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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 17 • April 23–April 30, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Our who’s-who guide to a jam-packed jazz weekend Up Front: MCPS struggles to stop potential pink slips Flash in the Pan: Ari LeVaux grades the best granola school


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 17 • April 23–April 30, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Our who’s-who guide to a jam-packed jazz weekend Up Front: MCPS struggles to stop potential pink slips Flash in the Pan: Ari LeVaux grades the best granola school


Big Sky Beef HAMBURGER PATTIES All natural Highland beef raised near Dell, MT.

$3.99 lb.

White Wave SOYMILK

Selected varieties. 64 oz.

$2.79 Santa Cruz ORGANIC JUICE Selected varieties. 32 oz.

$2.89 PORK SPARE RIBS All natural pork raised near Whitehall, MT.

Late July ORGANIC CRACKERS

$3.29 lb.

Selected varieties. 6 oz.

$1.99

CertiÀed Organic

LEEKS

Bob’s Red Mill ORGANIC BUTTERMILK PANCAKE MIX

99¢ lb.

In bulk.

$1.29 lb. Tasty Bite INDIAN AND THAI CUISINE

upcoming events at gfs

10 oz.

Bike, Walk, Bus Week & Bike Repair Workshop

$1.99

Peddle over to GFS between 11:00 am & 2:00 pm on Wednesday, April 29, and get expert help servicing your ride from Free Cycles Missoula. Missoula in Motion will be here too, with biking maps and safety information. Plus enjoy Bike Walk Bus Week Non-Polluter Commuter Deals all week in the deli.

Annie’s Naturals ALL NATURAL DRESSINGS & VINAIGRETTES

2009 Spring Anniversary Celebration We’re celebrating almost 40 years of organic and natural goodness by throwing a party. And you’re invited. Stop by and let us treat you to a complimentary sidewalk BBQ that’ll feature Planet GFS Chicken Caesar Salad, Big Dipper ice cream and more. Bernice’s birthday cake will be served inside, which you can enjoy while you listen to Tom Catmull singing in the deli. Bring the kids, because Mismo Gymnastics & Cheer will be here with their famous obstacle course. Of course we’ll also be giving away hundreds of dollars worth of terrific prizes.

Selected varieties. 8 oz.

$1.99 Clif Bar CLIF & LUNA BARS

Selected varieties. 1.41 to 2.4 oz.

79¢

SATURDAY, MAY 2, 11:00 am - 3:30 pm

www.goodfoodstore.com

Missoula Independent

|

1600 S. 3rd St. West

Page 2 April 23–April 30, 2009

|

541.FOOD

|

Sale prices effective through April 28, 2009


nside Cover Story The movement to bring passenger rail service back to southern Montana has picked up steam in recent months, fueled by a president committed to railroad expansion, as well as a supportive Montana congressional delegation and state governor. Will local trainiacs Cover photo courtesy of Amtrak revive the North Coast Hiawatha, or get derailed once again by funding questions and logistical challenges? .................15

Open Mic Tuesday 4/28 • 7:30pm

Pub Trivia Tuesday

News Letters Saluting Salazar and the Indy ..........................................................................4 The Week in Review TEA parties, gardens and oral arguments.................................6 Briefs City considers pot resolution, weather causes waters to rise...........................6 Etc. Grading the school of the 21st century..................................................................7 Up Front Rossbach dismissal reflects environmental rift ............................................8 Up Front MCPS struggles to stop potential pink slips ................................................9 Ochenski An Earth Day salute to you........................................................................10 Writers on the Range A new mantra for the oil patch: Chill, baby, chill.................11 Agenda Missoula County Democrats host Issues Caucus..........................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Granola school ...............................................................................21 8 Days a Week Plenty of room on this bandwagon ..................................................22 Mountain High Visit Tree City USA ...........................................................................33 Scope A who’s-who guide to a jam-packed jazz weekend.........................................34 Books Biography shows Rolston’s faith in evolution ................................................35 Theater Rabbit Hole jumps headfirst into profound grief ........................................36 Film Hollywood runs afoul in State of Play ..............................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films....................................................38

Thursday 4/30 • 9:00pm

Live jazz w/

The Discount Quartet The patio tables are open! Stop by and enjoy some Sunshine Wheat! SUNDAY 8PM FREE Euchre Tournament

Exclusives Street Talk ....................................................................................................................4 In Other News ...........................................................................................................13 Independent Personals.............................................................................................39 The Advice Goddess..................................................................................................39 Free Will Astrolog y ...................................................................................................40 Classifieds ..................................................................................................................41 Crossword Puzzle......................................................................................................46 This Modern World ...................................................................................................50

SATURDAY 4/25

MONDAY 10PM

TUESDAY 7:30PM



Fat Tire Pub Trivia

Open Mic Night with Mike Avery!

Doors @ 8pm, $10 advance/$13 day of show, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

with special guests

Demonlily Entertainment Presents:

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen PHOTO INTERN Ashley Sears COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane



Monday 4/27 • 10pm

Big John Bates

Sawyer Family & The Goddamn Gallows

and the voodoo dolls

Tickets available at: Rockin Rudy's, Ear Candy, & ticketleap.com

TUESDAY 4/28

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $TBA, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

40 OZ TO FREEDOM THURSDAY 4/30 Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609

Floater

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $10 Pre-sale, $13 Day of Show, 18+ ($2 surcharge under 21)

with special guests

Dead Me Downs

$10 Pre-sale, $13 Day of Show • Pre-sale Tix Available At Ear Candy, Rockin Rudys, & ticketleap.com

WEDNESDAY 4/29

Doors @ 9pm, No Cover, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

KALEIDOSCOPE KARAOKE

Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address:

a tribute to Sublime

April Special:

$2 Captain Morgan

independent@missoulanews.com

Join us at Buck's Club from 11am-4pm for our own

RECESSION Wed. 7pm • Fri. 7pm

STIMULUS PACKAGE featuring a

Missoula Independent

NIGHT AT THE OTHER SIDE

EACH TUESDAY FREE LUNCH BUNCH

FREE BURGER & FRIES!!!

(Limit one per customer • Dine-in only • First 200 customers)

with Purchase of Beverage Page 3 April 23–April 30, 2009


STREET TALK Asked Tuesday morning in downtown Missoula.

Q:

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Ashley Sears

This week the Indy looks at the effort to revive the North Coast Hiawatha passenger rail, which would run through Missoula. Do you think passenger trains are something the federal and state government should support? Follow-up: Planes, trains or automobiles? If you had your choice for a cross-country trip, which would you choose?

AJ Auar: I definitely do, because it would bring down the individual car traffic and pollution. If it came through here I’d definitely use it and would imagine the rest of the earth-conscious folks would too. Walkin’ man: None of them. I’d use my feet, which is what I’m planning on doing next year, or maybe a train if I could hop on for free. I’ve never [hopped a train], but I’ve heard some crazy stories.

Marilyn White: Absolutely! A lot of retired people would be using it, as well as college students with limited income who can’t afford to drive or buy a plane ticket home. It will also really help the environment with less pollution. Grounded: If I had the money, I’d take a car or maybe a train. But I never fly. I missed a plane once that almost crashed and I never flew after that.

Collyn Bandelier: Only on a couple conditions. I don’t know the particulars of their plan, but if it’s more fuel efficient than it would be if everyone who was riding on the train was driving in a car, then yes. Obviously it would be a little more inconvenient than people being able to just drive their own car, but it would reduce the amount of exhaust and emissions being put out. Sit back and relax: Probably train. I’ve never been on a train, and I’ve traveled by car and by plane so it would be something different.

Saluting Salazar A new day seems to be dawning on the way our federal government honors the environment that sustains us all—and not a moment too soon. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar (see “Clearer forecast,” April 16, 2009) is directing the management of our publicly owned BLM lands away from the exploitative and environmentally damaging rush for fossil fuels in areas close to national parks and monuments in Utah. This conservation minded action and his emphasis on renewable energy has (not surprisingly) evoked a stormy reaction from the oil and gas industry so favored by the Bush administration. We can applaud the stewardship of our public lands manifested through Salazar’s balanced approach to energy development, and give our support to the new paradigm of conservation and respect for the planet being initiated by the Obama administration. Let’s be sure to tell our representatives to keep it going and not be swayed by the many powerful, ensconced industry lobbyists that perpetually throw their weight around the capital. We’re on the right path now, and for everyone’s sake we need to stay there. James Roach Missoula

Interior looking out I continue to urge Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to look long-term toward energy and the environmental health of our planet. For the health of our society and our children’s and grandchildren’s future, please use the full power of your office to turn our collective, creative, and cooperative energy in ways that add real value to our world. The decades-long fascination with gambling our future for present material gains for the few is ready to be put to bed. Let’s work toward those dreams that embrace the global village. Bert Chessin Missoula

Footprint follow-up It was gratifying to read about the Indy’s push for a carbon neutral issue Duane White: Oh, definitely. I think that more people would take advantage of it if they knew it was federally supported. It will be running through other states too, right? So it’s a joint effort and they should join in. Homebody: Probably automobile. We don’t ever go very far.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 April 23–April 30, 2009

as well as developing a plan to further reduce their carbon footprint. It is good for planet Missoula as well as leading towards raising that almighty bottom line. Let me address another Indy “carbon offset,” one that did not garner any attention in the article. First of all, I would like to mention that I am one of the Independent’s distributors,

“myI consider deliveries the ultimate in carbon offsets, creating a sort of domino effect of good will and ultimately

reduced CO2.

delivering about 2,700 issues every Thursday to downtown Missoula. My vehicle is a medium-sized pick-up truck that enables me to carry this load to stores, cafes, eateries and other locations. At many drop-offs I am welcomed and thanked for my efforts by Indy patrons to get them the most up-todate and interesting social, political and cultural happenings for the upcoming week, as well as representing area businesses through advertising. Greeted with “hellos,” smiles and honest to goodness “glad you’re here” gestures, I feel my efforts are worth the fuel and vehicle use. Since the Independent promotes a positive and healthy awareness of western Montana to thousands of readers, I consider my deliveries the ultimate in carbon offsets, creating a sort of domino effect of good will and ultimately reduced CO2. (I hope ClearSky can create a place for this concept in future assessments.)

So, the next time you see an Independent delivery being made, rest assured that all of the drivers and staff are engaged in getting you the “latest” as quickly and efficiently as they can. Merrill Bradshaw Arlee

Crushing CHIP Everyone loves kids. That’s how proponents sold the CHIP extension bill of goods and how they are painting the picture of ogre Republicans fighting it. Montanans thought they voted for a health care program for low-income, uninsured children in a state with a surplus, but got instead a program for families with incomes $65,000–$70,000 in an economically troubled Montana. Within a week after Gov. Brian Schweitzer was elected, our alleged $1 billion surplus was reduced by $700 million, with the remainder dwindling since then. Another deception was the cost to taxpayers, with realistic estimates fives times higher, or $100 million per year. The only way to pay for this extension is to take money from somewhere else, such as K-12 education. I am a physician with five children and six grandchildren. Most of the time when children get sick, they need fluids, rest and loving comfort. They don’t need to see a doctor. At medical offices, they will be exposed to microorganisms, many will be put on unnecessary antibiotics and it is stressful to the child to be poked and prodded. Because most can’t afford to go to doctors, they give their children the love, rest and fluids they need, and the children get better. This is what parents have always done, and the children are better for it. Furthermore, when there are entitlement programs with a low co-pay for doctor’s visits, patients go to doctors more often than necessary. Medical offices don’t want to see these people because the payment is so low they would go out of business if they saw too many of them. Understand, truly underprivileged children are already covered under the CHIP program. Montana cannot afford to extend that coverage to the middle class. Annie Bukacek Kalispell

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


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Page 5 April 23–April 30, 2009


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Specifically, he wants the zoning rewrite to require a supermajority vote from the City Council. “[The progressive members of council] won’t be able to get [a supermajority] because there’s about five of us that won’t come over to their side until we have a chance to talk about things,” he said. The petition lists 10 consequences that residents will allegedly see if the current zoning rewrite is approved. The list includes accessory dwelling units, three story buildings up to 35 feet and a dramatic increase in on-street parking. Roger Millar, director of the Office of Planning and Grants, immediately responded to the petition in a point-by-point memo. Additional dwelling units, for example, do not change under the new ordinance, Millar wrote. Haines acknowledged that other members of City Council besides he and Hendrickson are involved in the petition effort, but he stopped short of naming them. “I’m not sure they want to be identified at this point,” he said. Jesse Froehling

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

up with Jaffe, law enforcement voiced concerns about the idea. Police Chief Mark Muir and City Attorney Jim Nugent both say such a measure would fall outside of their jurisdiction. “I wouldn’t tell my officers they couldn’t arrest somebody for it because that takes away the discretion they are provided by state law,” says Muir. Muir specified that Initiative 2 applies to county officials, such as Sheriff Mike McMeekin and County Attorney Fred Van Valkenberg, and not city law enforcement.

Marijuana

City eyes pot resolution A Missoula City Council committee discussion about making misdemeanor marijuana offenses law enforcement’s lowest priority elicited strong opinions from officials last week. A specific city resolution would follow Missoula County voters’ passage of Initiative 2, which called for similar action from county law enforcement in 2006. “The more I think about it, the more riled up I get about it,” says Ward 3 Councilmember Bob Jaffe. “Drug law in this country is just a travesty. If you look at what we spend on incarceration and tax dollars, it’s really appalling. The black market we create, the crime, the murders, all the awful stuff that revolves around drug dealing—it’s all because it’s illegal. They should be legal, they should be taxed, they should be regulated and completely eliminate the whole thing.” While other council members also lined

He also objected to a report stating that the Missoula Police Department has recorded more marijuana-related “incidents” in 2008 than the previous year. He attributed the rise to a zero-tolerance campaign that targeted underage drinking and downtown violence, but also turned up marijuana use. These “incidents” didn’t necessarily involve arrests or prosecution, but simply an encounter with pot. Despite law enforcement’s apprehension, Jaffe voiced his strong support of the city reinforcing Initiative 2. When asked if he could compel Muir and Nugent to honor a council resolution, Jaffe simply noted that City Council controls both departments’ budgets. Public Safety and Health Committee Chairman Dave Strohmaier has not yet scheduled the topic for further discussion. Jesse Froehling

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

6

Crime

Cold case heats up The previously unsolved case of a 2005 slipshod robbery at a Missoula porn shop neared closure Tuesday before the Missoula County District Court postponed sentencing of perpetrator Justin Casey Stinger. Stinger held up Fantasy for Adults Only with an unloaded .22-caliber pistol on Nov. 7, 2005. According to an affidavit, thenclerk Jacob Bigham first gave Stinger money from the till, then jumped him, wrestling both Stinger’s ski mask and pistol away. Bigham repeatedly clubbed Stinger with the .22, and Stinger fell through a glass counter and onto a large houseplant before fleeing the shop on foot. All he left behind was blood near pieces of the broken houseplant’s pot. No one linked Stinger to the robbery at the time and, without additional leads, investigators filed the case inactive. The state crime lab processed Stringer’s blood from the scene, but found no matches. The case didn’t resurface until July 2008, when Stringer’s DNA entered the state database following his conviction on three counts of robbery and one of tampering with a witness. After denying his involvement with the Fantasy for Adults incident, Stinger provided additional blood samples that matched the evidence from the scene. “This case is, for lack of a better word, housekeeping,” says prosecuting attorney Kirsten Pabst LaCroix. “It’s always good to wrap up these loose ends.” Stinger is currently on probation for the three robberies, which occurred before the porn shop holdup. He faces an additional year of probation under the prosecution’s proposed sentence. The prosecution offered Stinger a reduced sentence in a plea bargain earlier this year. Stinger subsequently pled guilty. District Judge Robert L. Deschamps III rescheduled Stinger’s sentencing for May 5 citing confusion over the case’s timeline. Alex Sakariassen

Times W.R. Grace lead attorney David Bernick used the word “special” in one sentence while describing former Grace executive Robert Locke’s relationship with the prosecution. Bernick and the defense accused the prosecution of misconduct during testimony on April 18 and said they will seek an acquittal this week.

etc. A dash of science fiction always seems to make life more interesting. At last week’s Committee of the Whole meeting, Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Alex Apostle held a captive audience while presenting his vision for schools in the 21st century. It’s not quite the Jetsons, but you can bet we’re leaving Beaver Cleaver far behind. Apostle’s dream has Missoula schools embracing the latest and greatest in modern technology. He described individual computer terminals instead of desks and touch-sensitive SMART Boards instead of white boards. Students of the future will not, apparently, be sniffing dry-erase markers. The presentation made an impression on committee members, but we couldn’t help noticing a few things missing from Missoula’s School of Tomorrow. Like giant reader board signs. Earlier this year students from Sentinel High School fought for one of these promotional beacons, smartly bypassing local zoning laws. Administrators claimed it was an excellent teaching tool for civic policy, and who are we to argue? Never mind that fussy neighbors find the flashing lights a tad intrusive. They’ll grow to love ’em, just like they have Lil Wayne ringtones. With kids tapped into the Internet during class, the School of Tomorrow should also allow concerned parents to instantly address questionable classroom content. When little Danny chooses The Story of Stuff among his five favorite movies on Facebook, mom can immediately Tweet about how she’ll be petitioning against the film at the next school board meeting. Don’t consider it an invasion of the classroom or an affront to dedicated teachers—come on, censorship’s so 20th century. Let’s call it advanced parent-teacher networking instead. Students, meanwhile, will embrace the School of Tomorrow for our proposed four-day school week. Pioneers like Arlee Elementary have already adopted the truncated schedule for next fall, and West Glacier Elementary announced recently that it’s also exploring the format. We like the idea not just for its money-saving measures, but also because it offers stressed-out students more free time for sports, extra-curriculars and the latest PlayStation platform. Save your “I used to walk 10 miles through the snow and study eight days a week” stories for the schools of yesterday. We see bright horizons for Missoula County Public Schools. Apostle’s vision, perhaps combined with our suggestions, may help the district avoid declining enrollment and the resulting budget concerns. But Apostle can’t do this alone. So, our final suggestion is that you keep an eye out for the May 5 school board elections. Who you elect may just make Missoula’s School of Tomorrow a reality.

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Over 87 Style & Color Combinations • Men’s • Women’s

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Karen Emerson Page 7 April 23–April 30, 2009


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Specifically, he wants the zoning rewrite to require a supermajority vote from the City Council. “[The progressive members of council] won’t be able to get [a supermajority] because there’s about five of us that won’t come over to their side until we have a chance to talk about things,” he said. The petition lists 10 consequences that residents will allegedly see if the current zoning rewrite is approved. The list includes accessory dwelling units, three story buildings up to 35 feet and a dramatic increase in on-street parking. Roger Millar, director of the Office of Planning and Grants, immediately responded to the petition in a point-by-point memo. Additional dwelling units, for example, do not change under the new ordinance, Millar wrote. Haines acknowledged that other members of City Council besides he and Hendrickson are involved in the petition effort, but he stopped short of naming them. “I’m not sure they want to be identified at this point,” he said. Jesse Froehling

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

up with Jaffe, law enforcement voiced concerns about the idea. Police Chief Mark Muir and City Attorney Jim Nugent both say such a measure would fall outside of their jurisdiction. “I wouldn’t tell my officers they couldn’t arrest somebody for it because that takes away the discretion they are provided by state law,” says Muir. Muir specified that Initiative 2 applies to county officials, such as Sheriff Mike McMeekin and County Attorney Fred Van Valkenberg, and not city law enforcement.

Marijuana

City eyes pot resolution A Missoula City Council committee discussion about making misdemeanor marijuana offenses law enforcement’s lowest priority elicited strong opinions from officials last week. A specific city resolution would follow Missoula County voters’ passage of Initiative 2, which called for similar action from county law enforcement in 2006. “The more I think about it, the more riled up I get about it,” says Ward 3 Councilmember Bob Jaffe. “Drug law in this country is just a travesty. If you look at what we spend on incarceration and tax dollars, it’s really appalling. The black market we create, the crime, the murders, all the awful stuff that revolves around drug dealing—it’s all because it’s illegal. They should be legal, they should be taxed, they should be regulated and completely eliminate the whole thing.” While other council members also lined

He also objected to a report stating that the Missoula Police Department has recorded more marijuana-related “incidents” in 2008 than the previous year. He attributed the rise to a zero-tolerance campaign that targeted underage drinking and downtown violence, but also turned up marijuana use. These “incidents” didn’t necessarily involve arrests or prosecution, but simply an encounter with pot. Despite law enforcement’s apprehension, Jaffe voiced his strong support of the city reinforcing Initiative 2. When asked if he could compel Muir and Nugent to honor a council resolution, Jaffe simply noted that City Council controls both departments’ budgets. Public Safety and Health Committee Chairman Dave Strohmaier has not yet scheduled the topic for further discussion. Jesse Froehling

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

6

Crime

Cold case heats up The previously unsolved case of a 2005 slipshod robbery at a Missoula porn shop neared closure Tuesday before the Missoula County District Court postponed sentencing of perpetrator Justin Casey Stinger. Stinger held up Fantasy for Adults Only with an unloaded .22-caliber pistol on Nov. 7, 2005. According to an affidavit, thenclerk Jacob Bigham first gave Stinger money from the till, then jumped him, wrestling both Stinger’s ski mask and pistol away. Bigham repeatedly clubbed Stinger with the .22, and Stinger fell through a glass counter and onto a large houseplant before fleeing the shop on foot. All he left behind was blood near pieces of the broken houseplant’s pot. No one linked Stinger to the robbery at the time and, without additional leads, investigators filed the case inactive. The state crime lab processed Stringer’s blood from the scene, but found no matches. The case didn’t resurface until July 2008, when Stringer’s DNA entered the state database following his conviction on three counts of robbery and one of tampering with a witness. After denying his involvement with the Fantasy for Adults incident, Stinger provided additional blood samples that matched the evidence from the scene. “This case is, for lack of a better word, housekeeping,” says prosecuting attorney Kirsten Pabst LaCroix. “It’s always good to wrap up these loose ends.” Stinger is currently on probation for the three robberies, which occurred before the porn shop holdup. He faces an additional year of probation under the prosecution’s proposed sentence. The prosecution offered Stinger a reduced sentence in a plea bargain earlier this year. Stinger subsequently pled guilty. District Judge Robert L. Deschamps III rescheduled Stinger’s sentencing for May 5 citing confusion over the case’s timeline. Alex Sakariassen

Times W.R. Grace lead attorney David Bernick used the word “special” in one sentence while describing former Grace executive Robert Locke’s relationship with the prosecution. Bernick and the defense accused the prosecution of misconduct during testimony on April 18 and said they will seek an acquittal this week.

etc. A dash of science fiction always seems to make life more interesting. At last week’s Committee of the Whole meeting, Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Alex Apostle held a captive audience while presenting his vision for schools in the 21st century. It’s not quite the Jetsons, but you can bet we’re leaving Beaver Cleaver far behind. Apostle’s dream has Missoula schools embracing the latest and greatest in modern technology. He described individual computer terminals instead of desks and touch-sensitive SMART Boards instead of white boards. Students of the future will not, apparently, be sniffing dry-erase markers. The presentation made an impression on committee members, but we couldn’t help noticing a few things missing from Missoula’s School of Tomorrow. Like giant reader board signs. Earlier this year students from Sentinel High School fought for one of these promotional beacons, smartly bypassing local zoning laws. Administrators claimed it was an excellent teaching tool for civic policy, and who are we to argue? Never mind that fussy neighbors find the flashing lights a tad intrusive. They’ll grow to love ’em, just like they have Lil Wayne ringtones. With kids tapped into the Internet during class, the School of Tomorrow should also allow concerned parents to instantly address questionable classroom content. When little Danny chooses The Story of Stuff among his five favorite movies on Facebook, mom can immediately Tweet about how she’ll be petitioning against the film at the next school board meeting. Don’t consider it an invasion of the classroom or an affront to dedicated teachers—come on, censorship’s so 20th century. Let’s call it advanced parent-teacher networking instead. Students, meanwhile, will embrace the School of Tomorrow for our proposed four-day school week. Pioneers like Arlee Elementary have already adopted the truncated schedule for next fall, and West Glacier Elementary announced recently that it’s also exploring the format. We like the idea not just for its money-saving measures, but also because it offers stressed-out students more free time for sports, extra-curriculars and the latest PlayStation platform. Save your “I used to walk 10 miles through the snow and study eight days a week” stories for the schools of yesterday. We see bright horizons for Missoula County Public Schools. Apostle’s vision, perhaps combined with our suggestions, may help the district avoid declining enrollment and the resulting budget concerns. But Apostle can’t do this alone. So, our final suggestion is that you keep an eye out for the May 5 school board elections. Who you elect may just make Missoula’s School of Tomorrow a reality.

0$*,&

EHJLQVZLWK WKH6SLFHV

Leather Goods Footwear 236 N. Higgins 543-1128

Over 87 Style & Color Combinations • Men’s • Women’s

WEEKLY DRAWING

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0RQ)UL6DW Missoula Independent

Sign up at our Downtown Store WIN a 50% off Merchandise Coupon

Karen Emerson Page 7 April 23–April 30, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Fall guy Rossbach removal reflects environmental rift by Matthew Frank

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 April 23–April 30, 2009

In a legislative session marked by unreasonable and an example of unnec- it’s terribly unfortunate that the Republicans have decided to make him aggressive attempts to streamline envi- essary bureaucracy. “To me it’s like you’re driving the scapegoat of one decision among ronmental permitting processes and spur natural resource development, down the highway at 70 mph, obeying the thousands that the board makes Senate Republicans looked to get rid of all the signs and the rules and the that they happen to disagree with.” Even worse, Hedges says, is that the any perceived hurdle. Turns out that speed limit,” says Black, “and someone hit list includes Missoula attorney Bill comes along behind you and changes board now loses Rossbach’s experience. it to 50 mph and you get stopped for Rossbach has 30 years of science litigation Rossbach. under his belt, including work on promiRossbach, who was named to the violating the speed limit.” But Rossbach says that argument nent cases like the Exxon Valdez oil spill. state’s Board of Environmental Review “He was one of the most valuable by Gov. Brian Schweitzer in 2004, was became a convenient excuse for the board members we’ve had in over a ousted earlier this month when 26 of project’s true troubles. decade because he has experience 27 Senate Republicans voted in this arena already,” Hedges against his reappointment. Every says. “He brought a tremendous Democrat, meanwhile, voted for amount of history and knowledge him. to the board. And there are very “I think the perception is that few attorneys out there who have he is the one that had the most that knowledge from the get-go.” negative votes on energy developSchweitzer spokeswoman ment projects,” says Sen. Jerry Sarah Elliott says the governor Black, R-Shelby. will now look for another attorThe Senate Republicans’ vote ney to fill Rossbach’s position. effectively tagged Rossbach the scapeShe also expressed frustration goat for development projects said to with the Senate’s decision not to be slowed or thwarted by environreappoint him. mental regulations, namely the con“We think it was a partisan troversial Highwood Generating move, for one reason or another,” Station. Developers of the proposed she says. “I wouldn’t speculate, but 250-megawatt coal-fired power plant Bill is clearly a very qualified pereast of Great Falls put the project on son to sit on that board, so it was a ice in February because of what they decision that Senate Republicans deemed an unfavorable “regulatory made to block his nomination.” climate.” Sen. Jim Shockley, R-Victor, was Whatever the specific reason, the one Republican to vote for Rossbach recognizes that his Rossbach. After reviewing removal was purely political. He, Rossbach’s record, Shockley didn’t as well as other observers, believe After certain energy development projects the move was made by pro-indus- stalled this year, Senate Republicans found see the logic of his colleagues’ vote. “I looked into it and I found out try politicians wanting to assert their scapegoat: Missoula attorney Bill Rossbach. that if I was Bill and I was following their authority and take a shot at the law I probably would have done Schweitzer. “Rather than saying, ‘We made a the same thing he did,” says Shockley, “What happened is this: They went back to caucus, and whoever has the mistake, the project isn’t doable, the specifically referencing the Highwood power in that Republican caucus said, project isn’t economical,’ they want to decision. “So I supported him on the ‘We’re going to make a statement to blame somebody else,” he says. “They floor.” The fact that other Senate Gov. Schweitzer, we’re all going to vote don’t want to take responsibly for their on this and Rossbach’s going to be the own problems. So they grasp on this Republicans overlooked Rossbach’s guy who goes down,’” says Rossbach. surrogate thing as some sort of truth. experience—the only qualifying criteria And the truth is, they got the permit to sit on the board—shows the political “They just picked me.” The decision to single out Rossbach anyway. They went back, followed the nature of the decision. Unfortunately, Hedges says it also exemplifies Helena’s dates back to the board’s 6-1 vote last rules and got their permit.” It was after they received the per- current anti-environment climate. April requiring the Highwood developer “It’s been the name of the game this and the Department of Environmental mit that the developer, Southern Quality (DEQ) to perform an additional Montana Electric Generation & session that we need to weaken our study of the proposed power plant’s par- Transmission, put the coal-fired power environmental laws, we need to grease ticulate emission controls. Specifically, plant on hold, announcing their inten- the skids for industry, so that they can they did not want DEQ to use a “surro- tions to pursue natural gas and wind have their way with the resources of this state with little to no oversight gate” method, as defined by the energy instead. Still, when it came time for the vote from government,” she says. “I think Environmental Protection Agency, for measuring the smallest of fine particu- on Rossbach’s reappointment, bitter- industry was flexing its muscles by getting Rossbach rejected. I think it’s late emissions. That vote became a ness over the stalled plant remained. “I think it’s bogus,” says Anne absolutely part of the whole puzzle.” “lightning rod,” according to Rossbach, with energy development proponents Hedges of the Montana Environmental mfrank@missoulanews.com believing the additional study was Information Center (MEIC). “I think


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

School ties MCPS struggles to stop potential pink slips by Alex Sakariassen

The Missoula County Public Schools (MCPS) Board of Trustees terminated contracts with roughly 12 non-tenured employees last week as part of an annual personnel restructuring. These pink slips, while far from unusual, highlight growing concerns over job security in the district. MCPS officials believe additional layoffs could be possible, despite incoming federal stimulus money. The problem is part budget sob story, part dashed hope. Just under 90 percent of the MCPS budget comes

supervisor, and scaled back the English program. Principal Tom Korst’s salary was reduced from full-time to parttime. He also teaches two classes. “I think anytime you lose money it’s definitely a difficult situation, but I’m glad to have a job,” Korst says. According to Human Resources Director Larry Johnson, elementary schools are stable, but the district is discussing six additional Full Time Equivalent (FTE) reductions in high school staff based solely on declining enrollment. That’s not to say MCPS will

Photo by Chad Harder

Stimulus dollars will boost federal programs like Title 1, which provides low-cost lunches for impoverished students at Lowell Elementary. MCPS had hoped the boost would help save staff jobs.

from enrollment-based funding, and student numbers have declined dramatically the past few years. The district dropped 267 students overall from April 2008 alone. To meet the budget shortfall, MCPS Business Services Director Pat McHugh says the district needs to secure multiple levies placed on next month’s school board ballot. Just to reach last year’s high school operating budget, for instance, McHugh says a $52,375 levy must pass. At the same time enrollment’s decreased and caused a budget shortfall, teacher retirements have also declined. McHugh says one high school teacher retired within the last year— compared to 10 the year before—leaving more teachers to be paid with less money. “We’re seeing far less retirements than we have in the past,” McHugh says. “I think people aren’t retiring in as high numbers because of the economy.” Seeley-Swan High School provides an extreme example of the budget woes that have the district desperate for a solution. In the last five years, enrollment has dropped from nearly 170 to 95. The district recently cut two staff positions, including a study hall

outright fire six employees, but it at least translates to serious pay cuts. “They certainly could find classes and things to do…,” says Johnson, stressing there’s still a need to hold onto the teachers, “but we’re not in that budget climate.” MCPS officials point to historic under-funding from the state as a main problem, and the current economic climate only makes things worse. On April 8, the Montana Legislature voted to back-fill—to the tune of $32 million—a shortfall in a K-12 entitlement increase using stimulus money, likely building a deficit into 2012 school budgets statewide. This move follows legislators’ $10 million cut to annual At-Risk Student program payments. With the state slashing the education budget and the need for such a large staff decreasing, more layoffs appear inevitable. It’s an attack on two fronts, and McHugh says the district is simply trying to maintain. “We try and keep and will likely keep all tenured staff,” McHugh says. “But our non-tenured staff, not all of them may be kept.” Some officials believed the federal stimulus package could offer immediate relief, but spending strictures passed

down from Washington, D.C., make it little more than a fiscal Band Aid. Allocation is a tricky operation. Once stimulus dollars hit Helena, state legislators stitch them into a handful of poverty- and special education-based federal programs. The funds can’t be used directly to cover staff salaries or raises, but they can free up general budget dollars normally used to fill gaps in those same federal programs. “It would have been nice and convenient for us if the federal government would say, ‘Here’s a million dollars. You can take it to hire new people and expand your science offerings and your math offerings and do all kinds of good things,’” Johnson says. “Well, they didn’t do that. What they did is put the money through existing channels.” The chief beneficiary in the state’s education stimulus is Title 1, a federal program for high-poverty schools. For MCPS, that money provides services like free and reduced lunches for impoverished students at Lowell Elementary. Without devaluing the importance of Title 1, McHugh says more relaxed restrictions could be the key to saving jobs, but the odds don’t look good. For now, MCPS is reducing textbook and staff development expenses to save money. McHugh says despite declining enrollment, it’s vital the district do whatever it can to retain its current staff. A wide selection of high-quality educators is key to MCPS meeting its mission statement of increasing student achievement. “We’re going to make every effort to keep our staff intact,” McHugh says. “There’s a certain inevitability [of reductions] when you have such large enrollment declines, but you have to minimize their impact on students.” Those with educators’ interests at heart sympathize with the desire to keep staff on the payroll. Eric Feaver, president of MEA-MFT, a union representing Montana educators and other state employees, recognizes MCPS is in a bind. While stimulus money offers at best a chance to maintain quality programs, he knows it doesn’t translate to job security for all. “I think we’re all in the same stew and it’s boiling,” Feaver says. “I think we’re all trying to figure out how we can jump out with the greater good intact.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 April 23–April 30, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

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Page 10 April 23–April 30, 2009

Way back in 1970, Americans instituted the concept of Earth Day. They deemed April 22 the day when we would put our relationship to our beautiful blue planet back in perspective. The idea was simple: Over time, with education and commitment, we could restore the environmental damages of the past and go forward with a greater appreciation for the frailty of nature by conserving more, consuming less and passing on a cleaner and more sustainable planet to future generations. For those who were young adults in the ’60s and ’70s, the concept of taking care of the planet instead of ruthlessly exploiting it for whatever we wanted made good sense. In fact, many say the original Earth Day celebrations, in which some 20 million Americans participated, gave birth to the concept of environmental advocacy and activism across the globe. Montana was no exception to the wave of newfound environmental consciousness. The drafters of the 1972 Constitution, fully aware of the degradations heaped upon the state’s lands and waters by mining and other resource extraction industries, filled the state’s guiding document with environmental protections. Article II, the Declaration of Rights, includes in Section 3 “the right to a clean and healthful environment.” That guarantee is expanded upon in Article IX, Environment and Natural Resources, in Section 1: “The state and each person shall maintain and improve a clean and healthful environment in Montana for present and future generations.” Section 2, Reclamation, follows with the mandate that: “All lands disturbed by the taking of natural resources shall be reclaimed.” To make it more than an empty phrase, the drafters instituted a $100 million Resource Indemnity Trust Fund fueled by “such taxes on the extraction of natural resources as the legislature may from time to time impose for that purpose.” Going further, the new constitution also contained a severance tax on coal since Montana was being touted as “the boiler room for the nation” while enormous strip mines and coal-fired power plants were being built. The Coal Tax Trust Fund was established in the constitution and, despite being attacked for years, having the tax rate slashed and funds diverted from their original intent, the coal severance tax has generated more than a billion dollars in revenue since its inception, with about

half that remaining in the permanent trust and its subsidiary trusts. In the ensuing decades, the state has moved forward to implement a number of visionary programs to address environmental problems. In the mid-’80s, Montana’s so-called “mini-Superfund” program was instituted and funded with interest from the Resource Indemnity Trust Fund. The program cleaned hundreds of toxic and hazardous waste sites across the state that would not qualify for the national Superfund program. On a parallel path, the Underground Storage Tank program was established to clean

“It’s not Montana’s political leaders who deserve praise on Earth Day this year,

but our citizens.

up leaking underground storage tanks. In the mid-’90s, the Future Fisheries Improvement Act was passed to funnel millions of dollars into restoring damaged streams to health to improve natural reproduction for Montana’s legendary wild trout. But now, sad to say, leadership in environmental policy has slipped from the prominence of the past—at least in the political arena. Nothing could offer more proof than the 2009 Montana Legislature. Forgetting the lessons of the past and ignoring their constitutional mandates, this session has actually thrown the state into reverse on environmental protection with measures that, once again, favor industry over citizens. The 2009 Legislature shouldn’t shoulder all the blame. Gov. Brian Schweitzer once told a cheering crowd on the campaign trail that “the real treasure in Montana is the land, not what lies underneath it.” But once in office, Schweitzer became the cheerleader-in-chief for massive development of Montana’s energy resources, saying he now wants more pipelines, more transmission lines, more oil, gas, and coal production while crooning a “clean

and green” line that stands in diametric opposition to what’s actually happening. More coal mines are not clean and green. Nor are more oil and gas wells. Nor are more coal-fired power plants such as the proposed Highwood Generation Plant near Great Falls, the demise of which has sparked many of this session’s anti-environment bills. In reality, it’s not Montana’s political leaders who deserve praise on Earth Day this year, but our citizens. They’re the ones who continue to hold dear the promises and guarantees of our constitution. Everywhere across Montana the local food movement is on the rise. Community gardens, once looked at as a way to help the less fortunate feed themselves, are now being built to provide local food for anyone willing to help grow it. Given the increasing number of food contamination issues in recent years, local food grown by local gardeners is now looked upon as safer and healthier than food coming from foreign countries or industrial farms. Organic farming, too, has come into its own, despite fierce opposition from industry giants like Monsanto and Dow Chemical. As Americans become ever more aware of the implications of healthy eating to a healthy life, the ideas of crossing animal and plant genes, dowsing your vegetables in pesticides or pumping up poultry and meat with growth hormones has come under much closer scrutiny. The penultimate question now being asked by millions of Americans is, “Why should I or my family eat chemically drenched, genetically modified industrial foods?” On a global scale, the increasingly visible effects of climate change and a warming Earth are likewise moving millions of people to do what they can to help slow the destruction of the planet by buying smaller, more fuel-efficient cars, recycling materials and conserving energy and water whenever possible. On this Earth Day, and especially in Montana, it is the people, not the politicians, who are leading the way forward to the more sustainable future envisioned so many years ago. We can only hope that one day the politicians will finally follow that lead. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Boom to bust

Tibetan Buddhist Practice - How Do I Begin?

by Randy Udall

A record number of natural gas wells were drilled in the United States last year. But in a stunning reversal, hundreds of rigs have been idled and thousands of roughnecks laid off. In the space of six months, the oil patch has gone from drill, baby, drill to chill, baby, chill. The historical roots of this story lie in southwestern Wyoming and the Pinedale Anticline. Although this natural gas field was discovered 60 years ago, early efforts to tap it failed because of the tight sandstones. One roughneck reportedly cracked, “The only way they’ll get the gas out is to trigger an atomic bomb down there.” Sure enough, in the early 1970s, the Atomic Energy Commission proposed detonating 100 underground bombs near Pinedale to fracture the rocks. “Nuclear stimulation,” they called it. When area ranchers discovered that the first blast would be 30 times more powerful than that which incinerated Hiroshima, the scheme was scrapped. The gas remained impregnable for another two decades. Enter a Wyoming paving contractor and oilman, Neil McMurry, his sons Mick and Vic, an Air Force Academy graduate named John Martin, and geologist Ed Warner. McMurry hated unions, drove a red Cadillac and wore a porkpie hat. His sons were Cat skinners. Martin had flown F101 Voodoos. Warner was a short, brash, fast-talking, Brooklyn-born geologist. The partners examined old drilling logs. They located geologists who had been defeated by the Anticline, bought them dinner and pumped them for information. Quietly, they purchased rights to thousands of acres. “Before we drilled our first well, we approached 27 different companies trying to find a financial backer,” Warner recalls, “and they all turned us down. No guts, no glory.” In 1993, the five musketeers brainstormed a new hydraulic fracturing method, which proved its merit with their first well south of the Anticline at a

place called Jonah. Holding $1 billion worth of energy per square mile, Jonah was a treasure trove. Warner eventually sold his piece for more than $30 million, much of which he donated to Colorado State University, sage grouse preservation and the Sand County Foundation. From the air, his masterpiece looks like a subdivision from hell. “It’s an industrial zone,” Warner good-naturedly admits. “Doing environmental mitigation inside that field is crazy, like trying to rehab a Wal-Mart parking lot.”

“No wonder half the drilling rigs in Colorado have been idled. The story is similar in New Mexico, Utah

and Montana.

If Wall Street is going to destroy wealth, then someone has to create it. Ed Warner claims to have “found more natural gas than any man alive,” and in a strange way he’s probably right. In the last few years, the fracking technologies he, Colorado oilman Bill Barrett and others invented have propagated outwards, unlocking enormous reserves of gas from black shale deposits in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania and New York. As a result, America’s troubling gas shortage has morphed into a glut. Aubrey McClendon, CEO of Chesapeake Energy, believes that the Marcellus shale underlying New York and Pennsylvania

contains more gas than the United States has used in its entire history. “Even if you give Chesapeake’s estimates a haircut, we are talking about a tremendous new supply,” says Peter Dea, past president of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association. “Not all of this shale gas will prove economic, but even 10 percent could be worth a trillion dollars.” Since 1990, 150,000 natural gas wells have been drilled in the West. Until a few months ago, the expectation was that this methane madness, with its profound economic, social and land impacts, would continue unabated. But the emergence of shale gas and the recession have cancelled that forecast. Although shale gas wells in the South and East cost about as much to drill as wells in the Rockies, they are much more profitable. Their initial production rates can be 10 times higher, and they are closer to major markets. No wonder half the drilling rigs in Colorado have been idled. The story is similar in New Mexico, Utah and Montana. Mineral severance tax collections are in freefall; Wyoming is poised to lose $700 million this year alone. The largest drilling boom in Western history is over. Although it unleashed colossal new supplies—Colorado and Wyoming now each produce more energy than does powerhouse Alaska—our remaining gas may not prove as valuable as experts thought. Indeed, some observers think drilling may be depressed for years to come. “It remains to be seen how rapidly the Marcellus and other shale gas plays will be developed,” says Colorado State Geologist Vince Matthews. “But if we have a long-lasting gas glut and prices stay low, then Rockies producers may—as they historically have—take it in the ear.” Randy Udall is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He writes about energy in Carbondale, Colorado.

7 Point Mind Training Teachings by Lama Tsomo Ewam - Arlee, Montana

Friday, May 1st at 7:00 pm through Sunday, May 3rd at 5:00 pm $100/weekend*

This retreat will be a continuation of the April retreat. A recording of the April retreat is available for purchase for those who were unable to attend.

*Price includes two books: Jamgon Kontrul’s, “The Great Path to Awakening”and Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche’s “Enlightened Courage”

Photo by Hannah Hardaway

A new mantra for the oil patch: Chill, baby, chill

“The Tibetans have been using a system developed over thousands of years, with many documented successes. They have proven, powerful methods of transformation. The problem for the Western mind is to be able to successfully use these methods to attain the same results.” Lama Tsomo, a long time practitioner, has studied and completed many intensive retreats under Gochen Tulku Rinpoche’s close instruction and supervision. She has also received many empowerments and teachings from him as well, including the course of study and practice of the traditional Three-Year Retreat. Lama Tsomo also holds a Masters Degree in Counseling Psychology. Her direct, clear, often humorous approach includes many stories and examples from modern life. Since she is quite learned in both Eastern and Western methods, Lama Tsomo hopes to act as a bridge for interested practitioners.

In the Seven Point Mind Training we will learn simple meditation methods which have been scientifically proven to help us to be more focused, calm, compassionate as well as experiencing other positive emotions. Through these methods as well as pithy sayings we can take into our busy lives, we can turn much of our daily challenges from suffering to joy, from “causes” of our bad behavior to chances to apply our newfound wisdom. Students often remark on how even their loved ones notice the difference!

No prior knowledge or experience necessary! You will want to listen to a couple of the CDs from the last retreat, though. Don’t worry – they’re interesting, inspiring, and sometimes funny!

To register for the retreat or for more information contact 406-726-0217, visit www.ewam. org, or email admin@ewam.org

Missoula Independent

Page 11 April 23–April 30, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

BOAT SWAP April 25th 6th Annual Canoe, Kayak, & Raft Swap. BUY or SELL boats & boating equipment.

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Get 110% of selling price in Trail Head store credit For more info contact

Now that ending the war, providing health care for all Americans and ensuring a viable and sustainable transportation infrastructure have all been accomplished, it’s time to start looking for some new projects. As the Missoula County Democrats circle their wagons in an inclusive manner—the door’s open for Independents and dissatisfied Republicans as well—they hone their group process around the question, “What do we stand for?” The large group introduction moves swiftly into breakout sessions, which give participants chances to provide input about local and state issues as well as those with national and global significance. Once the group reporting and con-

Figure out how to stop this crazy thing at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, where the Sustainable Business Council presents the panel discussion “Montana Businesses: A Discussion of Political and Practical Solutions to Climate Change.” Free. Call 465-1141.

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Help Missoula figure out how to keep our bridges aloft and whatnot when you attend this month’s Community Forum at 7 PM in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6081.

Fri. 24 April Keep the Wilma from becoming a CVS Pharmacy when you apply to serve on Missoula’s Historical Preservation Commission—but hurry, as the deadline for application is 5 PM today. Get started at City Hall, online at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/mayor/vacancies.htm or by calling 552-6078.

Page 12 April 23–April 30, 2009

The Jeannette Rankin Peace Center hosts the benefit event “Making a Case for PEACE: Final Argument,” which features spoken word, poetry and music, at 7 PM at the Crystal Theatre. $10 suggested donation. Call 240-4269 or 240-1406.

Mon. 27 April Drink specials have long been the lubricant for political maneuvering, and tonight the tradition continues at 5 PM, when Forward Montana’s Progressive Happy Hour gets to the heart of matters at the Badlander. Call 542-VOTE. America’s image makeover is in need of some shock troops, so get on board during a Peace Corps Informational Meeting, which begins at 7:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free.

Tue. 28 April The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

Sat. 25 April

Please, please, just get your cat(s) fixed, all right? The Humane Society of Western Montana hosts the all-day low-income event Spay Your Mama! End an entire feline line for just $10. RSVP 549-3934.

Planet-loving Bitterrooters will meet at 9 AM at the Stevensville Main Street Association office, where Stevensville Cleanup Day kicks off and features plenty of work tasks and a free lunch. Call 777-1102. If it’s got anything to do with two-wheel motion, it’s going down from noon—4 PM in Bonner Park, where the 12th annual Festival of Cycles kicks off Bike Walk Bus Week with free parts and mechanical assistance, music and food, kids’ activities, obstacle courses and more. Free. Call 880-6834.

You can do it, put your back into it: Inaugurate the efforts of One Thousand New Gardens as the

Open 7AM-11PM Mon-Sat • Sun 9AM-10PM 543-3188 • 701 South Orange Street

group meets at 8 AM in Kiwanis Park for Big Dig Day, with the goal of digging 10 new garden beds in the neighborhood. Free, but bring wellmarked tools, gloves and the like. E-mail 1000newgardens@gmail.com, or call 214-6664.

There’s more to the UM Women’s Law Caucus Silent Auction—which begins at 5:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts— than meets the eye: When you bid on items donated by local individuals and businesses, all the while enjoying the refreshments and live Irish tunes, you’ll be supporting the Missoula YWCA. Free. Call 240-1370.

Sun. 26 April

Missoula Independent

The Missoula County Democrats host an Issues Caucus from 5–9 PM on Sun., April 26, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Free, and child care (yet, sadly, no donkey tattoos) is provided. RSVP missoulademocrats@yahoo.com.

The Trail Head • 406-543-6966 • info@trailheadmontana.net

Thu. 23 April

Beef Filet Mignon Steaks

sensus-finding is done, a cookies-n-drinks celebration breaks out. And if the pizza and soft drinks available throughout, as well as the full-service child care, aren’t incentive enough, then perhaps the “kicking donkey tattoo booth” will be the straw that breaks your Camel of Apathy’s back. Just kidding about the tattoos, folks. —Jonas Ehudin

Wed. 29 April

Thu. 30 April Every Thu. in April, generation cell phone—and everybody else, of course—is invited to GYT: Get Yourself Tested, a free sexually-transmitted disease screening and treatment event at Planned Parenthood, 219 E. Main St. Free. Call 728-5490 or visit gyt09.org. Join the Consumer Counseling Credit Service’s Amita Patel for the noon brown bag seminar How To Survive in This Economy, which takes place at the City Life Building, 151 Fairview Ave., Ste. 220. Free. Call 543-1188.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – When Derek Shaun Clark, 26, kicked in the back door of a home in Evansville, Ind., entered with a drawn handgun and announced he was the police, homeowner Derrick Murray was skeptical because Clark and his accomplices “were talking in street slang.” Murray told WFIE-TV he ran and got his rifle from the bedroom and fired at Clark, who police said stumbled out of the house and attempted to get in his get-away car. “The white car was parked in front of my house,” neighbor Katherine Vessels said, “and they backed up and ran over him, and then he backed up, and then they backed up into the alley and into him again. Then they took off.” Clark ended up in intensive care. Two robbers leaving a Milwaukee jewelry store with cash and gems were accosted by another group of thieves, who robbed them. Police Lt. Thomas Welch told the Associated Press that after a brief fight, a car chase ensued. Police officers pulled over both vehicles and arrested the original two robbers, ages 31 and 40, and two men from the second group, ages 22 and 27. THEY ALL SAY D’OH – Ecuadorian fighter pilot Rafael Durango survived the crash of his jet into a dense jungle near the Colombian border but plunged to his death while being rescued after a cord broke as he and a rescuer were being pulled up to a helicopter. Craig Aylesworth, 51, threw a Molotov cocktail on his neighbor’s mobile home in Bithlo, Fla., only to have the wind blow the flames back and set his own trailer on fire. TOOL TIME – A 27-year-old Maryland woman was airlifted to the hospital after being injured by a sex toy attached to a saber saw blade. TheBayNet.com reported that a man called 911 about the incident and admitted attaching the sex toy to the saw and then using the high-powered, homemade device on his partner. The saw cut through the plastic toy and wounded the woman. The St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s office said no charges would be filed because the woman told investigators the injuries occurred during a consensual act after she and her partner decided to try something new. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – When Talon LaClaire, 20, pointed two knives at a 71year-old man who was scraping ice off his windshield in Rapid City, S.D., the victim turned the tables by using his ice scraper to fend off the would-be robber. The Rapid City Journal reported that LaClaire retreated into a nearby home, where police arrested him. WAY TO GO – Jeff Twaddle, 54, a deckhand on a charter boat carrying 20 school children in waters off Long Beach, Calif., tried to entertain the passengers by putting a bait fish in his mouth. The Orange County Register reported the joke turned fatal when Twaddle started choking and lost consciousness. The Coroner’s Office attributed the accidental death to “aspiration of fish.” A Chinese man held out his arms to try to break the fall of his suicidal girlfriend when she jumped from the seventh floor of an apartment building in Quanzhou, but the impact killed him. The Straits Capital News reported the girlfriend survived without suffering any lifethreatening injuries. HOMELAND INSECURITY – The government has begun investigating whether body odor can indicate when people are lying. According to a federal procurement document posted on the Internet, the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate is collecting human body odor samples to use in research it hopes will enable it to determine if “human odor signatures can serve as an indicator of deception” and whether “an individual can be identified by that individual’s odor signature.” According to the notice, “This research has the potential for enhancing our ability to detect individuals with harmful intent.” In reporting on the government project, United Press International noted that research published by the Royal Society in London in 2006 found “a substantial number of marker compounds [in human sweat] that can potentially differentiate individuals or groups.” The researchers cautioned, however, that about a quarter of the 44 distinctive marker compounds they identified appeared to be artificial contaminants, ranging from skin care and perfume products to tobacco smoke and other substances present in a person’s environment. AVOIRDUPOIS FOLLIES – A British family of four with a combined weight of 1,162 pounds told Closer magazine they are “too fat to work” and claimed that the unemployment and disability benefits they receive are inadequate. The family from Blackburn receives $32,965 a year in benefits. “We deserve more,” Philip Chawner, 53 and 336 pounds, said, insisting, “It’s not our fault we can’t work.” The Chawners, who haven’t worked in 11 years, blame their weight on a hereditary condition, even though they each consume 3,000 calories a day. “We have cereal for breakfast, bacon butties (sandwiches) for lunch and microwave pies with mashed potatoes or chips for dinner,” Audrey Chawner, 57 and also 336 pounds, said. “All that healthy food, like fruit and veg, is too expensive.” Daughter Emma, 19 and 234 pounds, said, “I’m a student and don’t have time to exercise. We all want to lose weight to stop the abuse we get in the street, but we don’t know how.” NEARER MY GOD – An Italian court convicted Tunisian pilot Chefik Gharbi of manslaughter for praying while his plane crash-landed instead of taking emergency measures to reach a nearby airport. Sixteen people aboard the ATR-72 turboprop aircraft died when the plane ran out of fuel and plummeted into the sea off Sicily. CAN’T GET NO SATISFACTION – A German woman divorced her husband of 15 years because she finally had enough of his constant cleaning. Reuters reported the wife put up with the man’s fastidiousness but ran out of patience when he knocked down and rebuilt a wall at their home after it got dirty. “I’d never had anyone seek a divorce for this,” Christian Kropp, court judge in Sondershausen, said. A woman in Haltom City, Texas, called 911 to report she didn’t get enough shrimp in her fried rice at a restaurant. Restaurant workers told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that the woman left with her order, then returned to complain about the lack of shrimp but was denied a refund. In the taped emergency call, the customer tells the dispatcher “to get a police officer up here, what has to happen?” When an officer did arrive, the woman had left.

2009 Thursday April 23 5:30 pm

Missoula Greenhorns Greenhorns Monthly Networking & Social Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine No RSVP

Tuesday April 28 8:00 am

Missoula Business Forum Beyond the current economic slowdown... Positioning Missoula for future economic success Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. RSVP: www.missoulacvb.org/attend

Tuesday April 28 5:00 pm

Missoula Downtown Association Downtown on Tap - Member Networking Social Sterling Savings Bank, 200 N. Higgins No RSVP

Tuesday May 5 5:00 pm

Missoula Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours - Member Networking Social The Ranch Club, 8501 Ranch Club Rd. Parking limited - Please carpool No RSVP

Thursday May 14 5:15 pm

Missoula Building Industry Association Open the Door - Member Networking Social The Masonry Center, 300 Expressway, #A No RSVP

Missoula Downtown Association Missoula Chamber of Commerce Missoula Builders Industry Association Missoula Business Forum Missoula Greenhorns Young Network

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Want to spread the word about a business networking event? Submit info to cmelton@missoulanews.com. Events must be sponsored by a Missoula leadership and/or trade org with 25+ members, and open to the public for professional networking purposes. Events are subject to approval before being published. Please submit requests at least two weeks in advance.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 April 23–April 30, 2009


O F F I C I A L BA L LO T People & Media

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For one issue every year, the Independent staff takes a step back from the paper and asks you—yep, you, the one reading this right now—to take over. It’s sort of a big deal. You have quite the responsibility. You may want to put that burrito down and take a second to listen. We’re talking about Best of Missoula, the Indy’s annual look at all things amazing about our little neck of the woods. While we certainly have our own opinions about what makes this place special, we ask you to put in the research, wrestle with the choices, make the ultimate decisions, and write it all down. In exchange, we’ll make it worth your while. We’re hosting our annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park Thursday, July 9—the same day your winners are announced in print—and we want you to join us. There’ll be food, drinks, live music from some of Missoula’s best bands—the works. All you have to do is fill out a ballot, and we’ve tried to make that as easy as possible. You can vote in hard copy by using this ballot, or visit www.missoulanews.com and vote online, where we’re offering 50 additional online-only categories (like “Best Bartender”). They’ll be announced at the same time as the traditional categories. We require ballots to include your full name, email address and phone number in the spaces provided below. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in will not be counted. Further, photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings will not be counted. Hard copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 12. Now get to work and have fun. You’re on deadline.

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Name:__________________________________ Email:________________________________ Phone:______________________

Ballot Box Locations:

Bernice's Bakery, Brady's Sportsman’s Surplus, Break Espresso, Bridge Pizza, Butterfly Herbs, Caffé Dolce (both locations), Cutting Crew, El Diablo, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Grizzly Grocery, Hastings, Hob Nob, Iron Horse, Kettlehouse Brewery, Liquid Planet, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Rosauer's Reserve Street Bistro, Sushi Hana, Taco del Mar, Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), UC Center Market, Uptown Diner, Westside Lanes, Wheat Montana and Worden's Market. Missoula Independent

Page 14 April 23–April 30, 2009


arren McGee, a wily 95-year-old from foresight, we allowed a very important piece of our Livingston who worked as a railroad con- heritage in this country—and something that could ductor for 40 years, spoke up in a room carry us into the future—slip away.” But while strategizing at the Izaak Walton Inn, of train buffs and offered his idea for how to revive this group didn’t focus as much on what was, but passenger rail service in southern Montana. “Maybe we should bring some of those old rails what could be. They’re part of a growing effort to restore Amtrak’s North Coast Hiawatha route, under the Endangered Species Act!” he hollered. To which Jim Lynch, director of the Montana which, until 30 years ago, ran between Seattle and Department of Transportation (MDOT), quipped, Chicago via Missoula, Bozeman and Billings. The movement to bring passenger rail service “Well, I can see by some of the passengers here we back to southern Montana has picked up steam in might even qualify.” Indeed, the group of 80 or so that gathered last recent months, fueled by a president committed month in Essex, Mont., for the annual National to railroad expansion—the first since Abraham Association of Railroad Passengers (NARP) Lincoln, some say—as well as a supportive Montana delegation and state Northwest Region Conference was noticeably congressional aged. Lynch called them a bunch of “gray hairs.” governor. Advocates at the meeting say a longInstead of the young alternative transportation set distance Amtrak train one might expect for a disrunning through southcussion on the importance “If it was up to ern Montana would serve of passenger trains, it was as an environmentallyattended by old-timers political will and the friendly intrastate and wearing railroad leather national mode of jackets and caps. sentiment of the transportation, provide That’s not to say the tourists access to group lacked enthusiasm. population, we’d Yellowstone National Virginia Sloan, a field Park and the region’s burdirector for Sen. Jon have a train parked at geoning cities, give Tester, attended the meetUniversity of Montana ing and extolled NARP the depot tomorrow. and Montana State and other regional passenUniversity students a ger rail advocacy groups Now we’ve got to means of returning for their unparalleled home, and create jobs passion. address the really across the state through “It is noted,” she said. its restoration and long“You seem to be vocal, hard issues.” term operation and mainorganized, and not very tenance. And despite often do you see the rela—Bill Taylor, train historian major funding and logistitionship with multiple cal hurdles standing in states really champion to the way of reviving the the same cause.” The spirited NARP meeting included members route, these trainiacs believe now’s their best from Montana, Washington and Oregon, many of chance to get everyone on board with the idea. whom rode in on Amtrak’s Empire Builder, the northern Montana route that stops at the front Laying the tracks door of the Izaak Walton Inn, a lodge constructed The first spike in the possible revival of the on the edge of Glacier National Park by the Great North Coast Hiawatha was driven, some say, by an Northern Railroad in 1939. unlikely champion. In fall 2008, President George The lodge stands as a Mecca for trainiacs, a ver- W. Bush signed the Passenger Rail Investment and itable museum memorializing the history of the Improvement Act, which authorized $13 billion in country’s rail systems. Railroad photographs and funding for Amtrak over five years, a boon for the insignia cover the walls floor to ceiling. Lamps and beleaguered government-owned corporation. More door handles were welded from railroad spikes. importantly to local rail supporters, the bill includGuests wave to trains rolling by and conductors ed a measure written by Montana Sen. Jon Tester honk in reply. directing Amtrak to study the feasibility of restoring Within that history, America’s abandonment of its abandoned route through southern Montana. passenger rail routes stands out as train advocates’ Thanks for the measure may also go to greatest lament. As Lynch said, “Without a lot of Missoula City Councilmember Dave Strohmaier.

W

Photo courtesy of Amtrak

Missoula Independent

Page 15 April 23–April 30, 2009


your guess is as good as mine,” says Strohmaier. “I think what this requires…is a grassroots effort. What I’ve discovered here in Missoula is representative of politics at all levels, and that is unless elected officials hear from folks, and hear something is a concern, you can assume the status quo. Our congressional delegation, our state legislator and local elected officials all need to hear this is a priority for folks.”

Hiawatha derailed

Photo courtesy of Bill Taylor

This historic photograph shows the North Coast Limited rolling through Missoula in 1949. This train combined with the Mainstreeter to form the North Coast Hiawatha in 1971.

“However, I think what it tells me,” The passionate train advocate met with issue. It’s not a Democrat or and he believes our future may be tied Strohmaier says, “is there’s a committo them, as well. Tester in Washington, D.C., to make his Republican thing.” “From what I’ve seen in terms of ment to taking passenger rail seriously. Recently, Strohmaier and Ackley case for more service in Montana just have organized public events to help efficiencies per passenger-mile and So even if we’re not able to avail ourbefore the Senate debated the bill. “It happened the same day I was further their cause, such as the April 8 the fuel savings that might be selves of this pot of money, I think there, right after we met, so I hope that “Rally for Rail” at the University of achieved from passenger rail versus there’s a long-term commitment to rail my bit of encouragement from the Montana. The event drew dozens to single-occupancy motor vehicles or and it’s an opportunity for a more susMissoula City Council standpoint sign a banner thanking Tester for his even airline transportation,” he says, tainable mode of transportation.” The stars are starting to align, played some role in his decision,” commitment to passenger rail. They’ve “rail offers some real environmental though any forward movement hinges Strohmaier says. “That was the work at planned another event for National advantages.” He’s not the only one who sees the on the findings of Amtrak’s feasibility the federal level that I think was really Train Day, May 9, at Missoula’s original possibilities. In addition to Amtrak’s study due to Congress in October. critical to setting the stage for every- Northern Pacific train depot. Amtrak’s Marc Magliari explains the “I have a pretty keen interest in feasibility study—due to be completed thing that would come after it, because getting a feasibility study done is sustainable modes of transportation,” by October—the Obama administra- study will estimate how many people absolutely essential to know what explains Strohmaier of his enthusiasm tion’s demonstrated dedication to pas- would use the new route, the substanon the issue. As he talks in his office at senger rail has local backers more opti- tial costs needed to improve the track we’re up against here.” and the operating budget. “And The feasibility study galvain the end,” he says, “Congress nized the campaign to bring will decide what to do going forAmtrak service back to southern ward. That’s how the system Montana. Strohmaier and fellow works.” organizer Michael Ackley have Amtrak will “piggyback” the been at the forefront of a congressionally mandated study statewide grassroots effort based onto state studies already underlargely in Missoula. way, Magliari says. As part of For instance, Strohmaier initiMDOT’s update of the state rail ated the signing of multiple city plan, it asked Amtrak to resolutions, as well as a joint resexamine possible routes between olution with the Missoula Board Missoula and Billings and, of County Commissioners and beyond that, Sandpoint, Idaho, the Chamber of Commerce in to Williston, N.D. support of local passenger rail “Whether all that trackage service. One of the city resolufrom 1979 is still there and/or in tions backed Senate Bill 9, key a reasonable condition to host legislation introduced by state passenger trains, I can’t say right Sen. Ron Erickson, D-Missoula, now,” Magliari says, “but that’s which authorizes local governPhoto by Chad Harder one of the things we’re looking ments to issue revenue bonds to Sheena Rice of the Montana Public Interest Research Group, left, presents Sen. at.” fund public transportation sysJon Tester with a banner signed by dozens of University of Montana students Amtrak’s investigating the statems like passenger rail. The bill, thanking him for supporting Amtrak service through southern Montana. A 2008 tus of the route by rolling hi-rail which currently awaits the goverUM survey showed 52 percent of students would be “very likely” to travel on a vehicles—essentially pickups nor’s signature, would help passenger train connecting Missoula and Billings. equipped with railroad wheels— Montana communities pay for Missoula’s Historical Research mistic than ever. The economic stimu- along the track from one end of ancillary services like train stations. “People are interested, that’s not a Associates, he overlooks the old tracks lus package set aside $1.3 billion for Montana to the other. “The best case scenario is that problem,” says Ackley, a local painting of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Amtrak and $8 billion for high-speed contractor who started lobbying for the Pacific Railroad, better known as the rail, and there’s $5 billion more in sometime this year the studies come southern route’s return eight years Milwaukee Road. Strohmaier says our Obama’s proposed budget. None of out and we have some hard numbers ago. “We don’t have to go drum up history is inextricably linked to the the money will likely make it to before us in terms of what it’s going to take to make this happen, and then support for this. It’s a non-partisan arrival of the transcontinental railways, Montana.

Missoula Independent

Page 16 April 23–April 30, 2009

Missoulians enjoyed passenger rail service for almost 100 years, beginning when Northern Pacific built rail through Missoula in 1883, and ending with Amtrak’s decision to discontinue its North Coast Hiawatha route in 1979. Historian Bill Taylor has most of the era documented in a stockpile of photographs, postcards and other collectables at his Missoula home. An antique railroad signal lamp and red and white striped railroad sign stand in his front yard. He and his wife Jan have turned their interest in passenger rails into four published books about Northern Pacific’s history in Montana. Taylor says the highpoint of local passenger train traffic occurred in about 1929. A nationwide erosion in ridership followed World War II with the creation of the Interstate Highway System, cheap gas and air travel, all of which “just blew the railroads out of the water,” he says. “By the time you get into the 1960s,” he says, “what you’re seeing is a general desire on the part of the private railroad companies to get rid of passenger service altogether. The truth is passenger service was always a losing proposition. From 1929 on, there were very few passenger trains that made a profit.” The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, which operates as Amtrak, formed in 1971 as a result of political pressure to relieve railroad companies’ financial burden of running unprofitable trains, Taylor explains. Amtrak took over operation of passenger trains and reduced or discontinued service. For example, the two trains that ran through Missoula— the North Coast Limited and the Mainstreeter—were essentially combined into the North Coast Hiawatha. “Amtrak, I don’t think, was ever intended to survive,” Taylor says. “I think what Congress saw it as was a way to take the onus of abandonments off of the private railroad that, within five or six years, could just be allowed to die a natural death, and everybody was going to go by car or airplane.” Amtrak didn’t die but Congress has forced it, repeatedly, to tighten its belt. In 1979 the North Coast Hiawatha succumbed. With the train running just three days a week, service was poor and ridership was down. While southern Montana’s route dried up, the northern Empire Builder survived.


speaks at the University of Montana’s April 8 “Rally for Rail.”

DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA/DANCE • SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS • 2008-2009

The Empire Builder’s success “The Empire Builder serves a vital “The rationale for leaving the train on the Hi-Line was that, a, it was the transportation function in northern would appear to bode well for the fastest way through Montana, and, b, Montana,” the report states, “the North Coast Hiawatha. But it also it serviced a number of communities importance of which may be difficult underlines some of the southern up there which did not have other to appreciate by those who are used route’s biggest obstacles. forms of public transportation,” Taylor to more generous transportation says. A long haul The North Coast While momentum Hiawatha, though, still builds behind the return of had its supporters. the North Coast Hiawatha, it An October 7, 1979 must first navigate a daunteditorial in the Bozeman ing series of roadblocks. Chronicle titled “Sham“If it was up to political trak” says the North Coast will and the sentiment of the Hiawatha came within a population, we’d have a fraction of meeting critetrain parked at the depot ria for continued service. tomorrow,” says Taylor. It needed 150 passengers “Now we’ve got to address per mile; it had 149. the really hard issues.” “To be sure the train Money tops the list— was losing money,” the how much and who pays. Photo by Chad Harder editorial read. “All passenThe feasibility study should ger trains around the Historian Bill Taylor, one of Missoula’s foremost answer the first question. world lose money. In train buffs, says the chances of reviving Amtrak serv- Answering the second will countries such as Japan, ice through southern Montana have increased dra- be much more difficult. matically over the last couple years. the trains keep running Because of the relatively since it is cheaper to subsidize the train options and amenities in more popu- small populations in Montana and the than to build massive highway projects. lous parts of the nation.” other states likely along the route, For instance, many residents most of the money would need to “The money the Hiawatha lost will go into fuel tanks and the pockets of along the Hi-Line take the train to come from the federal government. Arab countries. Now that makes sense, Whitefish to receive medical care. “The question becomes, Will the if you don’t know what you’re doing. That’s just one reason why Whitefish federal government provide an oper“All this is happening as the presi- is the state’s most popular station. ating grant to Amtrak big enough to “The Empire Builder is very, very let them support it the way they supdent [Jimmy Carter] talks about fuel conservation, and using public important to Montana,” MDOT’s port the Empire Builder?” says NARP Lynch told the NARP members at the President Ross Capon. “And that’s a transportation.” Pat Williams served as a freshman Izaak Walton Inn. “This administration dicey question, not just because of the U.S. congressman in 1979. As he and myself, as long as I’m director, we hard times economically, but also, remembers it, the outcry over the will do everything we can to make there are two competing routes route’s discontinuation was mild. And sure that we do not lose the opportu- Amtrak is studying at the same time.” the letters he did receive suggested nity for the Empire Builder…We can The Passenger Rail Investment & support for the route was not directly not afford to lose this route of travel Improvement Act also directed Amtrak across our state.” linked to ridership. to study the feasibility of two other “I compared the number of petition signatures and the number of letters with the number of people that were actually riding the southern route,” he says, “and I had three times as many signatures as people who were actually buying tickets.” Still, Williams tried to revive the route in the 1980s. But that last attempt–a proposed multi-state and federal effort– stalled in committee in the Montana Legislature, he recalls, because it was too expensive. With the North Coast Hiawatha now inactive for 30 years, the Empire Builder stands out as Amtrak’s most popular long-distance train five years running. The route covers roughly 2,200 miles from Chicago to the Pacific Northwest, and travels through Glacier National Park. In FY 2008, Empire Builder ridership increased by 9.8 percent to 554,266. In Montana last year, Amtrak employed 43 residents whose wages were about $3.6 million. A 2003 study by R.L. Banks & Associates concluded that the Empire Photo by Chad Harder Builder contributes nearly $14 million annually in economic benefits to Montana. And it notes the route’s City Councilman Dave Strohmaier, the city’s leading train advocate, benefits go beyond just finances.

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Page 17 April 23–April 30, 2009


defunct routes. The Pioneer connected Seattle and Chicago via Portland, Boise, Salt Lake City and Denver until it shut down in 1997. The Sunset Limited ran between Orlando and New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 and closed the route. “The North Coast Hiawatha may be the heaviest lift simply because it’s the longest run,” Capon says. “On the other hand, if the passenger traffic is projected to be robust, that could be mitigated.” The state will certainly need to chip in on funding as well. Gov. Brian Schweitzer supports the train, but the Montana Legislature’s track record appears mixed. Three bills were introduced this session with big implications for increased passenger rail service in the state. The aforementioned SB 9, which authorizes local governments to issue revenue bonds to fund public transportation systems, passed. Senate Bill 283, also introduced by Missoula’s Ron Erickson, would direct MDOT to update the state rail plan to reflect federal legislation. That bill died in committee. Senate Bill 166, introduced by Helena’s Dave Lewis, would allow the issuance of lowinterest coal tax trust fund loans to expand rail passenger service. That bill also died. “My guess is that there is enough bipartisan interest, particularly in the Senate, to get more done in the next session,” Erickson says. Beyond money, knotty railroad ownership and improvement issues must be untangled. The transcontinental freight company Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) owns the entire length of the old North Coast Hiawatha route in the state. Montana Rail Link (MRL) holds a lease through 2047 on more than half of it, from the Montana-Idaho border to Billings. Reintroducing a passenger train would take “extensive work,” says MRL spokeswoman Lynda Frost. She also emphasizes that freight is the company’s priority.

“However, if the southern line would materialize we are certainly going to be there to do everything we can to make it a success.” She adds: “It would certainly be an expectation that it would be a profit center for us.” The “extensive work” Frost mentions likely includes improving track so passenger trains can achieve higher speeds. There are also logistical issues, such as fitting passenger trains into current freight schedules. “You’re not going to have good service down here if you limit your passen-

“Without a lot of foresight, we allowed a very important piece of our heritage in this country—and something that could carry us into the future—slip away.” —Jim Lynch, Montana Department of Transportation ger trains to 59 mph and they’re out there playing bumper cars with the coal trains,” says Taylor. Then there are the depots at every stop along the old North Coast Hiawatha. The now-relics are mostly abandoned or have been converted into something else entirely. Finally, there’s the need for railroad cars, which cost more than $1 million each. These mounting obstacles contribute to the naysayers’ sense of fatalism. Missoula City

Councilman Dick Haines, for example, doesn’t oppose restoring the North Coast Hiawatha, he simply doesn’t think it can happen in his lifetime. “I just don’t think you could crank up a train system that would be self-supporting,” he says. “I told my colleague down there, Mr. Strohmaier, I said, ‘It will never happen, Dave. It will never happen.’ And it may be long after we’re both gone before it does happen.” Strohmaier counters with the same measured optimism that marks the whole movement. “My response to that,” he says, “is as long as you have that attitude it’s going to be a self-fulfilling prophecy if you don’t put any energy into it.” He told Haines he’d save him a ticket on the North Coast Hiawatha’s first trip out of town. But Haines’ belief that the train wouldn’t be self-supporting reflects a common knock against Amtrak—that it’s too heavily subsidized for the benefit it provides. Nationally, the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, argues this point the loudest, claiming that train travel is costlier than both driving and flying. Cato Institute senior fellow Daniel Mitchell called President Obama’s $8 billion high-speed rail plan announced on April 16 “just ludicrous.” “Most Amtrak trains outside of a few highdensity, short-distance corridors are a throwback to days gone by,” a 2001 Cato Institute analysis read. “The railroad does not now contribute much to America’s mobility, and its future plans, although expensive, spell more of the same. History is clear that increasing subsidies to Amtrak will not solve Amtrak’s problems. The nation must create a public-private rail franchise program and eliminate disincentives to private companies that may be interested in taking over promising Amtrak routes.” Historian Bill Taylor has heard this argument before, and he echoes a common refrain from train advocates.

“What people always forget is that we subsidize the Interstate Highway System horrendously to run trucks and buses and our private automobiles,” he says. “We subsidize the airline industry horrendously…There is no industrialized country in the world that runs a passenger system at a profit. It just doesn’t happen. You cannot charge people enough to offset the costs. What has to happen is that people, the citizenry, has to decide that having alternative ground transportation in the form of rail is a high priority enough to subsidize it.”

Light at the end of the tunnel Despite obstacles, the movement chugs along. Train advocates point to three more very good reasons for their optimism: Rep. Denny Rehberg and Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester, all of whom support increased service in the state. Rehberg sits on the powerful House Appropriations Committee and chairs the Congressional Rail Caucus. His work to secure funding for Amtrak led to NARP honoring him in 2007 with the George Falcon Golden Spike Award. Baucus chairs the Senate Finance Committee, perhaps the most influential committee in Congress. All three delegates sent letters to the NARP meeting at the Izaak Walton Inn, each followed by applause after it was read aloud. Baucus wrote, in part: “Rail service is not only part of the rich history and heritage of Montana; it also is part of Big Sky Country’s bright future…The time has come to reassess our transportation network. Time to find transportation solutions that preserve our outdoor heritage while boosting businesses and encouraging economic growth. That’s why I’m looking forward to the findings of the feasibility study for Montana’s southern route. I’m committed to exploring every option; to make sure Montana has a network that works for the 21st century.”

Photo courtesy of Amtrak

Amtrak’s Empire Builder winds along the edge of Glacier National Park. The train is Amtrak’s most popular long-distance route five years running, and serves as a vital source of transportation for residents along Montana’s Hi-Line.

Missoula Independent

Page 18 April 23–April 30, 2009


Receptive representatives don’t hurt, says NARP President Capon, “but the willingness of communities to invest in their facilities is at least as important.” Advocates are hopeful that the passage of SB 9 helps send that message, as well as other signs from small communities along the southern route. The Townsend City Council, which represents 1,981 citizens just southeast of Helena, passed a resolution late last year supporting the federal Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act. And a collective in Livingston, a city that thrived when Northern Pacific serviced its steam trains at the local depot, has proposed to restore former railroad shops to build new passenger cars for Amtrak. Together, they begin to bring into focus the local, state and federal partnership necessary to bring the North Coast Hiawatha back. So what are its chances? Capon puts a number on it: 55 percent. “I do think it’s a heavy lift,” he says, “and I think for Washington to be made aware of every investment—not just the resolutions that say we want the service, but tangible investments—on offer if the federal government makes a commitment to run the train can help push the odds to more favorable.” According to Taylor, they’ve become much more favorable than just a couple years ago. “When they first started—and I’ve lived in Montana all my life, I’ve been through all this stuff—I gave them about a one out of 100 chance of getting this going,” he says. “There are some events that played well into what they’re doing: $4 gasoline and what’s happened with the airline industry

the

Photo by Matthew Frank

Passenger trains are rarely parked at Missoula’s train depot, but the Rotary Club of Missoula partnered with Montana Rail Link in February to run two passenger cars from Missoula to Dixon to raise money for a local nonprofit organization.

here in the last year. People are dramatically wanting alternative transportation, and they’ve got a lot of political support behind this effort. “Over the course of the last couple years,” he adds, “I’ve seen their chances of success dramatically increase.” Whatever the odds, Councilman Strohmaier says they’re better than they’ve been since 1979,

the last time the North Coast Hiawatha rolled through Missoula. “My philosophy throughout all of this is we simply can’t retrench yet again,” he says. “We have about as good an opportunity now as we’ve had in decades to make this a reality. This is something worth having a bold vision of. Even though economic situations are challenging nationwide, I

don’t think that being timid about this is going to—in the long term, for future generations—buy us anything. I think we need to think creatively about how to make this a reality. If we think it’s important enough, I’m convinced we can make it happen.”

salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

mfrank@missoulanews.com

dish

$$–$$$...$15 and over The Keep Restaurant 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 728-5132 Steak - Seafood - Fine Wines and Spirits. Serving dinner 5pm-10pm seven days a week. Cocktail hour Mon-Thur 5pm-6pm in our fireside lounge. The ideal setting for weddings, receptions, and rehearsal dinners. Dates still available in 2009, call today. For dinner reservations call 728-5132. www.thekeeprestaurant.com $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Enjoy the warm ambience of our cozy neighborhood bistro with an urban feel. Our chefs transport flavors from Europe and the

Mediterranean offering a creative New American twist on classic fare. Featuring the freshest ingredients from local growers. Serving lunch Tuesday through Sat. 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tuesday through Sun. 5:00close. Beer and wine available. $$–$$$. Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone-deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, “Pizza by the Slice.” Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups,

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway • 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. MF 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Getting ready for outside seating? So are we. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Page 19 April 23–April 30, 2009


MISSOULA'S BEST

April

COFFEE

COFFEE SPECIALS Dark Roast

El Salvador Shade Grown

In A Crunch? Munch On Some Lunch.

Fair Trade

Sun thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm

$9.95/Lb.

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com

Missoula’s Best Coffee

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Times Run 4/24- 4/30 Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Sunshine Cleaning (R) Nightly at 7 &9 Sunday matinee at 1 & 3 FULL BAR AVAILABLE

The Class (PG-13) Fri, Sat at 7 & 9:15 Sunday matinee at 1 & 3 Will NOT show Fri or Sat 4/24 & 4/25

131 S. Higgins Ave.

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521

Across from the U of M campus.

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

Downtown Missoula

MAY 16TH CARAS PARK

GARDEN CITY

LOCALFEST

Handcrafted Artisanal Truffles Made with Single Origin 100% Ecuadorian Chocolate Come join us for lunch. Featuring freshly made sweet & savory crepes

MORE INFO AT SBCMONTANA.ORG

119 S. Higgins Ave, Missoula 543.2566 Next to the historic Wilma Theatre.

poshchocolat.com

the

dish

Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Open for Lunch and Dinner! Check out our new menu: Sesame House Salad, Soba Vegetable Pasta, Warm Brie Salad, the Dubliner, Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich, and Great Italian Pastas. Irish favorites, too: Pasties, Fish and Chips & Shepherd’s Pie. “where the Gaelic and the Garlic mix!!” $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Vietnam Noodle 2100 Stephens 542-8299 A true Vietnamese dining experience! Enjoy our authentic beef noodle soup, spring rolls, pad thai, Vietnamese style hot & sour soup, noodle soup bowls & daily lunch/soup combo specials. We suggest that you also try our new stuffed

Missoula Independent

hot peppers. For your cooking pleasure at home, we have an Asian grocery next to our restaurant! Get a free meal on your birthday when you bring 5 or more friends. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 36 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Page 20 April 23–April 30, 2009

Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. Lunch Board: Tuesday through Friday 11:30 to 2pm. Dinner A La Carte: Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 9pm. Reservations Accepted. For special events (business meetings, birthdays, baby showers, etc.) please call Chef Jason Tenesch.


by Ari LeVaux

Granola school When I was 17 years old, I conducted my college search with the help of a book that compared various schools in several important categories, such as the ratio of girls to boys, how good the food was, and—oh yeah—academics. One of the categories, measured on a scale of 1 to 5, was how “granola” the school was. This indicator crunched several criteria, such as the amount of armpit and leg hair worn by the average female student, tie-dyes per capita, bare feet per classroom and the quantity, in gallons per minute, of patchouli oil poured upon the student body. Granola was, in essence, the new way of saying “hippy.” Schools with lots of hippies were known as “granola schools.” Although at the time I wasn’t quite sure if granola was a good thing or not in this context, looking back I can at least say it was an appropriate term. In the early 1970s, when I was knee-high to a fire hydrant, my brother Charles lived in a community called Whitehorse Village in northern Utah’s Cache Valley. “We were an alternative bunch into making down-homey music while not overly clothed,” he says of the Whitehorse Village crew. As it turns out, down-homey music wasn’t the only thing my brother was making. When Charles wasn’t playing the bucket-bass in Whitehorse Village, he was a shepherd near the Continental Divide. There, at Sheep Camp, when he wasn’t feeding his horses, chasing coyotes or playing harmonica at the swimming hole, he was known to make really good granola. “My friend Carolee embroidered me a shirt with the words ‘Charlie Granola,’” Charlie recalls. “She walked three days to Sheep Camp to give me that shirt, and to eat some granola. I used to make big batches in a wood stove, burning sagebrush for fuel. “Sheep Camp was at 9,400 feet along the Utah/Wyoming line,” he continues. “I would saddle up Snooper at dawn for the morning herd, make granola in mid-day and play fiddle tunes on the metal roof of my chuck wagon in the afternoon.” He fiddled with his cappuccino maker as he told me this, 30-plus years later, having gone the way of many former hippies. We were in his new

Ask Ari:

Q

kitchen, which has granite countertops and a stove that lights when you turn a knob. “I phased out making granola when I moved back to civilization,” he says, wistfully. Alas, time is relentless. The last wild tribes of Amazon Indians are being contacted as we speak, Eskimos drive snowmobiles, cowboys shop at WalMart, former granola classmates are working at dotcom companies and Charlie Granola has traded in his horse for a riding lawnmower. But like those curled yellowed photographs from Whitehorse Village, there are ways we can hold onto the past. Unlike looking at old pictures, following Charlie

Granola’s granola recipe yields posterity you can eat. In fact, you pretty much can’t stop eating it. Since his granola recipe is adapted from wood-fired stoves to civilized kitchens, these temperatures and cooking times are approximate. To some extent, so are the ingredients. “The trickiest part was convincing the boss to bring up the ingredients,” Charlie says. “In 1973, the store in Woodruff, Utah, was a gas station, grocery store and post office all in one. They sold Velveeta, Oscar Mayer and Wonder Bread.” While the oven pre-heats to 375, mix the following wet ingredients: 3/4 cup maple syrup, 1/2 cup safflower oil and 1 tablespoon of vanilla extract.

Then mix the following dry ingredients: 5 cups rolled oats, 1 or 2 cups of cashews, 1 cup of pecans and/or sliced almonds, 1 cup dried, shredded coconut, 1/3 cup sesame seeds, and one and a half teaspoons ground cinnamon. Mix together the wet and dry ingredients and spread evenly about 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick onto oiled oven pans or a cast iron skillet. Place the pan(s) in the hot oven and prepare the second-stage ingredients: 1 cup dried cranberries or cherries and 1 cup each calimyrna figs and dates (pitted dates are easier to work with), both cut into peanut-sized pieces. “Sometimes the dates and figs are moist and sticky, and while being cut into little pieces they begin to bunch up into an ever-growing mound,” Charlie Granola says. “I need that about as much as a wounded rabbit needs a hungry coyote. So I keep the little fellers separated by spooning on white flour and working it in as needed.” Baking time can be 25 minutes or quite a bit longer depending on how thick your mixture is in the pans, and what kind of oven you’re using. Keep it moving with frequent stirs after the first 10 minutes, until it approaches golden brown. When it starts to turn, mix in the chopped fruit. Don’t let the brown darken a shade past golden. By this point, the whole house will smell like a 1970s sheep camp—in a good way. Be prepared for drooling friends, family and perhaps an army of hippies to show up in your kitchen, lured by the smell. If you have any granola left over after the initial assault, store it in jars after it’s cooled. Unlike many hippies, my brother Charlie Granola was the real deal—earthy, simple and soulful—and his granola is proof. Watching the way it gets devoured by everyone, at every time of day, it makes me question common assumptions about “hippy” and “granola.” Charlie’s granola isn’t just for hippies anymore, and it’s not just for breakfast anymore, either. And while the world may keep turning, and student bodies keep changing, Charlie’s kitchen, wood burning or newfangled, will remain my favorite granola school.

French American Cuisine 363-4567 • Upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton, MT 59840 Lunch Board • T - F 11:30 - 2pm Dinner a la carte • T - Sat 5 - 9pm

Local food bill

Dear Flash, Thanks for the heads-up about those important federal so-called “food safety” bills this week. I just wanted to draw your and your readers’ attention to an important bill currently in the Montana House of Representatives: HB 583. This bill would fund four food and agriculture development centers around the state, which would give farmers and ranchers the opportunity to add value to their product and sell it in state, rather than ship their raw materials to out-of-state processors. Adding value themselves would give producers the opportunity to reap more of the total profit from the fruits for their labor, and keep more of the $3 billion Montanans spend on food in state.

I urge your readers to contact their representatives right away! —Hungry for Montana Food

A

Thanks for the heads-up, HMF. Creating a local food-processing infrastructure will open important markets to local producers, including retail outlets, restaurants, hospitals, schools and other large institutions. Since your letter captured the gist of this important bill, I’ll just add that you can leave a message for your Rep by calling 406-444-4800. If you want to comment by e-mail, go to http://leg.mt.gov/css/Sessions/61st/ legwebmessage.asp. To read the bill and track its progress, go to:

http://laws.leg.mt.gov/laws09/law0203w$.startup. Meanwhile, I also want to spread the word about a local food opportunity of a different sort: Garden Burger has a grant program offering $1,000–$10,000 to groups that want to set up community gardens in their town. While Missoula’s Garden City Harvest has that covered, some other communities in the region might want to look into this. Visit www.gardenburger.com/Grants.aspx for more information. The application deadline is May 15. Thanks to Jonda Crosby at AERO for the tip.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Page 21 April 23–April 30, 2009


8

days a week

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

Businesses: A Discussion of Political and Practical Solutions to Climate Change.” Free. Call 465-1141. The Montana Community Autism and Aspergers Network invites you to their monthly meeting at 6:30 PM in the large meeting room at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Help Missoula figure out how to keep our bridges aloft and whatnot when you attend this month’s Community Forum at 7 PM in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Photo by Ashley Sears Free. Call 552-6081. Simple chants and melodies from the world’s “Okay, you hit the Dairy Queen, and I’ll head back over to Walgreens.” From left, Michelle spiritual steams inhabit your body and mind Edwards and Seth Bowling star in the UM Department of Drama/Dance’s production of when the Common Ground Center, 258 Euripides’ Medea, which opens at 7:30 PM on Tue., April 28, in the UM PARTV Center’s Roosevelt Lane in Hamilton, hosts an evening Masquer Theatre. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4051. of Devotional Singing at 7 PM. $3 donation. Call 363-4026. nightlife Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts The UM Peace and Justice Film Series contin- a Local Artist Showcase featuring Seth ues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University James, Tia Troy, Nathan Paul and Mike Center Theater, where screenings of Pickaxe, Avery at 7 PM. Free, drop-ins welcome. Call which illustrates how direct action does 541-8463. Be the blender for a fruit smoothie of move- indeed sometimes “get the goods,” are fol- UM art professor Bobby Tilton moderates a ment traditions every Thu. at 5 PM at the lowed by group discussions. Free, donations diverse panel discussion—one participant is a bear, for cryin’ out loud—related to Downtown Dance Collective, where Shake, appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Rattle and Pose: Yoga Dance Fusion car- All genres are encouraged every Thu. at 5:30 the exhibit Campus Picks at 7 PM in the ries you through the motions and delivers you PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 UM PARTV Center’s Meloy Gallery. Free. Call South Ave. W., where musicians bring their 243-2019. at Oneness’ door. Call 541-7240 for pricing. noise makers and synergy builds a joyful Architect, artist and author Lee Kierig reads Dig on the latest additions to the art world sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ from and signs his new book Where, Is Infinite during an opening reception for the UM Art Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Love at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Department’s Masters’ Thesis Show, which features work by Eva Champagne, Lisa Discover a new meaning for the phrase “dou- Store, 252 Main St. Free. Call 363-5220. Jarrett and Christina Murdoch Mills, at 5 ble trouble” when the Joan Zen Duo plays Get your snap on during a 7 PM Career PM in the UM Gallery of Visual Arts in the Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus Training Open House at the Rocky St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Social Science Building. Free. Higgins Ave., where you’ll get all the info you Young folk aged 13–18 are invited to the Put your wee beastie’s flailing to good use when you sign them up for the ongoing Y Missoula Art Museum at 6 PM, where pro oil need to make an informed career choice. Call Music Dance Therapy Group for kids painter Andy Cline takes you deep into that 543-0171. aged 6–9, which teaches ways to use your intoxicating world during Teen Open Studio body to manage big feelings, soothe tattered Night: Truth is Stranger Than Fiction. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April nerves and develop social skills, and meets Free. Call 728-0447 ext. 230. 24, to calendar@missoulanews.com. every Thu. at 5 PM at the YMCA, 3000 Figure out how to stop this crazy thing at 6:30 Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., S. Russell St. $16 per session/four PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. session minimum. Call 721-YMCA or visit where the Sustainable Business Council presents the panel discussion “Montana ymcamissoula.org.

THURSDAY

23

April

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Missoula Independent

Arts & Entertainment listings April 23–April 30, 2009

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The UM Creative Writing Program presents a set of MFA Thesis Readings by poets Chris Alexander and Scott Jones at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 243-5267. If your normal swing spot’s become jampacked with losers, head to the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., where swing lessons begin every Thu. at 7 PM and the dance party gets going in earnest at 8. $5. The Ronan Performing Arts Center presents U.S. National Fingerstyle Guitar Champion Chris Proctor, whose blurred fingers dance across the fretboard like butter on smokin’ cast iron at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance/free under 19. Call 676-2427 or e-mail cmc@ronan.net. Bring your axe—or banjer for you backwoods types—and reminisce about music’s good ol’ days at the weekly Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 726-3765 or 880-6834. Even though this show begins at 8 PM, youse gotsta be 18: Oregonoid bands Dream Killer and Bitchin’ Summer fill the hole in your head bored out by Montanians Priapism and Out the Lights at the Elk’s Lodge. $5. A stray dog nearly splits up a happily married couple when the Hamilton Players present Sylvia at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $8–14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Montana Rep Missoula stages the final production of their ‘08-’09 season with the Pulitzer Prize-winning tearjerker Rabbit Hole at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre. $10/$5 student rush at 7:30. Visit montanarep.org. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, led by Slit Throat, Sought After Death and Dripping Orifice at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. As though last night never happened, Colorado bluegrass sensation Yonder Mountain String Band jams out a second evening of their trademark high-energy improv at 9 PM at the Wilma Theatre, so don’t go combing the dreads out of your hair just yet. $25/$20 advance/$35 two-day ticket. Here’s hoping audience participation’s allowed: The Missoula Betterside Womens’ Rugby team hosts their second annual Oil Wrestling Fundraiser at 9 PM at The Other Side, where wetter’s always better. $5. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Missoula’s most ballady balladeer, Russ Nasset, graciously picks up a gig at the Old Post Pub, playing every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Continue the process during the second round of a Singer/Songwriter Showcase at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865.

FRIDAY April

24

Boys aged 7–13 can express that excess energy in an aesthetic way every Fri. at 3:30 PM, when the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., presents their Boys’ Art Group and encourages artsy exploration of the gross and the weird in a variety of media. $65/four classes. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com.

If high school English class isn’t exactly nurturing your inner poet, bring all that angsty verbiage to the Missoula Public Library every Fri. when the Teen Writing Group meets at 4:30 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Keep the Wilma from becoming a CVS Pharmacy when you apply to serve on Missoula’s Historical Preservation Commission—but hurry, as the deadline for application is 5 PM today. Get started at City Hall, online at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/mayor/ vacancies.htm or by calling 552-6078. Photographs depicting mountains and the thrill of travel comprise an exhibit by Ben Johnson, which opens at 5 PM at Hamilton’s Frame Shop & Gallery, 325 Main St. Free. Call 363-6684.

nightlife There’s more to the UM Women’s Law Caucus Silent Auction—which begins at 5:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts—than meets the eye: When you bid on items donated by local individuals and businesses, all the while enjoying the refreshments and live Irish tunes, you’ll be supporting the Missoula YWCA. Free. Call 240-1370. Everybody’s favorite UM mascot appears before children’s very eyes to help them read The Great Monte Mystery when the Children’s Museum of Missoula presents another round of Family Reading Adventures at 5:30 PM. $4.25/Free for members. Call 541-PLAY. International Ashtanga Yoga instructor David Garrigues presents a New Moon Kirtan performance, with musical support by Nathan Zavalney, at 6:30 PM at the Yoga Fitness Center, 123 W. Alder St. $15. Ryan Bundy offers an evening of acoustic originality at the Hangin Art Gallery and Coffee House in Arlee at 7 PM. Call 726-5005. A fundraising art fair featuring the works of Chi Alpha Ministries opens the evening at 7 PM at Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway, and the musicality of just-back-from-tour Pete Mason puts a nice finish on it all. $2. Visit zootownbrew.com. Apparently, you’re not the only fan of California rockers Trapt, as their 7 PM show at the Wilma Theatre with Red, Halestorm and Inept is, like, sold out. Better luck next time... What is the sound of every hand clapping? Find out when YMusic hosts Jam-O-Philia at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., where musicians of all ages, skill levels and instruments gather to mix it up, musically speaking. $5/Free for YMusic program registrees. Call 721-9622. The all-ages frivolity just don’t quit when FiftyTwo Skatepark presents ZebraCity, Thug Nasties, Blue Boy Destroy, How Do I Bullet and Autumn’s Review, and perhaps others, at 7:30 PM. $3.

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The Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival, which featured a 1 PM clinic, screams into the UM University Theatre at 7:30 and features vibes and marimba player Dave Samuels and trumpet player Randy Sandke joining the event’s namesake clarinetist. $22/$17 students and seniors/$40 two-day ticket. Call 243-4051. (See Scope in this issue.)

Goods & Services

The Missoula Community Chorus sings you into summer with “Here’s to Song!”, a concert featuring works by Berlin, Brahms, Elgar, and Copland, at 7:30 PM at St. Anthony Parish. $8/$25 per family of four. Food Bank donations accepted at the door.

Health & Wellness Best Best Best Best Best Best Best

Doctor Dentist Chiropractor Massage Therapist Physical Therapist Health Clinic Optometrist

Uniquely Missoula Food & Drink

Ross Logan and Isaac M play to the wineimbibing crowd at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5. Call 541-8463.

The UM Music Department presents a student recital featuring soprano Tracy Davis at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880.

Fishing Guide Personal Trainer Day Hike Yoga Instructor

Best Bar to Hook Up Best LGBTI Scene Best Poker Game

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Missoula Independent

Page 23 April 23–April 30, 2009


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SPOTLIGHT gay-tar heroes Far from being crucial info, a visiting artist’s sexual preference isn’t usually something I know about. In this case, however, it’s sort of the point. Like GWAR’s blood orgies or Southern Culture on the Skids’ habit of tossing fried chicken at the audience, the gayness of this week’s posse of electro-acoustic folk musicians—Tom Goss, Stewart Lewis and Jake Walden—is but one aspect of the show. There, consider them outed.

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WHO: Tom Goss, Stewart Lewis and Jake Walden WHEN: Sat., April 25, 8:30 PM WHERE: Club Q at the Elk’s Lodge HOW MUCH: $10 concert and VIP party/$5 VIP party only recent release of his third album, Back to Love… He’s a fixture on the Washington, D.C., folk circuit and his rock-influenced acoustic tunes carry us from themes of personal growth to simple reverence at life’s lessons.

A stray dog nearly splits up a happily married couple when the Hamilton Players present Sylvia at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $8–14. Call 3759050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Montana Rep Missoula stages the final production of their ‘08-’09 season with the Pulitzer Prize-winning tearjerker Rabbit Hole at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre. $15/$5 student rush at 7:30. Visit montanarep.org. Just to be on the safe side, you should fashion your cocktail umbrella into a shiv when the Lifers play the Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420

Missoula Independent

Page 24 April 23–April 30, 2009

Los Angeles singer/songwriter—and barefoot pianist, by the way—Jake Walden adds husky, vibrato-flecked vocals that outline the borders of his very personal content. To listen to his music, one almost feels a confidence is being crafted. And finally, New York City lends us Stewart Lewis, whose compositions are characterized by a very full sound and a higher vocal range. His work has also been featured on “MTV’s Laguna Beach,” “Dawson’s Creek” and “The Biggest Loser.” Between stops in Salt Lake City and Spokane, Rock the Folk OUT brings the LGBT spotlight to bear on Club Q, and further affirms Missoula’s presence on the rainbow circuit.

South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 207-0498. Kalispell’s Blue Canyon Kitchen and Tavern, 1840 Highway 93 S., delivers your ears to the indescribably pleasing music of Somewhere Down the Road at 9 PM. Free. Call 758-2583. You want to feel the music in our skull, so get to the Elk’s Lodge at 9 PM, where 10MT40s, Goddamnit boyhowdy and Birds Mile Home teach you a new meaning for “spinal tap.” $5. You’ll explore the full gamut of your emotions when Seattle’s

—Jonas Ehudin

Conservative Dad blends their folky rock with the tones brought forth by The Racquet and March of the Black Queen at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5. Celebrate the mysterious, the macabre and the grotesque, but do it for a good cause when the Palace Lounge’s Ladies’ DJ Night presents Carnivali to benefit the UM Women’s Center: The fun begins at 9 PM and features six hours of DJ tunes, all manner of freak show acts, a kissing booth, a lion tamer, tarot readings, and just about everything else you’d expect. $3.


Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Make sure your six shooter’s locked and loaded as Florence’s High Spirits presents Sho Down at 9 PM. Free. The Full Moon Prophets forecast you’ll meet your future ex-wife tonight when they play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. While you’ve got two chances to fix this weekend, don’t blow this evening’s dose of the Bryan Flannery Band, who rock Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Swing to your heart’s content as Russ Nasset and the Revelators play Whitefish’s Great Northern Bar at 9:30 PM. Free. Your local blues, funk and soul solution comes in the form of Def Cartel with Andrew Growmiller, who play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Delve deep into the world of psychedelics-induced munchkophilia when the UM University Center Theater presents The Dark Side of Oz at midnight. $4/$2 with Griz card.

SATURDAY April

25

Grab a lunch, a pair of binoculars and crazy Uncle Walter when the Audubon Society’s Gary Swant leads an all-day trip to the Warm Springs Ponds, for which you’re to meet at 7 PM in the UM Adams Center parking lot. Free. Call 327-1525. Planet-loving Bitterrooters will meet at 9 AM at the Stevensville Main Street Association office, where Stevensville Cleanup Day kicks off and features plenty of work tasks and a free lunch. Call 777-1102. If you’ve got big wood, today’s your oyster as the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula presents Forestry Day from 9 AM–4 PM, with all the lumberjack contests, restored machinery, food and crafts that cause us all to get pretty aroused. $3/$2 seniors/$1 students. Call 728-3476. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 541-7240. Platinum-grilled producers-to-be can attend a Digital Recording Workshop and learn to use Apple’s GarageBand at 10 AM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $ 35 . R S V P l c l e m i n s h a w @ bresnan.net or 529-2601.

The Creativity For Life Workshop Series for people facing illness and loss continues with C.K. Chao’s class Origami at 10:30 AM. Free, donations appreciated. Call 549-5329 for directions. Sylvia Robert’s your host for a series of Kundalini Yoga classes, which meet at 10:30 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., every Sat. through May 23. $80 for eight classes/$60 for six classes/$12 drop-in. Call 541-7240. Alison Laundrie gets you in shape and provides a few moments away from your spawn every Sat. at 11 AM during a Pilates class at Sunflower Montessori School, 1703 S. Fifth St. W. $10 includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247. If it’s got anything to do with twowheel motion, it’s going down from noon–4 PM in Bonner Park, where the 12th annual Festival of Cycles kicks off Bike Walk Bus Week with free parts and mechanical assistance, music and food, kids’ activities, obstacle courses and more. Free. Call 880-6834. Wildlife photographer Robin Poole will be on hand from noon–3 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall, where a display of her images will take you closer to a grizzly than is wise. Free. Visit robinsnaturepics.com. Get your snap on during a 1 PM Career Training Open House at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Higgins Ave., where you’ll get all the info you need to make an informed career choice. Call 543-0171.

Beer Drinker’s Profile "Visitors always welcome"

Author Mark Sullivan reads from and signs his book Triple Cross at 1:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Okay, the huge eyeballs were bad enough, but this whole 360-degree head swivel’s got to go: You’ll agree once you attend the Montana Natural History Center’s Saturday Kids’ Activity “Outrageous Owls” at 2 PM. $2/members free. Call 327-0405.

nightlife Help the brewery celebrate 10 years when Blue to the Bone plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Expect eclectic Americana from Charla Bauman, who plays Victor’s Hidden Legend Winery, 1345 Hwy. 93 N., from 6–8 PM. Free. Call 777-3353. Alicia Bullock-Muth and Andy Meyers present a staged reading of the OffBroadway musical hit Jon and Jen at 7:30 PM at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, where doors—and bottles—open at 6:30. $7. Call 541-8463. Folk musician Karli Fairbanks rips out tunes from her album The Breaking of Our Days at 7 PM at Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway. $2. Visit zootownbrew.com. The UM Creative Writing Program presents a set of MFA Thesis Readings by poet Laura Dunn and fiction writer Bradin Farnworth at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Free. Call 243-5267.

Author David Alan Cates presents a reading from his book, Freeman Walker, at 7 PM at Seeley Lake’s Grizzly Claw Trading Company. Free. The Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival, which featured a 1 PM clinic, screams into the UM University Theatre at 7:30 PM and features tenor saxophonist Benny Golson and drummer Steve Smith joining the event’s namesake clarinetist. $22/$17 students and seniors/$40 two-day ticket. Call 243-4051. (See Scope in this issue.) If a pig in a poke sounds funny to you, line right up for a Stand-up Comedy Show at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $20/$15 advance. Call 728-2521. A stray dog nearly splits up a happily married couple when the Hamilton Players present Sylvia at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $8–14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Montana Rep Missoula stages the final production of their ‘08-’09 season with the Pulitzer Prize-winning tearjerker Rabbit Hole at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre. $15/$5 student rush at 7:30. Visit montanarep.org. Just to be on the safe side, you should fashion your cocktail umbrella into a shiv when the Lifers play the Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 207-0498. Missoula shines in the spotlight of the LGBTI entertainment scene with

Congratulations and Way to Go!

Patrick

Rudy Gideon

What brings you to the 'Horse today, Patrick? Beers in the sun; enjoying having no plans but this, right here. For me, this is the place. Add a little rafting and relaxing with friends, that makes it perfect. Sounds like a prelude to summer? It is. I came to explore a year ago. Everyone here has been so hospitable. I've been at a table of six people; none are from Montana. Both the visitors and the residents are extremely welcoming. That wouldn't happen in Texas, where I'm from.

Mode of Sustainable Transportation: Bike How many days did you commute by sustainable transportation to work in March? 12 days Why do you choose to use sustainable transportation to commute to work instead of driving alone? I’ve always just enjoyed it. It allows me to see & smell things I would miss in a car. It makes me feel good. Profession: UM math professor What is Rudy’s prize for being March’s winner? $100 Gift Card to Open Road Cycles & Nordic

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Page 25 April 23–April 30, 2009


the 8:30 PM arrival of the Rock the Folk OUT Tour—featuring acoustic artists Tom Goss, Stewart Lewis and Jake Walden—at Club Q at the Elk’s Lodge. $10 concert and VIP party/$5 VIP party only. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Don’t even try to resist the hardcore ‘n’ sexy psychobilly of Big John Bates and the Voodoo Dolls, who play The Other Side at 9 PM with Sawyer Family and the Goddamn Gallows. $13/$10 advance ate Rockin Rudy’s and Ear Candy. Unless you really hate John Travolta and his legion of imitators, you’ve no sea-worthy reason to avoid DJ Kris Moon’s Love Unlimited Disco Party at 9 PM at the Badlander. Free, but let’s dress the part, shall we? They come in peace, hoping merely to celebrate their new album: Washingtonians Police Teeth play the Palace Lounge at 9 PM with Victory Smokes and PLACES. $5/$7 under 21. The Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., aims to introduce you to your upstairs neighbors with the 9 PM program Evening Star Gazing for Beginners, which features superstars from the Western Montana Astronomical Association. $8/$5 members. RSVP 327-0405. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East

Missoula Independent

Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Make sure your six shooter’s locked and loaded as Florence’s High Spirits presents Sho Down at 9 PM. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. Bring a ruler and a Sharpie to determine just how “full grown” the Full Grown Men are when they play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. If you spent last night trapped in the meat locker until Bobby realized he was small enough to climb through the window, you’ve still got a chance to catch the Bryan Flannery Band at 9:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Swing to your heart’s content as Russ Nasset and the Revelators play Whitefish’s Great Northern Bar at 9:30 PM. Free. R and B and a whole lot more are in store for you and your when Zeppo plays the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865.

SUNDAY April

26

You can do it, put your back into it: Inaugurate the efforts of One Thousand New Gardens as the group meets at 8 AM in Kiwanis Park

Page 26 April 23–April 30, 2009

for Big Dig Day, with the goal of digging 10 new garden beds in the neighborhood. The five-year goal is— you guessed it—1000 of the suckas. Free, but bring well-marked tools, gloves and the like. E-mail 1000 newgardens@gmail.com, or call 214-6664. Actualize your dreams of moving to the country and eating lots of peaches once you attend the 10 AM Fruit Trees and Edibles Workshop at Marchie’s Nursery, 1845 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 329-1346. Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Free. Taste the dust and see the rippling flesh of the bronc when the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula hosts an opening reception for an exhibit of Otho Hartley’s photographs, This Contest is for Real Hands: Rodeo Photographs of the 1930s, from 1–4 PM. Free. Call 728-3476. Peripatetic squeeze-boxers find harmony when the Five Valley Accordion Jam—which also welcomes guitars and banjos—presents three hours of great music for dancing and listening at 1 PM at the Poor Henry’s in Clinton. $4/$3 members. A stray dog nearly splits up a happily married couple when the Hamilton Players present Sylvia at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100

Ricketts Road. $8–14. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com. Raise some cash for the Keystone to Discovery After School Program as you listen to music by Sky Moose, bid in silent and live auctions and down volumes of beer during Bitterroot Bids for Kids, which runs from 2–8 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery. Admission free. Call 375-9999. Clubbing takes practice, so launch your wee ones on the right foot when Blackbird Kid Shop presents the Tiny Dancers Kids’ Dance Party from 3–6 PM at the Palace Lounge, where great food and great tunes are supplemented by a contests, a bubble machine and more. $5/$3 advance at Blackbird, 525 S. Higgins Ave. Non-walkers free. Call 543-2899. Grab your share of the helm from 5–9 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, where a Democrat Issues Caucus helps the Missoula County Democrats define exactly what they’re all about—beyond supporting the consumption of free pizza, drinks and cookies, that is. Free, and childcare is provided. RSVP missoulademocrats@yahoo.com. (See Agenda in this issue.)

The Jeannette Rankin Peace Center hosts the benefit event “Making a Case for P EACE: Final Argument,” which features spoken word, poetry and music by Andrea Harsell, Larry Evans, JeanJacques Myard, R.J. Parnell, Kacie Aniballi, Ryan Caron, Sunnie Bulletts and Greg Walter, at 7 PM at the Crystal Theatre. $10 suggested donation. Call 240-4269 or 240-1406. The UM Creative Writing Program presents a set of MFA Thesis Readings by non-fiction writers Carrie Braman and Michael Kautz at 7 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Free. Call 243-5267. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 7 PM, live jazz by Donna Smith at 7:30 and a rotating cast of bands thereafter. Free. Euchre is one of those games. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free.

MONDAY

27

nightlife

April

Alicia Bullock-Muth and Andy Meyers present a staged reading of the OffBroadway musical hit Jon and Jen at 7:30 PM at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, where doors—and bottles—open at 6:30. $7. Call 541-8463.

That beanie won’t save your melon: Protect your head with the help of St. Patrick Hospital, which holds another Low Cost Helmet Sale from 10 AM–1 PM on the fifth floor of their


Kissing Uncle Sylvia always kind of turned me on. Indulge in an evening of good-natured debauchery on Fri., April 24, when the Palace Lounge hosts the Ladies’ DJ Night production Carnivali, which features non-stop DJ action, a sweet freak show, a kissing booth, tarot reading, wild animals and the like at 9 PM. $3 benefits the UM Women’s Center.

Broadway Building. $7–20, depending upon the sport. Call 329-5660. Drink specials have long been the lubricant for political maneuvering, and tonight the tradition continues at 5 PM, when Forward Montana’s Progressive Happy Hour gets to the heart of matters at the Badlander. Call 542-VOTE.

nightlife What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube

when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Highway 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. See how well smooth guitar can pair with a nice French Bordeaux—not to

mention a coonskin cap—when David Boone plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-2906. The UM Creative Writing Program presents a set of MFA Thesis Readings by fiction writers Marvin Shackelford and Abigail Keller at 7 PM in the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Free. Call 243-5267. Comprehension’s really pretty subjective: Enjoy tales in two languages when the Missoula Public Library presents Bilingual Story Time at 7 PM. Free. America’s image makeover is in need of some shock troops, so get on board during a Peace Corps Informational Meeting, which begins at 7:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. The UM Music Department presents the UM Guitar Ensemble at 7:30 PM in Room 218 of the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Experience a strong drummer-dancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, w h o p r e s e n t s Tr i b a l Fu s i o n Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. and Wed. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. And I quote, “The finale is not when you come, it is how you stay and how you leave.” Join sexologist Dr. Lindsey Doe for the final workshop in the MonDates series, Afterplay, at 8:30 PM in Room 330 of UM’s University Center. $6. Visit doctordoe.com. For once in your life, leave the bar with a slightly thicker wallet with DJ Hickey’s Rawk and Roll Bingo Night every Mon. from 8:30 PM until midnight at the Badlander. $1 per card, and the opening round’s always free. With a name like Pauli Rhyme, he’d better be able to effect the correspondence of terminal sounds of words or of lines of verse: Catch this Bay Area master at 9 PM in the Palace Lounge, where support comes from an as-yet-unnamed pool of playas. $5/$7 under 21.

Bring my sluggish response to the voicemail he left to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can apologize to the host’s brother for me. Free.

TUESDAY April

28

Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. If they’re under 24 months old, bring the kiddos to the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., where Families First’s Family Motion offers a Corona yoga regimen for you and yours at 11 AM. $4.25/Free for members. RSVP 541-PLAY. Find strength and the will to fight at the Breast Cancer Suppor t Group, which meets at noon each Tue. at St. Francis Xavier Church, 420 W. Pine St. Free.

Missoula Independent

For the latest Latin cardio dance craze, try a dose of Zumba every Tue. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. The UM Music Department presents a UM Student Chamber Recital at 2:10 PM in the Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. Kids aged 6–11 will create projects based upon exhibits when the Missoula Art Museum presents the sixweek course After School Art Adventure: Museum Inspirations, which begins at 6 PM and runs through May 12. $55/$49.50 members. RSVP 728-0447. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife It’s Tuesday, and you ate your last dust bunny for breakfast, so why not Dine With the Elks from 5:30–7 PM? This week, stuffed and fried chicken breast, confetti rice pilaf, and chocolate mousse accompany the flashy pianizing of Adrienne Dussault. $9 per plate. RSVP 549-0542.

Page 27 April 23–April 30, 2009


Every Tue. at 5:30 PM, Intermediate Bellydance/World Fusion meets at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., but be warned that prior dance experience is recommended. $7. Call 531-3000. Help rejuvenate the Nature Adventure Garden when you plant flowers, install signs and more during a Native Plant Garden Party from 6–8 PM at Fort Missoula. Free. RSVP miss_grunzke@yahoo.com or 493-0544. Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Renew your oath to do no harm and recharge your regenerative battery at the monthly Healer’s Gathering, which takes place the last Tue. of each month at 6:30 PM at the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Call 273-2871. Le Cercle Francophone presents a screening of the French film Lili and the Baobab, which follows a French photographer on assignment in a remote African village, at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Email lecerclefrancophone@hotmail.com or call 546-4618. If you’re 18 and have an invisibility cloak—or eight bucks—you’re invited to the Union Hall at 7 PM, where an all-ages show features The Forecast, 1090 Club, The Photo Atlas and the Evergreen. $8. If you don’t learn to sing Italian in five beers or less, your next voice lesson’s free: Opera on Draft blends suds and beautiful music at 7 PM at Whitefish’s Craggy Range Bar. $5. If you’re 11 years old and want to slay, a Hunter Education Class begins at 7 PM in the Darby School Cafeteria, at which time registration will take place. Free. Call 542-5500. If you’d like to subject your wordsmith work to critique, bring six typed lyric sheets to the Nashville Songwriters Western Regional

Workshop, which begins at 7 PM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. Free. Call 542-9258, or e-mail songwriters@mardimilligan.com. The UM Music Department presents another engagement with the UM Student Chamber Recital at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. The UM Department of Drama/Dance takes us back to ancient Greece to witness emotional turmoil and “unspeakable acts” at 7:30 PM with the staging of Euripides’ Medea. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4051. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What is the most common cause of eye injury? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) If you’re still waiting for your ruca, perhaps she’s trying to offer you a subtle hint. Patch up that wounded ego with Sublime tribute band 40 Oz. to Freedom, who offer all the misogyny, So-Cal gangstaism and pre-O.D. tomfoolery of the real thing at 9 PM at The Other Side. Cover TBA. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM—with Happy Hour until 10—at the AmVets Club. Free. DJs Karl K, Dillon, Cosmic Diva, Timmie Irie, Tobin and Kris Moon play music for the iriehearted every Tue. at 9 PM when Reggae Night overstands all your troubles at the Badlander. Free. Forego the weekly shower and join Unwashed Promotions for live music and moist DJs Harvey and Heyska when Punk Rock Tuesday fumigates the Palace Lounge every Tue. at 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY April

29

Please, please, just get your cat(s) fixed, all right? The Human Society of Western

6 0 B E E R S O N TA P -

$7=

Montana hosts the all-day low-income event Spay Your Mama!, where you can end an entire feline line for just $10. RSVP 549-3934. Once your kids attend Ready? Set... Read!, an early literacy program for children aged 3–7, at 11 AM at the Children’s Museum, 225 W. Front St., every other Wed., your tactic of spelling out naughty words may no longer be effective. $4.25 admission/members free. Call 541-7529. The National Volunteer Fire Council benefits while you build a healthy headful of phlegm from 5–10 PM as Baskin-Robbins hosts their annual fundraiser, 31-Cent Scoop Night, at both Missoula locations. Call 542-2731 or 543-2731. Montana’s newest brewery—Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Joan Zen at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. If you’ve longed to see a pickle juice stand at the Western Montana Fair, your chance to make it happen begins at 5:30 PM in the Fairgrounds’ Home Arts Building, 1101 South Ave. W., during the Missoula County Fair Planning Kick-off Meeting. Free. Call 721-3247.

nightlife It starts early, but that’s only due to the density of the material: The Montana Lyric Opera holds court in the Palace Lounge at 6 PM, where Opera on Draft promises an irreverent environment for exposure to high culture. $5. Combine a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with live models in their birthday suits— 18 and over only, please—and you’ve got the Missoula Art Museum’s Hump Day Figure Drawing group every Wed. from 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Call 728-0447. Learn to mystify and entrance by wiggling those hips every Wed. during a Hula/Tahitian Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where you can learn beautiful and energetic rhythms at 7 PM. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Dr. Lindsey Doe joins Missoula Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Prevention Services (MAPPPS) in helping youngsters stay not knocked up with a Teen Birth Control class at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. The UM Department of Drama/Dance takes us back to ancient Greece to witness emotional turmoil and “unspeakable acts” at 7:30

Page 28 April 23–April 30, 2009

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Every Thu. in April, generation cell phone— and everybody else, of course—is invited to GYT: Get Yourself Tested, a free sexuallytransmitted disease screening and treatment event at Planned Parenthood, 219 E. Main St. Free. Call 728-5490 or visit gyt09.org. Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662.

SENTINEL KIWANIS EL CAZADOR FRONT STREET PASTA & WRAPS SHICHUAN BBQ

CASH FOR JUNKERS 12-4 p.m. REVEREND SLANKY 4-8 p.m.

Missoula Independent

April

FOOD BY:

LIVE MUSIC FEATURING:

www.missouladowntown.com

THURSDAY

come early for best selection!

brewfest glass plus 2 tokens additional tokens only $1

For More Information Call Missoula Downtown Association 543-4238

PM with the staging of Euripides’ Medea. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4051. Wednesdays are for the tango, and nobody knows this like the Downtown Dance Collective, where Abby and Diego offer three tango options beginning at 8:30 PM every week. Call 541-7240 for pricing. If you’d played 200 shows in 2008, you’d be tired. You’d also be Finn Riggins, who bring their polished sonics to the Badlander at 9 PM with the Chalfonts and the Magic Square. $5. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s bungeecords-didn’t-even-make-the-top-ten trivia question: While glamorous methods of injury such as fireworks, furniture corners and airbags typically splash across eye-injury headlines, it’s the hard work of household chemicals that carries the brunt of the ocular devastation workload. Spit the gorf out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327. This Missoula legend has nothing to do with ground beef: Wasted Wednesday at the Top Hat offers unlimited tap beer and MGroup at 10 PM and the wisdom you’ll gain is worth the $7 cover many times over. Call 728-9865. Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Thanks to our sponsors

SATURDAY MAY 2 CARAS PARK 12 P.M. TO 8 P.M.

Cherry Creek Radio KBGA Radio Zoo City Zymurgists


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 SASHA

Sasha looks like a Shepherd X with Corgi legs. She's quite close to the ground, which makes her a great medium size. She does need a home where she will be the only dog; she loves people, but she's not crazy about sharing her home with any other pets.

549-3934 FJORD

SHERIDAN

Sheridan has the build and coat of a Setter, but his unusual coloring must come from somewhere else. He is brindle on his head and legs, but his body is black. He has a unique look and a wonderful, lively personality.

Fjord is a vivacious Elkhound/Husky cross, who loves life and just wants to keep on living it. He gets along with every dog he meets, but he can't be left outside in the yard. Boredom gets the best of him, and thus he looks for something to do. He loves people the most though, something kind of unusual for his breeds.

ELLIE

Not only is Ellie a beautiful young Shepherd cross, but she really is quite sweet as well. She loves people, especially children, even lying patiently still while they fuss and climb all over her. Outside, though, she loves to play and go for walks. Ellie is just the dog your kids have been bugging you for.

The Pet Nanny In Home Pet Sitting and More Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

Amber Douglas

Liscensed and Insured • Small and Large Animal Care

BUDDY

Buddy was adopted as a very young puppy, but unfortunately his adopter had to move into a nopets rental. He hated having to bring Buddy back to the shelter, and we understand why. This is a loyal, happy, thoroughly endearing dog!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

www.petnannymt.com • (406) 529 5115

TINKER BELL

Tinker Bell may look a bit fierce, but that stern expression hides a quiet, affectionate personality. She needs an adult family, since she hasn't always been treated kindly by children, and all she really wants is a lap for sitting and a shoulder for cuddling.

SCOOBY

Scooby is another all–around fabulous fellow, who loves everyone and everything he meets! Toys are his life. He loves fetching anything throwable and he spends his time trying to lure others into play. He loves to swim, and is just itching to get out this summer, making it the perfect time to bring him home.

MORTON

The cage is just too small for such a big personality. We try to accommodate his demands the best we can by letting him hang out in the cat room or lounge outside in the sunshine on the cat deck, but Morton wants nothing more but to be out of a cage and into a home.

2420 W Broadway 2810 Brooks Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time

3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

CLIVE

Clive has a truly handsome face, and his tabby markings are pretty spectacular too. He's quiet and unassuming and obviously has no idea how good-looking he is! He thinks a real home would be a great improvement over living in our cat room.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

We make the world a better smelling place! 837 S. Higgins • 370-5078

NIGEL

Yes, we are still trying to find a home for Nigel. He's been at the shelter for over three months, so surely it must be his turn to be adopted by now! He's currently at the Petsmart Adoption Center, where we hope the right person will see him and take him home.

F R A S Q U I TA

Frasquita is a gorgeous longhaired grey princess, who knows how beautiful she is. She expects to find herself a home with a cozy lap, regular brushing, and, of course, feline free (she doesn't count)! Come on in and she'll tell you exactly what she wants, all while winning you over with her affection.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com 5174 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 728-2275

BUG

The past year has been full of adventures for Bug. She was found wandering around the parking lot of a local business, and after spending much time in the shelter, she was fostered into a home–a secure, permanent place. Loubelle Wissler 240-0753 KC Hart 240-9332 fidelitykc@montana.com

721-1840 www.missoulahomes.com “A Team of Professionals Making It Easy for You!” Please Support our Humane Society

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals

721-4710 MEEKA

Hey I’m Meeka and I am really shy. I would really love a home that is quiet. I’ve never had a family before and I think that’s why I’m so scared. I was born on the streets and then when I was a kitten someone brought me into AniMeals. I’m really afraid. I want a family and someone that I can trust.

RUSTY

Hi, I’m Rusty and I’m a little shy but I’m as sweet as can be. I grew up on the streets but then this nice man bought me here to AniMeals. I was really happy because now I have a warm place to sleep at night and that’s hard to find outside during the winter. I really want a forever home. I’m scared right now because I don’t know what’s going to happen to me.

TOM

Hey everyone, my name is Tom and I am a quiet cat who needs a nice quiet place to live the rest of my life. I’m really scared right now. I’m in this strange place with these strange people that I’ve never even met before but they’re really nice.

ANNIE

My name is Annie. I lead a pretty quiet life; my favorite thing to do is sit on a windowsill and watch people and cars drive by. I also love to lie in the sun; it’s so warm and cozy. I’m kind of sad, I used to have a home and all of a sudden I ended up here at AniMeals. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609 Missoula Independent

Page 29 April 23–April 30, 2009


WEEK LONG EVENTS Ride Free all Week on the Mountain Line. Mountain Line buses will operate FREE OF CHARGE on all routes during BWBW. “Give transit a try – on us.” Mountain Line. Ray Hoff. 543-8386. Walk N Roll Week. Mon–Fri, 7:30am – 2:30pm. ASUM Transportation’s incentive program for The University of Montana as part of Missoula’s BWBW. Volunteers will hand out buttons and raffle tickets at UM entrances and bus stops to those traveling to the U in any way other than driving alone. Raffle (Friday noon) prizes include a Cruiser bike, bike trailer, lights, and shirts. See also Friday listing. Nancy Wilson. 243-4599.

announced on Newwest.net. Families First and Missoula Children’s Museum. 225 W. Front. Niki. 541-7529.

native transportation and meet on the playground for healthy snacks. Enter to win prizes. Peggy. 542-1257.

Free Dog Treats! All day, all week. Every dog owner who bikes or walks to either location of GO FETCH! will receive free treats worth $1.00. GO FETCH! 627 Woody and 517 S. Higgins. Scott. 728-2275.

Lowell – Unique events to encourage walking/biking to school. See daily listings. Jen. 543-6215.

ernice’s Naturally Charged. All week long, 8–10 am. 12-oz coffee to go or singular in-house cup only $1. Keep your body naturally charged for all your alternative choices. BERNICE’S BAKERY, 190 S. 3rd West. Christine. 728-1358.

Transfer Center Information Services. Mon-Tue, Thur-Fri, 1–5 pm. Wed 2–5 pm. Mountain Line employees will be available to answer questions regarding routes and schedules in the Mountain Line Transfer Center. Mountain Line. Ray Hoff. 543-8386.

Meadowsweet’s Annual Event. Mon–Fri, 10 am–6 pm. Sat, 11 am–5 pm. Use an alternate mode of transportation and get a free stainless steel Meadowsweet Herbs mug. MEADOWSWEET HERBS. 180 S. Third West. Elaine. 728-0543.

On MCAT. Watch for special BWBW programming on MCAT, Bresnan Cable Channel 7. See www.mcat.org for a schedule or call 542-6228.

Save a Car; Ride a Pony. 11 am–5:30pm. Anyone who bikes, walks or buses to the CAROUSEL this week is eligible for one free ride per day. A Carousel For Missoula. 101 Carousel Drive, Caras Park. Theresa Cox. 549-8382.

Try a Better Way. Inaugural event. All week long, follow the stories of local Missoulians who pledge to use alternate transportation throughout the week. Leading citizens who almost always drive will try a better way. Eric. Bicycle Pedestrian Office. 552-6352. Good Food Store…non-polluter commuter deals. For anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a treat: See daily listings. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Blue Bike Special. Mon–Fri, 8 am-8 pm. Sat 8 am–6 pm. Sun, 12-6 pm. At the Currents Aquatic Center in McCormick Park, grab a Blue Bike, free for the day. Enjoy cruising around town on the Parks and Recreation free Dasani blue bikes. Missoula Parks and Recreation Dept. Jason. 552-6271. Kettlehouse Brewing Co. Incentives. All BWBW except Sunday. 12–9 pm. All who bike/walk/bus to the KETTLHOUSE can enter a drawing for free schwag (shirts, glassware, hats, etc). Suzy. 360-8175. Water Bottle Giveaway. REI will give a free water bottle to customers who bike, walk, or bus to the store and let us know they did. 2230 North Reserve Street. Ryan. 829-0432. 20% Off any Zoo City Item. 12–6 pm, Mon–Sat. Any who bike, walk, bus to Zoo City at 235 N. 1st St. get 20% off any Zoo City shirt, hoody, or trucker cap. Zoo City Custom Apparel. Chris. 529-6482. BWB Sale. All week long. SELVEDGE STUDIO. 509 S. Higgins. 20% off purchase if customer bikes, buses, or walks to Selvedge. Leah. 541-7171. Peace Center Promotions. Get around by bike, bus, or on foot this week and get an increasing benefit at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. On Sat 4-25, get 5% off any purchase. On Mon 4-27, 10% off any purchase. Tues 4-28 -- 15%. Wed 4-29 -- 20%. Thurs 4-30 -- 25%. Friday –May 1 -- 30%. Sat May 2--35%. Applies to all purchases except books. Katie Ghen Simpson. 543-3955.

BWBW Drink Off. All week long. $1.00 off any drink for any who walk, bike, or ride the bus to any LOOSE CABOOSE location: Brooks/South, N. Reserve, Mullan Road, or Broadway/Palmer. Jill. 880-6415. Downtown Architectural Treasure Hunt. Participants get a coupon for $5.00 off the next FIRST NIGHT MISSOULA button. Self-guided treasure hunt for architectural elements in Missoula’s downtown. Pick up your treasure hunt game sheet at the Missoula Cultural Council (217 E. Front), Missoula in Motion (127 W. Spruce), or OPG (City Hall). Co-sponsored by these groups and the Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 258-4706. Rhinoceros/New Belgium Pint Night. Walk, bike, or bus to the RHINOCEROS during the week and register to win a NEW BELGIUM “Cruiser” bike. Winner drawn Thur, Apr 30, 10:30 pm. Discounts on New Belgium beers & get a commemorative glass. Must be 21 and over and present to win. Brad. 721-6061. BWBW at Montana Natural History Center. Tues–Fri, 12–5pm; Sat, 12 pm–4 pm. Free admission and free copy of Montana Naturalist Magazine to bike/walk/busers during business hours. 120 Hickory Street. Lisa. 327-0405. Free Admission to the Historical Museum. Tues–Sun, 12–5:00 pm. Free admission for anyone who walks, bikes, rolls, or rides the bus to the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Enjoy the exhibit “Unintended Consequences: The 1918 Flu and World War I.” Building 322, Fort Missoula. Bob Brown. 728-3476. Half price on bike maps and bike licenses. Register your bike at half price Mon–Fri, 8 am–5 pm. Only at the City Treasurer’s Office in City Hall. Phil Smith. 552-6352.

Raffle for a Camelback. Customers who bike or bus to PIPESTONE MOUNTAINEERING during BWBW will receive a raffle ticket for a free Camelback given away on Saturday April 28th. Pipestone Mountaineering 129 West Front. Jim Wilson or Dave. 721-1670.

SCHOOL EVENTS

Free Bike-Cart Flower Delivery. Noon–4 pm. Free flower delivery by bicycle downtown and U of M area all week long during BWBW. BITTERROOT FLOWER SHOP. 811 South Higgins. Jeff. 542-0309.

Clark Fork School. Students pre-K to grade 5 will keep track of use of alternative transportation during the school week using passport booklets. All participants rewarded. Kathleen Harper. 829-0671.

2 for 1 Admission to Children’s Museum. Tues–Fri 10 am–5 pm. Choose sustainable transportation to the Missoula Children’s Museum during BWBW and receive 2 admissions for the price of 1 and be entered into our Free Birthday Party Raffle to be announced at the end of BWBW. Kiddos encouraged to participate in “sustain-a-travel” coloring contest; winners

Franklin – Bike Walk Bus Week Activities. Treats, prizes, bike rides, obstacle courses, and more. See daily listings. Jesse 493-0564.

Chief Charlo - BWBW in motion. All week long, events to promote children walking to school: poster contest, walking routes, incentives. Brenna Vestre. 396-1787.

Lewis and Clark – Walking School Bus. Tues–Fri am. Walking school buses on the 4 traditional routes. Join the walking bus or use own alter-

Missoula International School Bike/Walk-a-thon. All week. PE classes will chart who bikes/walks to school. Class with most participation gets a party. Celebration before school on Friday. Natalie. 546-6110. Paxson – poster contest all week, walking school bus on Wednesday only. Bike ride Thursday. See daily listings. Rattlesnake – Passports to a Healthy Lifestyle. Students receive a stamp for each day they arrive at school by walking, biking, busing, or carpooling to school. Students with five stamps at the end of the week will be entered in a drawing for numerous prizes, including 2 new bikers. Walking school bus and free breakfast for participants Friday. Rhonda. 728-2400 x4523. Russell – walking school bus and rally on Wednesday only. See Wednesday. Sussex School. BWB to School. During the school week, each day a student participates, they will be given a raffle ticket to win prizes. FUN incentives and friendly competition. There will also be a prize for the class with the highest participation. Robin. 549-8327.

BIKE WALK BUS WEEK

Willard - 6th Annual Free Bike Safety Check. Mon–Fri, 9:20am-11 am. Willard School Chain Links bicycle mechanics program will provide free safety inspections and basic tune-ups for anyone in the community all week. Willard School Chain Links. Vanessa. 529-6642. Commotion Challenge- the 2nd annual Live Free or Drive Challenge. Hellgate, Sentinel, Willard, Big Sky, and Loyola high school students who bike, walk, bus, skateboard or carpool during BWBW will be entered to win awesome prizes like bikes, movie tickets, and much much more. Prizes to schools with the highest percentage in their size category. Commotion volunteers will be present at each school to sign students up for the challenge and help them map out their sustainable transportation route Commotion and Missoula in Motion. Marcus. 258-4962.

City of Missoula Bicycle Pedestrian Office: 435 Ryman Street Missoula, MT 59802 The City of Missoula will provide reasonable accommodation for any known disability that may interfere with a person participating in any program offered by the City. Alternative-accessible formats of this brochure will be provided on request.

Please call the City at 552-6352. Sponsored, in part, by

COMMUTER CHALLENGES During the Commuter Challenge, employees at various businesses track how they commute to work during BWBW with the emphasis being on sustainable modes. Businesses compete within one of five different size categories. Participants and businesses are then rewarded for their participation with prizes and community recognition. Sponsored by Missoula In Motion. Chase. 258-4962. Category 1-10 Employees: Betty’s Divine Biomimicry Institute Clark Fork Coalition Eclipse Engineering, Inc. Ecology Project International Eddie’s Coffee Shop @ The Public Library homeWORD Missoula AIDS Council Missoula Urban Demonstration Project Montana Campus Compact Montana Natural History Center Morales Law Office Sunburst Sensors

Volkmann Woodworking Wild Rockies Field Institute Wildlands CPR Women’s Voices for the Earth Category 11-25 Employees: A Carousel for Missoula Adventure Life Journeys AMEC Geomatrix Boyle Deveny & Meyer, PC D.A. Davidson and Company Families First (Children’s Museum & Parenting Programs) Kettlehouse Missoula Housing Authority Missoula International School

Missoula WoRC Program Modwest, Inc. Morrison Maierle, Inc Mountain Press Publishing Company Rocky Mountain School of Photography Sussex School Staff/Employees Tetra Tech, Inc. Category 26-50 Employees: Adventure Cycling Association Bernice’s Bakery HDR Engineering, Inc. Missoula Aging Services Missoula International Airport

Mountain Line Bus Company Poverello Center REI-Missoula Rockin Rudy’s WGM Group Category 51-100 Employees: ALPS Garlington Lohn and Robinson, PLLP Lewis and Clark Elementary School Macy’s MT Dept. of Natural Resources & Conservation Vann’s

Category over 100 Employees: DirecTV Good Food Store Opportunity Resources, Inc. Tamarack Management, Inc. City of Missoula Missoula County Missoula County Attorney’s Office Missoula County Clerk of District Court Missoula County Public Library Missoula County Office of Planning and Grants Missoula County Rural Initiatives

Missoula County Water Quality District University of Montana Business Services Computer Science Department Office of the President Office for Civic Engagement USDA FS Northern Region Headquarters USDA FS Fire Lab USDA FS MTDC/AFD USDA FS Smokejumper Center

HIGH SCHOOL COMMUTER CHALLENGE: Five high schools participating to reduce the number of students driving alone to school. See entry at week-long events.

Events Saturday April 25TH Thru Saturday May 2nd SATURDAY APRIL 25 GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a free 12-oz drip coffee. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. YMCA Riverbank Run. Start location: Broadway and Higgins, downtown. Start times: 10K run –9:00 am. 5K run –10:30 am. Tri-fecta - 11:25 am. 1-mile fun run - 11:35 am. School-age participants can register through their school and compete against other schools. Missoula Family YMCA. Jason Shearer. 721-9622. East Pine Historic Homes Walk-About. 10 am. Join artist Kristi Hager for a walk through one of Missoula’s oldest residential neighborhoods. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission and the East Pine Street Neighborhood Association. Meet at E. Pine Street and Pattee. 258-4706. Deer Creek Sneak. 10 am. Group bike ride leaving from Eastgate/Albertsons parking lot. The ride is 22 miles: 1/4 paved, 3/4 dirt. Missoulians on Bicycles. Inc. Kathy York. 543-6274. Forestry Day. 10 am–5 pm. At the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Free admission to the events for all who bike, walk, or take the bus. U of Montana’s Woodsmen’s Team Competition with pro/am competitions, vendors, food, operating sawmill, tours of the fire lookout. Bob Brown. 728-3476. Festival of Cycles. 12 pm–4 pm. A BIG bicycle extravaganza with events for everyone. Build a bike, donate a bike, tune up your bike, learn maintenance skills, get bike parts, create bicycle sculptures, make a bicycle parking rack, see a range of human powered vehicles, and participate in the kids corner with bike painting, bike crafts, an obstacle course, and free helmets. Mechanical support from Willard School Chain Links. Bike mechanics come down with your tools. Good food, live music and more! Free Cycles Missoula. Bonner Park. Bob Giordano. 880-6834. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing to the Good Food Store, receive a free 12 oz drip coffee. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. 25th Annual Potomac Awful Burger Bicycle Ride. 10 am. Leave from Eastgate parking lot. 55 miles. Bring a lunch; the bar is closed. Missoulians on Bicycles. Paul O’Connell. 240-0056. Safe Trail Biking for Kids. 1–2 pm. Meet at Jacob’s Island Park by the bridge. Youth 8–14 ride with a BWAM member. Helmets obligatory. Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula. Ethel MacDonald. 549-9722. Bicycle Tour of A.J. Gibson’s Downtown. 1:30pm. Meet Rafael Chacon at the Ryman Street entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse for this guided BICYCLE TOUR tour of historic architecture. Bring your bicycle (or run along with the tour). Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. Rafael. 243-2735 or 258-4706. MONDAY APRIL 27 BUTTERFLY HERBS Free Coffee or Tea. 7–9:30 am. Individuals using alternative transportation will receive a free cup of coffee or tea from Butterfly Herbs. 232 N. Higgins. Scott. 728-8780. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7 am–9 am. For anyone biking/walking/busing to the Good Food Store, receive any fresh juice for $2.50. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Breakfast on the Bridges. 7:30–9:30 am. Missoula in Motion staff and Way to Go! Club volunteers will serve coffee and breakfast treats to commuters crossing the California Street, Northside, Madison Street, and Van Buren Bicycle-Pedestrian bridges. Chase. 258-4962. Franklin BWBW kickoff. 8 am. Morning goodies (muffins, juice, pencils, stickers etc) on the playground for all students who walk/bike to school. Commemorative ‘dogtag’ necklace for first students. Jessie. 493-0564. Bike Walk Bus Week. All day. 137 W. Front. Get 20% off your food order if you bike/walk/bus to the downtown MacKenzie River Pizza. Stephen. 721-0077. Discounted Bike Helmets and Fitting. 10 am–1 pm. At St. Patrick Hospital (Broadway Building). Get a bike helmet and fitting (must know head or hat size)! New bike helmets are $7.00 while supplies last. St. Patrick Hospital Trauma Unit. Michelle. 329-5660. Celebrate a safer West Broadway lunchtime bike ride. 12–1 pm. Meet in front of the County Courthouse. A short bike ride on Broadway from Russell to Van Buren. Learn about the major safety improvements on West Broadway and a new project planned for the intersection of East Broadway and Van Buren. Bring a bag lunch or pick something up along W. Broadway. Bike/Walk Alliance for Missoula. Jim Sayer at 721-2873. 11th Annual Promenade. 6:30pm. Meet and join neighbors at Bonner Park, corner of Evans and Hilda, for a stroll through the historic University Area. An evening of history, architecture and tales. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 549-0869. TUESDAY APRIL 28 Grounds For Change at the CATALYST CAFÉ. 7 am–5:00 pm. 6th Annual. Free drip coffee or hot tea all day long to bikers, walkers, bus riders and carpoolers. 111 North Higgins. Martha. 542-1337.

Missoula Independent

LE PETIT OUTRE Free Coffee. 7 am–10 pm. Receive one free 12-oz drip coffee when you bike, walk or bus to Le Petite Outre. 129 S 4th West. Jon. 543-3311. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. For anyone biking/walking/busing to the Good Food Store, receive a treat: half-price smoothies all day. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Walkin’ Wacky Socks Day at Lowell School. Wear wacky socks to school while walking and get a prize. Lowell School. Jen. 543-6215. Franklin Walk to School Day. 8 am. Hackey-sac Tuesday. Students receive a footbag for participating in BWBW and get a chance to kick it around with their favorite teachers on the playgrounds. Teachers & staff receive coffee cards for playing. Jessie. 493-0564. 2nd Annual Bird-Watching Hike. 8–9:30 am. Meet at Montana Natural History Center (120 Hickory St), just off the bike trail a block west of the Orange Street underpass. Join a naturalist to look for spring migrants and freshly arrived summer residents along the Clark Fork River Trail. 327-0405. Free Lunch Delivery. 11 am–2 pm. Instead of driving, have your lunch delivered to you by bicycle for free. Lunch delivery requests must be received at least 1 hour before delivery time. Some location restrictions. exCARgo LLP. Valerie or Dave. 241-1099. La Leche League meeting: Alternative Transportation for Your Family. 11:30 am–1 pm. Large Meeting Room, Missoula Public Library. Mothers and their children invited to this free meeting led by Alex Stokman, Missoula in Motion, about how you can incorporate alternative transportation into your family routine. Eva. 721-6111. Panel Discussion – Improving Active & Public Transportation Opportunities by Reforming Federal Transportation Funding. 12 noon–1:30 pm. City Council Chambers (140 W. Pine). Montana and the nation need a transportation policy for the 21st Century that includes better funding for public transit, complete streets, and filling in and expanding our commuter/recreation bike/ped trails. Come find out what the issues are and add your voice to the growing dialogue. Jackie. 552-6267. Discounted Bike Helmets and Fitting. 12–3 pm. At the “oval” on U of M Campus. Get a bike helmet and fitting (must know head or hat size)! New bike helmets are $7.00 while supplies last. St. Patrick Hospital Trauma Unit and ASUM. Michelle. 329-5660 or Nancy 243-4599. Discovering best bike routes: The XXXs to the Northside Co-op. 5:30–6:30 pm. Meet at the red XXXs (N. end of Higgins), bike to the Missoula Food Coop (1500 Burns). Free drinks at the Coop for participants. Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula. Erin. 550-0397. 5th & 6th Street Rebirth Open House. 6-8 pm. At Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins. Come learn about and give input on a proposal to make S. 5th and S. 6th streets very pedestrian and bicycle friendly. Missoula Institute for Sustainable Transportation. Bob Giordano. 880-6834. Walking Exploration of the McCormick and Southside Historic Districts. 6:15 pm. Meet at the corner of Cottonwood and River St. by the bridge over the irrigation ditch. Dedication of McCormick Historic District sign. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. Philip Maechling. 258-4706. WEDNESDAY APRIL 29 “Great Harvest Bike Walk Bus Roll”. 7-9:30 am. Free cinnamon swirl roll for all who walk, bike or ride the bus to GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. 1407 S. Higgins. 728-4549. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7–9 am. For anyone biking/walking/busing to the Good Food Store, receive a free 10 oz fresh squeezed orange juice. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Bike/Walk/Bus for & to the Planet. 8–10 am. Free 16 oz drip coffee for any who bike, walk, or bus to work today. LIQUID PLANET. 223 N. Higgins. 541-4541. BWBW Walk to School Rally. 7:30–8:30am. Russell School. Five walking school buses lead children to the morning rally which includes drawings, muffins and beverages, Monte, and more. 3216 South Russell. Participation by many groups, including St Patrick Hospital (helmets), UM Athletic Department, Mayor Engen. Martha. 728-2400 x4846. Walking School Bus to Paxson School. 7:45-8:30am. Paxson parent volunteers will be “bus drivers” to lead children safely to school. Breakfast for all kids and parents who walk, bike, bus or carpool to school, plus surprise guest on the playground. Angela. 549-8596.

Bike Maintenance Workshop and helmet sale. 11am–2 pm. At the Good Food Store. Free Cycles Missoula will do minor repairs to your bike and show you how to do them; other groups will have commuting information including Missoula in Motion. St. Patrick Hospital will sell for $7 bike helmets and fit them. Doug. 541-3663. Historic Walking Tour of the UM Campus. 12 noon. Join Prof. Mike Monsos in front of Main Hall on the Oval. Have a new look at the campus, which is also the Montana State Arboretum. Historic Preservation Commission. 258-4706. 10th Annual Pedal vs. Metal Errand Dash. 2 pm. Teams of bicyclists and drivers compete against the clock to see how long each takes to complete a list of errands in downtown Missoula. The contest, consistently dominated by the bicycle teams, starts and finishes at the Mountain Line Transfer Center at Ryman & Pine. Spectators encouraged. Missoula Bicycle-Pedestrian Advisory Board. Jed Taylor. 866-832-6255. Human Powered Shelter Move. 3:30 pm. Meet at corner of Arthur and University. Help Free Cycles move a 16-foot bus shelter with a 4-wheel bicycle pulling a hay wagon. The bus shelter, donated by Mountain Line, will become covered bicycle parking at Hellgate High School. Free Cycles Missoula. Bob Giordano. 880-6834. Franklin Neighborhood Ride/Walk. 4 pm. Meet on the big playground, head out for a ride or walk loop around town with a Dairy Queen stop. Franklin School. Jessie. 493-0564 Bike Auction. 5 pm at Gardner’s Auction (4810 Hwy 93 South). Spring auction of used bicycles recovered by Missoula Police. Missoula Bicycle Pedestrian Office. 552-6352. Discovering best bicycle routes. Jacobs Island to the west limits of the city. 5:15–7 pm. Meet at Jacobs Island by the Van Buren foot bridge. BWAM members will lead you to the safest and most pleasant bicycle routes west from UM to places like REI, Blue Mountain Road, or Fort Missoula. Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula. Ethel. 549-9722. Historic Walking Tour of Milltown. 6–8 pm. Meet at the Black Pedestrian Bridge across from Town Pump off I-90 exit 109 on Hwy 200. Bonner Area History Roundtable. Judy Matson. 258-6335. Run Wild Missoula Training Run. 6 pm. Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Join Run Wild Missoula’s Marathon Training Class for a run on Missoula’s streets and trail systems. Free during Bike Walk Bus Week only. Eva. 544-3150. Historical Fort Missoula Walking Tour. 6:30pm. Bob Brown, the Museum Director, leads a tour of the grounds of the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula and the historic greater Fort Missoula. Meet “Major Charles Rawn”, founder of the Fort, for this behindthe-scenes tour. Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Building 322, Fort Missoula. Bob Brown. 728-3476. THURSDAY APRIL 30 Bagels for Bikers and Walkers. 7–9 am. Non-polluter commuters stop at Bagels on Broadway and receive a free bagel and a small orange juice. All day, non-polluter commuters receive free drip coffee. BAGELS ON BROADWAY. 223 W. Broadway. Sue Thompson. 728-8900. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7–9 am. Anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a treat: free fresh squeezed grapefruit juice. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Decorate Your Bike and Bike Parade Day at Lowell School. Decorate your bike with streamers, flags, or balloons and ride it to school today. Parade of decorated bikes around the neighborhood. You can make a nameplate and noise makers for your bike. Get your bike fixed up for a spring full of riding. Learn street safety like bike signals, street signs, and traffic rules. Lowell School. Jen. 543-6215. Get on Board. 2 pm at MOBASH Skate Park. Hellgate Flagship and Commotion invite all Missoulians to join in as Skate and Long Boarders celebrate their culture with food and music. Prizes by Taco del Sol and Edge of the World. Helmets by St. Patrick Hospital. Emily. 728-2400 x 6071. Paxson’s 4th Annual Big Dipper Bike Ride. 2:30pm–4 pm. For Paxson students and parents. Parent volunteers show students how to get from school to “kid friendly” places around Missoula using safe bike routes. Includes a stop at Big Dipper for treats. Paxson Elementary School. Julie at 728-5625 or Jim at 721-2873.

Treats for Vanpoolers. All day. Treats provided in appreciation to those utilizing the I Ride vanpools. Missoula Ravalli Transportation Management Association. Megan. 3278515.

Commuter Party at Adventure Cycling Association. 4-7 pm. The ACA courtyard at 150 E. Pine St. If you biked/walked/ bussed/boarded/carpooled to town: refreshments and snacks, live music by bluegrass band Baba Ganoush. 4-5pm free bike maintenance and garage sale of bicycle gear. Raffle drawing at 6 pm. Bring treats to share, a cup for drinking and your dancing shoes. Adventure Cycling Assn, Bike/Walk Alliance for Missoula and Missoula Free Cycles. Kylie at 721-8719.

Bike Walk Bus for Bargains at Secret Seconds. 10 am–6 pm. Bike, walk, or bus yourself to any of the 3 Secret Seconds locations and receive 50% off one regularly-priced clothing item. All proceeds benefit battered women and children. Locations are 1136 W. Broadway, 920 Kensington, and 1221 Helen Ave. Secret Seconds. Caitlin Copple. 543-6691.

Discovering best bicycle routes: bridges and tunnels of Missoula demystified. 4:30 – 6:30 pm. Meet at Jacobs Island by the Van Buren foot bridge. Discover both ends of the California St. bridge, and secret tunnel under Reserve. Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula. Geraldine. 241-1111.

Page 30 April 23–April 30, 2009

Stories and Stones Walking Tour. 6:30 pm. Missoula Cemetery. Take a walking tour of this historic cemetery and meet some of the individuals that helped shape Missoula, as re-enactors bring some of our ‘stones’ to life before your eyes. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 552-6070 or 258-4706. FRIDAY MAY 1 Bike Walk Bus BREAK. 7–9 am. Free Grande coffee for all bike/walk/busers at BREAK ESPRESSO: 432 N. Higgins. Break Espresso. Elisa. 728-7300. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a free GFS cookie. Jennifer Marrow. 541-3663. Free Breakfast at Lowell School. 8–8:30am. Free breakfast with Monte for students, parents and staff who walk, bike or bus to school this morning. Lowell School. Jen. 543-6215. Walking School Bus to Rattlesnake School. 8-8:30am. Rattlesnake parent volunteers will be “bus drivers” to lead children to school, ending with free breakfast for participants. 728-2400 x4523. Mallwalkers Ride the Bus. Park your car at the Missoula Senior Citizen Center (705 S. Higgins) and catch the Route 6 Mountain Line bus to Southgate Mall at 6:47, 7:18, 7:47, 8:18, or 8:47 am. The first 30 Mall Walkers to arrive at the Mall by bus will receive a $5 gift card good at any store in the Mall. Return on the 8:45, 9:15, 10:15 or 11:15 am bus. Mountain Line. Stephanie. 543-8386. Mallwalkers Breakfast. 8:30am–10 am. Free breakfast for mall walkers in celebration of Bike Walk Bus Week, and promoting walking as a healthier choice. Want to learn more? Join in! Southgate Mall. Trisha. 721-5140 x 19. Walk N Roll Week. 12 noon. UM Library Mall. Celebration of The Week. ASUM Transportation’s incentive program for The University of Montana as part of Missoula’s BWBW. Fantastic raffle prizes include a Cruiser bike, bike trailer, head lights, skateboard, locks, and on and on! Food! Entertainment provided by Broken Valley Road Show. Nancy Wilson. 243-4599. Valet Bicycle Parking. 11:30 am to 1:30 pm at the U of M. Valet parking will be available to anyone who bicycles to the BIG Walk n Roll drawing and grand finale on the Library Mall. Eric. Bicycle Pedestrian Office. 552-6352. Downtown Walk. 12 noon. Meet at the “fish” sculpture in the park at the north end of Higgins Ave. bridge for an architectural treasure hunt and a look at the downtown, including some prominent Downtown buildings, with guide Philip Maechling. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 258-4706. Kim Williams Weed Eradication Project. 12–3 pm. Washington Middle School 8th grade students, staff and parents will bike from school to Mt. Sentinel trailhead and pull noxious weeds along the “M” trail as a community service project and to get into the spirit of BWBW. Ron Ireland. 542-4085. Franklin School. 4 pm–6 pm. Bike rodeo on the big playground. Fun obstacle course, paper delivery challenge, & more. Great prizes. Pot luck snacks (bring something healthy). Jessie. 493-0564. SATURDAY MAY 2 Rock Creek Ramble. 10 am. Bike ride to Rock Creek. Leave from Eastgate parking lot. 52 miles. Missoulians on Bicycles. Vickie Mikelsons. 721-8540. 24th Annual Georgetown Lake Loop. Bike ride by reservation only. $10 deposit by April 22. 120 miles. Missoulians on Bicycles. Julie Huck. 549-2226. Mt. Jumbo Weed Pull. 10 am–1 pm. Those who bike or walk to the weed pull will get credit for 5 pounds of weeds before they start! Cash prizes for those pulling the most pounds of invasive weeds! Target plants will be cheat grass and spotted knapweed. Be a part of the solution to reclaim our city lands from the grasp of these unwanted invaders. Bring good shoes and gloves. Weed diggers provided. Mt. Jumbo Advisory Committee. Giles. 543-2532. Hike and Bike to the Moon. 1–5 pm. Hike in or bike in (or ride in) to the Moon Randolph Homestead for a tour and some work at the homestead in the North Hills. The event includes a tour of the homestead at 2 pm and treats (donations accepted). For hike/bike directions, call us. Co-sponsored by NMCDC, HPO and the Hill and Homestead Coalition. 829-0873 or 258-4706. Milltown Bluff Tour. 3:15–5:15 pm. Catch Mountain Line Route 4 bus at downtown Transfer Station at 2:45 for ride to historic Bonner. Or bike or walk to Bonner School by 3:15 where vans provided by 10,000 Waves will transport the group to the Milltown bluff overlook. See panoramic views of the confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork river valleys. Guides from CFRTAC will explain restoration of the rivers to their historic channels. Leave 5:15 on bus back to Missoula. Milltown Redevelopment Working Group. 258-6335.


Join the Consumer Counseling Credit Service’s Amita Patel for the noon brown bag seminar How To Survive in This Economy, which takes place at the City Life Building, 151 Fairview Ave., Ste. 220. Free. Call 543-1188. Calling all bookworms: The American Association of University Women holds their annual Used Book Sale at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W., starting at noon and running through Sun., May 3. $6 gets you a bag of reading. Call 829-3898 or 543-5975. Celebrate sustainable transportation with Hellgate Flagship and Missoula Commotion from 2–6 PM at MOBASH Skate Park, which hosts Get on Board and offers very inexpensive—aka free—burritos, sweet prizes and maybe a helmet for your noggin. Free. Call 728-2400, ext. 6071. School’s out early, which means it’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. Junior detectives aged 5–8 team up with the Montana Crime Lab and the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., to process footprints, fingerprints, DNA and more at Afterschool Adventures: W.O.W. at 3 PM. $4.25/Free for members. Call 541-PLAY. Leave the car at home—unless you stuff it with other people—and you’re entitled to attend a Commuter Party from 4–7 PM at Adventure Cycling, 150 E. Pine St., where great food, bluegrass by Baba Ghanoush, extreme raffle possibilities and free bike maintenance await. Free.

nightlife The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Iron Jawed Angels, which takes us behind the scenes with American suffragist legends Hillary Swank and Angelica Huston, are followed by group discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Don’t make him turn your cell phone off permanently: John Floridis plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Overstock.com CEO Patrick Michael Byrne, Ph.D., presents the lecture “Mental Models and Social Entrepreneurship” at 6 PM in Room 106 of UM’s Galalgher Business Building, so don’t say I didn’t warn you. Call 243-6723. Explore the benefits of signing yourself up for some massive debt when a First Time Homebuyer Class explains everything in plain English at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Professional clown and actress Jonna Tomases brings humor to her real-life bouts with cancer in the film Jonna’s Body, Please Hold, which screens at 6:30 at the Missoula Public Library. Free. L’Alliance Francaise de Missoula hopes you’ll head up to the Ten Spoon Winery at 6:30 PM, as they present an authentic French Cabaret featuring Louis Giroux, Edith Piaf, Georges Brassens, Serges Gainsbourg, Jacques Brel, Boris Vian and many others whose names I’d butcher if this were a podcast. $20 includes one glass of wine/$15 members/$10 students.

If you love conservative comedy and God, prepare to shoot holy water out of your nose as Jeff Alan, Brad Stine, Anthony Griffith and Ron Pearson present The Apostles of Comedy at 7 PM at the Christian Life Center, 3801 S. Russell St. $16/$14 advance/$25 couples. Call (800) 325-SEAT. Lifelong woods worker Craig Thomas reads from and signs his book of ruminations, Regurgitations of a Montana Woodsman, at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Store, 252 Main St. Free. Call 363-5220. Witness the pinnacle of animal husbandry as the “world famous” Lippinzaner Stallions strut their massive meat all over Kalispell’s Majestic Valley Arena at 7:30 PM. $20.50–26.50. Call 755-5366 or visit majesticvalleyarena.com. The UM Department of Drama/Dance takes us back to ancient Greece to witness emotional turmoil and “unspeakable acts” at 7:30 PM with the staging of Euripides’ Medea. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4051. The genre’s probably punk, but who am I to pigeonhole? Train Song, Hangover Saints, Come Up Swing in and Arrested Adolesence play Feruqi’s at 8:30 PM. $5. Hopefully you can bring a little life to the venue when The Other Side presents Floater, with local support by Dead Me Downs, at 9 PM. $13/$10 advance. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, led by Lazerwolfs—who perform a final rendition of Judas Priest’s British Steel—

who share the stage with Thetan Revival and Bloody Blood Orgy at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Never let NASA name your band: Jazzy trio the Discount Quartet gives you something to drink about at 9:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. The field continues to narrow during the third round of a Singer/Songwriter Showcase at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Call 728-9865. Just to let you into my world a little bit, I’ve had something stuck in my eye since last night. I thought it was just an eyelash or a bit of bacon or something, but I sat through a two-hour board meeting trying to blink and rub—I know, I know, “Don’t rub it,”—the thing away, but it just dug in deeper. All night I struggled, vitreous humor tossing and turning in my socket, but to no avail. I awoke this morning in the continued presence of my new little buddy, Mr. Scratchy. In desperation, I hit the shower, and prying back my upper lid with a death-grip I was unaware I could muster, sent a hot stream of Missoula aquifer up in there. That kind of did the trick, but I’m still creeping through the day under the constant light duty annoyance of that eerie internal tickle. It reminds me of the irritation I feel when folks try to “slip something into the calendar” at the last minute. People, it doesn’t work like that. Should you hope for a metal sliver’s chance in a cornea of getting listed, please send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 24, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. And for Peet’s sake, don’t submit events through our website. Just don’t do it.

Recycling in the Schools School Sponsors For The Entire 2008-2009 School Year Thank you for contributing to our community sponsors! The project by Missoula Valley Recycling and Home Resource aims to give teachers and students the opportunity to recycle in our schools.

School Sponsors: Hellgate High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CM Russell School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CS Porter Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawthorn Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lewis & Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lowell School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franklin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missoula International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rattlesnake Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sentinel High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Target Range Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hellgate Elementary #3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Willard School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paxon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chief Charlo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meadow Hill School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cold Springs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rockin Rudy's/Knights of the Round Table Home Resource Pacific Recycling The Crystal Limit Sapphire Physical Therapy and Pat McCormick Allied Waste Good Food Store Glenn Kreisel Anonymous Sponsor Prudential Missoula Dale's Dairy and Missoula Power Equipment Missoula Federal Credit Union John Thompson/Kathy Rogers Missoula Federal Credit Union Kent Brother's Auto and Open Road Bicycle/Nordic St. Patrick's Hospital Twin Cranes Dental and Cedar Mountain Software PTA Sponsored Community Medical Hospital Community Medical Hospital

Also thanks to: Simmons Broadcasting, The Missoula Independent, Kristopher M Myers, Robin Lindsey Kent, Jennifer & Andrew Parker, Michaela Conway, Amy C. Andrews, Jill Perelman, Julie Little, Lara O’Conner, Sandra & Garrick Simmons, Patricia & Aubrey Dunkum, Flying Monkey Creative LLC, Loken Builders, Ace Hardware, Norris Woodworking, Hide & Sole, James and Gretchen Philip, Andrew Koenig and Gwen Jones, Heidi and David Kendall, Pat Forsberg and Steve Speckart, Michael Colville, Neva Hassanein, Ann Jackson, Ruth Austin, Nancy Brown, JoAnn Greathouse, Linda and Judy Smith, Thomas Facey and Maureen O'Malley, Judith and Donald Kiley.

Missoula Independent

Page 31 April 23–April 30, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 32 April 23–April 30, 2009


In the world of xylem and phloem, it’s fair to say that things are pretty much blowing up. Buds are swelling and turning to their brilliant greens and reds in a display that verges on the obscene. I mean, I saw a mother cover her child’s eyes in embarrassment as the pair passed beneath a cottonwood tree by the river. Okay, you’re right, I saw no such thing. But really, isn’t this springtime display of over-the-top sexual energy just a bit much? What’s a Comrade to do? I’ll tell you what a Comrade’s to do. He’s to revel in it. Every exuberant blossom, each sap-dripping catkin, down to the very last new larch needle, I’m going to gorge my senses on this regional display of the fecund. And where’s a Comrade to do so? Two words: Columbia Falls. Yes, our dear neighbor to the north has been officially designated as one of 3,310 Tree City USA communities by the Arbor Day Foundation. To commemorate this historic victory for trees around the globe, join a representative from Governor Schweitzer’s office at 1 PM on Fri., April 24, in Columbia Falls’ Marantette Park for a ceremony to mark the event. Performances by local schoolchildren, as well as the attendance of area trees, will add to the festivities. And with that day’s revelry behind you, I’d suggest a good night’s sleep, as Saturday begins early: It’s the return of my favorite peak-baggers, the Rocky Mountaineers (TRM). On Sat., April 25, join the intrepid granite-grabbers for a sojourn up the Bitterroot’s Trapper Peak (over 10,000 feet!), for which the meeting time is a gnarly 6:15 AM. I told you they were extreme. Call 243-4790. They say the Five Valleys Audubon Society never sleeps, and this week I’m inclined to believe it. You’re invited to join the insomniac aviophiles at 7 AM in the UM Adams Center parking lot on Sat., April 25, where Gary Swant leads a trip

begins on Sat., April 25, so what better way to celebrate than with a bike ride? Missoulians on Bicycles (MOB) asks that you meet at 10 AM at the Eastgate parking lot for the 22-mile Deer Creek Sneak, which is 75 percent dirt roads, so select the appropriate bike. And call Kathy at 543-6274. The Montana Natural History Center (MNHC), 120 Hickory St., dominates the remainder of the day, with two exciting events. First, at 2 PM on Sat., April 25, is the Saturday Kids’ Activity Outrageous Owls, which considers all aspects of the creepy prowlers. $2/members free. Call 327-0405. Then, at 9 PM, nature-lovers of all ages convene at the MNHC for the outdoor class Evening Star Gazing for Beginners, which features professionals from the Western Montana Astronomical Association. They’ll have telescopes and binoculars, but feel free to bring your own. RSVP 327-0405. Sunday, April 26, begins with a shot of lactic acid, as those Rocky Mountaineers are at it again. They offer up the Bass Creek Day Loop Trail, a 7.5-mile hike that affords views of flowers, creeks and your fellow hikers. Call Steve at 721-4686. Get your feet off the ground and back onto your pedals, as the MOB offers this alternative to trail-stumbling: At 10 AM on Sun., April 26, meet at the Eastgate parking lot for the 55-mile 25th annual Potomac Awful Burger Ride. This one’s a “show and go,” so just be there. And don’t forget your burger money. Your opportunity to join the fight against invasive species—in a very focused manner, at least—comes at 6 PM on Tue., April 28, when a Native Plant Garden Party at Fort Missoula has you transplanting flowers, erecting signs and more. RSVP miss_grunzke@yahoo.com. Photo by Chad Harder Rather than helping out native plants, you might like Rather than ogling birds, take this opportunity to improve your- this one: At 6 PM on Tue., April 28, the Montana Dirt Girls meet self physically. On Sat., April 25, the YMCA Riverbank Run up at the Jumbo trailhead to the top of Lincoln Hills Drive for begins at the intersection of North Higgins Avenue and a spirited jaunt up the hillside. Visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. And if all that doesn’t exactly tickle your fancy, there’s always more Broadway at 9 AM. The details are numerous and accessing killing that needs done. Prepare for the coming slaughter at 7 PM them involves your browser and the address ymcamissoula.org. Another option for this fine Saturday is to head to the Sitting on Tue., April 28, when a Hunter Education Course for humans Duck in Woods Bay, where Raptor Day begins at 10 AM and above the age of 11 begins in the Darby School cafeteria. features bird biologist Byron Crow offering programs for Register at the beginning of class, and call 542-5500 with questions. Now get out there and feel up some buds. both adults and children. Jae Hatt sets to jamming at 1 PM, and you can get more info when you call 253-1514. Bikes are the name of the game, as Bike Walk Bus Week calendar@missoulanews.com to the Warm Springs Ponds for some great waterfowl action. Bring binocs and a lunch, and call 327-1525. This town may not be big enough for two Audubon chapters, but this region certainly is. The Flathead Audubon Society invites you to partake in the third annual Marty Cohen Stroll, which takes place along the Whitefish River bike path once everyone assembles at 8 AM at the Whitefish City ball fields on Sat., April 25. Again, binoculars bring the wildlife up close, so pack a set. And call 755-3704.

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scope

Classy cats Our who’s-who guide to a jam-packed jazz weekend by Erika Fredrickson

Missoula may not be a hub for jazz, but every year Jazzoula and the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival make the Garden City a little like Bourbon Street or Chicago’s South Side. To highlight this weekend’s events, we’ve identified five featured players jazz fans won’t want to miss. Buddy DeFranco Missoula’s annual preamble to the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival typically saves its best for last. This year, Jazzoula’s Thursday night lineup includes jazz vocalist Melody Anderson backed by pianist extraordinaire Jodi Marshall, as well as a set with saxophonist Chuck Florence. But the evening’s highlight may be this year’s inductions into the Jazzoula Hall of Fame since the class is headlined by the man of the weekend himself, Buddy DeFranco, and his wife, Joyce. “He’s like a giant in the music business,” says Bruce Micklus, who spearheads Jazzoula. “He was one of the very first of the be-bop clarinet players. He was like Sting, you know, top of the top of the top.” DeFranco, now 86, made his name playing with the Count Basie Septet, Gene Krupa, Charlie Barnet and Art Tatum. He also served as the bandleader of the Glenn Miller Orchestra from 1966 to 1974. Buddy and Joyce DeFranco join University of Montana Jazz Band Director Lance Boyd and clarinetist Dexter Payne as this year’s Hall of Fame inductions. Melody Anderson and Chuck Florence play Thursday, April 23, at 6 PM, with an awards ceremony following. $7. A Saturday Night Jam Session happens April 25, at 10 PM. $7. Both events show at St. Anthony’s Parish Center.

radio markets—and now plays with The Caribbean Jazz Project. The latter recently won a Latin Grammy for their album Afro Bop Alliance. “It’s going to be a real pleasure and honor to be listed as one of the players who got to play with Buddy DeFranco,” says Samuels. “Not only is he a great player, but he’s an idol for me because I hope to be at his age doing exactly what he’s doing.” Dave Samuels performs as part of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival Friday, April 24, at 7:30 PM in the University Theatre. $22/$40 both nights.

Taylor, Billy Joel and Chaka Khan and Sandke started his career in a garage rock band. Randy Sandke performs as part of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival Friday, April 24, at 7:30 PM in the University Theatre. $22/$40 both nights. Steve Smith Steve Smith was not a city boy born and raised in south Detroit, but he did play drums for the band Journey. In fact, Smith occupied that position during the band’s most successful years— 1978 to 1985—playing on Escape and Frontiers. But if you’ve ever seen Smith play, you’ll notice that those Swiss Army triplets and buttery drum rolls are suspiciously jazzy. That’s because Smith went to the Berklee College of Music in Boston and toured with jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty before ever setting his sticks afire while Steve Perry sang, “Don’t stop believin’.” Modern Drummer Magazine readers voted him the best AllAround Drummer five years in a row and in 2001 the same magazine named him as one of the Top 25 Drummers of All Time. Steve Smith performs as part of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival Saturday, April 24, at 7:30 PM in the University Theatre. $22/$40 both nights.

Benny Golson You may not know it, but the soundtrack of your life features saxophonist Benny Golson. He’s the only living jazz legend to have composed eight standards for jazz repertoire, including “I Remember Clifford,” “Along Came Betty,” and “Killer Joe.” Golson also wrote scores for “The Partridge Family,” “The Academy Awards,” “M*A*S*H” Dave Samuels and “Mission Impossible,” not to Dave Samuels sees improvisamention several television comtion all around him. The worldmercials for brands including renowned vibraphone and marimba Ore-Ida’s frozen potatoes, Chevy, player assures me that, in fact, my conversation with him is the very Vibist Dave Samuels is one of the featured artists to play this weekend’s Heinz and Pepsi. You may also remember seedefinition of improvisation. I talk, Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival at the University Theatre. ing Golson play himself in the and he reacts. He talks, I respond. movie The Terminal, during which he gave Tom “The process of improvisation is not just Hanks’ character an autograph. And he composed something that we’re used to, it’s built into the Randy Sandke It often seems that the only way to prove the a tune for the film titled “Terminal 1.” The 80fabric of who we are,” he says. “Improvisation with a capital ‘I’ kind of represents change and quality of a jazz musician is to list other musicians year-old musician has been at it for 60 years, with reacting to change. We start out one way and end he’s played with. With trumpet player Randy 30 albums under his belt and 300 compositions. up completely different. Change is something Sandke, that list could run a mile. Only 55, he’s He may not be in the forefront of your mind, but already shared the stage with some of the greats, his music is definitely in your head. that is a part of our life cycle.” Benny Golson performs as part of the It’s an inspiring thought coming from a musi- including Benny Goodman, Mel Torme and Cab Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival at the University cian who’s played with everyone from Pat Calloway, to name a few. Sandke’s trumpet style is steeped in early jazz Theatre Saturday, April 25, at 7:30 PM. Metheny to Frank Zappa, and who won a Grammy in 2003 for “Best Latin Jazz Recording.” Samuels influences like Louis Armstrong and Bix $22/$40 both nights. played from 1977 to 1994 with Spyro Gyra—a Beiderbecke, but he’s also adept at more conefredrickson@missoulanews.com band that was smooth jazz before the term hit the temporary approaches. He’s played with James

Missoula Independent

Page 34 April 23–April 30, 2009


The Missoula Independent & Trail 103.3 present

The he e 200 2009

Scope Books Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

God’s wilderness Biography shows Rolston’s faith in evolution

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by Jay Stevens

A recent study by the mining industry consult- with pictures of massive, fiery infernos ablaze in ant Northwest Corporation claimed that, if leased, one of the country’s favorite parks—the policy, Montana’s southeastern coal tracts would net the and Rolston’s views, looked more moral later, in state $1.4 billion over the next four years in royal- the wake of the park’s natural renewal post-burn. After years of secular works on environmental ty payments. Ignore for a moment the source, the lost revenue for subsidies and eminent domain philosophy, Rolston tried to wrap theology into scipayments needed to kick-start mining in a bleak ence by noting that a number of necessary evolucoal market. What Northwest Corporation did was tionary steps were “sideways” and not the “inevitable put a price tag on a slice of Montana land, corre- results” of some “fixed biological or physical law.” This “cascading serendipity” looked to Rolston like lating its value only to the sum of its coal yield. But land, for many, has greater value than can the “mask of God.” This wasn’t a hands-on God that be counted in dollars. Still, opponents to develop- actively designed or managed, but was instead ment choose to cite the financial costs of coal “woven very delicately and continuously into ongoing evolutionary processes,” and extraction and use. They calculate leading life upwards into everthat runoff from mines damages increasing complexity. That this fish habitat and harms tourism. process was inevitably built on sufThey evaluate the harmful waste fering and death, not to mention put into our air and groundwater, mass extinctions of innumerable the escalating health care costs life forms, was not a cause for and the contribution to climate despair and renunciation of God, change. But that’s just another but was instead the method by reckoning by human arithmetic. which life survived, thrived and Doesn’t wilderness have a value evolved. And “just as Christ’s death that can’t be calculated by corpoon the cross” was necessary for rate accountants? human redemption, “so were the That’s essentially the quesdeaths of millions of animals...nection Colorado State University essary to drive the trajectory of philosophy professor Holmes earth’s history upward.” Rolston III has spent the bulk of Saving Creation Despite the myriad logical his career contemplating, and Christopher Preston leaps in this theory—for one, it the question at the heart of hardcover, assumes that what scientific theoChristopher Preston’s biography Trinity University Press 256 pages, $25.95 ry can’t explain implies the presof Rolston, Saving Creation. Born and raised in the Virginia Mountains, ence of supernatural design—it’s a long way from Rolston followed family tradition and became a the hostility to science that a literal interpretation of Presbyterian minister. During his few years minis- the Bible spawns. And it certainly gives Christians a tering in rural Southern pastorates, however, theological basis for preserving wilderness. In any case, Preston’s book is a delightful, easRolston’s devotion to field biology and environmentalism estranged him from the farmers whose ily accessible introduction to Rolston’s theories souls he tended. He was puzzled by the conflict and the school of environmental philosophy. between science and religion and enrolled in the Still, you’ve got to wonder why Preston, a University of Pittsburgh’s philosophy of science University of Montana philosophy professor, program as a means of reconciling the two. After chose to write about Rolston in biographic form taking a teaching job at Colorado State University, since he opts to omit the usual psychological and dramatic explorations found in many contempohe found the Western landscape a revelation. The hikes in the mountains and the wonder rary biographies. No doubt the decision is due to at the variety of local biology inspired Rolston to some kind of professional respect to the still-livpen the essays and books that propelled him to ing Rolston’s privacy, but the result is a life—apart become one of the pioneers of environmental from its philosophical impact—that is dazzlingly unremarkable. philosophy. Make no mistake, the meat of this book is in Rolston’s first notable essay was an assertion of nature’s intrinsic moral value. But unlike other Rolston’s theories, and in the competing and intellectual advocates of nature’s rights—like ani- complementary works of Rolston’s contemporary mal rights’ advocates, say—Rolston never trans- peers. Perhaps a better dish to serve would have posed human values onto nature. Instead, he been a history of the environmental philosophy advocated for a kind of “wild” moral system, one movement, with Rolston simply playing a signifithat encompassed entire ecosystems and the cant part. cold, evolutionary process of natural selection A discussion of Saving Creation begins at and cycles that included cruel suffering and widespread, but natural, devastation. His theories the Del Brown Room in Turner Hall Monday, were complementary to the controversial April 27, at 7 PM with a panel including National Park policy calling for hands-off manage- Christopher Preston, Holmes Rolston III, ment of the park’s ecosystem that allowed for Deborah Slicer and Albert Borgmann. Free. huge fires in 1988 to consume a large portion of arts@missoulanews.com Yellowstone. Unpopular at the time of the fire—

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Parallel worlds presents Exhibit Opening This Contest is for Real Hands: Rodeo Photographs of the 1930s Free Opening Reception Sunday, April 26 • 1:00-4:00 Special Guests: Lesli Furniss, 2009 Rodeo Queen from Frenchtown 1950s and 60s Rodeo Champion Brenda Schwenk Beers, and see some of her collection on exhibit Sculptor Len McCann, and see 3 of his rodeo sculptures in the exhibit This exhibit of photographs by famed Montana photographer Otho Hartley is on loan from the Powell County Museum and Arts Foundation, and will be open through 2009.

FORESTRY DAY 2009 SATURDAY APRIL 25 9 AM - 4 PM Annual Forestry Day is held in conjunction with the University of Montana Woodsman Team and the Montana Society of American Foresters.

Activities include collegiate and professional lumberjack competitions, including crosscut sawing, pole climbing, wood chopping, ax throwing, hot saws, and log rolling. See an impressive array of historic forestry and logging equipment, a working steam-powered sawmill and a restored fire lookout tower. Enjoy hands-on opportunities for all, a displays of crafts, and activities for children. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for senior citizens, and $1 for students. Children under 6 and members of the Friends are admitted free. As part of Missoula's Bike/Walk/Bus Week, admission is free for all who bike, walk, or take the bus to the event. Food will be available from The University of Montana's Woodsman Team. For more information contact: Robert M. Brown, 728-3476 Fax: 543-6277 ftmslamuseum@montana.com

Missoula Independent

Page 36 April 23–April 30, 2009

Rabbit Hole burrows into profound grief by Erika Fredrickson

Extraordinary moments do happen in this The idea of parallel worlds can be a little mindboggling. A separate universe where anything is production, but usually with comedic characters possible and every possible path does exist? Tough like Becca’s sister Izzy, played by Staci Weigum. to wrap your head around, but intriguing. In She charmingly wrinkles her nose at what she another universe you did drop out of college and doesn’t like. She stops and starts dialog with conbike around the world. You did win the lottery. In tagious exuberance and, other times, sheepishanother universe you decide not to go to that ness. When she finally wants to be taken seriousHalloween party, subsequently never drinking too ly, we see her as someone who makes mistakes much beer and breaking a Venetian vase, and never but has good intentions. The real force of this play is scene-stealer having to endure the yelling from that jerk dressed up as a giant carrot. Wouldn’t that universe be nice? Teresa Waldorf as Becca’s mother. Her comedic But then again, if none of that happened you’d timing rings of a “Mad TV” character without being a caricature. She drinks too never make friends with the much wine and talks about carrot guy later, and he wouldcelebrity airplane wrecks in a n’t have fixed your bike one loud Midwest accent. “It’s day, and then you wouldn’t sad,” she says. “All those have eventually moved with good-looking people falling him to the countryside. So, out of the sky. It’s a waste.” you never know. In this uniMaybe comic characters verse you take the good with are easier to latch onto in such the bad. And sometimes that a bleak situation, but I think it’s means your good times more than that. Even when are suddenly stunted by Waldorf isn’t speaking you’re inescapable, infinite pain. drawn to her, glasses perched That’s the case in Rabbit at the end of her nose looking Hole, a Pulitzer Prize-winpuzzled or scoffing. In one ning play written by the norscene, after she’s consumed mally comedic David Lindsayher wine, she helps Becca sort Abaire and directed for Montana Rep Missoula by Salina Chatlain stars in Montana Rep through Danny’s toys. Waldorf Missoula’s production of Rabbit Hole. plays her emotional cards like local drama professor Stacy a pro—still funny and passiveOhrt-Billingslea. The story begins mid-way through the lives of a couple aggressive, but tender, too. And when Becca asks her whose 4-year-old son, Danny, has been struck and if grief ever goes away Waldorf has built her character killed by a car. Becca, the mother, folds her son’s up so complexly that she gives you goose bumps clothes getting them ready to give away. The when she replies, “It becomes bearable, something father, Howie, spends his time in the dark illumi- you can come out from under and carry around with nated only by a flicker of light coming from old you. It’s not that you like it, but it’s what you have.” It’s too bad that we don’t get a better sense of videos of Danny running and playing. When the couple isn’t talking about the death, Howie and Becca’s relationship in this production. it still hovers over them, coloring every word they It seems to shrink from existence without a sense say with blame or despair, sometimes tenderness. that it ever did exist and, worse, it’s hard to care Their lives become a landscape of grief. When they about it. More powerful is Becca’s relationship to do talk about it, they review the event, rewinding Jason, the high school kid who hit and killed it as though knowing the exact details of the Danny. He shows up at the family’s home with a tragedy and exploring the what-if scenarios will story he wrote dedicated to Becca’s late son. It’s a sci-fi story about a scientist who explores the idea give them entry into an alternative outcome. Playing a character that grieves through the of parallel universes–rabbit holes—in order to find entire stretch of a play can’t be easy. It requires one in which his deceased father is still living. This nuance and an ability to reel in the audience and is the most touching part of all: Jason’s need for induce empathy rather than merely evoke distanced redemption gives way to a faith—and science—that sympathy. Salina Chatlain holds the reins fairly tight Becca can finally imagine. Even if her son no on Becca. She carefully unfolds her character’s grief, longer exists in her world, he almost certainly lives lets herself fall apart at significant moments and, at somewhere else and, in that place, she can imagine other times, suffers almost imperceptibly. She can being happy. In Rabbit Hole, it’s moments like these, moments that seem both plausible and illusmile and yet we understand she isn’t happy. Geoff Pepos’ Howie doesn’t overdo it either, minating, that make it worth watching. but he’s opaque. We know Howie is sad because he Rabbit Hole continues at the Crystal lost his son, and other times we know he’s angry because he’s yelling. But the cues beyond those Theatre Thursday, April 23, through Saturday, two basic emotions fall flat because the subtle dif- April 25, at 8 PM. $10 on Thursday, $15 Friday ference between angry-sad, angry-defensive, hurt- and Saturday. sad and any other combination that is vital to the efredrickson@missoulanews.com dialog between Howie and Becca all feel the same.


Scope Books Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Character deficit Hollywood runs amok in State of Play by Nick Davis

There are several other fine supporting roles There are a number of moments that stick out in the wake of State of Play—a handful of them here, most notably Helen Mirren’s turn as good, a fair number more of them not—but there’s McAffrey’s hard-nosed and profane editorial boss, one in particular that haunts me. It’s a close up of and Jason Bateman’s deliciously animated take on a young and righteous congressman at a political a strung-out PR guy in way over his head. But Affleck’s one-dimensional performance as hearing as he announces the sudden and unexpected death of one of his most valued staffers. a primary character drags everything else down The camera pushes slowly inward as he relays the with it. Rachel McAdams, playing a wet-behind-thenews, and just at the moment his face fills the ears blogger who transforms from McAffrey’s foil shot, here it comes: an honest-to-goodness upper- into his investigative partner, is also a complete washout. It’s hard to say whether that’s due to a lip quiver of a fairly significant magnitude. Now, I’m not one to take lightly the ability to lack of acting chops or the craptacular writing, but generate a normally spontaneous physical tic on when a movie built as a taut, thinking-man’s command, especially one as complex as a lip quiver. Seriously—try it. Indeed, you can almost see the sweat beading on the actor’s upper lip as he strains behind a broken visage, forcing that flap of meat to vibrate like a cheap motel bed full of quarters. As impressive as that lip quiver is, though, there are two fairly significant problems attached to it. The first is that the lip in question belongs to Ben Affleck, who after knocking one out of the park with Russell Crow gets hair styling tips from Rachel his pal Matt Damon in 1997’s Good McAdams in State of Play. Will Hunting (they would share an Oscar for writing the movie) has pretty much thriller features a female lead who is unable to rise sucked horribly in everything he’s done since. I above the level of eye-candy, that’s a problem. State of Play’s unbearable weight of mediocmean, can the good people behind the Razzie Awards (Affleck is a three-time nominee and one- rity has got me thinking a lot about the state of big time winner of the Worst Screen Couple prize) be Hollywood in general. Obviously, when you churn wrong? His performance here is as thin and out as much product as Tinseltown does, you’re wooden as his upper lip (okay, cheap shot there). going to have your fair share of hits and misses. The second problem is State of Play’s script, But more and more, it seems, big-budget movies which reportedly went through a series of rewrites are torpedoing themselves through an utter lack as it journeyed from a six-hour BBC series into a of plot and character development, and that is two-hour feature film, and bears the scars of multi- inexcusable. The people who made State of Play ple operations. Proving once again that he’s more spent upwards of $60 million to do so (including than just a pretty face, Brad Pitt, who was original- a cool $20 mil for Crowe’s services), and the end ly slated to star as Washington, D.C., journalist Cal result is a product that leaves no positive lasting McAffrey, removed himself at a late hour because impression whatsoever. Conservatives have long complained that Hollywood poisons the political of his concerns with the writing. Russell Crowe replaced Pitt. As luck would process, but perhaps it is now the movie industry have it, Crowe had just finished shooting 2008’s that should take a hint from the real-life Body of Lies, and still had the extra weight he had Washington, D.C., and start holding people packed on for that role. Though comments from accountable for the messes they create. That day seems a long way off, though. State of Play’s makers seem to indicate their surprise (read: disappointment) at Crowe’s physical Despite the economic downturn, box-office revcondition, the jellyroll around his belly, the long enues are on pace to set all-time highs this year, hair and the scruffy beard add a degree of news- as evidenced by this quote from an industry anaroom authenticity that much of the rest of the lyst: “Unless the world goes off its axis and spins movie sorely lacks. (Can you see Gladiator’s into the sun, I don’t see how we’re not going to Maximus sitting behind an unkempt desk work- have a $10 billion year.” Hyperbole begets hyperbole, it appears. But ing on deadline? Or Brad Pitt, for that matter? Me I’m crossing my fingers that the movie industry neither.) When the script allows Crowe to operate rel- sees some kind of market correction of its own, atively unfettered, he does an admirable job and soon. This garbage is getting old. bringing McAffrey to life. He follows the gut State of Play plays the Carmike 10. instincts of a truly skilled investigative reporter and works the finely balanced connections develarts@missoulanews.com oped over a career on the street.

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Scope Books Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

OPENING THIS WEEK Earth Polar bears, elephants, humpback whales and James Earl Jones follow the path of the sun across our planet with some totally sick shots. Rated G. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Fanboys In 1998, a pack of Star Wars nerds undertakes a cross-country road trip with the aim of infiltrating George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch to steal a pre-release copy of The Phantom Menace. Cameos by Billy Dee Williams, Carrie Fisher, Boba Fett, William Shatner and others add depth and pathos. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:30, 7:30 and 9:40 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:15.

Duplicity Undercover lovers Clive Owen and Julia Roberts are ex-spooks turned corporate spies, who find themselves in competition to steal a massive company secret. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Fast and Furious The fourth film in this series picks right back up where it all started, with Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez and Jordana Brewster staging a reunion for yet another two

Fri.–Sat. matinees at 1. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 9 with no Sun. show. Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D In DreamWorks’ latest animated 3D film, young Susan is transformed into a giant monster after being struck by a meteor. She’s whisked away to a secret military location, where she meets other monstrous folk the government has been collecting over the years. When aliens attack the planet, there’s no better group to save it. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with Fri.–Sat. matinees at 1 and 3:15. Also playing,

17 Again Imagine you had the chance to be, um, 17 again and re-do your life, this time avoiding such pitfalls as marrying your pregnant high school girlfriend and tossing away a basketball scholarship. Now watch the film. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:30, 7:30 and 10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Adventureland Director Greg Mottola (Superbad) brings us the story of James Brennan, a recent college grad forced to take the only job he can get— working at Adventureland theme park, in the summer of ’87. Plenty of vulgar humor, awkward sex and pot smoking ensue. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:15, 7:30 and 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. The Class Chosen by many reviewers as one of the top 10 films of 2008, this French film tells the story of a dedicated teacher attempting to motivate teenage students in a tough Paris neighborhood. Rated PG-13. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9:15 with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:15 and no Fri.–Sat. shows. Crank: High Voltage In this touching treatment of male intimacy issues, Jason Statham struggles to “reconnect with his heart.” Actually, his flesh-and-blood ticker’s been swiped, so he must regularly deliver massive shocks to the battery the Chinese mafia installed in his chest while he seeks to unravel the mess in this sequel to, you guessed it, Crank. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:15.

Missoula Independent

Fast and Furious Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 3:30, 6:50 and 9:30. Also playing at Entertainer in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:15. Fighting Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:30, 4:20, 7:25 and 9:55.

I Love You, Man Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 4:25 and 7:30. Knowing Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:10, 4, 6:55 and 9:35.

Obsessed Idris Elba is a man who’s got everything, including Beyoncé Knowles for a wife, but gets in trouble when a pretty temp proves pretty tempting. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4.

NOW PLAYING

Earth Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20 and 9:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 3:40, 6:45 and 9.

Hannah Montana: The Movie Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15 and 9:45 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:20, 7:15 and 9:45. Also playing at the Showboat in Polson at 4:15, 7 and 9:15.

Fighting Channing Tatum is a poor kid who moves to New York City with no prospects. Once he and manager Terrence Howard discover he can scrap like nobody’s business, the two start a life of wiping with Benjamins. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1.

The Soloist Jamie Foxx tells a tale based upon an L.A. musical prodigy’s slip into homelessness and his subsequent rediscovery by writer Robert Downey Jr., who helps get him back behind a cello. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:35 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4.

Crank: High Voltage Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:35 and 9:50 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:25, 7:25 and 9:50.

Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 6, 7, 8:15 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon. Observe and Report Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 2:10 and 9:55 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:10. Confrontations with Hummer drivers are worth a free 12 ounce orange juice during Bike Walk Bus Week. Fighting opens Friday at the Carmike 10.

hours of sex, drugs and really fast cars. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:10, 7:30 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:30 and 2:50. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Hannah Montana: The Movie The bifurcated personalities of Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus keep vying for control of the body they share until poppa Billy Ray decides it’s time for a road trip to Tennessee. Rated G. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5, 7:15 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:30 and 2:45. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. The Haunting in Connecticut Based on a true story, this film chronicles the creepy tale of a family who moves into a nice, big Victorian home, only to discover the hard way about its haunted past. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. I Love You, Man Paul Rudd scrambles to find an acceptable best man to serve in his upcoming nuptials in this overblown statement on male intimacy in our culture. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Knowing Get this: Nicolas Cage tries to save the world. Really. From a huge disaster. And he may have to make “the ultimate sacrifice.” Ooooh! Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 with

Page 38 April 23–April 30, 2009

but in 2-D, at the Village 6 at 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 4, and at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3. Observe and Report Seth Rogen is a mall cop with great aspirations who finds himself competing with police officer Ray Liotta to bust a flasher. And he does it all for the love of low-cut make-up counter lady Anna Farris. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7:15 and 9:45 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20 and 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. State of Play Super-edgy-thriller time, people: An all-star cast spins a tale of conspiracy and political maneuvering, which of course always sloshes over into murder, now, doesn’t it? Spend a coupla hours with Russell Crowe, Ben Affleck, Rachel McAdams and Robin Wright Penn. Rated PG13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Sunshine Cleaning Amy Adams and Emily Blunt star as sisters in this tale of a start-up crime scene cleaning business, with support from Alan Arkin and Steve Zahn. Rated R. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES 17 Again Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at noon, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:35 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:55, 4:35, 7:10 and 9:35. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 7:15 and 9:10.

Obsessed Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:20, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:50. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Race to Witch Mountain Cabbie Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson picks up two teens who happen to be aliens on the lam in this reboot of the family-pleasing Disney franchise. Rated PG. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:30, 2:50 and 5:05 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40 and 4. The Soloist Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:20, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:50. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. State of Play Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:05, 4:05, 7:10 and 9:40. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Taken Liam Neeson is a retired CIA agent who turns into a “crime-fighting machine” when his daughter is kidnapped in Paris by Albanian sex slave traders. Rated PG-13. Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 7:20 and 9:25. Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Anne Pastore. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., April 24. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; Wilma— 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton—961FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton—363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell—752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.


Scope Books Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Amy Alkon

PERSONALS Ready to meet great new people?

WOMEN SEEKING SWEET KIND WOMAN SF, 32, 5’5”, brown hair, blue eyes, N/S, N/ kids, likes to go out and see movies, read books, watch tv. Seeking a nice gentleman, 37-40, to share fun times, romance and maybe more. 305444



ATTRACTIVE & FIT SWF, 68, enjoys hiking, camping, skiing, snow-shoeing, gardening, travel, dining, quiet evenings at home. Seeking kind, conscious man to share life’s simple pleasures. 263816



I’M SHY AT FIRST... but I warm up quickly. Honest, caring, affectionate, hard-working gal, 34, N/S, kids at home, enjoys outdoors, Nascar, animals, movies, camping, pool, darts. Seeking honest, employed SM, 34-46. No games. 279293 @ MickyB



EASYGOING, SILLY, SINCERE Sarcastic, cynical SWF, 30, 5’6’’, hardworking, into gardening, movies, dining, travel, road trips, poetry, arts and crafts. Seeking SM, 30-50, similar interests. 274193



SWEET CHEEKS! SWF, 25, 5’7’’, brown/green, affectionate, outgoing, loves music, movies. Searching for Prince Charming, 27-35. Must be family-oriented, dedicated, honest, willing to show me true love is possible. 274172



FARM WOMAN SWF, 53, love the rural life, honest, kind personality, seeks SM, 52-66, to share activities, skiing, outdoor activities, trav273964 @ eling, cooking and more. winterphylli



SOUND LIKE YOU? SWF, 46, 5’5’’, working mother of two, looking for a man, 37-53, who enjoys golfing, swimming, boating, rafting, skiing, movies, time at home, etc. 277049



BEAUTIFUL GREEN EYES SWF, 32, N/S, light drinker, has cats, likes horror movies, music, more. Would like to meet secure WM for friendship first. Let’s have fun together. 277876

OVERLY LOVING Kind, fun-loving SWF, 46, 5’4’’, buxom blonde/brown, N/S, enjoys horseback riding, dancing. Looking for SM, 21-67, who has a career, is romantic, believes in chivalry. 309347



HAPPY BUT LONELY DWF, 49, business-owner w/2 children and 2 dogs. Enjoys the outdoors, barbecues, gardening, cooking. Seeking SM who’s a natural leader in a relationship yet understands his woman’s intellect and capability. 297238 @ delightful1



VERY ATTRACTIVE LADY Older WF with a sincere desire for a fun relationship that includes good humor. Likes cooking, hiking, being outdoors. If you like good conversation, cooking, dancing, dogs and the beauty of life, contact me. 60-72. 311062



LOVES HORSES SF, 29, 5’8”, 130lbs, never married, no children, seeks athletic, animal-loving, outdoorsy, witty, comical, handsome prince to sweep this princess off her feet. Is that too much to ask? 261002



NEW TO THE AREA SWF, 22, very easygoing, likes traveling, music, the outdoors and more. Seeking a nice guy, 21-28, for possible LTR. 294161 @ NDgirl86



LOOKING FOR YOU? SWF, 46, enjoys golf, skiing, travel, movies and a good micro-brew. Looking for nice, fun-loving man, 37-53, who’ll share his interests, humor, thoughts and then... who knows? 277047



MUST LIKE DOGS WF, 27, looking for a professional male, 26-35, who enjoys animals, outdoors activities and enjoying what the city has to offer. 278828



SO MUCH TO KNOW... about me. Liberal WF, 5’6”, red/hazel, very active, loves horses, likes biking, hiking, reading, watching sports. Seeking very active, secure WM, 45-58, with a good sense of humor. 286734



SEEKING SOMEONE NEW Active, hard-working SWF, 33, openminded, honest, enjoys watching horror movies, doting on my cats. Will share my great sense of humor with the right SWM, 25-37. Friendship first, possible relationship. 291395 @ nachomomma50



INDUSTRIOUS MAN WANTED Attractive, fit, health-conscious SWF, 62, 5’4’’, 120lbs, loves reading books, camping, exploring. Looking for SW/BM, 57-72, for possible relationship. 292410



NEW TO MONTANA Attractive SWF, 45, 5’8’’, long auburn hair, green eyes, seeks wonderful guy, 30-50, who is honest, sincere, enjoys nature, the arts, music, animals. 295494



I THINK LOVE STILL EXISTS Honest, caring, loving SWF, young-looking 56, seeks strong, confidnet gentleman, 5375, to be my best friend, lover, playmate, and partner in the dance of life. The next step is yours. 291187 @ ladybluwater



WHERE THE BROTHERS AT? BBW, 36, green-eyed sweetie, seeks faithful, kind, intelligent BM, 35-48, for friendship, possible LTR. Enjoy movies, long walks, dancing and much more! 296424



SEEKING A NICE GUY SWF, 50, seeks friendly, secure man, 6475, who is ready for a sweet change. Let’s build a friendship and enjoy the simple pleasures in life. 297307



LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE SWF, 50, N/S, enjoys the wide open spaces, road trips, contemplating nature’s beauty, taking long walks, biking, swimming, socializing with friends. Seeking friendly man, 45-55, for friendship, maybe more. 282465 @ Geri



ARE YOU THE ONE? SWF, 32, mother of three, passionate, honest, sincere, believes the key to any good time is good company and conversation. Seeking similar SWM, 37-45. 301196



Answer an ad: 1. Note the ad

☎ number listed in the

2. Call 1-900-226-1232 It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,

or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a major credit or debit card 3. Follow the instructions to listen to the advertiser’s voicemail greeting 4. Leave a personal message for the advertiser



WIDOW NEEDS COMPANIONSHIP SF, 62, independent, enjoys computers, television, camping, traveling, friends and family. Seeking SM, 55-72, with similar interests, for possible LTR. 287419 @ PatsyMontana



\ACTIVE LIFESTYLE SWF, 52, N/S, enjoys travel, antiques. Seeking SWF, 48-58, N/S, for sincere friendship, possibly more. 305226





ARCHETYPAL WILD WOMAN SWF, 27, seeks fellow mindful outdoor enthusiast to get out of town with and explore springtime wilderness! Hike, bike, boat, climb, hand glide, etc. 285159 @ montuckywoman

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

MEN SEEKING GOOD-LOOKING FELLA Active SWM, 25, 5’7’’, 190lbs, nice blue eyes, athletic build, seeks compassionate, active SF, 18-34, who enjoys the outdoors, exercise and more. 308460



SEARCHING SWM, N/S, carpenter, desires K-9 friendly SF, 30s, with long hair, for hiking, biking, climbing, hunting, gardening and the arts. 312047

Place your own ad: 1. Call 1-800-710-8737 2. Answer some simple questions to create your ad 3. Record a voicemail greeting 4. Learn how to pick up your messages – we’ll let you know when new ones have arrived!



TALK SOMETIME? SWM, sub-contractor, 6’, 175lbs, brown/ green, likes flying, skiing, sailing and surfing, keeping active. Seeking fit, fun-loving SF, 50-55, to share friendship and new adventures. 229043



LET’S HOOK UP! Male, 22, 5’5’’, 138lbs, smoker, seeks woman, 18-30, who enjoys bowling, snowboarding, video games, tv and movies. 263228



GET TO KNOW ME! SWM, 37, 5’9’’, 175lbs, light brown/blue, likes movies, sports, music, beach walks. Seeking SW/HF, 25-40, same interests. 263635



SOMEONE TO TALK TO SWM, 38, 6’, brownish-blond/blue, smoker, likes golf, hiking, rafting, seeks WF, 2545, to share my life. 263932



ARE YOU READY? SWM, 46, 5’9”, slim build, N/S, likes country and rock-n-roll, fishing, animals, camping, taking walks. Seeking SWF, 3550, N/S, for friendship, possible romance. 270593



ARE WE A MATCH? SWM, 43, 5’5’’, 187lbs, brown/green, enjoys music, walks, camping, fishing. Seeking similar SW/BF, 20-40. 274411



COOL GUY WM, 5’11”, 185lbs, medium build, likes working out, playing sports, having fun, more. Looking for WF, 18-35, who enjoys the same. 275442



GIVE ME A CHANCE SM, 39, 6’2’’, 225lbs, light smoker, no children, medium build, likes fly-fishing, hunting, camping. Seeking SF, 18-45. 277072



SEEKING DIVERSITY SWM, 43, intelligent, attractive, well-traveled, fit, clean-cut, blond/blue, successful, seeking slender, attractive A/B/BF, 30-45, for dining, travel, cooking, intelligent conversation. 281407



LET’S GIVE IT A SHOT SWM, 52, 5’8’’, N/S, athletic build, loves spicy food, boating, waterskiing, hunting, fishing, camping. Seeking SWF, 35-52, for friendship or more. 281682



Get more: ❖ Check out www.missoulapersonals.com to find more great new people ❖ See the @ symbol in an ad? That means the advertiser has a profile (and maybe even a picture!) at www.missoulapersonals.com ❖ Meet more new people using text messaging on your cell phone. Text “mistxt” to 23578 to learn more. ❖ Need help? Some tips? Email CustomerService@PlacePersonal.com or call 1-617-450-8773

Free Ads: Free ads placed in this section are not guaranteed- to run every week. Be sure to renew your ad frequently to keep it fresh. Guidelines: Personals are for adults 18 or over seeking monogamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carefully screen all responses and have first meetings occur in a public place. This publication reserves the right to edit, revise, or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content of or replies to any ad. Not all ads have corresponding voice messages. To review our complete guidelines, call (617) 425-2636

0421

MISSOULA AREA?

WEDDING BELLS ARE VIBRATING I’ve been engaged to a girl for two years. For about two weeks, she’s been texting a sales guy she met through work, and the text messages are in the hundreds per day. I found out from our cell phone bill, then snooped on her phone. Last night when we were out, I read one when she went to the bathroom. It said “Want 2 go out of town w/me?” I didn’t see her response because I spotted her coming back and quickly returned her phone to her side of the table. She hasn’t been neglecting me lately; if anything, she’s been a little more loving. So, am I wrong for being suspicious? If not, how do I approach this without being a jerk in case nothing’s going on? —Unsettled There are days when a guy needs to text a girl 15 or 20 times an hour—typically because he’s her gay best friend and it would mean so much to him to have her there the first time he gets his eyebrows string-plucked. But, hundreds of messages a day? Assuming she works an eighthour day, if she sends 200 texts during her work day, that’s 25 per hour, which means she’s texting the guy every 2.4 minutes. So, while there’s some tiny, electron-microscopic chance she isn’t cheating on you or about to, it’s clear she’s screwing her boss bigtime. And, come on, you’re a straight guy. Is there a girl in the world you have that much to say to—unless you’re scheming her into bed? And then, while I can’t get behind snooping, when you did snoop, the one message you saw was “Want 2 go out of town w/me?” Whaddya wanna bet his follow-up wasn’t “Oh, N where R my manners? B sure 2 invite ur fiance!”? A girl who’s serious enough about a guy to be engaged to him will make it clear to other guys that she’s off-limits; usually by starting sentences with “My boyfriend and I,” and long before some sales dude starts sending her sonnets about her breasts with all the vowels missing. Beyond that, being in a relationship with somebody, especially when you’re on the verge of making it a lifelong deal, means you put them first. Sure, you have friends of your own and stuff you do without your partner, but if you’re committing to one man, there’s something a little off if, during sex, you’re tempted to excuse yourself to the bathroom to see if you have any text messages from another.

Now, maybe this is just a last-ditch oats-sewing before she becomes Mrs. Cleaver II, or maybe she has cold feet and is too big a jerk to do the decent thing and call a time out. Then again, maybe she just wants what she wants when she wants it. If you start by accusing her of cheating, she’s likely to deny it. Take a less confrontational approach—over a week or two, so you both have time to think—and discuss whether the two of you are really ready to get married, how you’ll both stay monogamous, and, oh yeah, does she have any idea whose number that is on pages one through 326 of the cell phone bill?

MITE MAKES RIGHT In a recent column, you chronicled how women “overwhelmingly” want tall men, and included a woman’s comment from an ABC News report about how she’d only date the short guy if the tall guy were a murderer. I hope you’ll consider using your platform to raise awareness about this insidious discrimination, rather than perpetuating it. —Undertall And Overlooked Apparently, you’d have no problem dating a woman who’s shaped like a dumpster. I mean, if you did, wouldn’t that be “lookist” of you? Not everybody starts out with the same helping of genetic Monopoly money. That’s just how it is. While men evolved to prefer beautiful women, it appears women evolved to prefer men who are taller than they are. You can raise all the awareness in the world about how unfair that is, but nobody dates somebody because it seems the magnanimous thing to do. Now, there are some women who don’t seem to care so much about a guy’s height, but no woman wants a short, angry guy. Make peace with (sorry!) what little you’ve got, and maybe you can become a really confident short guy, with a winning personality. Look for women who are shorter than you. If you’re a biz wiz, you’re especially in luck. A platinum Amex can add a good two inches to a man’s height. The key to a Mercedes, maybe another inch. And a private jet? You’ll be in the running to replace the starting forward of the Knicks—while fighting off international supermodels, or at least instructing their shins, “One at a time, ladies, one at a time!” Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r A v e , # 2 8 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Page 39 April 23–April 30, 2009


Scope Books Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

PERSONALS

Free Will A strology

Ready to meet great new people?

by ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Rachael Yanetta, a young English woman, got a bellyache while working her regular job at the local pub. Despite the pain, she toughed it out until her shift was over, then went home. Her distress increased, though, and at 3 a.m. she checked into the hospital. A little over an hour later, to her shock, she gave birth to her first child, having been unaware she was pregnant until the very end of her nine-month term. I predict a comparable sequence for you in the coming days, Taurus. You’ll power through some perplexing anomaly that leads to the unexpected arrival of a new creation or vital revelation.

IMPORTANT NUMBERS:

JUST FOR FUN Male looking for a female to get together and have some fun with. Not interested in a relationship. 281153

ADULT

Answer an ad:

WANT SOMETHING NEW WM want to try anything new and is game for something different. If interested, give me a call. 282388

MERCEDES LADIES



CANCER (June 21-July 22): This would be an excellent time for you to lead a populist revolt to overthrow the abusive authorities or out-of-touch elites who have been working their dumb magic for far too long. It would also be a perfect moment for you to stop cooperating with energy-draining situations that undermine your autonomy. The Age of Passivity is ending, thank Goddess. Launching the Age of Awakening may not be easy or fast, but you will attract extra help and encouragement if you do it now.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I am not interested in money,” said actress Marilyn Monroe. “I just want to be wonderful.” Consider the possibility of trying out that approach for a while, Leo. I’m not, of course, encouraging you to be apathetic toward financial matters. But I do think it’s an excellent time to for you to specialize in making yourself more wonderful. The cosmic signs say that you now have access to unprecedented reserves of the most profound kind of charm (not the cheap, fake, manipulative stuff). They also suggest that certain qualities in you that have previously been merely fine are primed to evolve into being amazingly marvelous.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I once had a Virgo girlfriend who was exceedingly well-organized. The capstone of her heroic efforts to keep life rigorously ordered was her approach to her underwear. Each of her panties was embroidered with the name of a day of the week. In the large drawer where they were kept, all the Mondays were in a neat pile at the upper left-hand corner, followed by the rest of the days in their proper sequence. She was always able to grab the correct pair, even when she was half-asleep and the room was dark. If I were going to contact her now, I’d recommend that she should, for a change, arrange her intimate items out of order, and maybe wear Monday on Friday, or put Tuesday on inside-out on Saturday. According to my reading of the omens, this kind of playful self-trickery would set the right tone for you Virgos; it would encourage the universe to send you the benevolent interruptions and interesting interventions you need.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Being understood is not the most essential thing in life,” said actress Jodie Foster. While that may be true for her, I bet you won’t turn it down if a flood of appreciation and acknowledgement comes your way in the next few weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you now have the potential to be better understood than maybe you’ve been in a long time. I suggest you take maximum advantage of this good fortune. Make it easy for people to see you for who you really are.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The famous physicist Robert Oppenheimer sometimes displayed a disarming humility. “There are children playing in the streets who could solve some of my top problems in physics,” he said once, “because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.” I invite you to consider the possibility that you, too, could learn a lot from people you regard as beneath you or utterly unlike you. It’s one of those rare phases in your astrological cycle when useful revelations are likely to arrive from outside your normal frame of reference. (P.S. Animals might be great teachers as well.)

or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a majorcredit or debit card

MEN SEEKING HARDWORKING Native American male, 48, 5’9”, 160lbs, brown/brown, medium build, works out, likes the park, biking, fishing, horseback riding, more. Seeking female, 25-48, for dating. 282438



CONSTRUCTION WORKER SWM, 44, 5’10’’, 200lbs, seeks fun-loving woman who enjoys interesting conversation, needs a little excitement in her life! 282735



Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 40 April 23–April 30, 2009



FRIENDS

OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST SWM, 42, 5’10’’, 165lbs, fit, active professional, N/S, N/D, seeking SWF, 25-39, who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking, fly fishing and traveling, for friendship or more. 285175

SEEKING FRIENDS Female, 44, looking for friends, age open, who enjoys the outdoors, wildlife, the country scenery, hiking, fishing, camping. Friendship, companionship, and getting to know each other! 307262

LET’S TALK WM, N/S, N/D, looking for female, 35-42, for companionship that may possibly lead to a relationship. Someone who likes bowling, playing pool and more. 284641

OTHER





SEEKING NICE PERSON SWM, 20, 6’3”, 200lbs, blond/green, in shape, looking for a WF, 18-30, to hang out and have fun with, maybe leading to more. 288398



LET’S TALK American-Indian SM, 45, 5’3’’, 190lbs, likes long walks, wishing on stars. Looking for SF, 35-40, for friendship or more. 289174



WANTS COMPANIONSHIP Retired widower, 72, financially secure, enjoys golf, fishing, family, cruises, camping, gardening, my two poodles. Seeking relationship with similar lady, 50-67. 290376

214-7943 Now

Hiring

SHOW ME THE ROPES Clean, discreet, fun-loving, laid-back curious male, 30, 5’8’’, enjoys dining, relaxing at home, partying. Seeking openminded, fun Bi/GM to show me the ropes! 310170



LET’S GET TOGETHER SM, very oral and loves to receive, would love to meet singles and couples, males and females. ALso into toys and whatever else you would like. 307658



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JOIN US Bi couple, middle-aged, into pretty much anything, looking for the same, or select singles, who would like to share life’s pleasures with us. 291876



HI LADIES! Attractive male in search of no-strings, discreet afternoon fun. Are you up for it? 281777



READY FOR YOU WM, 5’11”, 180lbs, dark/blue, likes partying and having a lot of sex. Give me a call if interested. 273361

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SENSE OF HUMOR SWM, 44, 6’2’’, looking for outgoing SWF, 30-50, light drinker ok, who enjoys sports, outdoors, animals, kids, camping, fishing. 291953



LET’S GIVE IT A TRY! SM, 62, N/S, slim build, likes fishing, lounging around at home. Looking for SM, age open. 292992









WAITING FOR YOUR CALL GWM, 25, 6’1’’, 235lbs, seeks outgoing, gregarious, stable GWM for dating and romance. I enjoy movies, dining, bowling. 305105

LET’S TALK WM, 5’6”, 125lbs, reddish-brown/blue, nice tattoos, enjoys hiking, walks, bike rides, theater, dining out, time with friends and family, more. Seeking someone for friendship. 299138

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN! SWM, 65, 6’, 215lbs, N/S, social drinker, active, semi-retired businessman, likes outdoors, country music, dancing, hunting, traveling. Seeking SW/HF, 45-70, who’s kind, caring, in shape, for dating, possible LTR. 295947

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): As a leading practitioner of magical thinking, I regard it as my responsibility to serve as a kind of Quality Control Board. Excessive trust in invisible forces and odd coincidences, after all, can be as hazardous to your intelligence as blind faith in pure reason. This week, in fact, I’d rather see you operate like a scientist than a mystic. I hope you’ll evaluate every situation by invoking the powers of unbiased perceptivity and lucid objectivity. So please don’t heed anyone’s mumbo-jumbo, especially if it’s fear-based. Reject supernatural explanations if natural ones make equal sense. Be assured that when superstitious fantasies pop up, they’ll have little to do with what’s actually happening.

LOOKING FOR LOVE SWM, 18, 6’, short black hair, wears glasses, looking for SM, 18-21, to hang out with and get to know. 294712

NEWS FLASH! Attractive, single Native American guy, early 40s, seeks adventurous Native American beauty, 25-40, for love, harmony, honesty, balance and much more, if fate leads us that way. 282900



Escort Referral Service



Call 1-800-710-8737 Answer some simple questions to create your ad

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ve said enough for the time being. You have expressed the hell out of yourself and have been thorough in providing your vision of how the collaborative efforts should unfold. But now I think you should cultivate the power of silence. Keep your evolving thoughts to yourself for a while so that they can ripen in your imagination, and allow the ideas you have already put out there to fully work their way into the imaginations of others. In early May, it will be time to jump back in with a new dose of your insight and inspiration. By then, people should be begging you for more.



OPEN-MINDED FUN SWM, 52, 5’9’’, 190lbs, brown/blue, cleancut, fit, D/D-free, easygoing, laid-back, not into games, seeks SM, 18-55, for adult fun. 296853

Place your own ad:

DO YOU CANOE? SWM, 50, athletic, N/S, N/D, seeks SWF, 30-50, for canoeing, fly-fishing, camping. Let’s meet! 292008



LET’S HAVE SOME FUN Fit SWM, early 40s, looking for discreet encounters with ladies, 40-55. Please be slim. Married ladies are welcome. Will answer all replies. 291122

It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): It’s a Love Emergency! Am I right? There’s a growing itch in the romantic sphere, and it needs immediate scratching. I mean it really can’t wait for a few more days to pass; something’s got to be done soon. It may be true that this thickening of the plot has been underway for quite a while, and its growing urgency may have snuck up on you. It also may be true that the shift will ultimately be a promising development. But that doesn’t mean you can afford to be casual about it. Take action!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): From an astrological point of view, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to start a band and record an album. Your creativity is waxing, your attunement with the right side of your brain is especially sweet, and you will benefit immensely from anything you do to become less of a spectator and more of a participant. To jumpstart the process, go to Wikipedia and click on “random article.” That’s the name of your band. Then go to en.wikiquote.org and click on “random page.” The last few words of the last quote on that page will be your album’s title. Finally, go to flckr.com, click on “the last 7 days,” and choose a photo from the new page to be your CD cover. (My band is Widemouth Blindcat, our album is “More Time for Dreaming,” and our cover art is a spiral staircase from here: tinyurl.com/c89rt7.)



Call 1-900-226-1232

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As I close my eyes and ask my deep self for a psychic vision that symbolizes your current astrological omens, here’s what I see: You’re trying to look relaxed even though you have one foot on a dock and one foot on a boat as the boat pulls away. How should we interpret this scene? Here’s what I think: It seems likely that at any minute now you will have to commit yourself to either the dock, the boat, or the water.





LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, 47, 5’9’’, 175lbs, hard-working, nonsmoker, non-drinker, loves the outdoors. Looking for SF, 35-50, for friendship, dating and more. 294605





*charges may apply

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Astrology and Tarot cards are my favorite divinatory tools, but I also get a lot of use out of magnetic poetry kits. These are boxes full of evocative words and symbols in the form of refrigerator magnets. Sometimes after analyzing your astrological omens, I’ll close my eyes, beam a question out into the ethers, and pluck a few magnets at random from one of my poetry kits. I just did that for you. “What are the keys to unlocking the enormous reserves of energy that are potentially available for Aries folks right now?” I asked. Here’s the message that came: “swooping orgasms & laughing tears.” (Or it could also be arranged this way: “laughing orgasms & swooping tears.”)

LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, new to the area, 31, 170lbs, brown/ green, nice build. Looking to meet a nice girl to spend some of my time with. Let’s enjoy the simple things in life. 297422



DON’T WANT TO BE ALONE... for the holidays. WM, 41, 5’11”, 220lbs, blond/blue, business owner, wants to meet WF, 30-45, who likes to have a good time. 300473



LOOKING FOR ROMANCE SWM, 33, 5’11”, slim and fit Christian, seeks mature, sincere SWF, ages 20-45, for dating and possible LTR. I love movies, cats, reading, staying up late, playing board games, doing dinner and a show, romance, and more. 306560



TIRED OLD DREAMER SWM, 62, 5’8’’, 145lbs, would love to meet the woman of my dreams, 39-60. Call me, let’s connect! 308421



LOOKING FOR YOU SM, 30’s, clean-cut, easygoing guy seeks companion, friend, hopefully long-term. Family-oriented and likes outdoor activities. How about you? 269315



LET’S TALK SWM, 48, 6’, clean-shaven, independent contractor, seeks SM, 25-60, to spend some time together. Let’s talk! 292718



WANT TO TRY WM, 6’1”, 145lbs, brown/brown, wants to get together with a smooth man for some no-strings fun. A plus if you go both ways. 283737



866.399.5979

18+

0421


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

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Pet of the Week

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

There are still folks who don't recycle!!!

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

Final Silent Auction Gala 2009

April 25

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888583-2101. www.continentalacademy.com

6:30pm-10pm

MAKE MONEY NOW! LEARN TO BARTEND T O D AY. M o n t a n a Bartending Academy Get the Job You want in the Service Industry Learn how to: Increase your tips, Attract more customers, Manage alcohol responsibly within the law, Effectively write a resume, Communicate successfully in a job interview, Be a faster & more efficient mixologist BECOME AN EXCEPTIONAL BARTENDER!!! Guaranteed Job Placement Assistance upon Completion CLASSES FILLING FAST. CALL 880-1206 or E-MAIL mba@bresnan.net TODAY FOR SCHEDULING & DETAILS

Saturday

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Missoula Children's Theater 200 N. Adams

• Accidents & Personal Injury • Worker's Compensation • Social Security Disability

Over 17 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

Live music, beverages, delightful treats from Riversong Gourmet Organic Catering, and a chance to make a final bid on POTSKETCHES and one of a kind ceramic works.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Members: $40/person or $75/couple Non-members: $45/person or $80/couple

Medical Cannabis Certification in Missoula 541-8090

Help make our community a safer place. Sponsored By:

THE BONDSMAN

Harold Tamarzaray AKA "Ray Ray" OFFENSE:

25 YEARS

Probation violation following a conviction for robbery.

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FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800-475-0876

Nicholas Lee Morris OFFENSE: Failing to register as a violent offender.

AGE: 43 HEIGHT: 5 FT 9” HAIR COLOR: Blonde/Strawberry EYE COLOR: Brown

If a suspect is sighted, do not approach or attempt to apprehend them. If you have information regarding either of these two suspects, contact the United States Marshals Service at (406) 247-7030 or Local Law Enforcement.

My 89-year-old father, Frank Parks of Joliet, Illinois, served in the Seabees (1943-1946 in Guam) with Gary Plymale from Missoula. He lost track of Mr. Plymale several years ago. We were wondering if anyone has information on Mr. Plymale that they could share with us? If so, please call Carolyn Parks Baitinger (815) 723-8922 or cbaitinger68@comcast.net

Lost & Found REWARD Lost CD Case Possibly near the court house on Broadway & Ryman on Friday, April 3. Some of the cds have a lot of sentimental value (gifts, etc). CASH REWARD. 406-690-1524 LOST: Sunglasses- prescription, dark, hard case, wire rims. 5436982.

“Peggy Sue”- Originally a stray, we thought for sure someone was looking for Peggy Sue, so obviously sweet and well mannered. However that turned out not to be the case, and Peggy Sue is growing more and more lonely here at the the shelter. She has won over the hearts of many volunteers, who spend countless hours walking her and clicker training with her. She will make a perfect family pet or first dog for someone. She can be met with at the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. 549HSWM or online at www.myhswm.org.

Announcements I have a new business that I’m going to try out for 3 months. It’s Global Solutions LLC and I sure hope it works. Call Ole 327-7859 PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Pl a c e yo u r c l a s s i f i e d a d . Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 41 April 23–April 30, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS To Give Away

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

While other companies are cutting back …

filled. #2975352 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

42 years old, The Montana Army National Guard has many positions available starting at over $10.00/hr. $20,000 Enlistment Bonus $80,000 for College Education $20,000 for Prior Service. For more information call 1-800-GO-GUARD

live in beautiful central Montana. Salary negotiable, depending on experience. Send resume to Linda Armstrong, P.O. Box 5509, Helena, MT 59604 or email larmstrong@bankoftherockies.com EEO - Member FDIC #195

CONTRACTOR ASSISTANCE NEEDED. Accepting bids on summer projects; cement, plumbing, and maintenance. Contact Renee Rasmussen, Wibaux Public School, at 796-2474 ASAP. #196

SALES

ASSISTANT TO THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, F/T, Msla. Seeking fulltime ASSISTANT TO THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR to begin 6/1/09. DUTIES INCLUDE: Planning meetings, volunteer recruitment/coordination, publicity & marketing, hiring & supervision of artists, technical contractors & site managers, & working within a budget determined by Board of Directors. Media Relations & Marketing-writing PSAs, coordinating advertising budget/schedules, TV/radio appearances, supervision & design of marketing materials. Knowledge of MS Office, Dreamweaver, familiarity with e-newsletter & blog formats. Basic graphic design and photo manipulation skills (brochures, programs, event posters, etc). Assisting Exec Director with other business projects & programs, as well as clerical tasks such as filing, answering phones & other light office duties. MIN QUALIFICATIONS/EXP: Reliable/punctual; Familiar w/ MS Access, Word, Excel, Dreamweaver, web site alterations; Initiative to plan/promote business events; Congenial & courteous working manner with staff & public; Patience in working in a sometimes hectic environment; Well organized-can focus on several things that all happen simultaneously. Pay is $26,000/yr. Benefits provided after 6-month probationary period; Flex plan avail. Work: Mon-Fri; 8:30am-4:30pm DEADLINE: 5pm on Fri, 5/1/09. #2975322 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

MAINTENANCE PERSON, FT, Msla. MAINTENANCE PERSON NIGHT SHIFT (11pm-7am) needed for routine maintenance and repair at a Missoula hotel. This is a Fulltime position. Employer is willing to train, but experienced people are encouraged to apply. Hiring ASAP! Will be working with plumbing, electrical, carpentry, heating systems and pool maintenance, will occasionally be lifting up to 75lbs. Must also have a valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Will also be driving the shuttle van. Must be able to work unsupervised and will work weekends. Competitive wage depends on skills/experience. #2975348 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060

LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889 SKI TRAIL SNOW PACKER. 4’ spool with towing handle. In alley behind 422 West Spruce

WE ARE HIRING!

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Exciting work opportunity! PAID TRAINING! Great Bonus / Incentive Program! Receive pay per WORK ORDER and reimbursement for MILEAGE! Must have own work vehicle. Clean DMV. Health Ins.& 401K. Exp. a plus Email resume to:

swron@starwestsatellite.net Or call 888-541-8658 www.starwestsatellite.net

Volunteers AniMeals is looking for volunteers! AniMeals is a nonprofit animal food bank and no-kill adoption center. We are looking for volunteers to help with anything from socializing with the animals, office help, special events and delivery. If you are interested in helping AniMeals please call (406) 7214710 and ask for Kelli or email us with any questions at info@animeals.net You can always check us out on the web at www.animeals.com. Our hours are Monday-Wednesday from 8:00am-5:00pm, Thursday-Friday from 8:00am-7:00pm and Saturday from 11:00am-5:00pm. Help AniMeals feed hungry animals, make a difference in an animals life. Humane Society Volunteer Orientation. Do you love animals and have a few hours to help improve the lives of homeless pets? If so, come to the Humane Society of NW Montana Volunteer Orientation meeting on Saturday, April 25, at 11 AM. Volunteers assist in animal care, community education, reception area/ client relations, foster care, fundraising, mobile adoptions, dog walking, and many other capacities. For more information, please call 752PAWS (7297). The Humane Society Animal Adoption Center is located at 3499 Hwy 93 N in Kalispell

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CAR WASHERS, P/T, Msla. Missoula area employer is seeking Part-time Temporary CAR WASHERS to clean and detail rental cars. Duties would include: Thoroughly clean the interior and exterior of vehicles, drive vehicles for maintenance checks or minor repairs and driving rentals as needed to other locations. Must have a valid driver’s license with insurable Motor Vehicle Report (no DUIs), but employer prefers no moving violations on MVR. Some experience (3-6 months) in detailing is preferred, but employer is willing to train the right person. Will note car damage. Should be able to change tires. Wage starts at $8.00/hour. Hours and days of work will include weekends and evenings, 20+ hours per week. Employer prefers applicants with some flexibility. Open until

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

Advertise Your Service Prices as low as $8.25/week! Call 543-6609

Employment

Research - Field Interviewer INTERVIEW PEOPLE FOR THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT SPONSORED STUDY RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE, a research firm in North Carolina, is seeking field interviewers to interview randomly selected household residents in the Missoula, Montana areas. The study will start in June and continue through the end of December 2011. • Evening and Weekend hours • Average 20 to 25 hours per week with a possibility of up to 40 hours per week • Paid training (7-8 days) • Pay range, based on experience, starting at $12.00* • Dependable transportation required, mileage reimbursed at 55.0 cents per mile • No solicitation involved, although skills gained from previous sales work is helpful • Household Interviewing and/or computer experience preferred but not necessary To express an interest, go to http://nsduhweb.rti.org/newsad and enter the following 6 digit code: 778024. *All interviewers will be employed by Headway Corporate Staffing Services, under subcontract to RTI. Headway Corporate Staffing Services is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

CASHIER / EQUIPMENT ATTENDANT, P/T, Msla. Unique Missoula business needs a Part-time CASHIER/EQUIPMENT ATTENDANT. If you are looking for parttime work during the days, this may be perfect for you! Duties would include: Operating a cash register, Interacting with adults and children in a cheerful manner, Operating a carousel and ensuring that customers enjoy a quality experience. Due to the nature of the equipment, applicants must be old enough to operate heavy equipment, per state laws. Applicants do not need any experience, but should have excellent customer service and enjoy being around people. Conservative facial piercing is allowed by this employer. This is a nonsmoking workplace and smoking-breaks will not be allowed. Work days and shifts would be Monday-Friday, from 11:00am-3:30pm, and could be year round if the applicant wants. Wages are $6.90 an hour. #2975343 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CHINKING LABORERS, FT, Msla. Seeking an experienced full-time CHINKING LABORER requiring some travel. DUTIES INCLUDE: Apply chinking using a mortar with a sponge brush between joint of log homes; apply stain and power wash. Must not be afraid of heights. Valid driver’s license is required for travel. Overnight travel pays room and board. Shift is 7:00am to 4:00pm, Monday thru Friday. Must have 24 months chinking experience and previous painting and/or staining experience. Pay is $10.00/hr DOE. #2975342 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060 FLAGGING SUPERVISOR, F/T, Msla. Guide or control vehicular or traffic at construction sites. Must have current flagging and supervisor certificates for highway projects. Must have current drivers license, be able to travel and work long hours if needed. FEDERAL (DAVIS BACON) WAGES ON MOST JOBS. #9926492 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 FLEXIBLE BENEFITS ACCOUNTANT, FT, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a full-time Flexible Benefits Accountant. Duties include processing and keeping accurate balances of flex deposits on clients’ accounts. The incumbent assists flex plan participants and clients with questions pertaining to flexible benefits in accordance with the regulations outlined by Section 125 of the IRS Code. Other duties include posting flex deposits into the flex Luminex system, keep ledger in excel spreadsheets of deposits posted, log administrative fees, balances quarterly reports, and works with customers to resolve account discrepancies. Full job description is located at the Missoula Job Service front desk. Must have High School Diploma or GED. Previous experience with computer software applications and customer service is required. Testing must be completed for Basic Office Skills, Math Problems, Data Entry 10-Key (on screen), Customer Mindset Survey, Typing-Medical 1 Minute (on screen), Microsoft Word 2000, Microsoft Excel 2000 and Writing Thank You. Tests can be taken only once per opening. Allow up to 2 hours for the testing. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. #2975344 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 GOVERNMENT JOBS: Earn $12 to $48 Per Hour. Benefits, Paid Training. Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Administrative, Clerical, Of fice, Accounting, Finance, Wildlife, More! 1-800320-9353 x 2001 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 150 www.easywork-greatpay.com JOBS, JOBS, JOBS. Part-time job! Full-time BENEFITS - to include medical and dental. If you are 17-

Missoula Independent Page 42 April 23–April 30, 2009

NETWORK & SYSTEMS ADMINISTR Missoula web hosting company seeks experienced admin to help manage our 24/7 infrastructure. Must have Juniper, Cisco, and Linux expertise. 5414678. www.modwest.com/jobs or jobs@modwest.com RESIDENTIAL HOUSE CLEANERS, P/T, Msla. Residential House Cleaners needed for America’s #1 house cleaning service. This is a company that highly values their employees! No experience needed, employer will train. Cleaning is for residential homes and done in teams of 2-3 people. MUST have reliable transportation, proof of insurance, valid DL and phone or other means of immediate communication. *Background checks and drug tests will be conducted by employer. *Hours per week will vary depending on house load. Must be available Mon-Fri between 8:30 am to 4:00 pm. Saturday work may be an option for interested applicants. Paid weekly. Training wage is $8.00/hour for the first week and then will range between $8.50-$11.50/hour plus mileage to the job site. #2975323 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RESTAURANT COOK, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a part-time (4 or 5 days/week) COOK for an established restaurant in Frenchtown. Duties include prep, line work and full menu cooking, as well as light cleanup in kitchen area. Seeking an individual with breakfast, lunch and dinner cooking experience. Work days and work shifts will vary. Rate of pay starts at $9.00/hour for about 2532 hours per week. Must have reliable transportation and this position also includes free golfing at the business golf course. #2975356 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 SERVERS, P/T, Msla. A Thai Restaurant in downtown Missoula has an IMMEDIATE need for parttime SERVERS. Duties include taking orders and serving food in a prompt and friendly manner. Employer is seeking applicants with 3-6 months experience. Customer service skills are essential in this position. Will also be assisting in clearing tables and some dishwashing is required. Must work well under pressure and be open to fastpace. Work days and work hours will vary which includes weekends, nights and spilt-shifts. Restaurant is closed Sunday’s. Pay is $6.90/hr plus tips. #2975308 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 St Pats List -GENERAL / SUPPORT SERVICES, F & PT, Msla. Saint Patrick Hospital, a faith based healthcare ministry, is excited to offer the opportunity to apply for GENERAL / SUPPORT SERVICES positions. Refer to specific job descriptions on Saint Patrick Hospital’s website at www.saintpatrick.org. Qualifications and shifts vary. Wage is depending on experience. #2975336 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 S TAT E O F M O N TA N A POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL AG/COMMERCIAL LOAN OFFICER. Bank of the Rockies is seeking an individual with an agricultural and commercial lending background for our Lewistown, MT office. Business development is required and the successful applicant will be a self starter. Familiarity with guaranteed lending programs preferred. Excellent benefit package, including the opportunity to

BUDGET ANALYST II - Temporary, Msla. Employer is seeking a fulltime Temporary BUDGET ANALYST II. Duties Include: Providing support in administering the day to day pre and post award workload, review and negotiate research awards, writes and reviews subcontracts, assists with budget preparation, provides assistance in interpreting regulations, performs accounting work in managing grants and contract activities, processes payroll redistribution and subcontract payments and student stipend requests. Must have strong computer related skills (financial systems, databases and spreadsheets) and be skilled at producing reports. Requires a high school diploma and 4 years related work experience or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Employer prefers a Bachelor’s degree in Finance, Accounting, Business and/or Public Administration and demonstrated knowledge of and experience with Banner database software. This position is a 12 month, temporary, full-time position. Will work Monday through Friday, 8am 5pm. Pay is $15.885 per hour. Benefits included. #2975307 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060 POST OFFICE NOW HIRING! Avg. pay $21/hour or $54K annually including Federal Benefits and OT. Paid training, vacations. PT/FT. 1866-945-0325. #199

SKILLED LABOR A LIFE WITH A CAREER! Auto Transport Company seeking motivated drivers. Clean CDL, 100K verifiable miles. Car hauling experience necessary. Sign-On Longevity Bonus! Call Brad 406-855-3625. #194 CNC MACHINIST, F/T, Msla. A Lolo employer is seeking a permanent, full-time MACHINE SHOP MACHINIST. Needs 5 years CNC Lathe and Mill machinist experience. Set up, operate, or tend lathe and turning machines to turn, bore, thread, form, or face metal or plastic materials, such as wire, rod, or bar stock. Work days are Monday through Friday and work shifts are 8:00am - 5:00pm. Pay is depending on experience. #2975327 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060

PICKUP TRUCK & COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RV trailers and commercial trucks and buses to all 48 states and C a n a d a . L o g o n t o www.RVdeliveryjobs.com #197 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION AIRCRAFT MECHANIC FULL-TIME Great pay, ben-efits, vacation, $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800437-6044

SALES DIRECTOR, F/T, Msla. Local weight reduction center for women is seeking a full-time SALES DIRECTOR to work Monday-Friday, with an occasional Saturday morning. Wage will be $10.00 per hour plus commission. Must have a High School Diploma or equivalent and 2-3 years of previous outside commission sales experience. Requires excellent communication and computer skills. Duties will include: selling weight loss programs to new clients; completing all associated paperwork after client enrolls; guiding tours of the facilities and explaining what the weight loss program entails. Must be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. #2975349 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNTIES 100% RECESSION PROOF! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068

LEARN TO TEACH AND TURN 10-15 hours/week to

$1000+ /month

working from home.

Flexible Hours. Free online training. yourfreedomoffice.com

ENGINEERING TRAINEES Earn while you learn, no exp needed. Good pay, benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952

$500 SIGN-ON BONUS! Travel with young enthusiastic group, make money, have fun, see the country. Must be 18+, positions fill quickly. Call Trish 888-344-3004. #198

FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $$ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877)475-6289

$600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5.

PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 PRIMROSE MONTESSORI SCHOOL. Assistant Position Available. Must have knowledge of Montessori teaching method. Send resume/letter of interest to: Nancy Deskins, Director, PO Box 3354, Missoula, MT 59806 STEEL WORKER Get hands-on paid training w/great benefits, vacation, $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS PHYSICAL THERAPIST,F/T-P/T, Msla. Missoula Physical Therapy practice is seeking an experienced, licensed PHYSICAL THERAPIST. This position is with a thriving Physical Therapy practice, working with a team of 8 physical therapists. A minimum of 24 months experience as a licensed physical therapist is required and 36 months experience is preferred. Must be licensed in Montana. Manual skills is also a plus. This position starts out at 25 to 32 hours per week and will develop into fulltime over a 90 day period as the case load allows. Work days are Monday through Friday. Wage is Top Pay with benefits, DOE. Must be able to lift up to 50lbs. #2975361 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Fort Benton Realty, LLP 800-4060946. Fort Benton Investment Opportunities. Outdoor adventures franchise $50,000; Highway frontage lots with grain bins and granary $65,000; Triplex $99,500; Historic building on Missouri River $180,000; RV park plus home $258,000. www.fbrealty.com Fresh restaurant concept Invest in yourself! Our business is booming. Alternative to fast food coming to Montana. Limited franchises available. Check out our website, or email us for information. www.carusosandco.com LOOMIX(r) FEED supplements is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800-870-0356/kboen @loomix.com to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area. MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED NOW! Earn $100 - $300/day. No Experience Required. All Looks Wanted - FT/PT. Call Now 1-800605-5901 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 Need More Income? Learn How: Presentation; Wingate Inn, Msla. April 24, 7:30 PM. Reserve your Seat Now! Call: 273-4223. (Interviews after the 24th)

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com


CLASSIFIEDS Instruction

Instruction

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing.

Reiki Integrative Medicine, LLC 2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT Learn Reiki Yourself!

Reiki One Class June 6th 9am-6pm Cost: $130 CALL FOR MORE INFO • 360-9153

Missoula Community School

Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available. www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

Enrolling Summer & '09-'10 School Year 542-2833

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

721-0190

A.M. Yoga for Stress T-Th 7:45-8:45 a.m. $10 per class

Call Word of Hope at

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 BodyTalk, therapeutic Swedish massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Carla Green Massage, NCTMB 13 years, 211 N.Higgins #403, 4 0 6 - 3 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center! Warehouse Mall: 725 W. Alder, Suite 27. Regular Rates: $55/hr, $75/1.5hr, Students: $35/hr, $55/1.5hr. Erica: 396-6868, Souta: 207-6269, Mary: 5965842. Come see our local store and Art Gallery! Open M-F 107, weekends by appointment, and First Fridays 5-10pm. LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

113 W. Main 728-4395 For free confidential help after an abortion

Body/Mind/ Spirit

HEALTH IS FREEDOM Adrienne Veseth

Classical Homeopath

406.543.7055 freedomhomeopathy.com

406-549-6565 “The past is not the past if it still affects your present.”

Thinking about a wax?

Suffering with anxiety or depression? Think no one understands? Lucinda Bassett does. Get her free tape that will stop the suffering without drugs or alcohol. Call 800-652-9619.

Instruction

ALL NATURAL HOME GROWN BEEF FOR SALE. No chemicals. $1.60/lb. Hanging weight. 406240-9428

T'ai Chi 728-0918 missoulataichi.com TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

Adoption PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Backs, Cracks & Sacks

Construction Is my health at risk from previous exposure to asbestos? Abatement Contractors of Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

The Multi Item Store • 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Hydroponics 100 gal. hydroponic reservoir + extras. You haul, cash only. $100.00 OBO Lolo, MT 406-273-9946

Electronics

S AW M I L L S F R O M O N L Y $2,990.00 — Convert your LOGS TO VALUABLE LUMBER with your own Norwood portable band sawmill. Log skidders also available. norwoodsawmills.com/300n. Free information: 1-800-5781363, Ext.300-N

A Touch of Class NEW TO YOU Antiques & Treasures 11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

Congregations

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Missoula

Michelle McClain Waxing Specialist A Full Body Affair

Lolo 406-270-3230

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine IV Micronutrient Therapy

Dr. Christine White, ND

542-2147 www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com HIKING, BIKING, CAMPING AND BOATING Buy/Sell/Trade

10-6 • 543-0018

721-6056

I spy... Missoula! Where am I?

742 Kensington • 542-8090

Thrift Stores

Carlo's One Night Stand Costume Rental

ries o s s e c Ac Wigs 109 S. 3rd W. • 543-6350

SPECIAL

12-6 • M-Sat • On the Hip Strip

Garage Sale

at Cutting Crew 220 Ryman St.

BA R G A I N S

Instruction ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.MediaMakeupArtists .com 310-364-0665

Computers

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214 GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800-803-8819 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

Auction

HAIRCUT

KRISTA • 542-2978

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

111 S. 3rd W.

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

MSW, CHT, GIS

$15

Fly Rods

Clothing

The Goods

(next to Baskin Robbins on Brooks)

Sporting Goods

Consignments

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical

Ditch your dial-up! High-speed satellite internet service in rural areas from WildBlue! As low as $39.95/month! Call Expert WildBlue today at 1-800-9153965

Open Every Day

215 e main • missoula, mt • 541-6110 8:30am - 5:30pm weekdays 11am - 2pm Saturday

Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington

DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

crystallimit.com

Bathing Beauties Beads

Clothing

DIRECTV Satellite TV Special Offer: Save $21/month for one year, Free HD-DVR, Plus 3 Free months of HBO/Starz/Showtime! Call Expert Satellite. 1-888-246-1956 (credit card required)

1920 Brooks • 549-1729

501 S. Higgins Ave.

Positive. Practical. Casual. Comfortable. And, it's a church.

TEN PERCENT SOLUTION

Books! Books! Books!

FOR SALE: Landscaped Trees. Colorado Blue Spruce, 7-9’, Bold & Burlap. Polson, MT. Call 883-4553. #189

728-5693 • Mar y Place

Full Body Waxing

The Goods

Custom

Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

Hypnosis & Imager y

The Goods

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the following units: 236, 367, 617, 633. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 27, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, April 29, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

G A L O R E !

Find stuff for that new apartment @ Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a FREE 30 Minute Massage at:

THE WORLD’S LARGEST

Healthy Hummingbird 725 W Alder St, Suite 27

207-6269 Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

Sat. April 25, 9-1:30. UM Parking Structure. 243-4636 for details. Or visit our website www.umt.edu/sa/umadv

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 43 April 23–April 30, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Furniture

Automotive

Automotive

Automotive

DOMESTIC

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway

08 Chevy Aveo 4 Dr. AT Was $11,995 Now Only $9,995 SAVE $2,000 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

04 Chevy Malibu Sedan Ltd. Was $9,995 Now Only $7,695 SAVE $2,300 call Tina Baltz 406261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM MISSOULA’S NEW GO TO PLACE FOR CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. 2935 Stockyard Rd. Unit K2 406.214.1327

08 Chrysler PT Cruiser Was $12,995 Now $11,495 SAVE $1,500 call Tina Baltz 406261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

Music '08 Suzuki Forenza Sedan, Only 15 miles, Silver, Auto

$11,925 Outlaw Music

541-7533

Largest Selection of Electric & Acoustic Guitars in Western Montana 1706 Brooks Missoula, MT Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 728-5014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com DIRECTOR - Men’s A cappella Chorus - Barber Shop Harmony Society. Tuesdays 7:30 - 9:30. 5312142 TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

Pets & Animals

LDR Kennel

'07 Suzuki SX4 Sport (HB), 28k miles, Black, Local Trade

$12,888

Private Treaty. Registered Angus yearling bulls. Super dispositions, low birth weights, great EPDs. Priced for commercial breeder. Fertility tested. West edge of Billings. Gnerer Angus (406) 2598205

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

09 Ford Fusion Sedan Was $17,995 Now Only $15,495 SAVE $2,500 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 05 Ford Focus ZX3 Was 9,995 Now Only $7,695 SAVE $2,300 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

(stk#9110LB)

'08 Suzuki SX4 Sport, Only 52 miles, Blue, Auto, Sedan

$13,935 (stk#9120LA)

'08 Suzuki Grand Vitara, 5k miles, Red, Auto, Alloy Wheels

$17,968

'08 Suzuki XL7 Luxury, 13k miles, Black, Auto, V6, AWD, Sunroof, 7 psngr

$18,839 (stk#9062LA)

AKC German Shepherd Puppies Superior bloodlines, beautiful markings, family raised in the Blackfoot Valley. Shots, wormed, papered. Ready mid May. $650 Call 406-362-4890 leave message.

‘08 Ford Focus Sedan (stk8550LA), 8k miles, white, $12,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Automotive

05 Kia Rio Sedan Was $8,995 Now Only $6,695 SAVE $2,300 call Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

black, $12,784 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘06 Mazda 3s (stk9023la), 29k miles, $11,825 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘08 Mazda3 Sedan (stk8543LA), 12k miles, gray, $14,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘08 Smart Car fortwo passion cabrio (stk9108LA), 6k miles, orange $17,988 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘05 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean edition (stk 8332B), 55k miles, white, $16,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

(stk#9119LA)

(stk#9109LA)

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

‘07 Dodge Caliber SXT (stk9070LA), 7k miles, black, $13,998 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Automotive

'08 Suzuki XL7 Luxury, Only 3,429 miles, Gray, Auto, V6, AWD, Sunroof, 7 psngr

$19,529 (stk#9084LA)

2001 Ford Focus Wagon 82K. Good condition! Auto windows & locks. CD Player. $4,700 OBO. Call 605-484-1860. 0 6 P o n t i a c G 6 G T P Wa s $15,995 Now Only $10,995 SAVE $5,000 Toby Kundig 406871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 05 Pontiac Sunfire Coupe Was $9,995 Now Only $6,995 SAVE $3,000 call Toby Kundig 406871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

IMPORTS

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300 07 Honda CiviC SI, Sunroof, LOADED Was $21,995 Now Only $17,495 SAVE $4,500 call Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 1995 Honda Civic DX Well-maintained, 2 door, FWD, 5-speed manual transmission. 183K miles, mostly highway. AM/FM/CD player. Comes with snow tires on wheels. $2300 OBO. 360-5017. ‘07 Hyundai Elantra Sedan (stk8554LA), 7k miles, gray, $11,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Flanagan’s J e e p • M a z d a • L i n c o l n • M e rc u r y

Family owned & operated since 1974

1700 Stephens Missoula • 406.721.1381

www.flanaganmotors.com

Missoula Independent Page 44 April 23–April 30, 2009

05 Hyundai Accent Was $7,995 Now Only $5,695 SAVE $2,300 call Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM ‘07 INFINITI G35 Coupe (stk9073la), Gorgeous & Fast, $24,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘04 Jeep Liberty (stk8610LA), 59k miles, maroon, $10.999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Automotive

MOTOR HOMES/RVS WE TAKE RVs ON TRADE! call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 or Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

MOTORCYCLES 03 Jeep Grand Cherokee Was $10,995 Now Only $7,895 SAVE $3,100 call Tina Baltz 406261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

VANS 05 Kia Sedona LX Van Van Was $10,995 Now Only $6,495 SAVE $4,500 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

‘06 Harley Davidson H-D FLTRI (stk9098LA), 4k miles, purple, $16,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘04 Honda 450R (stk8601LC). Motocross ready, runs great! $4400 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Car of the Week!

‘08 Suzuki Forenza Sedan (stk9119LA), only 15 miles, silver, $11,925 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘06 Toyota Corolla Sedan (stk8114B), 53k miles, maroon, $11,997 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘06 Toyota Matrix HB (stk8445C), 15k miles, tan, $15,788 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

08 Toyota Camry 4dr, low miles Was $19,995 Now Only $17,995 SAVE $2,500 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

Kellogg, ID 1-800-635-8000

‘04 Volkswagen New Beetle GL TDI (stk9082LA), 46k miles, silver, $12,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

06 Volkswagon Jetta Was $14,995 Now Only $11,695 SAVE $3,300 call Tina Baltz 406261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

NEED NEW WHEELS?

04 VW Jetta GLS Leaving the country, must sell! 57k mi, power everything. $9000 OBO 509-570-4707 98 Chevrolet XCab Diesel 4x4 Was $10,995 Now Only $6,995 SAVE $4,000 call Tina Baltz 406261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 92 Chevy S-10 XCab 4x4 6cyl. Was $5,995 Now Only $2,895 SAVE $3,100 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 94 Chevy 1500, 4x4 Was $5,995 Now Only $2,995 SAVE $3,000 call Tina Baltz 406-2613660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM

SPORT UTILITY 08 Chrysler Pacifica AWD Was $19,995 Now Only $16,995 SAVE $3,000 call Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM 04 Honda Element EX sunroof, AWD, Was $12,995 Now Only $10,495 SAVE $2,500 call Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 WWW.RONANDODGE.COM ‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD (stk8270C), 74k miles,

FIND THEM

HERE


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of Missoula Development Park Sidewalk Improvements will be received by the Missoula County Auditor’s Office, Attn: Barbara Berens, on the second floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 until 1:30 PM local time on May 7th, 2009, and then publicly opened and read aloud. The project consists of the construction of approximately 50,000 SF of concrete sidewalk and 13,000 SF of asphalt sidewalk in the Missoula Development Park. The contract documents consisting of drawings, specifications, and bidding documents may be examined or obtained at the office of Professional Consultants, Inc., 3115 Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. The required deposit is $ 100.00 per set, which is non-refundable. In addition, the drawings and project manual may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. There will be a Pre-Bid Conference in Room 201 of t he Missoula County Courthouse Annex, at 1:30 PM on April 30th, 2009. Interested CONTRACTORS are encouraged to attend. CONTRACTOR and any of the CONTRACTOR’S subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406444-7734. CONTRACTOR is not required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project, but must have registered prior to execution of the Construction Agreement. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of Missoula County and the State of Montana. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula County, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a Labor and Materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Sealed bids shall be marked Missoula Development Park Sidewalk Improvements No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 1:30 PM., local time, May 7, 2009.The right is reserved to reject any or all proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the OWNER. The Contractor is required to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. Published at Missoula, Montana, this 23rd day of April 2009.

specifications should be directed to Erik Dickson, at (406) 258-3772. Prospective bidders must qualify as required by the State of Montana and Missoula County Missoula, Montana.. All proposals must be submitted on the regular forms furnished with the specifications, and each must be accompanied by cash, certified check, or bid bond in the amount no less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid. A corporate Surety and Payment Bond in the full amount of the contract will be required to guarantee its faithful performance. All proposals shall be submitted in an envelope marked “Bid Proposal for ReConstruction of Bridge Over Finley Creek, Doney Road.” The Board of Missoula County Commissioners reserves the right or to accept any bid or combination thereof which appears to serve the best interest of the county. By order of the Board of Missoula County, Missoula County, Montana /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman Dated this 10th Day of April, 2009

RESPONDENT(S). YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Petition for Forfeiture in this action, which is filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer with the Office of the Clerk of Court, located at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, and to serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff Attorney within twenty days after the service on this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Petition for Forfeiture of $3,103.00 (three thousand one hundred three dollars). Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 31st day of March, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Karen Johnson, Deputy Clerk.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT CALL FOR BIDS IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA RECONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE OVER LAVALLE CREEK DESCHAMPS LANE The Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed proposals for furnishing all materials, equipment, and labor, to construct a new Bridge over LaValle Creek on Deschamps Lane in Missoula, Montana. Bids will be received at the Missoula County Road Department, 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana 59802 until 10:00 o’clock a.m. May 1st, 2009 and immediately thereafter the proposals will be publicly opened and read. A contract will be awarded or bids rejected within forty-five (45) days after their opening. This contract includes supplying all labor, equipment, and materials necessary to construct the bridge with driven pipe pile abutments and trideck superstructure of Bridge over LaValle Creek, in accordance with plans and specifications. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Missoula County Road Department 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana 59802 or at the office of Muth Consulting Engineers, PC 1620 Regent Ave Suite C, Missoula, Montana 59801. All questions regarding interpretation of the technical specifications should be directed to Erik Dickson, at (406) 258-3772. Prospective bidders must qualify as required by the State of Montana and Missoula County Missoula, Montana. All proposals must be submitted on the regular forms furnished with the specifications, and each must be accompanied by cash, certified check, or bid bond in the amount no less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid. A corporate Surety and Payment Bond in the full amount of the contract will be required to guarantee its faithful performance. All proposals shall be submitted in an envelope marked “Bid Proposal for “ReConstruction of Bridge Over LaValle Creek, Deschamps Lane.” The Board of Missoula County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids, waive, formalities, or to accept any bid or combination thereof which appears to serve the best interest of the county. By order of the Board of Missoula County Missoula County, Montana /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman Dated this 10th Day of April, 2009

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No: 3 Cause No: DV-08-788 SUMMONS MIKE MCMEEKIN, SHERIFF MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA, Petitioner, vs. Dallas Peres, Respondent(s). THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT(S). YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Petition for Forfeiture in this action, which is filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer with the Office of the Clerk of Court, located at the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, and to serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff Attorney within twenty days after the service on this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Petition for Forfeiture of $1,905.00 (one thousand nine hundred five dollars) cash. Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 31st day of March, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Karen Johnson, Deputy Clerk

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT CALL FOR BIDS IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA RECONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE OVER FINLEY CREEK ON DONEY ROAD. The Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed proposals for furnishing all materials, equipment, and labor, to construct a new Bridge over Finley Creek on Doney Road in Arlee, Montana. Bids will be received at the Missoula County Road Department, 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana 59808 until 10:00 o’clock a.m. May 1st, 2009 and immediately thereafter the proposals will be publicly opened and read. A contract will be awarded or bids rejected within forty-five (45) days after their opening.. This contract includes supplying all labor, equipment, and materials necessary to construct the bridge with perched abutments and a Modular steel superstructure with asphalt wearing surface over Finley Creek, in accordance with plans and specifications.. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Missoula County Road Department 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana 59808 or at the office of Muth Consulting Engineers, PC 1620 Regent Ave Suite C, Missoula, Montana 59801. All questions regarding interpretation of the technical

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT Missoula County has issued a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) seeking lead design services to assist in developing and implementing a voice and data communications network to support coordinated operation of the Missoula County 9-1-1 Center, Emergency Operations Center, and associated field operations by emergency service agencies. A copy of the RFQ is available on the Missoula County Website, http://www.co.missoula .mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting: Barbara Berens Missoula County Auditor 200 West Broadway Missoula, MT 59802 Phone: (406) 258-3277 Fax: (406) 721-4043 email: bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. Responses to the RFQ must be received by Barbara Berens no later than 5:00 p.m., Friday, May 15, 2009. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No: 2 Cause No: DV-08-1122 SUMMONS MARK MUIR, CHIEF OF POLICE, CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA, Petitioner, vs. Jason R. Dominguez, Respondent(s). THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE GES, INC., A MONTANA CORPORATION, Plaintiff Against GEORGE MASTEL and LAVERNE MASTEL, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 5th day of May A.D., 2009, at 10:00 o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: The Defendant’s undivided 50% interest in the following described real property: Township 13 North, Range 20 West Section Four (4), Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4 NW 1/4); Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), less Chicago, Milwaukee, St, Paul & Pacific Railroad right-of-way. Township l4 North, Range 20 West Section ThirtyThree (33), Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4 SW 1/4), Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4), South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 35 acres; Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), South and West of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 7 acres; Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE 1/4 NW 1/4), South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 9 acres; Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 39 acres; Southeast Quarter of the Southwest (SE 1/4 SW 1/4), except Southeast corner, an area of one acre, more or less, east of slough which is excluded; Approximately 39 acres; Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW 1/4 SE 1/4) area North of slough, Approximately 24 acres; Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 SE 1/4) South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 39 acres, more or less; Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW 1/4 NE 1/4) South of Grass Valley Canal, Approximately 9 acres; Recording reference in Book 462 at Page 882 Micro Records. AND Lands lying in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. The Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) South of the

Missoula Independent Page 45 April 23–April 30, 2009


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Non-Medical Senior Care! Do you need assistance with a loved one or friend? DRIVING 65 is a bonded, non-medical senior care company, that can provide quality non-medical services for seniors and those in need, in an environment of their choosing, which will allow them to live a safe, happy and independent life. Call DRIVING 65 at 406-546-8857 - TODAY!

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543-3086  peteselec.com

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WINDOWS

CARPENTRY SCHROEDER LOG HOME SUPPLY, INC. Quality Log Home Products. Construction or Maintenance. Shipping from MN, MT, IN, TN. Free catalog available. 1-800-3596614. www.loghelp.com #202

Custom Pencil Portraits Drawings of people, animals, & landscapes from your favorite photos. Prices start at $75. Frame included. Contact Sarah Boston at 406.241. 0250 www.myspace.com/sarah_boston

QUALITY TILE. Lic/Ins, 5 year warranty, commercial, remodels, walk-in showers, floors, fireplaces, & walls. Best Rates! 239-5261

Voice Lessons! Great summer activity for kids! I am a trained vocalist who offers early childhood voice lessons. I create a supportive and fun learning environment! I also offer beginner to intermediate lessons for ages 13 and up! Please call Brittney Stocker for more information 406-531-7370.

PLUMBING

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

Your Source For: • Tankless Water Heaters • Solar Hot Water • Ground Source Heat

Carpentry-Tile Roofing-Decks Fences-Remodels Kitchens-Baths

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546-1837 How does asbestos cause health problems? Abatement Contractors of Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

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My 35 years of experience mean less cost for you and a higher quality finished product. Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates - Why wait?

"Look Under the Cushions"– treasure where you least expect it.

by Matt Jones

Missoula Independent Page 46 April 23–April 30, 2009

Outsource Your Chores!

Providing errand and concierge services and domestic and personal assistance!

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Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

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1 Sanders' rank: abbr. 4 Takes in too much 7 Band box 10 QB's scores 13 ___-male 14 Cut branches (off ) 15 Wade's opponent 16 Miner's find 17 Dream up 19 Gas station with a blue and red logo 21 Quad City that's home to the Mississippi

DOWN 1 Laurence Fishburne TV show 2 Physics unit 3 Item used to fasten planks, in old shipbuilding 4 1966 Gold Glove Award winner Tony 5 "Singin' in the Rain" codirector Stanley 6 Go on a buying spree 7 With the bow, in music 8 Former "S.N.L." actor Jay 9 Actress Holly Robinson ___ 10 Doughnut-shaped 11 "The ___ Chaperone" 12 French legislative bodies 18 Suffix for anatomical reproductive organs 20 Temptress

STORAGE SHEDS Montana Shed Builders Affordable, Durable, Delivered

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3207 W. Broadway 9-5 • M-F 9-12 • Saturday Radiators - Auto Batteries - Milk Jugs - Pop & Water Plastic - Phone Books & Shredding Services We pay market rate for metal & cardboard!

Call Rennie Frank, an experienced advocate offering comprehensive representation.

542-5101

Grass Valley French Canal and West of the existing fence. Recording Reference in Book 726 of Micro Records at Page 676. AND Lands lying in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. That parcel in the Southeast corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE 1/4 SW 1/4) East of, and surrounded by the forks of, the Slough. Recording Reference in Book 726 of Micro Records at Page 677. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 2nd day of April A.D., 2009. MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By: /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, HEREBY NOTIFIES MISSOULA COUNTY TAX PAYERS THAT THE SECOND HALF OF 2008 REAL ESTATE TAXES LEVIED AND ASSESSED WILL BE DUE AND PAYABLE BEFORE 5:00 P.M. ON JUNE 1, 2009. UNLESS 2008 TAXES ARE PAID PRIOR TO THAT TIME, THE AMOUNT THEN DUE WILL BE DELINQUENT, WILL ACCRUE INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5/6 OF 1% PER MONTH AND WILL BE ASSESSED A 2% PENALTY FROM THE TIME OF DELINQUENCY UNTIL PAID . IF YOU INTEND TO PROTEST YOUR TAXES, YOU MUST MAKE PAYMENT BY THE DUE DATE AND MUST INCLUDE A LETTER OF PROTEST WITH YOUR PAYMENT. THE LETTER OF PROTEST MUST INCLUDE YOUR NAME, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION, GROUNDS FOR PROTEST AND THE AMOUNT YOU ARE PROTESTING PURSUANT TO MCA § 15-1-402. VICKIE M. ZEIER MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-308 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Jimy Dee Murphy, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Jimy Dee Murphy, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Jimy Dee Murphy to Kyani Dee Murphy, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 20th day of May, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 15th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Gayle Johnon, Deputy

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Public Notices

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-506 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Shaun Fleming Gunderson, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Shaun Fleming Gunderson, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Shaun Fleming Gunderson to Shaun Fleming Hamilton, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 3rd day of June, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections may be

Valley Blues Festival 23 "I found a ___, which blended into the beige. No way am I going to eat it." 25 Be 26 Palm whose berries are now used in fruit juices 27 Punk offshoot 30 Dreyer's ice cream, in the Eastern U.S. 31 Poultry dish with broccoli and cheese 36 Popeye's love Olive 37 Bullfighting cheer 38 "So that's where the ___ to this old pen

went!" 39 Ballpark figure 42 Ongoing NYC tribute project where musicians cover the works of other musicians 45 You, in olden days 48 "Entourage" agent 49 "I'm rich! No, just kidding. It's only a ___." 50 "Amazing" magician famous for debunking 52 Briny bath additives 56 Rule that ended when Turkey became a

republic 59 "Ew...all I found were the stale remnants of a ___." 60 "The Wapshot Chronicle" author John 63 Part of mph 64 "Much ___ About Nothing" 65 Brain scan, for short 66 Record label with a "Manhattan" offshoot 67 "___ to Billie Joe" 68 TV chef Martin 69 Runnable computer file suffix 70 Ointment

22 Went into a personal online chat, for short 23 Folded food 24 Stiff and sore 28 Karaoke bar eqpt. 29 Roundish 32 "Rock and Roll, Hoochie ___" (1974 hit) 33 Literary lioness 34 ___-do-well 35 G.I.'s address 39 Parent company of Popsicle and Skippy 40 They're in charge of the bldg. 41 Tends to priority number one? 42 ___ a wild goose chase 43 Greet the judge 44 If ___ (Kenneth Cole shoe) 45 Allegro non ___ (lively, but not too live-

ly, in music) 46 It's far from love 47 Unabridged 51 Lance Bass headline, on a 2006 cover of People 53 Pageant host 54 ___ Twin (alias of electronic musician Richard D. James) 55 It may force a city to surrender 57 Alan of "M*A*S*H" 58 Brightly colored 61 It'll never get off the ground 62 Messy morsel at a barbecue

1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0411.

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call:

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filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 16th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Karen Johnson, Deputy

money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.00482) 1002.112220-FEI

standing principal balance of $227,889.38, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 29, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.17883) 1002.112413-FEI

Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/12/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 6, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $751,743.23. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $747,842.83, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 14, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26893) 1002.100319-FEI

Title Insurance Co was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title Insurance Co as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot B of Hill Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Includes a 1988 Fleetwood, 28 x 66, title W118317, VIN IDFLH13A10510CW manufactured home. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 199913216, Book 582, Page 1244, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Mellon Mortgage Company. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $77,087.87. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $72,862.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 13, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.16852) 1002.114210-FEI

(including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 9, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 9, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3064246 04/23/2009, 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009

Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Larry E Stolle and Sandra J Stolle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Century Title Company, a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to The Lomas & Nettleton Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 22, 1977 and recorded July 25, 1977 at 8:05 o’clock A.M., in Book 100, Page 1386, under Document No. 404652 and re-recorded on September 27, 1977 at 12:45 o’clock P.M., in Book 104, Page 1245, under Document No. 408933. The beneficial interest is currently held by LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates 1997HUD1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $472.25, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 27, 2009 is $28,118.42 principal, interest at the rate of 8.50% now totaling $3,831.18, suspense balance of ($296.09) and other fees and expenses advanced of $201.28, plus accruing interest at the rate of $6.64 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expensed actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated: February 12, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On February 12, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3066952 04/23/2009, 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-507 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Steven Hamilton Gunderson, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Steven Hamilton Gunderson, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Steven Hamilton Gunderson to William Steven Hamilton, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 19th day of May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 2S. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 16th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-57 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF GLADYS W. INMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James William Inman, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of TIPP & BULEY, 2200 Brooks Street, PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 1st day of April, 2009. /s/ James William Inman, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-64 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF OPAL L. OHNSTAD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Andra Jean Walker, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 10th day of April, 2009. /s/ Andra Jean Walker, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY. Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-08-181 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT L. WHITE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karen J. Hertzog, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg, P.C., PO Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of April, 2009. /s/ Karen J. Hertzog, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/18/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200621247, Bk 781, Pg 661, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Herb V. Peterson II, a married man as his sole and separate property was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for AHM Mortgage was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 of Seely Lake Estates, Block 2 Track 6, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 16, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $186,528.84. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $181,982.85, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 26, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/29/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200526136, Book 761, Page 906, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Bethany Burns was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Heritage Bank was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The North 72 feet of the West 45 feet of Lot 13 in Block 16 of Smith Addition Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, recording reference: Book 681 Micro Records, Page 47. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Book 833, Page 1362, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 2, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $99,043.85. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $97,283.48, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 10, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01118) 1002.113874-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/05/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200731695, Book 810, Page 23, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Sylvia Mikulski, an unmarried individual was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for First Horizon Home Loans was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 in Block 4 of Foothills Estates No. 2, a platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 17, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $243,182.74. This amount includes the out-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/08/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200613760, Book 776, Page 568, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lindsey Doe, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 44A of Cook’s Addition, Block 1, Lots 40 through 45, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $139,525.93. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,231.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 14, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01566) 1002.114050-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/07/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200715217,Bk-799,Pg-750, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Harold Monteau and Elizabeth M. Topsky was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE 1/4 of Section 18, Township 14 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 4327. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/06/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200500471, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David A. Fuschino and Mindy L. Fuschino was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. DBA Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 177 of Pleasant View Homes No. 2, Phase IV, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200803864, Book 813, Page 959, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $150,293.61. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $147,697.78, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 14, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01535) 1002.114202-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/06/98, recorded as Instrument No. 9821336, Book 551, Page 1682, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Laurie R. Hill, a married woman was Grantor, First Union Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and Chicago

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 19, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 14 OF GREENWOOD ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Leo C. Thrush and Tiffany Thrush, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Heritage Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 7, 2006 and recorded August 8, 2006 at 11:41 o’clock A.M. in Book 780, Page 742, as Document No. 200619850. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank National Association successor by merger United States National Bank of Oregon successor by merger U.S. Bank of Washington National Association successor by merger Southwest Washington Successor by merger Heritage Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to pay the Mature Loan in the amount of $27,050.32. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 23, 2009 is $25,791.10 principal, interest at the rate of 8.25% now totaling $986.72, and other fees and expenses advanced of $272.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $5.82949 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 19, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE N1/2NE1/4 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 20 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 7 OF CERTIFICATE SURVEY NO. 5320 Robert M. Barthelmess and Cinde L. Barthelmess, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 26, 2005 and recorded June 6, 2005 in Book 753, Page 1486 as Document No. 200513542. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RAMP 2006SP1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $4,879.10, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 19, 2009 is $719,500.00 principal, interest at the rate of 7.75% now totaling $20,878.64, late charges in the amount of $696.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $117.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $152.77 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3066477 04/23/2009, 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 22, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots Twenty-Two (22) and Twenty-Three (23) in Block Seventyeight (78), in Daly’s Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 26, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 5 OF SEELEY LAKE HOMESITES ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO TRAVIS SIMON AND MACHELLE L. SIMON, AS JOINT TENANTS BY DEED FROM TRAVIS SIMON RECORDED 11/03/2000 IN DEED DOC. # 200342157, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. NOTE: FOR STREET NUMBERING PURPOSES KNOWN AS 715 SPRUCE DRIVE, SEELEY LAKE, MONTANA Travis Simon & Machelle L Simon, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Old Republic, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 21, 2005 and Recorded October 3, 2005 in Book 761, Page 771, as Document No. 200526001. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as trustee for the benefit of the Certificateholders of Popular ABS, Inc. Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-D. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,087.37, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 27, 2009 is $107,426.48 principal, interest at the rate of 9.88% now totaling $5,095.94, late charges in the amount of $1,143.71, escrow advances of $578.84, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced

Missoula Independent Page 47 April 23–April 30, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

RentalsApartments

RentalsHouses

RentalsCommercial

RentalsDuplexes

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

of $442.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.08 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 16, 2009 Charles Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Jessica Hopkins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3070238 04/23/2009, 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009

1500 Stoddard Apartments Studio, Jr-1br, 1 bdrm and two bdrm units. Rent $555-$775. 721-8990

1423 S. 4th St- 3bed/2bath fenced yard, garage near bike trail & Good Food Store. $1250 Call Devan @ Prudential Missoula 2411408

Counseling/Massage Office Furnished office with waiting room. $100/month for one day each week. (Example: all Mondays) 529-2322.

11 39th: 2-bedroom, side-by-side, nice, garage, fireplace, southhills, hook-ups, no pets, $695 GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com.

Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

edge of town. Includes two homes, so great income potential. Secluded & quiet, within walking distance of hot mineral plunges. Call Trudy 741-3737, Century 21 Big Sky.

Looking for a rental? Visit www.prudentialmissoula.com for list of available rentals.

Dance Studio Space Teranga Arts School for rent. 1300 sq/ft. mirrors w/curtians parking $15/hr. 721.3854

RentalsApartments PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.

3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 Free Rent, Free Cable! 2 or 3 beds: 1510 Cooley St. $725-$850 Open Daily: 239.6483 Studios-2 BDS $395-$625 3915 Highway 200, East Missoula. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Upscale Living on the Clarkfork! Granite, Tile, Fireplaces, Underground Parking. $1050 $1200 Open Daily: 239.6483 We pay Heat! Free Rent! 1 or 2 beds on the Clarkfork $635 - $735 Open Daily: 239.6483

FREE RENT! FREE RENT! SOME RIVER VIEWS, WASHER & DRYER, FREE CABLE, FREE HEAT, STORAGE, UNDERGROUND PARKING. PETS OKAY. $550-$1200

OPEN DAILY:

239.6483 Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

Professional Property Management

1 BD Multiplex - 528 Hickory, $485/mo. 1 BD Apt - 2007 Wyoming, $465/mo. 2 BD Duplex - 1023 Cooley $595/mo. 2 BD Apt - Uncle Robert Lane, $620/mo. 4 BD House - 2225 Mount, $1195/mo.

Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

RentalsWanted

GOT GARAGE? Two bike businesses seek 2-car garage to rent, ideally south of river between Orange and Higgins.

Find your new home with PPM ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

241-9935

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RentalsFurnished

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

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Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

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UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

Tell ‘em you saw it in the Independent!

GardenCity

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 9 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

New Lease Special – Up to Two Months FREE Rent! Leasing Office Located Onsite at 4200 Expressway Missoula, MT

Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Missoula Independent Page 48 April 23–April 30, 2009

2 BD/ 1.5 BA $575/mo. 218 Barclay #A, Lolo. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060. Creek Crossing Court: 2-bedroom, upper-Rattlesnake, garage, hookups, dining area, PET OK, $895 GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Roommates ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com One Room In Pet Friendly Hip Strip House Share big sunlit house with 2 older professional/grad students. $400/month, 1/3 utilities. Environmentally friendly, sociable but respectful household. Available mid/late May. 241-2153. Room for Rent Room avail. in 3 bdrm house. $375 a month all utilt. incld. also incld internet and cable. located off expressway near direct t.v. call (406)360-3866 Rooms available in remodeled fraternity house from 5/15-8/1. Close to UM on Gerald. $350/month with deposit includes all utilities. Call MREM 406-541-6468 or visit www.millenniumrem.com

Homes for Sale 1333 Toole #C-13 $132,500 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House M-F 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1902 Pine Tree Hollow - Thompson Falls Newer, spacious 2bdrm/2bath, edge of town & gorgeous! $148,500 KD Dickinson Portico Real Estate 240-5227 2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting. $210,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 2bd/1ba, 2car gar Immaculate 217 South Ave W. $232,000 Close to Univ. Anne Jablonski 5465816 www.MoveMontana.com 3 bdrm 2 bath on large lot in Elmar Estates. City Sewer, underground sprinkling, single garage. $102,500 MLS# 809491 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12598 for pics 3 Bed/2.5 Bath house in Stevensville with 2 bdrm rental & 2 car garage. Separate 4 car garage with large shop. 1.3 landscaped acres. $299,900 MLS#900811. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics 3BD/2BA, DECK & SHED 4721 Sage St. in Westview Mobile Park. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000!

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $329,900 MLS#901764 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics 4 mos New Liberty, 28’x52’, 3bd 2ba. Move or lease lot. Realtors welcome. $81,000 546-5816 4800 SQ FT MULLAN RD AREA HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, great floor plan, family room with wet bar, vaulted ceilings, and more, $448,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4BD/3BA, 3GAR + VIEWS 6960 Linda Vista 4 doors off Upper Miller Creek. Anne Jablonski 5465816 www.MoveMontana.com

IMMACULATE LEWIS & CLARK AREA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, hardwood floors, new roof, large fenced back yard, lots of windows, $198,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

lovely university house 5Br/2ba + basement apartment. gas fireplace, garage,$450K, 5420589 New 1900+SF home with no steps!! 3 Bed / 2 Bath, low maintenance, full access home in Riverwalk Estates, Missoula. $349,900. MLS#806182. Joy Earls @ 406-531-9811 www.joyearls.mywindermere.com Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

4bd/3ba, Lovely Home w/Views 6960 Linda Vista $349,500 Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com

Open House Sunday- 1-4:00p.m. 2409 Snafflebit Way- Spacious 4BD home, 17 ft. ceilings, office/den. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

832 Cherry St. $239,500 Lower Rattlesnake - 2bed/1bath, brand new kitchen & bath, garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689

838 Stoddard - 3bdrm +1 bonus, huge yard, west side, tons of room. $234,900. KD Dickinson - Portico Real Estate 240-5227

REDUCED PRICE! 3bdrm, 1 bath, single garage. Fenced yard and covered front porch. Newly remodeled. MLS# 808575 $84,900 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:18883 for pics

921 S 4th St W. $249,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 A 3 BEDROOM HUD HOME! Only $40,000! Great deal! More 1-4 bds available! For listings 800620-4861, Ext. T114. #191 A BANK REPO, 3bd, 2ba $15,735! This home will sell fast! For listings 800-620-4861 Ext. T234. #192 ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus rooms, great deck and mountain and valley views, large sauna, just 20 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

Hot Springs Retreat Hot Springs Retreat: 2 1/2 city lots on

UNIVERSITY CHARMER. 2003 remodel on 2 lush lots w/gardens, fruit trees and arbor. 4 beds, 2 baths + country kitchen. $399,870. MLS#902594. Joy Earls @ 406531-9811 www.joyearls.mywindermere.com UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, single attached garage, new flooring, interior paint, updated kitchen, new furnace and more, $149,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES.3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $273,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185. www.AccessRealty.net

Homes for Sale www.classiccourt.com

Price reduction! $185,900 2 story home with nice fenced yard. Central location. Priscilla Brockmeyer

239-8350


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Joy Earls

Land for Sale

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $685,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

20 Lot Bitterroot Subdivision, 42 acres, views of Bitterroots & Sapphires. Appraised $127,500 each. $864,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

www.mindypalmer.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Homes for Sale

NEW LISTINGS! TARGET RANGE GEM & ACREAGE 4289 Capy Court, Missoula $389,900 MLS#902579

Homes for Sale

• 131 S. Higgins • Luxury Wilma Condo • MLS#901474

3 Acres + home with room for horses, hobbies, pets, family, gardens and fruit trees!! 1 owner and 1st time on market. Don't miss out--priced to sell. UNIVERSITY CHARMER 737 Evans, Missoula $399,870 MLS #902594

Land for Sale

OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3PM

• 6960 Linda Vista • come view the Views • MLS#900989 • Investment Opportunity in Helena • MLS#809493

Only 30 minutes from Missoula on the Blackfoot River. A family-owned business with seven log cabins, store and café on over 27 acres and is surrounded by public land. Hike, bike, snowshoe, cross–country ski, snowmobile, hunt or just take a nature walk. Fly fish form the banks or rent a raft or tube next door at Blackfoot River Rentals. Sale includes land, buildings, business, all-beverage liquor license, catering service and FF&E.

Proud to be a part of Windermere's new commercial real estate division!

"Raised on Real Estate" Experience with a fresh perspective.

& Williams

MT JUDSON GLEN VANNOY broker RE#15289.

Mortgage & Financial

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com

Missoula Properties

Where Service Meets Technology

Bid Starts at $25,000

Williams

PRICE REDUCED!

Mortgage & Financial

Rochelle Glasgow

Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening

5% Buyer's Premium May Apply

$1,900,000 MLS# 808145

10250 Valley Grove Dr $315,000 MLS 902264 Come see this wonderful Log Home between Lolo and Missoula. OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3PM

Joy Earls 531-9811

168 FRONTAGE RD, DE BORGIA, MT

Homes for Sale

CELL: 546-5705 • www.Live-Montana.com

Visit my website for more pictures and other listings…

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Homes for Sale

McNamara’s Landing

• 217 South Ave West • close to university • MLS#901729

Charming 1925 U Home,2003 remodel on 2 lush lots w/gardens, fruit trees and arbor. 4 beds, 2 baths + country kitchen. Rare find in amazing spot.

3BR 2BA 1,352sf+\-. Property sells: 10:00am Tue. Apr. 28 on site Open to the Public For open house information, please go to williamsauction.com or 800-8 01-8 003. Many properties now available for online bidding!

Homes for Sale

Austin McKee

Homes for Sale

Proudly serving Missoula, Mineral & Ravalli Counties

NEW 4BD/2.5 BA home in Missoula 44 Ranch Subdivision Spacious, master suite, full basement, gourmet kitchen. 2409 Snaffle Bit Way $297,000 • MLS# 809362

Mortgage & Financial

• Lower your You may be monthly able to: payment • Lower your monthly

payment • Switch from an ARM from an ARM to• Switch a predictable to a predictable fixed-rate loan fixed-rate loan

• Get a shorter term to • Get a shorter term pay off your to pay off your mortgage faster mortgage faster

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 544.3098

Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are Still You may be able to: Historically Low!

www.AccessRealty.net

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

• Finance your closing • Finance your closing costs part your costs as as part of of your newloan. loan new Don’t miss your chance,

Don't miss your chance, contact me today. contact me today.

For all your home mortgage needs call

Julie Lapham julie@landlmortgage.com Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

Bridget Bowers REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 207-5387 • Bridget@GreaterMontanaRE.com BitterrootMontanaProperties.com Specializing in: Homes with Acreage Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

240-0032 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

Astrid Oliver

#228,229

Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Home Mortgage Consultant Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com 1800 S. Russell St. Ste. 200 http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ Missoula, astrid-oliver MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Credit is subject to approval. astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Some restrictions apply. This http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver

Astrid Oliver

information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Credit is subject to approval. Some restrictions apply. Fargo Home Mortgage is a This information is accurate as of date of printing and is division of Wells Fargo Bank, subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home © 2009 WellsFargo FargoBank, N.A. 2009 Mortgage is aN.A. division of Wells Bank, N.A. N.A. All rights Wells Fargo Bank, reserved. #63731 All rights reserved. 03/09-06/09 #63731 3/09-06/09

Missoula Independent Page 49 April 23–April 30, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

KD Dickinson • Broker/Owner • 240-5227 1400 Burns St 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. 115 W. Addison • MLS#902650 OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-4 $189,900 • 2bed + 1bath with recent updates 832 Cherry St. • MLS#900054 $229,900 • 2bed/1bath, new kitchen & 910 Elm St. • MLS#902342 bath, garage, deck. $249,900 2ebd/2bath + bonus, hrdwd flrs., open living/dining 921 S 4th St W. • MLS#900678 $249,500 • 2bed/1bath, bonus, great 700 Rollins • MLS# 902235 upgrades, dble garage. $249,500 2bed/1bath, slant streets, corner lot 1902 Pine Tree Hollow • Thompson Falls MLS#900219 • $148,500 1216 S. 5th W. • MLS#902347 2bed/2bath. $239,900 2bed/1bath 1333 Toole #C-13 • MLS#901187 + bonus, great backyard + character $129,900 • 2bed/2bath newer condo.

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

S E U O H N E OP

15890 Queen Annes Lane, Florence • MLS#902586 • $239,900 • 1.45 acres, 3bed, 2bath

Justin Armintrout • Realtor 546-0768 2280 Greenough Dr. • MLS#900687 2141 Raymond • MLS#901594 $399,900 • 4bedrooms/2bath $399,900 • 3 bedroom/2 bath First time EVER on the market Marlies Borchers • Realtor • 370-5758

2B/1B + bonus, hardwood & tile throughout, fresh paint, updated plumbing & electrical, clawfoot tub, wired for surround sound, covered porch, corner lot. 643 Cleveland MLS#902539 • $214,500

406.239.2049

Beautiful Townhome! 3 Bed/2 Bath/Double Garage Located conveniently close to the center of Missoula, this townhouse boasts class and style.

1723 Ethel Lane • MLS#900844 2527 Valley View • MLS#805739 $175,000 • 3 Bedroom/ $224,900 • 3bed/1.5 bath 2 fire2 Bath Modern Townhome. places, views! Greg Zugay • Realtor • 396-6146

2195 Big Flat Rd. • MLS#808291 • $399,900 • 3bed/3bath Borders Plum Creek, trail access

4/26 • 12-2pm

2127 A W Kent Street, Missoula

Liz Dye • Broker • 531-4508 115 North Ave East • MLS#900646 $349,000 • 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath Arts & Crafts.

Park Rd, Georgetown Lake lot • MLS#901309 • $120,000 13.8 acres

Sunday

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

2348 River Road • MLS#803924 2bed/1bath; 2.27 acres, zoned 4 lots/acre

4011 Houk Way, Stevi MLS#806996 • $199,000 2bed/1bath on 1 acre. Views in every direction.

Homes for Sale

What will be the next page in your family scrapbook?

MLS# 902150 $175,000

2309 Grant • MLS#808330 • $195,000 • Commercial Space Erin Doherty • Realtor • 239-8240 Lorianne Arnot • Realtor • 360-1363 Doug Pinto • Realtor • 360-7835

PorticoRealEstate.com 445 w. Alder • Missoula • 406/327-8787

Land for Sale

Condos / Townhomes

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.RiverRidgeMT.com

Affordable Home Ownership STOP RENTING! At $107,500 the price of home ownership is possible and you may qualify for down payment assistance. Low income guidelines

For Lease • 1001 SW Higgins, Suite 104

apply. Call for info. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths! Nice! 1421 Eaton St. #28, Missoula $107,500. Call Sharon Scarborough at Prudential Montana Real Estate 329-2034

Manufactured Homes FROM $38,887. New Modular Homes *No Money Down* If you own your land. $8,000 Tax Credit. Champion Homes. 303-573-0067 free brochure and price sheet. www.coloradofactorymodulars.co m #201

Commercial 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $339,900 MLS# 901476 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595

Professional office space in the Panorama Park Building. 1,335+ sq. ft., 2 offices, large reception area, bathroom and kitchen. Could easily be converted into more office spaces. $1,650 a month. Most Utilities Paid • Broker Owned

Two 5 acre parcels 15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $159,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $299,000.

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

Missoula Independent Page 50 April 23–April 30, 2009

Out of Town 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

Mortgage & Financial CASH FOR GOLD! We buy Gold, Silver, Platinum. Get Cash NOW! Highest Payouts - Satisfaction Guaranteed 1-877-548-1550 Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803


Missoula Independent Page 51 April 23–April 30, 2009


JAZZ WEEK CONTINUES! Thursday, 4/23/09, 6pm

Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival April 24 - 25 University Theatre featuring * Benny Golson * Dave Samuels * Randy Sandke * Steve Smith Info: umt.edu/defrancojazz

Melody Anderson w/ Nan Bovingdon, Jodi Marshall & Pete Hand Chuck Florence w/ Jim Driscoll Hall of Fame Awards: Lance Boyd - Jazz Band Director Buddy & Joyce DeFranco - Jazz Ambassadors Dexter Payne - Brazilian Clarinet $7 or $5 students/seniors Jazzoula button: $15 - good for this show plus

the Saturday Night Jam Session w/ the stars from the Buddy DeFranco Show (jam starts at 10pm)

Lance Boyd photo courtesy of Glenn Junkert

Great food and full bar available Tickets and buttons available at Rockin Rudy's. For more info, call 542-0077

Lance Boyd • 39 years with the University of Montana Jazz Band and Missoula Blues & Jazz Society's HALL OF FAME winner, 2009.

Both shows at St. Anthony's Parish Center 217 Tremont


Missoula Independent 4.23.09