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NEWS

HOW “DARK MONEY” GROUP AMERICAN TRADITION PARTNERSHIP CONNECTS TO MONTANA’S NEW SENATE MAJORITY LEADER

DUANE RAIDER MEGALOAD COMPANIES ONE WRITER’S WISTFUL COMEDY KBGA’S NEWS OPINION DELIVERS BIG LAUGHS EYE STIMSON MILL SITE GOODBYE TO REHBERG


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS

HOW “DARK MONEY” GROUP AMERICAN TRADITION PARTNERSHIP CONNECTS TO MONTANA’S NEW SENATE MAJORITY LEADER

DUANE RAIDER MEGALOAD COMPANIES ONE WRITER’S WISTFUL COMEDY KBGA’S NEWS OPINION DELIVERS BIG LAUGHS EYE STIMSON MILL SITE GOODBYE TO REHBERG


[2] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013


Friday • Live Irish Music 6-8 pm

Tuesday Trivia Night

Cover photo courtesy U.S. Airforce

Wednesday $10 Burger & Beer

News Voices/Letters Medicaid and tax holidays..........................................................................4 The Week in Review Miss Montana is “America’s Choice”................................................6 Briefs School safety, megaloads and clean teeth ...............................................................6 Etc. The Griz battle a new legacy .......................................................................................7 News How the state’s new Senate majority leader ties to ATP ..........................................8 News Teachers argue Willard deserves piece of federal funding.......................................9 Opinion Megaloads mean major frustration on rural roads ...........................................10 Opinion A toast to Denny Rehberg’s 12 years of service.................................................11 Feature An American drone operator recovers in Missoula ............................................14

Thursday Open Mic Night Saturday 1/19 The Mountain Breathers

Arts & Entertainment Arts KBGA’s Duane Raider takes his humor to the stage .................................................18 Music Mite Aswel, The Captain Wilson Conspiracy and A$AP Rocky ..............................19 Arts The luminosity of Jennifer Li’s paintings..................................................................20 Books Humming the furious love poems of René Char..................................................21 Film Gangster Squad can’t find its target ........................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Take it greasy ........................................................................................24 Happiest Hour Half Nuts Rye at Draught Works.............................................................26 8 Days a Week Ready for vacation...................................................................................27 Mountain High Seeley Lake Winterfest...........................................................................33 Agenda Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration ..............................................................34

9:30 pm

Cash for Junkers 10 pm

Saturday & Sunday Brunch at 10 am

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Tawana De Hoyos Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen PHOTO INTERN Eric Oravski MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address:

Just got to say a big thanks to the team for outstanding service a couple of weeks ago! From the first inquiry to organizing sedation (due to a gag reflex), the appointment itself and the follow-up afterward, the team did a really amazing job! —James Davies

independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Better building

STREET TALK Asked Jan. 14 at the Orange Street Food Farm. by Eric Oravsky

The 2013 Montana Legislature has officially commenced. What do you want legislators to focus on this session? Follow-up: What political issue are you sick of hearing about? Marco Littig: It’s not really even an issue, but I would like them to start a dialogue about what is best for the state and how to go about it. They need to stop taking part in ideologically driven bickering and get things done. There is a lot of good going on in the state, but I am not crazy about clean coal. Hold your fire: Definitely Second Amendment rights. Freedom is not your ability to carry a firearm.

Jackie Borgstede: Allocating the Medicaid money. So many people in the state need it, but where is it all going to come from? Body blows: I am really happy that the campaign is over. I was sick of it. There was so much bashing from both sides.

Ben Prez: Definitely some careful consideration toward fracking and other extractive industries. I don’t like it, but I think it will inevitably come here. Money trail: I am sick of hearing the terms for the impending financial doom. They throw around these things that we don’t really understand and make it out to be the end of the world.

Pierce Chandler: Coal. Just don’t sell it. It is best left in the ground. It isn’t good here and it is even worse that we are going to be selling it to China. Clear choice: Abortion. It is silly that it is even an issue. If you don’t want one, don’t get one. It shouldn’t be left to politicians to decide.

Belinda Parrish: Health care is important to me. I want them to focus on making it affordable because we all need it. All together: I can’t say any one issue, but I am sick of people not getting along together to solve issues.

[4] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

From Culbertson to Miles City, cities are being hit hard by the costs of oil development. Sidney is expected to need $47 million in improvements to accommodate Bakken newcomers. Bainville, population 200, is expected to accommodate a 350person man-camp because of a new fracksand facility. In Culbertson, the sewer lagoons are at capacity. Who pays for these infrastructure costs? Not the companies making the profits from the oil wells. The oil and gas companies escape almost all taxes on Montana’s Bakken wells for the first 18 months. They only pay a rate of 0.5 percent as compared to the regular tax rate of 9 percent. In 2011, this tax difference— or tax holiday—cost the state of Montana almost $50 million! Montana’s tax holiday was enacted when oil prices were $11-$16 per barrel. Today, prices are $85-$105 per barrel. Does the oil industry really need a taxpayer subsidy these days? By contrast, North Dakota attached a price trigger to their tax holiday to ensure their taxpayers weren’t subsidizing the oil industry when prices are high. As a result, North Dakota is in a far better position than Montana to pay for the costs that accompany large-scale development. It’s time our legislature repealed this tax holiday in order to provide money to the impacted communities, where it is urgently needed. Montana cannot afford to give the oil and gas industry a free ride anymore. Cindy Webber Big Timber

Healing the budget Gov. Steve Bullock has decided to ignore the Schweitzer administration’s budget submitted last November and instead opt into Obamacare’s Medicaid eligibility expansion. This looks to be a patently bad idea; and even if it’s not there’s no reason to rush forcing Montana’s taxpayers into yet more unsustainable entitlement spending and to herd more of our citizens into a system that provides inferior care at great expense. First let's get a little background out of the way and then I’ll explain why it’s a bad idea. Medicaid provides health insurance— not necessarily health care, but more on that later—to families with incomes up to

L

133 percent of the federal poverty level. Montana’s taxpayers currently pay about 33 percent of the program’s cost, with the federal government picking up the balance. Last summer’s Supreme Court ruling let states decide whether to increase Medicaid eligibility to 138 percent of the FPL, which Obamacare tried to mandate. Many people portray this as “free money” since

“States like Montana that get from Washington much more than we give are going to feel the pain first and most acutely.”

Washington says it will cover almost all the costs until 2017 and then ramp down to 90 percent of the costs after that. But that promise, like so many others that were made during the health care reform debate, simply doesn’t match the facts on the ground. These facts argue against expanding Medicaid eligibility for two major reasons, one of them financial and the other one moral. The financial reason is that we already know this expansion isn’t “free money” for the state. And the moral reason is that it will result in thousands of Montanans being dumped into a system that results in inferior access to care, with many of them forced out of much better private insurance plans. Estimates of Montana’s potential share of expansion costs vary pretty wildly but most come in between $100 million and $200 million, or the equivalent of between 200 and 400 new teachers, for example. Our costs increase for a lot of reasons, but I’ll just highlight a few obvious ones.

First, with Obamacare scheduled to cut $8 billion from Medicaid and $500 billion from Medicare, you can be sure that Montana’s health care providers will be coming to taxpayers to be made whole when their costs inevitably outpace their reimbursements under these government programs. Next, the largest single increase will result from people who are eligible for Medicaid at the 133 percent FPL rate, but not currently enrolled, coming out of the woodwork as word gets out that eligibility has been expanded. Many of these people are technically uninsured today but would be enrolled in Medicaid and receive care if they needed it. Many others, though, have their own insurance and would simply shift from private to public coverage. Since they wouldn’t meet the new 138 percent FPL threshold, about 33 percent of their insurance costs would be shifted from them or their employers to Montana taxpayers. And finally, for anyone who believes that the federal government will continue to reimburse states at the 100 or even 90 percent level, well, I’ve got a bridge to sell you. Washington’s budget woes are going to be transferred to the states, and states like Montana that get from Washington much more than we give are going to feel the pain first and most acutely. Shifting our most vulnerable population to Medicaid is also immoral. Studies consistently show that Medicaid patients have poorer access to care than privately insured patients. Since Medicaid typically pays physicians 56 percent of the amount private insurers pay, fewer doctors are accepting new patients and they eventually wind up in hospitals with more serious conditions than those who are privately insured. In addition, there’s scant reliable evidence that Medicaid improves health outcomes at all, and zero evidence that it is the best way to improve health outcomes per dollar spent. Expanding Medicaid will only worsen our health care system’s woes, increasing costs and decreasing access to quality care while adding a new entitlement burden on taxpayers and dumping thousands of low income Montanans into a failing program. There’s no rush to expand. If it works for other states we can always sign on. But this is one case where we shouldn’t lead with our chin. Carl Graham CEO, Montana Policy Institute Bozeman

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


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missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Eric Oravsky

Wednesday, January 9 The Montana Department of Revenue releases its biennial report. In 2012, the state earned $75,533,075 from cigarette taxes, $12,024,144 from other tobacco products and $3,934,761 from taxes on beer.

Thursday, January 10 Helena and Great Falls get the worst of it, but winter storm Gandolf dumps more than 8 inches of snow on Missoula in its first 24 hours. Mayor John Engen encourages residents to stay home.

Friday, January 11 Roughly 200 people descend on downtown Missoula to show solidarity with the newly sparked indigenous rights movement, Idle No More. Marking a global day of action, Missoula rally-goers briefly stop traffic over the Higgins Avenue bridge.

Saturday, January 12 Alexis Wineman, Montana’s entrant in the Miss America pageant and the first contestant ever with autism, wins the “America’s Choice” award through an online vote. Miss New York eventually wins.

Sunday, January 13 A fatal crash on the Reserve Street bridge ties up mid-morning traffic for about two hours. Police say Corwin D. Cornelius, of Ronan, died at an area hospital after his vehicle collided with two others. The other drivers were also injured.

Monday, January 14 The Missoula City Council approves spending $54,000 from Missoula’s Open Space Bond to purchase a 27-acre parcel that’s needed to help build a trail that will run for more than two miles along Grant Creek Road.

Tuesday, January 15 Keith Regier, R-Kalispell, proposes House Bill 94, which amends deliberate homicide legislation to include “unborn children” as possible murder victims.

Holden Largay of Missoula soars off a jump Saturday afternoon at the 2013 Snowbowl Throwdown. Largay took third place out of 41 competitors in the men’s USSA freestyle event with a score of 18.54.

Medical marijuana

Task force

Talking school safety The news of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary reached Superintendent of Missoula County Public Schools Alex Apostle in the same way it did most Americans. On TV, he saw parents holding their children, watched circling aerial views of a quiet elementary school and heard newscasters report and re-report a death toll that eventually included 20 firstgraders. “It was absolutely horrific,” he says. “When you’re looking at complete innocence—6- and 7- yearolds—it’s completely devastating.” Terrified parents called Apostle that day. Some offered advice. Some demanded a plan. Apostle, in his fifth year as superintendent, needed a response. “I said to myself, ‘This can’t be a flash-in-the-pan type response.’ That’s when I decided to create an advisory committee.” The following week, Apostle announced the formation of a safety task force. The task force, which has yet to meet, will be cochaired by St. Patrick Hospital CEO Jeff Fee and Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir, and will be divided into three committees: mental health, facilities safety and design, and emergency response.

[6] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Apostle doesn't believe teachers should be armed, and he doesn’t think Missoulians want armed guards at every school. He feels any solution should be comprehensive and will begin and end with teachers and administrators talking to students—something, he says, “we all forget to do.” In high school in Tacoma, Wash., Apostle had a business teacher named Mr. Roberts who every day looked Apostle in the eye and asked how he was doing. “Sometimes that’s all it takes. ‘How you doing? Everything okay?’” he says. “Not just the councilor needs to be talking to kids when they have problems. Teachers and principals and...superintendents need to reach out to kids.” Apostle has no delusions about the complexities of the problems he hopes to address. He admits he is a novice when it comes to preventing America's next school shooting, and he knows the process will take time. “I think life is moving very fast. And as life continues to move faster and faster, I think we lose people,” he says. “We lose the human touch.” Jamie Rogers

Longtime activist dies The grandmother of Montana’s medical marijuana movement, Lori Burnam, died at home in Hamilton on Jan. 10. She was 66. The diminutive Burnam, who stood just 5-foot3, weighed less than 65 pounds when she testified in Helena District Court last month about how Montana’s new medical marijuana law threatened her supply of cannabis. She referred to the drug as the only one that eased her pain and left no negative side effects. “It did help a lot, a tremendous amount,” says her ex-husband, Larry Burnam, who helped care for Lori during the last months of her life. Lori Burnam’s testimony in district court speaks to the toughness of the woman who was diagnosed with lung cancer roughly six years ago. Morphine made her incoherent and the steroids doctors prescribed gave her nightmares. Instead, Burnam, who also had emphysema, ingested marijuana with a vaporizer or through liquid tinctures. She said it relaxed her knotted muscles and stimulated her appetite. “In that sense alone, it helped sustain her,” Larry Burnam says.


[news] Though she lost an eye to glaucoma about five years ago and the cancer would spread to her bones, Burnam continued to tote her oxygen tanks to interviews, pro-cannabis rallies and into courtrooms to tout marijuana’s ameliorating effects. For Burnam, the cause became a crusade of sorts. “She was physically tough and really, really tough emotionally,� says medical marijuana advocate Tom Daubert, who was featured with Burnam in the documentary film, Code of the West, detailing the rise and fall of Montana’s medical marijuana industry. Katrina Farnum from Garden Mother Herbs befriended Burnam while serving as her marijuana provider and says she didn’t come across as the typical marijuana advocate. For that reason, Burnam’s testimony seemed to resonate among people who might otherwise be repelled by marijuana’s lingering cultural and legal taboos. “She really knocked down those walls for people,� Farnum says. “She really wanted to help break down those stereotypes.� Jessica Mayrer

Partnership is attempting to help turn those numbers around by launching a new dental clinic at Lowell School to serve students and their families. “The concept of opening up other access points is that that would actually free up some space here at our existing clinic,� Mansch says. Partnership is asking the Missoula City Council to sign off on a $57,837 grant to purchase a dental lab, patient chairs and other infrastructure for the new clinic. The money would come from the city’s Community Development Block Grant, which is awarded annually through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The city anticipates that this year it will receive $561,486 in such funding, which is distributed to community organizations that serve locals with low and moderate incomes. Council expects to vote Jan. 28 on those awards.

Health care

Filling a need for fillings On some mornings, the line outside Partnership Health Center Dental Clinic starts to form by 6 a.m., more than an hour before the clinic’s doors open. With only a limited number of emergency appointments available, and patients seen on a first-come, first-serve basis, it’s important to arrive early. “That’s a huge signal for us that there’s just not access for people without resources in our community,� says Kim Mansch, Partnership’s executive director. Mansch says patients are willing to wait because they’re in pain and they likely can’t afford care anywhere else. Partnership’s sliding scale and payment options make dental services accessible to many Missoulians who might not otherwise be able to afford services at all. But the clinic can’t keep up with current demand. “We’re very limited on the number of new patients that we can accept,� Mansch says. “As a result, our community still has a number of patients that are in an emergency type of situation, where they are actually experiencing pain and we can’t establish care with them because we don’t have any access.� This month, the Pew Center on the States gave Montana an “F� for failing to make preventative dental care available to kids. In Missoula, a Partnership audit of clients of all ages served in 2008 showed that 64 percent had periodontal disease, more than twothirds had cavities and upwards of 80 percent were missing teeth.

The Lowell Dental Clinic will operate alongside a primary health care clinic that’s slated for a spring opening next to the school. Construction of the 2,500-square-foot facility is being funded by a $500,000 grant created through the federal Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare.� Jessica Mayrer

Bonner

Megaload companies eye mill Highway 200 could get a lot busier in the years to come. Last October, the BitterRoot Economic Development District applied for a $17,934 state grant to complete a transport plan for oversized loads between Bonner and the Port of Sweetgrass. Now the study is underway, marking the first potential step to-

BY THE NUMBERS

13

Percent pay raise for Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Alex Apostle as approved by the school board. Apostle will now earn $175,000 this year, $185,000 in 2013-14 and $200,000 in 2014-15. ward Bonner becoming a manufacturing hub for Canadian oil fields. “If you look at both the Bakken and the oil sands and you draw a 500-mile circle around them, you see that we are in the area that makes a lot of sense to provide some of the manufacturing,� says Jean Curtiss, Missoula County commissioner and president of BREDD. Several industrial manufacturers have already voiced interest in opening up shop at the former Stimson mill site. But with no clear idea of the long-term transport potential along Highway 200 and other routes, those companies still consider Bonner a business risk. In response, Missoula-based Poteet Construction is heading the effort to identify the best route from Bonner to Canada and determine what work needs to be done to accommodate regular megaload traffic. The total estimated cost of the transport plan is $35,014. The plan’s scope includes traffic control studies and environmental consultation, as well as identification of any obstacles to oversized shipments. So far, Curtiss says, it looks like the only obstacles will be utility lines. BREDD’s grant application cites “the ever rising price of oil and the political will to establish energy independence� as the key economic motivations for Missoula courting manufacturers with ties to Canadian oil. The document states that an unnamed company is currently considering occupying nearly half the available space at the former Stimson mill site, and could bring as many as 300 jobs and as much as $20 million in private investment to the area. Of course, Curtiss acknowledges that there are those in Missoula who would prefer the county oppose any tar sands-related business. Megaload shipments aren’t exactly tourist brochure fodder, she says. And oversized transport proposals from major oil players have sparked sizable opposition in the region in recent years. But for Curtiss, interest in Missoula as a gateway to nearby development projects is “kind of a fact of life right now.� Alex Sakariassen

ETC. The lead stories looked sadly familiar last week. On Friday, Missoula County District Court Judge Karen Townsend sentenced former Griz running back Beau Donaldson to prison for the rape of a longtime acquaintance. Testimony from the victim, her family and a friend was detailed and crushing, and marked the first time a victim had her say in court since a string of local sexual assault allegations, many involving members of the University of Montana football team, first surfaced in late 2011. The hearing also served as the latest reminder that the NCAA and Departments of Justice and Education have open investigations into UM and its athletics department. On the same day Donaldson received his sentence, another former football player appeared before Justice of the Peace John Odlin on charges of robbery and assault. Andrew Badger was among a group of men believed to have beaten a Jay’s Mart clerk with baseball bats before stealing the cash register. He and three others face a Jan. 31 preliminary hearing. Timothy Parks, yet another former player accused of helping with the heist, posted $10,000 bond on a charge of fabricating or tampering with evidence. The group reportedly needed the cash to pay rent. Griz Nation will point to a key word in both of these shameful stories: former players. These are problems in the past. Institutional changes have been made, coaches and directors fired. But if the Griz and their fans understand anything, it’s tradition and reputation. For decades, those things have been associated with a winning program and rabid following. Now, tradition and reputation have turned negative. When things go as bad as they have in recent years off the field, the image of Griz gone wild lingers. Unfortunately, it’s not going to disappear anytime soon, especially with investigations still ongoing. Which leads to another familiar story from last week: The men’s basketball team won, again, earning its 19th straight victory over a Big Sky opponent. That team doesn’t appear in the police blotter, doesn’t lead local newscasts, rarely makes the front page; it just wins. If Griz Nation is looking for something to rally around, it’s inside Dahlberg Arena. In fact, it kicks off a four-game home stretch Thursday night. And wouldn’t you know, plenty of tickets are still available.

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missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [7]


[news]

Taking the helm Montana’s new Senate majority leader linked to ATP by Alex Sakariassen

Last year, American Tradition Partnership won its most prominent legal battle before the U.S. Supreme Court. The Colorado-based nonprofit successfully challenged Montana’s 100-year-old Corrupt Practices Act, which barred corporate spending in state campaigns. What started as a dis-

“Is there a different tone this session? Yeah,” Wittich says. “You have new leadership on both the House and the Senate. You have new leadership in the governor’s office. I see a different tone, but there are still legitimate differences on the role of government that need to be discussed.”

Photo by Chad Harder

Records show state Sen. Art Wittich, the newly elected Senate majority leader, has connections to both “dark money” group American Tradition Partnership and Livingston-based Direct Mail and Communications.

trict court-level fight effectively became the legal basis for applying Citizens United v. FEC to state campaign finance laws. In the beginning of that legal battle, ATP turned to the Bozeman-based Wittich Law Firm for representation—the firm owned by Republican Sen. Art Wittich, who recently made headlines as newly elected Senate majority leader for the 2013 Montana Legislature. “Does the U.S. Supreme Court have any sway in the law in Montana? That’s the question,” Wittich says. “It was an interesting case. I didn’t first chair it, it wasn’t my case. But it was an important constitutional law question and it needed to be brought up and argued.” Wittich was elected in 2010 amid a nationwide Republican surge, trouncing Democrat Diane Elliott in the race to replace termed-out Republican Gary Perry. Now Wittich is busying himself trying to avoid the partisan gridlock that dominated his first session in the legislature, working alongside new Senate President Jeff Essman and other GOP leaders. He may come from a pro-gun rights, pro-life, limited-government platform himself, but he says he’s optimistic about the legislature’s chances of approaching functionality this time around. He’s even willing to venture the possibility of a balanced budget getting completed on time.

[8] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Wittich’s rise to leadership is hardly the first newsworthy nugget about the former Forest Service firefighter, Coast Guard environmental lawyer and Montana Power Company legal counsel. His law firm has been at the center of a number of high-profile cases in the state over the past few years. Wittich himself represented Bozeman-based conservative think tank Montana Policy Institute in a lawsuit against the Montana Department of Administration. MPI demanded that the state release salary data for some 14,000 state employees in electronic form. A district judge ruled in the group’s favor last spring, and the state agreed to pay $5,700 toward MPI’s legal fees in a subsequent settlement. “To me, it was a good government case,” Wittich says. “[MPI] asked for the data, it was public information, they should have been able to receive it. We had to fight to get it.” In light of recent investigations, however, ATP is perhaps the Wittich Law Firm’s most notable client. The group has repeatedly challenged campaign finance laws in Montana and nationwide over the past few years, but became the subject of significant public scrutiny last fall when PBS aired a “Frontline” investigation into ATP’s alleged illegal coordination with political campaigns in Montana. The broadcast hinged on a collection of documents recovered from a

meth house in Colorado that appeared to link ATP to various state and local candidates from the 2008 election. According to Wittich, ATP was represented by a partner at his firm during the 2010 district court fight against the Corrupt Practices Act. ATP went by the name Western Tradition Partnership back then, and a collection of checks made out by WTP reveals payments for the firm’s legal work—one check directly to Art Wittich for $2,000 signed June 14, 2010, and two $3,500 checks to Wittich Law signed in August and September 2010. The checks appeared among hundreds of WTP payment records loaded to the web by “Frontline” last November, separate of the meth house documents. According to the Montana Secretary of State’s office, Wittich Law Firm is still the registered agent for American Tradition Partnership and was when the group had filed under the name Western Tradition Partnership. Wittich also has political connections to Direct Mail and Communications, a Livingston print shop run by the wife of one-time WTP official Christian LeFer. Wittich’s campaign finance reports for 2010 show $7,915.43 in payments to Direct Mail for numerous campaign material and mailing expenses. One past Direct Mail employee told the Huffington Post last November that her job also involved work for WTP and other related groups. “They’ve had a lot of other issues and a lot of other lawyers working on things,” Wittich says of WTP. “Did we understand all of Western Tradition Partnership? No. Did we understand all of their legal issues? No. Certainly I didn’t.” Wittich says the recent indications of WTP’s close relationship with Direct Mail during the 2008 and 2010 elections haven’t raised any new concerns over the work done on his own campaign. He says political candidates hire outside mailing services to do campaign work all the time. “Back then, I don’t think people understood all of the relationships or issues [at play inside WTP],” he says. Asked whether his firm’s handling of the WTP case had increased his own familiarity with the nonprofit, Wittich adds, “I didn’t understand all of their internal workings and organizations.” It’s plausible that few outside Direct Mail and WTP did. But the red flags were there nonetheless. According to Secretary of State filings, Direct Mail shared a principal office address with WTP in Aurora, Colo. And Allison LeFer, the owner of Direct Mail, signed the bulk of WTP’s checks back in 2010—including those made out to Wittich’s firm. asakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

Held back Teachers argue Willard deserves piece of federal funding by Jamie Rogers

Davis Schmidt adds that budgetary problems are not unique to Willard. “I suspect if you went to any of our schools you’d hear similar complaints. There isn’t a lot of funding,” she says. “Ninety-one percent of the budget goes toward salaries.” Though Willard’s woes are not unique, the student body is, and teachers say they acutely feel their lack of resources. A social studies teacher, who like all teachers interviewed for this story asked to remain anonymous to protect her job, remembers when her class participated in a special project interviewing war veterans at Montana Public Radio studios. She says her students responded well to the experience. “We’re a project-based learning school. It’s how our students engage,” she says. “It’s what they came here for.” The only problem was that Willard couldn’t afford to transport the class. Each day, she and her students walked the three-and-ahalf mile round trip. The same teacher says the internet is so slow that she Photo by Chad Harder sometimes is forced to change MCPS received $757,559 last year in federal Title I funding to support struggling lesson plans when videos fail to high school students. Willard, where teachers feel limited by lacking resources load. An English teacher says her like an undersized library, didn’t see any of that money. computers were “outdated 10 as it is every year. They couldn't afford schedules, so teachers believe it should be years ago.” The school library has three book shelves. If Willard is to be treated as more calculators. Bennett asked Missoula a target for Title I funding. One Willard English teacher suspects a program of the district high schools, says County Public Schools for help. An exception was made: MCPS would use federal many of her students were flagged as Title one teacher, than “think of Willard as a Title I funds to buy five new calculators I students before they applied to Willard, classroom. Our classroom should have for Willard. On the surface, this seemed but when they left their district school, the the same resources as everyone else.” The teachers added they understand appropriate. Helping disadvantaged high funds did not follow. “It’s a simple math school students get new calculators is ex- problem,” says a math teacher. “If [a stu- there are no easy answers when it comes actly the sort of thing for which Title I is dent] comes to Willard, we should get a to funding public education, and they are meant. What made this case an exception certain percentage of their [Title I] allot- willing to get creative in order to make up for what MCPS can’t give them. One is that Willard Alternative High School ment.” Heather Davis Schmidt, an executive math teacher has partnered with the Deisn’t a school at all. Technically, Willard is a program in regional director with MCPS, says proto- partment of Anthropology at the Universupport of Missoula public high schools. In col, not discretion, dictates who gets Title sity of Montana. The anthropology some cases, this distinction is trivial. When I funds. “We can’t do anything when it students are designing a murder mystery that can only be solved with algebra. a student graduates from Willard, they re- comes to Willard and Title I,” she says. Yet, even if the system allowed Willard students will measure blood ceive a diploma from Hellgate, Sentinel or Big Sky. If a student wants to play a sport, Willard to receive Title I funding, it’s not splatter and bone fragments on their way they try out for the Knights, Spartans or Ea- certain the program would receive a reg- to solving the crime. “They’ll see that gles. But Willard’s status as a program pre- ular allotment. From the district’s per- math has some real value,” says the math cludes it from receiving Title I funds, spective, Title I funding is used to teacher. “It’s not just some made-up regardless of the needs of the students who intervene in a struggling student’s educa- problem in a book.” So far, the project has no costs. She go there. It’s an issue that has teachers at tion. “Willard is a different kind of interthe school up in arms, and MCPS officials vention,” she says. “It wouldn’t be a good isn’t sure, though, how they’ll get to UM’s decision to give Willard Title I funding be- campus. pointing to existing protocol. According to the U.S. Department of cause we’re already investing a significant jrogers@missoulanews.com Education, Title I is meant to improve “the amount of money [in Willard].” A few years ago, a math teacher at Willard Alternative High School became frustrated with the shortage of calculators in her classroom. Her Algebra I class had 12 students. Willard owned only seven graphing calculators. Students had to take turns or share. The math teacher brought the issue to Willard Principal Jane Bennett, who explained the school’s budget was as tight

academic achievement of the disadvantaged.” At the district level, Title I funds are allotted to schools who have significant percentages of students on “free-andreduced lunch” plans. The money is then used at the school’s discretion for those students who need supplemental support. Willard serves area high school students whose needs require smaller class sizes, additional attention and augmented

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Slow going Megaloads mean major frustration on rural roads by Wendy Beye

I love living in rural Montana, where every census confirms out-migration. But much as I enjoy it, there are a few disadvantages, such as spotty cellphone service, access to only two free television stations, wilted produce at the grocery store and lately, incredibly huge loads of equipment that clog our narrow two-lane highways. Recently, on my way to an appointment 80 miles away that I didn’t want to be late for, I came close to road rage. It was probably lucky that I am not a violent person. It was 10 a.m., and I’d allowed an extra 30 minutes of travel time for the trip. But three miles into my journey, I was brought to a halt by the driver of a pilot car, who was out of his vehicle and standing on the center line of the highway. Behind him, a monster truck blocked the highway from one edge of the pavement to the other. I rolled down my window and asked the man how long I’d have to wait. He sighed and informed me that an obstinate driver refused to move off the highway to allow the megaload to pass by. I suggested that he inform the driver of said vehicle that someone heading west needed to get moving. He obliged, via a short walkie-talkie conversation with a counterpart leading the caravan. After a few minutes, I observed an elderly rancher (aka the obstinate driver) attempting to back his very long livestock trailer onto a narrow track that led off the highway into a field. It was a painstaking process, but he eventually made it, and the mass of machinery ahead of me crawled on, with me bringing up the rear. I waved to the rancher. He smiled at me as I eased by the nose of his truck. I couldn’t blame him for not wanting to move off the highway onto a two-track. Of course, I expected the big rig to stop at a wide spot up the road and let me

go around, but no, it continued its laborious trek as nothing less than a slow-moving roadblock. I began to seethe, but thought, well, he’ll surely stop at the next turnout. By now, my half-hour cushion had shrunk to 15 minutes. The long, not the short of it, was that an hour later I had traveled only 20 miles and was definitely going to be late. Not only that, but as a well-informed member of Montana’s traveling public, I knew my rights had been run over by the heavy-haul-

“There are so many huge loads moving on Montana’s highways that it is difficult to track a particular one” ing transport crew. The law clearly states that holders of oversized load permits must not delay traffic on the open highway for more than 10 minutes. Through clenched teeth, I so informed the driver of the pilot car as I was finally allowed to squeeze by the load before it turned off my route at a highway junction. He shrugged and said, “Have a nice day, ma’am.” Not likely. The next day, I looked up the phone number of the Montana Department of Transportation Motor Carrier Division, and called to report the incident. The first em-

ployee I talked to said he had no way of finding out who was hauling the load. I didn’t believe him. The second in the chain-of-command was slightly more helpful, and took down the details of my experience. He suggested that I write a letter to his supervisor. About a half-hour later, the second employee called back to say that he had all the information he needed, and that it wasn’t necessary for me to write a letter after all. I immediately fired off a letter to the supervisor, sending it certified mail. The next day, the supervisor himself called to apologize and explained that these days, there are so many huge loads moving on Montana’s highways that it is difficult to track a particular one without knowing the name of the carrier. I gave him all the details I could, and he called back the next day with the identity of the offender from Casper, Wyo. The load was refinery equipment for oil and gas delivered to Laurel, Mont. He said he would forward my complaint to the company, and that his department would more carefully scrutinize its submitted travel plans before issuing future permits. We all know that the booming oil equipment transport business has strained state resources. This January, Montana’s biennial legislature will consider a request from the transportation department for more enforcement personnel to deal with the sudden stampede of oversize loads. In the meantime, the traveling public can do little more than carry a supply of aspirin. This might help to ease the headache of trailing a road hog of gigantic proportions at a frustrating 15 miles per hour. Wendy Beye is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She is a freelance writer living in Roundup, Mont.

Photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013


[opinion]

Happy trails A toast to Denny Rehberg’s 12 years of service by Dan Brooks

They say greatness is seldom recognized in its own time. They also say that the voters of Montana bitch and moan about Washington, D.C., but send the same people back there every election. The second aphorism we owe to Dennis Rehberg, who last week coincidentally was not sent back to Washington for the first time in 12 years, having lost his Senate bid to Jon Tester. How that bears on our ability to recognize greatness is a matter in dispute. To hear Rehberg tell it, our instruments are not finely tuned. He explained his position to Aaron Flint on the “Voices of Montana” radio show Jan. 3, the first day of our bold new Congress. “Look, the people of Montana actually had an opportunity to change the Senate and didn’t, and the people of America had a chance to change the presidency, and they didn’t,” he said. “So they bitch and whine and moan about all the things that are going wrong in Washington, and then they just send back exactly the same thing: same House, same Senate and same president.” A less charitable Flint might have pointed out that they didn’t send back exactly the same thing, but Rehberg should be forgiven his hyperbole. He was upset. I’m disappointed, too. As a person who makes remarks, I hoped to see Rehberg raised to as high an office as we could elevate him. It would not offend the former representative to say that he was easy to write about. He conducted his political career with belligerent élan. His last act as a member of Congress was to vote “yea” on the Congressional Pay Freeze and Fiscal Responsibility Act. During his 2010 campaign, he sued the City of Billings. Last June, he issued a press release demanding that the Environmental Protection Agency stop flying unmanned drones over Montana farms to enforce the Clean Water Act, a practice he read about on Infowars.com.

The EPA responded, politely, that they were not doing that. Corrected but not chastened, Rehberg voted two weeks later to let U.S. Customs and Border Protection fly unmanned drones over Montana farms to enforce border control. It was a bold move, and Rehberg made it confidently. It’s not that he didn’t care what voters thought. Clearly he cared, scrupulously referring to his unstocked land in Billings as a ranch and regularly appearing in a cowboy hat that made him look like a character

“Rehberg knew that what he did was less important than who he was, and who he was was a type.” on the “Tim and Eric Awesome Show.” But Rehberg knew that what he did was less important than who he was, and who he was was a type. As our representative, his job was to play Denny Rehberg, Montanan. So he lambasted the EPA for doing what he told Customs to do. He allegedly got drunk on a 2004 diplomatic excursion to Kazakhstan, called the locals “coneheads” and fell off a horse. Such behavior scandalized journalists and infuriated Democrats, but it embodied a certain way that our state loves to think of itself. Rehberg obscured his policies with as much rooting and tooting as he could muster, and through it all he stuck to one principle: Fade the public.

He bet that we had short memories and shorter attention spans. He bet that how he represented Montana in Congress was less important than how he represented Montanans on TV. For 12 years, he was right. Then we pulled the rug out from under him. Can you blame him for blaming us? Rehberg cannot have lost because of something he did, because he kept doing the same thing. It cannot have been his relentlessly lobbyist-friendly policies, because policy was never the point. He gave the people what they wanted, and what we wanted was a drunken farm boy who loved Montana and hated Washington. Then we didn’t want that anymore. The only explanation was that we didn’t know what we wanted. It was the logical conclusion for a man who based his career on lowballing the intelligence of Montana voters. When your bedrock assumption is that people have to be tricked into voting for the right man, how can you take them seriously when they choose someone else? Rehberg’s great gift as a politician was his sense of image, his ability to become a caricature of his own constituents. In the end, that turned out to be his great flaw. Like all scoundrels, he knew that we were less smart than him, but at some point he lost track of how much. He lost track way before Jan. 3; that was just the day he broadcast it on the radio. When I heard him, I resented Rehberg for assuming I was stupid, but I liked him for thinking that about everyone else. Maybe that was the Rehberg magic all along. He was a genius surrounded by fools, and yet he kept doing such foolish things himself. How can you not love that man? How can you not embrace him as someone just like you? Dan Brooks writes about politics, consumer culture and lying at combatblog.net.

Photo by Steele Williams

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Pennsylvania state police accused Randy R. Clinkscales, 27, of stealing a man’s identity after he applied for a credit card in the victim’s name and used it for a nose job. When the victim reported an unauthorized charge of $6,000, investigators contacted the medical practice that performed the procedure and learned the patient had identified himself as the victim. He also posed for photos before the surgery. Police used a facial-recognition program to match the images with Pennsylvania driver’s license photos and identified Clinkscales, who pleaded guilty. (Doyleston Intelligencer) When a homeowner confronted a burglar who kicked in the door of his home in Arleta, Calif., around noon, the thief begged the resident not to call police and dashed to his car, which he’d parked in the driveway. It wouldn’t start. Police records stated the burglar returned to the house to repeat his request not to call the police, but when he turned his back, the homeowner knocked him unconscious with a hoe. The suspect recovered and ran off before police arrived, but detectives found fingerprints, a clear footprint where he’d kicked open the door, blood on the hoe and the car, which contained other stolen goods, as well as a traffic citation with the name and address of suspect Miguel Luna, 25. “The crime scene was really a study in how to get caught,” Lt. Paul Vernon observed. (Los Angeles Daily News)

SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - A New Zealand court sentenced Phillip Russell, 46, to six months in jail for striking his wife in the chest with an ostrich egg because her pet pig ran amok and damaged his power saw. (Agence France-Presse)

There’s more to our care than you might think.

When Randall White, 49, complained about the slow service while waiting for his pizza at a Little Caesars outlet in St. Petersburg, Fla., another customer in line, Michael Jock, 52, admonished him. That “prompted them to exchange words,” police official Mike Puetz said, “and it became a shoving match.” White raised a fist, and Jock pulled out a .38 Taurus Ultralight Special Revolver and shot White in the lower torso twice. Puetz said that when police arrived, Jock insisted the shooting was justified under Florida’s “stand your ground” law because he feared for his life. (Tampa Bay Times)

FEATS OF SCIENCE - Among the winners of the 2012 Ig Nobel awards, sponsored by the journal Annals of Improbable Research:

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• Dutch researchers Anita Eerland, Rolf Zwaan and Tulio Guadalupe were awarded the psychology prize for their study “Leaning to the Left Makes the Eiffel Tower Seem Smaller.” • The acoustics prize went to Japanese scientists Kazutaka Kurihara and Koji Tsukada for creating the SpeechJammer, a machine that repeats public speakers’ words with a slight delay to alert them if they are speaking too quickly or have taken more than their allotted time. • Frans de Waal and Jennifer Pokorny won the anatomy prize for discovering that chimpanzees can identify each other by looking at pictures of their rear ends. (BBC News)

INFERNAL TRIANGLES - Candice Lee, 37, and her husband had an open marriage and invited her former lover, Shakir Muilam, 45, to live with them at their home in Monroe County, Fla., after he was diagnosed with cancer. Sheriff’s deputies said that when she began having a relationship with a new boyfriend, Muilam objected. She explained to the deputies that she grabbed a .22-caliber rifle and shot him in the thigh. (Miami Herald) When Nashville police pulled Michael McCarrell over for failing to use his turn signal, they found a 17year-old girl sandwiched between him and his wife in the front seat. The couple explained they met the girl on a dating website and picked her up in Kentucky so Amanda McCarrell, 27, could have sex with her. Although the couple insisted they didn’t realize the girl was under 18, police charged them with sexual exploitation of a minor. (Nashville’s The Tennessean)

BUSINESS DIRECTORY - A New York boutique that specializes in breast pumps and accessories: Yummy Mummy. (The Washington Post) Co-founders of Generation Investment Management, who stand to reap a sizable share of the $500 million that al-Jazeera agreed to pay for Current TV: David Blood and Al Gore. (Bloomberg News)

CONTRACTORS TO AVOID - Hoping to restore an 18th-century French chateau in Yvrac to its former glory, Russian businessman Dmitry Stroskin hired a construction company to renovate the baroque manor and raze a small building nearby while he was out of town. He returned to find the outbuilding still standing but the 140,000-square-foot manor reduced to rubble. “The Chateau de Bellevue was Yvrac’s pride and joy,” former owner Juliette Marmie said. “The whole village is in shock. How can this construction firm make such a mistake?” Explaining that he was “in shock,” Stroskin said he plans to build an exact replica of the chateau. (Associated Press) After Wells Fargo Home Mortgage foreclosed on a property in Woodland Hills, Calif., it hired a contractor to clear it out. Instead, the contractor emptied a nearby house belonging to retired bricklayer Alvin Tjosaas, 77, who was out of town at his granddaughter’s wedding. Alerted that their contractor had gone to the wrong house, Wells Fargo hired a different contractor, who also showed up at Tjosaas’s house. “Alvin was left to sit among the ruins of the house,” Pat Tjosaas said of her husband, noting that the contractors had used a satellite photo and an address that Wells Fargo gave them. Wells Fargo issued a statement that it was “deeply sorry” for the home “being mistakenly secured and entered.” (ABC News)

POLYGAMY FOLLIES - When Nigerian businessman Uroko Onoja returned from drinking at a bar in Ogbadibo, he had sex with the youngest of his six wives, Odachi Onoja. The other five wives entered the bedroom armed with knives and sticks, and demanded he have sex with them, too. He had sex with four of them before he stopped breathing. “I tried to resuscitate him,” Odachi Onoja said, “but when the other wives saw what had happened, they all ran off laughing into the forest, leaving me with the corpse.” Okpe Odoh, the village head, confirmed the incident had been reported to police. (New York’s Daily News)

[12] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013


missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [13]


Former drone operator Brandon Bryant, 27, in Missoula.

Photo by Gilles Mingasson

Joystick warfare hell An American drone operator recovers in Missoula by Nicola Abé Much has been made of the devastating impact American drones have on civilians in Pakistan and Afghanistan. One soldier’s story shows that it can also adversely affect the lives of those who operate the remote-controlled weapons. Former service member Brandon Bryant is still haunted by images of the injured and dying. For more than five years, Brandon Bryant worked in an oblong, windowless container about the size of a trailer, where the air-conditioning was kept at 63 degrees Fahrenheit and, for security reasons, the door couldn’t be opened. Bryant and his coworkers sat in front of 14 computer monitors and four keyboards. When Bryant pressed a button in New Mexico, someone died on the other side of the world. The container is filled with the humming of computers. It’s the brain of a drone, known as a cockpit in Air Force parlance. But the pilots in the container aren’t flying through the air. They’re just sitting at the controls.

Bryant was one of them, and he remembers one incident very clearly when a Predator drone was circling in a figure-eight pattern in the sky above Afghanistan, more than 6,250 miles away. There was a flat-roofed house made of mud, with a shed used to hold goats in the crosshairs, as Bryant recalls. When he received the order to fire, he pressed a button with his left hand and marked the roof with a laser. The pilot sitting next to him pressed the trigger on a joystick, causing the drone to launch a Hellfire missile. There were 16 seconds left until impact. “These moments are like in slow motion,” he says today, sitting in his mother’s house in Missoula. Images taken with an infrared camera attached to the drone appeared on his monitor, transmitted by satellite, with a two-to-five-second time delay. With seven seconds left to go, no one could be seen on the ground. Bryant could still have diverted the missile at that point. Then it was down to three seconds. Bryant felt as if he had to count each indi-

[14] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

vidual pixel on the monitor. Suddenly a child walked around the corner, he says. Second zero was the moment in which Bryant’s digital world collided with the real one in a village between Baghlan and Mazar-e-Sharif. Bryant saw a flash on the screen: the explosion. Parts of the building collapsed. The child had disappeared. Bryant had a sick feeling in his stomach. “Did we just kill a kid?” he asked the man sitting next to him. “Yeah, I guess that was a kid,” the pilot replied. “Was that a kid?” they wrote into a chat window on the monitor. Then, someone they didn’t know answered, someone sitting in a military command center somewhere in the world who had observed their attack. “No. That was a dog,” the person wrote. They reviewed the scene on video. A dog on two legs?

Invisible warfare When Bryant left the container that day, he stepped directly into America: dry grasslands stretching to the horizon, fields and the smell of liquid manure. Every few seconds, a light on the radar tower at the Cannon Air Force Base flashed in the twilight. There was no war going on there. Modern warfare is as invisible as a thought, deprived of its meaning by distance. It is no unfettered war, but one that is controlled from small high-tech centers in various places in the world. The new (way of conducting) war is supposed to be more precise than the old one, which is why some call it “more humane.” It’s the war of an intellectual, a war U.S. President Barack Obama has promoted more than any of his predecessors. In a corridor at the Pentagon where the planning for this war takes place, the walls are covered with dark wood paneling. The men from the Air Force have


ants die, and that the drones only fire at buildings when women and children are not in them. When asked about the chain of command, Tart mentions a 275-page document called 3-09.3. Essentially, it states that drone attacks must be approved, like any other attacks by the Air Force. An officer in the country where the operations take place has to approve them. The use of the term “clinical war” makes him angry. It reminds him of the Vietnam veterans who accuse him of never having waded through the mud or smelled blood, and who say that he doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

One of the paradoxes of drones is that, even as they increase the distance to the target, they also create proximity. “War somehow becomes personal,” says Tart.

children die during that time,” says Bryant. “I never thought I would kill that many people. In fact, I thought I couldn’t kill anyone at all.” After graduating from high school, Bryant wanted to become an investigative journalist. He used to go to church on Sundays, and he had a thing for red“I saw men, women and children die” A yellow house stands on the outskirts of Mis- headed cheerleaders. By the end of his first semester soula, against a background of mountains, forests and at college, he had already racked up thousands of dolpatches of fog. The ground is coated with the first lars in debt. He came to the military by accident. One day, snow of the season. Bryant, now 27, is sitting on the while accompanying a friend who was enlisting in the couch in his mother’s living room. He has since left army, he heard that the Air Force had its own univer“We save lives” sity, and that he could get a college education Col. William Tart, a man with pale eyes for free. Bryant did so well in tests that he was and a clear image of the enemy, calls the assigned to an intelligence collection unit. He drone a “natural extension of the distance.” learned how to control the cameras and lasers Until a few months ago, when he was on a drone, as well as to analyze ground impromoted to head the U.S. Air Force’s Reages, maps and weather data. He became a motely Piloted Aircraft Task Force in Langley, sensor operator, more or less the equivalent Tart was a commander at the Creech Air Force to a co-pilot. Base in Nevada, near Las Vegas, where he He was 20 when he flew his first mission headed drone operations. Whenever he flew over Iraq. It was a hot, sunny day in Nevada, drones himself, he kept a photo of his wife but it was dark inside the container and just and three daughters pasted into the checklist before daybreak in Iraq. A group of American next to the monitors. soldiers were on their way back to their base He doesn’t like the word drone, because camp. Bryant’s job was to monitor the road, he says it implies that the vehicle has its own to be their “guardian angel” in the sky. will or ego. He prefers to call them “remotely He saw an eye, a shape in the asphalt. “I piloted aircraft,” and he points out that most knew the eye from the training,” he says. To flights are for gathering information. He talks bury an improvised explosive device in the about the use of drones on humanitarian misroad, the enemy combatants place a tire on sions after the earthquake in Haiti, and about the road and burn it to soften the asphalt. Afthe military successes in the war in Libya: terwards it looks like an eye from above. How his team fired on a truck that was pointThe soldiers’ convoy was still miles away ing rockets at Misrata, and how it chased the Drone operators work in an oblong, windowless container about the size of a trailer, controlling airfrom the eye. Bryant told his supervisor, who convoy in which former Libyan dictator craft like the one below. notified the command center. He was forced Moammar Gadhafi and his entourage were to look on for several minutes, Bryant says fleeing. He describes how the soldiers on the That isn’t true, says Tart, noting that he often the military and is now living back at home. He keeps today, as the vehicles approached the site. ground in Afghanistan are constantly expressing their “What should we do?” he asked his coworker. gratitude for the assistance from the air. “We save used the one-hour drive from work back to Las Vegas his head shaved and has a three-day beard. “I haven’t But the pilot was also new on the job. to distance himself from his job. “We watch people lives,” he says. been dreaming in infrared for four months,” he says The soldiers on the ground couldn’t be reached for months. We see them playing with their dogs or He doesn’t say as much about the targeted killing. with a smile, as if this were a minor victory for him. by radio, because they were using a jamming transdoing their laundry. We know their patterns like we He claims that during his two years as operations Bryant completed 6,000 flight hours during his mitter. Bryant saw the first vehicle drive over the eye. know our neighbors’ patterns. We even go to their fucommander at Creech, he never saw any noncombatsix years in the Air Force. “I saw men, women and Nothing happened. nerals.” It wasn’t always easy, he says. their offices here. A painting of a Predator, a drone on canvas, hangs next to portraits of military leaders. From the military’s perspective, no other invention has been as successful in the “war on terror” in recent years as the Predator. The U.S. military guides its drones from seven air bases in the United States, as well as locations abroad, including one in the East African nation of Djibouti. From its headquarters in Langley, Va., the CIA controls operations in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen.

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [15]


[16] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013


Then the second vehicle drove over it. Bryant saw a flash beneath, followed by an explosion inside the vehicle. Five American soldiers were killed. From then on, Bryant couldn’t keep the five fellow Americans out of his thoughts. He began learning everything by heart, including the manuals for the Predator and the missiles, and he familiarized himself with every possible scenario. He was determined to be the best, so that this kind of thing would never happen again.

“I felt disconnected from humanity” His shifts lasted up to 12 hours. The Air Force still had a shortage of personnel for its remote-controlled war over Iraq and Afghanistan. Drone pilots were seen as cowardly button-pushers. It was such an unpopular job that the military had to bring in retired personnel. Bryant remembers the first time he fired a missile, killing two men instantly. As Bryant looked on, he could see a third man in mortal agony. The man’s leg was missing and he was holding his hands over the stump as his warm blood flowed onto the ground—for two long minutes. Bryant cried on his way home, he says, and he called his mother. “I felt disconnected from humanity for almost a week,” he says, sitting in his favorite coffee shop in Missoula, where the smell of cinnamon and butter wafts in the air. He spends a lot of time there, watching people and reading books by Nietzsche and Mark Twain, sometimes getting up to change seats. He can’t sit in one place for very long anymore, he says. It makes him nervous. His girlfriend broke up with him recently. She had asked him about the burden he carries, so he told her about it. But it proved to be a hardship she could neither cope with nor share. When Bryant drives through his hometown, he wears aviator sunglasses and a Palestinian scarf. The inside of his Chrysler is covered with patches from his squadrons. On his Facebook page, he’s created a photo album of his coins, unofficial medals he was awarded. All he has is this one past. He wrestles with it, but it is also a source of pride. When he was sent to Iraq in 2007, he posted the words “ready for action” on his profile. He was assigned to an American military base about 63 miles from Baghdad, where his job was to take off and land drones. As soon as the drones reached flying altitude, pilots in the United States took over. The Predator can remain airborne for an entire day, but it is also slow, which is why it is stationed near the area of operation. Bryant posed for photos wearing sandcolored overalls and a bulletproof vest, leaning against a drone. Two years later, the Air Force accepted him into a special unit, and he was transferred to the Cannon Air Force Base in New Mexico. He and a fellow soldier shared a bungalow in a dusty town called Clovis, which consists mainly of trailers, gas stations and evangelical churches. Clovis is located hours away from the nearest city. Bryant preferred night shifts, because that meant it was daytime in Afghanistan. In the spring, the landscape, with its snow-covered peaks and green valleys, reminded him of his native Montana. He saw people cultivating their fields, boys playing soccer and men hugging their wives and children. When it got dark, Bryant switched to the infrared camera. Many Afghans sleep on the roof in the summer, because of the heat. “I saw them having sex with their wives. It’s two infrared spots becoming one,” he recalls. He observed people for weeks, including Taliban fighters hiding weapons, and people who were on

lists because the military, the intelligence agencies or local informants knew something about them. “I got to know them. Until someone higher up in the chain of command gave me the order to shoot,” he says. He felt remorse because of the children, whose fathers he was taking away. “They were good daddies,” he says. In his free time, Bryant played video games or “World of Warcraft” on the internet, or he went out drinking with the others. He can’t watch TV anymore because it is neither challenging nor stimulating enough for him. He’s also having trouble sleeping these days.

“There was no time for feelings” Maj. Vanessa Meyer, whose real name is covered with black tape, is giving a presentation at the Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico on the training of drone pilots. The Air Force plans to have enough personnel to cover its needs by 2013.

drone pilot in Nevada, Col. Matt Martin wrote in his book Predator that, “Sometimes I felt like God hurling thunderbolts from afar.” Meyer had her first child when she was working there. She was still sitting in the cockpit, her stomach pressing up against the keyboard, in her ninth month of pregnancy. “There was no time for feelings” when she was preparing for an attack, she says today. Of course, she says, she felt her heart beating faster and the adrenaline rushing through her body. But then she adhered strictly to the rules and focused on positioning the aircraft. “When the decision had been made, and they saw that this was an enemy, a hostile person, a legal target that was worthy of being destroyed, I had no problem with taking the shot.” After work, she would drive home along U.S. Highway 85 into Las Vegas, listening to country music and passing peace activists without looking at them. She rarely thought about what happened in the cockpit. But sometimes she would review the individual steps in her head, hoping to improve her performance.

“I saw men, women and children die during that time. I never thought I would kill that many people. In fact, I thought I couldn’t kill anyone at all.” —Brandon Bryant, former drone operator

Meyer, 34, who is wearing lip gloss and a diamond on her finger, used to fly cargo planes before she became a drone pilot. Dressed in green Air Force overalls, she is standing in a training cockpit and using a simulator to demonstrate how a drone is guided over Afghanistan. The crosshairs on the monitor follow a white car until it reaches a group of mud huts. One uses the joystick to determine the drone’s direction, and the left hand is used to operate the lever that slows down or accelerates the unmanned aircraft. On an airfield behind the container, Meyer shows us the Predator, slim and shiny, and its big brother, the Reaper, which carries four missiles and a bomb. “Great planes,” she says. “They just don’t work in bad weather.” Meyer flew drones at Creech, the air base near Las Vegas, where young men drive in and out in sports cars and mountain chains stretch across the desert like giant reptiles. Describing his time as a

Or she would go shopping. It felt strange to her, sometimes, when the woman at the register would ask: “How’s it going?” She would answer: “I’m good. How are you? Have a nice day.” When she felt restless she would go for a run. She says that being able to help the boys on the ground motivated her to get up every morning. There was no room for the evils of the world in Meyer’s home. She and her husband, also a drone pilot, didn’t talk about work. She would put on her pajamas and watch cartoons on TV or play with the baby. Today Meyer has two small children. She wants to show them “that mommy can get to work and do a good job.” She doesn’t want to be like the women in Afghanistan she watched—submissive and covered from head to toe. “The women there are no warriors,” she says. Meyer says that her current job as a trainer is very satisfying but that, one day, she would like to return to combat duty.

“I can’t just switch back and go back to normal life” At some point, Brandon Bryant just wanted to get out and do something else. He spent a few more months overseas, this time in Afghanistan. But then, when he returned to New Mexico, he found that he suddenly hated the cockpit, which smelled of sweat. He began spraying air freshener to get rid of the stench. He also found he wanted to do something that saved lives rather than took them away. He thought working as a survival trainer might fit the bill, although his friends tried to dissuade him. The program that he then began working on in his bungalow in Clovis every day was called Power 90 Extreme, a boot camp-style fitness regimen. It included dumbbell training, push-ups, chin-ups and sit-ups. He also lifted weights almost every day. On uneventful days in the cockpit, he would write in his diary, jotting down lines like: “On the battlefield there are no sides, just bloodshed. Total war. Every horror witnessed. I wish my eyes would rot.” If he could just get into good enough shape, he thought to himself, they would let him do something different. The problem was that he was pretty good at his job. At some point he no longer enjoyed seeing his friends. He met a girl, but she complained about his bad moods. “I can’t just switch and go back to normal life,” he told her. When he came home and couldn’t sleep, he would exercise instead. He began talking back to his superior officers. One day he collapsed at work, doubling over and spitting blood. The doctor told him to stay home, and ordered him not to return to work until he could sleep more than four hours a night for two weeks in a row. “Half a year later, I was back in the cockpit, flying drones,” says Bryant, sitting in his mother’s living room in Missoula. His dog whimpers and lays its head on his cheek. He can’t get to his own furniture at the moment. It’s in storage, and he doesn’t have the money to pay the bill. All he has left is his computer. Bryant posted a drawing on Facebook the night before our interview. It depicts a couple standing, hand-in-hand, in a green meadow, looking up at the sky. A child and a dog are sitting on the ground next to them. But the meadow is just a part of the world. Beneath it is a sea of dying soldiers, propping themselves up with their last bit of strength, a sea of bodies, blood and limbs. Doctors at the Veterans’ Administration diagnosed Bryant with post-traumatic stress disorder. General hopes for a comfortable war —one that could be completed without emotional wounds— haven’t been fulfilled. Indeed, Bryant’s world has melded with that of the child in Afghanistan. It’s like a short circuit in the brain of the drones. Why isn’t he with the Air Force anymore? There was one day, he says, when he knew that he wouldn’t sign the next contract. It was the day Bryant walked into the cockpit and heard himself saying to his coworkers: “Hey, what motherfucker is going to die today?” editor@missoulanews.com This article originally appeared in Der Spiegel and was translated by Christopher Sultan and published with permission through The New York Times syndicate.

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Proving his metal KBGA’s Duane Raider talks music, flophouses and the thrill of stand-up by Kate Whittle

Photo by Eric Oravsky

O

n a cold Saturday evening, football is blaring from the widescreen TVs inside the Elbow Room. In the events room, where a comedy night is about to start, Duane Raider sits at a table with a few other performers, drinking water and nervously looking over his standup notes, a list with items like “homeless abortions,” “neighbor sex” and “velvet Jesus.” When he gets onstage, he becomes confident and hilarious. Raider’s humor jabs at anti-choice protesters, online dating and bad sex, but most of all, he pokes fun at himself in a relatable way. Raider might be most familiar as a fixture in the music scene. For someone who spends most of his waking hours in a windowless KBGA office, he appears everywhere, from introducing metal documentaries at the Big Sky Film Festival and deejaying hip-hop and metal radio shows, to playing in several bands and producing innovative programs like the KBandGA battle-of-the-bands contest. Just in the last six months, he’s started doing stand-up comedy for the hell of it. While many people know Raider by face, and many more by voice, not everyone gets to really know the somewhat awkward, shy 29-year-old. Some fun facts about Raider: His last name is actually Roeder, but he started spelling it phonetically as a teen to get people to say it correctly. He’s incredibly good na-

tured about his large size. He plays in metal bands wearing a black suit and tie. Last year, he joined punk/metal band Shramana on bass. He’s majoring in broadcast journalism at the University of Montana and hopes to work in radio when he graduates, though that will be a long time coming: 2015, he thinks. The chronic insomniac has a tendency to fail classes by sleeping in. What follows is part of our conversation at the Elbow Room. Indy: You’re from the magical land of Oregon, originally. Raider: Yeah, yeah I grew up there. … My mom moved up to Montana when I was 16 to work in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, and I stayed and tried to be independent in Portland and I was homeless for two years. Indy: So were you crashing with people, or sleeping under the Burnside Bridge? Raider: I was a couch surfer, stayed in flophouses. I got scabies once, that was gross. I was in a really, really dirty flophouse in Portland for a while... Yeah, like, people there were really gross. Indy: How long have you lived here? Raider: I’ve lived here about eight years now, it’s the longest I’ve lived anywhere. When I first moved up to Montana, I was living in the Flathead. … That was where my mother lived and where she got me an

[18] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

apartment. That was really lame at first. The first year I just did a ton of drugs, didn’t know anybody, tried to make friends by walking around late at night. That didn’t really work. Then I met the punk kids, and I was like, ‘Oh, we’re good now.’ Indy: I think people think of you now as the metal guy, and haven’t you said before you were really more of a rockabilly kinda guy? Raider: Yeah, kinda. Before I started working at the station, I was a hardcore kinda guy, listened to a lot of Shellac and the Melvins. I’m still not really a metal dude. I listen to more hip-hop than anything else. Been listening to a lot of Danny Brown, Kenny Lamar. Been getting into a lot of Odd Future. ... Chris [Justice, KBGA general manager] and I actually have a hip-hop show that we’ve been switching off on, on Mondays. Indy: And what bands are you playing in right now? Raider: I’m playing in Shramana, it’s a punk/metal band. As much as I listen to everything else, the only music I seem to end up playing is metal. It’s the only thing I wanna play. Indy: So when did the stand-up thing start? Raider: This group, Missoula Homegrown, does stuff the first Thursday of every week at the Union Club, and so KBGA was starting a new stand-up comedy show in the evenings on Saturdays, so I thought it would be cool to go down and get recordings of local comedians. I went down the first time in either

June or July. Then after watching, I was like, ‘I want to do this. I can do this.’ So the next month, I went up and did it. Indy: What’s been your reception? Has anyone thrown anything at you? Raider: Really good. The first night I went up, I got a lot of compliments and stuff afterwards. The whole time I was up there I thought I was going to pass out and puke all over myself. It was like that for the first three times or so. Indy: What’s the difference between getting up on stage with a band, and getting up by yourself? Raider: It’s like, when you’re on stage with a band, you have so many things between you and the audience. There’s a million fallbacks and fail-safes you can blame shit on. Like, ‘Oh, the drummer’s drum kit broke down, so that’s why shit happened.’ With stand-up, you’re just naked. It’s just you and a microphone and anything bad that happens is entirely you. It’s the most nerve-wracking thing I’ve ever done. I’ve done theater. I’ve done music. This is the most frightening of any of the performances. Duane Raider performs stand-up comedy as part of Birthdayfest at Zoo City Apparel, Sat., Jan. 19, at 7 PM. $5. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Livin’ it Mite Aswel faces the music head on It didn’t occur to me until I made my own hip-hop album (true story), that you really do have to deliver the bravado. I made fun of rap groups that tried to act cocky, and I didn’t see the error in my ways until it was my turn. You can be the geeky English major who knows how to translate iambic pentameter to a sweet-ass rhyme, but you still have to bring attitude. It’s only natural. Missoula artist Mite Aswel, aka Kyle McAfee, has all the tasty ingredients of good hip-hop on his new album Face the Music—bravado, sexual innuendo (or not-so-innuendo), humor, compelling beats and smart-person words. “Chasin’ the Dream,” the first track, might be the strongest one and a frontrunner, if you were to pick a single. “Fuck chasin’ the dream,” raps Mite Aswel, “I’m gonna live it.” In a minor-key, beat-laden landscape we hear about angels and demons sipping tea together in the midst of chaos. “This rap is a story of love,” says Aswel, to the creeping beats. “Beyond good and evil are people made of trust, shed the husk of our culture, take in the whole picture. Walk through the membrane that separates the blisters.” It’s the track you play when you’re having a comeback moment. Because of meme-culture, the title of the second track, “Hey Girl,” makes me think of Ryan Gosling. The lyrics don’t deter from that. Lines like, “Hey girl, it’s nice to meet you...When we make love, we’re breakin’ sonic boundaries,” layer on the cheese in the most hilarious

way. My favorite: “You’re like food. I want to eat you.” Are we being serious? Who cares. It’s too good. I could quote Mite Aswel lyrics all day long, but it’s also important to note that the music itself is seductive in a sneaky way. Heavy beats mix with frenetic digital bursts that sometimes sound like horns playing improv solos. Nothing too fancy, here. But the featured guests—The Riz and LeeLee, for instance— and electronic flourishes gives Face the Music that added cherry on top. (Erika Fredrickson) Mite Aswel plays a CD release show at the Palace Thu., Jan. 24, at 9 PM with special guests Tonsofun, Traff the Wiz and Dar. Free.

The Captain Wilson Conspiracy: Electrickeries Don’t you ever wish a live soundtrack just followed you around? The moments when you need it most seem the quietest, and breaking the awkward spell would be so much easier with a rad riff, right? Here’s the house band for your head, and all they need is a few minutes to set up. Taking some cues from ambience bands like Zero 7, The Captain Wilson Conspiracy destroys the assumptions of jazz as bygone and unoriginal. On the Missoula group’s album, Electrickeries, there’s no sax or crooner, but that penchant for formless improvisation still pervades. It’s experimental jazz in all its noisy glory. Keyboard-driven and sample-

sourced, the live-recorded album is occasionally brilliant alongside moments of what sound like something from a Hitchcock drama. Tracks like “The End of Time/Some Other Time” take an elevator from comfortable background noise to a nightmare, while “Messaien Around” brings in a cello for an added creepy bonus. The emphasis on “experimental” might scare one away. Don’t let it. The dissonance is always temporary. Think of Electrickeries like turning on KBGA. Who knows what those wacky college kids are listening to these days—the spontaneity might offer good surprises for you. (Brooks Johnson)

A$AP Rocky: Long.Live.A$AP I have heard “1TRain” called the best posse cut of the year—a practice my mother refers to as damning with faint praise. It is true that A$AP Rocky’s repeatedly delayed studio debut is not so startlingly good as 2011’s Live.Love.A$AP mixtape. Long.Live.A$AP does not sound new. Rocky still does ’90s fast-rap cadences over syrupy slow beats, and he still uses his flashy command of dialect to belie a compelling honesty. He’s just not doing it for the first time. And with a couple thrilling exceptions, it does not

bang. Maybe it was the pressure. A lot has happened to A$AP Rocky since his last mixtape, including making out with Lana Del Ray in a concept video about Jackie Onassis. Probably people have offered him drugs. The bad news is that A$AP Rocky is not going to blow our minds and make rap different every time he releases an album. The good news is that he is a craftsman, and he continues to work diligently on his voice and his biography. Here he works a little too carefully, but it is our fault for looking over his shoulder. (Dan Brooks)

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [19]


[arts]

A new light Jennifer Li shows the secret in the smile by Erika Fredrickson

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The invented characters of Jennifer Li’s oil paintings have secrets. They stare out from the canvas with Mona Lisa half-smiles or sometimes a slight grimace. Pieces like “The Steaming Pot,” “The Pie Maker” or “Just a Pinch” from Li’s Kitchen series transport you to the scullery quarters of some early 19th century peasant household, or perhaps they’re the kitchens behind the scenes of a “Downton Abbey”-type estate. Either way, Li focuses on the simple life of the lower class. “I love the idea of painting everyday things in a loving way,” Li says. “I love the idea of exalting ordinary objects.” Li, who is represented by several galleries including Missoula’s Dana Gallery, has a style that evokes

She moved to Montana—“in the boonies,” she says— with her husband, painter Nick Oberling. She started to take the vibrant colors of the natural world and combined those with the radiant finish of Dutch-style painting. “I was lucky to spend enough time in New York going to the Metropolitan Museum and getting to see those [Dutch] painters’ works. I did some traveling and I’ve been to Rubens’ studio in Antwerp and looked at them up close. They’re just so unbelievably beautiful and jewel-like and that’s what I really strive for, the way the brushstrokes just melt away and the surface is beautifully defined.” Li isn’t stuck on the idea of everyday objects. Her Circus series uses luminescent colors for scenes of

“Trixie’s Place” by Jennifer Li

the Dutch Golden Era, when famous painters such as Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer and Rembrandt presented often homely, mundane objects in natural light. Li plays with light, too, which enhances certain details of her work—a cooking pot or a rolling pin, for instance. In some ways, Li seems less concerned with realistic details than with the glow and finish of her work. Her warm yellows and golden browns, sunset oranges and steel blues don’t assault the eye in the ways some abstract paintings do. Instead, they emanate as if there’s a light built inside them. Li grew up in Marin County, Calif., near San Francisco, and after college she lived in New York for 20 years. She honed her skills at the Arts Students League and then worked at her own studio. Her colors evolved over the years. “When I was painting in New York, the idea was that you would paint your studio with a dark value of gray so that there would be a neutral feeling to everything,” she says. “And then you would put your subject in there and supposedly there would be no reflected light that would interfere with the colors of things. But when I looked back at paintings that I did in that era of my work, I’m just really struck by how even gray can have a reflection. So I felt everything was dulllooking compared to when I moved to Montana.”

[20] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

old-time big top characters. The tableau vivant-inspired scenes don’t indulge in action—no one is jumping through hoops. Instead, it’s more like a parade of characters passing through the window of the canvas, including a child on a horse with a tiger in tow, a dainty ballerina leading a lion and a woman sitting on top of a crocodile. “I love the whole interaction between humans and animals,” Li says. “Especially potentially dangerous animals.” Li’s working on a similar idea for the annual Western Masters Art Show and Sale in Great Falls in March. Her new series is based on the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show and will include an assortment of characters in boots and fringe, Native costumes and other western couture of the time. As usual, there will be gleaming colors and mysterious expressions, making you wonder just what all these characters are thinking. But Li, who is often as elusive as her paintings, isn’t going to give up her secrets so easily. “I tend to get questions about what my intentions are with my paintings,” Li says. “I really would like them to speak for themselves. Part of your aesthetic reaction is to fill in those blanks.” arts@missoulanews.com


[books]

Found in translation Humming the furious love poems of René Char by Jacob Kahn

“The translation had a very good effect on the The complicated history of literature and philosophy can be as hard to navigate as a vast metropolis, criticism,” says Baker, “especially Char, for whom but there’s no better guide to this Babylonian mess compression is the way, incisiveness, quickness. I than Robert Baker. A professor of English and compar- would say it was definitely symbiotic.” Overall, Baker’s translation feels tight and unative literature at the University of Montana, Baker’s first book of criticism, The Extravagant, is a whirlwind cluttered, precise but not rigid. Admittedly, I don’t exploration of the crossings between modern literature read French, but nothing ever feels particularly “lost and philosophy, while his second, In Dark Again in in translation” as these things can go, nor does anyWonder (published in early 2012), is a deeply har- thing feel stodgy or collared or overly correct. They’re nessed study on two poets who gave, as he puts it, “the burgeoning excitement of international Modernism a deeper, more philosophical orientation.” One of those poets, René Char, is the author of a fiery, incandescent collection, The Word As Archipelago, that Baker translated from French and recently made available in English for the first time. Char is a poet who invokes both the radiant expanses and the dark, furious corners of the world and mind. Initially rising out of the French Surrealism of the 1930s, his images are surprising and acrobatic (“The waters were speaking into the ear of the sky”), while his tone takes on a deeper, more philosophical tenor. Originally published in 1962, The Word As Archipelago is a book propelled by oppositional tension. Eros and absence, fury and mystery, death and renewal are all important, and Char relishes their generative energy. This is even apparent in the form of The Word As Archipelago, which is an archipelago of poetic methods. It’s a wide-ranging, emanating, enthusiastic The Word as Archipelago collection. Its “density, élan, René Char and reach,” Baker says, is most Translated by Robert Baker Paperback, Omnidawn fully realized in its prose 240 pages, $19.95 poems and aphoristic sequences, while its verse poems are “a kind of lightening, a stepping back and breath- not loose translations, but between semantic correcting before he goes back into his denser sequences.” ness and genuine feel, I think Baker phrases it well Baker began translating Char and The Word As Ar- when he says “that whole circumference has to be chipelago seriously in summer 2009 and finished the constantly renewed in your experience of translatpoems by that fall. “Even further back I translated him ing.” The poems feel, if anything, overwhelmingly now and then, because I just translate poems I love,” cared for—a trove of furious love poems intensely Baker says. “It’s something I’ve always done. If there’s a loved. While translating, Baker would dissolve into poet I’m reading deeply, or a poet I’m writing about, I’ll the work. “I just needed to be totally in that space,” often memorize their poems by heart because I want to he says, “just humming Char poems in my head, carry them around with me and hear them differently.” humming the lines, to get in that space that’s humThe process of translation, Baker says, “took me ming.” His translation of The Word As Archipelago into a kind of joy. I was on a kind of high from having hums with fury and mystery. It’s one, I think, that translated this poet I’ve loved for so long when I en- should satisfy even the most notoriously unyielding tered the space of criticism with such intensity.” Later of critics, Char himself. the next spring, he finished In Dark Again in Wonder, his book of criticism on Char. arts@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [21]


[film]

Shooting blanks Gangster Squad can’t find its target by Nick Davis

Sometimes, by design or by chance, a film will capture lightning in a bottle by holding a mirror to a currently raging political issue. Gangster Squad, the new crime noir loosely based on a real-life, clandestine police unit built to fight organized crime in post-WWII Los Angeles, had the chance to be just such a movie. Originally slated for release in September 2012, Gangster Squad was delayed after the theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., earlier in the summer. The orig-

as the source material for the script by screenwriter Will Beall. According to IMDB, this is Beall’s first feature project, and his only previous credits are a handful of TV scripts for the show “Castle.” Sadly, Beall’s inexperience leaks in a big way. The characters are essentially cardboard cutouts, with even the slimmest attempt at backstory sabotaged by cliché. The dialogue is laughable, caught in an odd no-man’s land between stylized pulp and earnest exposition. And the story arc is so banal, so predictable in the bad-

Hugs.

inal cut contained a scene in which gangsters let loose with machine guns in a crowded movie theater, and Warner Brothers wisely decided to re-shoot the scene in a less sensitive location. So, while it was a bizarre coincidence that thrust Gangster Squad squarely into the frenzied national conversation regarding gun control, an arguably even more bizarre coincidence lined the film up to be the Mother of All Hyper-Timely Politically Resonant Movies. That second coincidence was the recent declaration from the National Rifle Association’s Wayne LaPierre, in the wake of the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., that the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is with a good guy with a gun—a proposition that is, in essence, the moral fulcrum of Gangster Squad. Not in the vigilante, Die Hard sense, mind you, but in the sense of an officially sanctioned, desperation-driven societal response to unchecked violence. Putting aside the merits (or lack thereof ) of the argument, and recognizing that no movie can be—and maybe shouldn’t even try to be—the definitive statement on an issue of this complexity, it’s undeniable that Gangster Squad hit the lottery in terms of timing, inconvenient re-shoot notwithstanding. But there’s just one small problem. This movie isn’t nearly good enough to matter even in a “Should I pay 10 bucks at the theater or wait for Netflix?” way, let alone in a “Whoa, that made me think about a big thing in a different way” kinda way. Simply put, Gangster Squad is a vapid mess of a film. L.A. Times journalist Paul Lieberman’s seven-part 2008 series, “Tales From the Gangster Squad,” served

[22] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Hollywood way, it’s hard to believe that any of the events and characters ever had any roots in real life. Man, what a plum gig this must have been for a young writer knocking on the door of Big Hollywood—and what a colossal whiff in the face of such opportunity. The execution of such an immature script fell to another young filmmaker, director Ruben Fleischer. Fleischer scored a minor hit with 2009’s Zombieland, but was clearly not ready for a project of this magnitude. The feel of the film is schizophrenic, ranging aimlessly from classic noir to Goodfellas-like uberviolence, cartoonish fight scenes and Matrix-y gun battles. As a result, Gangster Squad is a colossal waste of money (a reported $60 million production budget) and talent (an ensemble cast that includes heavy hitters Sean Penn, Nick Nolte, Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone). Lieberman has since expanded his newspaper series into a book, Gangster Squad: Covert Cops, the Mob, and the Battle for Los Angeles. I haven’t read it, but I suggest that if you’re going to spend any money on this story, go with the book. It’s got to be better than the film. And as much as I wish the movie could have risen to the occasion and contributed something meaningful to the gun control debate, here’s to hoping that this particular golden opportunity never arises again. Gangster Squad continues at the Carmike 12, Pharoahplex and Entertainer. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK

and the Facebooks, oy vey! Also starring the forever beautiful Marisa Tomei. Rated PG. Pharaohplex and Showboat.

BROKEN CITY Framed by the mayor of NYC, a cop goes off the rails on the crazy train to catch the scoundrel and prove himself innocent. Starring the cast from the past, Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN In this documentary, a couple of South Africans seek out the “Latin Bob Dylan,” Sixto Rodriguez, a ’70s rocker who blew up in the African nation after a bootleg recording found its way there 20 years after its recording. Starring Rodriguez, Steve Segerman and Dennis Coffey. Rated PG13. Wilma.

THE IMPOSSIBLE A family of white people escape a tsunami in Thailand and we all learn just how important family is. Starring Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

THIS IS 40 Men are from Mars and women are into toilet humor in this follow up to Judd Apatow’s film Knocked Up, which follows the continuing lives (and lack of sex and sexy, sexiness!) of characters Pete and Debbie. Starring Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann and Jason Segel. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

THE LAST STAND So there’s this sheriff who used to be governor of California or something, and, like, a drug cartel leader escapes from prison in this crazy unstoppable car, so, like, the sheriff is going to try and stop him and stuff using totally any means necessary. Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Forest Whitaker and Johnny Knoxville. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. A LATE QUARTET A string quartet struggles to stay together amidst lusty loins, egoism and sticky fingers. Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christopher Walken and Catherine Keener. Rated R. Wilma. MAMA So you’ve got to raise your nieces after they’ve lived alone in the woods for five years. Something is bound to go wrong, very wrong. Especially with creepmeister Guillermo del Toro directing. Starring Jessica Chastain, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Megan Charpentier. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12 and Village 6. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK Based on the novel by Matthew Quick, this is the story of a former teacher returning home to his wife and parents after a stint in a mental institution. But things aren’t all turkey and stuffing cuz there is a mysterious woman in the picture, too. Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert De Niro. Rated R. Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING ANNA KARENINA Does the world’s finest literary labor measure up in movie form? Will Anna leave her husband for Count Vronsky? Will you love Keira Knighley’s outfits? Jude Law’s “acting?” Also starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Rated R. Wilma. ARGO Based on a true story, crafty CIA dudes try to bust some Americans out of the not-so-hos-

“My friend, take this card. It is the number of Bogota’s finest plastic surgeon.” The Last Stand opens at the Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. pitable country of Iran circa 1979. Ayatollah rock and roll-a! Starring Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston and John Goodman. Rated R. Village 6.

friends will be heroes for a millennia! Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

DJANGO UNCHAINED Django, a slave-turned-bounty hunter, seeks out his wife in the antebellum south. It’s about to get real violent up in here. Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Starring Jamie Foxx, Don Johnson and Leonardo DiCaprio. Rated R. Village 6.

JACK REACHER Jack Reacher knows you best be as ruthless and cunning as your opponent. And he is. This dude is the kind of crime investigator that makes the bad guys’ sheets sweaty. Starring Tom Cruise, Rosamund Pike and Richard Jenkins. Rated PG13. Carmike 12.

GANGSTER SQUAD With no love for East Coast mafiosos, a group of LAPD detectives decide that they are going to go to all lengths to keep them out of their town. Starring Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. A HAUNTED HOUSE A man’s wife is possessed by a demon so the man can’t have relations with her until he casts out that demon. Oh lordy, somebody call the Ghostbusters. Starring Marlon Wayans, Essence Atkins and Marlene Forte. Rated R. Village 6. HITCHCOCK Alfred Hitchcock and his wife fall in love during the filming of Pyscho, ‘nuff said. Starring Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren and Scarlett Johansson. Rated PG-13. Pharaohplex. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Reclaim the treasure stolen by that old dragon Smaug, Bilbo Baggins, and you and your elven

LES MISERABLES After a lifetime on the run in 19th century France, Jean Valjean agrees to care for a young girl and lives are forever changed. Plus, you know, singing. Starring the enchanting Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway. Rated PG13. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. LINCOLN Steven Spielberg directs Daniel Day-Lewis in this biopic about the United States’ greatest president as he struggles with the war, emancipation of the slaves, his cabinet and his family. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and David Strathairn. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

WRECK-IT RALPH Certain to appeal to folks of a certain age and their children, this animated film tells the story of a video game character seeking to be something more, all the while reeking havoc on the entire arcade where he dwells. Starring the voices of John C. Reilly, Jack McBrayer and Jane Lynch. Rated PG. Village 6. ZERO DARK THIRTY Zero Dark Thirty, retells the story of the military operation that resulted in Osama bin Laden’s death. If this were a Jerry Bruckheimer film, Navy recruiters would be creaming their jeans, but this one, directed by Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker), confronts issues of morality in wartime and the demons wrought by interrogation. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton and Chris Pratt. Rated R. Carmike 12. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

PARENTAL GUIDANCE Guess what? Billy Crystal is back! He plays an old-school grandpa taking care of his grandkids (along with Bette Middler) who are so 21st century with the technologies and the Innertubes

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missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [23]


[dish]

Photo by Ari LeVaux

Take it greasy by Ari LeVaux

VA L E N T I N E G I F T S FROM THE HEART

JANUARY

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic French Roast

$10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Big greasy breakfast (BGB) is an American tradition that predates the diners and greasy spoons where it came of age. It’s a breakfast that nourished colonies, powered pioneers and helped homesteaders break the plains. It’s a breakfast that requires no fresh ingredients, and thus can be made with nonperishable ingredients all winter long, even in places like North Dakota or Canada. Bacon, eggs and potatoes form the backbone of this big greasy meal. Bacon provides both meat and grease, and can be substituted with olive oil and other meat if you like. Whether your grease is pork fat, butter or oil, it’s important that it be of the highest quality. Potatoes give their earthy starch to the meal, and can be substituted with biscuits. Although I prefer my carbohydrates unprocessed, the pioneers did love them some flapjacks. As for eggs, there is simply no substitute in my big greasy heart. You either have them or you don’t. If you don’t, it isn’t a BGB. There are also some condiments worth having close at hand that will help make the most of your BGB. Did the pioneers have hot sauce? Probably not, which is depressing to think about. But the most pressing question is did they have coffee? Like wine, coffee makes flavor stand out, the way yellow and purple make one another more brilliant. Coffee and wine, like hot sauce or mayo, are condiments, added at serving time and chewed with the meal. They are also drug-delivering beverages whose creation is as much art as science, with distinct home regions, individual terroirs and nerdy descriptor words like “bouquet.” Unlike wine, morning vino can be enjoyed all day long without putting you to sleep or giving you a hangover. In fact, a good cup of coffee, with a BGB on the side, is a respected remedy for (and prophylactic against) hangovers. It’s almost as if wine and coffee were created together as a beautiful daily cycle of buzz-managing, food-enhancing beverages. Some foods go well with either wine or coffee, like steak, fried fish or lasagna. But the BGB dances only with coffee, even at night. I think it’s because of the eggs, which stand out against the dark, firm floor provided by coffee. The combination is habit-forming. If I have egg in my mouth but no coffee then I’m going to be frustrated. Period. The fact that there is no freshly grown produce in a BGB makes it a great wintertime breakfast for local-foods freaks. In these plush modern times of Tamworth bacon and other specialty greasy meats, not to mention condiments galore, the rustic roots of BGB can be dolled up in wondrous fashion.

FLASH IN THE PAN

Along with coffee and hot sauce, the final condiment in most BGB equations are creamy products like cheese, sour cream or mayo. My favorite crème by far is a fake mayo called Vegenaise. It may seem strange to put a vegan product atop your BGB, but it’s all about efficacy and getting the job done. On that note, I’ll leave you with some advice on making a simple BGB in a single pan. You know, for when you’re camping, or just have one clean pan, or don’t want to create extra dishes, or feeling just lazy. First, fry some bacon pieces on low/medium heat, with added olive oil if the bacon is lean. Thin slice some potatoes and add them to the pan, and let them slowly cook. Arrange the potato slices to maximize contact with the pan. Do the same with carrots, if you wish. The bacon will be done cooking and needs to be temporarily removed from the pan so it doesn’t burn, long before the potatoes are done. To speed the potatoes you can add a little water to the pan, and seal it with a lid (leave the bacon in). When the water steams off the potatoes will be done and starting to crisp in the remaining oil. Keeping the pan below medium allows potatoes and meat to slowly brown and crisp without burning. If you haven’t already made coffee, do it now. When the potatoes are nearly cooked, add any additional meat you wish to include. Along with steak, most any kind of sausage, made with good meat and fat, will do as well. When meat and potatoes are cooked, add some chopped garlic. Then, clear a spot on the bottom of the pan by pushing potatoes and meat to the sides. If the spot doesn’t look greasy enough, add some oil. Turn the pan up to medium and wait for it to heat, then add some beaten eggs to the hot oil. Even though everything is going to the same place, I make an attempt to keep the eggs, potatoes and meat separate from each other, which becomes increasingly difficult as you scramble the eggs. I let the eggs cook a moment before scrambling, to build up some body. But don’t burn them. If you do, you might well go back to bed and start over. The opportunities afforded by bacon, eggs and potatoes are near endless. If I’m not in a hurry I might soft boil the eggs and set them atop browned potatoes and crispy greasy meat, or scramble the eggs in oil with salt and pepper and serve them on the side in their unadulterated bright yellow splendor. Or I might fry them sunny-side-up, and when the bottoms are done but the tops are still gooey pour in a shot of water and put the lid on briefly; the steam will lightly cook the tops. Or, at dinner, scramble the eggs with steamed broccoli and Patak’s curry sauce. Whatever you do, just make sure the coffee’s on.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey months of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2013, bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday-Wednesday 11am-3pm, Thursday-Saturday 11am8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) $-$$ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Educate

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 36 PM Mon-Sat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 11am-8pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$

your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

A food & Wine Pairing, Hosted by Fuel Wine Distributing Featuring

ICE WINE at the Log’s Gastropub Sunday, January 27th, at 4 pm Tickets are $39 per person, and include tasting of 2 Sparkling Wines, 2 Romantic Reds, 1 featured Ice Wine, and food pairings from our kitchen. FREE Queen Room for the night with the purchase of 2 tickets. Tickets are limited, so purchase soon!

Call for reservations! 406-362-4822

Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 96:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Thursday is Trivia Night! Prizes, food and drink specials! Starting at 7 pm. Also,check our brand new wine menu! Considering a staycation? Check out our packages. Call for more details! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Half Nuts Rye at Draught Works HAPPIEST HOUR What you’re drinking: Half Nuts Rye English Brown Ale is a nod to the classic brown ales of northern England, with undertones of American craft brewing. Half Nuts is brewed with rye malt, which gives the beer a reddish luminosity. It also has natural hazelnut extract. A pint will run you $4.

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

What it tastes like: The spice of the rye cuts the classic brown ale sweetness, giving it an undeniably American flavor. The overall mouthfeel is smooth; a little caramel, a little dried fruit. The hazelnut is aromatic, something you notice between your nose and mouth, just before your next sip. It’s not sessionable (6.3 percent ABV), so slow your roll with this one. Sip. Taste. Swallow. Think Newcastle meets Mirror Pond. Why we like it: In England, brown ales are associated with the working class, the beer of choice for people who labor with their hands and backs—people whose bodies need a reward at the end of the day. Though we don’t really work with our hands or our backs, Half Nuts Rye English Brown Ale still tastes like a prize. Why you should try it now: Half Nuts is a seasonal. They brewed 30 kegs, and brewer

Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:303pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$

Photo courtesy of Draught Works

Jeff Grant says it won’t last long. Grab your glass now at Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave. —Jamie Rogers Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Café Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our nonsmoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, micro brews, fine wines & signature drinks. Gluten free menu, also. Takeout & delivery available. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Pita Pit 130 N. Higgins 541-PITA (7482) pitapitusa.com Fresh Thinking Healthy Eating. Enjoy a pita rolled just for you. Hot meat and cool fresh veggies topped with your favorite sauce. Try our Chicken Caesar, Gyro, Philly Steak, Breakfast Pita, or Vegetarian Falafel to name just a few. For your convenience we are open until 3am 7 nights a week. Call if you need us to deliver! $-$$

[26] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Sean Kelly’s A Public House 130 W. Pine St. • 542-1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for lunch & dinner. Featuring brunch Saturday & Sunday from 11-2pm. Serving international & Irish pub fare. Full bar, beer, wine, martinis. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis's Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$


January 17 – January 24, 2013

Peakin’ and grinnin’. Modern acoustic music–makers Head for the Hills perform at the Palace, 147 W. Broadway Ave., on Wed., Jan. 23, at 9 PM, with locals Dodgy Mountain Men. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy Music or stonefly-productions.com.

THURSDAYJAN.17 Big time folksters The Hasslers bring their special brand of “hard-hitting folk” to the VFW, 245 W. Main St., each Thursday during the month January, with special guests and a collection of bizarre dolls (untrue). 10 PM. $2.

Get the lowdown on grant cash at Missoula Nonprofit Network’s workshop, Grants Which Ones Should We Apply For? How Do We Know That We’re Ready? Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern Ave. Missoula11:30 AM–1 PM. Please don’t park right next to the bank. Visit missoulanonprofit.org.

nightlife

2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

See what things are like behind the sun when musical birds of a feather Mountain Breathers kick a hole in the sky at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free.

Take a ride, captain, on the Crystal Country Music, with the Best Westerns at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free.

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms,

Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. January’s guests, Kathy and Brian Derry, lead a

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [27]


[calendar] “kitchen conversation” about Advanced Care Planning: planning for our future and the future of our loved ones. Retired cardiologist Dr. Hal Braun and Aaron Derry, PA Hospitalist, facilitate. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free. Hear the acoustical tuneage of ol’ John Schiever when he plays at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery from 6–8:30 PM. Free. PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) holds its monthly meeting at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Third St., in Hamilton and screens the video, Faces and Facets of the Transgender Experience. 7 PM. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell

your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

W. Main St., so there’s no need to worry about Sir Psycho Sexy sassin’ you about them granny panties. 7:30 PM. $12/$8 students/$10 at ddcmontana.com.

Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free.

Dance music mavens Soul City Cowboys perform for you and yours at Cowboy Troy’s in Victor. 8 PM. Free.

Bow down to musical royalty when country soundgineers the Country Kings play for you all at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight.

FRIDAYJAN.18 They’re red hot, they are Cash for Junkers and they perform at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St., at 9 PM. Free. Hop aboard the Mellowship Slinky in B Major and venture to Bayern Brewery, 1507 Montana St., for an evening with PDX’s Miss Massive Snowflake. 5 PM. Free. Staffers from the Missoula YMCA recount their experiences in Asia during the Brown Bag Lecture: Embracing Asia. 1130 W. Broadway Ave. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife

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[28] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Hey bub, get a load of some great gams and follow the adventures of some big-time gumshoes at the North Valley Public Library in Stevi, which screens classic film noir every Friday evening with an informal discussion to follow. 6 PM. Free. Contact the library for title information at 777-5061. Live better and more smarter and learn how from integrative MD, educator and research scientist Shanhong Lu, who is speaking on Making the Shift to Ageless Living. Dr. Lu is board certified in internal and anti-aging medicine. Crystal Theatre, 501 S. Higgins Ave. 6–7 PM. Free, with lecture to health care professionals (RSVP 360-4455) at 8 AM, with free breakfast. Canadian guitar maestro Matt Andersen performs at the O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave., in Whitefish. 7:30 PM. $27. Standing Womb Only features the comedic stylings of several ladies at Downtown Dance Collective, 121

Buckle down and buckle up for a night of dancing it up with the Country Boogie Boys at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. If you love the music of the 1950s you are gonna just ‘splode at the Missoula Community Theatre’s presentation of the The Marvelous Wondrettes, a story of hopes and dreams and loves. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or visit mctinc.org Don’t go naked in the rain, or snow, instead come to Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., for Untrappable: a Wizard of Oz theme party. Wear your favorite character costume and come listen to live hip-hop from several northwest performers. 9 PM. $5. Take the subway to Venus to the Badlander for I’ll House You: Moonies Birthday Party!, an evening of house tunes and a celebration of Kris Moon’s birthday with DJs Kount Dubyula, Nic Gilpin, Sassy, Mike Stolin, Tigerlily, Kris Moon, Mark Myriad, Hotpantz, Tak45 and Hendawg. 9 PM. Free. Grand Pappy du plenty when honky-tonkin’ stalwarts Russ Nasset and the Revelators kick off the good times at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Bow down to musical royalty when country soundgineers the Country Kings play for you all at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. Be feelin’ fine with County Line who plays country tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9:30 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up.

SATURDAYJAN.19 Josh Farmer is most likely skipping the punk rock classics when he performs tunes to dance and neck to at the Union Club. Go on and neck, dudes. It’s okay. 9 PM. Free. Music is an aeroplane so share the gift of it with the chilluns at Kids’ Vibrations, a 45-minute funtime fea-


[calendar]

Photo by Eric Oravsky

Wonder years. The Missoula Community Theatre presents The Marvelous Wonderettes, which plays Fri., Jan. 18 through Sun., Jan 20 and Wed., Jan. 23 through Sun., Jan. 27 at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. For times and ticket prices visit mctinc.org.

turing local musicians. Downtown Dance Collective Studio 113, 121 W. Main St. 11–11:45 AM. Donations accepted. Never fear, lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds is rolling with music, kids’ activities, local produce, meat, baked goods, honey and so much more. 11 AM–2 PM. Kids who write are smarter than those who don’t. The Missoula Writing Collaborative knows this and that’s why they are hosting Saturdays in January Writing Workshops— A Winter Wonderland for Young Writers. Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., for an afternoon of discovery and wordsmithery. 1:30–3:30 PM. Free.

nightlife Be freaky stylie and head to the backwoods for some reggae tunesmithery by Chele Bandulu at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6– 8:30 PM. Free. Gil Espinoza and Paul Scarr tell tales, like that of Rain Dance Maggie, at the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Don’t be a no chump love sucker, instead head to Birthdayfest ‘13, a birth-anniversary party for a

handful of local musicians, with bands and stand-up comedians to rock your socks off. Appearing acts are Shramana, Zebulon Kosted, Total Combined Weight, Swamp Ritual, King Elephant and Con/Sequence, as well as comedians Victor Johnson, Duane Raider, Dale Guynes and Reggie Herbert. Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St. 7 PM. $5.

Vote for your favorite artist or band at missoulanews.com If you love the music of the 1950s you are gonna just 'splode at the Missoula Community Theatre's presentation of the The Marvelous Wondrettes. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or visit mctinc.org. Go against the grain and dance like it’s 1765 at the Missoula Folklore Society’s Contra Dance at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St., with Skippin’ A Groove performing and Mitchell Frey with the call. 7:30 PM lessons, 8–11 PM dance. $9/$6 members. Leave any notions about Californication behind and head to

the Lumberjack Saloon for tunes by Northern Lights. Or grab a ride on the shuttle bus. 9 PM. Free. Join good time boy Javier Ryan for some hip-hop and folk tuneage, with local rappers Trailer Park Jordan and Wormwood. Palace. 9 PM. $5. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo is the de facto dopest DJ duo in town. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. $2. Soul City Cowboys are hard at it again. The group brings dancing tunes to the Buck Snort Casino and Bar up Evaro way. 9 PM. Free.

SUNDAYJAN.20 Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. If you love the music of the 1950s you are gonna just 'splode at the Missoula Community Theatre's

presentation of the The Marvelous Wondrettes, a story of hopes and dreams and loves. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 2 PM. $17/$15 kids. 6:30 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or visit mctinc.org

nightlife Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 11-12:30 PM. $10/$75 for eight classes. Visit turningthewheel.org. Glacier Symphony’s Peter and the Wolf Winter Family Concert pops off at Kalispell High School. 3 PM. Ticket prices range up to $32/Kids under 12 free. Visit gcsmusic.org for mor e info. John Floridis plays music at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., 4–7 PM. Free.

MONDAYJAN.21 Annie wants a baby, and some jazz to boot, so check out David Horgan and Beth Lo at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., 7–10 PM. Free. Get on board pro-activists, Missoula Moves to Amend, a non-par-

tisan, non-profit organization working to help reduce the influence of money in politics, is holding a rally on the Missoula Courthouse steps at noon. Speakers discuss various issues related to the topic of money in politics and the Citizens United nonsense. The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule.

nightlife Join NCBI Missoula and the MLK Day Planning Committee for Missoula’s MLK Day Celebration. There is a rally at Caras Park at 5 PM, with speeches from local civil rights activists and live drumming by Ben Corral. The rally is followed by a candle-lit march for racial justice to St. Paul Lutheran Church (located at 202 Brooks Ave.) for the community celebration that begins at 6 PM. Jamee Greer, community organizer for Montana Human Rights Network and LGBTQ activist gives the keynote address, with music and dancing from the St. Ignatius Dance Troupe and a pres-

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [29]


[calendar] presented with: Who was the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ original guitarist? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Irie eyes be smiling at Royal Reggae, a weekly night of dance hall tuneage by local DJs Supa J, Smiley Banton and Oneness. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Magic Johnson won’t be in the house but Youth Rescue Mission, outta Seattle via Bigfork, is in da house for some indie rockin’ at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night. 9 PM. Free. No need to go under a bridge to donate some of that blood; instead, head to the American Red Cross, 2401 N. Reserve St., from 3–7 PM. Call 800REDCROSS.

WEDNESDAYJAN.23 If you love the music of the 1950s you are gonna just ‘splode at the Missoula Community Theatre’s presentation of the The Marvelous Wondrettes, a story of hopes and dreams and loves. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $19 adults/$15 children. Call 7287529 or visit mctinc.org. Locker rockers. Pop music makers Miss Massive Snowflake perform at Bayern Brewing, 1507 Montana St., of Fri., Jan. 18, at 5 PM. Free.

entation of awards for the MLK Youth Art and Essay Contest. Visit a seedy side of town at the Seed Social, with Kiki Hubbard of the Organic Seed Alliance and Native Seed/SEARCH’s Executive Director, Bill McDorman, who discuss the importance of starting a seed library. Burns Street Commons, 1500 Burns St. 5:30–8 PM. Food by Biga Pizza is $8 if you RSVP by Jan. 18. Contact Karl at ksutton@mmfec.org or 676-5901.

the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. If you see me getting high, knock me down because it’s time for another installment of electronical tuneage at Random Music for Random Kitties, with DJs Jaguar Sleepover, Osiris, Primecutz and the Milkcrate Mechanic. Badlander. 9 PM. Free, with $5 pitchers on tap.

More events online: missoulanews.com

TUESDAYJAN.22

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

True men don’t kill coyotes but they and their gals do head to Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., for Chug for Charity, which supports the Loyola Sacred Heart Foundation. 5–8 PM.

Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks

Hey money nerds, visit the Missoula Area Chamber of Commerce State of Missoula Commerce Report and learn about the the impacts of small business. Registration and payment must be submitted to the Chamber no later than Tue., Jan. 15. $35/$25 for chamber members. To register today contact, Kimberly at kimberly@ missoulachamber.com.

[30] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. Noon–1 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. It’s a new year, time for a new you, and a new you starts with talking right. The Compassionate Communication Class develops the tools for making effective conversation. 725 W. Alder St. #17. 725. 6–7:30 PM. $65 per single class or $120 for two. Contact Patrick Marsolek for info. or to register call 443-3439 or info@PatrickMarsolek.com

If you have to ask what a seed library is, you should check out the Missoula Seed Library Planning Meeting sponsored by the MUD Project and featuring Bill McDorman, Executive Director of Native Seeds/SEARCH. 629 Phillips St. 7– 8:30 PM. Free. Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library West Meeting room. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7–9 PM. Free. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be

nightlife Hey, winter is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Hear some pretty little ditties or light a fire under that stone cold bush when bluegrass and folksters Head for the Hills comes to town to blow doors, with locals Dodgy Mountain Men. Palace. $10/$8 advance plus fees at Ear Candy Music, ticketfly.com and stonefly-productions.com. (Pub trivia answer: Hillel Slovak, who died of a heroin overdose in 1988.)

THURSDAYJAN.24 Without Annette there ain’t no one for to captain that aeroplane, so check the tuneage at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6– 8 PM. Free. The Project Homeless Connect event gives struggling people a chance to access medical and dental care, reading glasses, a meal, clothing,


[calendar] hair cuts, counseling, legal advice, housing assistance, benefits enrollment and more. First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. 10–3 PM. Free. Call 258-4980 for event information or 728-1809 to volunteer. Get out from under the bridge and view artwork inspired by the cave art found at Chauvet Pont d’Arc and Lascaux in France in Nancy Erickson’s Kindred Spirits, as well as some old time costumage, tapestries and more in Fashion and Textiles at the Montana Museum of Art & Culture on the UM campus. Noon–6 PM. Suggested donation $5.

nightlife Families interested in something different should attend the Sussex School Annual Open House on the school campus, 1800 S. Second St. W. 5:30–7 PM.

Don’t be dosed when former professional sound engineer and pro music-maker Max Hay bring his unique-itude to the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6–8:30 PM. Free. What lasts longer than one hot minute and features the dubious imp Dobby? Why that would be Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, of course. It screens at the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St., at 6 PM. Check out the Harry Potter exhibit, too. 6 PM. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 8–10 PM. If you love the music of the 1950s you are gonna just ‘splode at the Missoula Community Theatre’s presentation of the The Marvelous Wondrettes, a story of hopes and

Photo courtesy of Matthew Sean Riley

Birthday boys. Birthdayfest ‘13 takes place at Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St., on Sat., Jan. 19, at 7 PM and is a rock ‘n’ roll and comedy blow out with Shramana, Zebulon Kosted, King Elephant, Total Combined Weight, Swamp Ritual and Con/Sequence as well as comedians Victor Johnson, Duane Raider, Dale Guynes and Reggie Herbert. $5.

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [31]


[calendar]

carried away For some 21st century men, maintaining a masculine identity is often a difficult proposition. Sure, we want to be cool dudes with hyphenated last names, a minor in Gender Studies and wives who make twice what we make, but we are the American male dagnabbit, trained since birth to be the breadwinners and protectors of the “fairer sex.” So what can we do to prove to other men that we are “the man”? The answer is simple enough: take part in the Pacific Northwest National Wife Carrying Contest. The contest: carry your wife from one end of a short course to the other faster than the man and woman next to you. Do not fall down. Do not quit. Do show your steel and your intestinal fortitude. But how

even to church or the golf course. Answer no questions about it. You are in training. Stay focused.

Eat only protein the week prior to the event. Two grams of protein per pound of body weight. For example, a 225-pound man would WHAT: Pacific Northwest National Wife want to ingest 450 grams of proCarrying Contest and Winter Carnival tein or approximately four galWHERE: Lookout Pass Ski and Recreation Area lons of whole milk per day. WHEN: Sun., Jan. 20, at 1 PM (PDT) HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFo: Visit skilookout.com

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[32] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

to prepare for such an event? Maybe you’re a firefighter, a deliveryman (ahem, delivery person) or a logger or some other such individual who may have been unwittingly preparing for this event your entire adult life. Count yourself lucky. But what about us weenus office drones attached to a chair on wheels, with gelatinous backsides and everexpanding beer guts? I have a three-step regime for you. To find out how much your wife really weighs, fill a backpack with cinder blocks that equal her weight, plus an additional 25 percent. Wear this pack at all times, dreams and loves. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. 8 PM. $21. Call 728-7529 or visit mctinc.org During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Commit a funky crime and check out local rhymesayer Mite Aswel’s CD release party with locals MCs Tonsofun and Traff the Wiz. Palace. 9 PM. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free.

You are going to use the same Estonian wife-carrying technique as the Finnish world champions do, right? Since your wife’s legs are to be wrapped around your neck as she hangs upside-down on your back, arms wrapped around your waist, you best get used to a possible lack of oxygen by wearing a belt around your neck weighted on one end with a 64-ounce bucket of all-natural peanut butter which serves to asphyxiate but only slightly. Do not wear it to bed. Do wear it in the shower. That is all. The rest is up to you, men. Show her that you are worthy. More importantly, show other men that you are better than them, that the things you carry mean more to you than the competition. —Jason McMackin Get a dose of countrified good times with Mark Duboise and Crossroads, who perform tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9:30 PM. Free. Big time folksters The Hasslers bring their special brand of “hard-hitting folk” to the VFW, 245 W. Main St., each Thursday during the month January, with special guests and a collection of bizarre dolls (untrue). 10 PM. $2. If you figured out the calendar’s theme this week, shoot me an e-mail and you can win a free book from the Indy’s extensive collection of self-published works. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 18 to calendar@ missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

E

ach fall I imagine that by the time the Seeley Lake Challenge Biathlon rolls around I’ll be in the best shape of my life. The fact is I like to eat salted meats and cheeses, so once again I’ll be unable to attend the event in a sufficiently competitive manner. No worries, though, we now have Winterfest, an affair that might be more in tune with our glutinous and, shall we say, lazy wintertime ways. Winterfest takes place over the course of two weekends and has an event for darn near everyone including a torchlight parade, chili cook-off, ice fishing and critter tracking. The Driftriders Snowmobile Club hosts a poker run around the area (hundreds of miles of trails surround the Seeley-Swan). For me, though,

the siren song of the winter biathlon calls to my Scandinavian roots. Participants can skate or use the classic technique while shooting at targets from prone and standing positions. Missed targets require that a 50yard penalty lap is skied. There is also a 1K kids race and beginners are encouraged to give it a try. Worst case, you do some laps and shoot some guns. —Jason McMackin The Seeley Lake Winterfest begins Fri., Jan. 18 and continues through Sun., Jan. 20, in and around Seeley Lake. It starts up again on Thu., Jan 24 and continues through Sun. Jan. 27. For a full schedule visit seeleylakechamber.com.

Photo by Chad Harder

THURSDAY JANUARY 17 The FWP hosts a Trapping Short Course & Trap Release Clinic for those who want to learn more about furbearer management. This class is geared toward those who do not trap but are curious about trapping. FWP regional office, 3201 Spurgin Rd. 6:30–9 PM. Visit fwp.mt.gov.

FRIDAY JANUARY 18 Go ahead and let the dogs out at the 6th Annual Darby Dog Derby Sled Dog Race at Lost Trail Pass. This two-day event features skijor, 2-dog junior, 4-dog, 6-dog and 8-dog classes. Races starts 8:30 AM. Free to spectate. Visit bitterrootmushers.org for a full schedule. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Let the kids climb the walls while you have a snort next door at Draught Works at the Freestone Climbing Center’s Kids Climbing Club. Kids get instruction and encouragement; you get to chill ‘til the next episode. 935 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. $25 per month. Make sure your first time is safe and that the person you’re doing it with knows what they’re doing. So moto on over to First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY JANUARY 19 The Whitefish Whiteout is a backcountry ski mountaineering race not for the faint of heart and definitely not for the weak of legs. The event starts with competitors skinning up from the bottom of the hill and then skiing back down, either on a 2,000 vertical foot recreational course or a 4,000 vertical foot race course. Note that some competitors make it to the top in less than a halfhour. That’s just wrong. Check out skiwhitefish.com and check under “Events.” Just don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occurs every Sat. at 8 AM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. After the run/walk, you’ll grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Shoot and ski, ski and shoot—and don’t forget to breathe—at the Seeley Lake Challenge

Biathlon, a 10K classic or skate-ski race that combines shooting and skiing. Experts and novices, adults and kids, are encouraged to take part. Check out seeleylakechamber.com. Get certified to hunt archery style at the Missoula Bowhunter Education Classes held by the FWP. The all-day class also includes a half-day field course on Sun., Feb. 3. The course takes place at the FWP office, 4301 Spurgin Rd., from 8:30–5:30 PM. Free. Register at fwp.mt.gov.

TUESDAY JANUARY 22 Join Olympian Jeff Galloway for Running Until You’re 100, Why and How, to learn why running may just save your life. Missoula Public Library. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 23 Wax your boards and keep your tips up for Snowbowl’s Alpine Evening Race Series. The races take place each Wednesday through March 7, with the last race and a big old party taking place on Fri., March 9. Become the queen of the mountain or the king of the hill—either way, rule your opponents. Contact Deb at 2585260 or debdem@optimum.net. My lovely man, Olympian Jeff Galloway, gives a talk called Improving Your Marathon Time at Runner’s Edge, 304 N. Higgins Ave., at noon. Free. Hit the K-12 and do it for your brother who died trying to break that record back in ‘78 at Whitefish Mountain Resort’s Wednesday Night Race League. Alpine racing y’all at 6:30 PM, partying afterward. Visit skiwhitefish.com. Learn to taste the pain and overcome it at Jeff Galloway’s Missoula Marathon or Half: You Can Do It! spiel at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. 7 PM. Free.

THURSDAY JANUARY 24 Olympic runner Jeff Galloway talks food at Fat Burning for Runners inside the Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St. W. Noon. Free. Be one of the good-time boys and a better runner after attending Jeff Galloway’s Three-Hour Running School at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. 5:30–8:30 PM. $99 or $49 for GTC participants. Visit runwildmissoula.org. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [33]


[community]

INFORMATIONAL MEETING Present Draft: Maclay Bridge Planning Study Missoula County Thursday, January 31, 2013 6:00 p.m. • Guest House Inn Suites & Conference Center • 3803 Brooks St., Missoula, MT Missoula County, in partnership with the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), have initiated the development of the Maclay Bridge Planning Study to determine potential needs of the Maclay Bridge and connecting roadways within the area. The purpose of this meeting is to present the screening process, and to gather feedback on the draft planning study report. The planning study identifies potential options and assists in facilitating a smooth and efficient transition from transportation planning to future project development/environmental review, if any, based on need and funding availability. The Maclay Bridge Planning Study is a planning-level study and is not an environmental analysis, design or construction project. The Maclay Bridge crosses the Bitterroot River approximately 2.75 miles west of Reserve Street via North Avenue. North Avenue connects to the existing bridge as the eastern approach, and River Pines Road serves as its western approach.

The meeting is open to the public and the public is encouraged to attend. Local governments attempt to provide accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person's participation in this meeting. For reasonable accommodations to participate in this meeting, please contact Jeff Key, Robert Peccia & Assocs. Inc., at (406) 447-5000 at least two days before the meeting. For the hearing impaired, the TTY number is (406) 444-7696 or (800) 335-7592, or Montana Relay at 711. Alternative accessible formats of this information will be provided upon request.

Comments may be submitted in writing at the meeting, by mail to Sheila Ludlow, Project Manager, MDT, P.O. Box 201001, Helena, MT 59620-1001

or online at www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml Please indicate comments are for the Maclay Bridge Planning Study.

To be honest, I care very little about whether Martin Luther King Jr. really wrote the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” with little or no editing, which is often supposed in our American Literature 101 books. The letter is a brilliant summary about what community means, about how we are all connected, about how there really is no such thing as an outsider. He writes, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly…Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider.” Rhetorically powerful and beautifully stated. Dr. King’s words sing out from the page, yet here we are almost 50 years after the letter’s writing and we still have many of the same societal problems, mainly because certain political groups and individuals insist that we must seclude ourselves from disparate societal segments and be fearful of the capital O: “Other.” The National Coalition Building Institute Missoula continues to do the work King began by focusing on training people “to interrupt oppression, prevent violence and resolve conflict, as well as develop strategies for building just systems,” according to the

group’s website. Along with the MLK Day Planning Committee, NCBI has helped organize Missoula’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration. Jamee Greer, of the Montana Human Rights Network, gives the keynote address and undoubtedly will share how far we’ve come and how for we have to go. The final sentence of King’s letter is one of positivity and suggests an attainable goal worth striving for. “Let us all hope that the dark clouds of racial prejudice will soon pass away and the deep fog of misunderstanding will be lifted from our fear drenched communities,” he wrote, “and in some not too distant tomorrow the radiant stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation with all their scintillating beauty.” —Jason McMackin The Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration takes place on Mon., Jan. 21, at 5 PM, beginning with a rally at Caras Park and speeches from local civil rights activists and live drumming by Ben Corral. The rally is followed by a candle-lit march for racial justice to St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks Ave., for the community celebration at 6 PM.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

Sign a 9 -12 month lease to receive 1 month free rent.

Features include energy-efficient features, LED site lighting and many other water and energy-saving measures. Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

THURSDAY JANUARY 17

TUESDAY JANUARY 22

PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) holds its monthly meeting at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Third St., in Hamilton and screens the video, Faces and Facets of the Transgender Experience. 7 PM.

Hey money nerds, visit the Missoula Area Chamber of Commerce State of Missoula Commerce Report and learn about the the impacts of small business. Registration and payment must be submitted to the Chamber no later than Tue., Jan. 15. $35/$25 for chamber members. To register today contact, Kimberly at kimberly@ missoulachamber.com.

Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

FRIDAY JANUARY 18 Staffers from the Missoula YMCA recount their experiences in Asia during the Brown Bag Lecture: Embracing Asia. 1130 W. Broadway Ave. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

MONDAY JANUARY 21 Get on board pro-activists, Missoula Moves to Amend, a non-partisan, non-profit organization working to help reduce the influence of money in politics, is holding a rally at the Russell Smith Courthouse, 201 E. Broadway Ave., at noon. Speakers discuss various issues related to the topic of money in politics and the Citizens United nonsense. Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM Flat, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

4000 Mullan Road • Missoula • 406 543 0060

mullanreserveapartments.com

[34] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. True men don’t kill coyotes but they and their gals do head to Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., for the Chug for Charity which supports the Loyola Sacred Heart Foundation. 5–8 PM.

THURSDAY JANUARY 24 The Project Homeless Connect event gives struggling people a chance to access medical and dental care, reading glasses, a warm meal, clothing, hair cuts, mental health counseling, legal advice, housing assistance, employment counseling, benefits enrollment, pet services and more. First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. 10AM –3 PM. Free. Contact Melissa at 258-4980 for event information or Sierra at 728-1809 to volunteer.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 DEUCE• Deuce

is a young, handsome Heeler/Pitbull X who lived a rather secluded life, so being at Animal Control is a big change for him. He's still a bit shy, but he's settling in nicely and really learning to appreciate attention from people. We think he has tons of potential.

LOO-CO•This good-looking Rottweiler X is full of energy and definitely has a mischievous nature. He'd do best in a home without livestock, and he's so smart that he definitely needs secure confinement. He's full of affection, however, and would love to share it with a family.

NOREEN•Noreen was left on the shelter

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

CLAUDE•Claude is a young adult, but his small size makes him look like a kitten. He's certainly as lively as yo would expect a kitten to be, and even though he loves people, he's not crazy about other cats. He'd much prefer to be your only one.

porch during the night, so we have no idea what her story really is. She had a severe wound on her side, but it responded very well to treatment, and she's healthy and happy now. She's also very quiet and reserved.

GLORY•We named her Glory because she is an absolutely glorious cat! She has a soft, smooth coat, a sweet personality, and beautiful black and white markings. She's lively enough to keep you amused, but never pesky enough to be annoying.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

BASTILLE•Bastille is about eight months old -- that great age where kittens begin to turn into adult cats. He's full of fun and energy, but he's past the point of bouncing around constantly in total kitten playfulness. He also has a silky, pewter-colored that really sets off his stunning green eyes.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 LUCILLE•Meet sweetness, meet Lucille. A wonderful tan & white beagle whose 10 years of life have given her perspective and patience. A social yet relaxed gal, she’s great with dogs, plays gently with children, and understands that the potty is outside. Lucille is hoping to explore the world around her with you. Come meet her today! LIZZY•Here’s Lizzy, an adorable black and

white 1-year-old pit bull mix, who’s hoping you’ll be her new best friend. A real social magnet, her network includes dogs, cats and of course, children. Easygoing, she’s smart as a whip having learned most of the basic commands and, of course, she’s housetrained. Lizzy’s awaiting your visit and hopefully her forever home.

JAKE• Hello! I’m Jake, a fun-loving, happyall-the-time 10-year-old Labrador and I can’t wait to meet you. I’m a friendly, yet responsive boy who has a great sense of humor and I’m looking for a family with the same. Come meet me today, and bring your kids if you have them (they’re the best!), and let’s see if there’s a match.

ARDEN•Hello from Arden, a big sweet or-

ange colored boy who’s just hitting his stride at 7 years old. While some may call him mellow and affectionate (which is true), he’s also adventurous and full of confidence. This boy is a longhaired kitty and thankfully, loves to be brushed. Reward him with treats and you’ll have a forever friend.

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

The Flower Bed

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MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

ROOTBEER•Rootbeer

is a delightful 2year-old torti/tiger striped girl who would love to be your constant companion. Sometimes called Sassy or Sidekick, Rootbeer is social and enjoys receiving your affection. Don’t be surprised if you find her capturing some quiet time, though – a girl needs her beauty sleep and a balance in life.

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

ONYX•This gentle 12-year-old kitty named Onyx is in her senior years, yet she’ll delight you with her playful side. She loves chasing a laser pointer or batting at feather toys, or quietly resting in your lap for a brushing. Onyx is on a special diet supporting her kidneys, yet hopes you’ll see past this and provide her a deserving retirement home.

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

January 17 - January 24, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD CABIN FEVER ANTIQUES FAIR & FLEAS! Helena Civic Center; Jan. 19&20; Adm. $5.00. Good both days. More dealers, more deals, MORE! Dealers inquire 442-5595, Leave message Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Lo-

cally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Buy 2 Hours, Get 1 Hour FREE! (Limit 1 free hour per customer). $90 value for $60. SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com SONGWRITERS Share your original songs Classic Country Western and Folk ONLY For in-

formation call Jay: 406-5529363 THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat buying event of the year” at Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, Jan. 25th, 26th & 27th. Hometown Ford Store on display. 443-6400 or 2 6 6 - 5 7 0 0 . www.mtboatshow.com

TO GIVE AWAY

Missoula is a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 105 S. 3rd St. W. and open Monday-Saturday 12-5PM

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744 WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5

FREE Clothing!! Pass It On

Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C9

Piano Lessons

This Modern World . .C12

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

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406-880-0688

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DO I QUALIFY FOR SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY?

www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 416 E. Pine Missoula MT 59802 • 721-7744

Bulman Law Associates

Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

I BUY

Hondas, Subarus, Toyotas Japanese/German Cars & Trucks

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not.

FAST CASH 24 HOURS

327-0300 "The least I can do is speak out for those who cannot speak for themselves.” - Jane Goodall

( :

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK MARCUS Hello! I’m Marcus, a playful hamster just waiting to meeting you. I’m in good health and stay in shape by running on my wheel and exploring large rooms in my hamster ball. I’m often called handsome when people see my beautiful black, brown and grey coat; but I really turn on my playful charm when you bring me a treat. I do enjoy company, but need my space at times. Sound like a match made in heaven? Stop by and let’s see. 549-9864 www.myhswm.org


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS

VOLUNTEERS

By Amy Alkon NEW KID ON THE BLOC I spent the last two years in the Peace Corps in Eastern Europe and just committed to another year. Before my assignment, I was dating a decent guy, but I told him it was temporary. When I was home on leave this summer, it was evident he hadn't let the relationship go. I reiterated that I just wanted friendship, but when I was back in Europe he emailed, asking if I still love him. He's always been really supportive, and even visited me in my first year, but I again told him I didn't have romantic feelings for him. He asked for time to get over us. I promised not to contact him until he contacted me. This month, after three months of silence, he messaged me saying he wanted to talk, but now he won't respond to my emails to set up a Skype date. I miss him terribly and wonder if I made a mistake ending it with him. Then again, I'm living in a culture where women my age are all married with two kids, and I'm getting a lot of pressure to get married. —Confused Assuming you aren't willing or able to "date local," this guy is effectively the last man on earth for you, at least for a year. Yeah, sure, you could go on a dating site and pique some new guy's interest, but imagine the directions for the first date: "Hop a 16-hour transatlantic flight, take three buses, transfer to the local mule cart, and tell Szylblczlka to turn left at the second group of goats in the road." Until recently, even with thousands of miles between you, this guy's been conveniently located: stuck on you. It sounds like you admire his good qualities—sort of in the way a great auntie appreciates her little grand-nephew's accomplishments in the macaroni arts. But, romance? Nuh-uh. Not feelin' it. Friendship only. And that's final. Well, sort of final. Because, while absence, punctuated by the occasional Skype chat, couldn't make the heart grow fonder, there's nothing that gins up feeling in a girl like the sudden and inexplicable disappearance of a guy after years of his tongue-dragging, tail-wagging, puppydog-like reliability. Adding to this allure, you're the single lady surrounded by all these happy villager couples. This leads to you telling yourself that maybe you're only now recognizing the guy's wonderfulness, but what you're really saying is "I don't particularly have feelings for him, but he's always had feelings for me, and I'm kinda lonely over here in Upper Eastern Wherever, where the milkmaid next door just got married at 14."

Paraphrasing Kant on how people shouldn't be treated as means to an end, "Don't be a user! That's, like, so bogue." Instead, engage in a truly humanitarian gesture—leave the guy alone so he can get you out of his system and go find somebody else. Ideally, she'll also "miss him terribly" when they're apart—but not simply because he's the one man she has contact with who lacks both a wife and the belief that pink No. 300 sandpaper doubles for White Cloud and a glass of warm water is the week's bath.

CASING AMY I'm a straight man who's become friends with two bona-fide, card-carrying lesbians. One I met hiking and the other is a coworker. Dominique and Angelique (not their real names) are both very attractive. I consider each a good friend, have lunched with them, hugged them, and met their respective unattractive partners (each of whom looks like a man). I know they are not interested in men, yet I continue to have prurient thoughts about them, and find this continuing attraction to gay women confusing. —Wrong Hots Wait. You're a heterosexual man who has the hots for hot women who get it on with other women? Weird. And yet, there must be other men out there who feel as you do, considering the vast selection of videos titled "Hot Lesbian Action," and the paucity of titles like "Two Lesbian Soccer Moms Nuzzle On The Couch While Sharing A Bag Of Kale Chips." Guess what: You aren't attracted to gay women; you're attracted to extremely attractive women, some of whom happen to be gay. (Not surprisingly, when coming up with aliases for your friends, you reach for names that are more stripper than lady field hockey coach.) If you're content to remain a lesbro—a straight guy who's friends with lesbians—your lesbian friends can provide you with priceless benefits: unlimited insight into the bizarre thinking and behavior of women. Just be sure you always keep a firm grip on the bottom line: If they were into men, they'd be dating a man instead of a woman who kind of looks like one.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer C o o r d i n a t o r , bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406543-3550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com French Class Learn French by Valentine’s Day Beginning French Tuesdays, January 29th-April 30th 5:00 or 7:00 p.m. $125/ 6 week session Levels101-104 for various experience Intermediate Conversational French Thursdays, January 24th- April 18th 6:00 p.m. $125/ 12 week session Alliance FranÁaise de Missoula afmissoula.education@gmail.com Montana School of Massage & Massage Clinic- Professional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS

COMPUTERS

SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 5496214

STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter discounts for spring delivery. 50x80, 62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200. Take advantage of tax deductions. Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-7040

Down Jackets & Warm Winter Gear 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and

piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com

specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo,


MARKETPLACE mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS 3 month old lab puppies, AKC. Yellow and Chocolate. All vaccinations given. Will deliver. $600. Leave message or call after 4pm 208512-3170 Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange, DSH, SF, 9mo; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs;#2573 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2587 Black, DSH, SF 9 mo; #2599 Grey Torti, DMH, F, 2yrs; #2602 Brn Torti, DSH, F, 8wks; #2615 Grey/Blk, Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF,

10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3635311 www.montanapets.org/ hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life. Gallery of Local Artists

Custom Framing Shrink-wrapping 709 Ronan Street

Missoula•541-7100

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Now Hiring! Start tomorrow. Days only. 273-2266

PROFESSIONAL THE MADISONIAN IN ENNIS is seeking an outstanding editor. Salary DOE. Submit resume, cover letter, three work samples and three references to s.hill@madisoniannews.com by Jan. 25.

SKILLED LABOR Looking for a truck driver. Must have Class A CDL with a clean driving record. Competitive wages, starting wage $18 DOE. Benefits: Simple IRA, health insurance, dental, paid vacation, and paid holiday. B&B Septic Services, Inc., 3604 N. Hwy 7, P.O. Box 1514, Baker, MT 59313-1514; Allan or Trish Barth 406-778-2599. Please send resumes to: trisho45@hotmail.com or can fax to 406-7783794 REGISTERED SANITARIAN/ LAND USE PLANNER (Sidney, Montana). Review applications/administer regulations for subdivisions, trailer courts/RV

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

parks, floodplain, water, wastewater systems. Degree required. Contact Stephanie Ler 406-4332207. TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

SALES Big Sky Publishing, parent company of the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, is seeking a part-time salesperson for our growing commercial printing division. This position offers flexibility in hours and home-base location (statewide sales); salary, commission, mileage and phone allowance. Candidate should be a self-starter, able to work inde-

SERVICES pendently and be inquisitive in seeking out new customer relationships. Knowledge of web offset printing a plus. Please send cover letter and resume to spressly@dailychronicle.com A Pioneer News Group company.

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HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

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PROSECUTING ATTORNEY – CONTRACT POSITION The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes – Pablo, MT are seeking a full-time

Prosecuting Attorney to represent the Tribes in Tribal Court. Applicants must be an attorney admitted to practice Law in the State of Montana. Must be a member in good standing of the State Bar of Montana. Applicant must have no criminal convictions other than minor traffic infractions for which the punishment does not include the possibility of a jail sentence. Weekend and off-hour work and occasional Court appearances required. All applicants are required to submit a Tribal application, copies of relevant transcripts and/or certificates, resume and a cover letter to the Tribal Personnel Department, 406.675.2700 ext. 1040 or visit the cskt.org website for the application and full vacancy announcement. Closing date will be Thursday, January 31, 2013 @ 5:30 p.m. The successful applicant, if not already employed with the Tribes, must pass a pre-hire drug test and serve a six-month probationary period.

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

MITCHELL MASSAGE THERAPY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): "If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it," wrote 19th-century poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. "Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of the earth." This is good counsel for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, Aries. I suspect you will have a good, clear shot at a target you've been trying to get close to for a long time. Make sure you adjust your trajectory to account for the attraction of the earth. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you learn a novel idea or a crucial new lesson while you are tipsy or outright blitzed, you will probably forget it when you sober up. And it will remain forgotten as long as you abstain. But there's a good chance you will recall the vanished information the next time you get loopy. I'm telling you this, Taurus, because even if you haven't been inebriated lately, you have definitely been in an altered and expanded state of consciousness. I'm afraid that when you come back down to earth in a few days, you might lose some of the luminous insights you've been adding to your repertoire. Is there anything you can do to ensure you will retain these treasures? It would be a shame to lose track of them until the next time your mind gets thoroughly blown open. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Studying the movements of the planets is my main way of discerning the hidden currents of fate. I sometimes supplement my investigations by reading Tarot cards and the Chinese "Book of Changes," also known as the I Ching. To arrive at your horoscope this week, I used all of the above as well as the following forms of prognostication: catoptromancy, which is divination by gazing into a mirror underwater; cyclomancy, or divination by watching a wheel that's turning; geloscopy, divination by listening to random laughter; and margaritomancy, divination by observing bouncing pearls. Here's what I found, Gemini: You now have the power to discern previously unfathomable patterns in a puzzling mystery you've been monitoring. You also have the ability to correctly surmise the covert agendas of allies and adversaries alike. Maybe best of all, you can discover certain secrets you've been concealing from yourself.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "To be reborn is a constantly recurring human need," said drama critic Henry Hewes. I agree. We all need to periodically reinvent ourselves—to allow the old ways to die so that we can resurrect ourselves in unforeseen new forms. According to my analysis, Cancerian, your next scheduled rebirth is drawing near. For best results, don't cling to the past; don't imitate what has always worked before. Instead, have faith that surrendering to the future will bring you the exact transformation you need.

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b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): My readers Paul and Sophie wrote to let me know they have patched together three Latin words to invent a term for a new concept: vomfiabone. They say it means "a curse that becomes a blessing." Here's an example of the phenomenon at work in their lives: While driving home from work together, they experienced car trouble and had to pull over to the shoulder of the road, where they called a tow truck. Later they discovered that this annoying delay prevented them from getting caught in the middle of an accident just up ahead. Extrapolating from the current astrological omens, I'm guessing that you will experience at least one vomfiabone in the coming week, Leo.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I bet that in the next five months you will be obliged to carry more responsibility than you have in the past. You will find it hard to get away with being lazy or careless. I suspect that during this time you will also have the privilege of wielding more influence. The effect you have on people will be more pronounced and enduring. In short, Virgo, your workload will be greater than usual— and so will your rewards. To the degree that you serve the greater good, you will be a major player. As for next few weeks, you should concentrate on the work and service and responsibility part of this equation.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do you know what a "binky" is? It's what a rabbit does when it gets so crazily happy that it exuberantly leaps up into the air, stretching and twisting its body as it flicks and flops its feet. I'm not sure if lexicographers would allow us to apply this term to humans. But assuming they might, I'm going to predict that you'll soon be having some binky-inducing experiences. You're entering the Joy and Pleasure Season, Libra—a time when abundant levels of fun and well-being might be quite normal.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You know that area on your back that you can't quite reach if you want to scratch it? It's called your acnestis. I propose that we make it your featured metaphor of the week. Why? Because I suspect you will have to deal with a couple of itchy situations that are just beyond your ability to relieve. Yes, this may be frustrating in the short run. But it will ultimately make you even more resourceful than you already are. By this time next week, you will have figured out alternative solutions that you haven't even imagined yet.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): "We need new friends," said essayist Logan Pearsall Smith. "Some of us are cannibals who have eaten their old friends up; others must have ever-renewed audiences before whom to re-enact an ideal version of their lives." Smith could have been talking about you Sagittarians in early 2013. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, you need some fresh alliances. Their influence will activate certain potentials that you haven't been able to access or fully express with the help of your current circle.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A San Francisco writer named Maneesh Sethi decided he was wasting too much time on the Internet. His productivity was suffering. So he hired a woman to sit next to him as he worked and yell at him or slap his face every time his attention wandered off in the direction of Facebook or a funny video. It worked. He got a lot more done. While I would like to see you try some inventive approaches to pumping up your own efficiency, Capricorn, I don't necessarily endorse Sethi's rather gimmicky technique. Start brainstorming about some interesting yet practical new ways to enhance your self-discipline, please.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "Ronnyjohnson618" is a guy who posts his opinions on a wide variety of Youtube videos. Many times, he claims to be an expert in the field he's commenting on. Responding to a live music performance, he says he's a conductor for an orchestra. Offering his opinion about a mimosa plant, he asserts that he is a botanist. Beneath other YouTube videos, he declares he is a meteorologist, chemist, psychologist, soldier, and geometry teacher. I love this guy's blithe swagger; I'm entertained by the brazen fun he's having. As you express yourself in the coming week, I recommend that you borrow some of his over-the-top audacity. Create a mythic persona. Imagine your life as an epic story. Play the part of a hero.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The earliest performance artist on record was the ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes of Sinope. In one of his notorious stunts, he wandered around Athens with a lit lantern during the daytime, claiming to be looking for an authentic human being. I recommend that you undertake a similar search in the coming days, Pisces. You don't have to be as theatrical about it. In fact, it might be better to be quite discrete. But I think it's important for you to locate and interact with people who are living their lives to the fullest—devoted to their brightest dreams, committed to their highest values, and sworn to express their highest integrity. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

Voting closes February 10


PUBLIC NOTICES

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s

CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Traffic Services Paint Striping Machine – Asphalt Marking Machine. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Traffic Services Paint Striping Machine, Closing, 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at HYPERLINK “http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids ” www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk Publish: January 10th, 2013 January 17th, 2013

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CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Parks Department stump grinder machine. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Parks Department stump grinder machine, Closing, 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 29th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on January 28, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance to create chapter 2.11 Missoula Municipal Code entitled “Development Services” in order to create a Development Services office and establishing the composition and duties the office is to perform including administration, planning,

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Properties2000.com engineering, code compliance, permitting, transportation services, land use and public/private building/construction projects. For further information contact Martha Rehbein, City Clerk at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, February 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. Proposed amendments to Title 20 Missoula City Zoning Ordinance Chapter 20.45.060 Accessory Dwelling Units and Chapter 20.60.020 Required Motor Vehicle Parking As directed by the Missoula City Council, Development Services prepared potential amendments to the Missoula City Zoning Ordinance Chapter 20.45.060 Accessory Uses and Structures, Accessory Dwelling Units and Chapter 20.60.020 Required Motor Vehicle Parking. The proposed language amendments to be reviewed by the Planning Board include expanding the option to create an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) to single family zoning districts allowing attached (or internal) ADUs by-right and al-

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 36, 201, and 228. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 1/21/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 1/24/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

lowing detached ADUs (backyard apartments) through the conditional use process. The proposed amendment to the parking chapter would change the off-street parking requirement for any two unit development from four to three parking spaces when the project includes at least one unit with 850 square feet in area or less. The City Council will conduct a public hearing on this item at a time to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The project files are available for public inspection at Development Services, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone Tom Zavitz at 2584657 or email tzavitz@ci.missoula.mt.us If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services. Missoula County Airport Authority Missoula International Airport Request for Qualifications and Proposals For General Contrac-

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 280 and 534. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, January 28th, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

tor/Construction Manager Services The Missoula County Airport Authority is formally requesting a statement of interest and qualifications for General Contractor/Construction Manager (GC/CM) services for the expansion and remodel of the Airport’s existing Operations & Maintenance Building. Parties interested in an RFQ/RFP packet should contact Cathy Tortorelli or Nancy Van Zant at the Missoula County Airport Authority Administration Office, 5225 Highway 10 West, Missoula, MT 59808, (406) 7284381. Submissions to this RFQ/RFP request will be accepted no later than 1:00 pm, local time on February 1, 2013.

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, January 28, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 602 Myrtle St – Tavern/Nightclub Conditional Use Request from Tim O’Leary, representing Helen S. O’Leary, for a Conditional Use approval at 602 Myrtle St (see Map C), zoned C1-4 (Neighborhood Commercial). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to utilize a beer and wine license at the site. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6630 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

ACROSS

1 Crafted 5 Trendsetting 8 Wife of the late Steve Irwin, a.k.a. "The Crocodile Hunter" 13 "Wonder ___ powers, activate!" 14 ___ the crack of dawn 16 Bolt who bolts 17 Three-piece suit piece 18 Rogen of "The Guilt Trip" 19 Artless 20 Lottery ticket that's also a coupon? 23 Person who vilifies ad writers? 24 "106 & Park" network 25 Dr.'s org. 26 Abbr. at the bottom of a letter 27 Airline whose last flight was in 2001 28 The Magic, on scoreboards 29 Enticed 31 Enemy 32 Go back and forth 33 The purpose of milk, in the mind of a cat? 37 Bushy-bearded natural health expert Andrew 40 Landscaping stuff 41 "Animal House" college 45 "Ermagerd," in shorthand 46 "___ for Alibi" (Sue Grafton mystery) 47 Singer Bachman 49 Mighty Joe Young, for one 50 Memorial designer Maya ___ 51 Grabbed the end of Indiana Jones's weapon? 54 What your card says when Toronto's NBA team sends you a present? 56 Woodsy home 57 Where flour is made 58 Stephen Strasburg's team 60 "In ___" (Nirvana album)

Last week’s solution

61 "On the Waterfront" director Kazan 62 Drug bust unit 63 Underneath 64 Make eggs 65 Once more

DOWN

1 "Jersey Shore" network 2 Totally rad 3 Rotating power tool part 4 Diary writing 5 Anjelica of "The Royal Tenenbaums" 6 Old treatment for poisonings 7 Hedge maze possibilities 8 Arctic expanse 9 Those things, in Tijuana 10 Sherbet variety 11 Monaco's region 12 How bunglers operate 15 "Oh yeah, I forgot there was another one" 21 Fail to be 22 Staircase post 23 Most populous state, in college nicknames 30 Grapeseed or sesame 31 Dahlia delivery option 32 Weekend retreat 34 1990 NBA Finals MVP ___ Thomas 35 "What're ya gonna do about it?" 36 Key for Elgar's Symphony No. 1 37 New member of the pack 38 Qatar, for one 39 Award bestowed by the Annals of Improbable Research 42 38-down neighbor 43 Letter 44 Salesperson 46 Urgent infomercial line 47 Muse of comedy 48 During leisure time 52 Give the third degree 53 Everlasting Gobstopper inventor 55 Surrealist Joan 59 Sty dweller ©2013 Jonesin' Crosswords

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ) FOR ARCHITECTURE SERVICES Missoula County is requesting Letters of Interest and Statements of Qualifications for architectural/engineering services to assist with a space needs analysis, site review of four buildings for possible renovations and preliminary building design with construction cost estimates. Additionally, work may include designing and supervising the construction of a project or projects. Payment terms will be negotiated with the selected respondent. A copy of the detailed request for qualifications (RFQ), including a description of the services to be provided by the respondents, the minimum content of responses and the factors to be used to evaluate responses, may be obtained on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, County Auditor, 199 West Pine, Missoula, MT 59802, bberens@co.missoula.mt.us or 406-258-3227. All responses to the detailed RFQ must be received no later than 3:00 P.M., Wednesday, January 23, 2013. MISSOULA COUNTY COMMENTS ON CITY’S ANNUAL ACTION PLAN REQUESTED The City of Missoula has developed an Annual Action Plan describing activities that it will undertake as a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Entitlement City and as a Home Investment Partnerships

Program (HOME) Participating Jurisdiction for the program year beginning April 1, 2013. The City’s Program Year 2013 Annual Action Plan will be available for public review and comment starting January 17. A public hearing on the Plan is scheduled before City Council at its regular meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, January 28, 2013, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula. Public comments on the City’s proposed activities submitted by February 14 will be included in the final version of the Annual Action Plan submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Comments may be made in writing or in person at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants (OPG), 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT, 59802; by phone at 2584934, or via email to nharte@co.missoula.mt.us. The City of Missoula and OPG welcome comments on its HOME and CDBG activities, Consolidated Plan and annual Action Plans on a year-round basis. Copies of the Action Plan will be available for review at OPG starting Jan. 17 in Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman; at the Missoula CityCounty Library, 301 East Main; or on OPG’s website at www.co.missoula.mt.us\opgweb. Persons wishing to receive a copy of the Action Plan or to review it in an alternative format should contact Nancy Harte at OPG, 258-4934. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) LAWN CARE AND MAINTENANCE - PLEASANT VIEW HOMES SUBDIVISION MISSOULA, MT

The Pleasant View HOA is requesting proposals for professional lawn care and sprinkler maintenance for all common and park areas owed by the association. Lawn care services will include grass cutting, edging, trimming, mulching and mechanical blowing. Tasks will be done on a contractual scheduled basis. Sprinkler maintenance will include annual start-up, winterization, and repairs as needed. Contract will be for 1 year with the option to renew annually for 3 years. Must be licensed and insured in the State of Montana. No proposal can be withdrawn from a period of 90 days from due date. Proposals must be received by US mail before 5:00 pm February 7th, 2013. Information about submitting proposals can be obtained by contacting Bill McGlynn at secretary@pleasantviewhomes.org. Dated:01/17/13 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS(RFP) LAWN CARE AND MAINTENANCE PLEASANT VIEW HOMES SUBDIVISION - MISSOULA, MT The Pleasant View HOA is requesting proposals for professional lawn care and sprinkler maintenance for all common and park areas owed by the association. Lawn care services will include grass cutting, edging, trimming, mulching and mechanical blowing. Tasks will be done on a contractual scheduled basis. Sprinkler maintenance will include annual start-up, winterization, and repairs as needed. Contract will be for 1 year with the option to renew annually for 3 years. Must be licensed and in-

Voting closes February 10

[C6] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

sured in the State of Montana. No proposal can be withdrawn from a period of 90 days from due date. Proposals must be received by US mail before 5:00 pm February 7th, 2013. Information about submitting proposals can be obtained by contacting Bill McGlynn at secretary@pleasantviewhomes.org. Central Mini Storage will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: #2. Units contain misc. items. These units may be viewed by appt. only by calling 543-9798. Please speak to Shannon. Written sealed bids may be submitted to the storage offices at 401 SW Higgins, Missoula, MT 59803 prior to January 25th, 2013 at 3:00 p.m. AUCTION SALES ARE FINAL AFTER THIS DATE. Buyer’s bid will be for the entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. CASH or MONEY ORDER will be accepted as form of payment MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-1, Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ROBERT A. DURINGER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Janice Sue Duringer has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to

Janice Sue Duringer, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Sally Johnson, Johnson Law Firm, PLLC, 234 East Pine Street, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 17th day of January, 2013. JOHNSON LAW FIRM, PLLC, 234 East Pine Street, PO Box 8327, Missoula, MT 59802 /s/ Sally J. Johnson, Attorney for Personal Representative. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DA-12-46 NOTICE OF HEARING TO TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS AND ADOPTION In re the Adoption of B.D.M. n/k/a B.D.L. a Minor Child. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Petitioner, Scott Patrick Lenz (“Lenz”), has filed a petition with this Court requesting to terminate the parental rights of Jacob Salvador Montano with respect to the minor child B.D.M. n/k/a B.D.L. (“minor child”), and has filed a Petition to adopt the minor child, born on July 31, 2006, in Banner Desert Medical Center, in Mesa, Arizona. NOW, therefore, notice is given to Jacob Salvador Montano (“Montano”) and all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petitions will be held at the Courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, on February 12, 2013 at 1:30 p.m., in the above-named Court, whose telephone number is (406) 258-4780, at which time objections to said Petitions will be heard. Montano must mail his objections, if any, to Lenz at St.

Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, Montana, 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. Montano’s failure to appear at the hearing constitutes his waiver of interest in custody of the minor child and will result in the court’s termination of his rights to the minor child, and enter a decree establishing a relationship between the Petitioner and the minor child. DATED this 28th day of December, 2012. /s/ Linda Osorio St. Peter MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO 1 ED MCLEAN CAUSE NO. DV12-1377 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. EDWIN BRESTER Plaintiff, v. HENRY GLANTZ, MOLLIE GLANTZ, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, OR ANY UNKNOWN DEVISEES OF ANY DECEASED PERSON, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS, UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO, WHETHER SUCH CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM BE PRESENT OR CONTINGENT, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, GREETINGS: You are hereby SUMMONED to answer the Complaint to Quiet Title in

this Action which is filed with the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after service of this SUMMONS, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of Quieting Title to the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 19, 20 and 21 in Block 81 of Daly Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Dated this 18th day of December, 2012. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Andrew Jenks, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-12-222 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGARET M. BRABECK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jeanne M Brabeck, return receipt


PUBLIC NOTICES requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2012. /s/ Jeanne M. Brabeck, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Patrick Dougherty MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate Case No. DP-12-219 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the BETTY JUNE DAHLSTROM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that MICHAEL RAY DAHLSTROM has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-entitled estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MICHAEL RAY DAHLSTROM, the personal representative, return receipt requested at c/o Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney at Law, 200 University Plaza, 100 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. DATED this 3rd day of January, 2013. /s/ Victor F. Valgenti, attorney for Michael Ray Dahlstrom, Personal Representative. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-12-224 Dept. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MARGERY JEAN FOOT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Per-

sonal Representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jamie Lee Foot, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of her attorney, Kristine L. Foot, Foot Law Offices, P.C., 701 W. Central Ave., Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. Dated this 13th day of December, 2012 /s/ Jamie Lee Foot, Personal Representative Dated this 24th day of December, 2012. FOOT LAW OFFICES, P.C. Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/ Kristine L. Foot NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200611976, Bk. 774, Pg. 1330, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Peggy S. Goodsell and Lewis A. Goodsell, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Mortgageit, Inc. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 3748, located in the Northwest onequarter of the Northwest onequarter of the Southeast one-quarter of Section 29, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana,

Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201202577, Bk. 889, Pg. 654, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 13, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $146,184.76. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $141,442.46, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents

(valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103366) 1002.234782-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200733266 Bk 811 Pg 138, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marvin J. Garding and Kim M. Garding, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Company of Missoula, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded

Stewart Title Company of Missoula, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 16 and 17 in Block 7 of Hillview Heights #6 in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201210438 Bk 895 Pg 115, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 14, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $133,029.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $116,304.55, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of

Missoula on March 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.92807) 1002.234826-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which

Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201200002, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 20, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $559,739.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpo-

rated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 01, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 AND 7 IN BLOCK 47 OF SUNRISE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF DANA R NICHOLS AND TABITHA NICHOLS, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2006 and recorded on June 28, 2006 at 4:27 o’clock P.M., in Book 777, Page 1193, under Document No. 200615820. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-7 by Washington Mutual Bank as successor in interest to Long Beach Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution

of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust, by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,444.59, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 26, 2012 is $171,198.03 principal, interest at the rate of 9.350% now totaling $62,500.54, late charges in the amount of $86.68, escrow advances of $8,203.66, suspense balance of $-397.61 and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,588.32, plus accruing interest at the rate of $43.85 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the

[C8] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30

days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 23, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 23rd day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs Nichols 41816.853 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The following described premises, in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: Lot 19 in Block 4 of EO Mar Estates Phase 1, a platted Subdivision in

Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof. Being the same fee simple property conveyed by deed from Larry Zagelow by Deanna Zagelow as Attorney in Fact and Deanna Zagelow as Attorney in Fact and Deanna Zagelow Joint Tenants to David Dixon and Kristin Berry Joint Tenants, dated 3/1/2005 recorded on 3/4/2005 in Book 748 Page 1366 in Missoula County Records, State of MT. Properly described as: Lot 19 in Block 4 of El Mar Estates Phase I, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Kristin Berry and David Dixon, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Finiti Title, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to CitiFinancial, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 31, 2007 and recorded on August 3, 2007 in Book 802, Page 1357 under Document No. 200719955. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiFinancial, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,881.63, beginning September 15, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and

interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 22, 2012 is $187,215.79 principal, interest at the rate of 11.6088% now totaling $43,849.74, and other fees and expenses advanced of $50.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $59.54 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or im-


PUBLIC NOTICES plied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 30, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 30th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission ex-

pires: 01/19/2018 Citifinancial V Dixon 41499.967 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 3A OF DAWN ACRES NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Dawn E. Lorash and Stephen W. Lorash, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank- Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on May 4, 2004 and recorded on May 10, 2004 in Book 731, Page 1396 as Document No. 200412535. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to Principal Residential Mortgage, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,176.01, beginning June 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 9, 2012 is $141,427.41 principal, interest at the rate of 5.8750% now totaling $12,645.49, late charges in the amount of $804.44, escrow advances of $3,916.77, suspense balance of $-281.21 and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,934.01, plus accruing interest

at the rate of $22.76 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The

scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 24, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 24th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Citimortgage Vs. Lorash 41926.901 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 04/26/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the

trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SANDRA G ROSTAD, A MARRIED WOMAN as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to STEWART TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/18/2003 and recorded 08/26/2003, in document No. 200331595 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 715 at Page Number 1344 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE WEST 15 FEET OF LOT 8 AND ALL OF LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 20 OF CAR LINE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. PARCEL NO. 0037158. MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: THE WEST 15 FEET OF LOT 8 AND ALL OF LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 20 OF CAR LINE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MISSOULA, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND

OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 618 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 2081. Property Address: 2401 WEST KENT AVENUE, MISSOULA, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC BANK USA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 20041. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 03/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $109,715.66

together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.75% per annum from 03/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/13/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0057023 FEI NO. 1006.162339

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744

SUSTAINAFIEDS Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Voting closes February 10

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oasismontana.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [C9]


RENTAL APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $550 across from Public Library, coinop laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $550 between Russell and Reserve, W/D hookups, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $575 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1260 S. 1ST ST. W.: 1 & 2 BEDROOMS, BRAND NEW, WASHER & DRYER, A/C, PRIVATE

3 Bedroom House Great neighborhood $1,150 G/S pd. Attached garage, fenced yard, no pets.

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

DECK/PATIO, GREEN CONSTRUCTION!, FREE CABLE, $725 & $895, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

ing, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

1502 Ernest #4. 1bed/1bath, W/D hookups, central location. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $650 across from Public Library, coinop laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1826 S. 4TH ST. W.: 2 BEDROOM, 2ND FLOOR, CARPORT & STORAGE, ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES, BIG CLOSETS, BY GOOD FOOD STORE, PRIVATE DECK, NO SMOKING OR DOGS, CAT ALLOWED!, HEAT PAID, $775.. $200 Costco Gift Card. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $615 coin-op laundry, off street park-

Find your new home with

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

professionalproperty.com

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 2101 Dearborn: Beautiful 2 bed condo, secure building, garage space, deck, heat paid, $1,050. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATHS, 2 STORY, PRIVATE DECK, FREE CABLE, CARPORT, STORAGE, HEAT PAID, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP.. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 446 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops.

$700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 510 E. FRONT: DOWNTOWN BY THE U!, 1+1 BEDROOM, HARDWOOD FLOORS, PORCH, LAUNDRY, CAT OK $895. $300 Costco Gift Card. Garden City Property Management 5496106 731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 808 W. KEMP: 1 BEDROOM, NEW CARPET, FREE CABLE, STORAGE, AIR CONDITIONER, ALL UTILITIES PAID, $650, Garden City Property Management 549-6106 825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Clyatt Apartments. 2 bedroom: $738. W/D hookups, dishwasher. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113 Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 includes all utilities. Missoula Housing Authority 5494113 New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C,

549-7711 Check our website!

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

2100 Stephens • 728-7333

Russell Square Family Building. 2 bedroom: $629. Heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority 5494113

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

Russell Square West. 55+/Disabled Complex. 1 bed: $525. Heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Rent Incentive 1409 2nd Street 1 Bed Apt. $460/month

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month

Visit our website at

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

www.gatewestrentals.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

DUPLEXES 3915 Buckley Place. 2bed/1bath, shared yard, W/D hookups, near 39th Street. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN 11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo.$800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 11285 NAPTON WAY: LOLO, 2 BEDROOM, HOOK-UPS,. WASHER & DRYER, NEAR SHOPPING & SCHOOL, DISHWASHER, STORAGE, HEAT PAID, CAT OK!, $650, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 5496106

407 S. 5th St. E. “B” 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, close to University, all utilities paid. RENT INCENTIVE. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

fidelityproperty.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

Studio apartment $450 near Orange Street Food Farm, true studio layout, all utilities paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES

2026 9th Street 1 Bed Apt. Hkups $525/month

www.alpharealestate.com

Solstice Apartments. 1 bed: $587. 2 bed: $688. W/S/G paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

Palace Apartments. 1 bed: $433-$550. 2 bed: $526-$650. Heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

117 North Johnson 1 Bed Apt. + Storage $485/month

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath townhouse $750 S/G paid, W/D in unit, storage, carport & off-street parking.

Orchard Gardens. 1 bed: $572. 2 bed: $691. All utilities paid. Missoula Housing Authority 5494113

4265 Birdie Court 2 Bed Apt. $685/month

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Office/retail space in Stephens Center. 950-2,170 sq. ft. $895-$1,990 + merchant fees.

deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 108 North Davis. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 car garage near Milwaukee Bike Path. Lots of upgrades and a great front porch. $180,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell. 3 UNITS. 3 bed house & two 2 bed apartments on corner lot. $380,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

4 Bdr, 1 Bath South Hills home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5 4 6 - 5 8 1 6 annierealtor@gmail.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice,

Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234

Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis. 2405227 porticorealestate.com Lovely Classic Home. Excellent Condition. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath,

Hardwood Floors, Fireplace, Central Location. 716 South 6th West. $269,000. 406-542-3860

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Open Floor Plan 1520 South 6th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with wood floors, fenced yard & basement. $185,000. KD Dickinson, Portico Real Estate 3278787. kdrae52@msn.com

1641 Stoddard To-be-built 6plex on Northside. $650,500 Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties

Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Remarkably Cute 2039 South 10th West. 2 bedroom home on large lot centrally located near Good Food Store, bike trails and schools. Full basement and single garage. KD, Portico Real Estate, 240-5227 www.porticorealestate.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

www.723n5thmissoula.com 2 bed, 1.5 bath with open kitchen, maple floors & deep soaking tub. Fenced backyard, patio & storage shed

MLS #20126435

1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell GREAT INVESTMENT! $380,000

2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $170,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2441 McIntosh. 2 bed, 2 bath in 55+ community. HOA fees include club house, yard work, sewer & garbage. $106,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7 2 8 - 8 2 7 0 . glasgow@montana.com

723 North 5th St. $179,500

2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

RICE TEAM

12791 Junegrass. Newly built 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage on 1 acre lot with 10 year building warranty. $224,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

723 North 5th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with maple floors, open kitchen, fenced backyard & lots of light. $179,500. Rochelle

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

2441 McIntosh Loop $106,000 2 bed, 2 bath in 55+ community HOA fees include club house, yard care, sewer & garbage

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

1641 Stoddard $84,500 2 bed, 2 bath single wide on commercially zoned C1-4 lot

23645 Mullan $169,900 Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on foundation allowed.

6614 MacArthur $194,500 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing Missoula views

This is a property that pencils out! Two story 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 bed, 1 bath basement apt. & 2 bed, 1 bath garage apt.

www.1136howell.com • MLS #20125053 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Voting closes February 10

missoulanews.com • January 17 – January 24, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns. 2405227 porticorealestate.com Beautiful Downtown Triplex Two 2 bedroom units and one 1 bedroom; great rental history; great building on Historic Register with tons of character and in great shape! $359,500. 518 Alder porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED

HOMES

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com

views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com East Missoula Building Lot With great trees and a sweet ‘hood. $55,000. 2405227 porticorealestate.com NHN Twin Creek Road/Bonner. 3.69 acres with creek. Mobiles on permanent foundations allowed. $165,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on. $160,000. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL 110 Main Street, Stevensville. Restaurant in heart of Stevensville next to Blacksmith Brewery. $149,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 4 Klakken, Noxon. Motel with 9 units, laundromat & 2 rentals on 1/2 acre. $259,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be a neighbor to the award-winning Homeword Organization! New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN 15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $595,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

19488 Highway 200 East/ Bonner. 5 bed, 3 bath, basement & 3 car garage on 3 mountain view acres near Blackfoot River. $394,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406721-1444 www.Creative-Finance.com

2110 Petty Creek, Alberton. Gorgeous 3 bed, 2.5 with 2 car garage on over 10 acres. $409,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $240,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

23645 Mullan. Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on permanent foundation allowed. $169,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley

[C12] Missoula Independent • January 17 – January 24, 2013

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Missoula Independent