

www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com ASK US ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET LOCAL FINANCING FOR YOUR PURCHASE OF ONE OF THESE LOVELY CONDOS.

3 Bdr, 2 Bath single level Stevensville area home on 6.3 cross-fenced acres with a large shop. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath home on 3.3 acres on Petty Creek. $425,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C15 April 12 – April 19, 2012


Pilsner Urquel or Peroni

Natural Directions Almond Milk

Willamette Valley Filet Mignon or Tenderloin Roast

$6.19

$2.35

$8.99

6 pack

64 oz.

lb.

Pabst 16 oz. Cans

Salted & Unsalted Tillamook Butter

Boneless Beef Cross Rib Roast

California Bunch Spinach

$1.99 16 oz.

$2.99

89¢ bunch

$16.99 24 pack

Canadian Heirloom Tomatoes

$2.99 lb.

lb.

Meridian California Wines

Assorted Rumiano California Organic Cheeses

$5.79

$3.49

.75 liter

8 oz.

Le Petit Birdman Bread

Assorted DaVinci Italian Pastas

$2.99 loaf

99¢

Gold'n Plump Drums or Thighs

California Bunch Broccolini

$2.19

$1.79

24 oz.

bunch

Family Pack Boneless Pork Country Ribs

Certified Organic Valencia Oranges

$1.99

79¢ lb.

lb.

16 oz.

IQF 16 oz. Tilapia Filet

$4.19 each

Certified Organic Green Cabbage

59¢ lb.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 7 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


SALE ENDS 4/15/12


Missoula Independent