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Up Front: Yellowstone set to make bank off bioprospectors Ochenski: Montana’s sordid history with Goldman Sachs Scope: DeMeng brings the dead to life in Dusty Diablos


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MISSOULA

Up Front: Yellowstone set to make bank off bioprospectors Ochenski: Montana’s sordid history with Goldman Sachs Scope: DeMeng brings the dead to life in Dusty Diablos


Missoula Independent

Page 2 April 22–April 29, 2010


nside Cover Story Forty years after the inaugural Earth Day, environmental activists are ratcheting up the call to protect the planet. We profile a few different ways locals are instituting change, from radical activism to broad-based collaboration ...........................................14 Cover illustration by Kou Moua

News Letters Physician-assisted death, wolves and Tester .................................................4 The Week in Review Drag racing, medical pot and “The Price is Right” .................6 Briefs Brucellosis, The Florence and Food Not Bombs ............................................6 Etc. UM announces bold—and expensive—Climate Action Plan ...............................7 Up Front Yellowstone set to make bank off bioprospectors .....................................8 Up Front State cuts women’s treatment center beds, not men’s ..............................9 Ochenski Montana has sordid history with Goldman Sachs ..................................10 Writers on the Range Catching the burbling air show in Choteau........................11 Agenda Support Aerie International.......................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Slow boat shopping......................................................................19 Happiest Hour Reno Casino....................................................................................20 Ask Ari Grassroots garden........................................................................................21 8 Days a Week Staging a sit-in on our couch..........................................................22 Mountain High YMCA’s Riverbank Run ...................................................................33 Scope DeMeng pays tribute to Mexican traditions in new book.............................34 Noise Eighteen Individual Eyes, David Morgenroth, The Used and Chris Sand..........................................................................................35 Soundcheck Young, old turn out for Buddy DeFranco Festival .............................36 DVD Environmental flicks for the Earth Day viewer................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................38

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold EDITORIAL INTERN Kyle Lehman CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367

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Page 3 April 22–April 29, 2010


STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked on the corner of Main Street and Higgins Avenue Tuesday morning.

Q:

Thursday, April 22, marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. How do you plan to celebrate? Follow-up: Do you think our country is doing enough to help preserve the planet?

Jerry Hogan: I’m going to get on my motorcycle and enjoy the beautiful weather—my bike gets 50 mpg! Big Rig Country: No. There’s a lot of government regulation in place for pollution, but I think there’s more that could be done. Even in Missoula there are so many SUVs and very few hybrids.

Dan Conner: I’m going to pick up astronomical amounts of trash around Missoula with a group of friends. There’s a lot of trash by the bike path under the Madison Street bridge. Glass hole: No, definitely not. Even in our own town we don’t recycle glass bottles!

Mark Aagenes: I plan on celebrating by trying to save Montana’s rivers from irresponsible development. More is more: Never. We should always strive to do more. I think it’s important to think globally and act locally. Improving Montana will help everywhere else.

Lora Gustafson: This month I ordered recycled yoga mats for the Bikram’s Yoga Studio and Sweat Mate yoga bags so people don’t have to use plastic bags. Lil’ effort here: No. For example, it’s even too difficult to recycle, which is ridiculous for a town of this size.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 April 22–April 29, 2010

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Help is homicide The pro-assisted-suicide organization Compassion and Choices (C&C) is telling Montana doctors that they face no penalties for assisting suicides. But its statements are contradictory. C&C attorney Kathryn Tucker called it “shameful” to warn suicide doctors that they face possible murder charges. But C&C President Barbara Combs Lee refused to identify actual suicides “to prevent investigations into the cases.” Watch what C&C does, not what it says. Nothing in the Montana Supreme Court’s decision prevents prosecutors from investigating and charging suicide-assisters with murder. Under the decision, assisting a suicide continues to be defined as homicide. The court merely said that in some narrow circumstances a physician might (or might not) be able to raise a “consent defense.” But a consent defense is for defendants already charged with murder. In real life, suicides involve patients who suffer pressures, abuse, impaired decision-making and other vulnerabilities that don’t even qualify as “consent.” And nothing prevents lawsuits against doctors and institutions over those messy details. Jeff Laszloffy President Montana Family Foundation Laurel

Respect wolves I have attended wolf panel discussions and hearings, read op-eds and articles, and done my own scientifically based research. I would like to share what I have learned. Introducing wolves into the ecosystem does not even begin to compare to what the Europeans did to the buffalo to starve the natives. I heard that from a hunter, with obviously very poor hunting skills, in a panel discussion last night. What it does compare to is what the Europeans did to the wolf that caused a reintroduction to be necessary to begin to rebalance the ecosystem. Yes, the wolf is native to the area. No, the domestic livestock is not. The domestic livestock is why the natives of all species were driven off the land, for some to the point of extinction, and others, who were able to endure, have been struggling ever since. Many members of the ranching community who state they are third or fourth generation ranchers have refused to learn how to live with the native inhabitants of the land and insist on getting handouts for their negligence. Instead of handing out money that taxpayers are being forced to foot, how about handing out education so

they can take responsibility for their insistence on remaining in a place that they refuse to learn how to live in harmony with? The numbers state that ranchers lose over 90 percent of their livestock to weather, disease and reproductive complications, not wolves. The native wildlife has been overcome with disease, bullets and poison so invasive, non-native livestock can continue to destroy the ecosystem they were brought into. Elk numbers are up! “Nationally, elk numbers grew 44 percent, from about 715,000 to over 1,031,000, between 1984 and 2009. Montana herds are 66 percent

Nothing “ in the Montana Supreme Court’s decision prevents prosecutors from investigating and charging suicideassisters with

murder.

larger, Wyoming is up 35 percent, and Idaho is up 5 percent,” wrote the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation on April 27, 2009. Why can’t the hunters see them? Wolves make prey scatter, and elk are not grazing in big numbers in wide open spaces any more. This actually improves the landscape and allows the browsed vegetation to recover. Wolves balance the ecosystem, keeping numbers in check. These wolves are not the big imported species that some claim they are. An Idaho Department of Fish & Game wolf expert says the average weight of the 188 wolves shot by hunters in Idaho averaged less than 100 pounds. The wolves are back in their territory, not yours. This is good for the health of the ecosystem. Respect should be given, not death. Jennifer Nitz Missoula

Bad precedent Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act is the first step toward dissolving 100-plus years of comprehensive national forest management acts and regulations. While there are many Montanans who welcome this, I, for one, do not. Choosing selected interest groups to create a management plan for any national forest, calling it a collaboration and then trying to find a way to get it through the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to include in an Omnibus Bill so as not to be scrutinized by the rest of Congress is politics as usual. I thought Sen. Tester was not going to buy into such politics and now, here he is the leader behind it. National forests are public lands to be managed for a variety of benefits. Those benefits are not just for the people within the locale of the particular national forest or those who make a living through the wood products industry. Nor are the national forests of Montana just for the benefit of Montanans. They benefit our nation as a whole through opportunities for sustaining healthy watersheds and ecosystems, enjoying scenic beauty and wilderness, creating a myriad of recreation activities that sustain economies, providing wood products and much more. Allowing a chosen few interests to decide how and which parts of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge, Three Rivers and Lolo National Forests will be managed without even including the natural resource professionals of the Forest Service, who manage those lands, turns our public national forests into “regional interest forests.” If Tester’s bill were to pass, it will no doubt set precedent for the creation of other regional interest forests throughout the United States. Forty-two of 50 states have national forest lands administered by the Forest Service. Tester’s bill states that one of its purposes is to reduce gridlock and promote local collaboration in national forest management. Rather than creating this end run around the agency ascribed to manage these lands, begin with including the natural resource professionals of the Forest Service at the collaborative table to find a means to do this without compromising the integrity of the national forest system as a whole. Send this act back to the drawing board. National forest lands are public lands not just for a few selected interest groups of Montana or any other state. Ellie Sigrist Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 April 22–April 29, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, April 14

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Missoula Mayor John Engen signs historic anti-discrimination legislation that provides legal recourse to individuals denied employment, housing or services based on sexual orientation or gender expression. The law becomes the first in the state to provide such protections.

• Thursday, April 15 Bernice’s Bakery co-owner Marco Littig appears on the CBS game show “The Price is Right” and wins a trip for two to New Zealand, among other prizes. Host Drew Carey does little to curry favor among Missoula’s coffee crowd when he congratulates an ecstatic Littig by saying, “Close down the bakery! Close down the bakery! [You’re] going to New Zealand!”

• Friday, April 16 Dena Mueller, 49, loses control of her Buelle motorcycle on Highway 12 west of Lolo, is thrown from her bike, slams into a pole and suffers a fatal neck injury. After efforts to revive Mueller fail, emergency responders declare her dead at the scene.

• Saturday, April 17 University of Montana sophomore Katrina Drennen cruises to a new school record in the women’s 1500 meters during the Montana Open at Dornblaser Field. Drennen’s time of 4:24.23 breaks the 11-yearold record by less than a second and, when adjusted for the altitude, ranks 12th in the West Region.

• Sunday, April 18

An employee with A1 Custom Fence—he declined to give his name—installs “a few hundred feet” of new fencing on the beach below the Deer Creek Road bridge in East Missoula Sunday afternoon. The employee explained his client doesn’t want to block beach access, but does want to prevent beachgoers from using his property as a latrine.

Downtown Lofty dreams for The Florence

After allegedly drinking at area bars, Mary Seabury, 52, races a motorcyclist in her red Corvette on Highway 10. The race allegedly reaches speeds of over 100 mph before Seabury crashes into a fire truck driven by Missoula Rural Fire Chief Tom Ziegler.

• Monday, April 19 Kalispell City Council votes 7-1 to ban any new medical marijuana businesses within city limits. The council essentially defers to federal law—under which marijuana remains an illegal drug—out of fear that doing otherwise might jeopardize the city’s shot at federal grants and loans.

• Tuesday, April 20 The Montana Department of Transportation presents local officials with its environmental assessment of ExxonMobile/Imperial Oil’s plans to transport truckloads of equipment through Missoula. The company aims to begin shipping 150-ton loads through town this fall on the way to Canadian oil fields.

For nearly 40 years, Bob Minto has worked doggedly to uphold The Florence’s reputation as a key business space in downtown Missoula. And last week he announced his loftiest goal yet: To turn the historic building back into a premier hotel. Out-of-towners shouldn’t get too excited about booking a room yet, though. Minto, acting president and CEO of the ALPS Corporation, stresses that the idea is still in the feasibility stage. The earliest The Florence could reopen as a hotel, he says, would be 2013. “What we’re doing today is spreading the pieces of the puzzle on the table,” Minto says. “We’re going to start putting the puzzle together to see what the picture is. Right now we’re still trying to find all the pieces.” At least one large piece is already in place. Minto lists the businesses currently occupying the first floor—Red Bird Wine Bar, Catalyst Café and Two Sisters Catering—as a ready-made infrastruc-

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ture of upscale hotel services. Several years ago, ALPS Corp. even restored the lobby space to how it appeared in the 1940s. Minto says turning the upper floors into hotel rooms is the “logical extension of that.” Minto is hardly the first to recognize the opportunity for a boutique hotel in downtown Missoula. Local businessman Mike Ellis had similar plans for the space at 139 East Main Street in late 2008. Indeed, Minto’s sudden interest in the idea in January was sparked by a conversation with Ellis over the closure of Macy’s. Now the two have thrown in together, with Ellis’ space offering a new home for businesses displaced by The Florence project. “It’s cooperative, it’s coordinated,” Ellis says. “It becomes one larger project instead of two smaller ones going their own ways.” Yet the odds at present seemed stacked against such a large financial gamble. According to the Missoula Downtown Association, five businesses have closed in the downtown area since January; only one has opened in that time. Ellis and Minto still see opportunity, but agree that the project will

Page 6 April 22–April 29, 2010

406.549.9244

be abandoned if it doesn’t work for the community. “If it isn’t a good deal,” Minto says, “it’s not going to happen.” Alex Sakariassen

Police Chief wants more turf Police Chief Mark Muir called on City Council to pass an emergency ordinance that would give the Missoula Police Department authority to arrest people up to five miles outside city limits. Muir says he’s proposing the ordinance because his department has been challenged in policing jurisdictional gray areas. As it stands, Missoula officers must travel through pockets of county land—overseen by the County Sheriff ’s Department—to arrive at annexed city territory. The proposed ordinance would help law enforcement do its job more efficiently, Muir says, while freeing his staff from potential civil lawsuits stemming from jurisdictional confusion. Blurry boundaries become more conspicuous this time of year, as warm weather lures partying


Letters

Briefs

teens to the beach off Deer Creek Road bridge. That beach east of Missoula is officially county turf, but just adjacent to city land. According to Muir’s referral to City Council, “Missoula residents have been persistently plagued by illegal, immoral, obscene and threatening behaviors from individuals who frequent this area outside the edge of city limits.” If City Council approves the law, city police would be able to clamp down on illegal activity there and in other tricky fringe areas. The county’s top law enforcement officer, Sheriff Mike McMeekin, says he’s evaluating Muir’s proposal before signing off. Meanwhile, others have expressed concerns about the proposal, including Councilman Bob Jaffe and commenters on his city government listserv, an e-mailed news bulletin that keeps locals abridged of council activity. Janet Stevens Donahue, a former Missoula County commissioner and retired chief administrative officer for the city, wrote on the listserv—and reiterated to the Independent—that it’s not smart to give municipal employees extra work during the current fiscal crisis. “It doesn’t make sense to me for the city to take on more responsibilities when we can barely handle our own responsibilities within the city’s limits,” she wrote. “I would be interested to understand more about why the police department feels the need for the five-mile jurisdictional area expansion. Surely there must be more to it than a teenage party in Deer Creek.” City Council plans to hold a public meeting to discuss the matter May 3. Jessica Mayrer

Brucellosis Legislator aims at elk As the number of elk infected with brucellosis in and around Yellowstone National Park rises—and with it the threat of the ungulate spreading the disease to domestic cattle—a Montana legislator seeks to aggressively manage elk the same way the state does bison. Sen. Debby Barrett, R-Dillon, has requested a draft bill, LC0029, to “Expand the bison management plan to include other wildlife.” The bill has yet to be written, but Barrett says expanding the Interagency Wildlife Management Plan—a 10-year-old pact among the National Park Service, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP), U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and Montana Department of Livestock (DOL)—could give Montana’s livestock

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

industry influence over elk management in the state. Barrett says that under her proposal the DOL wouldn’t manage elk, per se, but it would manage brucellosis, giving the agency influence over FWP’s elk management. “Diseases in wildlife are detrimental to livestock, wildlife and humans and they have to be addressed,” Barrett says, “especially in Montana where we have a constitutional right to a clean and healthy environment—and that means everyone, even livestock producers.” Elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem appear to be increasingly affected by brucellosis, a bacterial infection that causes cattle, elk and bison to abort their young. In late March, a U.S. Geological Survey study showed that the prevalence of the disease among the region’s more than 100,000 freeranging elk was between 8 and 20 percent in 20062007, up from 0 to 7 percent in 1991-1992. Montana’s billion-dollar cattle industry lost its

Ha rd er

Inside

ha yC ob t o Ph

d

brucellosis-free status in 2008 after cattle infections were discovered. Wildlife managers suspect elk caused the infections. The state regained the brucellosis-free status last July. While transmission of brucellosis from bison to cattle has never been documented in the wild, state and federal agencies have largely focused their efforts on bison. The animals have been hazed, quarantined and slaughtered to ensure that they don’t infect cattle. “We can’t haze the elk and do all of that stuff,” Barrett says, “but we have to address this disease.” Multiple FWP wildlife managers declined to comment before seeing a draft of the proposed legislation. Matthew Frank

Health Controversial cuisine A weekly vegetarian potluck outside the Missoula County Courthouse has sparked a civil lib-

Agenda

News Quirks

erties flap between local health officials and a decentralized group of peace activists called Food Not Bombs. The Missoula City-County Health Department confirms two inspectors approached Food Not Bombs during its weekly gathering Sunday evening and asked members to stop serving food. According to Environmental Health Supervisor Shannon Therriault, any organization that serves food to the public must have a service permit and pass a citycounty review. “We have a responsibility to enforce the state law and regulations in a fair and consistent manner,” Therriault says. “That’s what we intend to do, and ultimately it’s to protect the public’s health.” Food Not Bombs, which has been regularly sharing homemade meals since September, refused to comply with the inspectors’ requests. Now health officials are planning their next course of action, which could involve local law enforcement. “They’ve actually threatened police interference,” says group member Robbie Herbert. “But we’re going to continue regardless. We believe we are legally in the clear.” Herbert refers to the weekly Food Not Bombs event as an “open potluck,” and says that many of the 20-some people who show up are steady group members. The group has seen a significant number of homeless or impoverished individuals come, but Herbert says they are in no way competing with or critical of established service providers like the Poverello Center. “We believe that there is more than enough food for everyone in the world,” Herbert says. “The only problem is someone else owns it.” In response to the health department’s intervention, Herbert says Food Not Bombs has consulted local attorneys and contacted the Missoula chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. He says the issue comes down to the group’s right to peaceably assemble. But Therriault is far more concerned with the potential public health risk posed by Food Not Bombs. Roughly 105 million people suffer from food-borne illness nationwide each year, she says. Her job is to prevent such cases from striking Missoula. “I think the public really does have an expectation that when food is served to them it will be safe to eat,” Therriault says. “Especially when it’s provided in a public venue.” As for Herbert, he says if the cops do stop by this Sunday, they’re welcome to a meal. Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

$62,000

Cost to the Montana University System for hiring a Washington, D.C., consulting firm to aid a 20member committee in the search for President George Dennison’s replacement.

etc. Worldwide buzz this week has focused largely on Earth Day’s 40th anniversary, and the University of Montana—that bastion of the environmentally conscious—is no exception. The crown jewel of UM’s eco-orgy was the much-anticipated release of its Climate Action Plan, an intense study into how the school can radically reduce its contribution to climate change. The university’s annual emissions output has increased significantly in the past decade, from 35,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2000 to just under 50,000 in 2007. UM predicts that, if no action is taken, the school’s greenhouse gas emissions will double by 2050. That’s exactly why UM President George Dennison three years ago made a seemingly outrageous vow to make his alma mater carbon neutral by 2020. With the plan now officially announced, the university is one step closer to that goal. But like most UM projects, this one comes with a few head-scratchers. For instance, it could cost as much as $94 million up front and $190,000 annually for the foreseeable future. A statewide financial crunch for the Montana University System makes the numbers all the more daunting. We suppose Dennison never said going green would be cheap. Dennison did say carbon neutrality would mean major changes for how UM operates on a daily basis, and a look at the plan reveals just how major. There’s mention of the proposed four-day workweek, a quick-and-dirty way to cut energy consumption that’s already been well covered—and widely panned. Still, Dennison continues to push a UM task force to determine its feasibility. There’s also talk of transportation issues. Commuting and air travel account for 31.6 percent of UM’s total greenhouse gas output. Roughly 4,900 students drive to campus daily. According to the plan, if 5 percent of those students commuted by bus, the university as a whole would drive 132,000 fewer miles a year. The strategy to switch those drivers into riders: promoting the bus. Two big-ticket items also caught our attention. First, a wood-fired boiler and off-campus biomass plant—valued at $54 million—would replace natural gas powered steam-based heating. Then, off-campus wind turbines—with a price tag of about $30 million—would replace purchased electricity. Now, we’re the first to salute UM’s accomplishment in drafting a Climate Action Plan. The more efficiently our neighbors at the university can run, the better. This plan clearly states why there’s a problem, and what the solutions may be, but ignores the how—as in, How on God’s not-quite-as-green Earth do you plan on paying for any of this? That multi-million dollar question hangs over the plan’s promise like a cloud of soot.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 April 22–April 29, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Park profits Yellowstone set to make bank off bioprospectors by Matthew Frank

In 2001, Lucigen, a Wisconsin-based molecular biology company, began ladling thermophilic microorganisms out of Yellowstone National Park’s famed geothermal pools to identify and isolate new enzymes. These enzymes, explains Lucigen CEO and founder David Mead, “make DNA diagnostics better, faster and cheaper, or breakdown biomass into sugar so you can convert it into fuel better, faster and cheaper.” Over the last nine years, Lucigen has commercialized products derived from microorganisms that thrive in Yellowstone’s thermal features, including PyroPhage 3173 DNA Polymerase (patent pending). But the

there is a corporate pot of gold at the end of the rainbow,” says Jeff Ruch, director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). Ruch takes issue with the new policy, pointing to a stipulation that keeps secret the royalty rates paid to parks. He also says that because profits from commercial activity would go to individual parks (unlike other park-generated revenues), it creates a financial incentive for park officials to seek out corporate partners. “That’s one of the things that is so pernicious about this,” Ruch says. More than that, Ruch calls it “mystifying” that the park service would decide to

Photo courtesy Yellowstone National Park

The National Park Service two weeks ago released its record of decision—more than a decade in the making—on “benefits-sharing,” a controversial policy allowing national parks to profit from commercial products derived from research conducted within their boundaries.

park, though it’s provided the biological material key to Lucigen’s and dozens of other researchers’ innovations, hasn’t been paid a penny. That will soon change. Two weeks ago, the National Park Service released its record of decision—more than a decade in the making—on “benefits-sharing,” a controversial policy allowing national parks to profit from commercial products or services derived from research originally conducted within their boundaries. “What this decision allows us to do,” says Tom Olliff, director of the Greater Yellowstone Network’s Inventory & Monitoring Program, “is to sign benefitssharing agreements with people who are bioprospectors. Bioprospecting has been legal [since the National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 1998]. The only thing that wasn’t legal for us to do was actually sign benefits-sharing agreements.” While researchers applaud the April 6 decision, critics say it amounts to a commercialization of national park resources and contravenes the mission of the National Park Service. “It’s sort of the park believing that

n— ial ed

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 April 22–April 29, 2010

classify each of its 270 units as “federal laboratories,” which under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 allows them to negotiate Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs). “The park service has chosen something that is really cumbersome and requires them to decide that each park is a laboratory,” Ruch says, “and it isn’t. It’s a park.” The issue of benefits-sharing first rose to the surface in 1966. Microbiologist Thomas Brock scooped a bacterium, later dubbed Thermus aquaticus, from a geothermal pool in Yellowstone and was able to isolate the organism’s unique ability to produce the heat-resistant enzyme TAQ polymerase. Nearly two decades later, after some genetic manipulation, the microorganism was patented. It earned the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Hoffman LaRouche millions of dollars. Yellowstone National Park never saw a dime. Then, in the mid-1990s, the park tried to profit. It entered into a CRADA with the San Diego-based company Diversa (since acquired by a company called Verenium), marking the park service’s first profit-sharing agreement with a private commercial inter-

est. That led to a lawsuit filed by environmental groups in 1998. The judge would ultimately rule—10 years ago this month—in favor of the park service, except on one point: He called the profit-sharing a “major federal action,” forcing the park to conduct an Environmental Assessment, then an Environmental Impact Statement. That document wasn’t completed until October 2009. All the while, Yellowstone officials fought the contention that the park was selling out. “I think people see it as a selling of park resources, rather than a scientific collection,” says Olliff. “And I think the name ‘bioprospecting’ kind of conjures up images of your grandpa up there with mules and picks and shovels. Nothing could be further from the real thing going on out there.” Today, according to Olliff, Yellowstone has six or seven permitted bioprospectors. The only commercial company is Lucigen. The rest are federal and university researchers. “We are just now gearing up to begin negotiations with CRADAs for some of these folks,” he says. Count Montana State University (MSU) in Bozeman among the potential profit partners. Technology Transfer Office Director Becky Mahurin says researchers at the school’s Thermal Biology Institute currently collect and study Yellowstone microbes to create products with industrial applications. The institute has already patented and licensed an organism that when used as a seed coating conveys a certain level of drought tolerance. “We don’t collect large samples,” Mahurin says. “We’re talking about a test tube amount of a sample taken from a hot pool. So were certainly not in any way, we believe, affecting the dynamics of Yellowstone, or even of that hot pool.” Lucigen’s Mead says his company has a similarly minimal impact. “We’re just taking stuff that normally falls in the river and goes out to the sea—no harm, no foul,” Mead says. “And there are a bunch of folks out there who think parks should be pristine and nobody should ever take anything from them. If that’s the case, they shouldn’t let any of [Yellowstone’s] millions of visitors in because they trample the crap out of it every year.” With the benefits-sharing policy finally finalized, opponents now can only hope new park profits might help mitigate that trampling. mfrank@missoulanews.com


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Cuts impact women’s treatment centers, but not men’s being eliminated. That means the current waiting list will only grow, and the facility will be forced to eliminate nearly one quarter of its clinical staff, according to Susan Carroll, Elkhorn’s chief operations officer. Elkhorn isn’t the only women’s treatment center experiencing the effects of a bleak state budget. Passages, a 155-bed facility in Billings that offers substance abuse treatment for female offenders, will also lose four beds. Two more beds are being cut from the Warm Springs

Photo by Chad Harder

The Elkhorn Treatment Center in Boulder offers a nine-month program for female meth addicts. The Department of Corrections announced earlier this month that four of the facility’s 40 beds were being eliminated.

from her. Convicted of one felony and one misdemeanor, Moritz earned a deferred sentence and was released. She used again. That earned her a six-week stint at the Montana Chemical Dependency Center in Butte. Always stubborn, Moritz resisted the treatment. “I came back out,” she says, “and on the way home I just used.” In 2008, the Montana Department of Corrections (DOC) sent Moritz to the Elkhorn Treatment Center in Boulder. The nine-month residential facility had opened nearly one year earlier as part of an effort to stem the tide of meth addicts flooding Montana jails. As the state’s only residential chemical dependency program that provides longterm treatment for women, Elkhorn offered Moritz a chance to finally rebound. That’s why the reformed addict, who now lives in Butte and says she’s stayed clean since leaving Elkhorn in December 2008, is so vocal about budget cuts that will directly impact the facility. The DOC announced earlier this month that four of Elkhorn’s 40 beds are

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Micki Moritz started using drugs at 10 years old. She says she smoked pot and heroin, popped pills and snorted speed, and with increased frequency as she got older. By the time she landed in jail 30 years later, the mother of two had an intravenous methamphetamine habit she couldn’t shake. “It was all day, every day,” she says, “several times a day.” In April 2007, Moritz was charged with drug possession and child endangerment. Her children, now 11 and 8, were taken

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Addictions Treatment and Change Program (WATCh) in Glendive, a felony DUI facility that primarily houses women. No beds are being eliminated from men’s treatment programs. The cumulative cuts will save the state $365,000. DOC Director Mike Ferriter says the decision is part of an effort to shave about $6.8 million off the agency’s 2011 budget, and boils down to an issue of space. “We have bed space at the women’s prison,” he says. “We don’t have bed space in the male side of the prison system. We felt we could manage these eight offenders in the women’s prison.” Ferriter went on to explain that, although the prison doesn’t offer an intensive program like Elkhorn’s, it does offer treatment to inmates. “I think we are very unique in the country, let alone the northwest, in terms of the emphasis and the length and the commitment that our taxpayers have made to meth treatment,” he says. Ferriter’s rationale, however, flies in the face of why facilities like Elkhorn are

created. Chandra Villanueva from the Women’s Prison Association, an organization that advocates for women in the criminal justice system, says prison is simply not equipped to deal with the root causes of drug addiction. “Prisons are not made to treat the underlying issues,” she says. “They don’t deal with why people go to jail.” In fact, the Women’s Prison Association cites the success of facilities like Elkhorn with helping to decrease repeat offenders and female prison populations across the nation. Montana’s female inmate population, for instance, decreased 1.2 percent in 2009 after more than three decades of exponential growth. Carroll says her facility’s focus on extended, in-depth treatment increases the likelihood of getting inmates out of the state’s system. “It takes a significant period of time for the brain to start healing itself,” Carroll says. “And because of that, shorterterm treatments aren’t always really effective. Sometimes it’s difficult in shorterterm treatment to address the chemical dependency issues when you have somebody who has a mental health illness as well. And so, this really does provide opportunities to stabilize our residents.” Moritz is one example of success. She says she fought every step of the program, and, due to her struggles, graduated a month late. But eventually the lessons sank in. “After I got out, it just kind of all came together, all of the tools and things that I learned,” she says. “I guess the thing that is really different is that when problems arise I don’t just run out and get crazy and blow up my life. I think about my choices and what I can do. And I’m able to make the right choices, which is, for me, really amazing because of where I came from and what I was doing.” Moritz says many of her peers simply never acquired the tools necessary to cope with everyday challenges. For her, there’s a simple answer to the problem of drug-related crime: provide a place where addicts can get clean long term, and teach them skills to overcome roadblocks. “I’m really thankful that there was somewhere I could learn,” she says. “If they want to make budget cuts, there are other places to do it. Turn the freakin’ cable off at the jail and build another treatment center.”

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Missoula Independent

Page 9 April 22–April 29, 2010


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FOUNDERS CONCERT - A Tribute to the Viola with guest artist Brett Deubner, viola also featuring SOR founding members and guests

SUNDAY, MAY 2, 2010, 7:30PM UM Music Recital Hall

Tickets are $20 general/$10 student and are available at Rockin Rudy’s, Fact & Fiction, Morgenroth Music Center, at the door and online at www.SORMT.org. Mr. Deubner will conduct a masterclass for UM students on Friday, April 30 from 3:00-5:00 in the UM Music Recital Hall. This event is FREE and open to the public.

Missoula Independent

Page 10 April 22–April 29, 2010

Settle the score Montana’s sordid history with Goldman Sachs The next big item on the Democrat’s agenda is financial reform. According to some, both the fate of the Obama administration and the outcome of this year’s midterm elections may well rest on tackling Wall Street’s biggest players in an attempt to prevent future fiscal meltdowns like the one that plunged the nation into its deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression. Not coincidentally, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) decided this week to charge one of the top investment banking firms, Goldman Sachs, with a civil suit alleging the company fraudulently misled investors in a snaky “heads I win, tails you lose” scheme. Unfortunately, it isn’t the first time Montanans have experienced this from Goldman Sachs. The tale begins in 2007, when the enormously profitable firm was selling collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) comprised of the risky mortgage-related securities many blame for bringing the nation to its knees. Goldman Sachs, says the federal government, didn’t tell investors that the CDOs were put together by a billionaire hedge fund manager in his 20s who was planning on making enormous profits by swindling clients who believed they were buying solid investments. As most folks know, the sale of these so-called “derivatives” has been blamed for the collapse of the too-big-to-fail firms. Yet, while millions of Americans were losing their jobs and homes, the federal government bailed out the banks and investment firms with nearly a trillion taxpayer dollars. By 2008, the derivatives and sub-prime mortgage markets were in shambles, plunging the nation into recession. Goldman Sachs, however, received $10 billion from the federal government in the belief that such firms deserved being saved from the vagaries of the much-touted free market economy. To make a long story much shorter, Goldman Sachs miraculously managed to survive. Having undoubtedly used the federal money to good purposes, it also reported a record $3.3 billion profit in the first quarter of this year and lavished billions in pay and bonuses on its employees and top executives. Astoundingly, the leading sector in reaping that enormous sum came from trading what are termed “risky assets”— exactly the target for the financial reform legislation being pushed forward by President Obama and the Democrat-dominated Congress. And once again, Republicans are wholeheartedly against the effort as they have been almost to an issue since Obama took office.

Some observers say the move to bust Goldman Sachs is politically motivated, pointing to the 3-2 vote by the SEC. The three Democrats on the commission voted to go forward with the suit, the two Republicans opposed it. As far as timing and the guts of the issue go, it’s probably safe to say the American public, including

Goldman “ Sachs made $20 million for its efforts in helping destroy MPC, devastating its investors and hosing Montana

consumers.

Tea Partiers, are more than weary of saving Wall Street’s high-flying investment banks—and particularly their penchant for risky assets—while the general populace continues to lose homes in record foreclosures, unemployment remains at record high levels and wages remain stagnant or declining. While reading the story in the paper this week, I just about blew coffee out my nose when Greg Palm, Goldman Sachs’ co-general counsel, was quoted as saying: “We would never intentionally mislead anyone.” Perhaps in other places and other times, such a statement could be taken at face value. But not here in Montana. For Montanans, the memory of the role Goldman Sachs played in the disastrous move to deregulate our utilities remains a very sore topic. If you weren’t around back in the late ’90s, here’s basically what happened. The Montana Power Company (MPC), owner of most of the hydroelectric dams on the state’s largest rivers as well as Colstrip’s coal-fired power plants, used to be a fully regulated, vertically integrated utility. What that means in plain language: The utility was allowed to pass its investment and maintenance costs on to

Montana customers and profit was capped at about 10 percent. Montanans had the seventh lowest electricity rates in the nation and the company did just fine. But in 1997, with Marc Racicot in the governor’s office and an aggressive young CEO named Bob Gannon at its helm, MPC and the Republican-dominated Legislature decided to pass a huge utility deregulation bill in the last days of the legislative session that, they said, would offer customers “choice” in purchasing utilities. Before the year was out, however, MPC was no longer among the “choice” Montanans had. After a century of operation as a conservative, stable corporation in which thousands of Montanans invested, the company announced it was selling its dams and coal-fired power plants to an out-of-state firm, Pennsylvania Power and Light, and reinventing itself as Touch America, a telecommunications business. Five years later, Touch America filed for bankruptcy, MPC stockholders and pensioners were devastated and now, tragically, Montanans pay the highest electricity rates in the region. In lawsuits filed by MPC stockholders, the truth finally came to light. As reflected in MPC’s board notes: “We retained Goldman, Sachs & Co. to assist us in the sale of our oil and natural gas businesses, coal businesses, independent power production business, and utility business. Goldman, Sachs also assisted us in the restructuring plan of our Company from an energy-related business to Touch America Holdings, Inc.” Goldman Sachs made $20 million for its efforts in helping destroy MPC, devastating its investors and hosing Montana consumers. But here’s the rub—while they were advising MPC on getting rid of its utilities in favor of becoming a telecom firm, Goldman Sachs was investing heavily in buying utilities. You can judge for yourself if Goldman Sachs decided to “intentionally mislead” MPC into selling its utility assets. But the far-reaching impacts of that decision continue to plague Montanans. Perhaps the national Republicans think opposing financial regulation is a winning position. But here in Montana, we have long memories—and it’s about time we somehow got even with Goldman Sachs and the rest of the Wall Street pirates. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Winged migration Catching the burbling air show in Choteau by Joanne Wilke

I was visiting Choteau with my friend, Bill, when a cheery checkout clerk said, “I bet you’re here for the geese.” Our blank looks confirmed our out-of-towner status. “Snow geese,” she said. “They’re migrating north again now.” She told us how plump Arctic birds gather by the thousands in the wheat fields near her home. She’ll get up at dawn, she said, and stand at her kitchen window. And then she’ll watch a handful of geese rise and circle, honking all the while, until more and more birds join them. Goose by goose, they spool upwards like cotton candy on a twirling stick, a beating tornado of white feathers, golden light and honking encouragement. “Oh, the sound!” she exclaimed. “The first time I ever saw them,” she said, “it was like a million diamonds in the sky. We stood there for the longest time before we figured out it was birds.” That was enough description for us. Armed with cameras and vague directions—“outside Fairfield, maybe near Freezeout Lake”— we headed into the endless golden prairie of northwestern Montana, where largely unfenced wheat fields are broken only by rivers called the Sun, the Teton and the Missouri, and by the curve of the earth itself. Behind us loomed a sudden thrust of mountains, the Front Range, where rock cliffs fracture the prairie. Our silver car flew past flooded frozen plain, evening thunderclouds pressing in from every horizon. The first pond held more swans than we’d ever seen before, but we continued to the gravel turnoff and an icy blue expanse—and no geese. Then a high cry. In the distance, thin lines, wide, undulating. From tangled skeins, woven white and spiraling, the lines

grew into sheets of geese, wave after wave, hundreds of them honking, burbling, wheeling, clamoring, so close I could see their eyes. They washed over us and away like a half-caught wild breath, quick and timeless at once. Afterwards I stood in the middle of the road, my camera dangling from its strap, caught between worlds. I hadn’t taken a single picture. You hear about passenger

“overTheyus washed and away like a half-caught wild breath, quick and timeless at

once.

pigeons and bison “plentiful as grains of sand,” darkening the sky or the plain. Now we had had a taste of this. Every spring, tens of thousands of snow geese migrate north from their wintering grounds in the southern United States to breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra, an annual roundtrip of 5,000 miles. Small towns all over the West are fortunate to get a taste of this thrilling migration. The Choteau geese fly mainly from the southwest and West Coast. They stop to rest in the area’s vast wheat fields, and to glean leavings from the previous fall’s harvest.

I flagged down a muddy pickup before it rolled away. The driver was weathered, middle-aged, with button-snap striped shirt and a palpable sense of calm. I asked, “Can you tell us where they’re going?” No introduction seemed necessary, no further explanation. “The wheat fields east of town,” he replied, his wife nodding, exuding the same comfortable peace. Bill and I headed east, generally, as the country road bent in right angles over undulating hills, washboard and gravel. We never agree on directions, my friend and I; he reads his maps upside down. Between us, we ended up somewhere out there, someplace we could never find again at a T in the road, on the verge of lost. We didn’t see it at first. Then, straight ahead, pale wheat stubble as the sun drew low and the sudden clamor and abundance of irrepressible migrating life, fields of snow geese. I stepped from the car and the white rippled. Two steps closer and a thousand birds rose in a wall, a chorus, wings and cries deafening, beautiful, heartbreaking. They swirled back around, directly over me, a blizzard of birds, a boiling, spilling vein. We watched the muted waterfall pour towards earth in the distance, then rise again, spurred by a dark coyote racing against the white backdrop. The sun set and still we watched, flock after flock like distant lightning storms against a blackened, pink-edged sky. Back at the hotel the manager said, “Oh, yeah, the birds. I grew up here and every year the birds come through. It’s just a part of it all.” Joanne Wilke is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She writes in Bozeman.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 April 22–April 29, 2010


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Missoula’s obvious passion for supporting and promoting the visual and literary arts extends well beyond the usual downtown hotspots and directly into our public schools. Case in point: Aerie International, Big Sky High School’s yearly arts magazine, which is designed and edited by students, and publishes poetry, prose, visual art and photography from high school students who live as near as Missoula and Helena, and as far away as Namibia. And since its debut in 2008, the mag has received some serious praise. This includes an award nomination from the Program to Recognize Excellence in Student Literary Magazines, an initiative created by the National Council of Teachers of English. But like similar endeavors of its kind, this baby

can’t stay financially afloat by itself. This week, you’ll be able to help out during a fundraiser that includes readings from local literary figures like Sandra Alcosser, Prageeta Sharma and David Allan Cates, as well as students. Add live jazz to the mix, along with international appetizers and desserts, and you’ve got what I’d call a recipe for literary success. —Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY APRIL 22

Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

The Missoula Branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and the Five Valleys Central Asia Institute present the AAUW used book sale, which runs from 10 AM–8 PM at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W. The sale continues from 10 AM–5 PM on Fri.-Sat. and from 10 AM–2 PM on Sun. All proceeds got to the Central Asia Institute. Call 829-3898 or 543-5975. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict mediation by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Get neighborly during Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features the workshop “Appreciative Inquiry, Community Building and Active Listening,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 552-6081 or by e-mailing Erin at escott@ci.missoula.mt.us.

FRIDAY APRIL 23 Honor a Missoulian who worked to keep our city safe during the UM School of Law Women’s Law Caucus and YWCA Missoula sponsored “JJudy Wang Memorial Silent Auction,” which runs from 5:30–9 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. Free. All money raised goes towards the YWCA Pathways Program and Judy Wang Scholarship Fund. The event also includes a display from the Silent Witness Project. Call 543-6691.

SATURDAY APRIL 24 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

SUNDAY APRIL 25 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP.

MONDAY APRIL 26 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Ae r i e I n t e r n a t i o n a l ’ s f u n d r a i s e r i s Thursday, April 22, from 5:30–7:30 PM at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. $25 per “family,” which can include up to three or four friends or family members. Call Lorilee at 7282401, x8644.

TUESDAY APRIL 27 Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 28 Enjoy some frozen lactose on the cheap and support local and national firefighters during Baskin-Robbins’ 31 Cent Scoop Night, which runs from 5–10 PM at Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream, 1880 Brooks St. Free to attend. Proceeds will be donated to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. Call Matt at 542-2731.

THURSDAY APRIL 29 Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict mediation by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Get neighborly during Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features “Overcoming Bureaucracy: A Panel,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 5526081 or by e-mailing Erin at escott@ci.missoula.mt.us. If you’d like to review and comment on the environmental — assessment for the Kearl Module Transport Project— which means Imperial Oil would haul over-dimension loads through Montana—then get to an open house which starts at 6 PM, with a presentation/public hearing at 6:30 PM, at Meadow Hill Middle School, 4210 S. Reserve St. Free. View the assessment at the Missoula Public Library, or online at mdt.mt.gov/pubinvolve/eis_ea.shtml.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 April 22–April 29, 2010


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Two men tried to rob a man coming out of a convenience store in Medford, Ore., but fled when their intended victim ran back inside the store to call police. Officers arrived and were investigating, when the would-be robbers returned in time for witnesses to point them out. Police arrested two suspects, 19 and 20 years old. Police looking for a man who stole two phones from a convenience store in Orem, Utah, apprehended suspect John White after he flagged down the investigating officers to ask for directions. They noticed that White matched the description given them by the store clerk and said the address he asked about was the same as that on a slip of paper the thief had left behind. WAR IS HELL - The U.S. military command in Afghanistan is shutting down fast-food outlets at Kandahar Airfield, claiming that Burger King, Pizza Hut, Dairy Queen, Orange Julius and T.G.I. Friday’s use valuable resources, like water and electricity that are needed to run an efficient military operation. “This is a war zone—not an amusement park,” Command Sgt. Maj. Michael T. Hall said. “Supplying nonessential luxuries to big bases like Bagram and Kandahar makes it harder to get essential items to combat outposts and forward operating bases, where troops who are in the fight each day need re-supply with ammunition, food and water.” Canadian coffee-and-doughnut outlet Tim Horton’s won’t be affected. “Kandahar Airfield Tim Horton’s is an initiative to support our men and women in uniform for serving in Afghanistan,” Canadian Defence Department official Megan MacLean said. “There are no plans to close the Tim Horton’s.” Canada’s troops are scheduled to leave the war zone in July 2011. After U.S. and Afghan troops killed two pregnant women and three other innocent civilians during a night raid on Gardez, Vice Admiral William McRaven, commander of Joint Special Operations Command, apologized to Mohammad Tahir, the father of one of the women and brother of two men killed, by offering him two sheep. Tahir, who had vowed to become a suicide bomber to avenge the deaths, accepted McRaven’s apology. MONKEY WITH A MONKEY ON ITS BACK - After spotting a rhesus macaque that has been loose in Florida’s Hillsborough and Pinellas counties for more than a year, authorities shot the monkey twice with tranquilizer darts, but it escaped again. “The drugs just don’t seem to affect him for whatever reason. We’ve increased the dosage every time that we’ve shot him,” wildlife rehabilitator Vernon Yates said. “What we’re really doing is turning him into a drug addict.”

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SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - A jury convicted Vernon Brandt, 52, of assaulting Richard Albers, 85, in a McDonald’s parking lot in Loveland, Colo., after Albers objected because Brandt parked in the older man’s regular spot. As Albers approached Brandt’s pickup truck and knocked on the window to complain, Brandt swung open the door, knocking Albers to the ground. Prosecutors noted that the two men had argued previously over Brandt’s use of the spot that Albers used almost daily for 16 years. CHUTZPAH - Facing grand larceny and identity-theft charges after embezzling more than $800,000 from the Kingston, N.Y., law firm where she worked as a bookkeeper, Mary Merton, 43, pleaded with the lawyers to let her keep her job. “I do not want to put you on the spot but I would ask that you consider keeping me employed,” Merten wrote to the firm’s Richard Riseley and Michael Moriello. “Not because of the money, but because I truly enjoy my job and want to continue to work for the both of you to make up for my imperfections.” A forensic accounting put the total stolen at $807,399, which court documents indicated Merten used for vacations, premium cable TV at her New Paltz home, manicures, dinners and a race car for her husband. THE EMPEROR’S NEW GYM - A new $25 million high school gym in Akron, N.Y., will need additional money to install privacy screens for the locker rooms, according to school board members. The vestibule-style entrances from both the gymnasium and a hallway are at the center of the male and female locker rooms, providing a glimpse of students moving from the showers on one side to the locker areas on the other. The entrances have automatic closing doors, but school board members Kevin Stone and Patricia Buckley said staff monitors couldn’t be counted on to be sure the doors aren’t held open. “The first time a person looks in there and sees a naked kid,” Stone said, “we’re going to have a problem.” Adding privacy screens for the vestibule entrances will cost about $1,000 each. WAY TO GO - After Michael Edwin Berg, 23, passed his court-ordered drug test, he went on a drinking binge that ended when he drank a shot glass full of liquid morphine and fell asleep. Thirteen hours later, friends found him dead. The Polk County, Fla., Medical Examiner’s Office said the morphine killed him. Robert Gary Jones, 38, was listening to his iPod while jogging along a beach in Hilton Head, S.C., when a single-engine aircraft making an emergency landing after losing its propeller struck him from behind and killed him. Pilot Edward Smith couldn’t see Jones because the plane’s windshield was covered with motor oil, and Jones couldn’t see or hear the plane because, Beaufort County Coroner Ed Allen said, it was “basically gliding.” Jeronymo Pereira, 30, died after jumping from two buildings in Champaign, Ill. “He busted out a window [of a high-rise apartment building] on the west side,” police Sgt. Jim Rein said. “He fell on the adjoining four-story building below, then he got up and jumped off that building, too. How in the world he gets up is beyond all of us.” SPOILSPORT OF THE WEEK - New York Assemblyman Felix Ortiz, D-Brooklyn, introduced a bill that would ban restaurants from using salt “in any form in the preparation of any food for consumption by customers.” Ortiz said the measure would give consumers “more control over the amount of sodium they intake.” Offenders face fines of $1,000 for each violation.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 April 22–April 29, 2010


ore than 40 years ago, U.S. Sen. Gaylord Nelson, DWisconsin, announced his vision for what he called the “National Environmental Teach-In.” Scintillating titles aside, Nelson was onto something. His idea was to raise awareness of the burgeoning environmental movement and address global conservation problems head-on. Spurred by Nelson’s announcement, the New York Times even said the issue “may be on its way to eclipsing student discontent over the war in Vietnam.” On April 22, 1970, about seven months after Nelson first mentioned his plan—and after colleagues convinced the senator of a much better

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name—the inaugural Earth Day drew approximately 20 million Americans to events across the country. More importantly, organizers claim the event helped foster the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water and Endangered Species acts. Not bad for a grassroots “teach-in.” Earth Day has surely grown over the past four decades. Earth Day Network, a nonprofit charged with broadening the environmental movement worldwide, boasts a global reach with more than 20,000 partners and organizations in 190 countries. According to the organization, more than 1 billion people participate in Earth Day activities now, mak-

ing it the largest secular civic event in the world. In Missoula alone, we counted more than a dozen different events this year, ranging from special documentary screenings to lectures on ecofriendly products. It’s easy to feel green these days. That’s all fine and good—heartwarming, even—but in the minds of many environmental advocates, Earth Day has outgrown the feel-good vibe of buying compact fluorescent light bulbs and reached a moment of apocalyptic recognition. Yeah, we’re going there. Whereas the Earth Day gatherings of Nelson’s generation were able to claim remarkable progress on the issue—heck, they passed three differ-


ent landmark acts under President Nixon—today’s science makes the case that we’ve fallen dreadfully behind the curve. Just look out the window: 60 percent of the Helena National Forest is infested with mountain pine beetles, the state’s springtime snowpack has declined 40 percent in the last halfcentury, and we may need to rename Glacier National Park considering its namesake could be gone as early as 2020. There’s more: The most dramatic ecological event we experience in the Northern Rockies is wildfires, and a 2006 peer-reviewed study found a link between global warming and the frequency and severity of the fires. We haven’t just fallen behind, some scien-

tists believe we’ve flat-out dropped out of the game. That said, we’re not without hope. NASA’s James Hansen, arguably the world’s leading climate scientist, points out that the earth’s natural systems absorb 43 percent of the world’s global CO2 emissions, a phenomenal fact in and of itself. Even more remarkable is the fact that if we reduce emissions by more than 57 percent, the earth’s natural systems will start to draw down atmospheric CO2 concentrations, heading us toward a cooler planet—think of it like taking a blanket off the globe. Look at it another way: We’re currently at 391 parts per million (ppm) CO2 in the atmosphere,

and that number rises a few points or so each year. If we get down to 350 ppm quickly, Hansen says we’ve more or less dodged the climate bullet. That’s an achievable goal. But to reach those numbers, there has to be a change in strategy, it has to happen quickly and it has to be more than your California transplant neighbor trading in her Land Rover for a Toyota Prius. Right here in Missoula, the stage is set for exactly the kind of change that this situation calls for— change in the courtroom, change in legislation, and change by not letting the current ways of doing business continue. And it’s all happening right now.

LAW

FAVORABLE RULINGS Climate change has its day in court The Kyoto Protocol pact sunsets in 2012. Last year’s United Nations climate change convention in Copenhagen is widely viewed as a failure. The prospects of U.S. Congress passing cap-and-trade legislation this year are daunting. If the United States has made any progress in fighting climate change, it’s occurred in the courts. “What’s new and different—and what I think is really interesting—is attorneys making the argument that we need to take into consideration the impacts of climate change,” says University of Montana Law Professor Elizabeth Kronk, “and judges saying, ‘Yes, you’re right.’” Count U.S District Judge Donald Molloy of Missoula among the judges saying yes. Two of Molloy’s recent decisions have considered the impacts of climate change. Last fall, Molloy ordered the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) to return nearly 600 grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park back to the endangered species list, in part because their food supply is shrinking due to climate change. He wrote that the agency failed to take into account scientific studies that make a connection between the decline of whitebark pine trees—the nuts of which grizzlies eat—and the deaths of grizzlies in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. “The identifiable best available science,” Molloy wrote in his September 2009 ruing, “indicates that whitebark pines are expected to decline due to a variety of causes, including climate change, increased forest fires, the mountain pine beetle epidemic, and infection by white pine blister rust.” Experts say Molloy’s ruling serves as a prominent example of attorneys successfully leveraging the Endangered Species Act to combat climate change. “Numerous legal theories are being used to apply existing statutory authority

to climate change,” says Michael Gerrard, director of Columbia Law School’s Center for Climate Change Law. “The Endangered Species Act is one of them. There are some theories under which the Endangered Species Act can be used to try to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That would be a very indirect effect that most people don’t hold out much hope for. However, there are much more successful efforts to use the statute to protect particular species and places that are especially vulnerable, and [Molloy’s decision] fits in the second category.” Molloy made headlines again in March for approving an unprecedented settlement between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and three environmental groups, including the Montana Environmental Information Center. The settlement suspended 38,000 acres of oil and gas leases across Montana and required the agency to review how oil field activities contribute to climate change. “It’s important,” explains Erik Schlenker-Goodrich, an attorney with the Western Environmental Law Center who worked on the case, “because we’re not talking about the combustion side at the end of the line, we’re talking about when you take it out of the ground. What are the greenhouse gas emissions when that happens?” The settlement seems to have already changed agency policy. Two weeks ago BLM delayed another 91,000 acres of leases in Montana and the Dakotas “to bring more certainty to industry and in light of expected litigation.” “Since we agreed to conduct additional environmental reviews on the 2008 leases, it only makes sense to complete additional environmental reviews before we offer new acreage for leasing,” said Gene Terland, BLM’s Montana state director, in a statement.

Adds Mary Apple, spokeswoman for the BLM Montana office: “Probably everything between now and then will have its own separate environmental analysis.” Apple says the agency’s new in-theworks land-use plans will consider how its oil field leases contribute to climate change. And BLM spokesman Matt Spangler says the agency’s Washington office “is working on policy to address the recent environmental issues raised in Montana.”

Schlenker-Goodrich says the settlement isn’t legal precedent, “but, in a broader policy sense, yes, it is precedentsetting,” he says. In the absence of binding federal or international law, Molloy’s considerations of climate change give Western environmental groups hope that the few legal tools at their disposal to fight the problem can have a lasting impact. Matthew Frank

Two of U.S District Judge Donald Molloy’s recent decisions have considered the impacts of climate change. “What’s new and different—and what I think is really interesting—is attorneys making the argument that we need to take into consideration the impacts of climate change,” says UM Law Professor Elizabeth Kronk, “and judges saying, ‘Yes, you’re right.’”

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CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE

GIVE NO GROUND Rising Tide finds results from “direct action” campaign The five students figured they’d be arrested. After all, the odds of the Montana Land Board reversing its stance on leasing 570 million tons of Otter Creek coal because of a handful of Missoula protesters were slim to none. But the five young members of Northern Rockies Rising Tide (NRRT) held the floor—literally—for 45 minutes on March 18, refusing to budge. And as they predicted, it took the officers of the Helena Police Department to bring their stand to an end. NRRT co-founder Nick Stocks considers the sit-in a complete success. Sure, the Land Board approved the deal with St. Louis-based Arch Coal Inc. shortly after his cohorts were led out in handcuffs. Changing that outcome wasn’t exactly the point. There were larger stakes that day, Stocks says, for both the grassroots group and for Otter Creek. “The leasing of the coal necessitated some kind of punctuation,” says Stocks, 26, who was present at the meeting but did not participate in the sit-in. “It wasn’t getting a whole lot of national attention,

but because of the action, because of the way the wider world relates to direct action, it was a successful move in that moment to expand the argument. Now everyone knows about Otter Creek.” What people remain less familiar with is NRRT itself. The group formed last fall and still counts only a dozen members among its ranks. It’s one of the newest chapters in the global Rising Tide network, a loose and noncentralized collection of activists that has for years stood on the frontlines of the fight against climate change. The Rising Tide mission is simple: Refuse to compromise, give no ground, and take the consequences as they come. “I think the type of organization that Northern Rockies is has a lot to offer,” Stocks says. “The grassroots, far left has the ability to, when you take action along that front, put a lot more things on the table. It allows for much broader political debate.” Stocks and his fellow activists realize they aren’t the first to cross the line of political correctness and openly chal-

lenge the accepted course of debate in Montana. In fact, they thrive on the examples set by environmental radicals like Mike Roselle (see below), and have found the Missoula community surprisingly receptive to their efforts. “It never really went away,” Stocks says of the direct action movement popular during the timber wars of the 1980s and ’90s. “It just shifted its focus a bit. Climate change…this has become the path along which we’re organizing, and a new vein of direct action needs to be here.” Otter Creek proved fertile ground for the creation of NRRT and gave the group its first opportunity to draw a line in Montana’s soil. But five misdemeanors for disorderly conduct only marked the beginning. NRRT sees itself as filling a troubling void in Montana’s mineral extraction and climate change debate. “There has been a lot of work done in Montana, in the Northern Rockies, around wilderness issues and around mineral extraction, but there have been no direct action elements to that battle,”

says Max Granger, 23, a University of Montana student and one of the NRRT members arrested in Helena March 18. “So I guess we’re trying to build that backing a little bit.” Members like Granger are now preparing to up the ante. Last December, Imperial Oil announced plans to ship oil rig equipment through Montana to its Kearl Oil Sands Project in Alberta, Canada. Upwards of 300 trucks will pass through Missoula before heading up the east side of the Continental Divide to the border. Once assembled, the rigs will extract 300,000 barrels of oil a day for Imperial, whose majority shareholder is ExxonMobil. “We’re trying to get a campaign going to stop these shipments that are going to the tar sands mining,” says Michael Phelps, 29, who was also arrested during the Helena sit-in. “Basically it’s the first time in the United States that activists have been able to take a stand on putting a wrench in the tar sands mining operations, because for the most part we just consume the oil.”

“It means that we get to address it,” Phelps adds, “rather than hope somebody somewhere else does.” Many in NRRT’s ranks have deeply personal motivations for joining the fight against climate change. Brent Rowley, 28, grew up in a West Virginia coalmining town, witnessing first hand the devastation inflicted on the environment by mineral extraction. Suzie Rosette, 29, has gained a solid background in environmental activism from back east. Phelps vowed years ago to dedicate himself to protecting whatever place he wound up calling home. That place turned out to be Missoula and, by extension, Montana. But the group’s drive as a whole is far greater than those individual incentives. NRRT echoes Stocks’ sentiments when he explains that the Rising Tide message is about world economies, social justice and “the future of our planet.” “That’s why Otter Creek isn’t just about Otter Creek,” Stocks says. “It’s about all of the Otter Creeks.” Alex Sakariassen

SERIOUS ABOUT WINNING Granddaddy of radical eco-activisim continues the fight In 1987, Mike Roselle scaled Mount Rushmore and attempted to put a giant gas mask and banner across George Washington’s chiseled face. That protest against coal-fired power plants earned him four months in a South Dakota prison—and national notoriety. Over the years, the long-time Missoula resident hasn’t let up. He cofounded a slew of high-profile organizations, including Earth First!, the Rainforest Action Network and the Ruckus Society. He’s fought mining and logging companies with a series of controversial tactics that sent the same message: Act now to protect the planet, or it’ll be too late. And after three decades of using non-violent civil disobedience to fight the good fight, he’s considered the granddaddy of the radical eco-activism movement. “If we’re serious about winning,” he says, “then we’ve got to be serious about standing up and confronting the people who are making this happen.” More than two years ago, Roselle helped found his latest group, Climate Ground Zero. The organization has since conducted a high profile “pressure campaign” to stop Massey Energy’s West Virginia mountaintop removal operation. Climate Ground Zero activists draw from the civil disobedience handbook to stop coal mining by chaining themselves to equipment, squatting in trees on land

Missoula Independent

slated for blasting and using their bodies to block roads. Roselle has been arrested six times during the past year by the same police officer in West Virginia. The Climate Ground Zero crew as a whole tallied approximately 150 arrests last year and wracked up tens of thousands of dollars worth of fines. “It’s not a free ride. This is a very difficult way to wage a pressure campaign,” Roselle says. “You have to throw pretty much everything you have at it.” It’s worth it, though, because they’re getting the job done, Roselle says. He points to the group’s success at grabbing national headlines and the fact that, earlier this month, the Obama administration announced new regulations that are expected to seriously curtail mountaintop removal. Successes like that make it easier to shrug off criticisms. During his many years of demonstrations, critics have dubbed Roselle an eco-terrorist bent on destruction. Even people inside the environmental movement question his tactics at times. Roselle, however, makes no apologies. He says ballot boxes and political persuasion are optimal ways to affect change—and clearly less dangerous than, for instance, scaling Mount Rushmore. But if that doesn’t work, when it comes to saving the planet, civil disobedience becomes a moral imperative.

Page 16 April 22–April 29, 2010

“It’s a pretty traditional American way to respond to the fact that governments aren’t always right. The courts aren’t always right. And, of course, the corporations aren’t always right,” he says. “When everything else has been exhausted, and what we feel is irreparable harm to the environment and to these communities is happening, than it’s a moral issue. And we have to take actions that we think are going to make a difference.” Historically, pressure campaigns have led to groundbreaking environmental legislation like the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act, he says. Then there’s the obvious example of citizen activism helping to spur civil rights legislation in the 1960s. “The way it was really applied by Martin Luther King, those people who were involved in those campaigns they suffered immensely. They took huge sacrifices. And, of course, some of them died,” he says. “It was a very serious campaign and not just about marching down the street or banging drums or hanging a banner off of a building. They were actually getting out there and confronting the problem where it was.” Watching Montana glaciers melt and the state’s rivers flow at historic lows, Roselle says it’s clear an environmental emergency is mounting. But it’s been tough to drum up activists willing to take a stand against environmental threats in Montana.

Photo courtesy of Antrim Caskey/Appalachia Watch

Earth First! co-founder and long-time eco-activist Mike Roselle, right, believes civil disobedience is the only way to create real change. “It’s a pretty traditional American way to respond to the fact that governments aren’t always right,” he says.

“I was very interested in civil disobedience in Montana over the last few years. In Missoula, I find it very, very difficult to find people who are willing to take that step,” he says. “The people in western Montana didn’t seem to be too concerned about what’s going on in the eastern part of the state.” During the past several months, though, the emergence of Northern Rockies Rising Tide has given him a glimmer of hope. The group of young activists grabbed the spotlight locally and nationally in March after they staged a sit in that disrupted a Montana Land Board Meeting that convened to lease state-owned property for coal mining.

“Those are my heroes,” says Roselle. “They’ve got the only other campaign in the U.S. right now on coal mining. It’s us and them.” The environmental movement needs more groups like Rising Tide, Roselle says. Too often people simply write a check and expect someone else to do the work. “I think the fact that we spend probably a half of a billion dollars a year to maintain an environmental movement in this country and we get so little out of it is a travesty,” he says. “Citizens have got to become personally involved in these environmental issues …There’s enough of us to make a difference.” Jessica Mayrer


by Vote 0 1 May

O F F I C I A L BA L LO T

Arts & Entertainment

Nightlife

Best Art Gallery ____________________________________________________

Best Bar______________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Local Photographer __________________________________

Best Bar for a Stiff Pour ______________________________________

Best Local Writer __________________________________________________________________________________

Best Beer Selection ______________________________________

Best Movie Rental ________________________________________________________

Best Bloody Mary ________________________________________________

Best Movie Theater ________________________________________________

Best Casino ____________________________________________

Fashion & Beauty

Best Happy Hour ________________________________________ Best Karaoke Bar ________________________________________________

Best Cosmetics ____________________________________________________________________________________

Best Martini ____________________________________________

Best Day Spa________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Place to Dance ____________________________________________________

Best Jewelry_ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Place for Live Music ________________________________________________

Best Kids’ Clothing ____________________________________________

Best Pool Table ____________________________________________________________________

Best Lingerie ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Sports Bar __________________________________________________

Best Men’s Clothing ______________________________________ Best Place for a Hair Cut __________________________________

Food & Drink

Best Shoe Store ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Asian Food____________________________________________________________________

Best Tattoo Parlor __________________________________________________ Best Thrift Store____________________________________________________________________________________ Best Women’s Clothing ________________________________________

Goods & Services Best Auto Repair ________________________________________ Best Big Box Store ________________________________________________________ Best Bookstore __________________________________________ Best Car Wash __________________________________________ Best CDs and Music ______________________________________ Best Computer Repair Shop ________________________________ Best Department Store ____________________________________ Best Dry Cleaner

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Best Financial Institution ______________________________________ Best Furniture Store ______________________________________ Best Hardware Store ______________________________________ Best Hobby/Craft Shop ____________________________________ Best Laundromat

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Best Lodging ____________________________________________ Best Motorcycle/ATV Dealer ________________________________ Best New Car Dealer ______________________________________________________________ Best Pawn Shop __________________________________________________________ Best Pet Supplies ________________________________________ Best Plant Nursery ____________________________________________ Best Ranch Supply Store __________________________________ Best Store for Home Electronics ____________________________________ Best Store for Home Appliances ____________________________________ Best Store for Musical Instruments ______________________________________ Best Toy Store __________________________________________________ Best Used Car Dealer ________________________________________

Best Bakery ________________________________________________________________________________________

Not all elections are created equal. We’d probably agree there’s a slight difference between voting officials into office in Washington, D.C., and dialing for a dreamy teen crooner on “American Idol”—even if we do find Kelly Clarkson more influential than either Denny Rehberg or Max Baucus. But in the grand scheme of elections, one stands above the rest: Best of Missoula, our annual celebration of everything that makes Missoula special and quite possibly your most important voting experience ever. No, really. Ever. What other election offers you the opportunity to pledge your allegiance to a local restaurant, bartender or band? What other ballot tailors itself so exclusively to the place you call home—and to you—by offering more than 150 wide-ranging categories? And, more importantly, Best of Missoula doesn’t offer you a little sticker for your participation—we’ll throw a full-on bash to honor your role in the democratic process with our Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 8. Plus, making your voice heard is easy: Vote in hard copy by using this ballot, or visit www.missoulanews.com and vote online, where you’ll find 50 online-only categories. The rules are also pretty straightforward: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided below. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, May 10. With that, consider yourself registered, and let the most important voting of your life (at least until next year) commence.

Best Breakfast ____________________________________________________________________________ Best Budget Lunch__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Coffee ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Convenience Store __________________________________________ Best Delicatessen______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Desserts ____________________________________________________ Best Family-Friendly Dining ____________________________________________ Best French Fries ____________________________________________ Best Fresh Produce __________________________________________ Best Hamburger __________________________________________________ Best Ice Cream____________________________________________________ Best Liquor Store____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Mexican Food ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Microbrewery ______________________________________________________ Best Milk Shake ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best New Restaurant ____________________________________________________________ Best Outdoor Dining_ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Pizza __________________________________________________________________________ Best Pizza Delivery________________________________________________________________ Best Place to Eat Alone ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Restaurant __________________________________________________ Best Restaurant Service ____________________________________________________ Best Restaurant Wine List ____________________________________ Best Retail Beer Selection __________________________________________________________________________________ Best Retail Wine Selection ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Best Romantic Dining ________________________________________________________________________ Best Salad ____________________________________________ Best Sandwich Shop __________________________________________________________________________ Best Seafood __________________________________________ Best Steak __________________________________________________________________________________________

Sports & Recreation

Best Supermarket______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Bike Shop ______________________________________________________________________

Best Vegetarian Food ____________________________________________________________

Best Bowling Alley ________________________________________________________ Best Flyfishing Shop ____________________________________________________________________________

People & Media

Best Golf Course ________________________________________

Best Activist ____________________________________________

Name:______________________

Best Journalist ____________________________________________________________

Best Place to Get a Snowboard ________________________________________________

Best Local Sports Figure ____________________________________________________________________

Best Sporting Goods ____________________________________________________________________________

Email:______________________

Best Meteorologist __________________________________________________________________________

Best Store for Mountaineering Gear____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Radio Station __________________________________________________________________________

Best Store for Skis ________________________________________________________

Phone:________________________

Best TV Personality ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Best Health Club______________________________________________ Best Place for Paddle Sports Gear ____________________________________________

Best Store for Guns ______________________________________

Best Local Politician ______________________________________________________

Best Radio Personality __________________________________________________________

Best TV Newscast ________________________________________________________

Ballot Box Locations: Bernice's Bakery, Break Espresso, Bridge Pizza, Butterfly Herbs, Caffé Dolce (both locations), Computer Central, El Diablo, Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Grizzly Grocery, Hastings, Hob Nob, Iron Horse, Kettlehouse, Liquid Planet, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Rosauer's Reserve Street Bistro, Sushi Hana, Taco del Mar, Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), UC Center Market, Uptown Diner, Westside Lanes, Wheat Montana, Worden's Market Missoula Independent

Page 17 April 22–April 29, 2010


LEGISLATION

ALL TOGETHER NOW Clean Energy Works builds consensus for new energy plan One October morning in 2009, a busload of U.S. veterans from a national organization called Operation Free pulled up to Missoula’s Old Post Pub. They walked into the bar and sat down for breakfast with local veterans to discuss concerns about the impact of U.S. oil dependence on national security. Operation Free’s solution: a national clean energy plan. Operation Free is one group out of 80 organizations that make up Clean Energy Works, a sprawling nationwide coalition pushing for clean energy and climate legislation. How sprawling? In Montana, Clean Energy Works is comprised of Operation Free, Montana Audubon, Montana Business Leaders for Clean Energy, Montana Sierra Club, the National Wildlife Federation, the National Resource Defense Council and the Alliance for Climate Protection (which works toward former Vice President Gore’s Repower America campaign), among others. The coalition’s motto—“More jobs. Less pollution. Greater security”—speaks to the diverse viewpoints of its organizations. “The breadth of this coalition is unprecedented in the U.S. conservation movement and maybe in terms of any issue that’s come before Congress,” says Tom France, regional executive director of the National Wildlife Federation. Clean Energy Works attacks a common goal from different angles. Some groups, like Operation Free, are most concerned with national security. Others focus on the economic opportunities of clean energy technology. Still more express concern about the impact of climate change. Regardless of their primary motivation, all the members of Montana’s Clean Energy Works are pushing for the same end result: the passage of a national comprehensive clean energy and climate bill through the U.S. Congress this year. The organization’s strategy calls for creating a broad base of support through meetings like the one with Operation Free and its constituents at the Old Post. Montana Clean Energy Works field organizers like Derek Goldman and Benjamin Courteau have helped to coordinate dozens of meetings with farmers, fishermen, hunters and wildlife activists, and convinced them to work toward a specific outcome. “We find those who are in support of the issue and connect them with their representatives by having them write letters and make phone calls,” says

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Courteau. “We get businesses to sign up in support as well. We’re really pressuring Congress to act on this and support the bill.” The bill in question was written by Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., Lindsey O. Graham, R-S.C., and Joseph I. Lieberman, D-Conn., and is set to be introduced April 26. It promises to be a comprehensive piece of legislation covering energy use and a plan for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. That plan includes new loans and tax credits for companies that manufacture clean energy technologies, and funding for research and development. While some states have made commitments to clean energy and climate change policy (Montana has committed to 15 percent renewable energy by 2015) this bill would signal the first national plan dealing with the issues. Passing a bill that promotes clean energy is important to Montana because once the United States makes a commitment to go down the renewable energy path, entrepreneurs are more willing to make long-term investments in the industry. In Montana, where wind energy potential is ranked second in the nation, that could mean economic growth for the state. “There’s a lot of clean energy capital that’s been sitting on the sidelines for years waiting for a national policy to shift toward a clean energy economy,” says Goldman. “That’s where national legislation that limits greenhouse gas pollution can really help send that signal to investors. For a long time clean energy sources have been at a financial disadvantage because of the vast amount of tax breaks and subsidies that the fossil fuel industry receives from Congress.” Bi-partisan support for the Kerry-GrahamLieberman bill gives it a higher likelihood of passing. But like so much bi-partisan legislation, there are bound to be compromises. “Yeah there’s going to be compromises in it,” says Courteau, “but it might not be that bad. Most people agree that regardless of what’s going on with the climate we need to get off foreign oil and produce clean energy, that we need to be innovators in the industry so we don’t get out-competed by both our allies and our competitors, like China. That’s enough common ground to push the bill forward with perhaps fewer compromises than health care had.” Erika Fredrickson


dish

the

Slow boat shopping FLASHINTHEPAN Locavore fundamentalists might call it blasphemy, but there’s no reason why a meal made with local foods can’t also contain ingredients from the other side of the world. Homegrown vegetables like broccoli and garlic stir-fried with oyster sauce, locally raised lamb curry with homegrown potatoes, deer steak with salt and pepper, chocolate beet cake. In the above meals, local staples are combined with what I call “slow boat” ingredients—low-maintenance foods that can be transported slowly, unrefrigerated, without burning much carbon. The fact that curry powder, black peppercorns, powdered chocolate or a can of oyster sauce were shipped from afar doesn’t diminish the localness, and awesomeness, of the meal. Many locavores get hung up on this issue, clinging to the letter of eating local while forgetting about the spirit of it. In spirit, eating local reduces transport-related carbon emissions, supports your local economy and helps you become better tied to a place. As you learn the traditions, landscape and seasonal rhythms of your home ground, you’ll see the plum blossoms in spring and think about the chutney you’ll make in fall. And the fact that your chutney contains ginger won’t diminish its localness. You’ll look forward to strawberry harvest in summer and pray for a good rain after you’ve picked your fill. And it won’t rain on your breakfast parade when you eat that jam spread on local bread while drinking a cup of Ethiopian coffee. If the eggs in that breakfast are from the backyard, and the bacon is from a local farm, and the salsa is homemade, then the meal is local in spirit, despite the coffee in your cup, the black pepper on the eggs, or the fact that the tomato in your salsa originated, centuries ago, from a Central American progenitor. Countless culinary developments of great import have resulted from imported food. Italian

pasta would not have been invented were it not for Chinese noodles. South American peppers and potatoes have gone global. Mayonnaise, of course, came all the way from heaven. There’s nothing inherently wrong with shipping exotic ingredients from the other side of the world. How something is transported is usually much more significant than how far. Shipping something 100 miles by truck can burn more fuel than shipping something 1,000 miles by train, or 100,000 miles by sailboat. Indeed, shipping

by sailboat is as close to carbon-neutral as it gets. That’s why sailboats are the namesake of the slow boat school of shopping. Slow boat shopping is based on the fact that when Marco Polo brought back noodles and spices from China, he did so in his carbon-neutral sailboat, which wasn’t equipped with a refrigerator. Thus, he was limited to foods that wouldn’t spoil. To determine if a certain food import qualifies as slow boat, I ask myself two simple questions: Could this food have been produced at home? Could it have been shipped slowly, un-refrigerated? If the food can be produced close to home, then I make every effort to get as much of it as necessary in-season, and preserve it appropriately so I can eat it year round. But if the food is exotic to my area— such as coconut or avocado—I focus on the method

by ARI LeVAUX

of transport rather than mileage when deciding if I should buy it. Today, beyond a few shipments of boutique wines that cross the pond each year by sailboat, very little food is transported by wind power. And even if more food were blown here on a slow boat, the method of transport isn’t usually on the label, so it would be impossible to know it. But if you stick to food imports that aren’t refrigerated, then at least you are creating a diet based on foods that could have been shipped by slow boat— or the terrestrial equivalent: the un-refrigerated train car. The items that are shipped from afar should be used to enhance a local diet, not replace it. Adding coconut milk to a pot of New Mexico red chile, for example, creates a delicious variation on a proud regional dish. Here’s how to make it: Remove the seeds from eight dried New Mexico or Anaheim red chile pods, and soak the pods in hot chicken or veggie stock. Meanwhile, peel one head of garlic. Photo by Ari LeVaux Add the garlic cloves, a teaspoon of salt, and a tablespoon of dried oregano to a blender, with enough of the stock from the soaking chiles so it blends. Then add the soaked chile pods to the blender, along with enough of the soaking liquid that it blends into what looks like red paint. Steam some potatoes, cut into chunks and then fry the potatoes in oil until crispy on all sides. Add a chopped onion to the pan and sauté until it turns translucent. Then add the chile sauce. Cook on medium heat, tasting frequently, for about 10 minutes—until the flavor of the garlic in the chile mellows. Then add a can of coconut milk, and cook for another 2 minutes. Serve with rice and steamed vegetables—ideally veggies you blanched and froze last summer. You could also add the veggies earlier and let them cook in the curry. It’s a meal that thinks globally, acts locally and tastes great.

We're The Perfect Place To Sit, Sip, Meet and Eat! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as

artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burri-

tos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

Page 19 April 22–April 29, 2010


the

dish

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of ... ice cream! ColdStone is home-made, super-premium and more delicious than it should be, it seems! Cast your eyes on all our mix-ins and choose your favorites, be it for a cone, icecream cake or ice-cream sandwich! Many a fine folk will find ... It's a Great Day for Ice-Cream! $-$$ Doc's Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. Open Mon-Thurs 7am-8pm, Fri & Sat 8am4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Harry Davids 2700 Paxson Street, Suite H • 830-3277 Kicking off in February is LIVE BAND KARAOKE and LADIES NIGHT at Harry David’s every Thursday night at 9:30pm. Drink specials for the Ladies! Part Karaoke / Part Dance night with the band Party Trained, this is your opportunity to sing like a rockstar with a live band backing you up – and it will be every Thursday! If Karaoke is not your thing – no problem the band will be playing in between karaoke songs to keep you on the dance floor! Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot.

All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave. 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $

HAPPIESTHOUR The Reno Casino Claim to fame: On a recent afternoon, the only patrons consisted of two white-haired locals chatting underneath the rusty animal traps and antique guns that adorn the bar’s walls. But on Friday and Saturday nights the historic bar—a liquor license on the wall dates the Reno back to 1937—draws a raucous crowd of college kids, folks passing through town and

East Missoula locals. “We always have something crazy going on,” says bartender Vickie Nelson. Atmosphere: See picture. Who you’re drinking with: Nearby trailer park residents early in the day, blue-collar guys as the afternoon wears on. Pool sharks and diehard karaoke singers flood the place on the weekend. What you’re drinking: “We go through a lot of Bud, Bud Light,” Nelson says.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Happy Hour specials: Fifty cents off all drinks Monday through Friday between 4 and 6 p.m.

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$

How to get there: The Reno Casino is located a half-mile east of I-90 on Highway 200. —Jessica Mayrer

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

April

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly Organic $10.50/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Missoula Independent

Page 20 April 22–April 29, 2010

BUTTERFLY HERBS

COFFEES, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN


Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tan-

$…Under $5

talizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

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Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

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ASKARI Grassroots garden Dear Flash, We want to turn part of our lawn into a vegetable garden. What’s the best way to do that? —Obamawannabe

Q

There are several ways of doing this. Assuming you have a nicely manicured lawn with only one type of grass (say, Kentucky Bluegrass), then you can simply cut chunks of sod out, pick them up or roll them up, and replace them with topsoil, amended as necessary with compost, manure and peat moss. The sod that you remove can be composted. I’ve also heard of people cutting sod blocks and simply flipping them over, grass-side down. Then they cut little holes in the sod and plant directly into it. Supposedly the grass gets smothered and composts in place. If you have a half-feral lawn, with a diversity of grasses, dandelions and other weeds, the sod won’t likely cut and roll easily, because all of those plants will have roots of different depths. In that case, your best option is to cover the area you want to convert

A

to garden with black plastic, making sure to weight down all the edges so the wind doesn’t get under it. After six weeks of spring/summertime heat, everything underneath the plastic will be dead, and the soil will turn over like butter. This method also works on the picture perfect lawns with uniform sod. The only downside to this method is that if you don’t wait long enough, the grass won’t be completely killed and will come back to haunt your garden. Another angle of attack is to build raised beds directly on your lawn. First, lay down a layer of plastic or a thick layer of newspaper, then build the raised bed frames, fill them with topsoil, and get planting. If you use any of the above methods other than the raised bed method, you’ll probably want to think about edging your new garden so that the grass doesn’t spread into it. I like using cedar 1x4 boards, which won’t rot and will effectively block the spreading grass. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Page 21 April 22–April 29, 2010


8

Arts & Entertainment listings April 22–April 29, 2010

days a week THURSDAY

THURSDAY October

29

April

22

Just say no to despotism: UM presents its annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference with the lecture “Tajikistan: An Emerging Democracy!” which starts at 9 AM at the University Center Theater. Free. Other free lectures continue throughout the day. Visit umt.edu/cap to download a complete schedule of events. Call 243-2299. Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010.

Heidi Meili

Legacy Montana—a group of over 40 nonprofit organizations—hosts its “Legacy Montana Month,” a drive throughout April to remind citizens that leaving a gift of any size to a nonprofit you believe in is easy and can begin with a will or trust. Visit legacymontana.org. It’s all about craftiness during UM’s Spring Art Fair, which runs from 9 AM–6 PM in the University Center Atrium. Free to attend. Call 243-4115.

Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

The Sentinel High School Art Club announces a call to artists interested in selling, showing or donating art for the club’s “Color Missoula” second annual art auction, which opens May 7 at the Downtown Dance Collective. The minimum cost to you is 25 percent of the total sale. Submissions are due by May 3. If interested, e-mail a photo of your art, description, minimum bid, donation amount and contact info to Sally at sfriou@mcps.k12.mt. Call 7282400 Ext. 7624. The Missoula Branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and the Five Valleys Central Asia Institute present the AAUW used book sale, which runs from 10 AM–8 PM at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W. The sale continues from 10 AM–5 PM on Fri.Sat. and from 10 AM–2 PM on Sun. All proceeds got to the Central Asia Institute. Call 829-3898 or 543-5975.

Go ahead, touch his bling. Canada’s Bruce Cockburn plays the University Theatre Wed., April 28, at 8 PM. $30 plus fees at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. Call 243-4051.

Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com. Amos Guiora, a leading counterterrorism expert, signs a selection of publications on international terrorism starting at noon at Fact & Fiction in the UC Bookstore. Free. Call 243-1234. The cool kids are always the creative ones: Middle schoolers and teens can exert their artistic side during Young Adult Art Prep, an afterschool program that includes drawing, photography, book making, glass fusing and other activities, this and every Thu. from 3–5:30 PM

at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $15 drop-in with a bus ride/$12 drop-in. RSVP by calling 549-7555. Laptop musicians ought not miss this: As part of the Communikey and Dis-Patch Collaborative Tour 2010, UM hosts an audio software workshop on Ableton Live, featuring tips and tricks courtesy of the artist Piece of Shh...from 3–6 PM in Room 218 of UM’s Music Building. Free. (See Spotlight in this issue.) end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 23, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Times Run 4/23 - 4/29

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Runaways

MCAT TURNS 20 TODAY! Celebrate With Us! Drop in at MCAT Thursday, April 22 • 4 to 7:30 pm.

(R)

Nightly at 7 & 9 Sun. at 1 & 7 7pm only Sat 4/24 & Wed 4/28

Creation Nightly at 7 No show Sat • 4/24 Sun 3 pm only • 9 Wed. 4/28

The Ghost Writer Nightly at 9

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula

No show Wed. 4/28

www.thewilma.com

Missoula Independent

Page 22 April 22–April 29, 2010

406-728-2521

•Food & Drink, Memories & Startling Cameos •Far-Out Video Screenings •Curio Giveaways

Join Us at Your Community TV Station

500 N Higgins Suite 104


Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 3- to 6-year-old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Gnaw on something tasty and tour a studentrun project designed to encourage efficient and affordable homes during the Farm-to-College Barbecue, which starts at 4 PM at the UM FLAT, 633 S. Fifth St. E. Free to attend. Call Erica at 243-4856.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the vinyasastyle flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. and Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Keep your eyes on an ursine during Swan Valley Bear Resources’ third annual “Spring Bear Wake Up Social,” which features discussions from experts on current research and info related to bears in the Swan Valley, from 5–8 PM at the Swan Valley Community Hall, near mile marker 42 off Hwy. 83. Free. RSVP requested by contacting the Swan Ecosystem Center at 754-3137.

Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict mediation by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Keep bangin’ on that drum and dancing like there’s no tomorrow during a Djembe Community Drum and Dance class for all levels, which meets the second and fourth Tue. of every month at 6 PM at The Barn Movement Studio, 2926 S. Third St. W. $3 suggested donation. E-mail djebecommunity@gmail.com.

Gypsies come out during a Routine/Improv Student Troupe Bellydance class every Thu. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for every class you can make it to/ $8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667.

Get neighborly during Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features the workshop “Appreciative Inquiry, Community Building and Active Listening,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 552-6081 or by e-mailing Erin at escott@ci.missoula.mt.us.

Support the work of local and international young writers during the Aerie International Fundraiser Reading, a fundraiser for Big Sky High School’s literary arts magazine of the same name which runs from 5:30–7:30 PM at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. $25 per “family,” which can include up to three or four family members or friends. Includes live jazz, appetizers, and readings from students, Prageeta Sharma, David Allan Cates and others. Call Lorilee at 728-2401 Ext. 8644. (See Agenda in this issue.) After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula

ornamental & shade trees Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural. 1845 S. 3rd W. • 542-2544 M-Sat 9-5:30, Sun 10:30-4:30

H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

His guitar is beholden to no one: Brandon Eden keeps the independent spirit alive when he plays acoustic music at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Refine your creative side during The Creative Moment, a class taught by local artist Katie Ludwick where you’ll blend up and synthesize writing, drawing, object exploration, and works on paper to create an idea smoothie to boost your creative potential from 6–8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $10. Call 549-7555 to register.

The Jeannette Rankin Peace Center presents its “Search for Peace Awards Ceremony,” which starts at 5:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 543-3955 and visit jrpc.org.

20% off all

Witness the academic and creative accomplishments of middle school students during C.S. Porter Middle School’s “Spring Showcase of Student Achievement,” which features a host of art exhibits and performances and runs from 6–8 PM at the school, 2510 W. Central Ave. Cost TBA. Includes a live auction hosted by Mayor John Engen. Call Allie McFarland at 728-2400 Ext. 4624.

Chow down for our mother during Dine Out for the Earth, an Earth Day dining fundraiser for the WildWest Institute featuring these participating businesses: Scotty’s Table, Biga Pizza, The Bridge Pizza and Posh Chocolat. These businesses will donate a portion of their proceeds to the WildWest Institute. Call 396-0321 and e-mail info@wildwestinstitute.org.

Get those endorphins pumpin’ late in the day when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for tempo runs and drills during Thursday Tempo Runs, every Thu. at 5:30 PM starting with a stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA/free to Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org.

Arbor Day Tree Sale!

UM continues its International Terrorism Law Seminar Series with “Comparative Counterterrorism Approaches,” a talk with counterterrorism expert Amos Guiora from 6:30–9:30 PM, in the Castles Center of UM’s School of Law. Free. Call David Aronofsky at 243-4668. Missoula’s Jazzoula continues at 6:30 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. $10 per person/$8 seniors and students. Includes sets by the Hellgate Band, UM Jazz Alive, Melody and Clipper Anderson, Salsa Loca, along with a performance featuring Eden Atwood, Jodi Marshall and Kira Means. Call 542-0077. Also includes a Hall of Fame awards ceremony at 9:30 PM. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. It’s all about domination: The Peace and Justice Film Series continues with a screening of The World According to Monsanto, which starts at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

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Missoula Independent

Page 23 April 22–April 29, 2010


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UM continues its celebration of Montana Archaeology Month with “Yogo: Jewel of the Prairie,” a talk with UM archaeology student Jono Mogstad about the Yogo Mining District which starts at 7 PM in Room 331 of UM’s University Center. Free. Exploration cap not required: Author Jack Nisbet hosts a presentation and signs his book The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest, starting at 7 PM at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. UM hosts the keynote presentation of its annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference with the lecture “The Role of Islam in Afghan Politics,” which starts at 7 PM at the University Center Theatre. Free. Call 243-2299. Learn to trust the journos: UM’s School of Journalism presents its annual Dean Stone Lecture with “Journalists and ‘American Idol’: What We Can Learn,” a talk with Caesar Andrews—a journalism prof and former editor with the Detroit Free Press—which starts at 7 PM in Room 169 of UM’s Skaggs Building. Free. Call 243-4001. The Ninemile Wildlife Workgroup Lecture Series hosts Dr. Laurie Yung for the talk “Weeds, Wildlife and Ninemilers,” which starts at 7 PM at the Alberton Town Hall, 701 Railroad Ave. in Alberton. Free. Visit ninemilewildlife.org. Don’t expect to be speaking in tax code jargon when Brian Jameson offers a devotional singing program with live music and gentle direction at 7:15 PM at Hamilton’s Common Ground Center, 258 Roosevelt Lane. $3 donation requested. Call 363-4026. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A

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Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Mercedes McCann melts gold with her luxurious vocal cords when she plays a student recital at 7:30 PM, in the University Congregational Church, 401 University Ave. Free. Call 243-6880. Bowling and karaoke go together like Bloody Marys and bible thumpers during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Keep it fruity during Tropical Night at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., where you can get a $10 pitcher of something tropical of the bartender’s choosing this and every Thu. starting at 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3.


This is a beat-based summit of sorts: The Palace hosts the Communikey/Dis-Patch Festival Collaborative Tour 2010, which features live performances by Santa Fe, N.M. indietronic band D Numbers, dubstep, techno and ambient from Belgrade’s Piece of Shh... and WoO, along with live visuals from Incredible Bob, starting at 9 PM. $7. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Women give a thumbs up to spirits during Ladies’ Night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which features half-off drinks for women and occurs this and every Thu. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Flip Wilson urges you to pour a mixture of salt and Rooster Sauce into your wounds when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

FRIDAY April

23

UM continues its annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference with the lecture “Kazakhstan: The Birth of a New Regional Power,” which

starts at 9 AM in the University Center Theater. Free. Other free lectures continue throughout the day. Visit umt.edu/cap to download a complete schedule of events. Call 243-2299. Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com. Soak up some native tradition during the 35th annual Head Start Pow Wow, which begins with a grand entry at 4:30 PM, and is followed by dinner at 5:30 PM, at the Ronan Events Center, 35885 Round Butte Road. Free. Call 676-4509.

nightlife Jazzy bluegrass always makes the wine go down your gullet smoothly when two unnamed locals play the Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery’s tasting room from 5–9 PM at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine will cost you. Call 549-8703. Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Honor a Missoulian who worked to keep our city safe during the UM School of Law Women’s Law Caucus and YWCA Missoula sponsored “Judy Wang Memorial Silent Auction,” which runs from 5:30–9 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. Free. All money raised goes toward the YWCA Pathways Program and Judy Wang Scholarship Fund. The event also includes a display from the Silent Witness Project. Call 543-6691.

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UM hosts the American Cancer Society Relay for Life, which runs from 6 PM to 6 AM on Sat., April 24, at the UM Oval. Visit umrelayforlife.com for registration information. Call Alyse Johnson at 541-231-6551.

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UM continues its International Terrorism Law Seminar Series with “Torture, Extraordinary Rendition, Extreme Interrogation Techniques,” a talk with counterterrorism expert Amos Guiora from 6:30–9:30 PM, in the Castles Center of UM’s School of Law. Free. Call David Aronofsky at 243-4668. UM hosts the final keynote presentation of its annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference with the lecture “Religion and the State in Central Asia,” which starts at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-2299. Poet and visiting professor Peter Richards lets meter and rhyme take control when he reads and signs copies of his work at 7 PM, in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call Karin at 243-5267. Local dark metal/goth metal band Walking Corpse Syndrome rips you to shreds in the funnest way possible when they play the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St., at 7 PM. $5 at 7:30 PM/$4 at 7 PM, all ages. Kalispell’s Throne of Malediction and locals Mageddon open. Celebrate Glacier’s majesty during “History and Memory in Glacier National Park’s Centennial Year 2010,” a two-day symposium which starts with opening remarks from park superintendent Chas Cartwright at 7:30 PM, in Room 139 of the Arts and Technology Building at Flathead Valley Community College, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. Free. The symposium continues Sat., April 24, from 9 AM–5 PM. Visit crmw.org for a complete schedule of events. Call 243-7700. He’s your jazzy buddy: The first night of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival lights up the University Theatre with a performance featuring pianist Shelly Berg, trumpeter Terell Stafford, along with DeFranco, the UM Jazz Band, as well as Clipper Anderson and Bob LedBetter, starting at 7:30 PM. $24/$18 students and seniors/$42 both nights/$30 both nights students and seniors. A free public clinic occurs at 1 PM at the t h e a t e r. C a l l 2 4 3 - 5 071 . ( S e e Soundcheck and Noise in this issue.) UM student Royce McIntosh bellows out radiant notes when he plays a student recital, at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. So much enthusiasm: The Missoula Community Chorus presents their spring concert “Here’s to Song!” which starts at 7:30 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. $25 family of four/$8 per person. Call Kathy at 2445800 and visit missoulachorus.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the

Missoula Independent

Page 26 April 22–April 29, 2010

Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org.

Boulder, Co.’s Big Gigantic would rather you not bring a huge bucket of your sweat to the stage when they play “livetronica” at the Top Hat at 9 PM. $10. Locals E-Team open.

They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets.

Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

They’ll never bruise your fruits: Tom and The Tomatoes play a mixture of blues, Cajun, Celtic, country and swing at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Don’t be such a hater: The Hamilton Players present a performance of I Hate Hamlet, which starts at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children. Call 375-9050 and visit hamiltonplayers.com. Salsa Loca just might try your cayenne pepper eydrops when they play “Hot Island Nights” at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Call 543-6346. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hiphop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678.

Zeppo slips some pound cake over your ring finger when they play blues and R & B at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. No Shame saves you from your addiction to septic tanks when they play rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Curl that mustache up and get ready to belt out your best cover tune during Mustachio Bashio, a karaoke contest/fundraiser sponsored by students with UM’s Entertainment Management Program which starts at 9:30 PM at The Central Bar and Grill, 147 W. Broadway St. $5/$3 with a costume. All funds will be donated to the YMCA’s YMusic program. DJ Hase plays before and after the karaoke contest. Visit umtentertainment.org. Son of a Gun just wants to crack your soft-boiled eggs when they play country at Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free.

Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free.

He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free.

SATURDAY

Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. They aim to mystify, not perplex: Seattle’s The Beautiful Confusion keeps you from scratching your head when they play a mix of folk, pop and rock at the Badlander at 9 PM. $5. Locals Fiancée and The Racquet open. These punks never give up: Local punk/hardcore band Post Boredom RIOT! returns with a reunion show featuring Tonight We Ride, Slopstar and The Reptile Dysfunction starting at 9 PM at the Palace. $3.

April

24

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Get rid of some of your old sleeping bags, backpacks and other outdoors gear in order to help out the Mountain Shepherds—a community run, eco-tourism organization located in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve in India—during the Nature-Link Institute’s Gear for the Garhwal drive, which runs through April 30 with drop off locations at Pipestone Mountaineering, The Trail Head, Aerie Wilderness Medicine and UM’s Outdoor Program. Call 370-2294 and visit visit nature-link.org. Give Gaia the thumbs up during a refuge tour hosted by The Teller, a non-profit wildlife conservation organization, which offers sightseeing and wildlife viewing bus tours every hour from 9–11 AM at the organization’s refuge, located near Corvallis. Free. Call Lauren at 9613507 and visit theteller.org for complete directions.


with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. He shreds on a pizza like no other: Bob Zimorino plays a solo set at the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. D’s Guise lets your forefinger do the wagging when they play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Photo courtesy of Rebecca Sporman

His feet are not to be trifled with. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream this week starring, from left, Jeff Medley and Paul Chirico, Thu., April 22–Sat., April 24 at 7:30 PM nightly with 2 PM matinees Sat., April 24, and Sun., April 25, at the Crystal Theatre. $15 Fri.–Sun./$12 Wed.–Thu. Visit mtactors.com. I’m a lumberjack and I’m okay: The Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, Building 322 at Fort Missoula, presents Forestry Day 2010, which features lumberjack competitions, pole climbing, ax throwing and an assortment of other forestry fun from 9 AM–4 PM. $3/$2 seniors/$1 students/free children under 6 and Friends of the Historical Museum. Also free for people who bike, walk or take the bus to the event. Call Robert Brown at 728-3476. The Daly Mansion, 251 Eastside Highway near Hamilton, hosts “Living History Programs in Your Museum,” a seminar with Dan Thyer which covers designing, tailoring and implementing living history programs from 9 AM–4 PM at the museum. Free, with lunch. RSVP by calling 363-6004 Ext. 3. It could be rough or it could be smooth when the Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. in Hamilton, presents “Alternative Art Surfaces” an art class with Cathryn Sugg, which starts at 10 AM at the museum. Free. RSVP by calling 363-3338 and visit brvhs.org. Amos Guiora, a leading counterterrorism expert, signs a selection of publications on international terrorism starting at 10:30 AM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Connecting with Nature” with Hobie Hare. Free. Donations are appreciated but not expected. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com.

ACROtainment: A Performing Arts Show, an acrobatic theater performance featuring work by youth and professionals like Russ Stark and Sita Acevedo, with a show at 3 PM at the theater at Hellgate High School, 900 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$12 children/$12 advance/$10 advance for children. Another performance occurs at 6:30 PM at the theater. Call 728-4258 for advance tickets. Teens grades 7–12 discuss fighting oppressive governments during a talk on the book Little Brother during “Those Literary Kids,” a teen book club that meets at 3 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Shred softly or heavily to help keep a child safe during an open mic benefit for Watson Children’s Shelter, which starts with a sign up from 5–6:30 PM, followed by performances at 7 PM, at Higgins Hall, 617 S. Higgins Ave. $5 to participate/free to spectate. Call Amy Martin at 532-6267. Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM,

Jazz makes the pad thai go down smoothly when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents free live jazz from a rotating cast of local musicians at 6:30 PM this and every Sat. at the restaurant. Call 830-3237. He’s talking about a different Bruno: Dr. W. Vogelsberger presents “The Key to Tommorow’s Health: Help and Healing Through the Teachings of Bruno Groening,” a discussion on spiritual healing which starts at 7 PM at Kalispell’s Shining Mountains Center for Positive Living, 475 Eighth Ave. E. N. Free, but donations appreciated. Call Teresa at 503-244-1618 and visit bruno-groening.org. They spit rhymes for tolerance and peace: Palestinian hip-hop group Dam brings their positive, Arabic flavored rhymes to Missoula when they play the University Center Ballroom at 7 PM. $10 suggested donation. Five percent of proceeds will go to the organization Playgrounds for Palestine. (See Spotlight in this issue.) The University Center Theater presents a screening of When in Rome at 7 PM, and again at 9:30 PM. $5/$3 students. Call 243-5590.

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I’m sure they’ll avoid cauliflower ear as best as they can. Sportfight Montana presents “High School Boxing,” which starts with the first fight at 7:15 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10. Call 544-0028.

What brings you to the 'Horse today? I wanted to toast my friends, family, clients and future clients. Get ready, because here I come. What do you especially enjoy about the Iron Horse? The opportunity for a sunny sort of people-watching and the Stella Artois glass, among many other things. Beer of Choice? Stella Artois

They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 2 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. This is poetry in motion, indeed: Bitterroot Gymnastics presents

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Missoula Independent

Page 27 April 22–April 29, 2010


What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org.

a lecture by

Dr. Donald P. Ryan Pacific Lutheran University

Valley of the Kings Project Director

Recent Archaeological Adventures in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings Thursday, April 29, 2010, 7pm Masquer Theatre at the UM PARTV Center www.umt.edu/montanamuseum | 406.243.2019

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They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. He’s your jazzy buddy: The second night of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival lights up the University Theatre with a performance featuring saxophonists Grace Kelly and Lee Konitz, along with DeFranco, the UM Jazz Band, as well as the

Jazz Festival Trio, starting at 7:30 PM. $24/$18 students and seniors. A free public clinic occurs at the theater 1 PM. Call 243-5071. (See Soundcheck and Noise in this issue.) Dance peacefully for Bob Dobbs, or don’t, but be sure to get down with your inner spiritual self when Dances of Universal Peace meets for sacred movement, song and story at the First Christian Church in Hamilton, 328 Fairgrounds Road, at 7:30 PM. $3 donation. Call Star at 546-5344. Don’t be such a hater: The Hamilton Players present a performance of I Hate Hamlet, which starts at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children. Call 375-9050 and visit hamiltonplayers.com. Salsa Loca just might try your cayenne pepper eydrops when they play “Hot Island Nights” at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Call 543-6346.

John Patrick Williams makes amends with your eggbeater when the singer/songwriter plays the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but passthe-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Country bumpkins and rural dudes named Merle are never barred from shaking a tail during a Missoula Senior Center Saturday night dance with “City Slickers,” which runs from 8–11 PM at the center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5. Call 543-7154. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all laughing at your shortcomings at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 28 April 22–April 29, 2010

If Dam (aka Da Arabian MCs) had their way, Palestinians and Israelis would be breaking bread instead of fighting in an endless, bloody civil war.

with touches of Arabic percussion and the bouncing, minor key melodies of traditional Middle Eastern music. Most of the lyrics are also sung in Arabic and Hebrew—at least from what I’ve heard—and I have to admit, it’s a nice change to hear speedy rhymes spit in a foreign tongue.

The self-proclaimed first Palestinian hip-hop crew, pictured here, offers an infectiously political and uplifting brand of rap that brings attention to the plight of their people, while When these Arabic rapalso calling for peace, equali- WHAT: Dam pers play in Missoula on ty and justice for all—includSaturday night, I’d prepare for ing Israeli Jews and WHEN: Sat., April 24, at 7 PM a positive revolution to hit oppressed Arabic women. your dome. It’ll also hit your The group’s conscious and WHERE: University Center Ballroom wallet, but in a good way, often searing lyrical content since five percent of the proought to fit snugly into your HOW MUCH: $10 suggested donation ceeds from this show go aural repertoire if artists like toward Playgrounds for KRS-One, The Coup and Dead Prez are on heavy Palestine, a nonprofit that helps build playgrounds rotation in your iPod. for Palestinian youth in refugee camps and other As for the group’s musical beats, you can hear needy neighborhoods. the familiar pop and crack of hip-hop rhythms mixed

—Ira Sather-Olson


Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. T h e F r e n c h t o w n C l u b , 15 15 5 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, bootybusting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Poke one out at your own risk: Seattle’s Eighteen Individual Eyes—featuring Missoula-native Jamie Henkensiefken—brings alt rock, prog and psych vibes to the masses when they play the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Locals Rooster Sauce open. (See Noise in this issue.) Rave on bro, rave on: TRANCEformation, dubbed “Missoula’s largest themed electronic dance party,” hits the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W., from 9 PM–4 AM. $20, with tickets at Ear Candy, Thai Spicy and online at brownpapertickets.com. Music includes Seattle’s American Werewolf, along with local DJs Fleege, Coma, Chunkiye, Spidii, Chachie and DRE. The Whiskey Rebellion spikes your lemonade with firewater when they play outlaw country at 9 PM at The Lumberjack Saloon, off Hwy. 12 and one mile up Graves Creek Road near Lolo. Free. Visit lumberjacksaloon.com. Son of a Gun just wants to crack your soft-boiled eggs when they play country at Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. The Workers check your reflexes with a rusty pickaxe when they play a fusion of Americana, bluegrass and rock at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Playing in Traffic would rather you not jump in front of that oncoming semi-truck when they play rock and classic rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Kung Fu Kongress considers conducting an in-depth investigation on your scrambled eggs when they play what’s likely to be funk at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Jam on and jazz out during a Jam Session with the stars from the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival, which starts at 10 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. $5. Call 542-0077.

SUNDAY

4:30–6:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free. Call Janit at 207-7358.

April

nightlife

25

Get a taste of local food at a lower price and learn more about a participatory business model when you check out the Missoula Community Food Co-op’s Sunday Public Shop, a chance to shop at the co-op before you join from 10 AM–5 PM at the co-op, 1500 Burns St. Free to attend. Non-members are welcome to shop three times before becoming a member. Call 728-2369 and visit missoulacommunitymarket.org.

Get your artistic senses bubbling over during the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula’s newest exhibit “Let W o n d e r l a n d Te l l I t s S t o r y : William Henry Jackson’s 1871 Yellowstone Alberttypes,” which features photo prints from the first overland geological survey at Yellowstone National Park, with an opening reception from 1–4 PM at the museum, Building 322 at Fort Missoula. Free. Call 728-3476 and visit fortmissoulamuseum.org. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “Scream clean birth, not bloody murder!” Free. Call 543-7154. Don’t be such a hater: The Hamilton Players present a performance of I Hate Hamlet, which starts at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children. Call 375-9050 and visit hamiltonplayers.com. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 2 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. He’s a sick crooner and a slick rhyme spitter: Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” offers a mixture of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour mate Nima Samimi at Ronan’s Red Poppy, 1 Eisenhower St. S.W., at 2 PM. Free. (See Noise in this issue.) If you suffer from pain, join others who understand your plight during a Pain Support Group at 2 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free. This month centers on the topic “Developing a Holistic Approach—Enhancing the Healing Process” and includes a guest speaker. Call Nicole Dunn for more info at 327-8408. Dolce Canto and the Frenchtown High School Choir present the concert “Poetic Paths” at 3 PM at the UM Music Recital Hall, in the UM Music Building. Suggested donation: $15 adults/$8 students. Call 544-4923 and visit dolcecanto.info. If your chakras have been a little backed up lately, clear ‘em out during Table Time with Alternative Healers, an intuitive healing and energy balancing workshop from

Teen Challenge Montana’s Women’s Residential Center performs the play It’s Not Too Late, which is about the Columbine High School shootings with a performance at 5:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $25, includes a meal. Doors open at 4:30 PM. Get tickets at the Teen Challenge Thrift Store, Higher Ground Espresso or by calling 543-1912. UM hosts a talk with two sweatshop workers about the role students and community members can play in helping them in their legal battle with Nike—which includes trying to get severance and notice pay—with the discussion starting at 6 PM, in the University Center Theater. Free. E-mail Ciarra at ciarra.barreras@umontana.edu. Their weapons of choice are metaphor and rhythm: UM’s Second Wind Reading Series continues with readings by poets Carrie Ojanen and Keetje Kuipers, starting at 6:30 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Kuipers will also be Call 549-9010.

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He’s talking about a different Bruno: Dr. W. Vogelsberger presents “The Key to Tommorow’s Health: Help and Healing Through the Teachings of Bruno Groening,” a discussion on spiritual healing which starts at 7 PM in Room 204 of UM’s James E. Todd Building. Free, but donations appreciated. Call Teresa at 503-244-1618 and visit bruno-groening.org. Storytelling, poetry, song, prayer and movement combine to tell a story about our deepening ecological and economic crises during a performance of Leaps and Bounds, a production of the Affording Hope Project which starts at 7 PM at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. Free, but donations accepted. Visit affordinghopeproject.org. They are so saxy: Saxophonists Lee Konitz and Grace Kelly keep their reeds buzzing when they play jazz with David Morgenroth, Craig Hall and Brad Edwards at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave., at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Super 8 film never looked so good: Indy contributor Andy Smetanka presents a night of Missoula movies and scratchy Super 8 memories, which includes music videos by Fireballs of Freedom and Volumen, silhouette animation, time lapse work and several shorts, starting at 8 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. $8. Includes refreshments by the Big Sky Brewing Company. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

Peter Pan can really fly! Music based on the play by James M. Barrie Lyrics by Carolyn Leigh Music by Mark Charlap Additional music by Jule Styne, Betty Comden and Adolf Green Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Directed by Michael McGill SPONSORED BY

• First Security Bank • Lambros Real Estate ERA • Western States Insurance Agency

April 30–May 2, 5–9, 12–16 (406) 728-PLAY • www.mctinc.org

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Page 29 April 22–April 29, 2010


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The can-can’t. The UM cast of The 25 Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee performs the musical Fri., April 23–Sat., April 24 and Tue., April 27-Sat., May 1, at 7:30 PM nightly with a 2 PM matinee Sat. at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. Show also runs May 4–8. th

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Saxophonist Grace Kelly keeps her reed buzzing with delight when she plays jazz with David Morgenroth, Craig Hall and Brad Edwards at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave., at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com.

MONDAY

Listen to some homegirls chirp in unison when the UM Women’s Chorus performs at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

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Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 9:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from the Freemole Quartet, and DJs Gary Stein and Ryan Wendel.

Page 30 April 22–April 29, 2010

26

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

nightlife You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Joining up with UM’s French Club Le Cercle Francophone means you can repeatedly ask people “Pourquoi suis-je en vie?” or just brush up on your French skills when the club meets this and every Mon. at James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., at 7 PM. Free UM’s celebration of Montana Archaeology Month continues with the lecture “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Archaeology: Fort Missoula’s Lost Excavations,” which starts at 7 PM in Room 331 of UM’s University Center. Free. Stanzas creep off the page when local poet Mark Gibbons signs and reads copies of Mauvaises Herbes in English—while UM prof Michel Valentin reads it in French—at 7 PM at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Donna Smith and Mike Freemole exonerate your grapes from death row when they play “jazz with a twist” at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. He busts out a rhyme as smoothly as he croons a country tune. Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” mixes up shades of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour mate Nima Samimi at The Boiler Room in Kalispell, 525 Eighth St. E., at 7 PM. $6. (See Noise in this issue.)

They unleash the beast: Philadelphia’s Power Animal lets their experimental pop “power music” run free when they play the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., at 8 PM. $5, all ages. Locals FagRag and Shahs open. An artistic bout of sorts ought to tickle your musical fun glands during another installment of Top of the Mic, an open mic competition running this and every Mon. through April, starting at 8:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Alcohol and bowling go hand over foot during Monday Madness at Five Valley’s Bowl, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which features $1 bowling after 9 PM as well as $1.25 Coors Light cans this and every Mon. at the bowling center. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. Men drink on the cheap and can enjoy a game of pigskin, as well as karaoke, during Men’s Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Mon. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277.

TUESDAY April

27

UM’s Mansfield Center Brown Bag Lecture Series continues with “Teaching English in Inner Mongolia,” which starts at noon in the


Mansfield Center Conference Room, on the fourth floor of the Mansfield Library. Free. Call 243-2988.

Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. Email terillovet@hotmail.com.

nightlife

This isn’t redneck rap: Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” offers up a mixture of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour mate Nima Samimi at 7 PM the Raven Bar and Grill in Woods Bay, 4.5 miles south of Bigfork on 39 Orchard Lane. Pass-the-hat donations accepted. (See Noise in this issue.)

See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess what family of animalia the epihippus came from during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Keep your mind outta the gutter. Learn what exactly the “backdoor” is while wrapping your head around the “stop and go” and slurping down a fuzzy navel or sex on the beach during free poker lessons at 6 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Includes drink specials. Call 549-4152. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, sadcore—every Tue. at 6 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Take part in collective thoughts and actions for healing and enlightenment at the Healers’ Gathering Meeting, which takes place the last Tue. of each month at 6:30 PM at the Eagles Lodge meeting room, 2420 South Ave. W. This month: Speaker Jane Putz, a body talk practitioner. Free. Call 273-2871. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday

All genres welcome, but probably not postmetal: Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., presents a Nashville Songwriters Association Regional Workshop from 7–9 PM at the studio. Free. Call 542-9258. An assemblage master offers a glimpse into his aesthetic world when artist Michael DeMeng hosts a presentation for his new book Dusty Diablos: Folklore, Iconography, Assemblage, OLE!, at 7 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-9010. (See Scope in this issue.) Keep the poetry flowing from your fingers during the 406 Writers’ Workshop: Poetry with Chris Dombrowski, a salon-style workshop that runs for six weeks this and every Tue. from 7–9:15 PM at a TBA location. $175. RSVP by visiting 406writersworkshop.com. The UM Concert Band toots at you but not necessarily with you when they play the University Theatre, at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. Baritone Thomas Baty and soprano Liza Shpileyko give their pipes a benevolent beating when they perform a student recital at 7:30 PM, in UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

Meadow View Community Church, 3821 Stephens Ave., hosts “Foster Care Awareness,” a community talk about kids that age out of the foster care system which features comments from Mayor John Engen and others starting at 7:30 PM. Free. Call Kim Spurzem 406-461-4134. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? Here’s one for the ball whackers: What is the score of 40-all called in a game of tennis? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Chance mixes with money and prizes during bingo night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which occurs this and every Tue. starting at 8 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Ladies get their drink on and celebrate themselves with $1.50 well drinks during Ladies’

Night at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which runs this and every Tue. starting at 9 PM. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. They’re members of the rawk chamber of commerce: Orange Shades and Discharacter tear it up with indie and rock when they play the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Javier Ryan and Special Peoples sanitize your ears when they play what’s likely to be hip-hop at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

WEDNESDAY April

28

Support YWCA Missoula and get a screaming deal when its Secret Seconds store, 1136 W. Broadway St., hosts a 75 percent off everything sale which runs all day today through Sat., May 1. Free to attend. A shut down of the store occurs May 2–4, where staff and volunteers clean the building. To volunteer, call Caitlin at 543-6691. Visit ywcaofmissoula.org. Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, familyfriendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free.

nightlife Enjoy some frozen lactose on the cheap and support local and national firefighters during Baskin-Robbins’ 31 Cent Scoop Night, which runs from 5–10 PM at Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream, 1880 Brooks St. Free to attend. Proceeds will be donated to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. Call Matt at 542-2731.

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Missoula Independent

Page 31 April 22–April 29, 2010


Joan Zen avoids your bout with back scratch fever when she plays the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Kids can absorb a bilingual story during “El dia de los ninos/El dia de los libros” (aka Children’s Day/Book Day), a story time which starts at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org.

What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other likeminded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Even his axe gets universal health care: Canadian folk rock singer/songwriter Bruce Cockburn shows us how our northern neighbors do it best when he plays the University Theatre at 8 PM. $30 plus fees at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. Call 243-4051. Hot Topic punk rockers, this one’s for you: Utah’s The Used brings posthardcore and injects some alt rock into the mix when they play the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM. $26/$24.50 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and online at ticketfly.com. (See Noise in this issue.)

Missoula Independent

Page 32 April 22–April 29, 2010

He makes your seafood go down so smooth: Trusten Williamson plays acoustic music starting at 8 PM at Kalispell’s North Bay Grille, 139 First Ave. W. Free. Call 755-4441. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: The score of 40-all in a game of tennis is called Deuce. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Get a wicked case of “bowling finger” during Five Valley’s Bowl’s Wicked Wednesday, which features $2 bowling after 9 PM plus $2 cans of Bud Light this and every Wed. at the bowling center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Get Crunk” by Lil Jon (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. He busts out a rhyme as smoothly as he croons a country tune. Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” mixes up shades of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour


invites you to the 2010 Dean Stone Lecture

SPOTLIGHT

beat exchange

Caesar Andrews, visiting professor, Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada – Reno, and former editor of the Detroit Free Press and other national news organizations, presents:

Two pioneering electronic music fests—the Communikey Festival of Electronic Arts of Boulder, Colo. and the Dis-Patch Festival of Belgrade, Serbia— decided to join forces recently as a way to promote a cross-cultural exchange of electronic music and digital art. The collaborative tour will hit major cities in the United States before heading on to Serbia. And, surprisingly, the whole thing kicks off right here in our mountain town. The tour includes D Numbers, a three-piece out of Santa Fe, N.M. that plays experimental indietronic reminiscent of groups like Black Dice, but with a little more rock influence. Two of the live Serbian acts include Piece of Shh…, a dubstep producer who cranks out a funky mix of neck snapping rhythms and spacey textures, and WoO, pictured here, who pushes an entirely different sound: guitar-meets-synth ambient pieces that are dark and noisy in parts but not harsh, and sound like a mix between Brian Eno and Christian Fennesz. The two Serbs will be joined WHAT: Communikey and Dis-Patch Festival Collaborative Tour 2010 WHEN: Thu., April 22, at 9 PM WHERE: The Palace

“Journalists and American Idol: What We Can Learn”

Thursday, April 22, 2010 • 7 p.m. during their sets by Incredible Bob, a video performance artist whose work is, I have to say, pretty incredible. The guy creates what’s called “glitch art,” and the result is a psychedelically morphing array of unrecognizable images that he sources from video feedback. As a bonus to this one-night mini-fest, Piece of Shh… is holding a free audio software workshop earlier in the day from 3–6 p.m. in Room 218 of UM’s Music Building. It’ll be a chance for local beatsmiths to learn the ins and outs of the software program Ableton Live—the performance weapon of choice for many laptop musicians.

HOW MUCH: $7

mate Nima Samimi at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. (See Noise in this issue.) Be sure you’ve grabbed yourself a designated driver so you can imbibe during Wasted Wednesdays at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers drink specials and starts at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Seattle’s Eclectic Approach confiscates your stash of medical jelly rolls when they play rock and pop at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY April

29

Outdoor junkies, don’t miss this: The UM Outdoor Program presents its Used Outdoor Gear Sale, which runs from noon–5 PM at the University Center Atrium. Free to attend. Any gear to sell should be dropped off at the UC between 7–11 AM, and the Outdoor Program collects 15 percent of the selling price. Call 243-5172. Because I said so: UM presents “China’s Human Rights Record and Why It Matters to Us,” a talk with Columbia University prof Andrew J. Nathan, starting at 3:40 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2311.

169 Skaggs Building • Admission is free

—Ira Sather-Olson

nightlife Celebrate the past and the fact that Grant Creek’s one-room schoolhouse was recently placed on the National Schoolhouse Register during the Friends of the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula’s 2010 Annual Meeting, which starts with a social hour at 5:30 PM at Grant Creek Inn, 5280 Grant Creek Road. Dinner follows, along with a slew of programs. $25 per person. RSVP by April 26 by calling Robert Brown at 728-3476 Ext. 1. Get neighborly during Missoula’s Office of Neighborhood’s Neighborhood Training Series, which features “Overcoming Bureaucracy: A Panel,” from 6–9 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free, with refreshments. RSVP by calling 552-6081 or by e-mailing Erin at escott@ci.missoula.mt.us. Donna Smith halts the war over bellybutton lint when she plays jazz and blues at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. If you’d like to review and comment on the environmental assessment for the Kearl Module Transport Project—which means Imperial Oil would haul over-dimension loads through Montana—then get to an open house which starts at 6 PM, with a presentation/public hearing at 6:30 PM, at Meadow Hill Middle School, 4210 S. Reserve St. Free. View the assessment at the Missoula

Public Library, or online at mdt.mt.gov/pubinvolve/eis_ea.shtml. Keep it super sustainable during “Living Green: Two Community Conversations,” which starts at 6 PM with a potluck dinner, and is followed at 7 PM with presentations from UM prof Steve Running and gardener Molly Hackett, all at the University Congregational Church, 401 University Ave. Cost TBA. E-mail SteveMcArthur@aol.com. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Petroleum free is the way to be during the Peace and Justice Film Series screening of Oil + Water, which follows two kayakers as they embark on a road trip without petroleum, starting at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 April 22–April 29, 2010


WEEK LONG EVENTS Ride Free all Week on the Mountain Line. Mountain Line buses will operate FREE OF CHARGE on all routes during BWBW. No bus service Sunday. “Give transit a try – on us.” Mountain Line. Ray Hoff. 543-8386. The University of Montana’s Walk N Roll Week. Mon – Fri, 7:30am – 2:30pm. Head to the university any way other than driving alone and you will be eligible to enter a fantastic raffle. Volunteers will hand out raffle tickets at UM entrances all week, or you can get your raffle ticket at the University Center. Raffle (Friday noon) prizes include a cruiser bike, bike trailer, head lights, skateboards, locks, more. See also Friday listing. Nancy Wilson. 243-4599. Transfer Center Information Services. Mon-Tue–Thur-Fri, 1 – 5pm. Wed 2 – 5pm. Mountain Line employees will be available to answer questions regarding routes and schedules in the Mountain Line Transfer Center. Mountain Line. Ray Hoff. 543-8386. On MCAT. Watch for special BWBW programming on MCAT, Bresnan Cable Channel 7. See www.mcat.org for a schedule or call 542-6228. Good Food Store…non-polluter commuter deals. For anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a treat: See daily listings. Rebecca. 541-3663 x 228. Blue Bike Special. Mon–Fri, 8am - 8pm. Sat 8am – 6pm. Sun, 11am - 6pm. At Currents Aquatic Center in McCormick Park, grab a Blue Bike, free for the day. Enjoy cruising around town on the Parks and Recreation free Dasani Blue Bikes. Missoula Parks and Recreation Dept. Jason. 552-6271. Kettlehouse Brewing Co. Incentives. All BWBW except Sunday. 12 – 9pm. All who bike/walk/bus to the either Kettlehouse location can enter a drawing for free schwag (shirts, glassware, hats, etc). Angie. 728-1660 x 206. Water Bottle Giveaway. All week. REI will give a free water bottle to customers who bike, walk, or bus to the store and let us know they did. 2230 North Reserve Street. Ryan. 829-0432. Peace Center Promotions. Get around by bike, bus, or on foot this week and get a free bite-size Fair Trade chocolate at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. On Sat 4-24, get 25% off any purchase except books. Katie. 543-3955. Bonner Milltown History Center Open House. Tues, Wed, Thurs 2 – 4:30pm. Bike, walk, or bus to the History Center in the Bonner Post Office Building for free coffee, refreshments, and a bit of history. Judy Matson. 258-6335. 20% Off any Zoo City Item. Mon – Sat, 12 – 8pm. Any who bike, walk, bus to 235 N. 1st get 20% off any Zoo City item. ZOO CITY APPAREL. Chris. 529-6482.

BWB Sale. All week long. SELVEDGE STUDIO. 509 S. Higgins. 20% off purchase if customer bikes, buses, or walks to Selvedge. Leah. 541-7171. Raffle for a Camelback. Customers who bike or bus to PIPESTONE MOUNTAINEERING during BWBW will receive a ticket for a raffle for a free Camelback given away on Saturday April 28th. 129 West Front. Jim Wilson or Dave. 721-1670. Free flower raffles. All who bike/walk/bus to Bitterroot Flower Shop during BWBW can enter a drawing for a $50 bouquet or gift certificate. Any who have a Bicycle Benefits sticker on their helmet will get 1/2 dozen medium roses. 811 South Higgins. Nancy. 542-0309. 2 for 1 Admission to Children’s Museum. Tues – Fri, 10am – 5pm. Choose sustainable transportation to the Missoula Children’s Museum during BWBW and receive 2 admissions for the price of 1 and be entered into our Free Birthday Party Raffle to be announced at the end of BWBW. Kiddos encouraged to participate in “sustain-a-travel” coloring contest; winners announced on Newwest.net. Families First and Missoula Children’s Museum. 225 W. Front. Sara. 541-7529. Free Dog Treats! All day, all week. Every dog owner who bikes or walks to either location of GO FETCH! will receive free treats worth $1.00. 627 Woody and 517 S. Higgins. Kate. 728-2275. Bernice’s Bakery Specials. All week long, specials each day. BERNICE’S BAKERY. See daily listings. Christine. 728-1358. Buy Clothing, Not Gas! All week. 20% off purchase if customer bikes, buses, or walks to Betty’s. Betty’s Divine. 521 S. Higgins. Aimee. 721-4777. Meadowsweet’s Annual Event. Mon–Fri, 10am – 6pm. Sat, 11am – 5pm. Use an alternate mode of transportation and get 30% off a purchase of one item in the store (Dr. Hauschka excluded). MEADOWSWEET HERBS. 180 S. Third West. Elaine. 728-0543. Save a Car; Ride a Pony. 11am – 5:30pm. Anyone who bikes, walks or buses to the Carousel this week is eligible for one free ride per day. A Carousel For Missoula. 101 Carousel Drive, Caras Park. Theresa Cox. 5498382. BWBW Drink Off. All week long. $1.00 off any drink for any who walk, bike, or ride the bus to any LOOSE CABOOSE location: Brooks/South, N. Reserve, Mullan Road, or Broadway/Palmer. Stephanie. 360-6232. “RIDE AND SEEK” Bus Bench Scavenger Hunt. All week. Ride the Mountain Line bus and find the MIM couches around town. See www.missoulainmotion.com for details. Raffle prizes for eligible entries. Ryan. 258-4962. Rhinoceros/New Belgium Pint Night. Walk, bike, or bus to the RHINOCEROS during the week and register to win a New Belgium “Cruiser” bike.

Winner drawn Thur, Apr 29, 10:30pm. Discounts on NEW BELGIUM beers & get a commemorative glass. Must be 21 and over and present to win. Brad. 721-6061. BWBW at Montana Natural History Center. Tues – Fri, 12 – 5pm; Sat, 12 – 4pm. Free admission to the Center for bike/walk/busers all week, and free MNHC poster too --during business hours. 120 Hickory Street. Jessie. 327-0405. Free Admission to the Historical Museum. Tues – Sun, 12 – 5:00 pm. Free admission for anyone who walks, bikes, rolls, or rides the bus to the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Enjoy the exhibit “When the Mountains Roared: the Fire of 1910.” Building 322, Fort Missoula. Bob Brown. 728-3476. Walk with a Friend and Paws for a Picture. All week. Take your best friend on a walk to any of the trails and parks in Missoula (don’t forget your leash) and have a picture taken with your friend. To enter drawing, E-mail picture to MAC@ho.missoula.mt.us or bring your picture into the shelter and receive a fun pack of goodies. Drawing May 1 for prizes of $100, $50, and $25. Missoula Animal Control Shelter. 6700 Butler Cr Rd. Erin or Ed. 541-7387. Half price on bike maps and bike licenses. Register your bike at half price Mon –Fri, 8am – 5pm. City Treasurer’s Office in City Hall. Phil Smith. 552-6352.

SCHOOL EVENTS Chief Charlo – BWBW in motion. All week long, events to promote children walking to school: poster contest, walking routes, incentives. Brenna Vestre. 396-1787. Clark Fork School. Students pre-K to grade 5 will keep track of use of alternative transportation during the school week using passport booklets. All participants rewarded. Kathleen Harper. 829-0671. Franklin – Bike Walk Bus Week Activities. Treats, prizes, bike rides, obstacle courses, and more. See daily listings. Jesse 493-0564. Lewis and Clark – Walking School Bus. Tues – Fri am. Walking school buses on the 4 traditional routes. Join the walking bus or use own alternative transportation and meet on the playground for healthy snacks and/or morning activities. Enter to win prizes. Lisa. 370-9525. Lowell – Unique events to encourage walking/biking to school. See daily listings. Jen Bardsley. 543-6215. Missoula International School Bike/Walk-a-thon. All week. PE classes will chart who bikes/walks to school. Class with most participation gets a party. Celebration before school on Friday. Natalie. 546-6110.

19th ANNUAL BIKE WALK BUS WEEK MISSOULA 2010 City of Missoula Bicycle Pedestrian Office: 435 Ryman Street Missoula, MT 59802 The City of Missoula will provide reasonable accommodation for any known disability that may interfere with a person participating in any program offered by the City. Alternative-accessible formats of this brochure will be provided on request. Please call the City at 552-6352.

Sponsored, in part, by Paxson – poster contest in advance, so posters available during BWB week, walking school bus on Wednesday only. Bike ride Thursday. See daily listings. Rattlesnake – Passports to a Healthy Lifestyle. Students receive a stamp for each day they arrive at school by walking, biking, busing, or carpooling to school. Students with four stamps at the end of the week will be entered in a drawing for numerous prizes, including 2 new bikes. Walking school bus and free breakfast for participants Friday. Tracy. 728-2400 x4523. Russell – walking school bus and rally. On Wednesday only, see listing. Sussex School. BWB to School. During the school week, each day a student participates, they will be given a raffle ticket to win prizes. FUN incentives and friendly competition. There will also be a prize for the class with the

highest participation. Robin. 549-8327. Willard - 7th Annual Free Bike Safety Check. Mon – Fri, 9:20 - 11am. Willard School Chain Links bicycle mechanics program will provide free safety inspections and basic tune-ups for anyone in the community all week. Willard School Chain Links. Vanessa. 529-6642. Commotion High School’s Commuter Challenge. Hellgate, Sentinel, Willard, and Big Sky high school students who bike, walk, bus, skateboard or carpool during BWBW will be entered to win awesome prizes like bikes, movie tickets, and much more. Prizes to schools with the highest percentage in their size category. Commotion volunteers will be present at each school to sign students up for the challenge and help them map out their sustainable transportation route. Commotion and Missoula in Motion. Erin. 258-4962.

DAILY EVENTS Saturday April 24 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8 pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for a Bernice’s delicious, elegantly designed 6” cake. Christine Littig. 728-1358. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing, receive a free 12-oz drip coffee at Beverage Bar. Rebecca. 541-3663. YMCA Riverbank Run. Start location: Broadway and Higgins, downtown. Start times: 10K run –9:00am. 5K run –10:30am. Tri-fecta - 11:25am. 1-mile fun run - 11:35am. School-age participants can register through their school and compete against other schools. Missoula Family YMCA. Jason Shearer. 7219622. Forestry Day. 9am – 4 pm. At the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Free admission to the events for all who bike, walk, or take the bus. U of Montana’s Woodsmen’s Team Competition with pro/am competitions, vendors, food, operating sawmill, tours of the fire lookout. Bob Brown. 728-3476. Frank Winkler Memorial Ride to Ninemile. 10 am. 55 miles. Leave from Perkins (Reserve and Mullan). Missoulians on Bicycles. John Crull. 543-3230. Festival of Cycles. 12 – 4pm. A BIG bicycle extravaganza with events for everyone. Build a bike, donate a bike, tune up your bike, learn maintenance skills, get bike parts, create bicycle sculptures, make a bicycle parking rack, see a range of human powered vehicles, and participate in the kids corner with bike painting, bike crafts, an obstacle course, and free helmets. Mechanical support from Willard School Chain Links. Bike mechanics come down with your tools. Good food, live music and more! Free Cycles Missoula. Bonner Park. Bob Giordano. 880-6834.

Alliance for Missoula. Ethel. 549-9722. 12th Annual Promenade. 6:30pm. Meet and join neighbors at Bonner Park, corner of Evans and Hilda, for a walking evening of history, architecture, and tales in the historic University Area. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 549-0869.

Tuesday April 27 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for 6 loaves of Bread. Choose from any of our Old World Breads. Christine Littig. 728-1358. Grounds For Change at the CATALYST CAFÉ. 7am – 3:00pm. 6th Annual. Free drip coffee or hot tea all day long to bikers, walkers, bus riders and carpoolers. 111 North Higgins. Martha. 542-1337. LE PETIT OUTRE Free Coffee. 7 – 10am. Receive one free 8-oz coffee and cranberry struan roll when you bike, walk or bus to Le Petite Outre. 129 S. 4th West. Selden. 543-3311. Breakfast on the Bridges. 7:00 – 9:00am, while supplies last. Missoula in Motion staff and Way to Go! Club volunteers will serve coffee and breakfast treats to commuters crossing the California Street and Madison Street Bicycle-Pedestrian bridges. Alex/Ryan. 258-4961. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7 – 9am. For anyone biking/walking/busing to the Good Food Store, receive free 10-oz fresh-squeezed orange juice at Beverage Bar. Rebecca. 541-3663.

Bike Walk Bus for Bargains at Secret Seconds. 10am – 6pm. Bike, walk, or bus yourself to any of the 3 Secret Seconds locations and receive 50% off one regularly-priced clothing item. All proceeds benefit battered women and children. Locations are 1136 W. Broadway, 920 Kensington, and 1221 Helen Ave. Secret Seconds. Caitlin Copple. 543-6691. Bike Maintenance Workshop and helmet sale. 11am – 2pm. At the Good Food Store. Free Cycles Missoula will do minor repairs to your bike and show you how to do them; other groups will have commuting information including Missoula in Motion. St. Patrick Hospital will sell bike helmets for $7 and fit them. Doug. 541-3663. Historic Walking Tour of the UM Campus. 12 noon. Join Prof. Mike Monsos in front of Main Hall on the Oval. Have a new look at the campus, which is also the Montana State Arboretum. Historic Preservation Commission. Philip. 258-4706. 10th Annual Pedal vs. Metal Errand Dash. 12 noon. Teams of bicyclists and drivers compete against the clock to see how long each takes to complete a list of errands in downtown Missoula. The contest, consistently dominated by the bicycle teams, starts and finishes at the Mountain Line Transfer Center at Ryman & Pine. Spectators encouraged. Missoula Bicycle-Pedestrian Advisory Board. John Weyhrich. 721-1776 x 233. Franklin Neighborhood Ride/Walk: 4pm. Meet on the big playground, head out for a ride or walk loop around town with a Dairy Queen stop. Franklin School. Jessie. 493-0564.

Returning Parking to Paradise. 7:30am – 2:30pm. ASUM Transportation Board and the ASUM Sustainability board will turn parking spots between the UC and the Library into green space for the day. Stop by and say hi. Nancy Wilson. 243-4599.

Historical Fort Missoula Walking Tour. 6:30pm. Bob Brown, the Museum Director, leads a tour of the grounds of the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula and the historic greater Fort Missoula. Meet “Major Charles Rawn”, founder of the Fort, for this behind-the-scenes tour. Historical Museum at Fort Missoula. Building 322, Fort Missoula. Bob Brown. 728-3476.

Sunday April 25

Franklin Walk to School Day. 8am. Hackey-sac Tuesday. Students receive a footbag for participating in BWBW and get a chance to kick it around with their favorite teachers on the playgrounds. Teachers & staff receive coffee cards for playing. Jessie. 493-0564.

Thursday April 29

Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for 15 cups of Bernice’s Organic Blend coffee brewed double strength…often declared the best coffee in town. Christine Littig. 728-1358.

3nd Annual Bird-Watching Walk. 8 – 9:30am. Meet at Montana Natural History Center (120 Hickory St), just off the bike trail west of the Orange Street underpass. Join a naturalist to look for spring migrants and other animals along the Clark Fork River Trail. 327-0405.

GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing, receive a free 12 oz drip coffee at Beverage Bar. Rebecca. 541-3663.

A stroll through Franklin neighborhood. 10am - noon. Meet BWAM member Jon at Franklin Park picnic canopy for “A stroll through Franklin neighborhood: Parks, Pockets, gardens; some Missoula history and structure - infra and outfra.” Bike Walk Alliance for Missoula. Jon at 543-3409.

Northside Kettlehouse Kickoff Event. 5:00 pm. The first 50 people who come to the Northside taproom by walking/biking/busing get a free Kettlehouse pint glass. Kettlehouse Brewing Co. Angie. 728-1660 x 206.

Deer Creek Sneak. 10am. Group bike ride leaving from Eastgate/Albertsons parking lot. The ride is 22 miles: 1/4 paved, 3/4 dirt. Missoulians on Bicycles. Inc. Kathy York. 543-6274. Missoula Safe Kids Day. 12 – 4pm. Bicycle Helmet discount sales and helmet fitting at Fort Missoula Park. St. Patrick Hospital. Michelle. 329-5660. Bicycle Tour of A.J. Gibson’s Downtown. 1:30pm. Meet Rafael Chacon at the Ryman Street entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse for this guided BICYCLE TOUR tour of historic architecture. Bring your bicycle (or run along with the tour). Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 258-4706.

Monday April 26 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for a Bernice’s travel mug and 25 cents off your future beverages purchased in house at Bernices. Christine Littig. 728-1358. BUTTERFLY HERBS Free Coffee or Tea. 7 – 9:30am. Individuals using alternative transportation will receive a free cup of coffee or tea from Butterfly Herbs. 232 N. Higgins. Scott. 728-8780. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7am – 5pm. For anyone biking/walking/busing receive a free organic apple at Customer Service Desk. Rebecca. 541-3663. Tune up Your Commute. 7 – 9am. Worden’s Parking Lot downtown. Free Cycles and Missoula In Motion team up to tune up your bike for BWBW. Minor repairs and commuter information available. Alex/Ryan. 258-4961.

GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7am – 5pm. Anyone biking/walking/busing to Good Food Store, receive a free organic banana at Customer Service Desk. Rebecca. 541-3663.

11:30am – 1pm. Large meeting Room, Missoula Public Library. Mothers and their children are invited to this free meeting led by Alex Stokman, Missoula in Motion, about how you can incorporate alternative transportation into your family routine. Eva. 721-6111.

Breakfast on the Bridges. 7:00 – 9:00am, while supplies last. Missoula in Motion staff and Way to Go! Club volunteers will serve coffee and breakfast treats to commuters crossing the Northside overpass and the Van Buren Bicycle-Pedestrian bridges. Alex/Ryan. 258-4961.

Discounted Bike Helmets and Fitting. 12 – 3pm. In front of the Lomasson Center (west of the “oval” on U of M Campus). Get a bike helmet and fitting (must know head or hat size)! New bike helmets are $7.00 while supplies last. St. Patrick Hospital Trauma Unit and ASUM. Michelle. 329-5660 or Nancy 243-4599.

Free Breakfast at Lowell School. 8 – 8:30am. Free breakfast at Lowell Helping Hands Garden for students, parents and staff who walk, bike or bus to school this morning. Lowell School. Jen Bardsley. 543-6215.

Walking Exploration of the McCormick and Southside Historic Districts. 6:30pm. Meet at 3rd and Myrtle next to Bernice’s. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. Philip Maechling. 258-4706.

BWBW Deals. 11am – 6:30pm. Bike, walk, or ride the bus to the brewery and get a 40 oz stainless steel bottle full of beer for $10 (60% off), plus free samples. Big Sky Brewing. 5417 Trumpeter Way. Alix. 544-2777 X 120.

Wednesday April 28 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for a 5 healthy lunch combos. Choose from a 2-part combo of soup, salad, or sandwich. Christine Littig. 728-1358. Great Harvest Bike Walk Bus Roll. 7 - 9:30am. Free cinnamon swirl roll for all who walk, bike or bus to GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. 1407 S. Higgins. 728-4549. GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. All day. For anyone biking/walking/busing receives a free GFS cookie at Beverage Bar. Rebecca. 541-3663. Bike/Walk/Bus for & to the Planet. 8 – 10am. Free 16 oz drip coffee for any who bike, walk, or bus to work today. LIQUID PLANET. 223 N. Higgins. 541-4541.

Franklin BWBW Kickoff. 8am. Morning goodies (muffins, juice, pencils, stickers etc) on the playground for all students who walk/bike to school. Commemorative ‘dogtag’ necklace for first students. Jessie. 493-0564.

BWBW Walk to School Rally. 7:30 – 8:20am. Russell School. Students will take parent-led walking school buses; families and staff will gather to celebrate BWB Week. Featuring Monte, local celebs, crafts, drawings, coffee, muffins. 3216 South Russell. Martha. 728-2400 x4846.

Missoula Community School Bike Safety Rodeo. 9:00 – 11:00 am. Parking lot, corner of Myrtle St and S. 6th West. Linn Veen. 542-2833

Walking School Bus to Paxson School. 7:45 - 8:30am. Paxson parent volunteers will be “bus drivers” to lead children safely to school. Breakfast for all kids and parents who walk, bike, bus or carpool to school. Angela. 549-8596.

Discounted Bike Helmets and Fitting. 10am – 1pm. At St. Patrick Hospital (Broadway Building). Get a bike helmet and fitting (must know head or hat size)! New bike helmets are $7.00 while supplies last. St. Patrick Hospital Trauma Unit. Michelle. 329-5660. South Side Bike Ride. 4:30pm. Meet at Jacob’s Island Bridge near UM for “Safe and Pleasant biking on the South Side” with a BWAM member. Specific destinations may be chosen by participants. Bike Walk

Missoula Independent

Bagels for Bikers and Walkers. 7 – 9am. Non-polluter commuters stop at Bagels on Broadway and receive a free bagel with cream cheese packet and a small orange juice or coffee. BAGELS ON BROADWAY. 223 W. Broadway. Sue Thompson. 728-8900.

La Leche League meeting: Alternative Transportation for Your Family.

Crazy Socks to School Day at Lowell School. Wear crazy socks to school while walking and get a prize. Lowell School. Jen Bardsley. 543-6215.

Bike Walk Bus Week Discount. 11am – 9pm. 137 W. Front. Get 20% off your food order (excludes alcohol) if you bike/walk/bus to the downtown MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA. Stephen. 721-0077.

Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for 7 Bernice’s pastries, including croissants, danishes, muffins, scones, and more. Christine Littig. 728-1358.

Paxson’s 5th Annual Big Dipper Bike Ride. 2:30 – 4pm. For Paxson students and parents. Parent volunteers show students how to get from school to “kid friendly” places around Missoula using safe bike routes. Paxson Elementary School. Angela. 549-8596. Commuter Party at Adventure Cycling Association. 4 - 7pm. The ACA courtyard at 150 E. Pine St. If you biked/walked/ bussed/boarded/carpooled, join us: refreshments and snacks, live music by the Gravely Mountain Boys. 4 - 5pm free bike maintenance from Missoula Free Cycles. Bring treats to share, a cup for beverages, and your dancing shoes. Adventure Cycling Assn, Missoula Free Cycles. Teri at 721-1776 x 225. Stories and Stones Walking Tour. 6:30pm. Missoula Cemetery. Take a walking tour of this historic cemetery and meet some of the individuals that helped shape Missoula, as re-enactors bring some of our ‘stones’ to life before your eyes. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 552-6070 or 258-4706.

Friday April 30 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter a raffle for a $20 gift certificate. Christine Littig. 728-1358. Bike Walk Bus BREAK. 7 – 9am. Free Grande coffee for all bike/walk/busers at BREAK ESPRESSO. 432 N. Higgins. Break Espresso. Elisa. 728-7300.

Decorate Your Bike and Bike Parade Day at Lowell School. Decorate your bike with streamers, flags, or balloons and ride it to school today. Parade of decorated bikes around the neighborhood at 3pm. You can make a nameplate and noise makers for your bike. Get your bike fixed up for a spring full of riding. Learn street safety like bike signals, street signs, and traffic rules. Lowell School. Jen Bardsley. 543-6215.

GOOD FOOD STORE Incentives. 7 – 9am. For anyone biking/walking/busing receives a free 10-oz freshsqueezed carrot juice. Rebecca. 541-3663.

Treats for Vanpoolers. All day. Treats provided in appreciation to those utilizing the I Ride vanpools. Missoula Ravalli Transportation Management Association. Megan. 327-8515.

Mallwalkers Ride the Bus. Park your car at the Missoula Senior Citizen Center (705 S. Higgins) and catch

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Walking School Bus to Rattlesnake School. 8 - 8:30am. Rattlesnake parent volunteers will be “bus drivers” to lead children to school, ending with free breakfast. Join “A Walk with the Principal” on one of the routes. 728-2400 x4523.

the Route 6 MOUNTAIN LINE bus to Southgate Mall at, 7:18, 7:47, 8:18, or 8:47am. The first 20 Mall Walkers to arrive at the Mall by bus will receive a gift card good at any store in the Mall. Return on the 8:45, 9:15, 10:15 or 11:15am bus. Mountain Line. Stephanie. 543-8386. Mallwalkers Breakfast. 8:30 – 10am. Free breakfast for mall walkers in celebration of Bike Walk Bus Week, and promoting walking as a healthier choice. Want to learn more? Join in! Southgate Mall. Trisha. 721-5140 x 19. Walk N Roll Week. 12 noon. UM Library Mall. Celebration of The Week. ASUM Transportation’s incentive program for The University of Montana as part of Missoula’s BWBW. fantastic week-long raffle prizes include a Cruiser bike, bike trailer, head lights, skateboard, locks, and more! Plus small prizes to folks in attendance. Entertainment provided by Broken Valley Road Show. Nancy Wilson. 243-4599. Downtown Walk. 12 noon. Meet at the “fish” sculpture at the north end of Higgins bridge for an architectural treasure hunt and to view Downtown buildings with guide Philip Maechling. Missoula Historic Preservation Commission. 258-4706. Kim Williams Weed Eradication Project. 12 – 3pm. Washington Middle School 8th grade students, staff and parents will bike from school to Mt. Sentinel trailhead to pull noxious weeds as a community service project in the spirit of BWBW. Ron Ireland. 542-4085. Get on Board. 3pm at MOBASH Skate Park. Commotion and local Flagship Programs invite all Missoulians to bring their boards as we announce the winners for the High School Commuter Challenge. Skate and Long Boarders celebrate their culture (and show their skills) with food and music. Prizes will be given. Erin. 258-4962. Bike Doctor Safety Team at Lowell. 3:30pm. The Bike Doctor Safety Team will provide demonstrations of bicycling skills -- including BMX, Free Ride, and Mountain Bike skills -- at Lowell Field for the community and Lowell students. Featuring junior alumni from Lowell Elementary and Pro riders. Jen Bardsley. 543-6215. Franklin School. 4 – 6pm. Bike rodeo on the big playground. Fun obstacle course, paper delivery challenge, & more. Great prizes. Pot luck snacks (bring something healthy). Jessie. 493-0564. Get to Know the Northside/Westside ‘Hood’. 4:00pm. Meet at the red “XXX” sculpture at the north end of Higgins for a bike ride with a BWAM member. May include stops at the NMCDC, ZACC and /or the Kettlehouse before returning over the Northside Bike-Ped overpass. John. 728-0161.

Saturday May 1 Raffle for Goodies. 6am – 8pm. Anyone who walks, bikes, or busses to Bernice’s Bakery can enter the raffle for a Bernice’s travel mug and 25 cents off your future beverages purchased in-house at Bernice’s. Christine Littig. 728-1358. Run Wild Missoula Training Run. 8am. Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins. Join Run Wild Missoula for a group run on Missoula’s streets and trails. Eva. 544-3150. Solar Plexus Bike Tour. 9am. Meet at Solar Plexus, 1605 Stephens Ave, for a self-guided bicycle tour of up to 17 solar installations in Missoula (some within walking distance). Coffee and treats at the start. Jody or Theresa. 721-1130. Rock Creek Ramble. 10am. Bike ride to Rock Creek. Leave from Eastgate parking lot. 52 miles. Lunch at Ekstroms Stage Station. Missoulians on Bicycles. Eleanor Morris. 728-8636. Mt. Jumbo Weed Pull. 10am – 1pm. Those who bike or walk to the weed pull will get credit for 5 pounds of weeds before they start. Cash prizes for those pulling the most pounds of invasive weeds. Target plants will be cheat grass and spotted knapweed. Bring good shoes and gloves. Weed diggers provided. Mt. Jumbo Advisory Committee. Giles. 543-4706. Railroad District Historic District Walking Tour. 11:00am – 1:30pm. Meet at the Brunswick Building (Woody and Railroad St). Walking tour of one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods (1 of 8 historic districts). Bob Oaks. 829-0873. “Growing up in Historic Bonner” Tour. 12:30pm. Catch the Mountain Line Trolley at the downtown transfer station at 12:15 to ride to Bonner, or meet at the Bonner Milltown History Center in the Bonner Post Office at 12:30. Ride the Trolley with guides and hear stories of growing up in Bonner. Trolley arrives back in Missoula at 1:45. Bonner Milltown History Center. Judy Matson. 258-6335. May Day Frolic. 2pm. May Day party at the Homestead with traditional May Pole dance, food, beverages, kids’ activities. Hike in or bike in and get $1 off single person entrance fee of $5, or $2 off family rate of $10. For hike/bike directions, call us. Moon Randolph Homestead. Joanna Smetanka. 241-2945. Milltown Bluff Tour. 3:15 – 5:30pm. Catch Mountain Line Route 4 bus at downtown Transfer Station at 2:45 for ride to Bonner. Or bike or walk to Bonner School by 3:15 where vans provided by 10,000 Waves will transport the group to the Milltown bluff overlook. Requires 1/4 mile walk on rough terrain. See panoramic view of confluence of Blackfoot and Clark Fork rivers. Guides from CFRTAC will explain restoration of the rivers. Bus arrives back in Missoula at 5:45. Clark Fork River Technical Assistance Committee. Judy Matson. 258-6335. N. Side/W. Side Block Party. 4 – 10pm. N. 1st Street between Orange and Woody. Bike, walk, or bus to this wonderful block party and get 25% off pottery in the Zootown Arts Community Center. Hanna. 5497555.


Dig super deep during the Montana Museum of Art and Culture’s sponsored lecture “Recent Archaeological Adventures in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings,” a talk with Donald P. Ryan of Pacific Lutheran University which starts at 7 PM in the Masquer Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. She’s definitely not on the run: Karen Buley reads and signs copies of Nurses on the Run: Why They Come, Why They Stay, which starts at 7 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. 10 percent of proceeds from purchased books will be donated to nurse educator scholarships. Call Karen at 251-2507. This is beetle mania: Friends of Two Rivers presents a discussion with forester Eric Norris on the mountain pine beetle infestation starting at 7 PM at Bonner’s Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 8985 Highway 200. Free. Call Judy at 258-6335. Let the flying spaghetti monster be your guide to questioning everything under the sun during another installment of Socrates Cafe, a philosophy discussion group which meets at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Watch out for fake blood when the Flathead Valley Community College (FVCC) Theatre presents Evil Dead: The Musical, with a performance at 7 PM at the Black Box Theatre, in the Arts and Technology Building on FVCC’s Campus, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. $20/$10 students and seniors. Call 756-3814. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Keep your mind open to physical interpretation during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s Spring Dance Showcase, which features an array of student pieces and starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, in UM’s PARTV Center. $8.

Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. What’s that spell? The UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit umtheatredance.org. They’ve got so much love to give: The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12. Visit mtactors.com for advance tickets. Tenor Joseph Licitra gives growlers something to howl about when he performs a student recital at 7:30 PM, in UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. I’m not so sure myself: UM presents “Does the Rise of China Threaten American Interests?” a talk with Columbia University prof Andrew J. Nathan which starts at 8 PM, in the University Theatre. Free. Call 243-2311. Folk it up and freak the funk out during Rotaract’s benefit concert for the Central Asia Institute, which features music from Wartime Blues, Zeppo, Kung-Fu Kongress and Javi starting at 8 PM at the Top Hat. $8 per person/$15 for two people. Get advance tickets from Nic Davis by calling 581-9763. All proceeds from the concert will go to help develop schools in Central Asia. Bowling and karaoke go together like Bloody Marys and bible thumpers during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ ridiculous at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe���s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Thu., Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free.

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Sandman, aka “The Rappin’ Cowboy,” offers up a mixture of country, Americana and hip-hop when he plays with tour mate Nima Samimi at 9 PM at Hot Springs’ Fergie’s Bar, 213 Main St. Cost TBA. (See Noise in this issue.) Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free.

prepare to sing the unexpected. Until then, keep those events freely flowing by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., April 23, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the

Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Montana Neurology mtneurology.com We are a full-service Neurology practice with expertise in all neurological disorders, with special expertise in EEG and epilepsy.

Thomas Swanson, M.D.

trained in Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, with additional fellowship training in epilepsy and neurophysiology at the University of Pennsylvania. He recently moved from Cleveland, where he was a former staff of the Cleveland Clinic and faculty at the Ohio State University and Oberlin College. Dr. Swanson is a faculty affiliate in the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Montana. GO GRIZ!

Lynn M. Graham, PA-C. joined Montana Neurology from Salt Lake City in October, 2009. Lynn, also a licensed physical therapist, sees patients with headaches, epilepsy, and general neurology. Immediate appointments available. Most insurances accepted.

Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free.

Call 327-3895

Don’t wear black, just don’t do it: The Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., hosts the “Black Light Party” featuring a live set from Los Angeles rap duo New Boyz as well as DJ 4PLAY, starting at 10 PM. $25, with advance tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and 406 Motoring. Wearing white attire is encouraged.

the museum is proud to present:

Let Wonderland Tell Its Story William Henry Jackson's 1871 Yellowstone Alberttypes

If you consider yourself a karaoke king or queen and want to help local musicians thrive, be sure to sing yourself over to Mustachio Bashio on Fri., April 23, at 9:30 PM at The Central Bar and Grill, 147 W. Broadway St. Essentially, this is a karaoke contest that benefits the YMCA’s YMusic program, and features rounds of “karaoke roulette,” where you spin a giant wheel that determines what song you’ll sing. It’s only $5, or $3 if you wear an appropriate costume (moustaches are most certainly encouraged.) Sound like fun? Then gussy yourself up and

Exhibit Opening Sunday, April 25, with a free reception from 1 to 4. This exhibit features photographic prints from the first overland geological survey to map and explore the newly-created Yellowstone National Park.

Join exhibit designer Lee Silliman from 2 to 3pm as he discusses “William Henry James: Yellowstone’s Pioneer Photographer.” For more information, call 728-3476

More Bike Walk Bus Week NEIGHBORHOOD TOURS See daily listings for details. All are walking tours unless noted. Sun . . . . . . . 4-25 . . . . . .

1:30 pm . . . . AJ Gibson’s Downtown (bicycle tour)

Mon . . . . . . 4-26 . . . . . .

6:30 pm

. . . University Area Promenade

Tues . . . . . . 4-27 . . . . . .

8:00 am

. . . Bird Watching along the Clark Fork River

Tues . . . . . . 4-27 . . . . . . .

6:30 pm

. . . Southside and McCormick Historic District

Wed . . . . . . 4-28

. . . . 12:00 noon. . . Historic Walking Tour of U of M Campus

Wed . . . . . . 4-28 . . . . . .

6:30 pm

. . . Historical Museum at Ft. Missoula grounds

Thur . . . . . . 4-29 . . . . . . .

6:30 pm

. . . “Stories and Stones” Missoula Cemetery

Fri . . . . . . . . 4-30 . . . . . . . 12:00 noon . . Downtown Walk / architectural treasure hunt Sat. . . . . . . . 5-1 . . . . . . . . 11:00 am . . . . Northside RR Historic District Walking Tour Sat. . . . . . . . 5-1 . . . . . . . . 12:30 pm

. . . Historic walking tour of Bonner

Sat . . . . . . . 5-1 . . . . . . .

2:00 pm

. . . Moon Randolph Homestead in North Hills

Sat . . . . . . . 5-1 . . . . . . .

3:15 pm

. . . Milltown Bluff

COMMUTER CHALLENGES The MIM Commuter Challenge is a business-to-business competition, raising awareness and rewarding employee commuters who choose sustainable transportation for their work commute. Participating businesses compete in a dozen new categories; the business in each category with the highest percentage of employee participation will be declared the Commuter Challenge Champion at the Crowning Ceremony on May 13th. Please contact MIM for complete details! Missoula in Motion. Alex or Ryan. 258-4961.

2010 COMMUTER CHALLENGE PARTICIPANTS A Carousel for Missoula Adventure Cycling Association ALPS Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream Bernice's Bakery Betty’s Divine Boyle Deveny and Meyer PC CTA Children’s Museum City of Missoula Clark Fork Coalition DC Engineering Direct TV

DNRC Ecology Project International Ecosystem Research Group Forest Service, Human Dimensions Forest Service Region 1 Garlington Lohn & Robinson, PLLP GCS Research Good Food Store HDR Engineering, Inc. Heritage Timber Hide & Sole HomeWORD, Inc. Kettlehouse Brewing Company Lewis and Clark Elementary School

Missoula Aging Services Missoula County Missoula County Clerk of Court Missoula County Detention Facility Missoula County Sheriff’s Office Missoula Downtown Association Missoula Federal Credit Union Missoula Fire Sciences Lab (RMRS) Missoula Housing Authority Missoula Job Service WORC Program Missoula Osprey Missoula Public Library Missoula Technology & Development Center (Forest Service)

Missoula Independent

MMW Architects Modwest, Inc. Montana Community Development Corp. Montana Natural History Center Morales Law Office Morrison-Maierle, Inc. Mountain Line Mountain Press Publishing Company National Forest Foundation Office of Civic Engagement, U of M REI Rhithron Associates, Inc. Rivertop Renewables

St. Patrick Hospital Spirit at Play Sunburst Sensors, LLC Tetra Tech The Biomimicry Institute Trailhead UM Office of the President University Relations at the U of M Vann's, Inc. Watershed Education Network Western Montana Clinic WGM Group Women’s Voices for the Earth Wildlands CPR

Page 35 April 22–April 29, 2010


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 SADIE

Sadie is a beautiful young black Lab who was left behind when her owners moved. The landlady kept her safe, had her spayed, and brought her to us so that we could find her a good home. We hope to do just that!

549-3934 SKY

SHEP

Shep was quite shy and very thin when he was brought to the shelter as a stray, but now he's warming up and filling out nicely. He thinks the shelter is okay, but of course he really wants a home and family again.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

M AYA

Maya is a pretty ball of fluff who is going to grow up to be quite an outstanding adult. She's only about 10 weeks old, but she's already been spayed, and this happy, friendly little lady is also well on the way to being housebroken.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

G A RT H

Garth is such a friendly guy that we're amazed he was brought to the shelter in a trap. Surely anyone could have just picked him up and carried him through the door! He certainly hopes someone carries him out to a home soon. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

2420 W Broadway

www.missoulafoodbank.org

2310 Brooks

For more info, please call 549-0543 3075 N Reserve

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

6149 Mullan Rd

H A RV E Y

Harvey is older, and sometimes his arthritis makes him a bit cranky, but most of the time he's happy just relaxing and watching the world go by. However, this sweet guy would prefer a home with better views than our cat room!

All the staff loves this super fun lady! She is always so happy to see you, which certainly lifts our spirits! Also she is a perfect hiking friend on- or off-leash, and she loves fetch, especially in the river! Fellow Pittie lovers have to meet Sky!

RICK

Rick was brought to the shelter because the other family cats were mean to him. He's so quiet and unassuming that we can't imagine what their problem was, but we do know he'd love to have a new family choose him and make him feel special.

ROSE

Thanks to so many people's kind donations we have now raised enough money for Rose's surgery. Now we just have the task of matching her with a loving, caring, patient family willing to see her through her recovery. Flowers for every bride. Affordable flowers with an artistic flair. The Flower Bed Behind Vann's Appliances in the old yellow church building.

The Flower Bed 2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

WOBS

CHARLIE

Charlie is also a sensitive fellow, who honestly just doesn't care for all this alone time he has to spend at the shelter. He loves people and will do anything to make them happy, as long as he gets a best friend in return.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

ASTRO

Can you believe this little jumping bean is still at the shelter? He is super sweet, and knows lots of fun tricks, including my favorite, “roll over!” He has lots of energy and gets along with other dogs.

Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 517 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street

FA L A F E L

Hasn't anyone been listening? Wobs is seriously the best cat! She may be deaf but nothing will get in her way! Life is about fun and she will show you! Anything can be made into a toy, and she'll even put on a performance for you!

Falafel is a gorgeous young, tan and brown Mainecoon X who has come so far in her short life. She was born to a feral colony outside of town, but she and her brothers and sisters were rescued and brought inside for socialization.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

237 Blaine • 542-0077

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 B E V E R LY

They threw her out of the car and sped off in a cloud of dust and gravel. Beverly was devastated that her family would do such a thing. She didn’t know what to do or where to go….and the kids in the neighborhood pelted her with rocks every time they saw her.

EMMA

They found her living in an alley. She had made a nest in an old abandoned couch where she hoped to have her babies. Three days after her arrival at AniMeals, Emma had four beautiful kittens. She was such a good mama that she even became a surrogate to two other abandoned kitties.

SASHA

My world was a scary place before I came to AniMeals. I hid a lot, trying hard not to incur the wrath of “the man.” He was angry all the time. I was an emotional wreck when I arrived, but when constant fear is replaced by quiet calm, an amazing thing happens.

THE COUNT

His is the most interesting cat in the world. He has dashing good looks, but is somewhat humble and soft-spoken. Everything you have heard about him is true. Other cats aspire to be him. His charm is so contagious, vaccines were created for it. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula Independent

Page 36 April 22–April 29, 2010

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.


As I write this, the sun is shining brightly and it’s darn near 70 degrees outside. You know what that means? It’s the kind of weather that begs for a long walk in the glistening warmth of the sun’s rays. I bring this up because Sat., April 24, officially marks the start of Bike Walk Bus Week. I know I’ll be participating, since my car is currently out of commission. As for you? Well, the city has a plethora of events and incentives for you to bike, walk or bus around town, including raffles, free coffee, discounts on beer and plenty more. So come Saturday, hit the pavement without your vehicle, and click to bikewalkbusmissoula.org for a full schedule of events. But don’t blame me if the weather changes. Moving on, I want to let you know that you must RSVP by 4 PM Thu., April 22, in order for you and your child to participate in a free fly fishing workshop sponsored by the Missoula Children and Nature Network/Missoulian Angler Fly Shop, which runs from 10 AM–1 PM on Sat., April 24, at McCormick Park. The workshop will hook participants with proper casting techniques, as well as identification of fish species. Call Jason to RSVP at 552-6271. Slip into a wetsuit on Fri., April 23, for yet another Montana River Guides (MRG) Swiftwater Rescue Technician Course, which meets Fri., April 23–Sun., April 25 at 10:30 AM at a TBA location and is geared toward novice and experienced recreational paddlers and river guides. $295. RSVP quick by contacting Mike at 777-4837 or e-mailing rivers@montana.com. Get some shut-eye and prepare to rise early Sat., April 24, so you can register for YMCA’s Riverbank Run, which starts with day-of registration from 7–8 AM on the corner of Higgins Ave. and Broadway St. The race then begins promptly at 9 AM with the 10k run. It’s followed by the 5k at 10:30 AM and culminates in a one-mile fun run at 11:35 AM. For those of you hardcore enough to do it all, sign up for the Runner’s Edge “Trifecta” to get in on all three races starting at 11:25 AM. $29 for the Trifecta/$20 adults/$14 youth age 17 and under. Register online at ywcamissoula.org and call 721-YMCA.

AS LOW AS * $55/ month

If sweating turns you off, restoration work might get your activity engine humming Sat., April 24, during another Bugbee Nature Preserve Workday, which runs from 9 AM–4 PM at the preserve, off of Missoula Ave. Free. Bring gloves, lunch and water. E-mail rattlesnakecreek.watershedgroup@gmail.com. Here’s another way to get dirty on Sat., April 24: Join others for Mount Sentinel M Trail work and prairie restoration, which runs from 9 AM–3 PM at M trail. E-mail Marilyn at marilyn.marler@mso.umt.edu and visit umt.edu/earthday for more conservation happenings throughout the day. A mob of pedaling peeps also hits the road Sat., April 24, during

record waterfall descent—and stay for the barbecue, beer and music. Call Kevin at 721-2437. Those of us who enjoy riding on our pimped-out two-wheelers should also know Sat., April 24, marks the 13th annual Festival of Cycles, a bicycle extravaganza that runs from noon–4 PM at Bonner Park. Free. If you’re not familiar, here’s the scoop for your spokes: You can build a bike, donate a bike, tune up your bicycle, get parts, and enjoy other cycle-based revelry. Call Bob at 880-6834. I doubt the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) will be blasting The Beatles on Sat., April 24, during its Saturday Kids’ Activity Beautiful Beetles!, but you never know. So bring your little beast to MNHC, 120 Hickory St., at 2 PM and find out when UM insect lab manager Annika Johns displays several species of this bug. $2 child/free for MNHC members. Call 327-0405. Much like the Cyndi Lauper song, these mountaineers just want to have fun: The Rocky Mountaineers rise with the sun on Sun., April 25, to depart Missoula by 6:30 AM for a trip up Trapper Peak in the Bitterroots. Free. Bring skis, skins and perhaps snowshoes. Call Alden at 542-1966 for details on where to meet and visit rockymountaineers.com. Or sleep in Sun., April 25, in order to pedal it up later during the Deer Creek Sneak MOBI ride, which starts at 10 AM at the Eastgate parking lot, off of east Broadway St. Free. Call Kathy at 543-6274. On Thu., April 29, get a sweet deal on used outdoor gear, or sell off your old wares, during the UM Outdoor Program’s Used Outdoor Gear Sale, which runs from Photo by Chad Harder noon—5 PM in the University Center. Free to attend. All sellers should bring their gear to the UC between 7–11 AM, the Missoulians on Bicycles (MOBI) jaunt known as the Frank and should know the outdoor program collects 15 percent of the Winkler Memorial Ride to Ninemile, beginning at 10 AM at sale price of your gear. Call 243-2804. Perkin’s Restaurant and Bakery, 2275 N. Reserve St. Free. Call John at Alternately, donate your gear to some sustainable moun543-3230 and visit missoulabike.org. taineers during the Nature-Link Institute’s Gear for the Whitewater is always the best kind of water on Sat., April 24, Garhwal drive, which comes to a close Fri., April 30. Drop-off especially during StrongWater Paddle Sports’ Fundraiser for locations are at UM’s Outdoor Program, Pipestone Mountaineering, the MAX Wave Project, which begins at 10 AM at Strongwater, The Trail Head and Aerie Wilderness Medicine. Visit nature-link.org 612 S. Higgins Ave. $5 suggested donation. The day is literally over- and call Eric at 370-2294. flowing with aqua-centric events, including a whitewater kayak Until next week, hop on your cycle, pound the pavement with boat/gear swap, as well as a whitewater art show, which both run your soles and, if it rains, save me a warm seat on the bus. from 10 AM–5 PM. Stick around for the 8 PM video premiere of calendar@missoulanews.com. Dream Result—which features Montana native Tyler Bradt’s world-

This person is happy because...  Easy Financing  Low Carbon Footprint  70+ mpg  Easy To Park  Fun To Ride

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Get your work published in the 2010 Best of Missoula issue! Show us what “Best of Missoula” means to you... it could be a painting, a photograph, a drawing, etc., but it must somehow incorporate the Missoula Independent and it must somehow be totally awesome.

Winning entry will be featured in the Best of Missoula issue on July 8th. Contest Rules: Entrants represent and warrant that their submission is their original work, it has not been copied from others, and it does not violate the rights of any other person or entry. All entry materials become the property of the Missoula Independent and will not be acknowledged or returned. The copyright in any submission shall remain the property of the entrant, but entry in this contest constitutes entrant's irrevocable, perpetual permission and consent, without further compensation or attribution, to use the submission and the entrant's name and city and state for editorial, advertising, commercial and publicity purposes by the sponsor and/or others authorized by the sponsor, in any and all media now in existence or hereinafter created, throughout the world, for the duration of the copyright in the submission. Sponsor and/or others authorized by the sponsor shall have the right to edit, adapt, and modify the submission. Each entrant releases and discharges the sponsor, the judges, any party associated with the development or administration of the contest, their employees, agents or representatives or any of their parents, subsidiaries, sister companies, or affiliates from any and all liability in connection with the contest, including without limitation, legal claims, costs, injuries, losses or damages, demand or actions of any kind. More info: 543-6609 or lfoland@missoulanews.com

Submission Formats: PDF • TIFF • JPEG • EPS

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406.721.ZOOM

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Entries may be submitted via email to LFoland@missoulanews.com or delivered to 317 S. Orange, Missoula MT 59801

Missoula Independent

Page 37 April 22–April 29, 2010


scope

Bring the dead to life

Missoula Independent

DeMeng pays tribute to Mexican traditions in new book by Erika Fredrickson

Michael DeMeng recalls the first time he stepped into he claimed were those of a young girl who had drowned wing make for a macabre style, but DeMeng insists a bleak a Mexican cemetery. It was late December, 1993, and the in the water years earlier, the farmer began to build a outlook does not fuel his style. Instead, he’s inspired by village of Xo Xo on the outskirts of Oaxaca City was cele- shrine to the girl, amassing junked dolls he found in the liveliness he finds in Mexcio, including that first day in brating its annual Day of the Dead festival. Though it was Mexico City dumpsters. Soon, people began bringing him the Mexican cemetery. It’s why he continues to travel back dark outside, a sea of candlelight made it easier for dolls to add the collection (often in exchange for the pro- to Oaxaca every year. “Being in that space with all these families gathered DeMeng to make out locals gathered around brightly col- duce he grew on the island). Even after Santana died in around graves honoring their deceased loved ones, it ored, flower-framed shrines that honored dead loved 2001, dolls have continued to appear on the island. “That’s what I love about Mexico—every place you became very clear to me that this life and death is differones. He had his camera with him, but instead of photographing the scene he decided to wander through it, letting the weathered statues, skeleton drawings, bent photographs and mementos of the shrines pull him into the experience. “In my mind it’s the most beautiful thing I have in memory,” he says. “It’s one of those places that really changed me as an artist. It made my 2D world into a 3-D world. I started working with more found objects and shrines. And I fell in love with the place and the culture.” Over the years, since his first trip to Oaxaca, DeMeng has established himself as a local Latin Americaninspired assemblage artist with a penchant for found, often rusty, objects. He’s created shrines and statues consisting of grinning skeletons, stoic saints and snarling demons. Old pocket watch faces become eyes. Little doors and windows open into nooks and crannies filled with tiny totems. DeMeng’s new book, Dusty Diablos: Folklore, Iconography, Assemblage, Ole! (which follows his previous Secret of Rusty Things) shows a lot about who DeMeng is as an art educator. The book delves into Mexican folklore and pop culture, but it’s not just for a passive audience. DeMeng teaches workshops on assemblage, and so the book serves as inspiration for the aspiring rusty-object enthusiast. If you want to learn how to age a bottle cap so you can make it into a folk charm called a milagro, there’s a whole step-by-step recipe. It also has tear-out loteria cards for the reader’s Photo by Cathrine L. Walters personal projects, plus a full-on explanation of how to make your own Local assemblage artist Michael DeMeng has been inspired by Latin American culture since his first trip to shrine. But when you boil the book Oaxaca, Mexico, in 1993. “It’s one of those places that really changed me as an artist,” he says. “It made my 2D world into a 3-D world.” down to its core, it’s really just part of turn you find strange little things like that,” says DeMeng. ent from what we have in the states,” he says. “Some peoDeMeng’s ongoing tribute to Mexico. “The stories and the items and ideas of the book are “Is it mere superstition or is there something to it? Or does ple consider it grim, but it’s not at all. It was heartwarmpart of the Mexican experience and my interpretation of it matter? It was real enough for him. And from that, he ing. I definitely think they have a better grasp of mortalcreated an art piece, an installation that he left behind for ity than we do. Even beyond Day of the Dead, I think those things,” he says. “It’s a love affair with Mexico.” they have a better grasp of living. And this art grew from Last year, DeMeng took a gondola trip to the Island of us to see.” The dolls affected DeMeng more than he had thought that experience.” the Dolls near Mexico City where he discovered an intriguing project that’s spanned over 50 years. The island—Isla they would. He returned to Missoula to continue to make de Las Muñecas—sits in a network of water called the art, but the images of doll parts started working their way Michael DeMeng gives a presentation on Xochimilico Canals. It’s as big as a city block and full of into his pieces. D u s t y D i a b l o s : F o l k l o r e , I c o n o g r a p h y, “After I got back from photographing the island I Assemblage, Ole! at Shakespeare & Co. Tuesday, thousands of old dolls—some hanging up in trees and others gathered in spots on the ground. DeMeng learned that found myself drawn to little doll hands and broken faces,” April 27, at 7 PM. Free. a farmer named Julian Santana had lived alone on the he says, “things that you find in a doll hospital.” Doll parts, rusty nails, skeletons and broken pieces of island for several decades. After he heard the cries of what efredrickson@missoulanews.com

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Scope Noise Soundcheck DVD Movie Shorts

Eighteen Individual Eyes Slightly Frightened, Mostly Happy Scissor City Sound

On its debut EP, Eighteen Individual Eyes serves up some old-school flavor. The Seattle quartet evokes the dark dreaminess of The Sundays mixed with an angular rock sound that seems particular to the Emerald City. In fact, it’s hard not to think of Silkworm (a 1990s Seattlevia-Missoula rock band), especially on “Rosebud Youth,” where the minor chords waver with buzzing post-punk. Eighteen Individual Eyes is comprised of former local Jamie Henkensiefken (aka Jamie Hellgate) formerly of H is for Hellgate, and Irene Barber and Chrysti

David Morgenroth Alone with Duke Eskie Records

There’s nothing unique about an album exclusively featuring the music of Duke Ellington; the jazz icon’s voluminous songbook begs to be played and replayed. Given this, today’s musicians are faced with the challenge of revisiting these tried-and-true tunes without sounding redundant or old-hat. Missoula’s own jazz icon, David Morgenroth, rises admirably to that challenge on his solo piano album.

The Used Artwork

Reprise Records

I’d like to think that even my young gothic self, sitting in a candlelit room listening to The Cure, would never have been hoodwinked by the histrionic fanfare of The Used. I’ll admit Robert Smith was a self-indulgent sort, but even he knew when to hold back from theatrical overkill. Bert McCracken does not. The frontman of the Utah-based post-hardcore band drives his artificial angst home with echoing backup vocals (he might as well be using auto-tune for all its cheesiness) and a really annoying pop effect that waters down every song with any hardcore potential. All these awful elements only get worse when you listen to the lyrics, which

Chris Sand

Chemicals in the Wheat Loner Records

Former Montanan Chris Sand, aka “Sandman the R appin’ Cowboy,” can alternately bust out a slick rhyme, or break your heart with his high lonesome, country boy voice. But don’t call his latest country-rap. Chemicals in the Wheat is a delightful mixture of indie folk, Americana and country with just a dose of hip-hop flavor—and it’s a perfect platform for Sand’s impressively flexible writing.

Harrison of Seattle duo Hungry Pines, plus newly inducted bassist Samantha Wood. Henkensiefken steps back from her usual position as guitarist/singer to play drums, while Barber sings. And it’s quite a change. While Henkensiefken always coupled mathy guitar with burning, powerful vocals, Barber is far more even-keeled and ethereal. And that’s fine, but it does cancel out any grittiness. Listening to Barber’s vocals is like looking at a perfect butterfly behind glass. Or like floating in a cloudy dream. Not that it’s a lifeless recording, but it is distant and with few rough edges to admire. (Erika Fredrickson) Eighteen Individual Eyes plays the Palace Saturday, April 24, at 9 PM with Rooster Sauce. $5.

Don’t forget to vote for Blue Mountain Clinic, Dr. Ravitz and Off the Rack in the Best of Missoula poll! There’s more to our care than you might think.

610 N. California 721.1646

www.bluemountainclinic.org

Morgenroth gracefully swings through 13 tunes, some familiar, like “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing),” and some more obscure, like “Single Petal of a Rose.” Morgenroth’s not afraid to add his own flavor as when he reinvents a lighter “Mood Indigo.” But where Morgenroth’s prowess really shines is in his solos. Where other musicians may rehash old styles, Morgenroth artfully creates new melodic lines, while still paying homage to the original. Everyone does Duke, but not everyone does Duke well. Morgenroth proves he does, and in doing so, honors one of jazz’s greatest legends. (Melissa Mylchreest) David Morgenroth plays the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival at the University Theatre Friday, April 23, and Saturday, April 24 at 7:30 PM. $24 per night/$42 both nights. include lots of lines about bleeding, hollowness and coming undone. It’s whiny and, like reading a teenager’s diary, painfully cliché. Why is this so annoying? Because The Used sometimes plays with smart pop hooks and, every once in a while, manages something interesting. The brisk, thrashing riffs on “Blood on My Hands” kick off the album just right coupled with a strong, catchy chorus. On “Born to Quit,” the horror movie bass line also sparks a sense that this band has some good songwriting skills. Alas, the drivel quashes all nuggets of promise. (Erika Fredrickson) The Used plays the Wilma Theatre Wednesday, April 28, at 8 PM. $26/$24.50 advance. The rap-centric “Buddha Chant” showcases some of Sand’s funnier lines by exploring questions of faith with strikingly absurd lyrics. A mix of somberness and happiness cleverly floats “All the Things I Done Wrong,” a folk track about coming to terms with a failed relationship and moving on to better things. “Mister, I Can’t Save Your Daughter” strikes a bleaker tone, with the story of a man who saves a woman from an abusive relationship by helping her commit suicide. At least that’s what I think it’s about—Sand’s savvy way with words sometimes obscures any clear meaning behind his cowboy poetry. But it’s exactly those types of cryptic moments that make Chemicals in the Wheat one of the more intriguing albums I’ve heard this year. (Ira Sather-Olson) Chris Sand (as Sandman) plays the Palace with Nima Samimi Wednesday, April 28, at 9 PM. $5.

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Dan Flores Reception, Signing & Discussion

Scope Noise Soundcheck DVD Movie Shorts

Hot horns

VISIONS OF THE BIG SKY

Young, old turn out for Buddy DeFranco Festival

Fri. April 30

by Erika Fredrickson

5:30 to 8:00 pm Discussion begins at 7 pm

Fact & Fiction Downtown 220 North Higgins, Missoula

Missoula’s jazz scene appears as strong as ever. More local restaurants and breweries have begun to offer live jazz on a weekly basis. Every Sunday night people sip special cocktails at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini night to the soundtrack of local groups like the Freemole Quartet and the Donna Smith Trio. The living room concert series known as Daly Jazz hosts big-ticket musicians from New York City to the Bay Area and everywhere in between, for intimate local crowds of 40 people every month. A side order of live jazz, as it turns out, is something of a draw again in Missoula. This rising tide makes annual festivals like Jazzoula and the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival more apt. As

pet player Wynton Marsalis saw Kelly guest perform for the Lincoln Center Orchestra, he invited her to join his ensemble in Washington, D.C., for a Martin Luther King Jr. Day/Inauguration Eve concert. Piano crooner Harry Connick Jr. heard Kelly in a master class one afternoon and brought her on stage to sit in with his band that very night. She’s been named the youngest alto saxophone rising star by Downbeat magazine readers, and the Boston Music Awards called her the city’s Outstanding Jazz Act. Despite her more conventional style, Kelly happens to be a student of the more experimental Konitz. And for the Buddy DeFranco Festival this year, you’ll

Highlights of the Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival include, from left, Lee Konitz, Grace Kelly and Buddy DeFranco.

Jazzoula wraps up on Thursday, the Buddy DeFranco Festival kicks off with two nights of music from a handful of nationally renowned musicians, plus a few key locals. It’s time for standards, originals, improv, bebop, cool and hot jazz. On that note (ha!) here are a couple of highlights you won’t want to miss.

Lee Konitz Lee Konitz is a rebel. When Charlie Parker’s fast tempo, multi-note bebop style was the flavor of the day for 1940s jazz musicians, Konitz was busy paring down notes, shifting time signatures and playing around with unexpected phrasing. Isn’t it romantic to think about jazz musicians experimenting in some rundown New York apartment behind a Chinese laundry? That’s exactly what Konitz did in those days as part of what would later be called the cool jazz movement. Those musicians (including Parker) were looking for a new way to play jazz. Konitz and the rest of them recorded with the Miles Davis Band over several studio sessions and a couple of live gigs for the 1957 Capitol Records release of the famous Birth of Cool album. At 83 years old, Konitz is essentially a living history of the genre. He’s been there for Dixieland, big band styles, bebop, cool and hot jazz. But he’s famous for always being committed to experimental, avant garde and alternative. Just what we like to hear.

Grace Kelly You couldn’t get a bigger contrast to Lee Konitz than Grace Kelly. The 17-year-old saxophone player is just now on the up and up. And unlike Konitz, Kelly sticks to more conventional forms of jazz. But if there was a country of bebop, she might get elected the youngest president of it considering her airtight fluency. Here’s how thing have gone so far for the prodigy: At 12 years old she recorded an album. At 14 she played with the Boston Pops. Last year, when legendary trum-

Missoula Independent

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get to see them play together on Saturday night at the University Theatre in what could be a very interesting clash of titans (and certainly better than the movie).

Buddy DeFranco On Friday night you can see the man of the hour. Buddy DeFranco is now 87 and continues to play his clarinet with no sign of quitting. He started playing when he was 12, helping his blind father support his impoverished Philly family with music. As a young man, he spent a year playing with the Count Basie Quartet and eight years as bandleader for the Glenn Miller Orchestra. He’s been named Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts and inducted into the Jazz Hall of Fame. Like Konitz, he’s lived through an entire history of jazz from its golden eras on through to harmonic revolutions of “hot house” jazz. He’s got that sort of breadth of life that most of us only read about in stories or, in many of your cases, see on television.

Jam session at St. Anthony’s Parish After taking in the scene at the University Theatre on Saturday night, you can head down to St. Anthony’s Parish at 217 Tremont Street to get in on the late night jam session. All the Buddy DeFranco musicians will be there, including others we didn’t mention here, like local jazz piano slinger David Morgenroth. It’s great to see musicians in a music hall giving a nice clean performance, but when it comes down to the essence of jazz, it’s all about the after-hours party. The Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival hits the University Theatre Friday, April 23, and Saturday, April 24, at 7:30 PM nightly. $24 per night/$42 both nights. Jam session kicks off at St. Anthony’s Parish Saturday, April 24, at 10 PM. $5. Check out www.umt.edu/defrancojazz for more info. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Soundcheck DVD Movie Shorts

Green screen Environmental flicks for the Earth Day viewer by Dave Loos

There are probably better ways to spend Earth Day than lounging on the couch watching movies, but you can’t spend the entire 24 hours picking up litter, recycling and attempting to ease the guilt of not biking everywhere every day. Besides, it might rain, so you need a backup plan. Hello DVD collection. And hello to some films about the earth you may have missed, may want to miss or just need to view again. Watching them might do wonders for your sense of self worth. Or not. Avatar

To start with, Earth Day marks the DVD release of a small, independent sci-fi art-house film you probably missed called Avatar, directed by newcomer James Cameron and starring Sigourney Weaver and teeming with environmental allegories from a distant planet called … oh, never mind. You did see this film. Twice. And yeah, it was good, but the loss of a dimension on the television screen is going to make all those bioluminescent night scenes a lot less trippy. “Planet Earth”

Speaking of Sigourney Weaver, this isn’t her first foray into the environmental-themed feature. If you were unlucky enough to have seen the American version of the BBC’s “Planet Earth” in 2007, you know something was missing. That would be legendary British naturalist David Attenborough, who narrated the original with gravitas and whom the Discovery Channel apparently deemed too elitist for a U.S. audience. So they made changes to the script (damn you metric system!) and dubbed Attenborough over with the monotone Weaver, who is not a naturalist, and who will always be remembered for playing the Gatekeeper in Ghostbusters. (Ghostbusters, by the way, is our Earth Day recommendation for the enthusiastic Tea Partiers who rallied downtown last week. What anti-government crusader won’t love a movie where the Environmental Protection Agency is nearly responsible for the destruction of humankind?) “Life”

“Planet Earth” isn’t the only BBC series bastardized with poor narration by Discovery Channel. This time it’s the 12-part “Life,” and this time they dubbed Attenborough with Oprah Winfrey. It’s hard not to feel insulted. I’ve watched portions of three episodes, each more grating because Oprah’s second-grade-level science narration makes me angry that no one at Discovery respects my intelligence. I’ll wait until the BBC version is released June 1 to watch the rest. Idiocracy

For dumbed-down Earth Day viewing that won’t leave you angry, try Idiocracy, the 2006 Mike Judge film that barely made it into the theaters and failed to gain anything approaching the cult status of his previous classic, Office Space. Here, Luke Wilson plays an

army private who volunteers for a new military hibernation program and is subsequently forgotten about for half a millennium. He’s awakened by the Great Garbage Avalanche of 2505, only to discover he is now the smartest human on a planet gone to hell. It’s not the smoothest of satires, but how can you not appreciate a film that introduces us to a future with Costco University? It’s also nice to see Wilson before he let himself go in those ubiquitous AT&T commercials. Tapped

To sober up after some sci-fi satire and feel guilty about every bottle of Dasani you’ve ever purchased, give Tapped a try. You may remember hearing about this one because it screened at the Big Sky Film Festival, where it presented a damning case against the multi-billion dollar bottled water industry. Learn all about the corporations that drain local aquifers in Maine for a nominal fee and the nasty environmental impact of all that plastic now floating in the oceans. And feel uneasy at the fact the government doesn’t even have one full time employee to regulate the industry. The Day After Tomorrow

Depressed yet? Try and cheer yourself out of the Earth Day blues by watching one of the more ludicrous natural disaster flicks of the past 15 years. Say what you will about the questionable science— some ice ages take 10,000 years to form, this one takes a few weeks—but at least the special effects are pretty good. The film also marks the third time that director Roland Emmerich has destroyed all or parts of New York City (Independence Day and Godzilla are the others), but the first using the natural means of ice, snow and water. Though still technically a climate change movie, this one probably didn’t make Al Gore’s Top 10 in 2004. Wall-E

Finally, imagine a world 700 years in the future in which environmental degradation and neglect has forced all humans to flee Earth, leaving behind a barren wasteland of trash and pollution. Not exactly a feel good flick, unless that movie is a CGI production featuring anthropomorphized robots who fall in love. Wall-E falls somewhere in the middle of Pixar’s extensive resume of hit films over the last 15 years. The silent apocalyptic landscape showcased in the movie’s first 20 minutes is stunning. And the obesity epidemic among the remaining humans in outer space seems plausible. The silly robot romance that ensues, however, is harder to believe than the cooking rodent in Ratatouille.

presents

FORESTRY DAY 2010 SATURDAY, APRIL 24 9 AM TO 4 PM Sharpen Your Axes, Get Ready To Go! Annual Forestry Day is held in conjunction with the University of Montana Woodsman Team and the Montana Society of American Foresters. Activities include collegiate and professional lumberjack competitions, including crosscut sawing, pole climbing, wood chopping, ax throwing, hot saws, and log rolling. See an impressive array of historic forestry and logging equipment, a working steam-powered sawmill and a restored fire lookout tower. Enjoy hands-on opportunities for all, a displays of crafts, and activities for children. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for senior citizens, and $1 for students. Children under 6 and members of the Friends are admitted free. As part of Missoula's Bike/Walk/Bus Week, admission is free for all who bike, walk, or take the bus to the event. Food will be available from The University of Montana's Woodsman Team. While you're at the Museum, take the opportunity to see the new exhibit: When The Mountains Roared: The Fire Of 1910.

For more information call 728-3476 or visit ftmslamuseum@montana.com

arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 41 April 22–April 29, 2010


Scope Noise Soundcheck DVD Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK THE BACK-UP PLAN Jennifer Lopez is eager to settle down and have kids but can’t seem to find the right dude to be her mate, so she opts to get preggers via artificial insemination. Oddly enough, the day the procedure occurs she meets Alex O’Loughlin—a single guy who just might make the cut as a baby’s daddy. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:30, 5 and 7:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:50, 7:05 and 9:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9.

struggling to finish On The Origin of Species—and dealing with his loss of faith, lots of hate, and a strained marriage with the ever-so-faithful Jennifer Connelly. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7, with no show Sat. and a 9 only show on Wed. and a Sun. matinee at 3. DATE NIGHT Steve Carrell and Tina Fey are suburbanite parents with a marriage that’s going stale. In an attempt to inject a little spice into their lives Carrell decides to take Fey to an upscale restaurant, only to find out they’ve become the targets of some seriously cor-

THE GHOST WRITER Ewan McGregor’s a ghostwriter assigned to help Pierce Brosnan, a former British prime minister. At some point, McGregor realizes Brosnan has some serious political skeletons in his closet, and as he digs deeper, he soon finds himself in dire straits. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 9 with no show Wed. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:15 with an additional Fri.–Sun show at 1:30. HOT TUB TIME MACHINE John Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson and Clark Duke are all down-on-their-luck dudes who

THE LOSERS Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Chris Evans, Idris Elba and others unleash the mother freakin’ fury—or at least try to—against CIA agent Jason Patric, who left the band of mercenaries for dead during a covert op in a Bolivian jungle. Village 6: 7 and 9:35 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l : Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:25 and 9:50 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:45, 7:25 and 9:50. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9.

ALICE IN WONDERLAND Tim Burton makes his 3-D mark in this phantasmagorical classic, which features Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska and Anne Hathaway. Carmike 10: 7:20 and 10. CLASH OF THE TITANS Sam Worthington (Perseus), the Greek warrior and son of Liam Neeson (Zeus) decides to wage battle against demons and freakish beasts in his quest to defeat the hellraising ways of Ralph Fiennes (Hades). Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 3-D: Fri. at 12:30, 4:30, 9:45 and Sat.–Sun. at 7:15 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:30 and 9:45 with an additional Mon.–Tue. show at 7:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:15, 6:40 and 9:05. CREATION Paul Bettany is evolutionary hero Charles Darwin

Missoula Independent

KICK-ASS Aaron Johnson is a nerdy teen who’s obsessed with comics and is lacking on luck with the ladies. At some point, he brings his fixation to life by becoming a superhero—and soon enough, people like Nicolas Cage start emulating his pulverizing moves. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1, 3, 4, 6:15, 7, 9 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3, 4, 6:15, 7, 9 and 9:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. THE LAST SONG Estranged dad and former concert pianist Greg Kinnear uses the almighty power of music to patch up any rough spots with his daughter Miley Cyrus in this adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ book. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:45, 6:45 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.-Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

THE RUNAWAYS Kristen Stewart is badass shredder Joan Jett and Dakota Fanning rocks the role of vocal- “Tight leather and all I get is a soda?” The Runaways opens Friday at the Wilma Theatre. ist Cherie Currie in this biopic that traces the origins and success of this all-girl 1970s rock band. Wilma rupt cops. Carmike 10: 4:20, 5:45, 7, 8 and 9:30 decide that getting hammered in a ski resort hot Theatre: Nightly at 7 and 9, with 7 only shows on with an additional Fri. show at midnight and addi- tub is a good idea. When their night of debauchSat.–Sun. and Wed. with a Sun. matinee at 1. tional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:15, 1:45 and 3:30. ery ends, they wake up realizing they’ve been

NOW PLAYING

KENNY CHESNEY: SUMMER IN 3-D Country fans will rejoice as they witness Kenny Chesney rocking out on stage—sleeveless muscle shirt and all—in this visually enhanced concert flick that showcases his tour from last summer. Carmike 10: Fri. at midnight, Sat.–Sun. at 2 and Wed.–Thu. at 7:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri. at 7:30, Sat.–Sun. at 2 and Wed.–Thu. at 7:30.

Village 6: 7:10 and 9:35 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 12:25, 2:40 and 4:55. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 1, 2:20, 3:30, 4:30, 6, 7, 8 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 6, 7, 8 and 9:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. DEATH AT A FUNERAL Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence and an assortment of family and friends gather to mourn the death of their father. Of course, things go awry, especially when someone gets dosed with psychedelics, and Rock and Lawrence learn their dad was getting down on the down-low. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Stadium 14 in Kailispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:45, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:05, 7:20 and 9:35. DIARY OF A WIMPY KID Zachary Gordon tries his best to navigate his way through pre-teen life in an institution filled with “morons.” Village 6: 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:25 and 4:10.

Page 42 April 22–April 29, 2010

transported back to 1986. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:30 and 10 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 5:05, 7:35 and 9:40 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and an additional show Fri. and Sun. at 1:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 3:55, 7:30 and 9:40. HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON This 3-D animated flick follows Hiccup, a scrawny Viking teen who was brought up to mercilessly slay dragons. But things change when he befriends a “different” dragon that makes him realize they aren’t so evil after all. Carmike 10: 4, 4:15, 7:05 and 9:45 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:10 and 1:30. Village 6 in 2D: 7:15 and 9:40 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at noon, 2:25 and 4:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton in 2-D: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 3-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:30, 5, 7:30 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 7 and 9. Stadium 14 in Kalispell in 2-D: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 3, 5:30 and 8 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at 10:15 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:15, 7:30 and 9:40.

SHUTTER ISLAND Martin Scorcese directs Leonardo DiCaprio and Mark Ruffalo in a story about federal agents on the hunt for a batty murderer who disappeared from a remote institution for the criminally insane. After a few days in the nuthouse, though, DiCaprio starts acting a little loco too. Village 6: 7:10 and 10:15 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4:05. THE BOUNTY HUNTER Gerard Butler has trouble finding work as a bounty hunter, until he snags the lucky gig of going after his bail-jumping ex—Jennifer Aniston. Along the way, Aniston evades Butler’s cuffs, and in the process they both find themselves in some sticky situations. Carmike 10: 4:05, 7 and 9:40 with an additional Fri. show at midnight and an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:20, 7:05 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:10 and 9:15. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., April 23. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 43 April 22–April 29, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

April 22–April 29, 2010

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Table of contents

Luna Says, Frame Your Graduate,

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WANTED James Smith OFFENSE: Based on a t n federal felony de ! n e him charging D ep RE with dconspiracy U n I T with to e possess AP to th intent C n , and w d i distribute re - no distribution u of cocaine. at /1 Fe n 4 o AGE: 52 HEIGHT: 5'11" HAIR COLOR: BROWN EYE COLOR: BLUE

Mt Sentinel Pengelly Trail Saturday and Sunday hiking Pengelly Trail. You: green sweater and yellow lab friend. Commented about seeing each other Saturday. Me: Carhart pants and yellow T-shirt. Why hike alone when we can hike together. Man saw Woman March 21st Elephant Earrings your name is amanda. you were wearing a blue sweater at the kettlehouse. you could tell i was interested, but didn't give me much attention. can i try talking to you again on a day that i'm not working? Man to Woman April 10th

Checking (You Out) Account Me: In MFCU lobby waiting in line Fri around noon. You: In drive thru, small red car. I could see you through the window and you are v. good looking! I wish I knew who you were so I could ask you out. Woman saw Man April 2nd

Posting an I Saw U is easy! Go to themix.bigskypress.com Click on "I Saw U" in the blue menu bar Register for a free account (no profile ad created)

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www.missoulanews.com Porticorealestate.com

Post your own I Saw U or Shout Out online at

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Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

ATTENTION JOHN COONS John or anyone else that knows John please have him call Kelly Chivers at 509-496-5949 If you want to drink that’s up to you. If you want to stop call Alcoholics Anonymous. 1-888607-2000 PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a

What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly. -- Carl Rogers



Community-Based, Client-Driven, Uniquely Missoula

trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825. Vegas Swingers Event www.JPJustParties.com

LOST & FOUND runaway lawn chairs Two lawn chairs escaped from Slant Street backyard last snowy Monday night (Apr 5). Grey, woven fabric backs; heavy swivel base; black metal frame. Please call 370-5072. Thanks.

KD

ECO Broker • 240-5227


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

HOPE AGAINST NOPE I’ve been seeing this guy for over two years. Although we spend lots of time together, we don’t have a committed relationship. We’ve been off and on throughout this entire two-year “complexship,” as I call it. Normally, we’re fine until I start asking about us being more to each other. He then picks a fight and disappears. Out of the blue the other day, he told me I deserved more and said he didn’t want to waste my time or make me miss out on somebody who could give me what I want. I told him I’m fine, and that I’m dating other people (I am). Still, I’m not sure why he brought it up if he didn’t want to commit to me. I truly love him, and have since the moment we met. Do you think he’ll ever be ready, or am I his “temp” till he finds someone permanent for the job? —Stuck You’re about three blocks past “way too pathetic” when the stuff your girlfriends got sick of telling you—“Dump him! He’s just using you! You deserve better!”—is coming from the guy you “deserve better” than. Amazingly, you take this as a sign he’s ready to commit, rather than the obvious—his guilt so overtook his self-interest that he’s like the buzzard feeling sorry for the roadkill: “How ‘bout I just have a few pecks of your hindquarters and then be on my way?” Not surprisingly, you need to fancy up two years of hanging around not getting what you want by calling this a “complexship.” It isn’t complex in the slightest: You want a relationship with him; he doesn’t want one with you, but he’ll continue seeing you on what I call the Bag of Chips Principle, as in, if there’s a bag of chips within a man’s reach, he’ll probably help himself to some. To many, your situation might seem like a simple case of “He’s just not that into you.” And since you’d probably see a flicker of hope while blindfolded and being lowered head-first into a pitch-dark cesspool, let me make this perfectly clear: No, he’s not. But, there’s such a thing as readiness for a relationship. Finding the right person isn’t enough. You have to have the right person at the right time. It’s possible your guy hasn’t been ready for anything serious with anyone. Instead of accepting that he can’t give you what you want and waving goodbye, you most likely sealed the deal that he’ll never be ready for you by being all over him like ants on potato salad. (Men don’t want what comes easy to them, with the exception of “FREE BEER!”)

But, wait, there are mitigating circumstances here! You “truly love him!” Great— the universal excuse women give for doing something utterly stupid and self-destructive with a man. For a change of pace, show a little love for yourself. Take that old advice “If you love something, set it free.” If it comes back to you, and comes back to you, and comes back to you, and still won’t give you what you want, set it free again, and change the locks.

BOEING, BOEING, GONE A man sitting next to me on a long flight really opened up to me, and I ended up sharing stuff I never tell anyone. He asked for my number, but I never heard from him. How does someone connect with you so amazingly, then walk away from you like you’re any other stranger on the plane? —Seat 13D Welcome to the One-Flight Stand: Two total strangers, thrown together by airline seat assignment algorithms, sharing their deepest secrets over those little bags of pretzels and blankets that haven’t been washed since the Wright brothers took off. With somebody you’ll never see again, you can feel safe revealing stuff you’d only tell your closest confidant. And then, because you’ve treated them like a close confidant, they can start to feel like one. (Never mind that you can’t remember if it’s “Brad” or “Bruce.”) Some seatmates continue their relationship down the jetway, but most have broken up by the time they hit the terminal. As they’re getting off the plane, there’s that blast of outdoor air—real life hitting them, along with the realization that there’s no graceful way to fit 13D into theirs. Or, maybe they realize they got drunk on anonymity, and feel dirty for exposing way too much of themselves to a stranger. If you can’t stand the post-flight chill, wear protection: an eye mask or iPod headphones. If you’re willing to risk it, there’s always that possibility you’ll continue on with some seatmate, maybe even to the point where you find yourself joining him in the TSA line; joining, as in, “You may now cavity-search the bride.”

FREE CYCLES MISSOULA. Kids bikes are always free. Monday & Thursday: 3:00-7:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00-3:00. 732 South 1st West

ANNOUNCEMENTS Kayak & Fitness Symposium Spend a relaxing weekend paddling, practicing yoga, eating healthy organic meals, journaling, pampering yourself and more at this Memorial Day Symposium at Deep Bay Resort on Flathead Lake. 5/28 to 5/31. Email: Bobbie@GlacierSeaKayak.com for complete packet of information & registration.

VOLUNTEERS Meals On Wheels urgently needs volunteer drivers and substitutes weekdays between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Valid Montana driver’s license required, mileage reimbursement available. Interested in a rewarding volunteer role? Call Missoula Aging Services at 728-7682 WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call Collegebound Network Today! 1-877-892-2642

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advice goddess.com)

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 April 22 – April 29, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www. continentalacademy.com

Pre-order Your Mom’s

127 N. Higgins, Suite 307 532-4663 www.homeword.org

Bennett’s Music Studio

Ice Cream Cake!

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

549-5595

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Piano Lessons

Positive. Practical. Casual. Comfortable. And, it's a church.

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

LOST: One luxuriant, yet ruggedly masculine head of hair, over the span of several years. FOUND: A gently used straw Stetson at an antique store in Anaconda just in time to prevent sunburn while exploring along the Pintler Scenic Loop. (Looked good, too.)

REWARD: Find out at www.getlostmt.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

PET OF THE WEEK Shiloh is a one year old Border Collie mix just waiting for her life to finally begin. Her last family didn’t have time to exercise her, let alone work her brain the way those smart dogs need. Shiloh is super-motivated. With the proper outlets for her energy, she has the potential to blow you away with her focus, drive, and determination to please! Bring your family to the Humane Society, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Fri. 1-6 and Sat. 11-4.

First Annual Fundraiser

NOW ENROLLING FOR SUMMER! Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals Gardening

Ages 2-6 830-3268 1703 S. 5th West

T'ai Chi

May 1, 2010 • 7pm-10pm.

Missoula Hell Gate Elks Vintage Love Songs Performed by

728-0918 missoulataichi.com

Lori Conner & Dick Skultin Prizes awarded Throughout the Evening

MC'd by actress Heather Ann Smith of Los Angeles

Silent Auction Complimentary Hors D'oeuvres

543-2972

Residential & Commercial Pick Up!

missoulavalleyrecycling.com

112 North Pattee St., Missoula, MT $20 adv/$25 at the door Tickets available at Elks Lodge or by calling 273-0591 For more info visit

seedlingsofchange.org


EMPLOYMENT

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Children have a lot more to worry about from the parents who raised them than from the books they read. E.L. Doctorow FACT & FICTION 220 N. HIGGINS AND ON CAMPUS Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Experienced Heath Care Provider available for assistance with seniors for personal care, doctor’s appt, running errands, light cleaning and cooking. Resume Qualifications and local references available. Joy 493-0956 Healthy Hummingbird Massage 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 27: Couples,Swedish, Deep Tissue,

Looking for a climbing partner?

Hot Stone, Pregnancy, Cupping and Headache Treatment. Rates: $55/hr. $75/1.5hr., Student rates:$45/hr, $65/1.5hr Contact: Souta 207-6269, Erica 396-6868 Mary 596-5842, and Jeremy 4934376 Online Scheduling Available www.healthyhummingbird.com

Mountains. Call us at:: (406) 728-0543Email us at: classes@herbsmt.com

yahoo.com. Check out our website for further info: www.sacredstonemedicine.com

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220

Herbal Foundations: an InDepth Program in Herbal Medicine Thursdays, May 13 August 26, 2010 Join us for the fifth year of our annual in-depth herbal studies program. Make a deeper connection to the earth. Discover the healing properties of medicinal plants - a special and unique part of our world. Come on a journey with us and experience an intimate connection with healing herbs that are native to the Northern Rocky

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629

Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

BodyTalk Works, LLC Natalie Morrow, MS, CBP 406-370-8170 www.bodytalkworks.com

The BodyTalk System™

Stone Medicine Class Learn how to use heated & cooled stones in your massage practice. Four-day educational retreat in Spokane,WA offering 32 NCBTMB approved CE hour for $495. June 3,4,5,6. Contact Janelle @ (509)276-1368 or email JanelleLakman@

Well-Self Drum Medicine; experience ‘Drum Rain,’ balancing individuals or group get-togethers. $10 per person. 406-370-2918 rissacloud.wordpress.com. Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

Shear Art Salon

NOW ENROLLING

1804 North Ave FREE HAIRCUT

For more info. 406.830.3261

MT Academy of Skin Care

Evening/Weekend class starts June 1

EXP. 4/29/10

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We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

317 SW Higgins

GENERAL ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 BOOKKEEPER, F/T, Msla. BOOKKEEPER needed for local business. Must be proficient in the following programs: QuickBooks, Excel, Word, Microsoft Outlook. Must be skilled in payroll reporting & taxes, spreadsheets, A/R, A/P, budgeting and all other aspects of bookkeeping. 3-5 years of bookkeeping experience preferred. Full time, Monday through Friday. Pay is negotiable. #2977364 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COBRA SPECIALIST, F/T, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a full-time, permanent COBRA specialist to produce and send COBRA paperwork to individuals as required and guided by law. Duties include maintaining status information electronically & manually for premium collection, company referral, & claims processing. Will generate & send paperwork, acknowledgment letters, & coupons to all new COBRA enrollees. Must have High School Diploma or GED. Previous experience with computer software applications is required. Must be proficient in Word, e-mail applications and Internet navigation. With the first six months of employment applicant must complete COBRA Certification of Administrative Skills with an 85% or better accuracy. Must have certified copies of general typing test (3 minute on-screen), Allegiance Customized Excel and writing sample thank you letter. Pay depends on experience. #2977355 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800-GOGUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits HOUSEKEEPER/SERVER, F/T, P/T, Seasonal, POWELL, IDAHO. Picturesque IDAHO lodge located 57 miles west of Missoula near the Powell Ranger Station has an immediate need for a full-time HOUSEKEEPER/SERVER to start work mid-April. The housekeeper duties include: cleaning guest rooms and cabins, and stocking rooms with necessities. Additionally, 3 to 4 shifts per week the individual will work as server, seat patrons, take orders, serve food & drinks, provide customer service and clean as needed. Looking for a high energy, enthusiastic individual who enjoys interacting with people and making sure guests have a great experience. No experience necessary. Work week and shifts will vary. Must be available weekends. Min starting rate

$8.00 or depends on experience. There is housing available if desired: $125/month with shared common areas. Employer can offer a fuel supplement if employee wants/needs to commute from Missoula or Lolo area! Meals are provided during working shifts. Enjoy the fantastic scenery & recreational opportunities of the area during your free hours. Interviews and training to start immediately. #2977333 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Ladies needing $$ If you like to dance and entertain for parties, call 214-5944 LIFEGUARD/INSTRUCTOR, P/T, Seasonal, Msla. A Missoula employer is seeking part-time LIFEGUARD/INSTRUCTORS for spring and summer sessions. This position requires Red Cross Certification & be CPR certified. Applicant must be a TEAM PLAYER and have three months previous lifeguard/instructor experience, as will be instructing a variety of different ages. Work days and hours will vary to include evenings and weekends. Competitive wages based on experience, salary range $7.508.50. IMMEDIATE NEED. #2977337 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 OFFICE ASSISTANT, F/T, Seasonal, Msla. Local landscaping & nursery business is seeking a full-time, seasonal OFFICE ASSISTANT. Will be answering phones, scheduling, typing, filing, mailing, copying, faxing, working with customers and some cleaning duties. Must have previous customer service experience and good phone skills. Must enjoy working with people in a team environment. Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel is required. This is a full-time, seasonal position that will run until November. Will be working Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm until season ends. Starting pay is $7.25/hr. #2977362 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RESTAURANT MANAGER, F/T, Powell, ID. A picturesque IDAHO lodge located 57 MILES west of Missoula near the Powell Ranger Station is seeking a year round full-time RESTAURANT MANAGER. Applicant must be a self-directed individual who excels in customer service and has strong problem solving, management, and supervisory skills, and 2 years restaurant experience. Hotel operation experience is a plus. The primary duties are providing customer service, restaurant and lodge management and supervisory responsibilities. Work week and shifts will vary. Must be available to work weekends. Rate of pay is negotiable based on experience. A private house is available and meals are provided during working shifts. Enjoy the fantastic scenery & recreational opportunities of the area during your free hours. Interviews and training to start immediately. #2977361 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp TREATMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN, P/T, Msla. Treatment Service Technician needed to perform routine duties for the protection, care and supervision of adolescent clients receiving services in a residential setting. The primary responsibility is the close supervision of clients who are emotionally challenged, implementing treatment plans/interventions and ensuring programmatic structure and residential supervision. Provides direct communication between shifts to ensure consistency of programming. Requires a High School Diploma or GED; experience in human services preferred. The employee will be required to undergo training and pass testing in H.E.L.P. and First Aid/CPR. Requires a Montana Driver’s License. Clean motor vehicle record preferred. Shift is Tuesday Friday, 2 pm to 10 pm, for about 32 hours per week. Pay $9.75/hr. CLOSES 04/27/10 at 5pm #2977360 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, F/T, Msla. seeking a full-time EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR with strong leadership and management skills. The program serves 354 children and 80+ staff in Missoula, Granite, Mineral, Powell, and Sanders Counties. A minimum Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in Education, Business, Sociology, Psychology, Social Work or related field is required. Masters degree preferred. Responsible for managing a nonprofit, grant funded program with multiple funding sources. Must have strong budget & fiscal accountability skills; ability to coordinate shared decision-making with federal & regional Head Start administration; in addition to governance with local board, policy council, staff and parents. SALARY: $50K to $55K with excellent benefits. POSITION CLOSES: May 24th, 2010, 5:00pm. EEO. #2977346 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OPERATIONS/SUPPORT/PRO DUCT MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Provide implementation, training, support & project management of software products. Identify and troubleshoot software issues. Liaise between Client and company. Travel to client sites, collect data, support go-live event. Skills needed: Fluency Spanish highly desirable, excellent written and verbal communication skills. Experience in installation and troubleshooting of software applications & operating systems. Attention to detail & problem solving abilities. Experience in Public safety a plus. Starting rate is $10.34/hr. #2977353 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 April 22 – April 29, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Although obstacles and difficulties frighten ordinary people,” wrote French painter Théodore Géricault, “they are the necessary food of genius. They cause it to mature, and raise it up . . . All that obstructs the path of genius inspires a state of feverish agitation, upsetting and overturning those obstacles, and producing masterpieces.” I’d like to make this idea one of your guiding principles, Aries. In order for it to serve you well, however, you’ll have to believe that there is a sense in which you do have some genius within you. It’s not necessarily something that will make you rich, famous, popular, or powerful. For example, you may have a genius at washing dogs or giving thoughtful gifts or doing yoga when you’re sad. Whatever your unique brilliance consists of, the challenges just ahead will be highly useful in helping it grow. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Yes, I know that the bull is your totem animal. But I’m hoping you’re willing to expand your repertoire, because it’s a ripe time for you to take on some of the attitudes of the king of beasts. Consider this. The naturalist and shaman Virginia Carper notes that lions have strong personalities but cooperate well. They’re powerful as individuals but engage in constructive group dynamics. In many cultures, they have been symbols of nobility, dignity, and spiritual prowess. To adopt the lion as a protective guardian spirit builds one’s ability to know and hunt down exactly what one wants. Would you like more courage? Visualize your lion self. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 2011, I may do a tour of North America, performing my show “Sacred Uproar.” But for the foreseeable future I need to shut up and listen. I’ve got to make myself available to learn fresh truths I don’t even realize I need to know. So, yeah, next year I might be ready to express the extroverted side of my personality in a celebration of self-expression. But for now I have a sacred duty to forget everything I supposedly believe in and gratefully shuck my self-importance. By the way, Gemini, everything I just described would be a good approach for you to consider taking in the next three weeks.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Is it true what they say—that you can never have too many friends? If you don’t think so, it’s a good time to re-evaluate your position. And if you do agree, then you should go out and get busy. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you’re likely to be extra lucky in attracting new connections and deepening existing alliances in the coming weeks. The friendships you strike up are likely to be unusually stimulating and especially productive. To take maximum advantage of the favorable cosmic rhythms, do whatever you can to spruce up your inner beauty.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I have compiled a set of four affirmations that I think will keep you on the right track in the coming weeks. Try saying them at least twice a day. 1. “I am cultivating Relaxed Alertness, because that will make me receptive to high-quality clues about how to proceed.” 2. “I am expressing Casual Perfectionism, because that way I will thoroughly enjoy being excellent, and not stress about it.” 3. “I am full of Diligent Indifference, working hard out of love for the work and not being attached to the outcome.” 4. “I am practicing Serene Debauchery, because if I’m not manically obsessed with looking for opportunities to cut loose, those opportunities will present themselves to me with grace and frequency.”



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The Great Wall of China is the largest human construction in the world, stretching for almost 3,900 miles. But contrary to legend, it is not visible from the moon. According to most astronauts, the Wall isn’t even visible from low Earth orbit. Keep this in mind as you carry out your assignment in the coming week, Virgo. First, imagine that your biggest obstacle is the size of the Great Wall of China. Second, imagine yourself soaring so high above it, so thoroughly beyond it, that it disappears. If performed regularly, I think this exercise will give you a new power to deal with your own personal Great Wall of China.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the early 1990s, actors Johnny Depp and Winona Ryder were engaged to be married. In honor of their love, Depp got a tattoo that read “Winona Forever.” After the relationship fell apart, though, he had it altered to “Wino Forever.” If you’re faced with a comparable need to change a tattoo or shift your emphasis or transform a message anytime soon, Libra, I suggest putting a more positive and upbeat spin on it—something akin to “Winner Forever.”



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the Bering Strait, Russia and America are 2.5 miles apart. The International Date Line runs through the gap, meaning that it’s always a day later on the Russian side than it is on the American. I suggest you identify a metaphorically similar place in your own life, Scorpio: a zone where two wildly different influences almost touch. According to my reading of the omens, it’s an excellent time for you to foster more interaction and harmony between them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I have a group of colleagues who half-jokingly, half-sincerely refer to themselves as the Shamanic Hackers of Karmic Justice. The joking part of it is that the title is so over-the-top ostentatious that it keeps them from taking themselves too seriously. The sincere part is that they really do engage in shamanic work designed to help free their clients from complications generated by old mistakes. Since you’re entering the season of adjustment and atonement, I asked them to do some corrective intervention in your behalf. They agreed, with one provision: that you aid and abet their work by doing what you can to liberate yourself from the consequences of wrong turns you made in the past.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Weekly World News reported that a blues singer sued his psychiatrist for turning him into a more cheerful person. Gloomy Gus Johnson claimed he was so thoroughly cured of his depression that he could no longer perform his dismal tales with mournful sincerity. His popularity declined as he lost fans who had become attached to his despondent persona. I suspect you may soon be arriving at a similar crossroads, Capricorn. Through the intervention of uplifting influences and outbreaks of benevolence, you will find it harder to cultivate a cynical attitude. Are you prepared to accept the consequences that may come from being deprived of some of your reasons to moan and groan?



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Educational specialist Dr. Howard Gardner believes I.Q. tests evaluate only a fraction of human intelligence. He describes eight different kinds of astuteness. They include the traditional measures—being good at math and language—as well as six others: being smart about music, the body, other people, one’s own inner state, nature, and spatiality. (More here: bit.ly/Shrewd.) I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because you’re entering a phase when you could dramatically enhance your intelligence about your own inner state. Take advantage of this fantastic opportunity to know yourself much, much better.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): South Carolina now requires subversive people to register with the state if they have the stated intention of overthrowing the government of the United States. I have no such goal, so I remain free to operate unlicensed in South Carolina. I am, however, participating in a movement to overthrow reality—or rather, the sour and crippled mass hallucination that is mistakenly called “reality.” This crusade requires no guns or political agitation, but is instead waged by the forces of the liberated imagination using words, music, and images to counteract those who paralyze and deaden the imagination. I invite you to join us. You’re entering a phase when you may feel an almost ecstatic longing to free yourself from the delusions that constitute the fake “reality.” Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM COORDINATOR I, American Indian Research Opportunities, MSU-Bozeman. Details at www.montana. edu/jobs, Bozeman Job Service, or call 406-994-5584. Screening Date: 4/15/10. MSU-Bozeman is an ADA/ EEO/AA/Vet Pref Employer

petency, hydraulic & pneumatic systems, blue print reading, welding & lubrication methods. Works rotating 12-hr shifts 4 on 4 off. Apply w/Work Source Job WA2050423 or fax resume 509.544.2775 Equal Opportunity Employer Salary $21.62-$26.19 DOQ

PROGRAMMER, F/T, Msla. Problem solving, software design skills, J2EE, C/C++, & other relational databases. Convert project specifications and statements of problems and procedures to detailed logical flow charts for coding into computer language. Develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data and information. May program web sites. Good documentation skills. BS in Computer Science or equivalent training & experience. Starting rate is between $10 to $15/hour DOE. #2977356 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

SKILLED LABOR COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) Great Pay. Great Miles. CDL-A Required. New to trucking...we will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. 866-692-2612. Swift ENGINEER, P/T, Seasonal, Msla. Missoula hotel seeking experienced part-time Engineer. Hourly wage based on experience. Work schedule, (20 to 30 hours per week) to be discussed at interview. Part-time, seasonal position. MUST be able to work weekends! #2977354 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MANUAL MACHINIST, F/T, Temporary, Msla. A leading manufacturer and distributor of plastic components offering a vast array of processes including injection molding, fabrication, and urethane casting is seeking a full-time temporary MANUAL MACHINIST for their Missoula plant. Pay starts at $16.00/hr, or more depending on experience. This is a full-time temporary position that could possibly work into a permanent position. #2977352 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MECHANIC/ELECTRICIAN Boise Paper Holdings, Inc, in Wallula, WA, is looking for a master mechanic/electrician to service various machinery; such as corrugator, flexo, die cutters, etc. Following proficiences preferred: general maintenance, Allen Bradley, troubleshooting, machine & fitting shop knowledge, electrical com-

WILDLAND FIRE FUEL TRUCK DRIVER, Seasonal, Temporary, Lolo. FUEL FIRE TRUCK OPERATOR needed for wild land fires. Applicants MUST have ALL of the following to apply: current Class B CDL with Tanker and Hazardous Materials endorsements, current DOT Medical Card, and 2010 Standards of Survival Training (RT-130, 8 hrs). Duties include dispensing fuel from fuel truck to various trucks and equipment. Must also keep fuel truck full; either calling for refueling or driving to refuel. Will be responsible for detailed paperwork and extensive paper logs. Must have legible handwriting. Need reliable transportation to employer’s workplace. Competitive wages offered. Job will vary depending on fire season and calls by the USFS for equipment and staff. Pay begins when truck is signed up and ends when you return and park truck in driveway. Must be ready to go to work at short notice. Hiring as soon as possible so specific training can be completed. #2977351 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS

Work days and hours vary. Starting wage is DOE plus commission. #2977350 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES

CASE MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a full-time Case Manager. Requires a bachelor’s degree or higher in a health related field and licensure as a RN and three years clinical practice experience. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. #2977357

SALES WIRELESS CONSULTANTS, F/T, Msla. Experienced fulltime WIRELESS CONSULTANTS needed for the Missoula area. Duties include: Selling services and products to customers. Must have previous commissioned sales experience. Retail sales experience and customer service skills a plus. Must have basic computer skills with Microsoft Word and Outlook. Will also provide ongoing customer service to existing clients. Requires High School Diploma or equivalent.

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-7763068 Bartenders in demand. No experience necessary. Meet new people, take home cash tips. Up to $200 per shift. Training, placement and certification provided. Call (877) 435-2230 COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part-time to $7,500/mo. fulltime. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1800-330-8446 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION ASSISTANT / TEACHERS’ AIDE, P/T, Msla. Missoula area nonprofit is seeking Part-time ASSISTANT TEACHERS’ AIDE to work Morning shift. Will assist teachers with implementation of planned lessons and classroom activities, while providing quality care for preschool aged children. Will attend 1 meeting a month in evening hours and annual training conducted in evening hours. Will be caring for 2 to 5 year olds. Varied morning hours; Monday through Friday, starting at about 7am for about 25 hours per week. Pay is $7.25/hour. #2977349 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

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MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS FOR SALE Colorado Blue Spruce 7-10’ Ball and Burlap. Call 406883-4553 Polson, Montana FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-4750876 NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 April 22 – April 29, 2010

sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.Norwood Sawmills.com/300N 1-800661-7746, Ext.300N STEEL BUILDINGS: 6 only 16x24, 25x34, 30x38, 40x54, 45x74, 80x150. Must Move Now! Selling for Balance Owed! Still Crated. Free Delivery! 1800-411-5869 x183

AUCTIONS Delinquent Storage shed auction April 26, 2010 from 1-4. Units #30 Cheryl Smoker, #43 Frank Veto and #23 Kim Stevens. Units are located at 1640 Montana Street, Msla, 59801 Too many tools? More than enough equipment? Consign it with Fritz Auction. Sale May 22nd, Chester. Advertising deadline April 26. Call (406) 432-2845

SPORTING GOODS Capt’n Trips: Last year’s Blue NRS rental tubes for sale! Great prices! Call 531-3975. OSCODA CANOE. 13 foot. Good shape. $250/OBO. 5449040


MARKETPLACE APPLIANCES

DIRECTV FREE Standard Installation! FREE SHOWTIME+STARZ (3 month)! FREE HD/DVR upgrade! Ends 7/14/10. New Customers Only, Quality Packages From $29.99/month. DirectStarTV 1888-650-7714

Brand New White all gas range. $299. Call Dean at Brand Source 728-8090.

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533

FURNITURE

WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

Echo Echo Home Furnishings Worth Repeating. Call 2141327 or visit us online at www.echoechomt.com.

PETS & ANIMALS

MUSIC

CATS #0333 Black/brown tabby, Am Med Hair, M, 5wks; #0338 Orange/white, Am Short Hair, NM, Adul; #0342 Orange/white tabby, Am Short Hair, NM, Adult; #0362 Grey/brown tabby, Am Short Hair, NM, 4yr; #0363 Choc/tan, Siamese X, SF, 2yr; #0365 Black/brown tabby, Am Short Hair, SF, 2yr For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org. Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3635311 www.montanapets.org/ hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

FREE 6 Room DISH Network Satellite System! FREE HD-DVR! $19.99/mo, 120+ Digital Channels (for 1 year.) Call now - $400 Sign-up Bonus 1-877868-8670 HIGH-SPEED INTERNET available virtually anywhere through satellite! FREE standard installation. FREE 24/7 customer support. Lowest price ever! Call now-limited time offer from WildBlue 800-818-3574

COMPUTERS Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214 GET 2 COMPUTERS FOR PRICE OF ONE! Bad/Credit? NO PROBLEM! Starting at $29.99/week. Up to $3000 credit limit. Guaranteed Approval! Call Now! 888-860-2426 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 W. Broadway 543-8287

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ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com All strings are 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Drumheads - 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM MORGENROTH MUSIC APRIL IS INTERNATIONAL GUITAR MONTH Register to win a new guitar given away on April, 30th! April 23-24 is Test Drive Weekend! Try out a new guitar, bring your trade if you have one, do a short evaluation of the guitar you like and get a free Guitar maintenance kit! Register to win a new guitar! MORGENROTH MUSIC 1105 W Sussex, Missoula. 549-0013, www.montanamusic.com.

GARAGE SALES Saturday & Sunday, 4-24-4/25. 7:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Seven piece bedroom set, twin trundle bed, W/D, toys, many sizes clothing, household items. 4410 Nicole Court

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1920 Brooks • 549-1729

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Consignments

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724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

549-6214

Register to win a new guitar given away on April, 30th! April 23-24 is Test Drive Weekend! Try out a new guitar, bring your trade if you have one, do a short evaluation of the guitar you like and get a free Guitar maintenance kit! Register to win a new guitar! www.montanamusic.com

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

DOGS #0290 Grey/white, Pitt, NM, 3yr; #0328, Black, Lab, SF Adult; #0329 Black/brown, Hound X, SF, 1 _ yrs; #0337 Black/tan, German Shep X, NM, 3 yrs; #0379 Crème/Blk, Airdale/Husky X, SF, 3yrs; #0381 Black, Lab, SF, 10 mo; #0393 Tan/white, Pitt, NM, 11 mo; #0400 Black/brown, Shep/Heeler X, NM, 4 yrs; #0402 Black, Lab/Sharpei X, SF 4 yrsFor photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org. Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

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ELECTRONICS

Morgenroth Music 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013

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PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of Missoula County Auditor room 212 in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, in the City of Missoula, Montana until 3:00 o’clock PM., May 6, 2010 at which time bids will be opened, for the purpose of: Construction of a Secure Warehouse at the Missoula County Detention Center. Bids will be received for one single contract, the General Contract, which shall include all work for the construction of the project. A pre-bid walkthrough at the site (Missoula County Detention Center) will be held on Monday April 26, 2010 at 10 AM local time. A review of the site will be conducted. Bidders are encouraged to attend, however it is not a mandatory meeting. All work is to be performed in accordance with the resolution and plans on file with the Missoula County Facilities Management department in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula County, Montana. All work shall be performed under the supervision of Architects Design Group PC and Missoula County Facilities Management. Prospective bidders may secure copies of the plans and specifications from Architects Design Group PC, 1 Sunset Plaza, Kalispell, Montana, (406) 257-7125 or Missoula County Facilities Management, 200 W. Broadway Missoula, Montana, (406)-258-4756 upon submitting a plan deposit of $200.00. The plan deposit is 100% refundable upon return of complete sets of the bidding documents, in good condition, within 10 days after bid opening. Plans will also be available at the following Exchanges: Missoula Plans Exchange Center, 201 North

Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 Ph: (406) 549-5002. Builders Exchange of Billings, 2050 Broadwater Avenue, Suite A, Billings, MT 59102 Ph: (406) 652-1311. Spokane Regional Plans Center, 102 East Boone, Suite 102, Spokane, WA 99202 Ph: (509) 3289600. Great Falls Builders Exchange, 202 Second Ave. S., Great Falls, MT 59405 Ph: (406) 453-2513. Northwest Montana Plans Exchange, 2303 MT Hwy 2 East, Kalispell, MT 59901 Ph: (406) 755-5888. Bidders wishing to obtain more than one set of plans may do so by request to ADG or Missoula County Facilities. Charges for such documents will be made to cover reproduction and handling costs and is not refundable. Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier’s check or bid bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bids as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Construction of a Secure Warehouse and addressed to the Missoula County Auditor, Missoula Montana” The successful Bidder, if awarded the contract, shall within a period of 10 days from the date of award enter into a formal contract and furnish an approved Performance Bond and Labor and Materials Payment Bond each in the amount of 100% of the Contract as provided in the “Instructions to Bidders.” Each bidder shall be registered with the Montana Department of Labor, in accordance with Montana Statue, and provide Missoula County a current copy of his Montana Contractor Registration Certificate. No Contractor may withdraw his Bid for a period of 30 consecutive days from the date of opening of Bids, except as pro-

vided in the “Instructions to Bidders” By order of the Board of County Commissioners this 13th day of April, 2010. /s/ Barbara Berens, County Auditor /s/ Larry Farnes, Facilities Manager MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION GRANT FUNDING MISSOULA The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on Historic Preservation Grant Funding for renovations to the historic County Courthouse and the Historical Museum’s T-1 Building at Fort Missoula and accept public comment on the environmental assessment checklists for both projects. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Public Meeting on April 28th, at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802; by fax at (406) 721-4043; or by e-mail at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Anne Hughes by calling 258-3160 and will be posted on the County’s website as it becomes available. DATED THIS 15th DAY OF APRIL, 2010 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on a proposed ordinance to establish a maximum speed limit of 35 m.p.h. for Big Flat Road. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing on April 28,

2010 and May 12, 2010 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Gregory Robertson, P.E., AICP, Director of Public Works at Missoula county Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 or by calling (406) 258-4818. DATED THIS 7th DAY OF April, 2010. (s) Gregory H. Robertson, P.E., AICP, Director of Public Works MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, HEREBY NOTIFIES MISSOULA COUNTY TAX PAYERS THAT THE SECOND HALF OF 2009 REAL ESTATE TAXES LEVIED AND ASSESSED WILL BE DUE AND PAYABLE BEFORE 5:00 P.M. ON JUNE 1, 2010. UNLESS 2009 TAXES ARE PAID PRIOR TO THAT TIME, THE AMOUNT THEN DUE WILL BE DELINQUENT, WILL ACCRUE INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5/6 OF 1% PER MONTH AND WILL BE ASSESSED A 2% PENALTY FROM THE TIME OF DELINQUENCY UNTIL PAID. ..IF YOU INTEND TO PROTEST YOUR TAXES, YOU MUST MAKE PAYMENT BY THE DUE DATE AND MUST INCLUDE A LETTER OF PROTEST WITH YOUR PAYMENT. THE LETTER OF PROTEST MUST INCLUDE YOUR NAME, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION, GROUNDS FOR PROTEST AND THE AMOUNT

YOU ARE PROTESTING PURSUANT TO MCA § 15-1-402. /S/ VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF MISSOULA Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-10-43 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT N. MORGAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Toni Morgan, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Morales Law Office, PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of April, 2010. /s/ Toni Morgan, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Probate No. DP-10-42 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LEONARD J. HUBBLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Samuel H. Ballam, III, P.R., return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane, P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 7th day of April, 2010. /s/ Ronald A. Bender, WORDEN THANE, P.C., Attorneys for Applicant MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-29 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JERRY GRANT GREENOUGH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the

above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lana Greenough, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested in care of Paul E. Fickes, Esq., Christian, Samon & Jones, PLLC, 310 West Spruce, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 9th day of April, 2010. /s/ Lana Greenough, PO Box 321, 51 St. Regis Street, St. Regis, MT 59866 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Case No. DV-10-438 Robert L. Deschamps III NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 132. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting April 26, 2010 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to A p r i l 2 9 , 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

Matter of the Name Change of Seng Favtxhim Thao, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKEN NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Seng Favtxhim Thao, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Seng Favtxhim Thao to Shane Seng Favtxhim Thao and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 39, 48, 226, 289, 410, and 552. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 26, 2010 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 April 22 – April 29, 2010


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

d s

"Burn After Reading"–it's what remains.

by Matt Jones

PUBLIC NOTICES on the 18th day of May, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 in courtroom number 2S. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 7th day of April, 2010. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Maria Cassidy, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-44 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BERNADINE L. MARMON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that William Clarence Marmon has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to William Clarence Marmon, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Anne Blanche Adams, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 598078234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of April, 2010. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234. /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Attorneys for Personal Representative

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Hot spot offering 5 Author Jong 10 Like some water or lemonade 14 Milky gemstone 15 Lose it and run amok 16 Square footage, e.g. 17 Cabo ___ (Sammy Hagar tequila brand) 18 Adrenal, for instance 19 Closes a jacket 20 Loretta Swit's nickname, with "The"? 23 Jimmy Eat World genre 24 Ending for spat or form 25 Tried to buzz off of a fertilizer ingredient? 34 White from fright 35 Not quite right? 36 Rock's ___ Speedwagon 37 Heath bar competitor 38 Minute Maid Park player 39 Kenya's first prime minister Kenyatta 40 ___ in "uncle" 41 "___ Up Style" (Blu Cantrell single) 42 Word before book or opera 43 Meat-and-potatoes dish used to hone your culinary skills? 46 Off-roader of sorts 47 Part of many Arab names 48 Scary creatures that can't be bought with plastic? 56 Assist a criminal 57 How taboos are with most people 58 Barney's hangout 60 Guam, for one: abbr. 61 Macbeth was one 62 Yemen neighbor 63 "Caprica" network 64 Subject that may require a permission slip 65 Win over

1 "That's so cool!" 2 Product that debuted April 3, 2010 3 Race car driver Teo 4 It follows "And" in a Beatles title 5 It might get spiked in December 6 Part 7 Mosque figure 8 "Please?" 9 Totals 10 Type of suit for a chemical spill 11 Operatic solo 12 Weightlifter's units 13 Morse code bit 21 "You won't believe the mess ___..." 22 Fruit in a gin fizz 25 Fill the tank 26 Schindler of "Schindler's List" 27 Yonder objects 28 "___ la vista, baby!" 29 Large jazz combo 30 Olympic "Flying Finn" Paavo 31 Parfumerie's attraction 32 Long rides? 33 Turner's title film buddy 38 Ducts 39 His character was killed off after he left "Good Times" 41 Sir Topham ___ ("Thomas the Tank Engine" boss) 42 "Money Honey" Maria Bartiromo's network 44 Bear claw, for one 45 Made noises from the pen 48 Yoga class supplies 49 Follow the rules 50 Foamy toy brand 51 Architect Ludwig Mies van der ___ 52 Otis Redding record label 53 Actress Skye of "Say Anything" 54 "___ friend you are!" 55 Get better 59 Andy Samberg show, for short

Last week’s solution

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0464

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-10-39 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HOMER W. ROCK, JR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed CoPersonal Representatives of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Glenda Marie Rock and Lee LaRoche, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. DATED this 26th day of March, 2010. /s/ Glenda Marie Rock, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Lee LaRoche, Co-Personal Representative GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy Gibson MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DR-10-115 Summons for Publication In re the Marriage of David L. Johnson, Petitioner, and Genine M. Packert, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVENAMED RESPONDENT: You, the Respondent, are hereby summoned to answer the Petition in this action, which is filed with the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Petitioner within twenty days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. Title to and interest in the following real property will be involved in this action: DATED this 7th day of April, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Amy M. Day, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-10-126 AMENDED SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. M. SHEILA MURPHY and C. MAX MURPHY Plaintiffs, vs. NUTEC COMMUNICATIONS, Inc. d/b/a ROCKY MOUNTAIN COMMUNICATIONS, Inc., ELMER ANDERSON and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’title thereto, whether such claim or possible claims be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA SEND GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAME DEFENDANTS: Nutec Communications, Inc. d/b/a Rocky Mountain Communications, Inc.; Elmer Anderson; and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to the Plaintiffs’ title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent. YOU ARE HEREBY Summoned to answer to the Complaint in this action as filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs’ attorneys within 20 days after service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana and described as follows: A tract of land located in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as Tract 38 of Certificate of Survey

No. 47. WITNESS my hand this 13th day of April, 2010. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: Gayle Johnson, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-10-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGARET JANE JACOBSEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Helen J. Lee, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at Dye & Moe, P.L.L.P., PO Box 9198, 216 West Main, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the clerk of the aboveentitled court. Dated: April 16th, 2010. /s/ Helen J. Lee, Personal Representative NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Primary Election to be held on June 8, 2010, will close at 5:00 p.m., on May 10, 2010.. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election office up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election office on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive** electors of Missoula County are entitled to vote at said election.. **Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the polling place in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county.. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address.. DATED this 25th day of March, 2010. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy NOTICE OF RIGHT OF WAY ENCROACHMENT The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on a proposed sewer main utility encroachment in the Old Bitterroot Road right of way west of Lower Miller Creek Road. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing on April 28, 2010 at 1:30PM in Room 201 of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Gilbert Larson at Professional Consultants, Inc. 3115 S. Russell Street, Missoula MT 59801 or by calling (406) 728-1880. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated February 5, 2003 Grantor: Lei Ann Cross, 199 Cross Country Road, Polson,, Montana 59860 Lei Ann Cross, 17600 Highway 93 North Missoula, Montana 59808 Lei Ann Cross, 110 Main Street, Suite 7 Polson, Montana 59860 Lei Ann Cross, P.O. Box 549 Polson, Montana 59860 Borrowers: Lei Ann Cross and John L. Cross 199 Cross Country Road Polson, Montana 59860 Original Trustee: First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., P.O. Box 549, Missoula, Montana 59806 Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula 2601 Garfield Missoula, Montana 59801 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807- -8957 Date and Place of Recordation: February 6, 2003 in Book 698, Page 1312, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana. The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 20th day of July, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the abovedescribed instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: A tract of land located in the E_ of Section 23 and the W_ of Section 24, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, M.P.M., Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 24; thence S.00º01’E., along the West line of said Section 24, 3798.38 feet to the true point of beginning; thence S.68º07’10”E.,

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 April 22 – April 29, 2010

337.82 feet to the Northwesterly right-of-way line of the Northern Pacific Railway; thence S.43º33’20”W., along said railway right-ofway line, 165.15 feet; thence N.66º11’30”W., 411.11 feet to the Southeasterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 93 on a non-tangent curve (radial) line through said point bears S.75º43’30”E.’ thence Northeasterly along said Highway right-of-way line and said nontangent curve, being concave to the Northwest and having a radius of 2945.0 feet, 94.3 feet to a point on a tangent line; thence N.12º26’20”E., along said Highway right-ofway line, 46.95 feet; thence S.68º07’10”E., 155.74 feet to the true point of beginning. LESS AND EXCEPTING that portion deeded to the State of Montana recorded in Book 666 of Micro Records at page 1060. TOGETHER WITH improvements including a 1972 Great Lakes mobile home, Title No. M487388, upon which Beneficiary holds a first lien security interest. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 349 of Micro Records at page 1612. Subject to easements and encumbrances of record. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of her successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the Deed of Trust in the amount of Four Hundred Fiftyone and 30/100ths Dollars ($451.30) each for the months of November 2009 through February 2010, totaling One Thousand Eight Hundred Five and 20/100ths Dollars ($1,805.20); together with late charges in the amount of One Hundred Four and 83/100ths Dollars ($104.83); and the failure to pay real and personal property taxes and assessments for the years 2008 and the first one-half of 2009. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Forty-four Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-nine and 26/100ths Dollars ($44,359.26), plus interest thereon at the current rate of Eight Percent (8.%) per annum (variable), from and after the 18th day of October, 2009 to March 2, 2010, in the amount of One Thousand Three Hundred Two and 83/100ths Dollars ($1,302.83); plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Nine and 72/100ths Dollars ($9.72); plus all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law.. DATED this 9th day of March, 2010. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807 -8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula. This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 9th day of March, 2010, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. ((SEAL) /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the State of Montana. Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: January 6, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/07/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200901831, B: 832, P: 862, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Michael V. Mitchell, a married man was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Real Estate Mortgage Network, Inc was Beneficiary and Netco Title Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Netco Title Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The SW1/4 SE1/4, Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, of the Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, lying North and West of the Railroad Right of Way and Northland West of Highway, except: A tract of land located in the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, and in the N1/2 of Section 34, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, M.P.M., more particularly described as: Beginning at the South quarter corner of Section 27; thence Northerly along the midsection line of Section 27, 1034 feet; thence Easterly and parallel to South boundary line of Section 27, 367 feet; thence Southerly and parallel to said midsection line to an intersection with the Northwesterly boundary of U.S. Highway No. 93; thence Southwesterly along the Northwesterly boundary of U.S. Highway No. 93, 150 feet, more or less to its intersection with the South boundary of said Section 27; thence Westerly along said section line to its intersection with the Northwesterly boundary of U.S. Highway No. 93; thence Southwesterly along said boundary of U.S. Highway No 93, 318.9 feet; thence Northwesterly and right angles to an intersection with the South boundary of Section 27; thence Easterly along the section line to Point of Beginning, Missoula County, Montana. And all that part of SW1/4 SE1/4, of said Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, P.M. lying South and East of the Northern Pacific Railway Right of Way, Missoula County, Montana. Recording reference: Book 96 of Micro Records, Page 1538. Less and excepting that portion deed to the State of Montana in Book 201 of Micro Records at Page 1606 and Book 201 of Micro Records at Page 1610. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if appli-

cable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 17, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $225,658.54. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,694.76, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 28, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71252) 1002.147906-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/25/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200716720, Bk 800, Pg 925, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lyle Dewitt Kleckner and Jo Ann Kleckner husband and wife and joint tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 9 and the East onehalf of Lot 10 in Block 3 of Bellevue Addition No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official plat thereof. And Lot 9 and the East one-half of Lot 10 in Block 3 of Bellevue Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 220 of Micro Records at Page 1504. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/29/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 17, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $248,392.25. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $230,621.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 29, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-

monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.11989) 1002.148103-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/15/04, recorded as Instrument No. 200432695, Book 743, Page 1224, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Casey R. Peterson was Grantor, Argent Mortgage Company, LLC was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in and being a portion of Lots 1, 2 and 3 in Block 15 of Low’s Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 1238A. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200920064 Bk. 845, Pg. 908, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank, National Association as Trustee, Successor-in-Interest to Wachovia Bank, N.A. Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of November 1, 2004, Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2004WWF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 19, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $161,151.73. This amount

Missoula County Government

PUBLIC NOTICE North Lolo Growth Policy Update and Rural Special Zoning District The Missoula County Board of County Commissioners adopted a Resolution of Intent to create the North Lolo Rural Special Zoning District and adopt regulations for this District. The North Lolo area is approximately 900 acres in size. The triangular area is located immediately south of Bird Lane. It is bounded by Ridgeway Drive to the south and Highway 93 to the east. See Map O for the boundaries of the North Lolo area. The North Lolo Rural Special Zoning District includes six (6) zoning classifications including Resource Transition, Residential, Ponderosa Heights Subdivision, Town Residential, Community Commercial, and Town Mixed Use. It also includes a specific set of definitions, general requirements, nonconforming use provisions, and admin-

istrative and enforcement provisions that outline specifics for conditional use permits. The North Lolo Rural Special Zoning District map and regulations are on file for public inspection at the office of the county clerk and recorder and at the Missoula County Rural Initiatives website http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/rural/Lolo AreaRegionalPlan/NLoloProject.htm. A protest period will be held for thirty (30) days after the first publication of the notice of the Resolution of Intent on April 15, 2010. The Board of County Commissioners will receive written protests to the creation of the zoning district or to the zoning regulations from persons owning real property within the district whose names appear on the last-completed assessment roll of the county. Written protests may be submitted to Missoula County Board of County Commissioners, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802.


PUBLIC NOTICES includes the outstanding principal balance of $151,978.07, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 1, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.10007) 1002.146717-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/28/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200705387, Bk. 793, Pg. 202, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Douglas J. Nyberg and Tammy Bowshier Nyberg, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Stewart Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 246 of Pleasant View Homes No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 25, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $223,358.95. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $212,268.09, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 7, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71562) 1002.148793-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/08/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200613760, Book 776, Page 568, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in

which Lindsey Doe, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 44A of Cook’s Addition, Block 1, Lots 40 through 45, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 5, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $153,448.28. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $136,231.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01566) 1002.114050-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/23/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200337626, Bk 719, Pg 83, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James Kaufman and Gretchen Kim Kaufman, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the E1/2 NE1/4 SW1/4 and all that part of the NE1/4 SE1/4 SW1/4 lying North of US 12 as now constructed, all in Section 26, Township 12 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book No. 481 of Micro Records at Page 1534. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for WFASC 2003-16. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $224,955.70. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $218,662.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 13, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the

SERVICES sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.71485) 1002.149552-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 1, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK 32 OF DALY’S ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORD PLAT THEREOF. Kendra E. Root, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 5, 2003 and recorded September 10, 2003 as document number 200333774, in Book 717, Page 589. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc., Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $953.59, beginning October 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 22, 2010 is $109,914.19 principal, interest at the rate of 6.75% now totaling $2,899.94, late charges in the amount of $192.95, escrow advances of $151.30, and other fees and expenses advanced of $466.31, plus accruing interest at the rate of $20.33 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession

ADULT

of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 22, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 1/22/10, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JOAN MEIER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/13 ASAP# 3510789 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 14, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the N 1/2 of Section 22, township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M. Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534. Less and excepting that portion of Tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534 more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Tract C2, Certificate of Survey No. 3534, thence northwesterly, along the Frontage Road right-of-way, along a nontangent curve, whose center bears C29º00’21” W., 4074.20 feet, an arc length of 160.00 feet; thence N27º33’07” E., 574.09 feet; thence S.62º26’40” E., 160.00 feet; thence along the East boundary of said Tract C2. S.27º33’12” W., 575.00 feet to the point of beginning. Debra Ann Finley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated August 7, 2001 and Recorded on August 13, 2001 in Book 666, Page 567, as Document No. 200119620 and Re-Recorded on September 5, 2001 in Book 667, Page 860, as Document No. 200121908. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,214.17, beginning August 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 23, 2010 is $143,642.86 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $5,776.20, late charges in the amount of $135.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $136.33, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.04 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the

amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 4, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 4, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3525426 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 21, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK M OF CAR LINE ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Doreen M Bermingham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 30, 2006 and Recorded on March 31, 2006 under Document # 200607104. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2006-2, Mortgage-Backed Notes, Series 2006-2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $852.14, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 4, 2010 is $98,968.87 principal,

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 April 22 – April 29, 2010


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Open House Only Part of the Story By Brint Wahlberg, 2010 MOR President Earlier in April, the National Association of REALTORS® promoted a nationwide Open House weekend. The weekend had extra significance, coming as it did just a few weeks before the tax credits expired. And with the snow gone and the very slightest tinges of green starting to show in the northern regions, it was a great opportunity to get out in the community. Walking through a house, seeing the view from the windows, hearing footsteps on the floors, opening doors and cupboards, and then stepping back outside into the sunshine trumps sitting in front of a computer looking at pictures every time. Open houses have typically been seen as a time when those with houses already on the market can show them off to those who are actively looking to purchase. That perception may be reminiscent of a time that no longer exists. What we know about consumers today is that they are more cautious and more deliberate than they may once have been. They may be looking at houses long before they are actually ready to purchase. We also know that they are not just looking for a house. They are looking for a lifestyle.

The saying has always been that real estate is about three things: Location, location, and location. And today it’s not just about the location of the house; it’s also about how that house contributes to a lifestyle. Where are the parks, the hiking and biking trails? Is there a bookstore, coffee shop, drug store, grocery store close or within walking distance? Can the kids walk to school, to other activities? When will there be sunshine or shadows? Wind? Noise? For parts of the last decade, both consumers and real estate brokerages reveled in the possibility that they could complete transactions without ever seeing other parties involved, maybe sometimes not even seeing the house until the moving truck arrives. They communicate by e-mail. They FAX documents or send them as attachments. Electronic signatures expedite the process even more. Such arrangements are no longer a novelty; it’s business as usual. But the impersonal transaction fails to pass the relationship test for those seeking more than just the paperwork. Consumers today want local expertise; they want to know about the local market; they want someone who can help them interpret that market; and they

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want stories and information about the community, about the neighborhoods. In short they want to know what it will be like to live in that house, not just spend time there. So the nationwide open house weekend in Missoula accomplished two goals. It served a business purpose. It introduced potential buyers to the local market and it showcased homes that are ready for a new family. But it also served to invite the community into the neighborhoods, to walk the streets, to make connections, to visit with each other. For many of those participating in the open house weekend, it was, most likely, a fleeting experience irrelevant until a decision is made about purchasing. But for REALTORS®, it’s what they do every day. It’s what gives them the insights they need to help interpret the numbers, to understand the complexities of the market, analyze the mountains of information, and share the local stories, and advocate for their clients. It’s what we mean when we say, for all of us, ‘It matters how we “Live Missoula!”

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PUBLIC NOTICES interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $2,411.42, late charges in the amount of $105.15, escrow advances of $76.03, and other fees and expenses advanced of $150.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid

money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the

trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 10, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2010 ASAP# 3534320 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 8, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in

Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 4 of MOUNT JUMBO VIEWS, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Steven D. Wall, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated September 30, 2005 and Recorded September 30, 2005 at 03:43 o’clock P.M. in Book 761, Page 593, under 200525823. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,799.11, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and

other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 20, 2010 is $459,599.50 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $26,156.88, late charges in the amount of $1,575.00, escrow advances of $4,218.43, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,757.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $73.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting

only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be post-

poned by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 29, 2010 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On January 29, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3519874 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010

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1545 Cooley: 2-bedroom, garage, 2nd floor, dishwasher, hook-ups, heat paid, $850, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com 2915 O’Shaughnessy #202 Newer 2bd/1.5ba Condo, DW, W/D hkups, microwave, sgl gar. Behind Home Depot. $995/mo. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 3320 Great Northern Apartments-Rent $495-$570 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 7218990 4705 Potter Park Loop Charming 2bd/1ba House, DW, W/D, dbl gar, front and back yd. Out by Airport Blvd. $995/mo. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 721 Palmer. 3 bdrm 1 bath gas heat washer and dryer hookup

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

251- 4707

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $605/mo.

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 April 22 – April 29, 2010


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 10250 Valley Grove Dr., Lolo MLS#902264 $289,000Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath, artsy log home on 1.84 acres 5 minutes from Missoula Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 150 ft Flathead Lk Ftg 3B/2B Manufactured Hm. Boat Dock, level grass-to-lake 1.46 acs in Elmo. $495,000 / Real Living Greater Montana 406-239-7588 2663 Stratford, Target Range MLS#907889 - $212,000 Well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath ranch with fenced yard. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3322 B Connery Way MLS#908163 - $191,000 Unique 3 level condo. 2 bedrooms, plus loft & 3 bath. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 4322 Capy Ln. - MLS#904419 $435,000 Wonderful executive style 4 bed, 4 bath home on 1 acre lot. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS#906641. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12591 for pics 7097 Mormon Creek $177,000 A MUST SEE HOME!!! COZY, WELL MAINTAINED 2 BEDROOM HOME, A PARK LIKE SETTING ON APPROX 1/2 ACRE FENCED IN LOT, BEAUTIFUL MATURE TREES . FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS HOME PLEASE CALL HEATHER AT BERGUM REAL ESTATE 406-241-4018. Affordable, nice, like-new single family home in central Missoula with 3brm, all aplliances, awesome open floorplan and only $169,900, 1947 12St 3278787 porticorealestate.com

333 Martin Lane MLS# 10000160 • $249,900 NOW $239,000

Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $179,900. MLS#906774. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Msg:12881 for pics BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 10,000 Sq Ft Lot, open floor plan, double attached garage, lots of storage, living room & family room, close to Good Food Store, and more. $223,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED SOUTH HILLS HOME ON A 13,000 SQ FT LOT. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, gorgeous interior, hardwood floors, incredible yard, great mountain and valley views. $207,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com CUTE ROSE PARK/SLANT STREETS NEIGHBORHOOD BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2+ bonus rooms, hardwood floors, arched doorways, built-ins, single garage, fenced yard, mostly finished basement, and much more. $249,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Darling 1940’s home in great neighborhood! Elegant coved tray ceilings. Darling kitchen, hardwood floors, 2bd, 1ba, organic raised garden and fabulous patio area. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Development potential, almost 2 acres, vintage farmhouse & duplex, additional undeveloped ground. Preliminary Plat City Council Approval in place, contact agent for details, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1.03 ACRES IN THE LOLO CREEK VALLEY. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Main floor master suite, great room, family room & rec room, formal and casual dining rooms, great mountain and valley views. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-

6696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Fantastic North Side Home Wonderful new 3 bed/1.5 bath home (total remodel in 2003) is close to downtown, Farmer’s Market, the Northside trail system, and much more. Ample space for a garage if you desire. Enjoy summer BBQ’s on the new trexdeck and nice yard. Call Devin Khoury for your showing 207-8200. Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12 porticorealestate.com Fantastic, like-new, 4Bdrm, 2Bth, open floorplan, affordable at $229K, Next to Fantastic Community Garden and close to Good Food Store and bike trail. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com FISH THE BLACKFOOT RIVER FROM YOUR BACK YARD. Beautifully landscaped 4 Bdr/2 Bath home on 1.2 acres on the Blackfoot River just 10-15 minutes from Missoula. Open floor plan, great deck with hot tub

overlooking the river and much more. $475,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Great 3bdr house with hardwood floors, fireplace, nice sized kitchen and big backyard with garden space, fruit trees and garage with shop area. 933 Woodford 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Hillview Acres - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Acreage in Helena area. Zoned for cemetery. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Huge Price Reduction Lot 1 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905530 - $85,000 or two lots totaling 5.12 acres for $160,000 2.87 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Huge Price Reduction Lot 2 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905531 - $85,000 or two lots totaling 5.12 acres for $160,000 2.25 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

Log cabin with no close neighbors. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 906248 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam @windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics NHN Applegate & Prarie Rd., Helena - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Great investment to get in at the very beginning of a cemetery development. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Nice, 2bdrm, 2 bonus rooms, fireplace, familyroom, walkoutdaylight basement, spacious home in South Hills close to Chief Charlo, updated kitchen, backyard oasis, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Single floor living 3 bd, 2 bth. Wood & tile flooring, private yard w/ garden area. Double car garage & shop space. $199,900. MLS#10001697. 4505 Rio Vista, Missoula. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great room, open floor plan, double garage, unobstructed views of the Bitterroot

Spacious, light-filled Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2

SPECTACULAR BITTERROOT VIEWS. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath Stevensville area home on 10 acres. High ceilings, beautiful hardwood floors, fireplace, spacious master bedroom, deck with hot tub, and much more. $489,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy19 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Flathead Lake Views

$169,000 Nice 2+acre property between Elmo and Dayton with views of Flathead Lake and Chief Cliff. Property has shared well and septic approval.

Downtown Sweetheart

On the corner of Broadway and Russell

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Proper ties

100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION. For the past 4 years. Give us a Try!

514 W. Spruce St. • $269,000 Shelly Evans 544-8570 Jodie Hooker 239-7588 Jerry Hogan 546-7270 Kevin Plumage 240-2009

YOUR COMMUNITY IS A REFLECTION OF YOU APRIL IS FAIR HOUSING MONTH OUR DIVERSITY IS SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE!

1920’s era house has been revamped while retaining all of its original charm. Updated electrical, plumbing, handicapped accessible bath, security alarm, offstreet parking, underground sprinklers, and air conditioning in harmony with original bullseye woodwork, mahogany flooring, high ceilings, and all right downtown on West Spruce. Zoned B2-2 for a variety of commercial or residential uses. MLS#10001940

1839 W. Central • $189,900 Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

REDUCED PRICE Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, views of Bitterroots, immaculate inside & out. Paved Road to property! 1 Mile south of Florence with views all around. Porch swing. Hot tub, and storage shed are all included.

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker

Open House • Sunday May 2nd

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

Call me for more good values on Missoula area homes & investments.

joyearls.mywindermere.com

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms & 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths, a really nice big backyard with patio. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

1500 W Broadway, suite A Missoula

Joy Earls

Joy Earls, Broker • 531-9811

Mountains, great yard. $219,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com

Missoula's All New, All Local Online Community! Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 April 22 – April 29, 2010


REAL ESTATE

Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood throughout, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com University area home, 3bd, 2ba, nice studio apartment above garage. A really nice kitchen and family area make this home very livable. 616 E Sussex 3278787 porticorealestate.com View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077 Well cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home w/ hot tub, A/C, & UG sprinklers. Near parks and trails. $319,900. 5501 Bonanza. Pat McCormick, 240SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES .80 Acs on a Creek: Very nice level land near Turah, Power, Well, Shop set up for a manufactured home, or build! $124,900 Real Living Greater Montana 406-239-7588

LAND FOR SALE 20 ACRES. Creek, power box on county road runs through property. Rural and private. Missoula County. $99,000/ make offer. 544-9040 3 acres fenced & ready for horses. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 24x18 outbuilding, beautiful views. 499 Grandview, Stevensville. $185,000. MLS# 10002488. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam @windermere.com. Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. $99,999. MLS#908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503riceteam@windermere.co m. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @2396696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Large Building on Highway Frontage. Full commercial kitchen, fuel pumps provide monthly income. Easy access for truckers. For sale or lease in Big Sandy $155,000. 406378-2489

Cell: 808-640-3100 or E-mail: susie.spielman@hawaiiantel.ne t 20 years experience. FREE INFO~NO PRESSURE~NO OBLIGATION

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Need a roommate? Check out our local online classifieds to find the perfect one.

REAL ESTATE LENDING WITH A CONSCIENCE. Private funding for secured legitimate “Non-Bankable” Loans with substantial equity. Cash for “Seller Held” contracts and mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC, 619 SW Higgins, Ste 0, Missoula, MT. 59803. 800-999-4809 MT. Lic #000203

OUT OF TOWN HAWAI’I REAL ESTATE ~ BUYER’S MARKET homes-condos-land. Average temperature in the 70’s. Susie Spielman, RS, Windermere C&H Properties.

Spring Place Lots Both lots are in the heart of the Rattlesnake Valley Lot D: $165,000; 13,965 sq ft, level lot End of cul-de-sac; MLS 10000174

Tract 1A: $165,000; 25,263 sq ft sloped building lot. MLS 10000172

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 April 22 – April 29, 2010


USDA Organic Valencia Oranges

Nature's Source Frozen Super Lean Ground Beef

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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


Friday, April 23 & Saturday, April 24 St. Anthony's Parish Center 217 Tremont Street Tickets and info at Rockin Rudy’s

7:30pm both nights University Theatre

Guest artists include: Buddy DeFranco Grace Kelly Lee Konitz Shelly Berg Terell Stafford

THURSDAY, 4/22 6:30 Hellgate Band 7:15 UM Jazz Alive 8:00 Melody & Clipper Anderson

Tickets available at griztix outlets and

8:45 Three Generations of Women in Jazz: Eden Atwood, Jodi Marshall, & Kira Means

griztix.com

9:30 Hall of Fame Awards presented to John Combs and Terry Conrad 9:45 Salsa Loca

SATURDAY, 4/24 **Music at 10:00**

Jam Session with the stars from the Buddy DeFranco Show **ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE AND FLEXIBLE**

WORLD HEADQUARTERS

RECORD HEAVEN

CDs - Gifts - Jewelry - Clothing • 237 Blaine • 542-0077

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Missoula Independent