Issuu on Google+

MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 48 • Nov. 26–Dec. 3, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

by the Independent staff

Scope: Bridgebuilder releases 12-year retrospective album Up Front: UM project examines decline in youth involvement Range: Confessions of an off-road vehicle outlaw


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 48 • Nov. 26–Dec. 3, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

by the Independent staff

Scope: Bridgebuilder releases 12-year retrospective album Up Front: UM project examines decline in youth involvement Range: Confessions of an off-road vehicle outlaw


• Why rent when you can own? • Enjoy downtown living -

walk to restaurants, shops, & theater

• Ask about our special financing options

Models open 11:30 - 5pm

Thurs-Mon; By appointment only Tues & Weds.

$8,000 TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE TO FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS

FHA & VA Financing Available

RE/MAX Realty Consultants LLC

Missoula Independent

Contact Jeff Ellis sales associate Office 406-203-4143 Cell 406-529-5087

Page 2 November 26–December 3, 2009


nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Alex Sakariassen

Many of you may already have the next four months set with meticulous plans to shred the slopes, lounge at the bar or simply hibernate. For those of you still looking for a few ideas, or perhaps some thoughtful propositions from seasoned locals, consider these pages a warmup to your winter itinerary. . . . . . . . . . . .14

This Week’s Montana-Produced Special

Beef & Cheddar Irish Boxty

An Irish potato pancake filled with Montana ranch ribeye beef and lifeline organic sharp cheddar cheese. Finished with béchamel sauce and served with vegetables and Irish soda bread.

Friday 11/27 @ 10:30pm

Eric "Fingers" Ray

News Letters Public option, clean energy and climate change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Week in Review Griz roll, a party gone wrong, and an embezzler quits . . . .6 Briefs Meat-cutting convicts, stimulus lull, and a detour from Warm Springs . . . .6 Etc. Knee deep in ski areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Up Front Wherefore art thou, youthful enthusiasm? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Ochenski Good to be alive, but better to be a Montanan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Writers on the Range Confessions of an off-road vehicle outlaw . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Agenda Holiday cheer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Tuesday 12/1 @ 7:30pm

So you think you are smart? Fat Tire Pub Trivia Wednesday 12/2 @ 8pm

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan The meatri dish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 8 Days a Week Extra gravy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Mountain High Ski season is nearly upon us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Scope Bridgebuilder’s 12-year retrospective album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Noise Felt, Cage, Hank Green and Dead Man’s Bones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Books Freeman rails against e-mail in Tyranny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 DVD Savory flicks for turkey day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

HUMP-NIGHT EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT BINGO 100% Cash PAYOUT, winner takes all. SUNDAY 8PM FREE Euchre Tournament

MONDAY 10PM



Open Mic Night with Mike Avery!

TUESDAY 7:30PM Fat Tire Pub Trivia

Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-1 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-2 Free Will Astrolog y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-4 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-11

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Adams Ranch & Trees christmas trees . 27 NOV h t ru 2 DEC. 2

Everything you need to make your holiday season special including wreaths, swags, & garland.

Trees range in size from

2 feet to 16 feet and start at $4.00

Noble • Grand frasier • Douglas Fir Alpine • Balsam

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367

(406) 250 - 9697

E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

At Rosauers RosauerS Missoula Independent

Page 3 November 26–December 3, 2009


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday afternoon at the UM Oval.

Q:

The Indy’s winter recreation issue provides lots of suggestions for cold weather fun. What’s your favorite part of this season? Follow-up: How about the least favorite?

Rochelle Toussaint: Skiing and snowboarding back home at Blacktail Mountain. I love the snow! DOA: The cold and how everything dies and there’s no leaves on the trees.

Harmony Joy Fix: There’s so much! Sledding, skiing, snowboarding and hockey. Gotta love those Maulers. Melts under pressure: When the snow melts. And finals week, I hate that.

Climate change hits home I strongly urge both Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester to support the Kerry-Boxer climate bill with the current provision to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent from 2005 emission levels by 2020. Climate change is a well-researched phenomenon with the support of America’s and the world’s scientific community. It is a mistake for Americans to turn our backs on our scientists at a time when a discovery such as global climate change is already impacting America and Montana. The most salient examples of global climate change in Montana are the melting glaciers in Glacier National Park and reductions in annual snow pack and stream flow throughout the state. At least 10 million tourists visited Montana in 2008 and spent approximately $2.8 billion dollars supporting about 48,000 or 10 percent of the jobs in Montana. Many of these visitors come to Montana to enjoy activities such as skiing, fishing and sight-seeing, all of which will be severely hindered by a loss of glaciers, snow pack and stream flow. Who will want to visit Glacier National Park when it has no glaciers? Who will ski on bare mountains? Who will fish in dry streams? Losing Montana’s natural beauty will destroy a huge part of Montana’s tourism industry and cause the Treasure State to hemorrhage jobs. Supporting strong science-based climate legislation like the Kerry-Boxer climate bill will preserve our tourism jobs and keep Montana a beautiful place for generations. Thomas Bassett Missoula

Power Act of 2009 is by no means perfect. It is a human solution to a human problem. Of course there will be flaws, but the important thing is to pass an act that will begin to turn the tides of global warming. The truth is we need something to work with now. We must pass this national act that has the potential to curb the impact of human fueled contamination of the environment. We have

“ Who will

want to visit

Glacier National Park when it has no glaciers? Who will ski on bare mountains? Who will fish in dry

streams?

A step forward Brett Bates: Snowboarding at Big Mountain and up at Lolo Pass. Chilled to the throne: Driving in bad conditions. My pilot light in my heater is kinda broken at home too, so that kinda sucks.

The Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act of 2009 has the power to do great things for our country and state. It has the power to create thousands of jobs in Montana alone and millions throughout the country. It has the power to move our country toward energy independence, which will keep American money and jobs in America. It will also show the rest of the world that we care about the planet and are willing to make changes to move toward a better future for everyone. The Clean Energy Jobs and American

Jered Champion: Snowboarding. I try to hit a new hill in the state every year but usually go to Lost Trail. What a choke: The Missoula inversion.

Missoula Independent

something important to work for: a healthier, cleaner America for our future generations. Whether you think global warming is completely human based or a cyclical process of the earth, you cannot deny our planet needs to be cleaned up and our children deserve to breathe cleaner air on a cleaner planet. Renewable energy is alive; coal is dead. I ask the residents of Missoula

County and beyond to contact Sens. Jon Tester and Max Baucus to urge them to support clean energy to protect our nation and our planet. Stephanie Tuke Missoula

Public option not dead I am concerned about the ability of Americans to get access to quality health care people can afford to pay for. As a young American who recently graduated from college, I am realizing quickly what my degree will and won’t do and the value of the money I earn and spend. I feel strongly as a Montanan the obligation to pay the debts I incur. I am currently working on paying off my student loans. With the low salaries available to me because of my desire to live in Montana, I am simply not able to afford to purchase private health insurance. While I understand the importance of health care reform, I also understand the complexities and limitations to what we are able to do. I see health care reform without a public option as being even harder on my—and many others in similar positions—fiscal situation. The bill presented by our senator, Max Baucus, basically equates to a mandate that I purchase insurance I currently cannot afford. There are measures to ease the burden of this mandate—tax rebates and insurance co-ops—but the bottom line is that I could not afford to pay for the insurance. Would that be breaking the law? In order to provide a plan that is viable for me and many others, we need a public option. This public option would basically equate to me being able to pay to be covered by benefits similar to Medicare or Medicaid. This system would provide some actual competition to the insurance companies that would only stand to gain record setting profits by the plan suggested by Max Baucus. I would like to reiterate that the plan presented by Baucus is only one of many different options currently being considered in Congress. Most of the plans considered contain this public option. We, as Montanans, need to let our senators know that, as their bosses, we demand they support a public option in their final legislation. Bradley Seaman Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L

Page 4 November 26–December 3, 2009


Griz Home Basketball Games Down the Road Follow Grizzly Athletics Through… Web: www.montanagrizzlies.com Twitter: UMGRIZZLIES Facebook Fan Page: UM Grizzly Athletics

12-4 Northern Arizona – 7:00pm 12-5 Northern Colorado – 7:00pm

Lady Griz Home Basketball Games Down the Road

12-6 Great Falls – 2:00pm 12-9 Montana Western – 7:00pm

November 27 • 28 • 29 Friday & Saturday 10am-6pm • Sunday 10am-4pm

Hilton Garden Inn

N. Reserve St., Missoula, MT Juried artists and craftsmen from across the Western USA showing and selling their work - fine arts, woodworking, pottery, stained glass, bronze art, jewelry, copper, and antler art, & handcrafted clothing. Something for Everyone!

Free Admission and Parking All Three Days • Fantastic Door Prizes Register all three days to win a 32" Class LCD HD TV to be given away Sunday. Need not be present to win.

Missoula Independent

Page 5 November 26–December 3, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, November 18

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Linda Faye Harris, 50, resigns from the FlorenceCarlton School Board two days after she was charged with embezzling more than $237,000 from CTA Architects Engineers. Harris allegedly used company funds to pay her son’s student loan and mobile phone bills, among other things.

• Thursday, November 19 Police arrest Jordan Iddings, 24, and five other members of his bar-hopping bachelor party after Iddings, of Frenchtown, allegedly sexually assaults and punches a woman in the Bodega Bar on Ryman Street, and then attacks a bartender in nearby Red’s Bar before head butting a police officer.

• Friday, November 20 Wearing a feather boa, Mayor John Engen, as part of the YMCA’s first YMusic Jamophilia Extravaganza at the packed Wilma Theatre, sings Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive” while surrounded by an entourage of dancing children. Event MC Jeff Medley calls the mayor’s performance “ridiculously good.”

• Saturday, November 21 UM Grizzly football beats down the Montana State University Bobcats 33-19. The stomping marks Montana’s fifth perfect regular season (11-0) and eliminates the Bobcats from playoff contention. The next day the Football Championship Subdivision playoff committee awards the Griz the No. 1 seed in the 16-team tournament, which begins this weekend.

• Sunday, November 22 The Montana Highway Patrol blames icy snowpacked roads and speed for the Interstate 90 accident that killed 19-year old University of Montana student Joseph Michael McKeon and injured two others near Three Forks. The group was returning to Missoula after the Bobcat-Grizzly game in Bozeman.

• Monday, November 23 After weeks of debate, the Missoula City Council again sends the Historic Preservation ordinance back to committee for further tweaking amid concerns that restrictions could cause an undue burden to homeowners.

• Tuesday, November 24 The Lumina Foundation for Education announces it will award Montana up to $1.77 million in grants to help residents earn college degrees. Montana is one of seven states awarded a total of $9 million by the private foundation, which aims to increase the percentage of Americans holding higher degrees.

Matt and Aimee McQuilkin award Ryan Fishbeer, center, the men’s Most Stylin’ Player medal after the Le Kickball Missoula Championship game Thursday night at the Badlander. Fishbeer, whose team calls itself No Pants Party, also won a Booziest Player award.

Flathead zoning

Investigation winds down Flathead County Planning and Zoning officials hope a flap over planning practices will wind to a close in the coming weeks, as a private detective agency finishes a third-party investigation into a series of allegations. Planning Director Jeff Harris says the Flathead County Board of Commissioners hired Moonlighting Detective Agency of Kalispell in mid-July to probe seven complaints from local residents concerning alleged illegal planning practices and disregard for open meeting laws. The investigation was originally scheduled to end in late September, but investigator William Eisentraut requested a two-month extension when the list of complaints grew to 20. “We think they’re getting close,” the planning director says, adding that his staff will meet with Eisentraut for the first time sometime this week. The investigation cost Flathead County $5,000 between July and September. Eisentraut

Great Gifts! Noteworthy* has gifts for every occasion! Personalize a set of notepads or engrave a Cross® pen. Give a keepsake journal, handmade album or stylish sticky notes! Come in and check out our newest lines and unique selection today!

Missoula Independent

Page 6 November 26–December 3, 2009

asked for an additional $5,000 in a Sept. 28 letter to county commissioners, stating that more than a dozen more allegations surfaced during his initial review. Commissioner Jim Dupont says the county expects the final report by the second week of December. For Harris, the issue can’t come to a close soon enough. He says the complaints first arose this summer over the controversial Eagle’s Crest Subdivision in Lakeside, when landowners claimed his office secretly circulated drafts of the development plan online. The Independent reported on July 9 that a group of residents had subsequently begun petitioning for Harris’ resignation. Harris responded to each complaint individually before Eisentraut started his investigation. “This thing has been hanging over our heads since July,” Harris says. “It’s affected the office morale, it can’t help but affect staff. So the sooner we put this to bed, the better.” Harris, who has served as planning director for more than four years, says he’s unaware of any precedent for such an investigation. It’s not a mat-

ter of the number of individuals complaining, he says, rather the volume of a relative few. “I have 30 years of experience in public planning, and I’ve never been involved in anything like this,” Harris says. “From my experience, it’s totally abnormal, without question.” Alex Sakariassen

Stimulus

Bridging the gap With the repair of Missoula’s Scott Street Bridge complete, thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, David Brothers, a member of the Carpenters Union Local #28, finds himself out of work. Brothers, 52, was one of about 20 carpenters and laborers who had a hand in repairing the Scott Street Bridge’s deck, a three-month, $1.8 million stimulus project awarded to Great Fallsbased Sletten Construction Co. Before that, Brothers helped replace the Old Steel Bridge in Kalispell, a $8.7 million stimulus project.


Inside

Letters

Briefs

“It was pretty crucial,” Brothers says, “because things were starting to slow down, and that Old Steel Bridge up in the Flathead was coming to a close, so it was nice to be able to go to another job and it was nice that it was a stimulus job. I thought that was pretty outstanding.” But with the projects done and no more work available, he’s passing the time with his mother in Kalispell, replacing a faucet and doing other odd jobs. “I’m supposed to start a job up in Sandpoint and they’ve already started on it,” Brothers says, “but right now they don’t need my particular trade, so…” According to recovery.gov, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has brought Montana some $877 million in stimulus contracts, grants and loans, of which about $136 million has been received so far, creating or saving more than 6,000 jobs. For laborers like Brothers, it’s one of the few things keeping them from working fulltime at their mothers’ houses. Union representative Dennis Daneke keeps a weekly list of all the union members around western Montana looking for work. Due to the recession, that list, Daneke says, includes about twice as many names as it used to. The stimulus projects haven’t put all of them to work, but, he says, “It’s not getting worse.” “I wish it were faster,” Daneke says, “but slow and steady wins the race, too.” Brothers remains optimistic. “Once these stimulus projects start kicking in I think things will start picking back up, and I think we’re starting to see the tip of that, the front end of it,” he says. Matthew Frank

Game

Back to the grind Some 10 people in white, flesh-stained aprons and gloves stand over cutting boards at a long table, each busily slicing up pieces of an elk, its skinless hind quarter hanging from a metal hook. About 10 more elk quarters hang in queue along the wall, only a fraction of the meat this disassembly line will process today at H & H Meats in Missoula. John Peterson, 71, the genial but no-nonsense owner of H & H, says a couple of these workers are residents at Missoula’s Pre-Release Center on

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Mullan Road. But he doesn’t say which ones, because, he says, “It’s nobody’s business…We show them the same respect we show any other employee.” For 20 years Peterson has hired pre-release workers during the busy fall hunting season, when H & H processes between 2,000 and 3,000 animals at its South Avenue facility. He employs as many as five every season, and estimates he’s worked with about 100 since he bought the business in the late 1980s. “The people down at pre-release, they very well know that if they have a certifiable meat cutter that has years of experience that he’s got a job here,” Peterson says. Missoula’s Pre-Release Center, one of six in the state, houses 92 men and 20 women, all felony offenders nearing the end of their sentence. The

center’s treatment coordinator, David Wiltfong, says because the residents are required to work and pay room and board, they seek out employers like Peterson, who benefit from the reliability of workers living under strict rules and regulations— not to mention the tax credits available for hiring felons. “(Peterson) can see through the label put on people—and that they’ve earned committing felonies—but he’s willing to give guys a chance,” Wiltfong says. “I don’t ask what they did, what their problem was,” Peterson says. “It’s none of my affair…Every one of us, every single individual, had circumstances been different at some period in their life, could have had prison time. And anybody who says, ‘Oh no, couldn’t happen to me,’ either has a very short memory or is very, very, very unusual.” Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

Mental health

Detoured from Warm Springs The Montana Legislature is slowly shaping a new paradigm for dealing with the state’s mentally ill in local settings, before they reach the state hospital at Warm Springs. Until now, safety nets capable of catching mentally ill Montanans before they get in trouble have been few and far between, says Disability Rights Montana Staff Attorney, Anita Roessmann. “The state hospital has always been the safety net for everybody,” she says, “The only mental health service you get is the state institution.” But that’s changing as policy makers recognize that sending patients away from families and communities into state prisons and hospitals doesn’t make sense, Roessmann says. “You wouldn’t go to Warm Springs to get a fire engine.” Roessman lobbied the state legislature last session for funds to provide early intervention at the local level rather than costly after-crisis incarceration and hospitalization. Mentally ill people comprise as much as half of the state prison population (depending on the study cited). Her lobbying worked. The legislature passed a trio of laws providing funds to treat people in their communities before illness escalates. One piece of legislation, House Bill 130, allocates $2.1 million statewide to address mental health challenges at home, enabling the Missoula County Commissioners last week to sign off on a joint agreement with the state that will, among other things, fund four social worker positions. The social workers will connect patients with Saint Patrick’s Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Partnership Health Center, the Missoula County Public Defender Office and the Western Montana Mental Health Center to better ensure clients’ access to housing and treatment, improving the odds in the patient’s favor, says Kim Brown Campbell from the Missoula County Office of Planning and Grants. Sometimes people must wait as long as two weeks to meet with a social worker after discharge from in-patient mental health treatment, Brown says. Once the state funding comes through, the wait will dwindle to less than a week. “I’m really thrilled,” Roessmann says. “This is the first step in the right direction.” Jessica Mayrer

OPEN SUNDAYS IN DECEMBER 12-4

3.6 million

Dollars the University of Montana needs to trim from its base budget due to disappearance of one-time federal stimulus funding. UM’s proposals, submitted to the Montana Board of Regents last week, include potential faculty cuts and increased fees to students.

etc.

We’ve been asking ourselves that familiar Thanksgiving question this past week: Where the hell is all the snow? October and November gave us a tasty preview of the coming ski season—pray-for-snow parties, strings of ski-film releases, an unexpectedly early season opener at Lookout Pass Nov. 13. But with a wave of upgrades in the works at choice mountains in western Montana, we’re betting we aren’t the only ones dying to carve some turns before Christmas. Of course, some have hit the slopes already. Kevin Taylor, owner and general manager at Great Divide near Helena, estimates 1,000 skiers and snowboarders turned out for the area’s Wildwood Rail Jam on Nov. 7. Great Divide has since opened two lifts, with access to mostly human-made snow. Season prep at Great Divide started well before fall, Taylor says. Contractors and mountain personnel cleared large swaths of pine beetle kill over the summer. The project, which Taylor says cost a “bundle of dough” and threatened to put the area in “a world of hurt,” opened up 200 acres of skiing off the summit. We envy the dude laying down maiden tracks in that pow. Great Divide isn’t the only snow sports venue boasting new terrain this year. News traveled fast among powder hounds about Discovery Ski Area’s new triple chair serving roughly 400 acres off Rumsey Mountain. Co-owner Beatrice Pitcher says it will take two or three seasons to fully develop the new acreage. When finished, the expansion should add seven to eight runs. The new lift will open around Christmas, Pitcher says. But due to lack of snow, Discovery won’t open on Thanksgiving weekend. Missoula shredders can look forward to a few changes in their own backyard this season. Montana Snowbowl broke the news online that it has added two new intermediate runs off the LaVelle lift, just below Point 6. And don’t forget the experimental terrain park debuting whenever the snow sticks. The Indy got the skinny on University of Montana student Gregg Janecky’s project in early November. A freestyle skier and ’boarder, Janecky told us he lamented the lack of proper jumps and rails in these parts. Shops like Edge of the World backed Janecky’s proposal, and Snowbowl owner Brad Morris approved the move. Looks like steeps and deeps won’t be the ’Bowl’s only draws this year. Now if only we could find a solution for the weather. If we pray any harder, we just might pull something.

12

'21 7*2:,7+

7+(.,'

The REAL Santa! Dec. 12th & 19th 1-3pm Free Cookie Decorating!

Super fun toys, books, puzzles,Le Creuset cookware, vintage style aprons, cool ornaments & much more! Classic & unique gifts for young & old Free Cookie Decorating at Ellie Blue! December 5th, 1-5pm Downtown Parade of Lights

Josh Slonick +$33<7+$1.6*,9,1* 0217$1$7($ 63,&( :%52$':$< 021)5,6$7

328 East Pine Street • “The Oldest House In Missoula” FREE GIFT WRAPPING & PARKING! Tue - Fri 10 to 5; Sat 12 to 4 and Sun 12 to 4; closed Mondays

406-728-8889

','1 7, :$51<28"

Missoula Independent

Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

Leather Goods – Great Footwear Downtown – 543-1128 www.hideandsole.com

Page 7 November 26–December 3, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Rethinking the vote UM project examines decline in youth involvement by Alex Sakariassen

During a visit to the University of Montana Oct. 8, White House Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Messina spoke briefly about the political fire ignited among America’s youth by President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign. Their passion, sparked by the unconventional tools of the digital age, helped sweep Obama into office. But Messina’s comments painted a discouraging picture for the future of that movement. He said voters ages 18 to 29 continue to rally around the issue of cli-

In the wake of Messina’s visit, Bloomsburg and seven other UM journalism students grew increasingly puzzled about the change of heart during the first months of Obama’s presidency. They began asking young voters in Missoula a compelling question: If you could recast your 2008 presidential vote, would you? That reexamination of the election lies at the core of “Rethink’08,” a graduate seminar that seeks to answer why youth enthusiasm is dwindling. So far the group has focused its efforts online through

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

A graduate seminar in journalism at the University of Montana recently launched an online project, Rethink’08, aimed at discovering why youth enthusiasm generated by the 2008 presidential election has dwindled over the past nine months.

mate change, but the enthusiasm generated by the Obama camp has cooled over the last nine months. Many credit the 2008 election phenomenon to Obama’s presence at the younger generation’s digital feeding grounds, mainly Twitter and Facebook. According to a civics study by Tufts University, an estimated 23 million voters under 30 cast their ballots last November—3.4 million more than in 2004. Time Magazine dubbed it the “Year of the Youth Vote.” Messina offered no explanations why that passion subsided so rapidly. He only cited anecdotal evidence that it has. Cody Bloomsburg, a 23-year-old journalism grad student at UM, remembers pressing the issue with Messina. “I asked him about it. I said, ‘Well, are you seeing a lot of the youth vote walk away?’ He replied, ‘Yeah, people got busy. They were happy that Obama got elected, and then they kind of returned to their lives. We’ve seen a decline in young people working for Organize for America and being involved.’”

Missoula Independent

Page 8 November 26–December 3, 2009

social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook—the same tools used by Obama to drum up support. “During the election last year, people seemed so very fired up, especially young people,” says Anne Clausen, a 28-year-old exchange student from Denmark and one of the group’s more vocal members. “What happened? Where did all the enthusiasm go and why did it go away? There are so many issues still to resolve. When there are so many big issues, you really have a feeling that this country is, in a way, at a crossroads. Where are things going to go from here?” Clausen, Bloomsburg and Rethink’08 hosted a kickoff event in the University Center on Nov. 4. They asked students how attitudes toward Obama have changed in 2009, using photos to illustrate the answers they received. “That’s where you really get the physical reaction,” Clausen says. “And it’s been very, very different. Some people go ‘thumbs up’ a year ago and ‘thumbs up’ now. Others have really changed their point of view, for many different reasons.

We had a gay guy write on a piece of paper, ‘gay and waiting.’ He didn’t feel like Obama had done enough in that direction. Other people think Obama’s really screwed up the economy. “There are a lot of different opinions out there,” Clausen continues. “People are really fired up about it, and if you ask them, they do have an opinion, they do care. The weird thing is it doesn’t translate to people doing stuff.” So far, Rethink’08 has leaned heavily on Twitter feeds to distribute information on Obama’s performance and gather public comment. And Facebook has helped draw some traffic, Bloomsburg says, but not nearly in the numbers the group feels necessary to propel the study forward. They’ve been struggling to branch from the campus population into the broader Missoula community. “It’s tough to just go out on the street and engage people in a political discussion,” Bloomsburg says. “We’re trying to steer people toward the website and get the Missoula community involved there.” Sidestepping the challenges of social networking, Rethink’08 approached several Missoula individuals directly to create a string of young voter profiles. Bloomsburg says these interviews, specifically his own with Missoula native Chavvahn Gade, shed light on what drew youth to activism in 2008 and what could well be driving the youth vote away. “She’s still very active in politics and still definitely approves of Obama,” Bloomsburg says of Gade, who interned in Obama’s Senate office during the election. “Where she was disappointed really was in the Democratic Party itself, particularly [Sen. Max] Baucus. She feels like she worked so hard to get Obama into office and was very excited for it. Now that the Democrats control everything, she feels they should be getting more done.” Rethink’08 plans to host an online debate in the coming weeks between two yet-to-be-named local representatives from the left and the right. By mid-December, the group plans to open its forum to people outside the United States—again using Twitter and Facebook—which Clausen hopes will offer a valuable outsider perspective on the decline of youth enthusiasm and the importance of global politics in reigniting that interest. “We don’t want to just be putting more information out there,” Clausen says. “We really want to turn this thing around so people can have their say.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA Now get your local channels from DISH Network for less! Also available in HD!*

GET OVER 120 TOP CHANNELS INCLUDING LOCAL CHANNELS

mo Reg. Price $39.99/mo

LOCK IN YOUR SAVINGS

FOR A YEAR

FOR 12 MONTHS (with Agreement)

SPECIAL LIMITED-TIME OFFER!

& 8 CHANNELS

10 CHANNELS

FOR 3 MONTHS (with Agreement)

DVR UPGRADE

STANDARD

PROFESSIONAL

($5.98/mo DVR Service fee applies)

INSTALLATION IN UP TO 4 ROOMS

YOU CAN’T GET THIS DEAL WITH DIRECTV ! ®

Why would you ever pay more for TV?

1-888-DISH-916 3

4 7

dishmissoula.com

4

Or visit your local participating Retailer

Get DISH Network for your business and SAVE!

Also available at this DISH Network Authorized Retailer: Eagle Satellite: 800-DumpCable (800-386-7222)

* ABC, CBS and NBC available in high definition. Digital Home Advantage offer requires 24-month commitment and credit qualification. If service is terminated before the end of commitment, a cancellation fee of $15/month remaining will apply. Programming credits will apply during the first 12 months. All equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH Network upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Limit 4 leased tuners per account; lease upgrade fees will apply for select receivers; monthly fees may apply based on type and number of receivers. HD programming requires HD television. All prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Local channels only available in certain areas. Offer is subject to the terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer Agreements. Additional restrictions and fees may apply. First-time DISH Network customers only. Offer ends 1/31/10. HBO/ Showtime: Programming credits will apply during the first 3 months. Customer must downgrade or then-current price will apply. © 2009, DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME and related marks are trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS company. DIRECTV is a trademark of DIRECTV, Inc.

205507_9.625_x_12.5.indd

1

Missoula Independent

ADS2522 MISSOULA

dishnetwork.com/business

11/17/09 9:19:14 Page 9 November 26–December 3, 2009

AM


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Bright side Recognizing the many ways Montana’s got it good

543-5141•1300 W. Broadway•Missoula•M–Sa 9-6 Locations in Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, & Boise www.aspensound.com

Missoula Independent

Every year about this time I leave the politics behind and write a column voicing thanks for our lives here in Montana. This year, that’s particularly easy with national politics in a state of chaos. You have Sarah Palin gracing the cover of Newsweek in running shoes and short shorts while the Democrats pat themselves on the back over a do-nothing health care bill. In the meantime, the Republican Party moves further toward the far right edge of reality, perhaps never to return. But here in Montana, despite the recession, we have plenty of reasons to focus our attention locally and leave the national nuthouse behind on this Thanksgiving Day. This being the end of hunting season and all, there are plenty of Montanans of every political persuasion who are thankful for what they were able to harvest from the mountains and plains of our great state this year. We are fortunate to still be able to take healthy wild game to feed ourselves and our families. In Montana, hunters can simply walk into a sporting goods store and purchase a deer or elk license—and often more than one where there’s an over-abundance of game. But that’s not the case everywhere—and certainly not something we should take for granted. In Utah, for instance, you must apply for a permit, drawn by lottery. If you are one of the few to be successful, you then get to hunt their one-week general big game season. Given the obvious physical similarities between Utah and Montana, it’s somewhat of a mystery why their wild animals are so limited. Then again, perhaps the Beehive State is buzzing a little too much to take care of their game these days, while here in Big Sky Country we put a higher value on our native wildlife and the habitat it takes to maintain healthy, harvestable populations. Whatever the reasons, you can bet there’s a lot more game in Montanans’ freezers than in most other states in the nation. And as we look around at the uncertain economic times and the hardships visited on our population, it’s easy to be grateful our friends and family can still fill those tags and even have enough to share with those less fortunate. We can also give thanks for a second good water year in a row. Considering the last 10 years of severe drought and the tremendous impacts it has caused all across the state, the ample snowfall and wet springs have saved us from all-toofamiliar smoke-filled summers. Instead, we are surrounded this year by green

Page 10 November 26–December 3, 2009

lands, rivers and lakes filled with fish, and snow-capped peaks to remind us of years long gone in the onslaught of global warming. Economically, too, we have reasons to be glad to live in Montana. The geographic location of our far northern state

“While the

impacts from the recession have been crippling in many states, with unemployment reaching 10 percent nationally and 15 percent or higher in many areas, Montana has largely been spared catastrophic eco-

nomic trauma.

has often been blamed for the lack of a vibrant economy. After all, you have to go a long ways to bring anything into Montana and an equally long, if not longer, distance to get goods out to market. While this means we haven’t fully participated in many of the economic bubbles that have swept the nation, it also means we haven’t been subjected to the harsh conditions the collapse of those bubbles ultimately produces. Our grains still grow on the northern plains, cattle wander our fields, and our population, while inching toward a million, continues to advance at a fairly steady pace. While the impacts from the recession have been crippling in many states, with unemployment reaching 10 percent

nationally and 15 percent or higher in many areas, Montana has largely been spared catastrophic economic trauma. Sure, we’re still down near the bottom of the barrel in per capita income levels, but our populace is dealing with less than 7 percent unemployment, one of the lowest rates in the nation. If the post-recession economy booms again, we will likely lag behind the rest of the nation. But what some would see as boring stability sure beats the speculative rollercoaster of boom and bust driving so many from their homes across our country. We can also be thankful our state is one of the few that remains fiscally solvent in this crisis. Many states, such as California, are in turmoil over their budgetary disasters as they wrestle with the enormous problems that come when massive government spending collides with massively reduced revenues. Montana, however, still has a fund balance in our state budget, in no small part due to the very nature of our political landscape. Both Republicans and Democrats routinely seek to live within our means—a lesson the land itself has driven home for generations of Montanans. It’s a lesson worth heeding when wish lists come to the legislature. And while some may curse the lack of single-party control of the state, this often-awkward balancing act has proven valuable. Republicans tend to give too many tax breaks to their wealthy patrons, which can and has drastically reduced state revenues, while Democrats are often prone to spend too much on government services, creating programs and bureaucracies that, while useful, can be difficult to sustain. Finally, there’s our clean environment. While far from perfect, Montana’s air and water are cleaner than almost anywhere in the nation and we’ve been hard at work repairing past damage from resource extraction. It’s easy to take for granted until you go somewhere else— where you can see the air and the rivers run brown. We’re lucky to live here, fellow Montanans, and we know it. So this year, when we sit at the table with our families and friends, let us give a moment of thanks for what Montana has given us— and a promise to do what we can to return her many favors. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Switching gears Confessions of an off-road vehicle outlaw by Garrett VeneKlasen

By God, it was my right. No one could tell me I couldn’t chop new roads through national forest land with my offroad vehicle (ORV) and my chainsaw. I paid my taxes. This land belonged to me. If a few trees had to be cut and some makeshift roads had to be opened, well, too bad. It was worth it if I got to have a little more fun. My buddies in New Mexico and millions more around the country probably felt the same way. Then I began to notice something about the Carson National Forest near Taos, N.M. The elk were leaving, migrating somewhere else, and the quality of the hunts I’d enjoyed began to decline. And I noticed something else: The elk were moving to areas where they didn’t have to face harassment from rogue offroad vehicle-users like me. I remained quiet about this for years, but when a group of thoughtless riders ruined my own hunting experience, I had no choice but to think hard about what I’d been doing. It was time for me to change my habits and to speak out openly on behalf of reasonable and responsible off-road use. For an entire morning, I’d tracked a herd of elk in an area that hadn’t faced significant pressure from aggressive ORV riding. It was the peak of the rut, and the bugling of bull elk echoed during a perfectly planned hunt. I knew that the long effort of following this herd was going to pay off. But then, three all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riders shattered the stillness, roaring into the area on an illegal trail and blasting shotguns at a flock of grouse. The elk fled—and my hunt was over. When I confronted the riders, they had no clue that their raucous invasion had destroyed my outdoor experience. They didn’t even think about the impacts their riding had on those who enjoy quiet recreation—hiking, camp-

ing, hunting and horseback riding in our national forests. After the three ATVers ruined my hunt, I knew I had to change my ways. I love ATV riding, but the truth is that my ATV and the millions like it have made severe and cumulative impacts on

“I love ATV

riding, but the

truth is that my ATV and the millions like it have made severe and cumulative impacts on our public lands and

wildlife.

our public lands and wildlife. The impacts of off-road vehicles are probably even more profound and far-reaching than we think they are. It’s sad but true that future generations—including my 3-year-old daughter’s—will find our public lands roaded and devalued beyond repair if this problem is not addressed. When I told my fellow ORV riders of my change of heart, most replied that I was “nuts.” They said that even if I

decided to alter my behavior, most other ATV riders would not. Luckily, that has not been the case. My transformation into an advocate for responsible off-road vehicle riding has led other riders I know to rethink how they behave in the national forest. And as more of us set examples of prudent off-road use, we can become a powerful force to protect our key national forest lands. It couldn’t happen at a better time. The Carson National Forest, which sits right in my backyard, is at a critical juncture. Its land managers, along with other forest managers across the country, are drafting long-term plans that will change how off-road vehicles are dealt with for decades to come. Now is the time to urge our land managers and lawmakers to set aside large segments of America’s national forests, preserving them for clean water, wildlife habitat and the vast majority of us who visit the backcountry seeking peace and quiet. This means accepting fair and reasonable restrictions on ORV use. After all, everyone has a right to enjoy our forests, but no one has the right to abuse them. If we don’t change our ways, then the warning of Wallace Stegner, the esteemed author and conservationist, may well come to pass: “Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed…so that never again can we have the chance to see ourselves single, separate, vertical and individual in the world, part of the environment of trees and rocks and soil, part of the natural world and competent to belong in it.”

Choose wreaths, swags, centerpieces, boxes of boughs, and garlands $30.50 each + shipping

BITTERROOT EVERGREENS 1-866-642-3618 642-3618 478 Tushapaw Rd. Victor MT 59875 • evergreenwreath.com

Garrett VeneKlasen is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He was born, raised and currently lives in northern N.M.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 November 26–December 3, 2009


Brighten a child’s holiday

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

As you sit around with family and friends on Th a n k s g i v i n g , c h o w i n g down turkey, slurping up cranberry sauce and merrily drinking your beverage of choice, you’ll no doubt be thankful for the company you have and the plentiful food on your table. You also might ruminate on how lucky you are to have things like a roof over your head. This week, you can express your gratitude in another way by lending a hand to those in need over at Montana’s largest homeless shelter, the Poverello Center, as well as its three satellite facilities: the Salcido Center, Valor House and Joseph Residence. Specifically, the organization needs blankets, socks and toilet paper, as well as bulk food. These donations can be dropped off anytime during

the week, and even on Thanksgiving Day. Ellie Hill, the Pov’s director, says volunteer opportunities are also available if you want to help prep or clean up after the Pov’s massive Thanksgiving feast, which fed about 551 people last year. Hill reminds everyone that even after the holidays end, the Pov never closes, and always needs donations and volunteers. “We’re open all year round. We always have this need,” she says. –Ira Sather-Olson

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 27

upcoming season during a fundraiser at the Banquet Room of Bayern Brewing, 1507 Montana St. $5 suggested donation, all ages. Features ski movies, prizes and a drawing. E-mail Kevin at fru_003@hotmail.com.

If you’d like to honor veterans during the holidays, consider sponsoring a wreath to be placed on the headstone of each veteran’s grave at Fort Missoula and the Western Montana Veterans Cemetery. Each wreath costs $15 and will be placed at those cemeteries on Dec. 12 by cadets with Missoula’s Civil Air Patrol. Call Dave Mihalic at 251-3388.

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 28

You can help make the holidays a little brighter for kids in need. Just pick up a Mountain of Giving gift tag at any MFCU location, purchase an item on that child’s wish list, and return the unwrapped gift to any MFCU branchbefore Mountain beforeDecember December18 18thth..Mountain of Giving volunteers will wrap the gifts and distribute them in time for the holiday. Cash donations are also accepted.

More than you expect 523-3300 / www.missoulafcu.org Missoula Independent

Page 12 November 26–December 3, 2009

If you have compulsive eating problems seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Organic green thumbs in the Bonner, Milltown and Riverside areas can get involved with the Milltown Garden Patch—a nonprofit organic community garden slated to open in Milltown in spring 2010—during an organizational meeting, which starts at 2 PM at 108 Regal St. in Milltown. Free. Visit www.milltowngardenpatch.org.

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 29 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP.

MONDAY NOVEMBER 30 Bid on something pleasant for yourself—while you help raise money for an organization that helps teen moms— during a silent auction for Mountain Home Montana, which runs all day, each day, from Nov. 30–Dec. 6 at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free to attend and spectate. Call 541-0163 or e-mail fot@mountainhomemt.org.

To donate goods or to volunteer at the Poverello Center or any of its facilities during Thanksgiving week, call 728-1809 or stop by the Pov, 535 Ryman Street.

If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Al-Ateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, u s e a l l e y e n t r a n c e . C a l l 72 8 - 5 818 o r v i s i t www.al-anon.alateen.org.

TUESDAY DECEMBER 1 While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 26 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement—from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

THURSDAY DECEMBER 3

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010.

Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

Bid on something pleasant for yourself—while you help raise money for an organization that helps teen moms— during a silent auction for Mountain Home Montana, which runs all day, each day, from Nov. 30–Dec. 6 at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free to attend and spectate. Call 541-0163 or e-mail fot@mountainhomemt.org.

Help celebrate backcountry skiing while also helping UM’s Backcountry Club with club expenses for the

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A man approached a clerk at a restaurant in Haverhill, Mass., declared he had a gun and demanded money from the register. When the clerk insisted on seeing the gun, the man fled. North Andover’s Eagle Tribune reported police found suspect Adam Alsarabi, 22, hiding in the woods, gunless. ROAD WORRIES - Bad driving may be genetic, according to researchers at the University of California Irvine. Their study, reported in the journal Cerebral Cortex, found that people with a particular gene variant performed more than 20 percent worse on a driving test than people with a different DNA sequence. About 30 percent of Americans have that mutant gene, according to study leader Steven Cramer. “These people make more errors from the get-go,” he explained, “and they forget more of what they learned after time away.” Accused hit-and-run driver Edward Cespedes-Rodriguez, 34, testified in a Portland, Ore., court that he didn’t see the victim because he was fumbling for a dropped cell phone. Kate Altermatt told the Oregonian she doubted his assertion considering she was wearing a 6-foot-tall bright orange bunny costume and riding a pedicab that was lit up with reflectors and a blinking red light. Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Karin Immergut agreed and found Cespedes-Rodriguez guilty. Bulgarian prosecutors announced they’re investigating a new gambling game, called “Russian road roulette,” where drivers bet as much as $7,400 that they can speed through red lights at busy intersections without crashing into other cars or hitting pedestrians. Onlookers also wager on the outcome. Vanio Stoevski, head of the Sofia Road Police, attributed two deaths to the game, telling Reuters they occurred when a speeding motorcyclist crashed into a spectator. FLAME GAMES - Chad Matthew Lever, 26, pleaded guilty to starting a fire that killed his mother in Breinigsville, Pa. Investigators said Lever was trying to get the woman’s cat in bed with her by flicking a lighter under the bed but didn’t see the cat, so he headed downstairs to look for it without realizing he had set the mattress on fire. His mother, an invalid, yelled that the mattress was burning, but Lever couldn’t get her out of the room and was overcome by smoke. Allentown’s Morning Call reported Lever, who received two years’ probation, told detectives he had played the lighter trick with the cat before, and usually the flicker of the lighter scared it to jump onto the bed. Firefighters treated a mobile home resident in Des Moines, Iowa, for smoke inhalation after the bathtub caught fire while the residents were celebrating the Day of the Dead. Noting someone put candles in plastic plant vases with dirt at the bottom in the tub, investigators concluded that when a candle burned down to the bottom of a vase, it caught fire, melted down and caused the bathtub to catch on fire. “We normally have the candles burning in a plate of water,” resident Noemi Garcia told the Des Moines Register. “Whoever put them in the bathroom thought the dirt would be good enough. But it wasn’t.”

MISSOULA NORTH

MISSOULA SOUTH

HAMILTON

721-1770

721-0888

363-3884

STEVENSVILLE

THOMPSON FALLS

POLSON

RONAN

777-4667

827-8473

888-1099

676-7800

UNCLEAR ON THE CONCEPT - Raibin Raof Osman, 20, called 911 to report that a McDonald’s in Aloha, Ore., had left out a box of orange juice from his drive-through order. The Oregonian reported that a restaurant employee later called 911 to report that Osman and his companions were blocking the drivethrough lane, knocking on restaurant windows and intimidating employees. He was arrested and fined $300. Calvin Hoover, 21, called 911 in Marion County, Ore., to report someone had broken into his truck at a tavern and stolen cash, a jacket and some marijuana. The Statesman Journal said Hoover called 911 again to complain that sheriff’s deputies hadn’t arrived, but the dispatcher had trouble understanding him because he was driving and stopping several times to vomit. When deputies did show up, they charged Hoover with driving under the influence of intoxicants. Police in Clarksville, Tenn., arrested Hee Orama, 34, after she repeatedly called 911 to complain that a man lied to her about wanting to marry her. Nashville’s WSMV-TV said police had arrested Orama the week before for repeatedly calling 911 because she couldn’t find her car. MELTING POT FOLLIES - Citizens protested in Taos, N.M., after hotel owner Larry Whitten, 63, forbade Hispanic workers from speaking Spanish in his presence and ordered some to Anglicize their names. “I’m just doing what I’ve always done,” Whitten told the Associated Press after fired workers, their relatives and some townspeople set up pickets across the street from the Paragon Inn. He explained he asked workers to speak only English because he perceived they were hostile to his management style and worried they might start talking about him in Spanish, which he doesn’t understand. Six Dallas police officers ticketed at least 39 motorists over the past three years for not speaking English, even though no law requires drivers to speak English. Police Chief David Kunkle apologized repeatedly while promising to investigate the officers involved. The Dallas Morning News reported Kunkle also ordered pending cases to be dismissed and fines already paid for the non-existent offense to be refunded. RULES ARE RULES - Maryland’s Hereford High School lost a Baltimore County cross-country championship after an official disqualified one of its runners whose black undershorts had white thread. Official Steve Smith explained the rule against wearing visible multicolor undergarments is new but is on the books and noted that a number of other runners changed their uniforms before the race to comply with the rule. CRUEL AND UNUSUAL PUNISHMENT - After serving time for illegally dumping hazardous waste, Sicilian builder Santo Gambino, 30, was transferred to house arrest in Villabate. Soon after, Italian news agencies reported, Gambino went to the police station and asked to be returned to prison to avoid arguing with his wife. Instead, police charged him with violating the conditions of his sentence and ordered him to go home and patch things up with his wife. THANKS INDEED - An Ontario family said their Thanksgiving dinner was ruined when ashes of their mother leaked into the mashed potatoes. The Hamilton Spectator reported Lisa Blair, 31, and two of her sisters were wearing lockets containing some of their mother’s ashes when the incident occurred. Blair also found ashes all over her white sweater. The family spent $140 each for the lockets, which were not professional urn jewelry provided by funeral homes, but the Casket Store, a funeral service company, offered to reseal the lockets for free.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 November 26–December 3, 2009


rom the time this issue hits the stands to the first day of spring, we have 116 days to take advantage of another Montana winter. Many of you may already have the next four months set with meticulous plans to shred the slopes, lounge at the bar or simply hibernate. For you, we toast your focus and preparation, and wish you much powder, beer nuts and time with your Snuggie. For those of you still looking for a few ideas, or perhaps some thoughtful propositions from seasoned locals, consider these pages a warm-up to your winter

F

itinerary. We’ve looked into some of the region’s most outstanding, outlandish or outright-odd offerings, and covered a little of everything for everyone. Ski bums get their own category, as do bar flies and shut-ins. We’ve also listed choice getaways, can’t-miss winter events, our favorite holiday traditions and a karmic to-do list. One hundred and sixteen days may sound like an eternity, but spring will be here before you know it. Don’t dally. Get out there—or stay inside—and start exploring. Remember, few things warm the soul better than a new adventure—and the perfect hot toddy.

Photo by Chad Harder

THE BEST IN SKIING, SKATING, SOAKING, ESCAPING, PARTYING AND STAYING WARM. by the Independent staff

SEVEN SICK SKI ADVENTURES Ski in two states —Idaho and Montana—in one day at Lost Trail Powder Mountain. The base area is just off Montana Highway 93. Five lifts and nearly 40 runs are yours for just 34 bones. Hike Point 6 off Montana Snowbowl for some easy off-area

Missoula Independent

turns. By boot-packing up the ridge just off Snowbowl’s Nutcracker, you can add several hundred more vertical feet to your run. The south face feeds back toward the resort, but be mindful of skier etiquette and remember: When you’re off-area, you’re on your own. Cave to nostalgia and hike Marshall Mountain for some skiing. Take Highway 200 from East Missoula to Marshall

Page 14 November 26–December 3, 2009

Canyon Road and keep your eyes peeled for the unmistakable cut of ski runs. The hill is just over five miles from downtown Missoula, so park, hike and enjoy.

Try car skiing. It’s just what it sounds like. Hook a rope to a car. Hold on. Pray.

Indulge in a moonlight ski trip up the Rattlesnake. Cruise up Rattlesnake Drive to the trailhead, about 4.5 miles north of Missoula. Follow Rattlesnake Creek or take a turn up Spring Gulch.

Cross-country ski at Lolo Pass. The pass—about 45 miles southwest of Missoula on Highway 12—tops out around 5,200 feet and offers a number of scenic ski trails of varying lengths. Finish a chilly day with a hot drink at the


the 2010 Pike on Ice fishing derby on Seeley and Salmon lakes. The competition will be held Jan. 16 and 17. Play softball in the snow. Put together a team and enter the annual Blizzardball invitational softball tournament at Fort Missoula Jan. 30 and 31. This year’s team theme is “Blue.” Find out more at www.blizzardball.net. Shoot things and ski. Compete in the Seeley Lake Challenge Biathlon on Jan. 23, hosted by the Seeley Lake Chamber of Commerce. Bring your own gun or borrow one. It’s Nordic skiing combined with shooting balloon targets, with different races for both beginners and advanced. They even serve burgers, donuts and hot chocolate.

Photo by Chad Harder

Dogs love treats almost as much as you’ll love cross country skiing.

Lumberjack Saloon or the roadside Bearcave Bar and Grill.

Top Choice Tour the south-of-Missoula ski loop Suffering a little cabin fever? Itching to get the hell out of Dodge? Skiers know after a big snow, sticking around town just isn’t an option. So play hooky from work and head south on U.S. Highway 93 to Lost Trail Powder Mountain for a Friday away. When the slopes close at 4 p.m., have a few drinks and call it an early night. With Maverick Mountain just 75 miles farther, even the least rabid powder hound won’t mind rising a little early for some new terrain. Take Montana Highway 43 east to Highway 278, then loop north on the Pioneer Mountains Scenic Byway. Well off the beaten path, Maverick touts itself as one of “Montana’s best kept secrets.” With Anaconda about an hour away, you can make it back to civilization well before last call. Stay the night, then return to Missoula on Highway 1, stopping at Discovery Ski Area outside Phillipsburg to polish off the weekend. Your knees might ache on Monday, but your coworkers’ stories of watching football games and walking the dog will sound mundane in comparison. Alex Sakariassen

EIGHT EXQUISITE ESCAPES Sleep in an igloo or snow cave at Glacier National Park. Spend a few days—or more—cross-country skiing throughout the park, and sleep in the surprising comfort of these accommodations. Prices start at $215. Call 1-800-7191328 or visit www.montanatours.us. Ta k e a s n o w c o a c h t o u r i n Yellowstone. See bison and elk in the country’s oldest national park from the comfort of what feels like your living room. Several snowcoach operators run

daylong tours from West Yellowstone. An eight-hour trip generally runs in the $100-per-person range. Check out www.yellowstonenationalpark.com/sno wcoach.htm for more. Rent a yurt in the Swan Mountains. Up to eight people can stay in Yurtski’s 20foot canvas sanctuary, which includes beds, pads, dishes, two lanterns, a three-burner cook stove and a large table with seating. Non-guided access runs a minimum of $140 and catered visits start at $300 per day. Visit www.yurtski.com for more. Go see the Olympics. The 2010 Winter Games take place in Vancouver, which is just nine hours away. Visit www.cosport.com for ticket information. At last glance, we found tickets for women’s freestyle skiing on Feb. 23, and most of the men’s ice hockey rounds the week of Feb. 15. Tell ghost stories in a Garnet Ghost Town cabin. The Bureau of Land Management rents cabins furnished with beds, dishes, gas cook stoves, lanterns and wood heat stoves starting at just $30 a night. Garnet, located just 40 miles east of Missoula, was an active gold-mining town 100 years ago with 1,000 residents, 31 businesses and 13 saloons, but was deserted once the gold played out. Call 329-3914 for cabin availability. Fly to Vegas. Allegiant Air may get you on the baggage fees, but a one-way ticket to Las Vegas still costs as little as $39.99. Learn to surf at Silver Mountain. The Kellogg, Idaho, resort—just two hours west of Missoula—features an enormous indoor water park and wave pool, and offers hour-long surfing lessons on Saturdays and Sundays. Oh, and there’s some skiing at the place too. Visit www.silvermt.com for more.

Top Choice Rent a cabin at The Jack The Lumberjack Saloon off Highway 12 is a self-contained complex of down-home, rustic pleasure. The log cabin bar on 7000 Graves Road overlooks a firepit and large yard populated by four tiny but clean rental cabins. The cabins rent for $65 a night for one bed or $75 for four beds—that’s beds, not bedrooms. This isn’t a getaway for the highbrow. But the cabins are efficient and cute, and include kitchenettes, full bathrooms and straightforward sleeping space. It’s not really about sleeping anyway. What truly makes “The Jack” a gem is the fun you’ll have hanging out in the saloon all night. Yes, you might witness a fistfight or find yourself inexplicably covered in peppermint schnapps. But the cozy isolation of the joint promises a little more magic than your average downtown rowdy bar. It’s open year-round, but winter time at the saloon means hanging out drinking whiskey and beers in the warmth of a large log cabin bar full of hospitable locals, good-timing forestry students in Carrharts and flannels, and random out-out-of-towners. It promises bar food galore, winter barbequing and cheerful sing-a-longs. And you can wander outside and warm yourself over the roar of a bonfire as snow falls. On weekends, the saloon hosts country and cover bands of varying calibers, and if you’re into dancing, you’ll probably find someone who knows western swing. Best of all, when you’ve had 12 too many shots of Jägermeister, you can stumble out the front door of the bar and into the comfort of your cabin (you must reserve ahead of time) just a few yards away, where you can sleep it off until breakfast. Erika Fredrickson

Join the Whitefish Curling Club at the Stumptown Ice Den. Saturday practices are open to the public from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Cost to cover ice time is $10, or buy a season membership for $20. More at www.whitefishcurlingclub.com. Win $1,000 in the Fifth annual Pond Skim Competition in Whitefish. Registration for the April 3 event is $25 per person, and wild costumes are a must. Have to be 21 or older to participate. Try snowkiting on Georgetown Lake Feb. 13 and 14. The public demo and kitercross race is hosted by Montana Kite Sports.

NINE NON-TRADITIONAL WAYS TO PLAY Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Be like the guy on this week’s cover. Grab a case of Rainier and enter

Ice fishing and napping: two great things that go great together.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 November 26–December 3, 2009


Erik and Brent Wilson—have traded the trophy amongst themselves for years. It’s a signature Missoula event. U.S. Telemark National Championships at Whitefish Mountain Resort. Watch free-heeler Kelsey Schmid-Sommer of Whitefish, the four-time women’s champion, try to defend her title March 18–20. Volunteers earn a lift ticket voucher for each day worked. Flathead Sled Dog Days and the Seeley Lake Sled Dog Race. You’ve always wanted to see some good ol’ Montana mushing. The Flathead race ( Jan. 8–10) takes place in the Stillwater State Forest while the Seeley Lake race ( Jan. 15–17) goes from Lincoln to Seeley and back.

Top Choice Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Staring at a hole in the ground never felt so good.

Test your luck at the Moonlight Snowmobile Poker Run. The Snow Warriors Clubhouse is just a three-mile snowmobile ride from Hooper Park in Lincoln, and it’s the place for poker on a full moon. Games start at 6 p.m., so ride fast. Run in Missoula’s Frost Fever 5K Fun Run on Jan. 30. Times and registration fees to be announced in December. Keep your eyes peeled and your quads warm. Freeze your spandex off in the 31st Snow Joke Half-Marathon. Registration is $10. Race starts at 11 a.m. on Feb. 27 in Seeley Lake. Grow a pair and try the annual Flathead Lake Polar Bear Plunge. The Raven Brew Pub in Woods Bay hosts the shivery dip every Jan. 1 at 2 p.m.

SEVEN SIGNATURE SPECTATOR EVENTS Northern Division Freestyle Competition at Snowbowl. We recommend watching this annual two-day event (Feb. 13 and 14) from the bar deck. The competition draws the best mogul bombers, freestylers and jumpers around. Lookout Pass’ “Battle on the Border” slopestyle competition. Freestyle skiers and ’boarders duke it out for bi-state bragging rights during this annual invitational on Feb. 21. Snowbowl’s annual Gelande Championship. Jumpers from around the country compete for an $8,000 cash purse—the largest on the Gelande circuit—on Feb. 27 and 28. Three local brothers—Rolf,

2010 National Finals Ski-Joring Races Outdoor recreation tends to take interesting, illogical turns when temperatures fall and bloodalcohol levels rise. Enter skijoring, sort of the Amish equivalent of winter waterskiing, whereby a skier is towed behind a horse going full-gallop down a snowy road. Any number of obstacles can factor: jumps, hoops, slalom poles, etc. One thing’s for sure, it’s safer to play spectator than competitor. Good thing Red Lodge hosts the 2010 National Finals Ski-Joring Races March 12–14. Skiers from across the continent will hold on for dear life in the name of a $20,000 prize. A separate long-jump competition is scheduled, with record distances of more than 60 feet. Chances of viewing a grisly accident are pretty good. Just ask Chris Anthony, a professional skier who botched an on-camera skijoring attempt in downtown Leadville, Colo., for a Warren Miller ski film in 2008. Anthony walked away from his face-first spill, but not without an inch-long tear at the corner of his mouth. What else is winter for but cheering complete strangers on to personal injury? Alex Sakariassen

OUR NINE FAVORITE HOLIDAY TRADITIONS Cut down your own Christmas tree. Pick up permits at the Missoula Ranger District office, located at Fort Missoula, for just $5. Bask in the glow of Missoula’s Parade of Lights. The downtown spectacle starts at 6 p.m. on Dec. 5. Santa arrives at the Florence Building at 1 p.m. Take a tour of local Christmas light displays. We recommend the Rattlesnake and University neighborhoods. Drunken caroling. Or, you know, just caroling throughout your neighborhood. But a little Jameson always makes “Jingle Bells” more fun. Sit on Santa’s lap. Who cares if you’re too old or jaded to believe he’ll finally bring you that Red Ryder carbine-action 200-shot range model air rifle? You’d shoot your eye out anyway.

Photo by Chad Harder

No need to hurry. The beer won’t run out before you’re done.

Missoula Independent

Page 16 November 26–December 3, 2009

Go see The Nutcracker. Garden City Ballet’s annual production runs Dec. 18–20 at the University of Montana’s Montana Theatre. Call 240-6042 for tickets.


Spin a dreidel. Don’t know what we’re talking about? Learn more from the good folks at Har Shalom (3035 Russell Street), or visit their Dec. 18 vegetarian latke potluck dinner, which is followed by dreidel games and music. Eat yourself into a coma. Maybe use a recipe or two from our holiday food issue last week. Build a gingerbread house from scratch. Don’t succumb to the boxed variety available from Costco.

Top Choice Stage your own live nativity scene So, you ask, how does one go about staging a live nativity scene? First, you need a handful of friends. At a minimum: Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus, three wise men and an angel. Shepherds are optional. Mary should be demure and modestly clad. Tall hats are a nice touch for the wise men, and Jesus wears a swaddling cloth. I’ve found that a sheet twisted around the diaper area works well. It gets a little chilly, so you might want to wear trousers under your swaddling cloth.

Trade beads during the Mardi Gras celebration at the Snowbowl bar. This would be an excellent time to try the ’bowl’s famous Bloody Mary.

BLA FRIDCK SPEC AY IALS

Tour Missoula’s three award-winning breweries. Our suggestion: Start with the Slow Elk at Big Sky (5417 Trumpeter Way), then travel south to grab a Doppel Bock at Bayern (1507 Montana Street) and end with a Cold Smoke at Kettlehouse (602 Myrtle Street). Consider hiring a designated driver. Wear your best platform shoes and knock back the pints at the Whitefish Winter Carnival Disco Party. This year’s citywide celebration— including the grand parade—is scheduled for Feb. 5–7.

Doors

Educate yourself about single-malt scotch. Suggested starting point: The Rhino (158 Ryman Street) stocks roughly 50 different single-malts.

OPEN

Friday ,

Nov. 2

7 th at

Built-in DVD player

While supplies last!

$ Honestly, it’s better than Wii.

Make the perfect hot toddy. Our recipe: Two shots of rye whiskey, one lemon slice, one sugar cube and hot water. Stir with a cinnamon stick. Make snow cones with actual snow—and vodka. Our resident bartender suggests filling your cone with snow, then adding the vodka. Some of the snow will melt. Add more snow, then Kool-Aid for color and flavor.

Top Choice Play Polish Horseshoes, aka Snowbee Snowmen melt, but victory lasts forever. That’s why, if you’re looking for a new way to frolic in the snow this winter, you should drop the carrots and coal, call your buds, and try the addictive winter drinking game often called Polish Horseshoes. ( We prefer a name less derogatory, like, say, “Snowbee.”) What you’ll need: Four people Two ski poles One Frisbee Lots of beer How to play: Stick the ski poles in the snow, 25 feet or so apart. Place an empty beer bottle or can atop each pole. Split up into two teams of two, and stand behind the poles. Throw the Frisbee back and forth, trying to knock the beer bottle off the poles. Drink beer.

32" LCD HDTV with built-in DVD player MSRP $49998

ONLY

Search Vanns.com: 462484896

399

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

SEVEN WAYS TO DRINK YOUR WAY THROUGH THE SEASON

.m.

Toast in the New Year at the Northern Lights Saloon in Polebridge. Getting there can take a while, but the stories last forever.

32"

After priming your nativity posse, I suggest taking the scene on the road. My crew, which included an archangel with a broken wing and a blue heeler wearing faux reindeer antlers (to impersonate a sheep), filed into Mary’s Volkswagen van and hit Missoula’s slant streets. Our rolling nativity scene culminated in Christmas caroling, and we found Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” set the right tone while spreading a delicious dose of holiday cheer. Baby Jesus 2006

8:00 a

$

129

98

88

New low price!

Blu-ray player MSRP $19997 Search Vanns.com: 487141334

SIMPLEshopping www.vanns.com

Your local Vann’s

Toll-free 800-769-5668

Missoula 3623 Brooks (406) 728-5151 Frrid dayy, 11/2 27 store e hourrs: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.; OPEN SUND DAY 12 p.m.. - 5 p.m m. Holiday Store Hours: Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sunday 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Missoula Independent

Page 17 November 26–December 3, 2009


Scoring: Three points for hitting the beer bottle, two for hitting the ski pole and causing the beer bottle to fall off The receiving team can negate points by catching the Frisbee or beer bottle. If a Frisbee hits a beer bottle, but the receiving team catches the bottle, the throwing team only receives 2 points. If the receiving team catches the beer bottle and the Frisbee, the throwing team only gets 1 point.

You must be holding your beer at all times. Play to 11. Loser has to do something cold and funny. Matthew Frank

SIX WAYS TO SPEND THE SEASON INDOORS Ride the waterslides at Currents. The indoor pool at McCormick Park fea-

tures two fantastic indoor slides and a whirlpool. Note: Weekend crowds can be intimidating. Try Bikram yoga. The key here is the heated room. And, we suppose, the two breathing exercises and 26 asanas central to Bikram yoga. Missoula Bikram Yoga is located at 211 N. Higgins Avenue. Witness the greatness of Anthony Johnson. Missoula may be a football town, but the current point guard at the University of Montana is on pace to become the next great Griz. Considered the best player in the Big Sky Conference, the senior started the season averaging 22.3 points, 4.7 assists and 3.7 rebounds per game. The Griz host Northern Arizona and Northern Colorado Dec. 4 and 5, respectively. Turn up the heat in your house and host a beach party. We suggest beach balls, tiki torches, drinks served with little umbrellas, mandatory bathing suit attire and—here’s an important thing—establishing a coat room.

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

Take in four movies at the theater in one day. In Missoula, this involves the Carmike 10 or Village 6, and generally requires missing any three-hour epics. But, this weekend you could hit the 12:20 matinee of 2012, the 4 p.m. show of The Twilight Saga: New Moon, Where the Wild Things Are

at 7 and A Christmas Carol in 3-D at 9:50. Just keep an eye on the popcorn intake. Watch teeth-shattering hits at a Maulers game. Missoula’s resident minor league hockey team features some legitimate young talent, plus two freaks of nature: 6-foot-9 defenseman Sean Sanford and 6-foot-6 forward Jake Schutte. The Glacier Ice Rink offers thrillingly close vantage points to the action.

FIVE PRACTICAL POSSIBILITIES FOR IMPROVING YOUR KARMA Actually shovel your sidewalk. Then shovel your neighbor’s. Pick up the dog poop in your yard. It’s easier when it’s frozen. Write a love note. If you’re lonely, write a note to the Indy. We’ll always love you. Well, most of you. Donate your old winter coat to the Poverello Center. Make sure the item’s clean, and help keep someone warm this winter. The Pov’s located at 535 Ryman Street. Replace all your Christmas lights with new LED lights. The LED are more expensive, but they reportedly save 80 percent more energy.

Terrain parks simulate highway construction for your snowboarding pleasure.

the

dish

$$–$$$...$15 and over Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offers creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the Great Room; visit with the chefs and dine in the Kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: M-Th 11am10pm; Fr-Sa 11am-11pm; Sun 10am-10pm; Sun brunch 10am-2pm; Tavern til Midnight Su-Th, 2am Fr-Sa. $$-$$$ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining

Missoula Independent

areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins 542-1337 Open daily from 7 am to 3 pm. Breakfast and lunch served all day, everyday. Huevos Rancheros, Omelets, Tomato Lime and Tortilla Soup, Bing Cherry Salads, Fried Egg Sandwiches. Locally owned and operated since 1991. Daily specials from our local farmers and ranchers. $-$$

Page 18 November 26–December 3, 2009

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our

fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All of our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch and dinner. $-$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on all-natural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am4pm. $–$$.


November

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Peru Dark Roast - Shade Grown $9.75/lb.

Golden Aged Sumatra Low Acid $11.95/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

Get Stuffed! Happy Thanksgiving

BUTTERFLY HERBS

COFFEES, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 North Higgins Avenue • Downtown

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

BUTTERFLY HERBS

4951 N. Reserve Street Just south of the I-90 Reserve St. Exit 830-3210 • www.seankellys.com

the Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well ad international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins 542-2206 123 E Main 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your

favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ What’s For Dinner Meal Delivery Service 406-207-2203 Delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door. Fresh dinner menu changes weekly, frozen dinner and dessert menus change monthly. Order by noon on Monday, deliveries are made Tuesday. Meals start at only $7.50 per portion. Menus and ordering available at www.WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

dish

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 ColdStone Creamery ice-cream cakes will make your party perfect. With super-premium, home-made ice cream and layers of moist cake, we can make you the belle of the ball. Call a day ahead and we will decorate it with anything you want - from princesses to giant robots to unique holiday scenes. Bring in your business card for a $5 discount. $-$$

Times Run 11/27 - 12/03

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

A Serious Man

Nightly at 7 and 9 Sunday matinee at 1 and 3 Thursday (12/3) at 9 ONLY

An Education

Nightly at 7 and 9 Sunday matinee at 1 and 3 Thursday (12/3) at 7 ONLY

www.thewilma.com

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Holiday special orders available and coming soon: Santa photos and cupcakes for charity! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $

Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Missoula Independent

Page 19 November 26–December 3, 2009


by Ari LeVaux

Weekly specials

The meatri dish

(dine in with meal)

Mon. - 2 for 1 desserts Tues. - Free appetizer night Wed. - 2 for 1 bubble tea all day Thurs. - Free pot of select tea w/meal 529 S. Higgins • Hip Strip Missoula 830.3237 Mon- Sat Lunch & Dinner www.izarestaurant.com

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

WHAT'S FOR DINNER? delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door! Starting at $7.50 per portion

Free Delivery 406-207-2203 WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com

Light Up Your Taste Buds Any Time Of Year www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

A philosophy paper recently published in Neuroethics presents the current state of biotech research on the use of genetic engineering to eliminate pain in animals. Author Adam Shriver, a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, argues it’s our moral obligation to use such technology to reduce the suffering of animals on factory farms. “If we can’t do away with factory farming, we should at least take steps to minimize the amount of suffering that is caused,” he told New Scientist recently. Shriver, a vegetarian, says his personal preference would be that nobody eats meat and that factory farms had no reason to exist. But given the demand for meat, he assumes factory farms are here to stay and sees pain-free meat (meat from animals genetically engineered to not feel pain) as a compromise that would at least reduce the amount of suffering in the world. Shriver isn’t the only one in the ivory tower thinking about pain-free meat. But this idea contains a fatal flaw that makes it unlikely to advance beyond an intellectual exercise. Factory-farmed meat is problematic in many ways beyond animal suffering, and knocking out certain “pain genes” would further encourage and enable this atrocious and unsustainable practice. By numbing animals, we’d be numbing ourselves to the ills of factory farming, to which we should be anything but numb. Nearly one-fifth of global carbon emissions come from factory farms—more than the combined emissions of the world’s transport activities, including cars, planes, trucks, trains and boats. Factory farms use and pollute incredible amounts of water, degrading hundreds of rivers and killing millions of fish, while helping create a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico the size of Massachusetts. Slaughterhouse suffering isn’t limited to the animals that die there. Uncomfortable and unhealthy working conditions, repetitive-stress injuries and the occasional major trauma are the norm for slaughterhouse workers—who are often undocumented, poorly paid immigrants whose status helps keep them from unionizing for better conditions. Those who eat factory-farmed meat can be victimized, too, by bacterial contamination, hormones and antibiotics. Factory-meat victims also include the

Ask Ari:

Q

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has put its money on the prospect of death-free, animalfree meat. The animal-rights group has a standing offer of $1 million to the first person or company to come up with a safe, affordable and commercially marketable process to create meat without raising or killing animals. PETA’s interests are aligned with a growing network of scientists. The In-Vitro Meat Consortium is an international alliance of environmentally concerned scientists collaborating to facilitate the establishment of large-scale carne-culture. While the group has gained momentum and believers, the goal of lab-grown meat that’s affordable enough to compete with factory farms is still five to 10 years off, according to Jason Matheny of New Harvest, a U.S. nonprofit that channels funding to animal-free meat research.

Hard to swallow A

With a bumper crop of tomatoes, bolstered by the warm September weather, I was able to put away lots of salsa this harvest season. I canned some and I froze some. Without giving it much thought, some of my fresh salsa was frozen in reused yogurt containers, while some was frozen in glass mason jars. Much to my surprise (and disappointment), all the salsa I froze and stored in glass jars became nearly half liquid, while all the salsa froze and stored in the plastic yogurt containers is thick and tasty. What gives? —Former Glass Man

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Missoula Independent

many people who go hungry because land that could have been used to grow food for people is used to grow food for animals. With the world’s meat consumption expected to double in the next 40 years, such problems are likely to increase. Few issues divide the human diet more than the eating of animal flesh. While some argue meat eating played an integral part in the evolution of our minds and bodies, others believe that in today’s world, eating meat is completely unnecessary—and both sides may be right. While Shriver’s pain-free plan falls short of addressing all the problems associated with factory farms, his assessment of the forces that create factory farms is realistic. It may indeed be a given that cheap meat will be consumed. If so, the question becomes: How will it be produced?

Page 20 November 26–December 3, 2009

I’m not buying your story, FGM. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if you’re making it up—the possible giveaway being that if you freeze salsa in glass jars, the most likely problem would be that the jars crack, especially if it’s as watery as you say. However, I’m going to assume this is a sincere question and that you were careful to leave enough headspace in the jars to allow for the salsa to expand without busting its way to freedom. I did some research in hopes of verifying or disproving my initial thought that the vessel could influence the salsa’s water content, and found nothing to indicate that freezing salsa in glass could make water materialize. I suppose

The science behind this young field is borrowed partly from medical research into tissue regrowth. The idea is to take cells from tasty farm animals, then stimulate and nourish the cells so they grow into edible masses of muscle meat that vaguely resemble animal tissue—perfect for nuggets or burgers. New Harvest commissioned a recent Oxford University study to estimate the environmental impact of lab-grown meat. The study found replacing factory farms with meat labs would create 80 percent fewer greenhouse-gas emissions, use 90 percent less land and water, and be cost-comparable. Many slow-food/small-farm types are calling foul at the prospect of further distancing the eater from the source of his or her food. And they’re right. I personally wouldn’t want to eat it. But while meat labs seem vaguely disturbing, factory farms are completely disgusting. Some argue cultured meat is unnatural. But neither is it natural that chickens are bred to grow so fast their legs snap under their own weight. Nor is it natural when cattle are overbred to the point that they can’t even safely have sex and must rely on artificial insemination to procreate. Some farmers and agricultural experts are convinced small farms could feed the world all the meat it needs. This may be so, depending on how we define “need.” In any case, if small farmers really think they can quench the world’s thirst for blood, they have a five- to 10-year window in which to make their case. One of the biggest obstacles to cultured meat is the development of a suitable growth medium, which is a soup of salts, sugars, amino acids and vitamins. Medical-tissue cultures use animal-derived sources, like blood, but using animal fluids would defeat the purpose for meat production. Matheny says the most promising source of growth media is algae, but making the production process cost effective will take time. If and when that time comes, and lab-grown meat begins filling the processed-food troughs of the masses, the question becomes: Will the Oscar Mayer wiener-eaters of the world even notice, or care? If not, and if it can be made safely, and if the environmental benefits turn out to be true, I say let them eat from the meatri dish.

there’s an outside chance the glass could encourage the salsa to separate, but if so the problem could be addressed by stirring the salsa after it’s thawed. I suspect, however, that you began the freezing phase of your salsa adventure using the yogurt containers, and when they ran out you switched to glass. You scooped from the bottom, which made the first containers of salsa chunkier, and the later containers more watery. Case closed—until some physicist or chemist writes to vindicate FGM’s hypothesis. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net


Arts & Entertainment listings November 26–December 3, 2009

8

days a week

THURSDAY November

26

Hey, it’s Thanksgiving, so be thankful, at least today, okay? That being said, most places are likely closed, perhaps even your favorite watering hole. So be sure to call ahead before you head out. And if you can, spend today in the company of family and friends. Stretch and find harmony before you slurp down cranberry sauce and turkey during a drop-in yoga class, from 9–10:30 AM, at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in. Call 581-4093 or visit www.yogainmissoula.com. If you find yourself wandering to the Missoula Public Library on Turkey Day, or on Black Friday, stop yourself and head home. The library is closed until 10 AM Sat. Burn off some calories before you gorge on turkey or Tofurky during the Turkey Day 8K Race, a run/walk down the Kim Williams Trail which starts at 9:30 AM at the Boone and Crockett Club, 250 Station Drive. $15/$12 Run Wild Missoula members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org to register. If you live in Ronan and don’t have any Thanksgiving plans, spend it with others during the Annual Ronan Community Thanksgiving Dinner, which runs from 11 AM–3 PM at the Ronan Community Center, 300 Third Ave. NW. in Ronan. Free. Also includes music every half-hour. Call Adina Fox at 676-9228. Entertain the fam before getting gluttonous with turkey with a carousel ride: A Carousel of Missoula offers free rides from 11 AM–3 PM at the carousel, 101 Carousel Drive next to Caras Park. Call 549-8382.

Photo by Cathrine Walters

Modern furnishings meet a timeless tale of headbutting when the UM School of Theatre and Dance performs Shakespeare’s Hamlet Tue., Dec. 1, through Sat., Dec. 5 at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Also runs Dec. 8–Dec. 12.

FRIDAY November

27

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia with Jody Mosher, every Friday at 8 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240.

If you find yourself wandering to the Missoula Public Library on Turkey Day, or on Black Friday, stop yourself and head home. The library is closed until 10 AM Sat.

nightlife

If you’d like to honor veterans during the holidays, consider sponsoring a wreath to be placed on the headstone of each veterans grave at Fort Missoula and the Western Montana Veterans Cemetery. Each wreath costs $15 and will be placed at those cemeteries on Dec. 12 by cadets with Missoula’s Civil Air Patrol. Call Dave Mihalic at 251-3388.

Get your hand out of the stuffing and haul your tryptophan-addled body over to see John Patrick Williams, who strums his geetar at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361.

Help less fortunate children in Missoula by stopping at Southgate Mall’s Holiday Wish Tree, located at 2901 Brooks St., where you pick a tag off the tree and fulfill the gift wish by returning an unwrapped gift to the tree by Dec. 21. Free to participate. Call 721-5140.

Do your part to keep kids in Missoula warm this winter by dropping off gently used winter coats and gloves at Southgate Mall’s Kids n’ Coats box, between Sears and JC Penny at the mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free to participate. Call 721-5140. Get your little beastie involved with dance, crafts and more so you can shop ‘til you max out that plastic card during Drop Off So You Can Shop, a childcare arts activity from 10 AM–2 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5 per hour, per child. Includes snacks. Call 541-7240. Spend Black Friday and the subsequent weekend away from the big box stores by perusing fine arts and crafts during the Under The Big Sky Holiday Festival, which runs from 10 AM–6 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 North Reserve St. Free, with free parking. Call 207-6502 or visit www.underthebigsky.net.

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Nov. 27, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

In-Stock

starting at

Ceramic Tile

99¢ sf

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Neff's 1285 S. First St, (Hwy 93) Hamilton, Mt. Just south of Northwest Trailer Sales Hours: 9-6 M-F 10-4 Sat. Closed Sunday 406-363-7093 800-622-2465 toll free www.neffsflooring america.com

18 Months Interest Free

Missoula Independent

Page 21 November 26–December 3, 2009


Cowboy ballet was the first thing to conquer the West. The Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre presents its Montana Holiday Spectacular with performances Fri., Nov. 27, and Sat., Nov. 28, at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $15. Call 549-5155 or visit www.rmbt.org. Invigorate that spine of yours during a Classical Pilates Mat Class taught by Alison Laundrie every Fri. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 11 AM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Perhaps they’ll softly play the Animal Collective during Animal Art Collective, a kids’ art project that focuses on buffalo at 11 AM and again at 3 PM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY or visit www.familiesfirstmontana.org. Karen Perry leads you through the oneness of it all, while offering modifications, adjustments and encouragement as needed during Hatha Yoga for All, which meets this and every Fri. from noon–1 PM until Dec. 18 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com. Avoid the insanity of Black Friday during DayAfter-Thanksgiving Family Movies, which features screenings of Riddle in a Bottle and The Loneliest Animals at noon at the Roxy Theatre, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $3. Call 728-9380. Take a seat on Santa’s lap and ask for peace in the Middle East during Southgate Mall’s photos with Santa, which occurs Mon.–Fri. from noon–7 PM, Sat. from 10 AM–8 PM and Sun. from noon–6 PM up until Dec. 24 at the mall, 2901 Brooks St. Cost of photos TBA. Call 721-5140. Three kids vie for Grandma’s attention by constructing elaborate gingerbread houses when Janice Mineer signs her book Gingerbread From the Heart at 1:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Kids in first through fifth grade stir their artistic passions after school during the ZACC’s Young Artist Afterschool Program where instructor Hanna Hannan leads art projects, field trips, tours and more from 3–5:30 PM every weekday until Dec. 23 at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $12 per day, with busing available. Visit www.zootownarts.com or call 549-7555. Your holiday-induced curmudgeonliness might ease a tad when Hamilton’s River Street Dance Theater performs a song-and-dance version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, first at 3 PM and again at 7 PM, at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton. $7 at the Music Box in Hamilton or by calling 363-1203. Event also includes post-show craft hour.

Missoula Independent

Page 22 November 26–December 3, 2009

nightlife Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Take a historic stroll through the digs of a deceased copper magnate during a Daly Mansion Holiday Tour from 6–8 PM at the mansion, 251 Eastside Highway near Hamilton. $8/$7 seniors/$5 children/free kids under age 6. Call 363-6004 ext. 3. Dance the turkey and yams out of your system in a peaceful and spiritual manner during a Dances of Universal Peace circle, which meets at 7 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free, but donations accepted at the door. Call 251-3010. Raise a toast and roast your feet by dancing erratically to the bluegrass of the Canyon Creek Ramblers, who play the Piggyback Barbeque in Whitefish, 102 Wisconsin Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Formalized dance in tutus and pointe shoes rings in the holiday season during the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre’s Montana Holiday Spectacular, a ballet performance at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $15. Features dances from choreographer Kathryn Posin and M i n g Ya n C u i . C a l l 54 9 - 5155 o r v i s i t www.rmbt.org. Spooning might not be allowed but swooning certainly is when “cowboy crooner” Gary Redman plays a gig at the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Bob Rose plays what could be rock, country or folk when he overtakes the Raven Bar and Grill in Woods Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork at 39 Orchard Lane, for a show at 8 PM. Free. Call 837-2836. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678.


Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Exercise your right as a consumer to drown yourself in a swarm of booty-shakin’ beats and/or booze for Black Friday when DJs Monty Carlo and Chris Baumann rock sets at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. A tryptophan hangover is no excuse not to imbibe in some punk and country punk when Bozeman’s Out the Lights play with locals Hangover Saints, TSMF and Birds Mile Home at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Zeppo MT urges you to burn the midnight oil in your finest dance attire when they blues up the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY November

28

Get those endorphins pumpin’ early when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for mid to long group runs during Saturday Group Runs, every Sat. at 8 AM starting with a stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA/free to Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. They probably won’t be playing Blackalicious’ first album on repeat, but you can still get down with some lively movement of the same name when Jody Mosher and Cathy Jenni lead a Nia class every Sat. at 9 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240. If you have compulsive eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Snag some hot holiday gifts from a plethora of local crafters while also helping the Teen Challenge Program during the City Life Community Center’s Annual Craft Bazaar Holiday Extravaganza, which runs from 9 AM–4 PM at the center, 1515 Fairview Ave. Free to attend. Call 532-1545. Strengthen your immune system by bettering your posture and more during the workshop Yoga for the Immune System, from 9 AM–Noon at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $35 drop-in, $25 punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit www.yogainmissoula.com. Vendors hawk Christmas-themed gifts while you munch lunch and more at the Corvallis Christmas Bazaar, which runs from 9 AM–3 PM at Corvallis High School, 1045 Main St. in Corvallis. Free. Call 369-3458. Learn to mix and match your bellydance styles during Beginners World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Sat. at 10 AM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for as many classes as you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Wendy at 5410667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com. Spend Black Friday and the subsequent weekend away from the big box stores by perusing fine arts and crafts during the Under The Big Sky Holiday Festival, which runs from 10 AM–6 PM

at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 North Reserve St. Free, with free parking. Call 207-6502 or visit www.underthebigsky.net. The wireless age collides with art during the Missoula Art Museum’s Cell Phone Tour, which runs from 10 AM–3 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St., and features exhibiting artists discussing their works from your cell phone. Free. Call 728-0447. It could be a choir, jazz band, or an ivory tickler. Whatever music it is, you know good times will be had during the Missoula Art Museum’s Holiday Weekend Fun activity, which features live music and runs from 10 AM–3 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free, includes a “creativity station” for kids to make holiday ornaments. Call 728-0447 or visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick it to the core for Core-Kicking Pilates Class with Alison Laundrie every Sat. at 646 Sixth St. W., at 11 AM. $10, includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247. Sample local and international crafts and food during the Frenchtown Holiday Market, which runs from 11 AM–7 PM at The Corner Hub in Frenchtown, 16862 Beckwith St. Free to attend, $10 fee for vendors. E-mail Laurie at lkhandicrafts@yahoo.com. See the artistic fruits of peeps from Kyrgyzstan during the Kyrgyzstan Felt Products Road Show, from 11 AM–5 PM at China Woods Home and Garden, 716 N. Dickens St. Free to attend. Features ornaments, stockings and other goods imported from Kyrgyzstan. Call 550-2511. If you get lost when trying to figure out the social networking tentacles of Facebook, let the experts at Vann’s guide you during the workshop “create a Facebook page” at 1 PM at Vann’s, 3623 Brooks St. Free. Call 541-6000.

Your Complete Hobby Store for All your Aircraft Needs Blade mCX $129.99 The Blade® mCX is an ultra micro-sized version of the Blade CX/CX2, offering first-time pilots the ability to learn how to fly with ease and experienced heli pilots the ability to fly anytime, anywhere indoors.

THE TREASURE CHEST Crafts & Hobbies 1612 Benton • 549-7992

The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Organic green thumbs in the Bonner, Milltown and Riverside areas can get involved with the Milltown Garden Patch–a nonprofit organic community garden slated to open in Milltown in Spring 2010–during an organizational meeting, which starts at 2 PM at 108 Regal St. in Milltown. Free. Visit www.www.milltowngardenpatch.org. Your holiday-induced curmudgeonliness might ease a tad when Hamilton’s River Street Dance Theater performs a song and dance version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, first at 3 PM and again at 7 PM, at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton. $7 at the Music Box in Hamilton or by calling 363-1203. Event also includes post-show craft hour.

nightlife Post-Thanksgiving serenity meets its musical match when Tom Catmull plays a solo set at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. The snow gods just might answer your pleas for fluffy white stuff during a Pray for Snow Party at Bierstube at the Whitefish Mountain Resort, 3896 Big Mountain Road in Whitefish, at 7 PM. Free. Starts with a bonfire at 7, followed by music from the Canyon Creek Ramblers at 8:30 PM. Call 862-6560. Formalized dance in tutus and pointe shoes rings in the holiday season during the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre’s Montana Holiday Spectacular, a ballet performance at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $15. Features dances from choreographer Kathryn Posin and Ming Yan Cui. Call 549-5155 or visit www.rmbt.org.

LIFE DOESN’T SLOW DOWN AT 50 406.721.5600 • 800.525.5688 •

W E S T E R N M O N TA N A C L I N I C . C O M

50 M E D I C A L P R O V I D E R S • 19 S P E C I A L I T I E S • S E R V I N G Y O U R C O M M U N I T Y S I N C E 1922 BROADWAY BUILDING 500 W BROADWAY MISSOULA

COMMUNITY MED CTR CAMPUS PHYSICIANS CENTER 3 2835 FT MISSOULA RD • MISSOULA

Missoula Independent

URGENT CARE FACILITIES IN MISSOULA NOW CARE • BROADWAY BUILDING NOW CARE • SOUTHGATE MALL

Page 23 November 26–December 3, 2009


Do the foxtrot or gobble walk with a friend or two during the Missoula Senior Center’s Thanksgiving/Autumn Ball, which features music by Lockwood’s Versatiles and runs from 8–11 PM at the center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5. Call 543-7154. John Patrick Williams brings hot licks to hotter mineral baths when he plays the Symes Hot Springs Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free.

Great Music doesn’t care how old youare.

Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo guarantee to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Suck up some experimental rock and post-rock when Bridgebuilder plays a CD release party at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. This Band Kills Facists and Modality opens. (See Scope in this issue.) Old time country and honkey tonk fills you like a stuffed domesticated fowl when The Country Kings play Boomers Pub, 2021 Brooks St., at 9 PM. Cover TBA.

Holiday Pops! You’re invited to a feast of tree-trimming holiday favorites featuring the Orchestra, the Chorale and the Missoula Children’s Choir. Our spectacular show will get listeners of all ages into the spirit of the season. Even Santa will be there!

SAT., DEC. 5, 7:30 P.M. SUN., DEC. 6, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $8 to $35 Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. The Lifers aim for you to stop moving around the goalposts in your life when they play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

SUNDAY

29

November

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual

Missoula Independent

Page 24 November 26–December 3, 2009

message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. It could be a choir, jazz band, or an ivory tickler. Whatever music it is, you know good times will be had during the Missoula Art Museum’s Holiday Weekend Fun activity, which features live music and runs from 10 AM–3 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free, includes a “creativity station” for kids to make holiday ornaments. Call 728-0447 or visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Spend your Sunday away from the big box stores by perusing fine arts and crafts during the Under The Big Sky Holiday Festival, which runs from 10 AM–4 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 North Reserve St. Free, with free parking. Call 207-6502 or visit www.underthebigsky.net. See the artistic fruits of peeps from Kyrgyzstan during the Kyrgyzstan Felt Products Road Show, from 11 AM–5 PM at China Woods Home and Garden, 716 N. Dickens St. Free to attend. Features ornaments, stockings and other goods imported from Kyrgyzstan. Call 550-2511. Quench your urge to watch football with others on several different televisions every Sun. at Lucky Strike Casino, 515 Dearborn Ave., and, if you’ve got the the gusto, belt out some bars during their karaoke contest which starts a 9:30 PM. Free. Call 549-4152. Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “You killed my thirst for life!” Free. Call 543-7154. Grab some writing tips from a seasoned author from San Francisco when writer Stephen Elliott leads a 406 Writers’ Workshop craft talk at 611 Stephens Ave., at 4 PM. $25, includes a copy of Elliott’s newest book The Adderall Diaries. RSVP required. Visit www.406writersworkshop.com to register. Seek connection, mutual life, or even death using the ancient Japanese strategy game Go when a group of enthusiasts meets to play the game this and every Sun. at 4:30 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Email goinmissoula@yahoo.com.

nightlife You might do the fox trot or the waltz when Sandy Lawler leads a six-week Beginning Ballroom class this and every Sun. at 6 PM until Nov. 29 at the Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. $45 for six-week class. Call 239-6044. Give voice to your creativity and spirituality with a devotional, improvisational song circle that meets the first, third and fifth Sun. of every month from 6:30 to 8:30 PM at Unity Church, 546 South Ave. W. A $2 donation is requested, but don’t let lack of funds (or shyness) be an obstacle. Call 542-1066. Improvisational movement with others takes on an extemporaneous vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome

and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: Jazz from the Donna Smith Trio, the Sam White Quartet and DJ Gary Stein. A 30 piece orchestra mixes musical juices with a community choir of around 100 people in order to help raise funds for Habitat for Humanity of Missoula during a thundering performance of Handel’s “Messiah,” at 7:30 PM in the University Theatre. Free, but free-will donations accepted. Call 243-2080. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. New York City’s indie hip-hop phenom Cage slices and dices his dark past and more on the mic when he plays the Palace at 9 PM. $8. Opening support from Slopstar and Acher. (See Noise in this issue.)

MONDAY

30

November

Quit that dead-end job and head down to the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center, 310 S. Curtis St., where you can brush up on your reading, writing and math skills in order to pass the GED or enroll in college during free adult education courses, every Mon.–Thu. from 8 AM–12 PM and 1–3 PM, as well as every Tue.–Thu. from 6–8 PM. Call 542-4015.

Support your spine, and tap into your inner core during a Pilates Mat Class with Avril Stevenson this and every Mon. until Dec. 16 at 8 AM and again at 5:30 PM, at Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. D. $12, with all levels welcome. Call 360-7421. Now that you’ve moved here, it’s time to start speakin’ ‘Merican and learning about our wonderful banking and health care systems (you can tell I’m joking, right?), as well as our educational system during Adult Basic Education courses at the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center, every Mon. and Wed. at 8:30 AM at the center, 310 S. Curtis St. Free. Call 542-4015. Bid on something pleasant for yourself—while you help raise money for an organization that helps teen moms— during a silent auction for Mountain Home Montana, which runs all day, each day, from Nov. 30–Dec. 6 at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free to attend and spectate. Call 541-0163 or e-mail fot@mountainhomemt.org.


Pulsating Latin rhythms make you gyrate with sassy dance steps during a Zumba Dance class, this and every Mon. from noon–1 PM until Dec. 21 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Bring tennis shoes or sneakers. Call 5417240 or visit www.ddcmontana.com. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. After school activities for your kid aged 8–12 get a little wild and primal during the Roxy Theatre’s After School Wildlife Film Safari which runs Mon.–Fri. from 3–5:30 PM, except for holiday’s, at the theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $6/hour. Call 728-9380 to register. Kindergartners through eighth graders find a positive, stress-free environment after school at Two Creeks Bridges program which features play materials, art and more Mon.–Thu. from 3–5:30 PM at 258 Roosevelt Lane in Hamilton. $4 per hour. Call 363-4740 to register or e-mail sarchibald@dishmail.com. Kids in first through fifth grade stir their artistic passions after school dur-

ing the ZACC’s Young Artist Afterschool Program where instructor Hanna Hannan leads art projects, field trips, tours and more from 3–5:30 PM every weekday until Dec. 23 at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $12 per day, with busing available. Visit www.zootownarts.com or call 549-7555.

nightlife

You work long hours, but your kid doesn’t, so keep them busy after their studies during an after-school program for kindergartners through sixth graders Mon.–Fri. at Elrod School, 412 Third Ave. W. in Kalispell, from 3:15–5:45 PM. $10 early out days/$6 regular days. Call 758-7975.

You’ll probably want to take out those metallic studs when you head to Gothic Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/per month for each class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com

Soon-to-be mommas with buns in the oven can feel empowered, relaxed and nurtured during a prenatal yoga class, this and every Mon. at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave., at 4 PM. $11/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. Two sessions of World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class hits Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon. At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month, drum rental available. RSVP 3963352 or visit tangledtones.com.

If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. W. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot.

Rejuvenate your mind and body from the Monday blues during a Vinyasa Yoga class this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave. $12/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

SPOTLIGHT

questioning questions

Of all philosophical questions pondered by humans, the ones fraught with the most confusion and/or inconsistencies seem to be those that touch on why we’re here, who we are and how we got ourselves into this sometimes-chaotic-mess called life. On Wednesday, you’ll get to explore those very questions in a humorous manner when the Montana Actors’ Theatre (MAT) presents a performance of Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the tragicomedy based on two characters from Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The production, in part, follows Rosencrantz and Guildenstern offstage from the Shakespearean classic as they struggle to figure out why they’ve been summoned to probe their buddy Hamlet on his alleged bout of madness, and why Hamlet’s uncle Claudius has asked the duo to escort their old friend to England. On their way to the British Isle, the two even start questioning who they are and if they’re even alive. They sometimes find their actions coinciding with Shakespeare’s play, but are mostly characters in their own story. And if you hadn’t yet noticed, Stoppard drenches the play in absurdist and existentialist themes. For MAT’s rendition, director Carrie Ann Mallino says the production isn’t set in any particular time WHAT: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead WHO: Montana Actors’ Theatre WHEN: Wed., Dec. 2–Sun. Dec. 6 and again on Wed., Dec. 9–Sat., Dec. 12

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Sporman

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead features Jared Branden, left, and Richard Davenport.

period and that it’s completely character driven, so much so that the stage is barren. The focus, she says, is on the duo’s relationship with philosophy and each other. And that relationship constantly switches hands, since local actors Jared Branden and Richard Davenport never actually know which character they portray. “It’s up to the audience to find out which one is which,” Mallino says. If that seems bewildering, don’t fret. Mallino also believes the play should resonate with a wide audience. “This really delves into the experience of culpability…at some point we have to look at our personal responsibility, the choices we made to get us to this place,” she explains. “We might not be able to control a mudslide, but we still have our part that we play [in life].”

WHERE: Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave.

If anything, she wants the audience to come into this with an open mind that’s ripe for some intellectual stretching.

HOW MUCH: $15 for Fri.–Sat. shows, $10 for Sun.–Thu. shows

“I hope it really provokes discussion at the end of the day,” Mallino says. —Ira Sather-Olson

Best Coffee Hut - Independent '08 & '09 Available at Four Locations

2420 W. Broadway 3075 N. Reserve

Missoula Independent

2810 Brooks St 6149 Mullan Rd

Page 25 November 26–December 3, 2009


If you suffer from any type of neurological pain, see if a new non-invasive test helps reduce your symptoms during a free screening at 5:30 PM at the Doubletree Edgewater Hotel, 100 Madison St. Free, but limited to the first ten callers. RSVP by calling 541-2281.

2

Happy Sunday-Thursday 4-6pm & Hours 10pm to close Wednesday Night Karaoke

Free Buzztime Trivia Trivia drink specials Any Sunday in 2009

Buy 1 domestic draft beer & get 1 free 1 coupon per customer per Sunday. Bar area only.

4880 N. Reserve St.  543-8001

What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Help celebrate back country skiing while also helping UM’s Backcountry Club with club expenses for the upcoming season during a fundraiser at the Banquet Room of Bayern Brewing, 1507 Montana St. $5 suggested donation, all ages. Features ski movies, prizes and a drawing. E-mail Kevin at fru_003@hotmail.com. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. Wiggle that belly with style and grace during beginning and continuing belly dance classes, this and every Mon. until Nov. 30 with continuing classes starting at 6:30 PM at St. Patrick Hospital’s Wellness Center, 500 W. Broadway St. Beginning class follows at 7:30 PM. $8 drop-in. Call 273-0368 or visit aniysa.com. If you find yourself wandering around Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St., at 6:30 PM, saunter over to Clock Court, where the Missoula Community Chorus performs a free concert. Call 721-5140. Inhale, exhale and become one with yourself in the company of others during a Vinyasa Flow yoga class from 6:30–7:30 PM at Birds & Bee’s LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St. $8 suggested donation. RSVP by calling 544-1019. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free.

543-5141•1300 W. Broadway•Missoula•M–Sa 9-6 Locations in Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, & Boise www.aspensound.com

Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Joining up with UM’s French Club Le Cercle Francophone means you can repeatedly ask people “Pourquoi suisje en vie?” or just brush up on your French skills when the club meets this and every Mon. at James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., at 7 PM. Free If you’re 18 and under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Al-Ateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org. The stars align depending on how many glasses of wine you sip when David Boone plays some folk at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated.

Missoula Independent

Page 26 November 26–December 3, 2009

Lichen splashes onto an aesthetically pleasing page when Karen McAlister Shimoda presents an opening exhibit for her ink drawings titled Specimens—featuring this piece, “Lichen on the Valley”—with a reception Thu., Dec. 3, from 5–7 PM at the University Center Art Gallery in the University Center. Free. Call 243-4991. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Rawk ‘N Roll Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Also includes a free nacho bar.

Moms get a minute away from their kids and can vent their joys, and frustrations, of being a parent during Mom Me Time, at 11:30 AM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-7690.

Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com.

Kick off your week with a drink and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during the Palace’s Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week. Free. This week: For Beats’ Sake, a dance party featuring DJs Kris Moon and ir8prim8. See a plethora of patterns and colors— after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY

01

December

While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement—from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. The flexibility of your child gets explored during Family Motion: Mismo a gymnastics class for you and your kid at 11 AM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY or visit www.learnplayimagine.org.

You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. If you can yodel like a yokel or belt out a ditty, and you go to Sentinel High School, don’t miss preliminary tryouts for First Night Idol—a First Night Missoula competition for high school singers—at 3:30 PM at the school, 901 South Ave. W. Free. If you make it to the final round, you’ll perform at the Wilma Theatre during First Night. Call 532-3240. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Tue. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. This week features a pro from MCAT that’s going to help you create your own short video. Call 721-2665.

nightlife Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200.


Hey, we all overindulge sometimes, but when you’ve had enough, head down t o Ta k e O f f P o u n d s S e n s i b l y (TOPS), a meeting which starts with a weigh-in between 5 and 5:30 PM, followed by a meeting at 5:30, this and every Tue. at the Rocky Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 6510 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 862-1233. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Flush the early week stress from your system with a Tuesday Track Workout featuring speed training by UM women’s track coach Courtney Babcock every Tue. at 6 PM at Dornblaser Field, on the corner of Higgins and South avenues. Free for Run Wild Missoula members/Cost TBA for others. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. Free pizza and door prizes might just get you out of your dorm and into a discussion regarding leadership opportunities at UM during a Leadership Summit, at 6 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-5754. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10 per class/$35 for four classes. Call 549-7933. Beginners can try their hand with more experienced folks during a Beginner/ Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance class, which takes place every Tue. at 6:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in

after. Call Blair at 531-3000 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. If you’ve suffered from cancer, utilize your creative energies during a free beginning painting class offered by Living Art of Montana which features basic theory, design concepts and more at 6:30 PM at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 17. Free. RSVP by Dec. 1 by calling 549-5329 or e-mailing ysteinprograms@livingartofmontana.org. Explore a system of natural childbirth labor techniques during The Bradley Method and Beyond, where certified instructors guide you through the process during an 11-week course every Tue. at 6:30 PM at Families First, 815 E. Front St. Ste. 3. $185 per couple. Call 721-7690. You never know what you’ll find— except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Grab the rooster sauce and get spicy when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, every Tue. at the Badlander. $7/per class per person. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-

Big box.

get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Brown Lounge at the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com.

If you’re a dude and you’re a little unfocused about sexuality, fix it during More for Men, a focus group “to help men sort through sexuality” that meets every other Tuesday from 7:30–9 PM at Birds and Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St. $8 suggested donation. Call 544-1019.

Dashing thoughts relax a bit under the influence of wine and fine music when Tom Catmull plays a solo set at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What is Lambertschaag? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.)

Get tips on avoiding an early burial by snow during an Avalanche Awareness Lecture, at 7 PM in UM’s Urey North Underground Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-5172. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 2739992 to reserve your spot. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

You’re likely to hear some mad broken beats on hand drums, steel drums and African drums during UM’s Fall Percussion Concert, which starts at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880.

It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every Tue. at 8:30 PM, when Intermediate Hip-Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Electric guitar and multimedia intensify a Shakespearean classic filled with familial tension, treachery and fatality during a UM School of Theatre and Dance performance of Hamlet at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org.

New moms get a chance to bond and shimmy with other moms during “New Mama Strength and Boogie,” a dance class that meets this and every Tue. from 8:30–9:30 PM at the Teranga

Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $5. Visit terangaarts.googlepages.com. Th e B r o a d w a y ’ s Tu e s d a y N i g h t Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. Grab the stun gun and prod yourself in the name of experimentation when Elephant Gun shoots out some experimental rock at the Badlander at 9 PM.

WEDNESDAY

02

December

Support your spine, and tap into your inner core during a Pilates Mat Class with Avril Stevenson this and every Wed. until Dec. 16 at 8 AM and again at 5:30 PM, at Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. D. $12, with all levels welcome. Call 360-7421. Breath and movement flirt while you create heat from deep within during Power Yoga, a Vinyasa flow class lead by Veronica DeSoyza that meets this and every Wed. at 9 AM until Dec. 22 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240.

Outside the box.

This Holiday season, discover all that Downtown has to offer. Shop Dine Entertain

www.missouladowntown.com Missoula Independent

The most versatile gift card in Missoula!

Page 27 November 26–December 3, 2009


HOLIDAY SOCK GIVEAWAY Nov 27-30 4 days only NOW AT BOTH LOCATIONS DOWNTOWN & SOUTHGATE MALL 543-6966

541-6979

www.trailheadmontana.net

% 5 1 10%

Off

Missoula Independent

Page 28 November 26–December 3, 2009


Morning Melodies, a free, friendly music event tailored occurs every Wed. at Montana downtown Whitefish at 10 AM.

fun-filled, familyto preschoolers, Coffee Traders in Free.

Art projects, educational games and storytime activities aim to stimulate your 3- to 7-year-old’s mind into genius capabilities during Ready Set Read at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY. See what standpoint you stand on when Christopher Preston and Dane Scott lead the lecture “The Moral Hazards of Geoengineering” at 12:10 PM, in Room 330 of the UM University Center. Free. Call 243-6605. They could be banging on cans, milk jugs or old steel pipes. Whatever they play, don’t miss the Hawthorne Elementary School Recycled Instruments Group, who perform at 2 PM at Clock Court in Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. Call 721-5140. Make sure you’re properly positioned as you take in the UM Ecology Seminar Series lecture “Getting Caught in Peculiar Positions: Variation in the Mechanisms of Monogamy,” at 4:10 PM in Room 110 of UM’s Interdisciplinary Sciences Building. Free. Call 243-5292.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. You can help support Blue Mountain Clinic by downing a pint or two during a community unite pint night at the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room, 313 N. First St. W., from 5–8 PM. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from every pint sold goes to Blue Mountain Clinic. Call 728-1660. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Red Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts into a work of genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s non-instructed figure drawing classes, from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. Find out the difference between regular pilates and pilates from the Big Apple when Alison Laundrie leads a New York Style Pilates class every Wed. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 6:30 PM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy both cravings by attending bimonthly meetings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running sciencefiction convention, the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites

players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333.

Excellence in End of Life Care

In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The literary megaphone is all yours during Writers Open Mic, a writer’s reading session which occurs at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Bring up to eight typed pages of your work, and be sure it’s suitable for all ages. Call 721-BOOK. Read the works of Wharton, Poe and Lydia Davis and then rip them off, in your own unique style, during a 406 Writers’ Workshop titled “Short Fiction Imitations Workshop,” which meets this and every Wed. for six weeks from 7–9:15 PM at a TBA location. $150 for the six week workshop, taught by Elizabeth Urschel. Visit www.406writersworkshop.com to register.

Providing skilled and compassionate care in the comfort of your home; honoring your wishes "We enter the world surrounded by love and comfort . . . We deserve the same when we leave."

Certified by Medicare 800 Kensington, Suite 204 406-543-4408

hospiceofmissoula.com

Learn the favorite tricks of sexologist Dr. Lindsey Doe’s trade during a “sexual finesse workshop” at 7 PM at Birds & Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St. $5. Call 544-1019 or visit aboutsexuality.org. Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:20 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Release that mid and late week stress during Tai Chi Chuan classes every Wed. at 7:30 PM and every Sat. at 10 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $10/class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Electric guitar and multimedia intensify a Shakespearean classic filled with familial tension, treachery and fatality during a UM School of Theatre and Dance performance of Hamlet at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Two minor characters from Shakespeare’s Hamlet absorb themselves with philosophical arguments and nonsensical rants during the Montana Actors’ T h e a t r e r e n d i t i o n o f To m S t o p p a r d ’ s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit www.mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Extend yourself beyond regular ballet using emotion through movement to tell stories and interpret music when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Lyrical Class every Wed. at 8:30 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Lambertschaag is a town in the Netherlands. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts ladies’ night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Call of the Hammer” by 3 Inches of Blood, or a similar tune, during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 November 26–December 3, 2009


Fight for the right to belt out a semicoherent version of The Darkness’ “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” every Wed. during Combat Karaoke at Rowdy’s Cabin, 4880 N. Reserve St., at 10 PM. Free. Call 543-8001.

THURSDAY

03

December

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010. Bid on something pleasant for yourself—while you help raise money for an organization that helps teen moms— during a silent auction for Mountain Home Montana, which runs all day, each day, from Nov.30–Dec. 6 at Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free to attend and spectate. Call 541-0163 or e-mail fot@mountainhomemt.org. Get a glimpse at the talents of local crafters during UM’s 38th Annual Holiday Art Fair, which runs from 9 AM–6 PM in the University Center. Free, with live music and door prizes. Call 243-5714. Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. Engage your senses with decorated trees—while also helping to raise

Missoula Independent

Page 30 November 26–December 3, 2009

money for an organization that helps teen moms—during Mountain Home Montana’s 11th Annual Festival of the Trees Tour of Trees, which runs from 10 AM–7 PM at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. Donations accepted. Call 541-0163 or e-mail fot@mountainhomemt.org. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Kids disguise themselves in festive style w i t h m a s k s d u r i n g A f te r s c h o o l Adventures: Playdate With an Artist featuring the program “Masquerade Mask” at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., at 3 PM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY or visit www.learnplayimagine.org. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on Guitar Hero, Rock Band and more on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 3- to 6year-old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing.


SPOTLIGHT

crowing wisdom

Americans are an odd, finicky bunch. Some of us are obsessed with collecting massive amounts of cheap crap, or discussing how such-and-such celebrity looks after her latest round of botox shots. Others spend their time engrossed in asserting their religious beliefs on a populace who’s just fighting for the basic right to get married.

at several layers of our cultural crust: from the detachment of social-networking sites like MySpace, and our infatuation with celebrities, food and fitness, to the tendency to cure our ills by gobbling pharmaceuticals. Our avian narrator also delves into the chasm between theists and atheists, chimes in on the gay marriage debate, and voices his disdain for dictators.

Corvus Brachyrhynchos sees this firsthand. As a crow, he’s a keen observer of American culture and human nature, warts and all. He’s also the narrator of local author Tom Rau’s rollicking book of short essays titled The Crow’s Philosophy: Collected Essays on Contemporary American Life from a Bird Brain. Equal parts stream-of-consciousness ramblings and wisecracking sarcasm, the collection takes shot WHAT: Tom Rau signing The Crow’s Philosophy WHEN: 4 PM, Thu., Dec. 3 WHERE: Fact & Fiction University Center Bookstore

Corvus’ viewpoint embraces the cynical and somewhat nihilistic, but with a decidedly liberal libertarian bent. And he definitely evokes a laugh with such bold declarations as: “I think the U.S. should have monthly assassinations of dictators.” In another moment of candid observation, he picks Wal-Mart as his target: “Their only goal is to effectively assimilate the average shopper and turn them into mindless, metal cart wielding maniacs that would scalp Mother-Teresa with a rusty butter knife for a cheap WWF Smackdown DVD, fresh beef jerky and some cheap, knock-off thigh-high black plastic boots.” Rau won’t be reading from his book next Thursday, he’s only signing it, but I’m sure he’ll impart a nugget or two of witticism from his feathered literary friend for all those who attend.

HOW MUCH: Free

—Ira Sather-Olson

American life and culture gets a sarcastic literary kick to the groin from a crow when Tom Rau signs copies of his b o o k T h e C r ow ’ s P h i l o s o p h y : Collected Essays on Contemporary American Life from a Bird Brain, at 4 PM at Fact & Fiction’s UM University Bookstore, in the University Center. Free. Call 243-1234. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.

Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171.

Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000.

nightlife

Renew and connect with the natural world, for free, during a Vinyasa Yoga class that meets this and every Thu. from 5:30–6:30 PM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third S t . W. F r e e , u n t i l 2 0 1 0 . V i s i t terangaarts.googlepages.com.

The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383.

Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Wiggle those hips and strike poses of elegant expression when former UM dance prof Amy Ragsdale leads a Beginning to Intermediate Modern Dance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., every Thu. at 5 PM. Cost TBA. Call 541-7240. Complex ink drawings that represent biological specimens, cells, slide smears and more take hold when Karen McAlister Shimoda presents an opening for her exhibit Specimens with a reception from 5–7 PM at the University Center Art Gallery, Room 227 in the University Center. Free. Call 243-4991. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, noise—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy

Sip on wine, munch on organically produced appetizers, hear live music and bid on rafting trips, art and more during a VIP Pre-Film Fundraiser Gala for the Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival at 5:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $125 for two people/$75 person. Visit www.sbcmontana.org or call 824-7336. Get those endorphins pumpin’ late in the day when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for tempo runs and drills during Thursday Tempo Runs, every Thu. at 5:30 PM starting with a stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA/Free to Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at

Unlodge the earwax out of your hearing apparatus with a pipe so you can enjoy the “bus stop blues” of Sour D and the Pipecleaner, who play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free, all ages. Call 363-7468. Celebrate peace by singing and making luminaries during “A Night of Peace”, hosted by Lewis & Clark Elementary School teachers, parents and kids from 6–7:30 PM at the school, 2901 Park St. $2 suggested donation. Call 542-4035. Tug your purse strings and heart strings when the Missoula Strings perform at 6 PM at Clock Court in Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. Call 721-5140. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224.

Missoula Independent

Page 31 November 26–December 3, 2009


There’s a smarter way to have fun this winter.

Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. You just might do the push, whip or the jitterbug-lindy when Cathy Clark slings beginning swing dance lessons every Thu. at 7 PM, and then moves to beyond basics swing lessons at 7:30 PM, at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. Documentary films that touch on sustainability, water issues and outdoor trekking take the stage during the Second Annual Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival at 7 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $11, or two for one with a valid student ID. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s, The Trailhead or Green Light downtown. Visit www.sbcmontana.org or call 824-7336.

Save Big on Advance Lift Ticket Coupons-Buy Before December 1 Before 12/1/09

After 12/1/09

Save

Adult

$32

$39

$7

Student* / Senior

$29

$36

$7

Child

$11

$18

$7

Buy Advance Lift Ticket Coupons at GULL SKI, REI, BOB WARDS, THE TRAILHEAD, or online at www.montanasnowbowl.com. *Students 13+ only be prepared to show proof of current enrollment plus photo ID when redeeming coupons for lift tickets.

Congratulations and Way to Go! Aaron Conway

Mode of Sustainable Transportation: Carpool/Biking How many days did you commute by sustainable transportation to work in October? 21 days Why do you choose to use sustainable transportation to commute to work instead of driving alone? “I work with my wife so we can ride together. Otherwise, I ride my bike so I can get there early.” Profession: Web developer/graphic designer

GRAND TOTALS

What is Aaron’s prize for being October’s winner? $100 Gift Certificate to Bitterroot Toffee

2,761 Days 1,587 Members 187,958 Member Reports 10,071,898 Miles 8,155,383 lbs CO2 Total Miles Biking: 2,222,391 miles Walking: 479,403 miles By Bus: 1,133,723 miles Carpooling: 5,885,223 miles Telecommuting: 225,708 miles Other: 125,450 miles

Sponsored by

You could be a winner too! Register for the Missoula In Motion Way to Go! Club today. Contact Missoula In Motion at 258-4961 or visit our website!

www.missoulainmotion.com Missoula Independent

Page 32 November 26–December 3, 2009

Get a glimpse of just how serious the threat of global warming is through the expertise of scientists and journalists during a screening of the doc Everything Is Cool at 7 PM, in the University Center Theater. Free, but donations accepted. Visit www.peaceandjusticefilms.org. Shopping and bluegrass find common ground when the Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass Band plays Clock Court in Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-5140. You can waltz, cha cha, swing, salsa, merengue and even bust a cupid shuffle during a variety line dance class which meets this and every Thu. until Dec. 17 from 7–8 PM at the Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. $24 person. Call 529-3204. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Electric guitar and multimedia intensify a Shakespearean classic filled with familial tension, treachery and fatality during a UM School of Theatre and Dance performance of Hamlet at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Tw o m i n o r c h a r a c t e r s f r o m Shakespeare’s Hamlet absorb themselves with philosophical arguments and nonsensical rants during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit www.mtactors.com for advance tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Drown out the sounds of reality with vocals that hit high registers when soprano Courtney Mostad and mezzosoprano Joselyn Thomsen perform a student recital at 7:30 PM, in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463.

Metalheads get into a charitable spirit during “Santa’s Slay Ride,” a costume party/toy drive for the Watson Children’s Shelter which features local metal bands The Green Sickness, Gnarwail, Mageddon, Walking Corpse Syndrome and Nocturnal Obsession, at 8 PM at the Palace. $7/$5 in costume/free if you bring a new toy valued at $5 or more, but you must bring a receipt as proof. Visit myspace.com/ turnitloudentertainment. Bowling and karaoke go together like egg nog and motor oil during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Get your fix with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Don’t spill the spittoon whilst hopping and hustling to the Americana of Lil’ Smokies, who play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

We just got the word on this, but if you’re a writer, you’ll be punishing yourself if you miss a “master memoir class” by renowned, San Francisco-based author Stephen Elliott at 4 PM on Sun., Nov. 29, at 611 Stephens Ave. The class is hosted by The 406 Writers’ Workshop, and costs $25, but that gets you the craft talk, as well as a copy of Elliott’s latest work, The Adderall Diaries. Find out more and RSVP by clicking over to 406writersworkshop.com. In the meantime, help keep me in my craft by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Nov. 27, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


As we find ourselves in that one special week of the year where we all seem to splurge with our eating and buying habits, I want to let you know I’ve uncovered a handful of events to kickstart your Thanksgiving to ensure you’re not driving yourself into total gluttonous abandon. On Thanksgiving, Thu., Nov. 26, you’ve got two local opportunities to burn off some calories before you put on a few thousand later in the day. T h i s f i r s t i s t h e M i s s o u l a F a m i l y Y M C A’ s Thanksgiving Day of Exercise, which runs from 9–11 AM at the Health and Wellness Center at the Y, 3000 S. Russell St. Once there, you’ll have three exercise events to pick from, including a family aerobics class, and a step aerobics class that both run from 9:15–10:15 AM. The third option is a cycling class that runs at 9 AM and again at 10 AM. All events are open to the public and cost one non-perishable food item per person. Call 721-YMCA. The second opportunity is a reminder from last week: the Turkey Day 8K, a running/walking race which starts at 9:30 AM at the Boone and Crockett Club, 250 Station Drive. The race is open to the public and costs $15/$12 for Run Wild Missoula members. Visit runwildmissoula.org to register. Also, skiers and snowboarders shouldn’t forget that both Discovery and Big Sky Resort open on Thu., Nov. 26. According to its website, lifts start running at Discovery at 9:30 AM and an adult full-day pass is $35. At Big Sky, lifts begin at 9 AM and an adult day pass is $79. This could change, depending on the will of the snow gods, so if your eyes are set for Discovery, visit skidiscovery.com and call 563-2184. If you’re keen on Big Sky, visit bigskyresort.com and call 995-5900. Once the turkey, cranberry sauce and other fixins have settled in your stomach, skip out on Black Friday and spend your hard earned dollars on a trip to Red Lodge, since the Red Lodge Mountain Resort is slated to open at 9 AM on Fri., Nov. 27. For an adult day pass, you’ll have to shell out $47, but I’m guessing it’ll be worth it for

all you snow junkies that have been hoping for a powder fix. In the case of less than stellar conditions, visit redlodgemountain.com and call the snow report hotline at 255-6973. And if you’re looking for another way to burn off some Thanksgiving-induced blubber, join those acrobats of ascension known as the Rocky Mountaineers when they head off at a TBA time on Fri., Nov. 27, for a climb up Mount Calowahcan in the Mission Mountains. The trip is estimated to be 7.5 miles in length and trip leader Forest Dean indicates that you should be in good physical condition for this outing. Also plan to bring: a harness and belay device, crampons, an ice ax and be sure you’ve secured a Confederated

ed up and ready to jet to the mountain—located on 1700 Snow Bowl Road—be ready to part with $39 for a full-day lift ticket. But before you even head out of the house, call Snowbowl at 549-9777 or visit montanasnowbowl.com for updated conditions, as opening day could be delayed due to our warmer than normal November temps. Also, those of you up in the Flathead who aren’t yet able to rock some inverted 180s at the Whitefish Mountain Resort can certainly pray for the chance to hit fresh powder at 7 PM on Sat., Nov. 27, during the Pray for Snow Party, which takes place at the Bierstube on the mountain, 3896 Big Mountain Road outside of Whitefish. The free event is for those 21 and older and includes a bonfire at 7 PM, followed by music by local Americana stringers Canyon Creek Ramblers at 8:30 PM. Take note that there’s a complimentary shuttle to the resort from Whitefish throughout the duration of the party. If you’ve got any lingering inquiries, call 862-6560 or visit skiwhitefish.com Once your weekend of wickedness on ice crystals comes to a close, spend the night on Mon., Nov. 30, helping out a local group of backcountry ski enthusiasts when UM’s Backcountry Club holds its annual fundraiser at 6 PM at Bayern Brewing, 1507 Montana St. The group is looking to raise some fundage in order to support its expenses over the 2009/2010 ski season, and for that, asks for a $5 donation at the door. In return, you’ll get to watch ski movies and have a chance to win prizes including donated ski gear from local businesses. For more info, contact Kevin Freund at fru_003@hotmail.com. To cap off our week, I’ll make mention of the Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival, which hits the screen of the Wilma Theatre at 7 PM on Thu., Dec. 3. I’ll include more details next week about this docuphoto by Alex Sakariassen mentary fest, which features films that touch on sustainability, outdoor trekking and more. Admission costs $11 Salish and Kootenai Tribal recreation permit. Forest also has a backup or two for one with a valid student ID, and you can nab tickets at the plan if conditions are sour, so be sure to click over to rockymoun- door, at Rockin Rudy’s and a few other spots. Visit sbcmontana.org for taineers.com. For info on when and where to meet for the trip, give a full list of ticket vendors and more info. Be thankful in your gorging endeavors, but be ready to cook off him a ring at 240-7612 or e-mail him at mtnear1@gmail.com. After soaring high on Friday, plan to wake early on Sat., Nov. 28, some of the extra padding by next week. to shred it up at our local ski hill of vertical intensity, Montana calendar@missoulanews.com Snowbowl, which is slated to open at a TBA time that day. Once suit-

• NEW LOWER PRICES! • FREE delivery in Missoula • Pickup available in Missoula • FREE gift wrapping • 20% off non-sale items coupon code: Independent Live far away from your Grandchildren? Check out our Grandparents page. We will wrap your gift and have it delivered by a Grandma - especially from you! She will give your Grandchild a message of love and say how much you miss being together.

worldgamesofmontana.com Missoula Independent

Page 33 November 26–December 3, 2009


scope

Sonic laboratory

Missoula Independent

Dave Johnson releases Bridgebuilder’s 12-year retrospective album by Erika Fredrickson

Even if it’s well guided, however, unpracticed As a 9-year-old growing up in Great Falls, Dave also released Johnson’s new album on his record label, Johnson would memorize his violin homework so Kapustin Yar Records). Ghafour, like Johnson, has a songs played on a profusion of electronic devices quickly he’d get bored and start experimenting with one-man music project, Zebulon Kosted, which he’s ensure an element of surprise. During their last show, sound. He’d forego the bow and wildly strum the worked on for 10 years and describes as “crazy, dark, Ghafour says, he taped down notes on the keyboard to strings instead. He used the violin to learn “Pushing ambient, electronic ritual.” He plans to give audiences created a wall of sound, but when he pulled them off Forward Back,” a song by Seattle rock band Temple of a sample of his sound in between Bridgebuilder sets, during the next song, the keyboard created a pulse the Dog. At 17 years old, he bought a Del Ray Teisco but he insists on maintaining the integrity of beat and feedback loop. It wasn’t part of the plan, but the duo adapted, changing the rhythm of the song in a guitar—a Sears Roebuck special—with his birthday Bridgebuilder itself. “I’m basically leaving the songwriting up to Dave,” way they’d never played it before. money and that same night recorded his first noise “We rolled with it and nailed it,” says Johnson. album, Torch It With Oxygen. He made 50 copies for he says. “I don’t want to change Bridgebuilder into “Sometimes we’ll set those things up and all the elechis friends. Under the moniker Bridgebuilder, he some black metal band.” Onstage, Johnson and Ghafour switch up between tronics will be grounded, everything will be fine. And experimented with other musicians, at one point touring with a cello player and, later, a percussionist. The line-up of the band has changed over the years, but Johnson’s always been at the center, experimenting with the sounds of sheet metal, radio broadcasts and feedback loops. This week, Johnson celebrates 12 years of Bridgebuilder with the release of his new album Solemn Hymnal to the Ancient Ones, a 12-song retrospective (with the sci-fi subtitle 12 Years of Pre-man, Post-human Rock in 12 Parts) that includes a mix of Johnson’s personal favorites from his 16 previous albums and EPs. Johnson says he’d hoped to do a 10-year retrospective, but by the time he got around to mining his material, he’d missed the moment. Still, that means he was able to include songs from The Garuda (2008) and Lay Waste the Siege Perilous! (2009). He wasn’t, however, able to salvage songs from the first Photo by Cathrine L. Walters recording. “The degradation on the first Dave Johnson, left, and Rachid Abdel Ghafour comprise the newest lineup of Bridgebuilder, a local band tape was so bad,” says Johnson. “I that will release a 12-year retrospective album this week. tried mastering it, compressing it drums, bass and guitar, all the while also manning then, out of nowhere, we’ll get these weird Christian and everything. I just couldn’t get much out of it.” Johnson prefers sci-fi subject matter. Song titles— other unconventional instruments. Percussion ele- ministry AM broadcast frequencies picking up on the “The Lure of Light” and “Grey Winter Dawn Forever,” ments include sheet metal, railroad spikes, an oil drum instruments. And so we’ll play with those.” Johnson plans to record another album in for instance—hint at the apocalyptic and space themes and pots and pans, while synthesizers, radio frequency that inspire him. He sings about trapped space demons signal and a hyperactive drum machine add ambient January and he says he’ll continue to dabble in new instruments and the art of offbeat sounds. If you lisand melodic effects. and stars going supernova while everyone’s asleep. Unlike most bands, Ghafour and Johnson don’t ten to his 12-year catalog of songs, you’ll notice how “While I definitely don’t have the keenest mind for science,” he admits, “I’m a big fan of scientific explo- practice—at least not in the conventional meaning of much he’s also experimented with style. Hardcore folration. I love science fiction—things that happen once the term. Instead, they map out their songs on paper. lows sweeter, acoustic numbers. Sludgy metal prelhumanity goes extinct, because every species eventual- The map indicates silent passages. It describes what udes angsty folk. It’s all part of keeping a balance, he the bass should be doing in each section, what beat the says. ly does.” “I love sound, you know,” he says. That’s what Beyond themes, sonic experiments inspire him. drums play, which effects will be on for each instruHe’s enthralled by a project in which a man recorded ments and where the vocals fit in. Beneath, they sketch matters. I’ll probably be like 80 years old and a hunchthe sounds of Beijing for a year on a microphone hang- out riff charts and pitch clusters for each section. back with bolts in my spine and I’ll still be hitting open “We basically study it like it’s homework,” says mics with an acoustic guitar, singing some old-man ing off a skyscraper. “There was a rhythm to each hour, each day, each Ghafour. “We basically sit and talk about it for an hour songs about, ‘I’m burnt out, I’m an old guy!’” He week and each month,” Johnson says. “And the year and say, ‘Okay, we’ll play this and then we’ll play this,’ laughs. “Someday I will sing that song. And I will have had its own cycle. He quantified all that into musical but we don’t actually practice it. And then we get on earned it, damn it.” Bridgebuilder plays its CD release at the notes. I like to think about what happens when you stage.” “And it works,” adds Johnson. “It’s pretty well Palace Sat., Nov. 28, at 9 PM with This Band Kills combine so many disparate elements.” Johnson has played with six line-ups over the last guided. We know what the core riffs are but each time Fascists and Modality. $5. 12 years. His newest collaborator, Rachid Abdel there are definitely different harmonics and tempos efredrickson@missoulanews.com Ghafour, joined Bridgebuilder in August of 2009. (He going on.”

Page 34 November 26–December 3, 2009


Scope

Noise

Books

Cage

Depart From Me Definitive Jux Recordings

Most pairings of rap and rock seem like lofty experiments gone bad. On Depart From Me, New York City’s Cage proves otherwise as he delivers an intensely private journey into his sordid past over some seriously rockin’ beats. Much like his previous album Hell’s Winter, Cage (aka Chris Palko) lays himself bare for all to see with cleverly laced rhymes that dissect his past battles with drug addiction, depression and other maladies. It’s a dark ride, but it also explores how he’s

Hank Green

This Machine Pwns N00bs Dftba Records

Not long ago, the Indy featured local Hank Green as a “visionary” whose inventive websites like eco-geek and Brother 2.0, among a surfeit of other projects, made him the kind of person who stays afloat even in a recession. And here we have it, one more pie with Green’s fingers in it: music. Green’s predilection to diversify proves true even on the album itself. Imagine a flashback to an early 1990s new wave techno club, then add rap. “This Isn’t Hogwarts” deals in angsty-yet-nerdy punk rock with lyrical gems like, “Here’s what’s true. I’d do pretty much anything to go to wizard school.

Felt

Felt 3: A tribute to Rosie Perez Rhymesayers Entertainment

On their latest collaboration as Felt, MCs Slug and Murs swirl sarcasm, adroit storytelling and observational rhymes into a mix of blazing hip-hop. Aesop Rock provides straightforward beats for the affair, surprisingly good for a guy who’s known best for his skills on the mic. And though they dub this album as a tribute to Rosie Perez, they don’t seem to make any reference

Dead Man’s Bones Dead Man’s Bones Anti

I’ll admit I find Ryan Gosling hot. The Notebook oozed treacle, but Gosling’s a mighty good actor. Trivia: He starred in the The Slaughter Rule, a fabulous film directed by Missoula’s own Alex and Andrew Smith. But judging from this debut album, he’s far more than eye candy. Dead Man’s Bones doesn’t emit the disingenuous whim of some clueless actor. The sound dangles somewhere between the soulful yearning of Sam Cooke and the ghostly reverb of Arcade Fire. Gosling and his collaborator, Zach Shields, boldly feature the Silverlake Conservatory of Music Children’s Choir out of Los Angeles, and it pays off.

DVD

Movie Shorts

working to actualize a better life for himself. Some of the best cuts, though, are also the most morose, like “I Found My Mind In Connecticut,” which pairs a haunting beat with lines like “What if Ian Curtis were to climb down from the noose?/That’s what I thought, that dangled from my neck in amazement/Struggled, undo hangin’ myself in my own basement.” He contrasts gloomy introspection with amusing tracks like “Fat Kids Need An Anthem,” where he self-deprecatingly raps about when he was overweight. A handful of poppier tracks take a few listens to really grow on you. But overall, Depart From Me skillfully illustrates the density and ingenuity of Cage’s lyrical smarts. (Ira Sather-Olson) Cage plays the Palace Sun., Nov. 29, at 9 PM with Slopstar and Acher. $8.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN MAP GALLERY

I’d even call Delores Umbridge my friend, if it meant I’d never have to go to gym again.” You’ll be treated to a minor-key polka about colons with “Ulcerative Colitis.” You’ll find offbeat show-tune stylings in “Demolition Derby” and brooding acoustics in “Protons and Neutrons.” It’s hard not to crack a smile while listening. Green does it best when he stays wry and poker-faced, showing off his pleasantly rich vocals even while talking about murder, masturbating and chew. (Erika Fredrickson)

Art Maps - Antique Reproductions Satellite Posters - Raised Relief ROLLED MOUNTED FRAMED MT - ID - WY - UT - CO - NM - AZ state - regional - national parks united states - n. america - world

By Appointment

(406) 542-1541

to the actress at all. Rather, the duo raps about real encounters with crazed fans (“We Have You Surrounded”) and old friends jealous of their success (“The Prize”). And they pair those with several more fictionalized narratives of an alluring paranormal woman (“Ghost Dance Deluxe”) and a man sorting out his jagged life as a criminal after fleeing from a botched crime (“Glory Burning”). The latter track really shows off their finesse for telling tales, as Slug takes on the role of bystander while Murs jumps in as the criminal hiding from police in the trunk of a car. For all its clout, Felt 3 does have a few flops, especially the slightly obnoxious brag tracks. Otherwise, this is a solid release and shows these cats are just as good as a duo as they are solo. (Ira Sather-Olson) When the children all sing, “My body’s a zombie for you!” and clap together as if participating in a ghoulish childhood game, the effect proves chillingly delightful. In “Young & Tragic,” buzzing electronica and blipping samples of the kids’ vocals evoke the sense that they’re all spirits from another time. Some songs highlight the easy current of Gosling’s soft and gravelly vocals, and others sport a saucy swagger. Echoing piano chords, weeping sound effects and the children just add more layers. It might be a gimmick, but it doesn’t feel like one. I guess I’m in love. (Erika Fredrickson)

Missoula Independent

Page 35 November 26–December 3, 2009


Holiday Tea Party

Scope

Noise

Books

DVD

Movie Shorts

Don’t hit send

Friday, December 4th 6 to 9 PM

10% OFF (except dr. Hauschka)

Freeman rails against e-mail in Tyranny

An evening of celebration & gift shopping Holiday Hours Monday thru Friday 10 to 6 Saturday 11 to 5 180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice’s • 728.0543

Our handmade futons are almost as cozy and just as natural. H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Tuesday, December 8 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 9 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Wingate Inn 5252 Airway Blvd. in Missoula

Missoula Independent

Page 36 November 26–December 3, 2009

by Azita Osanloo

In 1844, Samuel Morse sent the first telegram in Mencken—unlike us—contended with the postal the United States. The message was: WHAT HATH service, making it impossible to write and reply GOD WROUGHT. In the early 1970s, a young pro- more than once every few days. With e-mail, we’re grammer named Ray Tomlinson sent the first e-mail. bound—lest we be boors and asses—to respond In contrast to Morse’s, Tomlinson’s message was less within minutes of receiving a message. While Freeman’s history does underscore how apocalyptic. Just a random series of capitalized letters, the message actually said nothing at all— easily a medium like e-mail can overtake our lives, his history often undermines his Tomlinson didn’t feel the need to own argument. If nothing else, mark the moment, he just wanted human beings are creatures of corto check that the program worked. respondence, always seeking out For John Freeman, former ways to connect from afar. Rather Indy contributor and current than being an anomaly in that hisauthor of the incisively critical tory, e-mail is very much part of it. The Tyranny of E-mail, the disThe same complaints made today tinction between the two virgin about e-mail were once made messages is crucial. about casual letter-writing, “Previous generations,” telegrams and postcards. Freeman writes Freeman, “however giddy himself points to an op-ed at the they became about the best techturn of the 20th century that comnology, did stop and think.” The “gibberish” contained in plained, “There is no standard Tomlinson’s first e-mail, according nowadays of elegant letter writto Freeman, is representative of ing...rapid note taking finishes the how the modern generation takes ruination of handwriting and technology for granted. He states: The Tyranny of E-mail style.” The same complaint is “It’s about time we asked our- John Freeman echoed today when professors selves a more articulate question: hardcover, Scribner lament the lack of proper gram256 pages, $25.00 What have we wrought?” mar and style in their students’ eWhat we’ve wrought seems to mails. A hundred years ago, the be an addiction to the Internet, specifically to e- postcard was often blamed for the demise in letter mail: In 2009, the average corporate worker will writing. And, like e-mail, it had defenders. Freeman spend more than 40 percent of his or her day send- quotes a New York Times contributor who pointed ing and receiving e-mails. To boot, we spend more out that, with postcards, “People write less than they time with our computers than we do with our ever did, and yet they keep their friends at home partners. posted…better than ever before.” The same might “Ironically,” Freeman points out, “tools meant have been said of the telegram a hundred years ago to connect us are enabling us to spend even more and is today said of e-mails, text messages, tweets time apart.” and facebook updates—indicating that today’s eFreeman urges us to be mindful of the cultural mail addicts might very well be lamenting tomordystopia inevitable with e-mail. row’s users of the next craze in correspondence “The creeping tyranny of e-mail is a symptom of technology. how out-of-control the situation has become,” he While Freeman’s criticism of e-mailing is fair, it writes, adding: “The tyranny of e-mail has also entered doesn’t always connect and his prose, particularly in a feedback cycle that makes it harder to reflect on how the non-historical sections, adds to this disconnect. bad the situation has become. Spending our days His message is powerfully clear. But—make no miscommunicating through this medium...we are slowly take—Freeman’s is a manifesto and, like any manieroding our ability to explain—in a careful, complex festo, the prose can be self-righteous and vague, way—why it is so wrong for us.” complete with hyperbole and sections where rhetorFreeman weaves his critique with a history of ical questions are piled on top of rhetorical quescorrespondence, including the creation story of the tions. The last chapter, wherein Freeman advises on U.S. Postal Service, as well as the advent of the type- how to cut down your e-mailing, while not without writer, telegram and postcard. This might seem like its relevant points, is also not without its condescendull, nap-worthy reading, but Freeman’s research is sion: “Before you send a message, ask yourself: Is extensive and, in these chapters, his writing is at its this message essential?” most engaging. He notes, for instance, that H.L. By its very nature, a manifesto asks its readers to Mencken felt duty-bound to respond to every piece either accept or deny its message and Freeman’s will of mail he received every day, much like many of us invariably attract readers who already agree with feel duty-bound to reply to every e-mail. Like the him. Despite its flaws, The Tyranny of E-mail is part current dictates of e-mail etiquette, Mencken of an increasingly relevant discourse about the demanded a response to his mail: “If I write to a effects of the Internet. I’d like to spin further, but I man on any proper business and he fails to answer need to e-mail this off to my editor. me at once, I set him down as a boor and an ass.” Part of the point Freeman drives home is that arts@missoulanews.com


Scope

Noise

Books

DVD

Movie Shorts

Epic thanks Put some BOOM in your SWAGGER this season!

Films savor off beat turkey day traditions

Product Packs, Gift Certificates and Tiered Pricing make Boom Swagger the place for all your Holiday Steez!

by Andy Smetanka

Batman The first thing I remember watching on TV, ever. It was some kind of Batman-movie special and I’m sure it was on Thanksgiving because getting to stay up late to watch it was our reward for behaving ourselves on a long day’s drive to eat dinner with family friends somewhere in Minnesota. I recall there was a speedboat involved; in my recollection Batman and Robin slide down special pilings to launch it from their hidden pier. And that’s just about all I remember. With the Internet at my disposal, I could probably track this vague artifact of memory down and, if in fact it does prove to be real, rent it by mail for old times’ sake. That’s more like something my older sister would do, though. She’s the most sentimental Smetanka, as well as the best rememberer and a tireless storyteller, and it is to her that such tasks of family mythmaking typically devolve.

The Land That Time Forgot (1975) Along with the Sinbad movies, a formative early stopmotion TV experience: After a German submarine torpedoes a British ship (it’s set during WWI) and picks up the survivors, the captain takes a wrong turn in the North Sea and friend and foe fetch up on an uncharted prehistoric island inhabited by dinosaurs and Neanderthals. I would love to watch this movie again, but I have never run across a copy in a video store. I know I watched it on Thanksgiving because I distinctly remember throw-

ing up cranberries when the volcano erupts at the end. So actually it could have been Christmas.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)



oks

The Ice Storm (1997) Significantly, the only movie on this list with an actual Thanksgiving setting: Ang Lee’s bleak, brooding study of suburban angst is the movie, for me, along with Hannah and Her Sisters, that best captures the complicated mixture of feelings that goes with being home again for the holidays. That’s another quality I prize in a holiday movie: a certain broodingness, to usher in a long winter of brooding. Maybe it’s a Smetanka man thing. We’ve always been awfully good at brooding. arts@missoulanews.com

at our new location – 2204 Dixon. Friday, December 4th, 5-7 PM

Bro

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

There’s the obvious thematic tie-in of gluttony, of course, but the reason I associate this movie with Thanksgiving is that when I was studying in Sweden, our little circle of homesick Americans got together to cook a big dinner and watch the movie afterward. One of the few Swedes in attendance hated the movie so much he began shouting at the TV. I liked that—a lot. So I started shouting, and together we triumphed over this movie’s bloated horribleness by forcing the rest of the group to give up on watching it. I still maintain we did them a favor, and I offer this service for free to anyone whose significant other is planning to make them watch this, or any other Peter Greenaway movie.

Over the years I’ve been adopted for Thanksgiving by families with holiday traditions decidedly different from the ones I grew up with, including grass-green butter and special grown-up desserts in a separate pan on top of the fridge. With the right cook, and the right crowd, even one of the less-funny works in the Russ Meyer oeuvre can still be a real knee-slapper.

OPEN HOUSE

Dixon Ave.

The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover (1989)

Good Morning... and Goodbye (1967)

You’re invited to our

Paxon

My dad and I have digested many a turkey dinner watching this epic together. It fulfills many of our shared desires in holiday viewing: length, grandeur, historical relevance and, not least, a certain lack of interest to the women in our family. But we always fall asleep before it’s over. To be fair, it’s almost four hours long. Another martial holiday tradition for Smetanka men: Patton!

S. Reserve

When I think of Thanksgiving movies, I always think of Ray Harryhausen animation. To me, any movie with stop-motion creatures is a Thanksgiving movie, because it seemed like there was always a Sinbad movie on TV during Thanksgiving when I was a youngster, catatonic in the golden La-Z-Boy after a big turkey dinner. As a family, we experimented with various sport-themed movies and other sanitized family fare for the holidays, but in the end it was my dad and I who did the most holiday movie watching while my mom and sisters and any visiting relatives—invariably women—played card games upstairs and spent hours catching up on the doings of relatives, neighbors, relatives’ neighbors and neighbors’ relatives. Any war movie or Western, therefore, is also a Thanksgiving movie for me. And I’ll never forget the little Thanksgiving miracle, before we had a VCR, when a crystal-clear and decidedly not-edited-for-television version of Porky’s magically drifted in on the rogue Canadian station at the end of the dial. The following is a short tour of other formative Thanksgiving viewings, in memory of my mom, on the occasion of our first Thanksgiving without her. She wouldn’t have cared much for any of them.

Dr. Christine White, ND

(406) 542-2147 www.BlackBearNaturopaths.com

www.losttrail.com - 406.821.3211

OPENING SOON

ONLY 90 MINUTES SOUTH OF MISSOULA

THU-SUN GREAT SNOW! $34.00 ADULTS $24.00 KIDS 6-12 Missoula Independent

Page 37 November 26–December 3, 2009


Scope

Noise

Books

OPENING THIS WEEK

NOW SHOWING

FANTASTIC MR. FOX Wes Anderson dips his fingers into animated kids’ flicks with this story about a shrewd, chicken snatching fox voiced by George Clooney. Village 6: 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:20, 2:45, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:45; midnight Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 3:45, 6:45 and 8:55.

2012 John Cusack plays a divorced dad skirting the acrimony of Mother Earth as she goes cannibalistic on peeps. Carmike 10: 12:20, 3:40 and 7 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10:20. Village 6: 12:20, 3:40 and 7 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10:20. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 only, with Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–next Thu. at 1:30, 3:50, 5:05, 7:30 and 8:30 and midnight Fri.–Sat. and additional Wed.–Sun. show at 12:25. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15 and 7:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1.

NINJA ASSASSIN An ex-sword slinger plots vindication against his old coterie after they slay his buddy, but can

DVD

Movie Shorts

Mon.–Thu. at 1, 2, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9 and 9:50. Showboat Cinema in Polson: Wed.–Thu. at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. THE FOURTH KIND A psychologist prods the minds of people in a small Alaskan town to see if they were probed by aliens. Village 6: 1:45, 4:35, 7:10 and 9:40. THE MEN WHO STARE AT GOATS Ewan McGregor is a reporter aiming to get the lowdown on the U.S. Army’s plans to end war and kill goats using ESP. Carmike 10: 1:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:45 and 9:55.

motorbikes, werewolves and American Indian history. Carmike 10: 1, 1:30, 2, 4, 4:30, 5, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:50, 10:10 and additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10:20. Village 6: 1, 4, 7 and 9:50. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–next Thu. at 1:30, 3, 3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:15, 8 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10 and midnight and additional Wed.–Sun. shows at noon and 12:45. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with Sat–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 6:50 and 9:20.

Fire, walk with me. Ninja Assassin opens Wednesday at the Village 6.

he kill ‘em off himself? Village 6: 1:25, 3:50, 7:15 and 9:45. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:35, 5, 7:25 and 9:50; midnight Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 4, 7:25 and 9:50.

AN EDUCATION A teenage British girl falls for Mr. Moneybags, only to find out he might not be the one. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9 nightly with 7 only shows on Thu., Dec. 3, and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

OLD DOGS John Travolta and Robin Williams play career junkies forced into paternity when twins land at their feet. Carmike 10: 1, 1:30, 3:10, 3:40, 5:20, 5:50, 7:30, 8, 9:40 and 10:10. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30; midnight Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:30, 6:50 and 9. Showboat in Polson: 4:15, 7:10 and 9.

THE BLIND SIDE Sandra Bullock plays an upper crust mom who takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 1:25, 4:20, 7:10 and 10. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–next Thu. at 1:15, 3:15, 4, 6, 7, 8:45 except on Sun.; 9:45 and midnight Fri.–Sat. and additional Wed.–Sun. show at 12:15. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 6:50 and 9:20.

A SERIOUS MAN A physics prof gets the shaft in more ways than one and turns to Judiastic masters in this newest Coen Bros. flick. Wilma Theatre: Opens Wed., Nov. 26. Shows at 7 and 9 nightly with 9 only shows on Thu., Dec 3, and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

DISNEY’S A CHRISTMAS CAROL Jim Carey begs for laughs as the curmudgeonly Ebenezer Scrooge in this 3-D remake of Charles Dickens’ classic. Carmike 10: 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30 and 9:50. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:10, 1, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6:35, 7:30, 9, 9:50; midnight Fri.–Sat. and

Missoula Independent

Page 38 November 26–December 3, 2009

Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:25 and 9:40; midnight Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:35, 7:25 and 9:40. MY LITTLE PONY: TWINKLE WISH ADVENTURE Pinkie Pie and other animated ponies navigate a supernatural world in order to find a coveted wishing star. Village 6: 10 AM only on Sat.–Sun. PLANET 51 An astronaut sets foot on a new planet, only to discover aliens that embrace the corn-fed lifestyles of mainstream 1950s America. Village 6: 1:45, 4:35, 7:05 and 9:30. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. at 3 and no 9 show Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Wed.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:35 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 4:05, 6:55 and 9:10. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1. THE TWILIGHT SAGA: NEW MOON A teen whose love was sucked dry by a vampire finds pleasant distraction through

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE Spike Jonze and Dave Eggers team up for a stunning spectacle that follows Max on his quest to hang out with freakish ogres. Carmike 10: 1:30, 4:10, 7 and 9:35. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson.

Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Nov. 27. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–5417469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton–363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


• Chronic Nausea • Seizure Disorders • Hepatitis C • Neuropathy •

Bringing Dignity and Lightness to Your Life We have 9 medicinal cannabis strains

AVAILABLE NOW for our patient base. We are also accepting a limited number of new patients. Specializing in oncology, HIV, female hormonal issues and more. Medicaid Spend-Down Provider Veteran's & AARP Discounts Medicated diabetic baked goods available.

406.728.5297 info@mpmrelief.com 2311 S 3rd St. • Missoula

• Multiple Sclerosis • Chronic Muscle Spasms • GERD •

• Glaucoma • Severe Chronic Pain •

M-F 730am - 6pm Sat 10am-1pm

• Asthma • Aging • Crohn's Disease •

Do you suffer from any of these diseases? CHRONIC SEVERE PAIN • MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS • GLAUCOMA • CHRONIC MUSCLE SPASMS CANCER • GERD • ASTHMA • ARTHRITIS • CROHN'S DISEASE • CHRONIC NAUSEA SEIZURE DISORDERS • PARKINSON'S DISEASE • AIDS/HIV • CACHEXIA • HEPATITIS C • IBS Missoula Independent

Page 39 November 26–December 3, 2009


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

Nov. 26–Dec. 3, 2009

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD BULLETIN BOARD Clearwater & Snake River Steelhead Fishing. Prime dates still available. 509751-0410 www.snakeriverguides.com Free Class- MIND BODY SPIRIT ENERGIES 101 Will meet bi-monthly, meet & greet registration is Sun Oct. 4th. Learn simple and effective energy techniques for self balancing, soul searching, healing and manifesting. Attendees will qualify for a free Reading + Reiki session. Space is limited you must RSVP. Please join Group for more info: missoulaareaevents.ning.com/group /energies or call 800-809-0122

GUN SHOW COMING!

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Kalispell, MT Flathead County Fairgrounds

Dec. 4, 5 & 6 Fri. 2-6

Sat. 9-6

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available. bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Sun. 9-3

Missoula

Care Givers In-Home care for seniors and loved ones. Licensed Quality Caregivers helping people live full independent lives. Local References.

370-9087

Wildflower Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals Ages 2-6 • 830-3268 1703 S. 5th West

406-350-1408

www.rockymountainpromos.com

Tangles Hairstyling will be accepting donations of nonperishable food and personal care items for the Missoula Food Bank during October, November and December. Your donations will be greatly appreciated and will benefit our local community.

WORKER’S COMP DENIED? Call Eric at Bulman Law Today! 721-7744 • Bulmanlaw.com 416 E. Pine Missoula MT 59802

Help make our community a safer place. Sponsored By:

WANTED THE BONDSMAN Mario Brown 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

24 Hours A Day • 7 Days A Week ALL COURTS • ALL AMOUNTS

728-0844 • 1-800-335-0844 When you find yourself in a tight spot, call us for help. If a suspect is sighted, do not approach or attempt to apprehend them. If you have information regarding a suspect, contact the United States Marshals Service at (406) 247-7030 or Local Law Enforcement.

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-583-2101. www.continentalacademy.com

Montessori School

Rocky Mountain Promotions

Free- Build A Recycled Recumbent or 4 Wheel Bike SUNDAYS: Please CALL to RSVP & for Meeting Times. 2 hours volunteering required. Contact “Bob Ruby” @ 800-809-0112 See Details & Pics “Build a Bike Group” @ http://missoulaarea events.ning.com

OFFENSE : Failure to register as a sex offender.

Under the Bigsky Holiday Festival Nov. 27, 28 & 29 Fri & Sat 10-6pm, Sun 104pm at the Hilton Garden Inn, N. Reserve St. Missoula, MT. Free admission and free parking all 3 days! Searching for a Caregiver? 'Grizzy Green Organics', Griz Country's Favorite High Quality Caregivers, offers 100% Legal Locally Grown Medicine. 406-824-GRIZ (4749)

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.co m 310-364-0665 Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7210190 BennettsMusicStudio.com Variety Line Dance! Ladies only. Waltz, Cha Cha, East and West Coast Swing, Salsa, Merengue, Some Country and the hottest new line dance - Cupid Shuffle. Women’s Club on Bow St. $24/person. Thursdays, December 3rd - 17th, 7-8 PM. 406529-3204 FUN! FUN! FUN!

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Freewill Astrology . . . .C4 Holiday . . . . . . . . . . . . .C6 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C8 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C10 This Modern World . .C11

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

Walk it.

LOST & FOUND Found Black and White Kitty Black and white kitty with extra toes about 5 or 6 months old. near Higgins. 406-396-2444 LOST BLACK CAT NAMED JACK! He is 4 months old. He has green eyes, is unaltered, and has thumbs and an extra rear toe. We love him! Please call 3962444 if you find him! Lost Two Tarps One big orange tarp and one small blue tarp from outside HideA-Bed sofa. 542-7451 LOST: Brown suede bag with flap and two zip pockets by trailhead at Boone & Crockett. Contains glasses, cell phone, date book, iPod and Flipcam. Rock thrown through car window so it’s actually stolen. Please call 549-6544

Facial and Body Waxing Want smooth, hairless skin for Christmas? It's time to book your appointment at The Grizzly Bare Waxing Studio. We offer professional facial and body waxing services in Missoula. 406-290-9299

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

317 S. Orange



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

We Fix Poor Credit

www.CreditRestorationNW.com 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

239-1270

2009 -2010 for ages 3, 4, Kindergarten & Pre-K

MISSOULA COMMUNITY SCHOOL

542-2833

Local Artists • Art Classes 20% Off Custom Framing 1st Friday Openings 709 Ronan St. Missoula 541-7100 montanaart.com

T'ai Chi

Openings available now! Inspiring children to explore, create & care.

AGE: 38 HEIGHT: 5’8” HAIR COLOR: BALD EYE COLOR: BROWN

Table of contents

Give your trash a happy ending.

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

728-0918 missoulataichi.com


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

Between A Rack And A Hard Place I’m planning to marry my boyfriend in December. I love how he makes me feel like a supermodel even though I’m slightly overweight, and how he’s always saying he loves me. This is in sharp contrast to my mentally abusive exhusband always saying he never loved me. Recently, my boyfriend asked me to clean out his car, and I found a black bra under the passenger seat. He said, “Baby, I bought that for you, it was supposed to be a surprise.” When asked to produce the tags or receipt, he responds, “Excuse me for trying to do something romantic” or says he’ll show me the rack at the store where he got the bra. Should I really believe he accidentally bought a bra way smaller than my size and lost the tags and receipt? He’s proven to be romantic on several occasions—only several because we only met in March. He swears he’s being honest, but he lies a lot; even his parents tell me they can’t believe much of what he says. —Hopeless Romantic There are two sides of you talking here: the side dying to believe he’ll show you the rack at the store where he found the bra, and the side that can’t help but know that the rack he got it off belongs to some skinny blonde. Come on…you know as well as we all do, when a guy’s buying his girlfriend lingerie, the salesclerk doesn’t say, “I could wrap this in pink tissue paper, slap on a gold sticker, and pop it in a fancy little bag. But, you know how your girlfriend would really like it…under the passenger seat, with a Life Saver stuck to it, next to a crumpled Burger King wrapper and some crunched-up leaves.” Yeah, I know…excuuuuse him for trying to do something romantic. Next on Romeo’s list, “I have a box of chocolates for you—they’ve been in the trunk for a month!” He does have his good qualities, all two of them: He makes you feel like a supermodel—one whose boyfriend cheats on her—and always tells you he loves you. He especially loves how you look in the moonlight when you’re believing just about anything. His other character witnesses are less dewy-eyed. While parents of murderers step over the dead bodies in their foyer to defend their kid’s honor, his parents came right out and told you he’s a relentless liar. You later e-mailed me that he yells and swears at them, and even threatened to

LOST & FOUND

vandalize their new car if his dad didn’t do what he wanted. (Apparently, telling Dad he’s pretty doesn’t cut it.) Do you actually find anything attractive about him; I mean, besides how attractive he makes you feel? You’re clearly trying to make the best of a really bad situation, because for you, being without a man is an even worse situation. This boyfriend isn’t a good guy, just a different kind of bad guy than the last one. Once again, this isn’t going to end well—none of your relationships will until you do the hard work it takes to build up a strong self and standards, and the guts and dignity to stand up for them instead of settling for pretty talk. For a guidebook, pick up Nathaniel Branden’s “The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem.” You’ll be ready to date again when you find it unbelievable that this guy was ever in a position to ask you to marry him—and even more unbelievable that your answer was “Yes” and not “Why don’t we skip straight to the bitter divorce?”

Flee Infestation My boyfriend is moving across the globe. I love him deeply, but he says he’s battling commitment phobia, doesn’t think I’m “the one,” struggles to say “love,” and doesn’t have butterflies in his stomach for me anymore. Instead of breaking up now, he wants to play it by ear after he leaves. I’d do anything for him. I’m so sad he’s struggling to love me back. —Crushed Welcome to the low-impact breakup: “Nothing comes between you and me, Babe, except maybe the world’s largest body of salt water.” Not to worry—after he moves, you two’ll “play it by ear.” Translation: He’ll gradually stop calling and blame the time difference. Or, he’ll finally tell you it’s over, but only when he can cut short your crying jags with “Whoops! Looks like my phone card’s about to run out.” Sorry for the tough love, but the guy’s told you in numerous ways that there’s nothing left. Even the butterflies have hit the road. You can wish things were different, but the kindest thing you can do for yourself is admit the obvious, and stop editing the writing on the wall into something a little less “I’ll soon be in bed with Svetlana!”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Stolen bike! Yellow GT Aggressor mountain bike stolen out of my garage near Willard school- I love this bike! Please keep our eyes peeled- I will offer a reward for info or return of this bike! It has brand new studded tires- new seat- new colorful grips. Black plastic fenders. Please call with info- 544-2491 LOST KITTY MALE BLACK LONG HAIRED CAT. PURPLE COLLAR. 10TH & CATLIN AREA. CALL JENI 406-880-4500. HE IS VERY MISSED!

NOTICE Holiday Crafts Bazaar! Come join us on First Fri. Dec. 4th 4-9pm, and Sat. Dec. 5th 10am-5pm; at our Holiday Crafts Bazaar at Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center 725 W. Alder, Missoula. Local Artisans and Crafters welcome! For both days, space for one table is $25, Friday only: $10, Saturday only: $15. We will have a gift wrap station, live music, and free food and drinks! Contact Erica: 396-6868, edale528@yahoo.com.

TO GIVE AWAY

VOLUNTEERS

FREE CYCLES MISSOULA. Kids bikes are always free. Monday & Thursday: 3:007:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00-3:00. 732 South 1st West

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889 Pass It On Missoula.com offers FREE infant, toddler, and maternity clothing to local families in serious need. FREE delivery! www.passitonmissoula.com

WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

is $7.25 or more per hour depending on experience. #2976613 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Waiver, & Wellness. This position closes 12/30/09. #2976581 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-9656520 ext. 278

LIGHT TOW TRUCK DRIVER, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking part-time, On-call LIGHT TOW TRUCK DRIVER with a 3 year clean driving record. This position could turn into full-time. #2976579 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Faith Development Director Parttime postion with progressive, active church. Individual oversees nursery thru elementary program. Concentrates on nurturing and developing growth and leadership. Job description available at joyce@uccmsla.org

BOOKKEEPER/RETAIL-IMMEDIATE NEED! P/T, Temp, Msla. Employer is seeking a part time (20 hrs/week) bookkeeper with 12 months of experience for retail business. Option to work additional hours in retail capacity to make fulltime. Rate of pay to start for bookkeeper is $10/hour or higher depending on experience. Position is available ASAP! ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS: Will be sitting for extended periods, reaching, twisting, bending, light lifting and carrying. #2976580 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COOK/PREP COOK, P/T, Msla. A Thai Restaurant in downtown Missoula is seeking a COOK/PREP COOK. Duties include prepping vegetables, meats and washing dishes. Will also need to cut vegetables and other prep work duties as assigned. Must work well under pressure and be open to fast-pace during rush hour. Individuals with 6 months experience preferred, but willing to train the right person. Need to lift up to 60lbs. Weekly hours will be 15-20. Pay is $8.00/hr to start & weekly work schedule will vary. Weekly hours may increase. #2976609 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HABILITATION AIDES, F/T, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking both full & part time HABILITATION AIDES to work with adults with developmental disabilities. Job Service Front desk. Starting wage is $9.02/hour. #2976620 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 INFANT ROOM AIDE, F/T, Msla. Missoula business seeking an experienced INFANT ROOM AIDE. This is a part-time position working with infant children. Work days are Monday through Friday, 1:00 PM until 6:00 PM, lunch breaks to be discussed at interview, approximately 25 hours per week. Must be able to lift up to 30 lbs. Starting wage

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-3081186 Pattee Creek Market is looking for two full time checkers. Cashier experience, see Karen. 704 SW Higgins. RV DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RVs, boats, and trucks for PAY! Deliver to all 48 states and Canada. For details log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, F/T, Msla. The University Of Montana School Of Art is seeking a fulltime ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY/STUDIO ART. DUTIES INCLUDE: Teaching photography at the introductory, advanced and graduate levels; Teaching additional courses either in painting, drawing, printmaking or foundations; Coordinate digital lab, chemical darkroom and lighting studio. Will also have opportunity to develop new curriculum that encourages hybrid media and interdisciplinary studio work. Salary can be discussed at interview and does include benefits such as Medical Insurance, Mandatory Retirement, Professional Development, Partial Tuition

Montana Headwall is seeking an experienced, aggressive, professional sales representative to help grow our recently launched quarterly magazine. Headwall captures the best of Big Sky country and its spectacular abundance of outdoor activities. Packed with adventure and loads of fun, each issue of Headwall appeals to active, energetic recreation enthusiasts throughout Montana and the Pacific Northwest. You can check out our most recent issue at montanaheadwall.com. Montana Headwall has a growing circulation, currently at 15,000, and is distributed at more than 400 locations in Montana, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and California. We're looking for a part-time commission-based advertising sales specialist who is self-motivated, organized and well connected in the outdoor community. If you have three or more years’ experience in print media sales, are an account prospecting superstar, and motivated by commission sales, then we want to talk to you! This is an independent contractor position – work from your own home!

Send resume to: Montana Headwall, 317 S. Orange, Missoula MT 59801 or email to pkearns@montanaheadwall.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 November 26–December 3, 2009

MSU - Bozeman Agricultural Research Station Jobs NARC - Havre, MT. Research Assistant III. LARRL - Miles City, MT. Livestock Research Technician. Details and application materials at www.montana.edu/jobs or Montana Job Service. MSU-Bozeman is an ADA/EEO/AA Vet Pref Employer SITE DIRECTOR F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time SITE DIRECTOR for organization in Missoula. Duties include leading strategic planning and tactical execution of customer care operations, analyzes and interprets information which helps develop future strategic plans, forecasts critical milestones and potential obstacles in stages of plan and evaluates alternate courses of action. Will facilitate adherence to policies and procedures that support the overall objectives. This position may require travel up to 20% of time. Salary is in the $95,000/year range. #29766603 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 YOUTH CASE MANAGER, F/T,Msla. This position is with a licensed mental health center and placement agency committed to the preservation and restoration of natural families. Their approach is a strength-based family centered model designed to follow our families and their needs. They are presently looking for a YOUTH CASE MANAGER in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valley area to provide advocacy and facilitation for families in need of community services.

ADVERTISING SALES REP Are you enthusiastic, creative, motivated? Do you work well under weekly deadlines and enjoy a challenge? Are you an experienced sales person? If so, then you may be the person we're seeking to join the Missoula Independent's sales team, and we're anxious to hear from you! Send your resume to: pkearns@missoulanews.com

or to PO Box 8275, Missoula MT 59807. No calls, please. EOE


EMPLOYMENT

CONTRACT FORESTER NOTIFIER/INSPECTOR, F/T, Msla. Utility Consulting company is seeking a full-time CONTRACT FORESTER - NOTIFIER/INSPECTOR to work in the Missoula area. Will assist utility in coordination of its vegetation management program and in other aspects of public relations, education, and contractor compliance. Prefer Bachelor’s or Associate’s degree in forestry, horticulture, or other natural resource field, or a Certified Arborist with utility experience. Must have or attain ISA Certified Arborist certification as soon as possible. 4X4 vehicle will be provided for on the job. Compensation will depend on qual-

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800545-4546

HEALTH CAREERS PROGRAM SPEC I - SENIOR NUTRITION, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a part-time (24 hrs/wk) Program Specialist I - Senior Nutrition Program. Salary range is from $11.14 to $12.05/hour and includes a comprehensive benefit plan. Full job description at the Missoula Workforce Center front desk. The employer will not consider applicants

that contact them directly. Closes 11/30/09 #2976594 728-7060

Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

REGISTERED NURSE, F/T, P/T, Msla. Small skilled nursing and assisted living center is seeking a Registered Nurse who is licensed in the State of Montana. Six months experience or more in facility setting is preferred; new grads welcome! Shifts and days can vary—to be discussed at interview, will include evenings and graveyard shifts. 20 to 32 hours per week. Pay is $17 to $22/hour plus benefits. Business is on bus line. #2976616 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES

SALES

Are you an enthusiastic, organized, motivated and detail-oriented person? Do you work well under deadlines and enjoy talking on the phone with many different kinds of people? If so, you might be the person we are seeking to join the Missoula Independent classified sales team. Some sales experience is preferred, but we will train the right person.

Send resume and a cover letter SELLING YOURSELF to: pkearns@missoulanews.com or to PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807

STORE MANAGER Will be responsible for recruiting, hiring, training, performance management, store operations, store merchandising, inventory management, directing and maximizing sales, and customer care. Must work evenings, weekends and holidays. R e quir ements include quirements include:: • Minimum of 5 years rretail etail experience with at least 2 years in rretail etail stor e management store • Four year college degr ee or equivalent degree combination of education and experience We offer excellent benefits and provide an outstanding compensation package consisting of a starting base salary, sales incentive and bonus.

For consideration, email resume: rrodger odger .r osenber g@radioshack.com odger.r .rosenber osenberg@radioshack.com

equal opportunity employer dedicated to diversity in the workplace www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com

Go to CarlaGreenMassage.com. 15 minutes free when you intake, pay and schedule online @ CarlaGreenMassage.com 406-3608746

BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 5524477 http://astrologymontana. webs.com

Escape With Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

PRODUCT REPRESENTATIVE, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking an EXPERIENCED, Full-time Outside Sales PRODUCT REPRESENTATIVE. Wage is $30,000 per year plus commission. #2976618

HEAD START is accepting applications for: 40 hrs/wk. 43 wks/yr. Primarily Education Asst. Assist Ed. Manager in the overall operation of the Education program. Provide clerical and classroom support. Receive visitors/answer incoming calls. Route mail & program information. Operate office machines. Use two-way radio. HS dip/GED req'd. Applications/job descriptions available at 1001 Worden, Missoula, 59802. Apps. Due December 2, 2009. EOE

NOW HIRING: companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 Dept. MT-4186

HEAD START is accepting applications for: Home Start Te a c h e r / S e e l e y L a k e : 20 hrs/wk. 41 wks/yr. Plan organize implement in home educational program for preschool children. HS dip/GED req'd. Prefer 2 years exp. Applications/job descriptions available at 1001 Worden, Missoula, 59802. Apps. Due December 2, 2009. EOE

Jody Mosher offers a weekly dose of playful cardiovascular exercise aka - Nia every Friday at 8:00AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main, cost $10.

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark- (406)728-2629

Achieve optimum health with Bio-Entirety Zone Therapy, a foot-based meridian treatment. Audrey S. Romine, CZT

Layed Off? Need to Supplement income? 406-241-1645

Education Asst/Receptionist:

ADVERTISING SALES REP

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-7763068

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220

(406) 459-3035

Shear

Art Salon 1804 North Ave FREE EYEBROW WAX EXP.12/3/09 Call 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Therapeutic Massage Willa Gingery , CMT

• Arthritis & Chronic Fatigue • Allergies, Intolerances • Injuries & Illnesses • Headaches/Migraines • Learning Disorders

• Maintain Health & Wellness • General, Neck & Back Pain • Viruses & Bacteria • Sports Performance • and much more...

$10 OFF FIRST TABLE SESSION

544-5698 wmgmassage.iwantamassage.com

Attention Qualified Design/Build Firms:

Hypnosis & Imager y * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

You’re invited to our

Jacobs is seeking qualified design/build firms interested in participating in Amtrak’s nationwide projects funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) economic-stimulus package. Capital grants have been awarded to construct, renovate, repair and/or upgrade properties for Amtrak and other railroad owners throughout the United States.

728-5693 • Mar y Place

OPEN HOUSE

The Design/Builder will be responsible for completing the design requirements (typically at 30% or more) and self performing and/or subcontracting the work through construction close-out. Projects include, but are not limited to, utility and right-of-way upgrades, station construction and restoration, security, fire and life safety enhancements, and station access and mobility improvements. In support of small and minority-owned businesses, Jacobs and Amtrak will set individual goals for significant levels of small and disadvantaged business enterprise participation, and contract projects to create jobs that will further economic recovery and provide long-term benefits. For specific project opportunities, please visit Amtrak’s web site at http://procurement.amtrak.com

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk

MSW, CHT, GIS Thanks Missoula! B e s t H o l i d a y Wi s h e s To A l l



Dixon Ave.

oks

Paxon

SKILLED LABOR

ifications, education and experience but does include benefits (60% of medical coverage, 401(k) pension plan, Holiday leave, Vacation leave). Position will be filled January 2, 2010. #2976612 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

S. Reserve

Master’s level preferred but will accept applications from BA level in social work, counseling, or psychology, as long as the applicant has experience in Case Management. This is a full time position with competitive salary and benefits. This position will remain open until filled. #2976582 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

Bro

at our new location on 2204 Dixon. Friday, December 4th, 5-7 PM

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Dr. Christine White, ND

B o d y C a re By Michelle

(406) 542-2147 www.BlackBearNaturopaths.com

Waxing • Facials Massage $45/hr P R O F E S S I O N A L S E RV I C E S O N LY

We Trade Accepted

406-270-3230

Need a roommate? Check out our local online classifieds to find the perfect one.

Or Jacobs’ web site at http://www.jacobs.com/amtrak.aspx?id=6020.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 November 26–December 3, 2009


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): One of the greatest superpowers a human being can have is the ability to change herself in accordance with her intentions. Let’s say you’re tired of feeling shame about something there’s no good reason to feel shame about, and you decide to do whatever it takes to dissolve that shame, and you succeed in doing it. Or let’s say you no longer want to attract bad listeners and flaky collaborators into your life, and you resolve to transform that pattern, and you ultimately achieve your goal. These are acts of high magic, as amazingly wizardly as anything a shaman does. It so happens, Aries, that this superpower is especially accessible to you right now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your story is taking a hotter and wetter and more cosmically comical turn. The splendor and the rot are all mixed up. The line between your strengths and liabilities are hair thin. But have no fear. One of your dormant talents will activate in the nick of time. Your wild guesses will shed bright light whenever the darkness creeps in. And you’ll have even more emotional intelligence than usual. P.S. If your psyche tingles like a funny bone that has been tapped, it means that unanticipated help or useful information will arrive within 12 hours. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “The more you do what you want,” says Santa Fe artist Erika Wanenmacher, “the more magic happens.” And what she wants, in part, is to be surprised by how life’s random events ask to be included in her creative process. During her long walks along the irrigation ditch near her home, for example, odds and ends on the ground call to her, suggesting that she use them in her art pieces—heart-shaped rocks, miniature liquor bottles, bent spoons, parts of toys. One of her gallery pieces, “Spell Wall,” consists of amulets made from this found stuff. “I’ll make whatever I want,” Erika says. “Out of whatever I want. About whatever I want.” She’s your role model, Gemini. Borrow from her perspective. Go in quest of unexpected clues that make you feel loose and free and fertile.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Needing a creative disruption in my routine, I hiked into a forest I’d never visited. The late afternoon light was wan and the wind was chilly. In places, the trail narrowed to a scruffy rut barely big enough for me to walk on, leading me to wonder if I was reading my map wrong. Three times this happened, but always the wider path resumed. Were there bobcats here? When I spied a flash of fur in the distance, I wished I’d researched that subject before I’d come. Still I pressed on. Then I came upon a single segment of a wooden fence, inexplicable in this remote area. One end of its upper slat had come loose and fallen. Moved by a whimsical urge to insert order into the midst of my disorientation, I fixed the slat. My mood brightened, my anxiety dissipated, and the rest of my hike was filled with small epiphanies. Everything I just described, my fellow Cancerian, is an apt metaphor for your week ahead.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I believe that in the coming weeks you’ll enjoy experiences that have an emotional resemblance to those referred to in this passage by French novelist Gustave Flaubert: “I want to cover you with love, with caresses, with ecstasy. I want to gorge you with all the joys of the flesh…I want you to be astonished by me, to confess to yourself that you had never even dreamed of such transports…When you are old, I want you to recall those few hours. I want your dry bones to quiver with joy when you think of them.” Please note, Leo, that I’m not necessarily saying the pleasures you gather in will stem from an engagement with an actual lover. They might. But your delight may also have a more mysterious origin.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s not just our era that has a tormented relationship with time. Many cultures have been frustrated by its tyranny. During France’s July Revolution in 1830, for instance, rebels shot guns at public clocks. While I think that’s too extreme for you, I do recommend that you perform a ritual to empower yourself as you wrestle with the passage of the hours and days and weeks. How about smashing a cheap alarm clock with a hammer? Or spending an entire day without ever referring to a timepiece? Or taking ten deep breaths as you imagine you’re inhaling eternity and exhaling the grinding tick-tock? It’s a perfect moment to claim more freedom from temporality.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Montana Pain Management A Missoula-based company offering relief resources with full range cannabis therapeutics. 9 medicinal cannabis strains AVAILABLE NOW. (406) 529-2980 NATURE & SPIRIT COUNSELING. Call 3377

SHAMANIC 1-541-212-

Paradigm Reiki Balancing



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “A neurosis is a secret that you don’t know you are keeping,” wrote theater critic Kenneth Tynan. Your assignment is to uncover one of those secrets in yourself. It may not result in an instantaneous cure of your minor personality glitch, but it will be a potent first step that will set in motion a series of healing events. Be brave, Capricorn. I guarantee that any ugliness you might find lodged deep inside you will be entangled with surprising beauty.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Seventy percent of the world’s fresh water is locked away in Antarctica’s ice, which is 7,000 feet thick. Let’s hope it remains that way for the foreseeable future. If global warming melted that giant slab even a little, sea levels all over the planet would rise and coastal lands would be inundated. As for your frozen areas, however: I’d really like to see at least 30 percent of them thaw. Would you consider doing whatever it takes to release a mini-flood of summery feelings?



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): While walking in an unfamiliar neighborhood, I saw a huge red wooden chair on someone’s front lawn. It was big enough for a 20-foot-tall giant. An equally oversized martini glass was perched on the arm of the chair. Nearby was a sign that read, “I have flying monkeys at my command, and I’m not afraid to use them.” I assumed this scene was the handiwork of an adorable crazy person who’s an admirer of The Wizard of Oz mythology. I also flashed on how I could totally see you sitting in that chair. Metaphorically speaking, you too have flying monkeys at your command. I just hope you use them to accomplish good deeds, not evil ones. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

• Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

541-8090 We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid

Call for appointment 541- 8092 742 Kensington (intersection of Kensington & Bow)

Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS



Professional massage therapy. 18

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

VIRGELLE MERC. ANTIQUES presents a “Real Country Christmas” at a “Real Country Store.” Saturday and Sunday, December 5&6, 9am to 5pm. Antiques, Art, Collectibles. Phone 1800-426-2926 or (406)378-3110. www.VirgelleMontana.com Celebrate the season at Virgelle, Montana.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The surest way to beat the system, my dear, is to elude it and erect your own system. The strategy most likely to leave your competitors babbling in the mirror, sweetheart, is to go completely over their heads. That doesn’t mean, darling, that you should be a remote and grandiose narcissist who listens to no one but yourself. Smile sweetly as you describe why your way is the best way, you gorgeous genius. Enlist worthy collaborators through the irresistible force of your guileless charisma.

Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

Variety Line Dance! Ladies only. Waltz, Cha Cha, East and West Coast Swing, Salsa, Merengue, Some Country and the hottest new line dance - Cupid Shuffle. Women’s Club on Bow St. $24/person. Thursdays, December 3rd - 17th, 7-8 PM. 406529-3204 FUN! FUN! FUN!

We make it personal



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do you know what you’re really worth? Not as measured by your bank account and luxurious possessions. Not as reflected by your boss’s or parents’ or enemies’ images of you. Not as distorted by what you wish you were worth or fear you’re not worth. I’m talking about taking an illusion-free inventory of the skills you have that are fulfilling to you and useful to others. I’m talking about your wisdom more than your knowledge, your self-love more than your popularity, your ability to be good more than to look good.

PENIS ENLARGEMENT. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps. Gain 1-3 inches permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures. 619-2947777 http://www.drjoelkaplan.com (discounts available)

years experience. Deep Swedish Massage, Sports Massage, and Therapeutic Aromatherapy Massage. Danielle Packard, CMT 274-3221.

Affordable • Quality • Personal

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1800-475-0876

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I agree with football coach Lou Holtz, who said, “The problem with having a sense of humor is often that people you use it on aren’t in a very good mood.” It’s possible to work around this difficulty, however. What you have to do, before you unleash your levity, is conjure up empathy for the sourpuss in question. You should also make sure that your intention is not to mock or poke at the person, but instead offer a potential escape from his or her locked energy. By my calculations, you could be an expert at this kind of psychic judo right now. For best results, practice on yourself. Whenever you’re headed toward a negative thought or emotion, nudge yourself away with a jest or wisecrack.

and Healing Session- $40 549-0289

ANTIQUES

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

FURNITURE 5-Piece Bedroom Set Includes headboard, Dresser, Mirror, chest, and nightstand Savannah pine finish Retail $1895 sacrifice $795 2610745 8’ Pool Table 8’ Pool Table solid wood hand carved 1’ slate, Simonis Cloth, Aramith balls, leather pockets, 4 cues etc. Cost $6000 Sacrifice $1795 Call 261-0745 Bedroom Set Cherrywood Bedroom Set solid wood cherry sleigh bed, dresser, mirror, and 2 nightstands cost $1700 Sacrifice for only $795.00 call 261-0745 Log Bedroom Set Amish made log bedroom set, log bed, dresser, nightstand and chest sacrifice $1350 261-0745

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 November 26–December 3, 2009

New sofa and loveseat Brand new microfiber sofa and loveseat, chocolate brown, hardwood frames nice Sacrifice $695 261-0745

All strings are 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM

Theatre Sectional rustic Theatre Sectional rustic leather look with recliners and cup holders retail $2850 Sell $1299 call 261-0745

Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM

MUSIC

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533

ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

I buy watches! Looking for vintage or new Rolex, Omega, Hamilton, etc.

Variety Line Dance! Ladies only. Waltz, Cha Cha, East and West Coast Swing, Salsa, Merengue, Some Country and the hottest new line dance - Cupid Shuffle. Women’s Club on Bow St. $24/person. Thursdays, December 3rd - 17th, 7-8 PM. 406-529-3204 FUN! FUN! FUN!

PETS LAB PUPPIES available now! 8wks. 6 yellow $250ea. 2 black $200ea. 207-3215

WANTED CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

The Multi Item Store

406-207-0687 Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins)

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

Pass It On Missoula

Open Every Sunday 11am-4pm 1010 Clements Rd. www.PassItOnMissoula.com

40% OFF Through Dec. 31st Furniture, Household Goods, Books,Decor, Etc. Reuse, Recycle, Feel Good! 1358 1/2 W. Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272


MARKETPLACE Crystal Limit

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Holiday Sale Nov. 27, 28, & 29th 1920 Brooks • 549-1729 c rysta l l i m i t . c om

PRAY FOR SNOW

SALE 111 S. 3rd W.

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to vacate a plat or a part of a plat specifically described as: Kahle Lots Subdivision, Lot 2C Located in the E 1/2 of Section 31, Township 14 N, Range 20 W. Reference in the office of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder as Book 33 of Plats, Page 26. The following attachments, of satisfactory scale and legibility, must be provided with this petition: 1. Paper copy of a vicinity map showing location of the recorded plat to be vacated 2. Paper copy of the recorded plat to be vacated 3. Paper copy identifying the area (lot or lots) of the recorded plat to be vacated. The vacation of this plat, or part of this plat, is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. To revert existing subdivision lot to acreage 2. To allow for conveyance to family 3. To resume use of existing apartment / shop. (For more informa-

Stop Foreclosure

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

PUBLIC NOTICES

Horsey Holidays!

Chapter 13 & other options

273 - 4226 • Lolo, MT crazyhorseconsignment.com

New Arrivals!

Custom Fly Rods MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. North Reserve Business Complex (Behind Johnny Carino's) unit k3 406.542.1202

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com

Daniel Morgan Andrew Pierce 433 W. Alder • 830-3875 Missoula County Government

LDR Kennel

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will conduct public hearings at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 9, 2009 in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, on the following:

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

A request by Bruce Hazeltine for a variance from the side yard setback requirement of 10 feet set by Zoning District #18 (10). The property, 4975 Evergreen Street, is legally described as: Tract 7B COS 3926, T12N, R20W, Section 2. It should also be noted that the placement of this structure is proposed within a 10 foot utility easement as noted by COS #3926. If you have any concerns or are able address releasing this easement please contact the Office of Planning and Grants. See map B.

tion, please see petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor.) A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested vacation of a plat or a part of a plat will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on December 2, 2009, at 1:30 p.m., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk and Recorder/Elections (406) 258-4752 Date: October 23, 2009 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR Professional Engineering Services Notice to Engineering Consultants: Notice is hereby given that Missoula County Public Works will receive written Qualifications and Proposals for engineering consultant services for hydrologic and hydraulic analysis for a second bridge or other suitable structure for Cold Creek Road Bridge No. SS-19 near Condon, Montana. Proposals are to be submitted to: Missoula County Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 and must be postmarked by 4 p.m. on December 1, 2009.. The selected consultant will develop a hydrologic and hydraulic study on a short segment of Cold Creek. Based on this analysis, the consultant will prepare recommendations to address changes in the stream that threaten Cold Creek Road. Background: Cold Creek is a braided stream that moves throughout its floodplain. Currently, some of the flow has migrated east during peak events and has threatened the integrity of the road. It is likely a second structure is warranted to pass this flow, however, all other available options should be considered. The Missoula County Government

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, December 15, 2009, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1.Rezoning Request – 1311 E. Broadway (former Missoula Athletic Club site) A request from Rick Wishcamper and Mike Bouchee of Rocky Mountain Development Group, Inc. to rezone property located on at 1311 E. Broadway from OP-3 (Public Lands and Institutional) to C1-3 (Neighborhood Commercial, Intensity Designator = 3), legally described as Lot 2B of Gateway Gardens No. 1 Lots 1B and 2B Subdivision, located in Sec. 23, T13N, R19W (see Map Z) The City Council will conduct a public hearing this item at 7:00 p.m. on

County of Missoula reserves the right to accept the proposal that the County Commissioners deem in the best interest of the county for any reason. Proposal Content and Format: 1. Project Approach: Provide a narrative of how your firm will accomplish the work.. You must demonstrate unique capabilities, innovative approaches, technical skills and systems, or special methodologies to accomplish the work efficiently and to a high standard. Specifically list any work for which you do not have in-house capability, and name the firm you propose to subcontract for that work. Provide a systematic and methodical description as to how the scope of work will be accomplished in language suitable for inclusion in a legal contract. 2. General Experience: Include a summary of the consultant’s experience and qualifications with projects (dates, description, locations, and references) similar to the this type of project. Emphasis should be given to projects performed from the local area office using staff nominated as available for this project. List specific experience dealing with Government Agencies. Please note any experience that will ensure this project is developed in the timeline specified. 3. Experience of Key Personnel: Identify the location of the office where the work will be performed and the names and resumes of the key supervisors and staff to be committed to the project. For each of the key personnel, identity their areas of responsibility and the percentage of their time dedicated to the project. Please note that key personnel will be named in the contract and any change will be subject to approval of the County Engineer. Proposal Evaluation: Selection of the consultant will be made by a three to five person team selected by the Missoula County Public Works Director. If needed, questions may be directed to respondents to clarify proposals. Criteria for selecting the consultant include: Points: 1. Professional qualifications, past performance and references: 0 – 30 points. 2. Clarity of consultant’s response and understanding of the Local Entity’s project requirements:. 0 – 25 points 3. Demonstrated knowledge in H&H Studies: 0 – 35 points 4. Local familiarity and availability to project: 0 – 10 points. Maximum Points: 100 The selection committee reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Upon notification to the consultant selected based upon the evaluation criteria, will submit a proposed cost estimate, fee schedule, and a “not to exceed” estimate for all phases of the project with subtotals for each phase. Negotiations will then be undertaken to reach a fair and amicable agreement. If such an agreement cannot be reached, the negotiations will be terminated and negotiations will be undertaken with the next highest ranked consultant. Submission Instructions: Five copies of consultant’s written proposal shall be submitted to the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula MT, 59808 on or before 4:00 p.m., local time on Friday, December 1, 2009. Envelopes shall be clearly marked “Consultant Proposal for Engineering Services for Missoula County’s Cold Creek Road Hydrologic and Hydraulic Study Project. Questions regarding the project should be directed to Gregory Robertson, P.E. by calling (406) 258-4818 or by e-mail at groberts@co.missoula.mt.us. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with state statutes governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, Missoula County reserves the right to negotiate an agreement for each project, some projects or all projects based on fair and reasonable

ADULT Any written comments can be mailed to Jamie Erbacher, at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 or e-mailed to jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning & Grants at 406258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

SWEET & DISCRETE

Monday, January 11, 2009, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula.

Escort Referral Service

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 2584657.

NOW HIRING

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services.

829-6394

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory or inappropriate. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE Dept. No. 3, Cause No. DV-09-760 FIRST SECURITY BANK OF MISSOULA, a Montana banking corporation, Plaintiff, Against MARTIN JEFFREY PLOYHAR, DONNA JEAN PLOYHAR, STATE OF MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, STATE OF MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRIES, and INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks. On the 3rd day of December A.D., 2009, at 10:00 o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: A. Tract C of Certificate of Survey No 969, a tract of land located in the North one-half of Section 30, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. B. The Southwest one-quarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 29, Township 13 North, Range 15 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. LESS a strip of land 60 feet in width along the South boundary adjacent to the Section line common to Sections 29 and 32 of the above mentioned parcel of land. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 12th day of November A.D., 2009.. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE TO PROSPECTIVE BIDDERS REVISED SPECIFICATIONS The Missoula County Facilities Management Department is soliciting sealed bids for custodial services for county offices in seven buildings. Bids will be accepted until 3:00 PM, Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009 by the Office of the County Auditor at which time bids will be opened and read. All work is to be performed in accordance with specifications shown below. Each prospective bidder must take a facilities tour and must schedule it by contacting Larry Farnes, 406258-4756. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Proposal for Custodial Services” and 3 copies submitted to: Barbara Berens, County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR CUSTODIAL SERVICES AT: 1. Missoula County Courthouse and Annex, 200 W. Broadway 2. Missoula County Health Department, 301 W Alder 3. Missoula County Print Shop, 223 W Alder 4. Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody 5. Missoula In Motion, 127 W Spruce (twice weekly) 6. Missoula County Weed and Extension, 2825 Santa Fe Court 7. Youth Court, 311 Woody Work requirements - all locations: Clean premises every night on Monday through Thursday between the hours of 5 PM and 7 AM, and once over the weekend between 7 PM Friday and 7 AM Monday. Courthouse and Annex: Provide one full time and one half time custodian between the hours of 8 AM and 5 PM Monday through Friday. Adjust night schedule to accommodate evening meetings; unlock doors prior to meeting and

lock up afterwards; conduct walk through to insure that no unauthorized parties remain on premises and that all offices are locked. Day Shift: (Courthouse & Annex) Offices will be cleaned according to the following schedule: 1. Clean Sheriff’s Civil Offices each morning Monday through Friday. 2. Clean 9-1-1 each morning Sunday through Saturday. 3. Clean Justice Court during the hours of 12 noon to 1 PM Monday through Friday. 4. Clean Sheriff’s third floor offices during the hours of 3:30 PM to 5 PM Monday through Friday. 5. Clean all other offices at night. All Locations Daily responsibilities will include but not limited to the following: 1. Clean and sanitize all rest rooms and restock supplies. Maintain restrooms throughout the day. 2. Clean around all outside entrances and empty and clean all ash receptacles. 3. Clean interior and exterior of all entrance doors. 4. Clean and sanitize all drinking fountains. 5. Change any burned out light bulbs or fluorescent tubes while minimizing disruption to business. Inform maintenance of fixtures with bad ballasts. 6. Mop entrances, stairs and halls during inclement weather. Put out “wet floor” signs. 7. Clean up spills on floors and carpets as needed. 8. Carry a pager and respond to departments as requested. 9. Inform maintenance of any needed repairs. Twice Weekly: 1. Wind all clocks. Weekly: 1. Thoroughly clean all offices, including ceiling diffusers, walls, baseboards and under desks. Dust desktops when requested by user. Monthly: 1. Buff all hard surfaced floors. Quarterly: 1. Strip and wax all hard surface floors*. 2. Shampoo and extract all carpeted areas*. *Frequency may increase during the winter months. Annually: 1. Clean all windows inside and out. The contractor shall furnish all restroom paper products and hand soap. The contractor shall also furnish all trash liners, cleaning supplies and equipment required to accomplish work as specified. Green products should be used if cost effective. Equipment furnished by the contractor shall be the size and type best suited for accomplishing the various phases of work. Equipment shall be suitable for operation from existing sources of the County furnished electrical power and shall have a low noise level of operation. Equipment considered by the County to be improper or dangerous will be removed and replaced by the contractor with satisfactory equipment. The County will not be held responsible for loss or damage to any equipment belonging to the contractor stored on County premises. The contractor will agree to hold the County harmless against and from all losses from any acts or omissions of the contractor. The contractor will be required to maintain general liability insurance in the amount of one million dollars ($1,000,000) per occurrence and two million ($2,000,000) in the aggregate. All insurance policies must be from an insurance carrier licensed to do business in the State of Montana. Contractor agrees to furnish proof of required insurance to the County prior to commencing work under this Agreement. The contractor will be required to carry Workers Compensation Insurance during the term of the contract and meet all existing regulations for prevailing wage rates as required by the State of Montana. The contract shall be in force for three (3) years from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012 or from the date the contract is signed by both parties, whichever is later, and may be renewed for an additional three (3) year term upon satisfactory negotiation of the cost of services. Monthly cost for janitorial services listed above are: First year: $_______Second year: $ _______ Third year: $_______

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC

miles, garymann22@ yahoo.com, 406-988-4588

2001 Forest River Reflectio $19,950, clear title, excellent condition, 22,750

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 November 26–December 3, 2009


HOLIDAY La

holiday sale

at the clay studio of missoula

La 3914 Brooks St. 251-0055

La

Mon-Fri 10am-5pm Sat-Sun 12pm-6ppm

Fa

Best bead selection in Montana!

Nov. 27th - Dec. 24th Fri. Dec. 4th 530pm - 9pm

Holiday Soiree Sat. Nov. 28th 530pm-9pm

Mon-Sat 10-6pm • Sunday 12-5pm

www.beadin.com find all your locally made holiday gifts at the clay studio

Resident Slam Fri Dec 18th 7pm

1106 Hawthorne A Msla, MT 59802 406.543.0509 www.theclaystudioofmissoula.org

Shop Local this holiday season

20% off all Cat's Eye clothing & Milk Baby bikinis.

An eclectic boutique specializing in handmade clothing, accessories, jewelry & giftable art.

137 E. Main St. • 541-7466

Cat’s Eye Designs a new eclectic boutique specializing in one of a kind handmade pieces and a cool vibe. Offering year around bikinis, reinvented clothing, jewelry and accessories as well ad unique, giftable art including pottery, photography, paintings and other locally made treasures. Always receiving new pieces and keeping the art fresh. 137 E. Main, 541-7466 Copenhaver Plantation. Choose and Cut Christmas Trees. Grand Fir and Wreaths. Open Sat and Sun starting Nov. 28th. Call 5494983 or 549-4342 for more information or directions Jem Shoppe Jewelers Buying, Selling & Appraisals. Jewelry repair & design, vintage watches, estate jewelry, big diamonds, yogo sapphires, rare coins & antiques. 122 W. Broadway- 728-4077, 331 SW Higgins- 728-6399 Locally Made Gifts The Clay Studio offers beautiful, locally made gifts as well as exciting events. Don’t forget our Holiday Soiree on Nov. 28th! Check our website for a schedule: www.theclaystudioofmissoula.com 543-0509 Marchie’s Nursery Handmade Wreaths & Garlands, Living Christmas Trees, Fresh Cut Native Christmas Trees, Gift Certificates. Bird Baths & Pottery 20% Off! M-Sat 9-5 • 543-2544 • 1845 S 3rd W Missoula Academy of T’ai Chi Ch’uan. Private lessons. Open Classes. Gift Certificates. 728-0918. missoulataichi.com Montana Spirited Massage Professional massage therapy & supplies. Gift certificates available. Open 7 days a week. 543-8500, 1116 S. Russell www.montanaspirited.com Santa Suit Rentals Even Santa rents his suit at Carlo’s! Carlo’s One Night Stand also rents Mrs. Claus, Grinch, and Elf costumes. Open 12-6 daily, located at 109 S. 3rd St. W. on the Hip Strip. 543-6350. Shop: Garden of Beadin’, Montana’s Premier Full-Service Bead Store for all your beading needs. 3914 Brooks St. 251-0055.

Insurance Billing Available! www.MontanaSpirited.com 543-8500 • 1116 S. Russell Street

Two Sisters Catering: for all your holiday party needs. 111 N. HIggins 549-3005 www.twosistersofmontana.com

Open 7 Days A Week!

• • • •

Handmade Wreaths & Garlands Living Christmas Trees Fresh Cut Native Christmas Trees Gift Certificates Baths & Sale! Bird Pottery 20% Off

1845 S. 3rd W. 542-2544

M-Sat 9-5

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 November 26–December 3, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-186 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY LELA CIK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to James P. Cik, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 4th day of November, 2009. /s/ James P. Cik, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-08-881 NOTICE OF NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF: LONDON CHANCE HALLMARK, MINOR CHILD OF JESSICA TAYLOR, Petitioner. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED HEREIN: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a verified Petition for Name Change of LONDON CHANCE HALLMARK to obtain an order of this Court granting leave to assume the name of CHANCE PARKER TAYLOR, will be presented to the above-entitled Court, at the Missoula County Courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on Wednesday the 9th day of December at 1:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard and that that at such time, application will be made for the relief sought in the said Petition. DATED this 21st day of October, 2009. WELLS & MCKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Tal M. Goldin MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Case No. DV-09-1349 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Jesse David Janssen Sr., Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Jesse David Janssen, Sr. has petitioned the District Court for the 4th Judicial District for a change of name from Jesse David Janssen, Sr. to Jesse David Nenemay, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 31st day of December, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula in courtroom number 2S. At any time before the hearing objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 19th day of November, 2009. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Michelle Vipp, Deputy Clerk of Court. AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 4367 located in the Northeast one-quarter Section 29, Township 13 North, Range 20 West and West one-half of the Northwest one-quarter of the Northwest one-quarter of Section 28, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. Jeffrey S. Malek, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated June 11, 2008, and recorded June 16, 2008, as Document No. 200813295 records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded October 30, 2009, in Book 849, Page 1241, Document No. 200925993, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $150,135.00, plus interest at a rate of 6.850% totaling $3,520.79 and late fees of $156.27, for a total amount due of $153,812.06, as of October 29, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 3rd day of November, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 3rd day of November, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 9 and 10 in Block 81 of School Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Jeffrey S. Malek, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated November 15, 2007, and recorded that same date in Book 808, Page 1633, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded October 2, 2009, in Book 848, Page 631, Document No. 200923984, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforemen-

tioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $210,040.72, plus interest at a rate of 7.5% totaling $6,743.62 and late fees of $231.00, for a total amount due of $217,015.34, as of October 23, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 6th day of November, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 6th day of November, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on March 22, 2010, at 10:15 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Parcel I: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 4358, a tract of land located in the Southeast one-quarter of Section 34 and the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35, Township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: TOGETHER WITH a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1744. Jeffrey S. Malek, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated November 15, 2007, and recorded that same date in Book 808, Page 1635, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded October 2, 2009, in Book 848, Page 632, Document No. 200923985, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $210,040.72, plus interest at a rate of 7.5% totaling $6,743.62 and late fees of $231.00, for a total amount due of $217,015.34, as of October 23, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the abovedescribed property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 6th day of November, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 6th day of November, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/08/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200613760, Book 776, Page 568, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lindsey Doe, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 44A of Cook’s Addition, Block 1, Lots 40 through 45, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 7, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $149,323.53. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,231.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified

checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01566) 1002.114050FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/22/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200534296 Bk. 766, Pg. 944, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Karen L. Rausch, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit B as shown and defined in the Declaration of Unit Ownership for KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc. as recorded June 5, 2009 in Book 840 of Micro Records, Page 1322, records of Missoula County, Montana and as amended by Amendment to KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc., Declaration of Unit Ownership recorded July 6, 2009, located on the South one-half of Lot 2 in Block 1 of Mosby’s Leisure Highlands Addition No. 5, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Together with an interest in the General Common Elements and an interest in the Limited Common Elements as set forth in the Declaration of Unit Ownership for KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200822123, Book 826, Page 1307, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, NA, as Trustee for NHEL Home Equity Loan Trust, Series 2006-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 5, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $130,229.51. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $110,092.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17630) 1002.99755-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/22/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200534297 Bk. 766, Pg. 945, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Karen L. Rausch, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit A as shown and defined in the Declaration of Unit Ownership for KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc. as recorded June 5, 2009 in Book 840 of Micro Records, Page 1322, records of Missoula County, Montana and as amended by Amendment to KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc., Declaration of Unit Ownership recorded July 6, 2009, located on the South one-half of Lot 2 in Block 1 of Mosby’s Leisure Highlands Addition No. 5, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Together with an interest in the General Common Elements and an interest in the Limited Common Elements as set forth in the Declaration of Unit Ownership for KTT Townhomes Owners Association, Inc. By written instrument recorded as

Instrument No. 200822127, Book 826, Page 1311, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, NA, as Trustee for NHEL Home Equity Loan Trust, Series 2006-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 5, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $181,082.14. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $146,664.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17629) 1002.99756-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/19/02, recorded as Instrument No. 200205747, Bk. 677, Pg. 1691, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Nordis E. Riley was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Wachovia Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: All of Lot 8, Block 1, located in Charlies Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 12, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $101,041.69. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $89,662.38, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.02438) 1002.135527FEI

led e c n Ca

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/08/99, recorded as Instrument No. BK 568, PG 2227, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard A. Sandefur and Wendy L. Sandefur, husband and wife was Grantor, North America Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust

encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 of Huson Heights, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704460, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 6, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $102,424.15. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $98,623.37, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on February 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other

than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06728) 1002.135536FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale T.S. No. 09 -0006140 Title Order No. 090053974 THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 03/31/2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: On the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT.RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which DEAN O BAKER, AND DARLA J BAKER as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/13/2005 and recorded 07/14/2005, in document No. 200517442 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 755 at Page Number 1490 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 1 OF CANYON VIEW SUBDIVISION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL

RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 714 MONTANAAVE, MISSOULA, MT 59802-5525 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2008, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $136,718.89 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.625% per annum from 07/01/2008 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 11/26/2009 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 ASAP# 3344699 11/26/2009, 12/03/2009, 12/10/2009

SERVICES HANDYMAN

CLEANING

Drive a little, save a lot!

Brian’s Handyman Service. Household repairs and minor remodels. Missoula Area. Licensed & Insured. 406-544-5823

Pristine Housekeeping Dependable housekeeping services for Missoula and surrounding areas. lic. bond. Please call for estimate. 406.493.0956 www.pristinehousekeeping.com

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

Northwest Homes “The Affordable Choice...”

Rivera Works, LLC All-around Handyman & Home Improvement Services

Energy Efficient Homes

Christian Rivera Mark Hamilton 546-1837 NorthwestHomesMT.com

529-8125

Sh

te el

r Des ig

Your local yurt company

Improving Your

w/ solar radiant floor heat Terry Davenport 369 - 0940

ns

(406) 295-4661 shelterdesigns.net

STORAGE SHEDS MontanaShedBuilders.com Affordable, Durable, Delivered

406-546-1246

Outlook!

CORNERSTONE

PAINTING

880-6211

Commercial or Residential improvingyouroutlook.com

Solar Water Heating 543-6465

newerapandh.com

35 Years Experience Interior & Exterior Free Estimates Winter Special!

546-5541

Commercial & Residential Interior & Exterior - All Phases • Historic Restoration

Licensed & Insured (406) 880-1540

Montana Bathroom Solutions Custom Bathroom Remodel & Design

Zach Long 544-6264

info@montanabathroomsolutions.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 November 26–December 3, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES tions secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2009, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $183,193.71 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.25% per annum from 07/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 11/12/09 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-985-07-03 Richardson, TX 75082 ASAP# 3327856 11/12/2009, 11/19/2009, 11/26/2009

SUSTAINAFIEDS

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 11, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The North one-half of lots 11, 12, and 13 in block 70 of school addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, recording reference: Book 743 Page 1057 micro records. Commonly known as: 720 Bulwer Street, Missoula, MT 59802 Alan Jason Mogseth, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Source, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 25, 2007 and Recorded February 16, 2007 in Book 792, page 189 under Document No. 200703914. The beneficial interest is currently held by Provident Funding Associates, L.P. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1069.97, beginning May 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 31, 2009 is $145,801.80 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $3,786.50, late charges in the amount of $230.90, escrow advances of $120.88 and other fees and expenses advanced of $81.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.97 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the

amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 1, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 9/1/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instru-

ment and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. TERI LYNN STECKLER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 9/22/2012 ASAP# 3332966 11/12/2009, 11/19/2009, 11/26/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 9 in Block 2 of West Riverside, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Frank L. Sonnenberg, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Fidelity National Title Ins. Comp., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 31, 2006 and recorded on June 3, 2006 under Book 773, Page 868, as Document No. 200610119. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $829.91, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 24, 2009 is $99,311.99 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $7,428.70, late charges in the amount of $397.18, escrow advances of $873.09 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,742.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.39 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such

amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 8, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA

County of Stark On September 8, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. ASAP# 3336390 11/19/2009, 11/26/2009, 12/03/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 21 and 22 in Block 29 of Hammond Addition No. 3, A Platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Leslie Largay, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 8, 2006 and Recorded December 13, 2006 in Book 788, Page 1168 under Document Number 200631899. The beneficial interest is currently held by National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $3,930.21, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 25, 2009 is $674,367.73 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $12,509.86, late charges in the amount of $495.24 and other fees and expenses advanced of $438.00, plus accruing inter-

Highlighting businesses dedicated to creating a more sustainable world

SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING For More Information Contact: John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group • Custom Portfolios 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A • Shareholder Advocacy Missoula, MT 59803 • Community Investing (406) 543-0708 • Screening johnfaust@pwfinancial.net Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

GREEN HANGER

Notice of Trustee’s Sale T.S. NO. 09-0160894 Title Order No. 090752989MTGSI THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 03/17/2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: On the front steps to the County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT.. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which ALLAN DALE FREY, AND A’LSA MARJO SCOTT, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 01/04/2007 and recorded 01/18/2007, in document No. 200701256 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 790 at Page Number 794 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: PARCEL 1: TRACT D OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5108 A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY MONTANA PARCEL 2: AN APPURTENANT NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT AND RIGHTOF-WAY FOR PRIVATE ACCESS AS DESCRIBED IN BOOK 579 AT PAGES 1898 AND 1900 MICRO RECORDS. Property Address: 1655 FREY LN, MISSOULA, MT 59808 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obliga-

Eco-Friendly Dry Cleaners Laundromats • WI-FI Alterations • Free Laundry Soap Clean & Comfortable

Got no checkbooks, got no banks Still I'd like to express my thanks I got the sun in the morning And the moon at night......... Irving Berlin

406.239.2049

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!! 146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Broker/Owner

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

CONSULTING ENGINEERS Mechanical • Electrical • Environmental The Trail Head the Alpine Start Coffee Shop recycle everything they can, including coffee grounds. They also offer not just health insurance, but also a daily bonus to employees who choose not to drive to work. They work closely with vendors who have made a commitment to sustainability through such efforts as using wind power and recycling products. Nearly 90% of their fleece is made from plastic bottles.

• Complete engineering designs • Industrial and building component analysis • Comprehensive and code compliance systems • Energy analysis and conservation OFFERING: LEED COMMISSIONING & ENERGY CONTROLS FOR COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS 2825 Stockyard. #A16 Missoula (406)-541-0583

204 East Lyndale Helena (406)-441-4000

www.wtrconsulting.com Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 November 26–December 3, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES est at the rate of $108.55 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby {including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN

ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 4, 2009 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On September 4, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3336381 11/19/2009, 11/26/2009, 12/03/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on January 19, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit B-2 of Grandvue Village, according to the Declaration under the unit ownership act recorded as Document No. 443148, on March 27, 1979, located on Lots 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 in Block 2 of Hillside Homes No. 1, A platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Together with an undivided 1/20th interest in the common elements appurtenant thereto as set forth in the declaration. Francis R. Cartier, Jr., as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Gregory G. Schultz, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 1, 2005 and Recorded November 2, 2008 in Book 763, Page 704, as Document No. 200529212. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County,

Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $947.26, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of August 24, 2009 is $150,469.10 principal, interest at the rate of 6.125% now totaling $9,014.22, iate charges in the amount of $473.50, escrow advances of $5,013.38, other fees and expenses advanced of $2,968.90, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.25 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest

in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: September 9, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. BOX 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On September 9, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3341868 11/19/2009, 11/26/2009, 12/03/2009

single garage. 8990

Alpine Meadows, newer, spacious work out room, NO APP FEES. Dishwasher, W/D hookups, microwave, patio, storage, small pets ok Starting at $695 Missoula Property Management- 251-8500

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Tuesday, the 5th day January, 2010, at the hour of 1:00 p.m., at the front door of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligations set out below, has been directed to sell and has elected to sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time sale, and without warranty or covenant, express

or implied as to title, possession, encumbrances, condition, or otherwise, the interest of the Successor Trustee, Martin S. King, and the Grantor SAMUEL J. POLK and ALICIA D. POLK, in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula, Montana, to wit: GROUND LEASE PARCEL A8, CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5715 BEING A PORTION OF LOT A OF CLARK FORK COMMONS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. AND THE LEASEHOLD ESTATE CREATED BY THE GROUND LEASE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CLARK FORK COMMONS, INC., AND SAMUEL J. POLK DATED SEPTEMBER 1, 2006. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 1401 Cedar St., Unit 16, Missoula, MT 59802. Said sale will be made in accordance with the statutes of the State of Montana, and the terms and provisions of: that certain Deed of Trust recorded September 1, 2006, in Book 782 at page 544, as Document No. 200622504 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, wherein SAMUEL J. POLK and ALICIA D. POLK are Grantors, FIRST INTERSTATE BANK is the named Beneficiary, and FIRST AMERICAN TITLE MISSOULA is the named Trustee; that certain Appointment of Successor Trustee dated August 21, 2009, and recorded August 24, 2009, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana, in Book 846 at page 412 as Document No. 200920967, wherein the Beneficiary substituted Trustee First American Title Missoula with Martin S. King, attorney at law, as Successor Trustee. This foreclosure is made because the Grantors, SAMUEL J. P0LK and ALICIA D. POLK, have defaulted in the terms of said Deed of Trust and the corresponding Promissory Note in that they have failed to pay the monthly payments and

otherwise defaulted on said Deed of Trust, and pursuant to the terms of the Deed of Trust, the Beneficiary has exercised its option to declare the full amount secured by such Deed of Trust immediately due and payable. That the principal sum now owing on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust is the sum of One Hundred Ten Thousand Three Hundred Seventy-eight and 07/100 Dollars ($110,378.07), together with interest at the note rate, until the date of sale. That on the date of sale, presuming no other payments are made and that the sale is not postponed, there will be due and owing the sum of One Hundred Ten Thousand Three Hundred Seventy-eight and 07/100 Dollars ($110,378.07) in principal; Six Thousand Five Hundred Ninety and 68/100 Dollars ($6,590.88) in interest; and Three Hundred Thirty-four and 22/100 Dollars ($334.22) in late fees, One Thousand Two Hundred Seventynine and 25/100 Dollars ($1,279.25) in escrow advances, totaling the sum of One Hundred Eighteen Thousand Five Hundred Eighty-two and 22/100 Dollars ($118,582.22), together with costs and expenses of foreclosure and related trustee fees, costs and attorney fees allowable by law. DATED this 26th day of August, 2009. /s/ Martin S. King, Successor Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA) :ss. County of Missoula). ON THE 26th day of August, 2009, before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of Trustee’s Sale as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana, Residing at Missoula. My commission expires January 24, 2012

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS NOTICE Yellowstone County is requesting proposals for Planning and Engineering Services to complete an evaluation of flood hazard and groundwater conditions in the West Billings area to develop a preferred, integrated solution for control of the 100-year flood, stormwater management, and groundwater recharge; and to update the current Yellowstone County Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan to meet all of FEMA’s current standards and requirements. Proposals shall be received addressed to City-County Planning Division, 510 North Broadway, 4th Floor, Billings, MT 59101, Wyeth Friday, AICP, Planning Division Manager, by 5:00 PM on Friday, December 11, 2009. The full RFP document may be accessed at www.ci.billings.mt.us/planning and additional information regarding this project can be obtained by contacting Wyeth Friday, AICP, Planning Division Manager, at fridayw@ci.billings.mt.us , via telephone at (406) 247-8660, or in person at the City-County Planning Division, 510 North Broadway, 4th Floor, Billings, MT 59101. Proposers may withdraw their proposal either personally or by written request at any time prior to the due date set for receiving proposals. No proposal may be withdrawn or modified after the due date and time, unless and until the award of the contract is delayed for a period exceeding ninety (90) days. The right is reserved by Yellowstone County to reject any or all proposals received, to waive irregularities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed ninety (90) days, and to accept that proposal which is in the best interests of Yellowstone County, Montana. Award of any contract(s) is contingent upon approval by Yellowstone County. Yellowstone County is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Lease Special! Every lease comes with a one-year gift of membership to Costco! GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com

tive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

CIAL FOR 3BDRM Missoula Property Management- 251-8500

Wolf Glen Apts. 1-2-3 bdrms, W/D included, dishwasher, $600-$850 NO APP FEES, $250 MOVE-IN SPE-

HOUSES

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1213 Cleveland –B $575 1bd/1ba, HEAT PAID, off-street parking, storage, coin-ops onsite. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$585 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups,

Professional Property Management

Find your new home with PPM ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990 New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent! Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

Rent $850. 721-

733 W Sussex #2 HEAT PAID! 2bd/1ba off-street parking, coin-ops, storage $650 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

Expect the best from

MISSOULA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500 Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competi-

Plum Property Management 406-493-1349 Relax! We’ve got you covered.

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

1&2

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Great Space Main St. Historic Building

1000 sq. ft.

251- 4707

for Gallery, Offices (?).

1 BD Apt 2026 9th St. $525/mo.

543-8723

Lease Special! Every lease comes with a one-year gift of membership to Costco! GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com

COMMERCIAL ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

1 BD Apt New carpet 119 Johnson $470/mo. PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $575/mo. 2 BD Duplex 1240 South 3rd St. $615/mo. 2 BD 2 Bath 4905 Lower Miller Creek $865/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

GardenCity Property Management

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com

Specializing in single family homes & horse properties in Missoula, Lolo, Florence & Stevensville.

3320 Great Northern Ave. Next to Costco FLEXIBLE LEASE TERMS

Amenities include: - Washer/Dryer - Air Conditioner - Energy Efficient Heat - Dishwasher Newer Jr. 1 Bd apartments at an Affordable Price

Rent: $495 - $555 Call PPM for details

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

4 0 6- 2 4 1 - 0 0 95 w w w .k i n gpm .c o m

543-1500

www.gcpm-mt.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 November 26–December 3, 2009


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

d s

REAL ESTATE

"Initial Reaction"--letters, not words.

by Matt Jones

Job Seeker?

HOMES FOR SALE 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $135,000. MLS#906610. Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics 2 Bedroom ground level condo with patio and private backyard. Convenient and economical living. One owner—immaculate. New to market! 2904 Tina Avenue #203. MLS# 908154. $145,000 JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

ACROSS 1 Numerical classification of some World War II U-boats 8 Necklace pieces 13 Butt 14 Person who keeps count 16 The U.S., in Mexican slang 17 Valentine sentiment to the 8089% crowd? 18 Actor Delon 19 "What ___ mind reader?" 21 "___ Tu" (hit 1973 song in Spanish) 22 Football, abroad 24 Mork's home planet 25 John Irving's "The World According to ___" 26 Thankful thought toward a universal blood type? 29 TV "Science Guy" Bill 30 Play the part 31 Mrs., in Madrid 32 Cloud shaped like a small Roman numeral? 36 Key on a PC 37 St. with many keys 38 Cross-country travelers 41 Tagline of a rap-oriented cologne slogan? 46 Pitcher Hershiser 47 Fair-hiring abbr. 48 Thing of little imporance 49 Skylab launcher 50 Hit for the Kinks 52 Current capital of Nigeria 53 Hassle at the local community gym? 55 Destroyer 57 Leaves stranded 58 Like some sea bass 59 ___ firma 60 Makes melancholy

Last week’s solution

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

DOWN 1 Crime against one's country 2 Like old newspaper, color-wise 3 Grand style 4 Strong nickname for Beethoven's Third Symphony 5 Surname of four generations of French painters in the Louvre 6 Savings acct. figure 7 Brainchild 8 Capital city of Mali 9 TV Tarzan and game show host Ron 10 Lesson taught through symbolism 11 Class project in a box 12 Harsh 14 Car in the Beach Boys' "Fun, Fun, Fun" 15 Bodily system that includes the lungs: abbr. 20 Term used in taste-testing 23 "Seacrest out" speaker 27 Columbus Day mo. 28 "For shame!" noise 32 It sets things apart 33 Critical hosp. wing 34 Right angle-shaped pipe 35 Winter spread? 36 Ugly statue, e.g. 38 Runaway from another country, perhaps 39 "Les Miserables" surname 40 Bear ___ (company in 2008 economic news) 41 Reach for 42 1997 biopic about a late Tejano singer 43 North Africans disputed in a "Seinfeld" Trivial Pursuit question 44 Pregnant 45 Like vulgar humor 46 Ender for "pseud-" 51 Rainbow shapes 54 Opposite of vert., on old TVs 56 "I get it now!" ©2009 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0442.

Find the perfect fit in our print or online employment ads

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com 4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin &

Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

Great business opportunity! Live in your home and earn income. 2 bed, 2 bath modular home on one acre. Sixty-two 10’ X 15’ storage rental units which rent for $50 per month. $489,900. MLS#905520. Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12597 for pics

www.mindypalmer.com

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS LOLO HOME WITH PRIVATE LAKE FRONTAGE. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage. New roof, new interior & exterior paint, new baths, wrap-around covered porch, tons of storage. $339,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10.7 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy

RICE TEAM

www.mindypalmer.com

GREAT DOWNTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Need help finding your Dream Home? Call Beverly Kiker @ Prudential Missoula. (406) 544-0708 New

land/home

package

Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 One owner - built 10 years ago, 5 acres on a branch of the Clark Fork. Trout & ducks. House sits towards water. Private showings only. $679,999. MLS#906926. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com PRICE REDUCED! New home in Riverwalk Estates with no steps and easy maintenance, 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6549 Kiki Court, Missoula. $329,500. MLS#808566. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit...

in

www.mindypalmer.com

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413

AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

missoulanews.com Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Grant Creek Log home on 26+ private acres $525,000

Borders Lolo National Forest. Ski out your back door, drive 10 minutes to Snowbowl Ski area, or take a hike in 3 different directions in the summer! Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula!The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin!

Privacy, Fruit Trees & Views MLS# 907106 • $209,000

Missoula Properties

Kevin & Monica Ray 1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 November 26–December 3, 2009

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

4BD/2BA home on nearly one acre. Hardwood floors, fireplace, carport, heated shop, additional outbuilding, basketball court, wonderful deck. An easy drive from Missoula! www.SaintMarysLakeRoad.com

207.1185 • 822.7653

www.11815benchrd.com

Rochelle Glasgow www.YourMT.com

Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walkin closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 2006 CHAMPION 16x80 MOBILE. Purchased 2007. Like new inside/out. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, large master, a/c, vinyl siding skirting front steps. Great Falls. 949-0836. $45,000

LAND FOR SALE 19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $89,900 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Message:12890 for pics 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Joy Earls 5 Acres & a 4 Bedroom Home on a branch of the Clark Fork-all on 3rd Street! One Owner built this home 10 yrs ago-catch fish from your back yard & enjoy a secluded setting across the water. $679,999 MLS# 906926 Call for a private showing.

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $324,900 MLS# 901478 Janet 532-7903/Robin 2406503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595

Nice 1+ acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. Close to fishing, golfing, park and shopping on Reserve. Sale contingent of final plat approval. $99,999. MLS#908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics

Tanning Salon $65,000- Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

COMMERCIAL

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

3 Quizno’s Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! $650,000Missoula, MT. Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753.

OUT OF TOWN

land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 3707689, Prudential Missoula.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-Bankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-999-4809. Info@creativefinance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Lorin & Amy Peterson

a father daughter team The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 priscillabrockmeyer.com

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223 www.LorinAndAmy.com

Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900

Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. This home has been well cared for and has many updates such as paint, appliances, lighting, A/C and underground sprinklers. This home is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large insulated/sheet rocked garage plus a huge storage shed for over flow. There is a master bedroom, plus 2 additional bedrooms and a full bath. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. Call today for your private showing. MLS# 907496

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

• Cute 2 bdrm mobile on 4 acres • Large double detached garage • Irrigation well on property • Owner financing available OAC • $169,900 • MLS# 905771 Text:44133 Message: 12884 for pics

• Bonner area 5 Bed / 2 Bath on 2 acres • Large kitchen w/ island • Chain link fence in front yard • Private deck in back, mature trees • $219,900 • MLS#906641 Text:44133 Message: 12591 for pics

• Cute little log cabin on 6.822 acres • Great hunting area, w/ great views • Well is in but need pump & generator • Snowmobile access in the winter • $99,900• MLS#906247 Text:44133 Message: 12590 for pics

• 23645 Mullan / Huson • Beautiful 14 acre parcel • Meadow with trees & pasture • Modulars or double wides ok • $184,900• MLS#906774 Text:44133 Message: 12881 for pics

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 November 26–December 3, 2009


USDA Organic Sweet Potatoes & Yams

Hutterite Holiday: Turkeys, Geese, & Chickens

89¢

lb.

Miller Lite 16 oz. Cans

$2.19

$7.99

12 pack

16 oz.

Pillsbury Brownie Mix

USDA Organic Yellow Onions

59¢

Arriba Salsa Ranch Dip

lb.

Pabst, Rainier

$13.99

24 pack

88¢ 19.5 oz.

Zacky Farms All Natural Young Turkey Breast

$1.59

lb.

USDA Organic Celery

Pacific Foods Buttery Sweet Corn Soup

89¢

$1.39

lb.

Bohemian Highway California Wine

$4.69

16 oz.

.75 liter

Smart Chicken 93% Lean Grain Fed Ground Chicken

$1.29

Mexican Mangos

Banquet Dinners

2

88¢

For

$3

8-10 oz.

Chicken Bowtie Pasta Salad

$4.99

10 oz.

lb.

Earthbound Farms Organic Romaine Hearts

$2.99

Montana Red Potatoes 5 lb. Bag

2

For

$3

Western Family Frozen Orange Juice

99¢

Sunflower Seed Bread

$1.99

loaf

12 oz.

3 pack

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188



Missoula Independent