Page 1

by Matthew Frank

Scope: Tom Foolery’s miniature attack on cowboy chintz Up Front: Mental health crisis center heals an old wound Dance: Headwaters puts Montana Suite into motion


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


by Matthew Frank

Scope: Tom Foolery’s miniature attack on cowboy chintz Up Front: Mental health crisis center heals an old wound Dance: Headwaters puts Montana Suite into motion


Missoula Independent

Page 2 February 4–February 11, 2010


nside Cover Story Much like the West’s gold rush, the noticeable rise in cannabusinesses elicits a mix of heartwarming success stories, rampant opportunism and chaotic legal wrangling. More than anything, our current “green rush” speaks to just how fast the industry has grown since federal enforcement Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters was relaxed late last year. The Indy spoke with more than 50 people involved in various parts of the industry to cover how we got to this point, what it means and where things go from here.............................................14

News Letters Poaching, Tester’s promises and wild horses ..................................................4 The Week in Review Margot Kidder, Anthony Johnson and Mayor Engen................6 Briefs Hellgate Rollergirls, city budget and Homeless Connect..................................6 Etc. McDonald’s erroneously linked to local meat ......................................................7 Up Front Record enrollment, limited funds challenge COT.......................................8 Up Front Mental health crisis center aims to correct past problems..........................9 Ochenski Mine Program among Obama’s proposed “savings”.................................10 Writers on the Range Studying the ups and downs of climate change...................11 Agenda Five Valleys Land Trust’s Our Extraordinary Place......................................12

Montana Cottage Bacon Buffalo Burger

Grilled Montana raised Buffalo burger topped with Kalispell cottage bacon and melted Lifeline organic sharp cheddar cheese. Served with French fries. Every Thursday

Big Sky drink specials and an opportunity to win Atomic skis Starts 2/22

Top of the Mic, an open mic night competition. First place wins $1,000.00 and a live performance. See our website for other prizes and the details

Deadline to register is Feb. 15, 5pm. Saturday 2/6

$10 all you care to drink for the Firefighter Stairclimber Fundraiser



Monday 2/8 @ 10pm

Open Mic Night with Mike Avery! Missoula's Finest Talent

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan Fried stone......................................................................................19 Happiest Hour James Bar..........................................................................................20 Ask Ari Curry conundrum .........................................................................................21 8 Days a Week Medicating. Heavily..........................................................................22 Mountain High Cyclist Willie Weir pedals to Montana .............................................37 Scope Tom Foolery’s miniature attack on cowboy chintz .........................................38 Noise The Salamanders, Dessa, P.O.S. and Pierced Arrows .......................................39 Dance Headwaters puts Montana Suite into motion................................................40 Film The Messenger offers no simple tidings .............................................................41 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films....................................................42

Exclusives Street Talk ....................................................................................................................4 In Other News ...........................................................................................................13 Classifieds.................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y..................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-12 This Modern World................................................................................................C-15 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith EDITORIAL INTERN Kyle Lehman CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

This Week’s Montana-Produced Special

Tuesday 2/9 @ 8pm Fat Tire Pub

Trivia

So you think you are smart?

Wednesday 2/10 @ 8pm

HUMP-NIGHT B I N G O

EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT 100% Cash PAYOUT, winner takes all.

Tired of your caregiver not having readily available medication? Let MCC be your source for a consistent supply of all available strains.

830-3335

AVAILABLE

NOW

NEW PATIENTS RECEIVE Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807

$50

Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367

OFF THE PURCHASE OF YOUR FIRST OUNCE

*Limit one per customer *Some restrictions apply

E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2010 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Do you suffer from any of these conditions? chronic pain multiple sclerosis glaucoma chronic muscle spasms

cancer gerd asthma arthritis

Missoula Independent

Crohn's disease chronic nausea seizure disorders Parkinson’s disease

aids/hiv cachexia hepatitis C IBS

Page 3 February 4–February 11, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday at Tremper’s Plaza off Brooks Street

Q:

This week the Indy looks at the meteoric rise of Montana’s medical marijuana industry over the last four months. What’s been your reaction to the influx of local caregivers and clinics? Follow-up: Do you think the Legislature should make changes to the existing law during the next session?

Jerry Sumner: Whatever makes you happy, go for it! I know some people who don’t suffer but want the card. I think it should be reserved for those who really need it. Leaf relief: I think so long as the law continues to allow only people with back pain or miserable health conditions to legally buy it.

Cody Olszyk: I believe in natural solutions, like homeopathic remedies, for pain. I’m down with it and think it’s a good thing. I think like any drug a person can abuse it, but overall it has great medicinal purposes. Farms before pharma: I’d like to see the qualifying conditions expanded to kids instead of giving them lithium or antidepressants. You don’t necessarily have to smoke it, you can put it in their food.

Mike Horstman: I’m actually getting a caregiver’s license. I think it’s good for the economy if people don’t abuse it. Cast no stoner: I don’t think they need to change the current legislation—it sounds all right. It should be regulated but I don’t want to see the regulations get too out of control.

Graham Roy: I’ve been surprised at how many clinics have developed and come into town. They have a huge presence all of a sudden. Legalize, and tax: I’m curious what kind of control or legal framework they will work out for it. I think they should consider controlling how the marijuana is distributed and if they will do more to tax it.

Missoula Independent

Be on the lookout Kudos to Alex Sakariassen for his fabulous article on the serious poaching problem in Montana (“The price of poaching,” Jan. 21, 2010). Law enforcement officers at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks work tirelessly to enforce the laws that protect wildlife, but the state is vast and the wardens’ resources are finite. Montana wildlife enthusiasts, including hikers, bird watchers, horseback riders and campers are the beneficiaries of the state’s rich wildlife resources. It is extremely important for these citizens to be on the lookout for illegal activity and report violations immediately to the Montana statewide tip line at 800-847-6668. To learn more about poaching and other wildlife abuses, visit humanesociety.org/poaching. Those who disregard wildlife protection laws are callous criminals that harm wild animals and ruin our opportunity to appreciate them. The public serves a crucial role in helping Montana bring poachers to justice for their senseless crimes. Wendy Hergenraeder Montana State Director Humane Society Billings

because of the increase in humans. But I often read about RMEF working with private landowners to acquire more land for the wild animals. That seems a bit contrary to what you stated in your letter. I am hoping you are just simply misinformed and will take the time to do more research and expand your knowledge. The Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971 states that wild, free-roaming horses and burros will have approximately 52 million acres of land “which is

Does the “ RMEF stand to gain something from this? I hope this is not going to be another political manipulation of

Wild balance First of all, let me start by saying that I admire the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF). They do wonderful things. However, having said that, I feel that I need to address M. David Allen’s recent letter about wild horses (see “Emotional baggage,” Jan. 21, 2010). I just don’t understand, and perhaps you can help clarify a few things. I am not an expert on wild horses or elk, but with the limited knowledge I have on elk, I don’t really see any direct conflict with the elk and wild horses. Why are you making this a priority to send this letter not only to the papers in Missoula, but also several others throughout the West? Does the RMEF stand to gain something from this? I hope this is not going to be another political manipulation of some sort. I am wondering if you speak for the entire membership of the RMEF or if it is just your own personal opinion. I also wonder why? One of your statements says that wild things need wild places, but have to do with less

Page 4 February 4–February 11, 2010

some sort.

devoted principally to their welfare.” But that land has been arbitrarily reduced by approximately 36 percent, and 95 percent of the balance has been leased to cattle and sheep ranchers for livestock grazing. The horses and burros are outnumbered 150 to 1 by cattle and sheep on lands that are supposed to be “devoted principally to their welfare.” Consequently, America’s mustangs are in serious danger of extinction. There are approximately 60,000 still-wild mustangs in existence, roughly the same number as in the early ’70s. But 33,000 of that 60,000 have been gathered out of the wild and are in Bureau of Land Management holding facilities across the country. And those that remain in the wild are living below viable levels. Simply put, that means below the number that must be available for breeding to keep the horse from not being forced into incest for the species to attempt to survive.

How would you feel if suddenly the land that the elk live on was taken away? I understand balance, but in order to have balance it needs to be equal on all sides. Not just the side of one wild species. Sandy Elmore Potomac

Tester’s broken promises As someone who supported Sen. Jon Tester in 2006, I expected him to keep his campaign promise to protect all remaining roadless lands in Montana. I expected him to strive for open government processes when considering the fate of the wildest parts of the Last Best Place. I expected him to treat fellow Montanan, Matthew Koehler, who testified at a hearing on his Forest Jobs and Recreation Act, with civility and respect. I expected him to reach out to the grassroots on both sides of the timber wars who have fought the longest and hardest. That would have been true collaboration rather than the cooked-up mishmash of motorized recreation, military landings, misplaced logging and some wilderness crumbs thrown in to satisfy Big Green’s foundation funders. A piecemeal approach to wilderness designation is unacceptable and I ask Tester to hammer out a real bill that deals with the full complement of Montana’s 6 million acres eligible for future wilderness designation. This bill will not solve the real ecological problems facing our forests nor will it save the timber industry. Logging 70,000 acres of dry roadless forests on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and 30,000 acres in core grizzly habitat on the Kootenai isn’t sustainable. This was pointed out to Tester by Agriculture Undersecretary Harris Sherman at the Senate hearing. Supply side economics via mandated logging is a bad idea in this timber market. Tester’s bill does a disservice to former President Clinton’s Roadless Area Conservation Rule, the Wilderness Act, the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Forest Management Act—all of which embody the best efforts of citizens in Montana and around the country standing up for not just our roadless wildlands, but for the all important doctrine of the public trust. I expected you to do better. Jake Kreilick Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 February 4–February 11, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 27

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

VIEWFINDER

Agenda

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

A third-party investigation clears the Flathead County Planning and Zoning Office of wrongdoing related to alleged illegal planning practices and disregard for open meeting laws. Upon release of the $10,000, 700-page report, Commissioner Joe Brenneman says the conservative property-rights group that prompted the investigation, American Dream Montana, “has no credibility.”

• Thursday, January 28 Margot Kidder, former actor and current state coordinator for the Progressive Democrats of America, announces the group’s “Ax Max” campaign at the Missoula Public Library. The movement is a largely volunteer effort of bumper stickers, posters and activism aimed at replacing U.S. Sen. Max Baucus.

• Friday, January 29 Interior Secretary Ken Salazar appoints Montana attorney and former state Sen. Steve Doherty to serve as his senior adviser for the northwest. The job entails consulting on matters ranging from recreation and wildlife management to legal and political affairs.

• Saturday, January 30 Anthony Johnson scores 25 of his 28 points in the second half, including 13 straight during one stretch, to lift the University of Montana men’s basketball team over Northern Arizona, 84–64, in Flagstaff. The Griz improve to 15–7, and Johnson is later named Big Sky player of the week.

• Sunday, January 31 Missoula police respond to a report of screaming at a residence and find a kitten with its head shaved and a broken pelvis. The kitten was apparently stomped and flushed in a toilet. Charges are pending against the alleged assailant, Gary Bassett, who adopted the kitten from Missoula Animal Control in early January.

• Monday, February 1 Missoula Mayor John Engen says the city will hire another prosecutor for the city attorney’s office to fill the void left when a drunk driver killed Judy Wang last September. Wang, who served in the office for more than 20 years, was a well-known advocate for domestic violence victims.

• Tuesday, February 2 Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock appears before a U.S. Senate panel discussing the implications of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision to lift a ban on corporate spending in political campaigns. Prior to the court’s decision, Bullock lobbied the court to leave existing campaign finance laws in place.

A packed crowd cheers on performances by the kings and queens of drag during the 2010 Panty Rock Drag Show at the Palace Jan. 29. “Boy Rogers,” above, and others took the stage to help raise money for The Women’s Resource Center’s upcoming production of The Vagina Monologues.

Homeless In search of a connection Angela Killion brought her resume—all six pages of it—with her to the fourth annual Project Homeless Connect in Missoula on January 28. The extensive document covers her work as a college instructor, legal assistant and counselor, but it hasn’t done her much good in Missoula’s dismal job market. “I just can’t find work here,” said Killion, who also holds a master’s degree in experimental psychology. “It’s like nobody will look at me.” Odd jobs and food stamps have helped the mother of two stay afloat, but further struggles could put Killion among Missoula’s homeless population. That’s why she and hundreds of others waited at First United Baptist Church in search of free legal assistance, counseling and medical exams, among other services, at the event organized by Missoula’s At-Risk Housing Coalition. Bruce Warne, like Killion, is not yet homeless, but worries he may be unless he finds a

Will you be mine? Valentine’s Day cards in stock now! Rather make your own? Check out our February workshops!!

Missoula Independent

Page 6 February 4–February 11, 2010

job soon. He says he has filled out around 50 job applications in the 10 months he’s been unemployed. “We could use help in over half of the columns,” said Warne as he filled out a questionnaire listing available services at the event. He adds that he’s particularly interested in taking advantage of the free dental and eye care. Melissa Gordon of the At-Risk Housing Coalition said this year’s event was much busier than in years past. “There was a line until about 2 [p.m.],” she said. “We saw a lot of new faces this year.” Around her, people browsed racks of clothing and waited in line to get haircuts or talk to social workers. Volunteers in the kitchen baked 1,200 cookies, used more than 20 loaves of bread for sandwiches and made a vat of soup so big it covered the entire stovetop. Two barbers working non-stop gave around 50 haircuts by the day’s end. These individual services combined to offer some reprieve for the city’s homeless and those perilously close to joining them. For Rodney French, a father of three, the incentive

for showing up was as simple as a few hours off a difficult job search. “You go to the library and there’s a two-hour wait for a computer, and that’s kind of hard with three little ones,” he said. “This really helps.” Kyle Lehman

Bitterroot Resort Maclay goes it alone The Bitterroot Resort answered two weeks ago to its lender’s attempt to foreclose on the sprawling ranch below Lolo Peak, the second step in a legal back-and-forth in Missoula District Court that could last years—and eventually determine the fate of Tom Maclay’s grand vision for a four-season resort south of Missoula. In the filing, the defendants—the various business entities that make up the yet-to-be-built Bitterroot Resort—admitted or denied a series of allegations levied by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MLIC) Asset Holdings, LLC, in its October 2009 “Complaint of Foreclosure.” The


Inside

Letters

Briefs

current value of the loans, given in 2000 and 2005, total nearly $19 million, and MLIC claims the resort, in April and May 2009, defaulted on its payment obligations. The resort denied that claim in its filing on Jan. 21. “All the back-and-forth you see is just typical litigation stuff,” says Bitterroot Resort attorney Stephen Brown of Garlington, Lohn & Robinson. “There’s really nothing unusual going on. It’s just a typical case where a lender brings a claim arguing they have a right to foreclose. It’s being defended right now. It’s really in the early stages.” Maclay’s financial troubles became clear before MLIC’s October filing. Reports surfaced in April of unpaid services and liens placed on his land. Also in April, the resort’s former COO, Jim Gill, told the Independent that Maclay was selling parcels of his roughly 3,000-acre ranch to pay off his mounting debt. Brown represents Maclay’s business entities, but not Maclay. He says Maclay’s representing himself, and he failed to answer to the foreclosure complaint on time, prompting the court to file an “Entry of Default” on his behalf. Maclay then filed, on Jan. 20, a motion to set aside the default. “The grounds for this motion are that I am appearing in this matter pro se and was under the understanding that the time for me to respond to [MLIC’s complaint] was the same as for other corporate Defendants,” he wrote. Maclay did not return repeated calls for comment. MLIC declined to comment. Matthew Frank

Rollergirls

Local team nabs new space Last Sunday, Feruqi’s bar brimmed with Hellgate Rollergirls donning a red-themed mixture of spiky high heels, Converse sneakers, striped leggings, short skirts and girly-yet-badass punk accessories. Rollergirl supporters sipped cocktails and $1 pints of Pabst while perusing merchandise stacked on pool tables, including kneepads, bearings, pins and scarves. The gathering celebrated the local roller derby team’s new calendar, which showcases photos of a handful of Rollergirls—with pseudonyms like Viperella, Bitty Bitch and Hannibal Wrecker—posing playfully in skates. The party also celebrated another milestone for the team: an indoor practice space. Since its inception in September 2009, the Hellgate Rollergirls have practiced in parking lots

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

around town, and often driven to Spokane to skate with the Lilac City Roller Girls. Neither arrangement has been easy in winter weather. After soliciting local warehouses, schools and churches for available space, the group got the green light to practice at Target Range School’s multipurpose room for $25 per hour. “It’s a practice space only,” says member Marlana Kosky, aka M. Kneesya. “We’re not going to be able to do bouts there. But we do need a place to practice that’s inside.” While the women hone their skills for the stylized, full-contact sport in hopes of obtaining certification from the Women’s Flat Track Derby

Association, the group’s steering committee continues its quest to procure a space for bouts. Kosky says most leagues won’t travel to compete at any track unless it’s a minimum of 80 feet by 110, plus room for spectators. Once the group gets a space, Kosky says, she hopes more women will sign on. “I think it’s going to be a snowball effect,” she says. “When we had our first practice at the new space we had 12 people, and we have 20 duespaying members. But we have more than 200 people who are interested. As soon as we get the ball rolling and we have a place, I think they’re going to be more willing to come forward.” Erika Fredrickson

City Budget handcuffs cops As tax dollars dwindle and city coffers contract, Missoula’s municipal money managers are

Agenda

News Quirks

calling for across-the-board belt tightening. The end result will continue to leave local emergency responders short-staffed, says Police Chief Mark Muir. “This year has been a real challenge for us,” Muir says. In an effort to beef up budget reserves, Missoula number crunchers asked department heads citywide last month to whittle 2.8 percent off of their annual expenses. The move will save about $1.25 million, better buffering the city from economic challenges going forward, says Missoula Chief Administrative Officer Bruce Bender. “It’s sort of a stop-gap measure,” Bender says. But for the Missoula Police Department, the shrinking balance sheet means trimming $305,000 off this year’s existing budget in addition to a 3.7 percent cut going into the fiscal year. Even with federal stimulus money offsetting some of the cuts, Muir says the cumulative effect leaves him short two members of the department’s 102-person staff. “It has really just kind of destroyed our traffic enforcement efforts,” Muir says. “We also have to be a little more selective about the calls we go on.” In addition to spending less time policing traffic violations, law enforcement is adjusting how it responds to non-emergency calls. For instance, the department is taking reports for petty theft reported after the fact over the phone instead of in person. The department is making due, but Muir still worries his officers are foregoing precautionary measures, like calling for backup, which makes them more vulnerable to confrontation and, in turn, injury. “They try to make up time by not necessarily exercising the normal safety precautions,” Muir says. “That’s always a concern.” To offset cuts, Muir is examining revenuereaping options. One idea floated involves charging citizens for police activities that go beyond traditional peacekeeping, like investigating fender- benders. Muir says the public is just as safe as it’s ever been. But as the budget shrinks, law enforcement must continue juggling its finances smartly. “We’re struggling to do it,” he says. “We’re asking for a little bit more from everybody.” Jessica Mayrer

BY THE NUMBERS

342

Estimated bighorn sheep in the Upper Rock Creek herd. According to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the herd recently became the fourth in the state to exhibit signs of a pneumonia outbreak.

etc. A recent Missoula Chamber of Commerce e-mail that encouraged its members to sponsor the chamber’s upcoming Agri-Business Banquet left a funny taste in our mouths—a taste similar to, say, downing a soggy, threeday-old Big Mac after it’s been zapped in the microwave. The e-mail stated that the Feb. 10 event, organized to “support local farmers and ranchers,” is being sponsored by, among others, five McDonald’s locations from Polson to Hamilton. The irony was as thick as the fast food joint’s hot mustard dipping sauce. So we asked the chamber how Mickey D’s, of all restaurants, the world’s largest buyer of meat products, in any way supports local farmers and ranchers. “They actually buy a good portion of their meat from our farmers and ranchers in Montana,” said Kathy Giffin, the chamber’s director of programs and events. Great news, we thought. “Robble, robble!” But before we headed for the drive-thru to grab Happy Meals even a locavore could love, we called corporate. Turns out, it was too good to be true, sort of like a lot of things McDonald’s serves. (see: Rib, Mc.) “We looked into it,” said Katie Conway, a McDonald’s public relations manager, “and the national supply chain is telling me we don’t have any beef suppliers anywhere in your area. We are still one of the largest purchasers of U.S. beef—our preference is always to purchase domestically— but we don’t have any specific suppliers in Montana.” We grimaced. Our glee was hamburglared away. But there was a McNugget of consolation. In 2007, McDonald’s purchased more than 15 million pounds of flour from Montana producers, worth almost $2.4 million, Conway reported. And there might have been more purchases since, but those figures won’t be made available for a couple months. Giffin at the Chamber of Commerce apologized for the confusion, and defended McDonald’s participation in the event. “As you know,” she said, “farmers and ranchers shop and eat in the Missoula community. They shop at Quality Supply. They get their trucks at Bitterroot Motors or Karl Tyler. So they support our businesses on a daily basis, both financially and with the food that we eat. So the Agri-Business Banquet is an opportunity for community businesses to thank them.” Yes, a thank you is in order. We just think McDonald’s should thank local farmers and ranchers by actually buying more products from them.

Engaged?!!

Ellin Ifft Win a 50% OFF Merchandise Coupon Sign Up for our Weekly Drawing

ellie blue is your Wedding Invitation & Save the Date Headquarters!! Largest selection of Carlson Craft, Crane & Co., and much more...

25% OFF invitations with store registry 406-728-8889 • www.ellieblue.com

Leather Goods – Great Footwear Downtown – 543-1128 www.hideandsole.com

328 East Pine Street • “The Oldest House In Missoula” OPEN TUES-FRI FROM 10-5 • SAT 11-4 • CLOSED SUN & MON FREE GIFT WRAPPING & PARKING!

Missoula Independent

Page 7 February 4–February 11, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Trailer teaching Record enrollment, limited funds challenge COT by Jessica Mayrer

tuition expenses, offers new students a more attainable education opportunity. Moe says that in addition to hope, the colleges are expressly positioned to help students escape occupational roadblocks and respond to local needs. “This is what two-year colleges do,” she says. “And this is what neighbors do.” But faced with a shrinking bottom line, Moe says that directive is becoming increasingly difficult to meet. “It’s a real dilemma, I think, for the state and for the COT, figuring out how to deal with this explosion in demand when there’s almost a converse amount of resources,” Moe says. In an effort to make due with what they have, state administrators are already brainstorming cost-saving techniques. One plan currently in the early stages includes building a virtual community college. Similar to online offerings through the university system, a virtual college would beam professors into student homes via the Internet, thereby curbing the need for physical space. But, Moe says it will take severPhoto by Cathrine L. Walters al months before the state is The University of Montana College of Technology erected several doublewide ready to roll out the virtual coltrailers across campus to help meet record enrollment. “We’re needing lege. “We don’t have the technitriplewides,” quips professor Joe Crepeau. cal infrastructure to make that work right now.” In the meantime, the school is work“We’re needing triplewides,” Crepeau responding increase in resources, educaing with what it has. Barry Good, COT’s tional quality will suffer. quips. “The question is, how long can we dean, says the school remains well COT enrollment jumped 28 percent between fall 2008 and fall 2009. Last provide a level of service that we all want equipped to provide developmental edusemester’s 2,105 students marked the to provide?” Moore says. “How long can cation, the start of a health care career or school’s largest headcount ever. With dis- everyone cope with it and still perform groundwork for obtaining a bachelor’s placed workers from Smurfit-Stone and function at the level we want and degree down the road. As for the expected influx of disContainer Corp., Macy’s and other busi- need to?” Faculty and administrators at com- placed workers, many will receive federnesses hit hard by the recession also expected to land on COT’s doorstep, munity colleges across Montana are ask- al aid to help cover educational expensing themselves the same question, says es. That, Good says, will help offset some enrollment will likely continue to rise. But what sounds like a good thing Mary Moe, the state’s deputy commis- of COT’s costs. Regardless of fiscal chalfor COT is causing some major logistical sioner for two-year education. As jobs lenges, the dean says he and his staff are problems as the school tries to balance dry up, colleges in Billings, Great Falls committed to fulfilling their role in the d e m a n d w i t h l i m i t e d r e s o u r c e s . and the Flathead are seeing enrollment Missoula community. “If there’s any question that the Administrators say finding adequate spike. Moe specifically points to Flathead building space and sufficient staffing Valley Community College, which is University of Montana, including the while tax dollars dry up is proving diffi- weathering a 31.7-percent jump in College of Technology, is going to be responsive to the needs of dislocated cult, and faculty worry about the fallout. enrollment this year over last. “They are looking for hope,” says workers, the answer is absolutely, ‘Yes,’” For years, UM has aimed to construct a new COT facility. But during the last Moe of the many newly unemployed he says. “We do have challenges…In spite of the challenges and everything legislative session, school officials were returning to school. COT, a two-year college that oper- else, we’re making this work.” unsuccessful in persuading lawmakers to cough up the $30 million needed to con- ates as a part of UM but with less stringent entry requirements and smaller struct a new building. jmayrer@missoulanews.com University of Montana College of Technology (COT) professor Joe Crepeau affectionately calls the doublewide trailer he shares with another tenured professor and an army of adjuncts “the math shack.” Crepeau’s trailer, which acts as the nerve center for the COT math department, is one of several erected across the school’s South Avenue campus during the last few years to make room for a record influx of students.

Missoula Independent

Page 8 February 4–February 11, 2010

It remains to be seen if the 2011 Legislature will find money to fund new digs for COT—statewide budget issues would appear to make it a long-shot—but space isn’t the only challenge. Professors say staffing has become increasingly difficult. As it stands, COT faculty members typically teach five full classes per semester, says Eddie Moore, an organizational psychology professor. He worries that if demand continues to rise without a cor-


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Stabilizing service Mental health crisis center heals old wounds by Alex Sakariassen

Ravalli County has a dark history when it comes to mental health emergencies. In spring 2005, three inmates at the county’s Adult Detention Center committed suicide in a span of only two months as a result of mental illness. Public officials still consider the incident a black mark on the Bitterroot, and pin blame on the community’s lack of adequate crisis facilities. That all stands to change in 2010. Ravalli County received a $310,000 stimulus-backed grant from the state on Jan. 19 to build a crisis stabilization center in

Alongside the budget increase, Montana’s MHSP experienced a dramatic spike in 2009—from 100 applicants per month earlier in the year to 250 in July. Twenty-five percent of those individuals applied for aid during crisis situations, Council adds. “It jumped really quick,” Council says, “and the money started running out a lot faster than [the Legislature] anticipated.” Driscoll notes a similar surge in Ravalli County. Expenses for mental health crisis services rose from $180,000 in 2008 to $300,000 in 2009. If ever the

Image courtesy of the Western Montana Mental Health Center

An early rendering of Hamilton’s new crisis stabilization center, a muchneeded addition to Ravalli County’s mental health infrastructure.

Hamilton. Many hope the seven-bed facility, when completed this fall, will help erase the county’s disturbing past. “If anything good came from [the inmate suicides],” says Ravalli County Commissioner Kathleen Driscoll, “it was the fact that we’ve learned our lesson and we’ve decided this is the way to do it and do it right.” Oddly, the timing of the expansion coincides with talk in Helena of budget shortfalls and potential cuts to the state’s network of mental health services. The annual budget for Montana’s Mental Health Services Plan (MHSP) grew from $3.7 million in 2005 to $7.5 million in 2009, but whether that level of funding will last into the next fiscal year remains uncertain. Possible cuts to Montana’s statewide day-treatment program have already been discussed. In other words, Hamilton may be plugging one hole while budget concerns open more. “We just don’t know what’s going to happen with any funding right now,” says Chuck Council, communications director for the Department of Public Health and Human Services. “It’s really up in the air for a while.” Council says one indisputable fact is the rising need for a seamless network of mental health services across the state.

county needed to enhance its crisis infrastructure, Driscoll says, it’s now. The Bitterroot’s existing mental health crisis system is both pricey and piecemeal. Crisis situations arise when individuals with mental illnesses like schizophrenia become a hazard to themselves or the public, and are taken into law enforcement custody. Local jails lack the proper training or facilities to restrain patients, so patients are either submitted to Room 301 at Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital under law enforcement supervision or transported to facilities in Missoula or at the Montana State Hospital in Warm Springs. Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital recently eliminated the long-term availability of Room 301 when it filed a lawsuit against the county over security concerns. Outsourcing to non-county programs can cost thousands of dollars per patient and often accelerates a crisis situation. “When they are in crisis, it’s not unlike having a stroke or a heart attack,” Driscoll says. “When they’re having these crises, you don’t want to make it worse by shackling them and sending them on long trips.” To that point, the Western Montana Mental Health Center ( WMMHC) views a crisis stabilization center in Hamilton as a

quick and easy fix. Executive Director Paul Meyer says WMMHC will step in to operate the facility, simultaneously treating patients and alleviating the stress placed on its already taxed Missoula treatment center by transfers from the Bitterroot. “The Missoula County resources get kind of parochial,” Meyer says. “If we have a county resident first, we’re going to take a county resident.” Meyer admits establishing a new center in Hamilton could be financially risky given uncertainties over the continued stability of state funding levels for mental health services. But he says the potential long-term savings outweigh any immediate concerns. “The state’s going through fiscal crisis and they probably will be for the next two or three years,” Meyer says. “But the issue for us is, does that mean we don’t do anything over the next three years, or do we try to do things that look more cost-effective and make better sense for the counties?” Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital has also gone in on the effort, donating one acre of land adjacent to the hospital for the future crisis center. Driscoll says the county’s ongoing relationship with the hospital remains crucial in providing crisis intervention services to people with mental illness. “It’s not like they are just closing the door,” Driscoll says of the hospital’s decision to close Room 301 to crisis management. “They’ve always been at the table, and they’d just reached the maximum capacity as far as the room they had.” Hospital administrators have yet to comment publicly on the donation. Driscoll says the county realizes it won’t see an immediate drop in expenses when the crisis stabilization center is complete. The $540,000 project itself necessitated the county taking out a $20,000 loan, and even with seven beds, the county will likely continue to see an overflow of patients traveling to Warm Springs. But with other mental health services cropping up in Hamilton— including a new, privately owned drop-in style location downtown that opened this week—the Bitterroot is turning a corner in addressing the problems of its past. “They’re betting this will be financially much better for the county,” Meyer says, “as well as for the patients that won’t have to be hauled around in cop cruisers.”

Spaces Open for Ages 2-5 Separate Program for 2 year olds

Peaceful, Homelike Environment Low Student-Teacher Ratios Convenient Scheduling Options Low Monthly Tuition Rates We-Trade Members Welcome! *Tuition Includes*

Homemade Whole & Organic Meals Full Montessori Academic Curriculum Fine Arts Classes in Music, Dance, Theatrical Play, Creative Movement, Art, French, Spanish Cooking in our Kitchen Classroom Indoor & Outdoor Gardening Toilet Training Assistance

Winter Special

1st Month Free OPEN HOUSE 1-4pm Feb. 13 & 14 and Feb. 20 & 21 Open Year-Round M-F 7:30am - 5:30pm 1703 S. 5th St. West 830-3268

asakariassen@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 February 4–February 11, 2010


BETTY'S

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

BIG

Feeling abandoned

SALE Begins Wed. February 3rd through Sun. February 7th •50% off all Clothing, Shoes, & Winter Accessories... •70% off All Sale Items! •25% off All else!

Mine Program among Obama’s proposed “savings” fresh, contemporary and creative clothing, footwear and accessories

721-4777 Mon.-Sat. 10-7 Sun. 11-4 on the Hip Strip at 521 So. Higgins Ave.

Mahayana Mindfulness Living in the Path

with Venerable Losang Drimay at Osel Shen Phen Ling To many, mindfulness in Buddhist practice usually means just slowing down and paying attention. Mahayana Mindfulness is making all of your daily activities into Dharma practice. On the retreat, we will learn mindfulness exercises in our tradition as taught by Lama Zopa Rinpoche. We will discuss and come up with some plans to implement these mindfulness techniques in our lives.

7KXUVGD\‡)HEUXDU\‡SP Vajrasattva Purification Practice

)ULGD\‡)HEUXDU\‡SP

Public Talk Living with Mahayana Mindfulness

Mahayana Mindfulness Retreat

6DWXUGD\‡)HEUXDU\‡DPSP 6XQGD\‡)HEUXDU\‡DP1RRQ Please meet at the Center at 9:00 am each day to carpool to the retreat venue. Vegetarian lunch provided on Saturday.

0RQGD\‡)HEUXDU\‡SP

Guru Puja & Tsog Offering Please bring food, light or flowers to share. :RRGZRUWK‡0LVVRXOD

All events open to the public. Anyone may attend any or all sessions

Suggested donations: $10 for the Public Talk; $35 for the Workshop; $40 for both in advance For more information & complete schedule, please visit www.fpmt-osel.org

Missoula Independent

Even President Barack Obama’s staunchest, most enthusiastic supporters are having a tough time trying to find much to cheer about these days. Last week’s State of the Union address didn’t turn out to be the barnburner his base was looking for. Nor did it turn out to be a vision of a better future. It was just another speech by a young president who is very good at giving speeches, but considerably less good at devising policies—especially progressive policies—at the time we most need them. Instead, we are treated to a sorry continuation of Bush-era policies, wars and budget priorities as Washington goes whackier than ever very early in a crucial election year. Last week should have been a pivotal moment in Obama’s presidency. He should have looked back on a year filled with accomplishment as he ticked off his campaign promises and the reforms he has initiated to fulfill those promises. But alas, when one goes down the long list of Obama’s campaign promises, there’s simply no way to get around the stunning fact that he has not managed to keep them and, even more egregiously, has reversed himself on many. The disaster began when the Democrats, led by Montana’s Max Baucus, decided to abrogate their majority position and seek bipartisan cooperation on achieving Obama’s pledge to reform health care. First they threw away the simple and thorough reform of single-payer, universal coverage, and then they threw away precious time courting dubious Republican support through the first half of the year. In return, they accomplished almost nothing except creating a new political movement, the wholly antiObama, anti-Democrat Tea Party. The highly energized “teabaggers,” as they were called by some, scared them so badly with their actions at town meetings during Congress’ August recess that many Democrats simply refused to hold meetings on the health issue. That, in turn, put Democrats even further behind the eight ball, a position from which they have yet to—and may never—recover. Toss in the loss of Kennedy’s Massachusetts Senate seat and the concurrent shift of power away from a filibuster-proof majority and health care goes out the window as spooked Democrats run for cover. But a president has many opportunities to use both policy formulation and the bully pulpit to his or her advantage, and Obama is no exception. So now, with health care reform laying crippled and bleeding on the side of the road, the

Page 10 February 4–February 11, 2010

president rolls out his budget, which could surely have brought some of those seminal campaign promises to fruition. Ah, if only that were the case. Instead, Obama has produced a budget that sends military spending skyrocketing into the stratosphere, eclipsing even the outsized budgets of the warmongering Bush administration. If

Abandoned “IfMine money is diverted to other uses, cash-strapped states will be forced to pass their polluted mine sites on to future

generations.

Congress goes along with it—and don’t look to scared Democrats to resist— Obama will commit this nation to spending more than $2 billion on the military every day. Moreover, Obama has not included the full military funding in the budget bill, but will, like his infamous predecessor, seek an additional $33 billion in a separate appropriation for his massive infusion of troops into Afghanistan—a war that even his generals and ambassadors believe we are already losing and have no chance of winning. While talking about how he and Congress must act like an American family in this time of uncertain economic futures, he has specifically removed both the military and homeland security funding from any reductions. Let’s see, what American family would consider keeping 800 military bases worldwide in a time of tight finances? Who, in their right mind, would spend as much in one year on the military as it would take to bring full health care to every American over 10 years? Sadly, the answer is “no one”—at least no one in their right mind. So, with two of the most enormous, least productive cost cutters off the

table, what does our president decide to do? Well, he goes after domestic spending programs to find what he says are “savings.” Here in Montana, some of those “savings” include cutting funding for the Abandoned Mine Program—funding which is provided by a 35-cent per ton federal tax on coal production. Being major coal producers, both Montana and Wyoming are major contributors to the fund, but now Obama says we won’t be seeing that money come back to us because he thinks our mine sites are “cleaned up.” Nothing could be further from the truth—and it’s puzzling where or how Obama came up with this conclusion. More than a decade ago Montana categorized, characterized and prioritized the hundreds of abandoned mine sites scattered across the state. We know what the problems are, what the pollutants are, and which sites are most injurious to human health and the environment. Thanks to the prioritized list, we have slowly but surely been using Abandoned Mine funds to mitigate, to the best of our ability, the toxic legacies of the past. If Abandoned Mine money is diverted to other uses, cash-strapped states will be forced to pass their polluted mine sites on to future generations, just as they were irresponsibly passed on to us. Some progress that is, especially when you consider that the total “savings” of $115 million this year would fund our military insanity for a whopping 1.3 hours. In the meantime, in a budget shell game reminiscent of Bush, Obama is claiming money he doesn’t have to reduce the record-high national debt. But counting on non-existent revenue from carbon cap-and-trade is a fool’s game, since the measure is far more likely to join health care as political roadkill than pass Congress. Instead of responsibly addressing the nation’s budget woes, look to our whacky Congress to continue its porkbarrel spending in this election year, continue the losing wars, and continue the nation’s slide into unimaginable debt while the president, sadly, continues his own slide away from the greatness that could have been his legacy. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Topographic tell-all Studying the ups and downs of climate change by Pepper Trail

One thing I love about the West is that so many people know their elevations. I doubt many citizens of Atlanta take pride in their thousand-foot-high city. But everyone knows Denver is a mile high, and most of us are well aware of the elevation of whatever high pass we have to cross in the wintertime. This knowledge of our place in the topography ties us to the land in a profound way, and soon, it will open our eyes to the progress of climate change. My house sits at about 2,300 feet in the foothills of Oregon’s Siskiyou Mountains. Over the 15 years I’ve lived here, I’ve learned this is an elevation where things change. Most winters, there are days when the snow piles up on our street, though just 100 feet down slope, the roads are clear. Below us, the natural vegetation is oak woodland; above us, the conifers begin to close ranks into a proper forest. Every spring, the acorn-loving scrub jays and the conifer-dwelling Steller’s jays do battle over our yard. This invisible ecological boundary has probably been fairly stable for centuries, wavering a few hundred feet up and down the hillsides with short-term climate fluctuations. It has remained even as the Oregon landscape has been completely transformed over the past 160 years of European settlement. It has remained because it is based not on biology, but on physics. The average temperature decreases by 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit for every 1,000 feet of elevation gain, because the thinner air at higher altitudes can hold less heat. Cooler temperatures change both the water regime—especially the snow level—and the fire danger, which together do much to determine vegetation in the West. And so, physics and biology have collaborated to create a noticeable environmental transition right about where I live.

Today, that transition is in transition. The physics that relates temperature to elevation isn’t changing, but the baseline temperature is. If global warming produces a 3or 4-degree increase in annual average temperature by 2100, as most models suggest, my house will find itself in the climate

than “byMore any other change, global warming threatens the West with a seemingly simple trick: changing snow

into rain.

and vegetation now found 1,000 feet lower. No more snow to deal with, but my Douglas firs probably won’t make it, and goodbye Steller’s jays. Hello, clammy winter fog and a lot more summer days over 100 degrees. It’s not a happy picture. But the truly significant changes will be happening higher, on the 4,000–6,000 foot-high ridges that ring our valley and hold the snow that melts in the spring to feed our creeks and rivers. More than by any other change, global warming threatens the West with a seemingly simple trick: changing snow into rain. Without snowmelt, even if total precipitation remains exactly the same, we are in for a lot

of trouble. The timed release of water from snow keeps forest soils moist well into the summer, buffers streams from floods, and allows irrigation districts to manage water distribution throughout the year. This January, I gazed across the valley toward the peaks, and I saw no snow. I realize this is likely a yearly anomaly, but such sights will become the norm soon enough. When that happens, will the West be able to sustain the population we have now, much less the population growth so many boosters still promote? This vision of the future has me looking at the topography in a new way. I spent much of the past summer climbing up and down the walls of my valley, ever mindful of the elevation. My friend Jim Chamberlain and I documented these familiar landscapes as if for the first time, collecting natural history information, making notes and taking photographs. Together, we produced a profile of our environment as it is, and a series of meditations on what is to come. This work (available at www.shiftingpatterns.org) has become a focus for community education and discussion about climate change. Here is what I urge you to do: Look at your home topography. What is your elevation? When the talk of climate change blurs into a fog of generalizations, explore the elevations of places you know and love (Google Earth is a great tool for this). Then imagine them a few degrees hotter, with the climate now found hundreds or a thousand feet lower down the mountain. That is our future, unless we can convince ourselves to get serious about climate change. Pepper Trail is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is a biologist and writer who lives in Ashland, Ore.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 February 4–February 11, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

SERIES

www.bARTc.org 406.363.7946

BOX OFFICE: 127 W. Main Hamilton

WITH THE

STRING ORCHESTRA OF THE ROCKIES

Tickets: $20 / 22.50 / 25 on sale Jan 8

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20 8 PM

Wu Man

BITTERROOT

open Wed thru Friday 12 - 6

Cirque Mechanics BIRDHOUSE FACTORY

Performances at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Rd.

COMING UP

SUNDAY, MARCH 21 7:30 PM Tickets: $30 / 32.50 / 35 on sale Jan 22

Garden City residents tend to be a generous bunch. Give Missoulians a cause and many throw a greenback or two at it, or offer to help as volunteers. And most never expect anything in return. But this week you do get something back for your charitable spirit during Our Extraordinary Place, a multimedia concert presented by Missoula’s Five Valleys Land Trust that’s billed as “a montage of spoken word, music and images inspired by the natural world.� It features the sweeping string work of Eugenia Choi, a renowned violin soloist, along with the talents of UM music prof and pianist Christopher Hahn. They’ll be joined with words from M. Sanjayan, lead scientist with The Nature

Conservancy. Sanjayan plans to speak about how conservation work in Missoula contributes to and affects worldwide efforts. This all comes to us for free, as thanks for helping the nonprofit raise an extra $250,000 in 2009. This money—which now totals $500,000—will be used to help protect western Montana’s wildlife habitat, water and serene landscapes. In other words, it’ll help keep this place we call home extraordinary for years to come. —Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 4

appreciated and accepted. Register by calling 5495329 or visit livingartofmontana.org.

Democracy is truly at play during the Missoula Parks and Rec’s solicitation for public comment to replace three playgrounds, and create a new one, for a project called Playgrounds 4 Missoula. Comments are due Fri., Feb. 5. Visit ci.missoula.mt.us/playgrounds for more info, site plans and a questionnaire, or call 721-PARK.

Our Extraordinary Place is Fri., Feb. 5, from 7–9 PM at UM’s University Theatre. Free. Call 549-0755 or visit fvlt.org.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 8 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Be a force for positive change by becoming a YWCA advocate for women and children in crisis, or as a mentor for girls aged 9–18, during a volunteer orientation session from 5:30–7 PM at YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. RSVP by calling Diana Thompson or Jen Euell at 543-6691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org to download an application.

If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 7285818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org.

Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with a community approach to creative conflict during a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com.

You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955.

I hate parking tickets, too. Get a glimpse of what could be in store for parking in Missoula as it relates to the Greater Missoula Downtown Master Plan during a public parking workshop, which starts at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 728-1140.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 5 Who are you? No, really: YWCA Missoula presents sign ups for its Women’s Leadership Series, which helps women strengthen leadership abilities and clarify ambitions, among other things, and meets for eight weeks starting at 8 AM Fri., Feb. 12. Applications are due today. Tuition is $500, with scholarships available. Grab an application at ywcamissoula.org or call Jen Euell at 543-6691.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 6 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Mandalas� with Beth Jaffe. Free, but donations

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 9

I’m probably never going to be able to buy one, but maybe you will. The Bitter Root Resource Conservation and Development Area Inc. presents a series of First Time Homebuyer Classes every night from 6–9 PM today through Feb. 11 at Hamilton’s Human Resource Council Building, 316 N. Third St. $20, covers cost of reference materials. Call 363-1444 ext. 5 to register. Conservative hippies, now’s the time to come out of the closet: The Conservative Patriots host a meeting featuring a talk by Bruce Nelson of Montana Ordnance and Supply on the history of gun control at 6 PM, at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 251-5961 or 722-3167. Now’s the time to make a good impression: The Missoula County Democrats present their central committee meeting with a meet and greet with Brenda Desmond and Karen Townsend, two candidates for district judge in District 4, starting at 7 PM at Missoula’s City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free to attend. Visit missoulademocrats.org.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 11 Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with a community approach to creative conflict during a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 February 4–February 11, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Two burglary suspects fleeing Sacramento County, Calif., sheriff’s deputies headed for a high school football field, where they ran into players practicing for the upcoming Pig Bowl, an annual contest between firefighters and law enforcement. The latter team, comprising mostly deputies, was working out and quickly tackled suspects James Hill Jr., 19, and a 17-year-old boy. Two gunmen tied up the staff at a Chicago scrap-metal plant and then tried to steal an automated teller machine the company keeps on hand to pay customers. They gave up, however, after the 250pound machine proved too heavy for them to lift onto their Jeep Cherokee. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION FOLLIES – When some 20 Swedish dieters showed up at a Weight Watchers clinic in Vaxjo to see how much weight they’d lost, the floor collapsed. “We suddenly heard a huge thud,” one of the participants told the Smalandsposten newspaper. “We almost thought it was an earthquake, and everything flew up in the air. The floor collapsed in one corner of the room and along the walls.” Eventually, the whole floor gave way. MIXED-USE ZONING – Homeowners in a Knoxville, Tenn., community banded together to tell the Metropolitan Planning Commission they oppose a plan by resident David Perkins to turn his singlefamily house into a duplex and use one of the units to operate a combination music studio and Jewish sperm bank. Perkins, a musician who specializes in Klezmer music and Dixieland jazz, said he wants to give music lessons at the address, not performances, and insisted neighbors won’t notice the activities he proposes because he’s been doing most of them for two years without any complaints. He already operates a sperm bank, to which, according to his website (jewishspermdonor.net), he appears to be the only donor. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Oklahoma City police arrested Chad Anthony Logan, 25, after they said he broke into his ex-girlfriend’s apartment, fought with her current boyfriend and used his buttocks to smash her 72-inch television screen. Police in Buffalo, N.Y., said Julious Jones, 25, tried to kill himself by sitting naked in a bathtub holding a clock radio, two electric clippers, a curling iron and a clothes iron. Alerted by the man’s landlady, Officer James Hosking thwarted the suicide attempt by reaching into the bathroom and unplugging the electrical cords. A hooded man walked into a crafts boutique in Dallas, Texas, pointed a gun at owner Marian Chadwick, 57, and demanded money. According to a security tape of the incident, when she told the gunman she had none, he pounded the gun twice on the counter. “I got mad,” Chadwick said. “So I pointed my finger and said, ‘In the name of Jesus, you get out of my store. I bind you by the power of the Holy Spirit.’” The gunman took a step back and told a customer to drop to the floor. After she refused, Chadwick pointed her finger at the man and continued to chastise him until he walked out, cursing but empty-handed. IT’S REALLY THE REAL THING – Bolivian President Evo Morales endorsed a proposal by coca growers to boost coca production by introducing a soft drink made from the plant. An official with the Ministry of Coca and Integral Development said the drink would be called “Coca Colla” and packaging would feature a black swoosh and red label similar to Coca-Cola’s. Coca is already being used in tea, flour, toothpaste and liquor produced in Bolivia, the world’s third-largest producer of the plant. NEXT TIME, A BAZOOKA – When Donald Koranek, 80, tried to enter the Hillsborough County (Fla.) Courthouse with a pocketknife, a security guard told him to take the knife to his car. He returned with a gun. After a security guard spotted the loaded pistol in his belt, Koranek explained that he had a concealed weapons permit. Deputies detained him and seized the weapon. IS THERE ANYTHING BACON CAN’T DO? – Pregnant women could boost their baby’s intelligence by eating bacon and eggs, according to University of North Carolina researchers. They found that pork products and eggs contain a micronutrient, called choline, which helps babies’ growing brains develop in the womb, particularly in the areas linked to memory and recall. The findings were reported in the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, whose editor-in-chief, Dr. Gerald Weissmann, said, “We may never be able to call bacon a health food with a straight face, but [similar studies] are already making us rethink what we consider healthy and unhealthy.” IS THERE ANYTHING GUNS CAN’T DO? – Authorities said a 28-year-old security guard at a Northern California casino drove off the road when his hands-free cell phone device activated and startled him. The sport utility vehicle plunged into a creek in Roseville and began sinking, but the driver escaped by blasting out the window with his handgun. He flagged down a passerby and reported the incident. FIRST THINGS FIRST – Venezuela’s new currency structure, set by President Hugo Chavez, lists whale sperm, ham and pickles as essential goods, entitling importers to a preferential exchange rate. Electricity, which has to be imported because a drought has halted a hydroelectric plant that supplied 73 percent of the country’s power, is considered nonessential, along with racehorses, rabbit meat, ketchup and video games. RECIDIVIST OF THE WEEK (TIE) – Las Vegas police arrested Mark Hoffman, 47, for killing another man during a welcome-home party celebrating Hoffman’s release from jail. According to a witness, Hoffman beat the victim to death with a steel pipe, which he called his “personal home security device,” after learning the victim had an affair with his girlfriend while Hoffman was behind bars. Police found Hoffman near the scene hiding in a Port-a-Potty.

MISSOULA NORTH

MISSOULA SOUTH

HAMILTON

721-1770

721-0888

363-3884

STEVENSVILLE

THOMPSON FALLS

POLSON

RONAN

777-4667

827-8473

888-1099

676-7800

third annual

Missoula Federal Credit Union

Sustainability Fair CALL FOR VENDORS March 23, 2010

4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Missoula Cildren’s Theater

Get the word out about your eco-friendly business or non-profit organization at the 3rd Annual MFCU Sustainability Fair, on Tuesday, March 23, 2010. Participants are required to apply for inclusion. Applications are available at www.missoulafcu.org or at any branch location.

On her first day out of prison, Theresa Jones, 49, was arrested in Pasco County, Fla., accused of stealing a car. Authorities said Jones had just completed a two-year, eight-month sentence when she met a pen pal, and they drove to a New Port Richey hotel. Jones borrowed the man’s car, saying she was going to buy beer. She didn’t return. When authorities located her the next day, she explained that she stole the car so she could get drugs.

More than you expect

523-3300 / www.missoulafcu.org

Missoula Independent

Page 13 February 4–February 11, 2010


GREEN

RUSH

Getting a grip on Montana’s budding medical marijuana industry by Matthew Frank • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

Watching it grow June: Hawaii lawmakers pass legislation allowing the use of medical marijuana. It’s the first time a law of this nature is enacted by a state legislature.

2000

June: Missoula’s Robin Prosser begins a 60-day hunger strike to protest her inability to grow her own marijuana for medicinal purposes.

2001

2002

November: Voters in Nevada and Colorado approve the use of medical marijuana, bringing the national total to eight states. California, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Maine and Hawaii previously passed similar measures.

Missoula Independent

Page 14 February 4–February 11, 2010

November: Montana voters pass Initiative 148, allowing patients with specific medical conditions to use medical marijuana under medical supervision.

2003

2004 May: Vermont lawmakers pass legislation allowing the use of medical marijuana.

December: Montana DPHHS reports 176 registered patients in the state.

2005 June: U.S. Supreme Court rules 6–3 that federal authorities can ignore state laws condoning medical marijuana and prosecute patients who use marijuana under state programs.


N

ot too long ago any talk of a “green” business had something to do with the environment or climate change. But a bumper crop of new medical marijuana businesses in Missoula—and across the state—forces a new definition of the phrase. Montanans are now coming to grips with a different kind of green business, and an emerging “green rush.” Much like the West’s gold rush, the noticeable rise in cannabusinesses elicits a mix of heart-warming success stories, rampant opportunism and chaotic legal wrangling. More than anything, the current green rush speaks to just how fast the industry has grown since federal enforcement was relaxed late last year. The numbers tell much of the story. At the end of 2008, Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) reported 1,557 registered medical marijuana patients in the state. One year later, there were 7,339. Based on current trends and estimates from those in the industry, the state likely added another 3,000-plus patients to the rolls in January. In Missoula County, where 935 patients were registered at the end of 2009, storefront businesses are sprouting up throughout downtown. The city counted four licensed medical marijuana businesses last November. Now, just three months later, there are 12, according to Bill Bonetati, accounting supervisor at the city’s licensing department. That number doesn’t include the many more registered caregivers operating without storefronts. According to DPHHS, 260 caregivers call Missoula County home, and they range from those growing marijuana in a spare bedroom for one patient to those with more than 500 patients growing thousands of plants in local warehouses. These operations may challenge the community’s capacity to enforce the vague state law that governs them, but are still gaining legitimacy. To wit, one local business, Zoo Mountain Natural Care, joined the Missoula Chamber of Commerce last month, the first such business to join any of the chambers in the state. The “green rush” took five years to take root in the Treasure State (see timeline below). In 2004, 62 percent of voters supported Initiative 148, making Montana the 10th state to pass a medical marijuana program. (There are now 14.) At the infancy of the Medical Marijuana Act, patients and caregivers still feared federal prosecution. For instance, Missoula activist Robin Prosser, the poster child for medical marijuana rights, fought a constant battle against federal authorities to gain access to her medicine until she killed herself in 2007. Just last year, the Independent interviewed four different caregivers who, despite adhering to state laws, operated largely secret grow houses and delivery services in order to help registered patients who also felt as if they could be arrested at any moment. But the landscape abruptly changed last October after the Obama administration

November: Missoula County voters pass Initiative 2, which makes marijuana offenses by adults law enforcement’s lowest priority.

announced that federal authorities would defer to state marijuana laws, essentially meaning the days of feds raiding patients’ homes and pot dispensaries around the country were over. The move opened the floodgates in Montana, bringing the industry out of the grow rooms and onto main street. Patients and marijuana advocates rejoiced, and law enforcement appeared to look the other way. Today, advocates and law enforcement alike wonder if it’s grown too fast (see sidebar on page 16). Specifically, concerned patients question whether some caregivers operate in deference to the “spirit of the law” and keep a patient’s best interests in mind. Authorities suspect the law now serves to “cloak” illegal drug dealing. Either way, the industry has changed dramatically, causing a ripple effect through the local job market, medical community, court system and police force.

March: DEA agents in Missoula seize 20 grams of mailed medical marijuana sent to Robin Prosser.

2006 January: Rhode Island lawmakers pass medical marijuana legislation.

Logan Head, the 20-year-old co-owner of Zoo Mountain Natural Care, inspects one of the roughly 200 marijuana plants in his growing facility. Zoo Mountain joined the Missoula Chamber of Commerce last month, becoming the first such business to join any of the chambers in Montana.

October: Robin Prosser commits suicide.

2007 December: Montana DPHHS reports 287 registered patients in the state.

April\: New Mexico lawmakers pass medical marijuana legislation.

The Independent spoke with more than 50 sources to try to cut through the haze of the state’s medical marijuana industry. What we found might be best explained by walking through the three steps to becoming a medical marijuana patient: finding a doctor, choosing a caregiver, and growing medicine on your own.

Finding a doctor In order to legally use marijuana in Montana, a licensed doctor must verify that a patient has a qualifying medical condition and find that the potential benefits of medical marijuana will likely outweigh the risks. According to the state, a total of 247 doctors have approved the paperwork for the state’s more than 7,000 patients. A single doctor estimates he’s signed off on nearly a quarter of them.

November: Voters in Michigan approve the use of medical marijuana.

February: U.S. attorney general announces the feds should defer to state medical marijuana laws, effectively ending raids on legally operating caregivers and patients.

2008 December: Montana DPHHS reports 572 registered patients in the state.

Chris Christensen, a family practitioner at Big Creek Family Medicine in Victor, has come to specialize in medical marijuana. He says he’s registered more than 1,500 patients from a small, cash-only clinic that caters to the uninsured. “I’ve just happened to have developed both a willingness and a knowledge base to allow me to feel like I can venture into an area that a lot of doctors won’t touch,” says Christensen, a primary care physician for 35 years. “It began with people coming to see me who had pain problems, and that started me looking back at what was in the literature about marijuana for pain. I think the first half-dozen patients that I certified were people I already had in the practice and they came to me and said, ‘This is how I’m managing my chronic pain.’ And as a result of that I got informed about the law and said, ‘Okay, I don’t have a problem certifying you to do this.’” Five years after opening Big Creek Family Medicine, Christensen says he now spends about 50 percent of his time working with patients who come from all over the state seeking medical marijuana cards. Many of these patients, he says, are people whose primary doctors rejected their requests for one. He and his staff devote two or three days a week to these patients, seeing about 30 each day. Patients pay, on average, $150 and must watch a 30-minute video of Christensen explaining the legal nuances of the Medical Marijuana Act before visiting with the doctor one-on-one. Patients report that Christensen conducts complete evaluations and fosters a genuine doctor/patient relationship. One patient says Christensen spent three hours evaluating him. The sheer number of patients Christensen has registered raises the eyebrows of others in his field. But being at the center of controversy is nothing new for him. About a decade ago, while practicing in Idaho, Christensen says authorities charged him with multiple felony counts of prescribing controlled substances outside the scope of a professional practice. “In other words, dealing drugs,” he says. He was practicing in Idaho’s Silver Valley, where he found high instances of chronic pain a function of the timber and mining industries “that leave a lot of damaged bodies behind.” His prescribing habits— most of his 400 patients, he says, were on some opioid—raised eyebrows, and the state filed charges. The accusations of abuse also led to a dispute with the state’s Board of Medicine, which resulted in Christensen relinquishing his license for two years. He says he also relinquished his ability to prescribe opioids for the rest of his career. Christensen acknowledges what he calls “the double-edged sword of trying to practice compassionate care.” But the key to providing compassionate care, he says, is believing the patient. He explains that many doctors, holding a handful of negative test results, will tell a patient that they must not hurt, instead of figuring out a way to fix it or to make life more tolerable.

2009

December: The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THC) holds its first “medical marijuana clinic” in Missoula. Montana DPHHS reports 1,557 registered patients in the state.

December: Montana DPHHS reports 7,339 registered patients in the state.

Missoula Independent

January: New Jersey becomes the 14th state to approve the use of medical marijuana.

2010 January: Zoo Mountain Clinic becomes the first medical marijuana caregiver to join the Missoula Chamber of Commerce.

Page 15 February 4–February 11, 2010


“You either believe the patient or you believe the study,” he says. Christensen’s point cuts to a major criticism of Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act: that individuals can exaggerate, or outright lie about, their symptoms and easily obtain a medical marijuana card. Christensen addresses the concern directly: “One of the most common things I say to the patient—not that I’m going to be able to observe it— is if the point of you being here today is so that you can go sit in the corner and drool on yourself, I’d rather not be doing this. I’d rather that we talk about some other options. But the vast majority of the peo-

ple I’m seeing have self-selected by having to get their medical records and wait for an appointment. And they have a one-on-one encounter with me in which they know they have to look into my eyes and be judged. And that, I’m telling you, is a very powerful force.” He says it’s impossible, though, to always identify disingenuous patients. “I wouldn’t tell you,” Christensen says, “that I haven’t had a patient come into my office, give me a song and dance about a past injury and still having pain, go out the door, slap their buddy on the back and say, ‘I got what I wanted.’ But I think that’s, in a

percentage, less 5 five percent of the total, and if that’s how well I’m doing I think that’s probably pretty good.” Christensen’s practice stands out, but a number of other clinics specialize in medical marijuana, too. In Missoula, for example, River City Family Health recently expanded its clinic by creating Montana Medical Cannabis Certification Inc., or M2C2. The new branch charges patients $200 for an appointment, offered, typically, twice a month. “It’s quite a remarkable opportunity for health care providers to interface with people who have never had health care, or who have been out of the

system for years, sometimes 20 or 30 years,” says Deni Llovet, the clinic’s owner and a family nurse practitioner. Llovet estimates her clinic has approved about 300 patients since last April, many of whom have a distrust for western medicine and self-medicate with marijuana. Patients who already have a primary doctor come to M2C2, Llovet says, because their regular doctor refuses to sign the medical marijuana certification, or because the patient is afraid to even mention it. “One of the things that we ask our patients is, ‘Is it okay with you if we notify your primary care physi-

High concern Ever since voters approved Montana’s Medical Marijuana Act in 2004, the measure has been criticized as too vague. But with the medical marijuana industry’s recent growth, and interpretations of the law increasingly stretched, those criticisms have become more widespread. Perhaps the best evidence of this prevailing concern is that those who helped craft the law count themselves among those most worried. “I was imagining that this program would evolve primarily under the influence of Montanans who understand Montana culture and Montana ethics,” says Tom Daubert, founder of Patients and Families United, the main group lobbying for medical marijuana rights in Helena. “I think some of the, shall we say, ‘ganjapreneurial’ behavior that’s inciting backlash is coming from people who have only recently moved to Montana. In some cases, it’s people who moved here solely to make money from medical marijuana.” Daubert never thought the tenor of the debate would reach this pitch. He puts himself alongside the law enforcement officials, legislators, doctors and lawyers who wonder if the intent of the original law has been lost amid the industry’s sudden growth. “I really do fear for the future of patient rights, and the possibility that certain kinds of medical conditions could be eliminated from our law as a result of some types of clinics,” he says. Daubert is just one person who’s raised concerns. Deputy Missoula County Attorney Andrew Paul describes what he sees as “rampant abuse” of the medical marijuana law. “It seems to me like there’s a lot of gray area in the medical marijuana law, and I think that public officials are really having a difficult time trying to figure out how to address it, and how to address all of these dispensaries popping up everywhere,” Paul says. “And it’s not just in Missoula. Local government officials are struggling with this all through Montana.” Specifically, Paul suspects the medical marijuana movement is trickling into the black market. “We’re seeing a lot of people cloaking themselves with medical marijuana who are basically just drug dealers,” he says. “We know that that’s going on frequently. It seems like every person that we’ve busted who has been a caregiver has been selling to people who are not their patients, and have been either growing or buying large quantities of marijuana that are not going to legitimate patients, but is being sold, basically, on the black market.” The problem, Paul adds, is that it makes it difficult for law enforcement to differentiate between illegal users and patients who are trying to access their medicine legitimately. The medical profession expresses its own concerns. Dudley

Missoula Independent

About 800 people showed up at the Montana Caregiver Network’s “Cannabis Convention” on Jan. 26 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Missoula. A few dozen caregivers lined the room courting new patients.

Dana, a Missoula-based clinical psychologist and licensed addiction counselor, says he and colleagues have noticed a dangerous rise in the number of patients receiving marijuana recommendations. “I know of no other medication that has bypassed rigorous research before it is allowed to be prescribed,” he says. “The focus is generally on efficacy, safety and side effects. It is hard to imagine given the side effects of THC that it would be approved.” More than that, Dana worries about the minimization of marijuana’s addictive potential. He explains that the vast majority of addiction therapists and researchers think that medical marijuana can precipitate “a spiral into addiction,” similar to alcohol, especially for those genetically predisposed. He tells of one young patient for whom “everything went to hell” after receiving a medical marijuana card for a dubious health issue. Once the patient used marijuana daily, Dana says it led to “the deterioration of his life.” “If we’re going to legalize marijuana, let’s have that debate,” Dana says. “Let’s not make an end run around the whole issue by medicalizing it.” The issue has already been brought to the attention of the Montana Board of Medical Examiners. In particular, roving clinics run by Montana Caregivers Network (MCN), which can include doctor visits via video conferencing, have been the source of informational meetings with the board. Jean Branscum, the board’s executive director, says the board doesn’t have jurisdiction over the clinics themselves, but it does over all licensed doctors in the state.

Page 16 February 4–February 11, 2010

Confidentiality rules forbid her from saying whether or not doctors associated with MCN or other clinics are under investigation. “We’ve heard from physicians that there’s a question of clarification that’s needed for physicians participating in these clinics,” she says. “And the board is working on a position paper [to address that].” All investigations, Branscum says, look at whether or not a physician upholds a standard level of care. Asked if it’s possible for physicians who visit with patients via video conference to uphold that standard, she says, if they’re under investigation, they’d have to prove it. Branscum stresses that complaints trigger any board investigation, and that a review can end with a physician’s license suspended or revoked. While there’s no consensus about how to immediately address the concerns, Daubert at least offers some common ground. He says law enforcement and patients ultimately desire the same end result. “Patients merely want access to the medicine without fearing arrest or prosecution, and they want it to work, to be good, and to be safe,” he says. “Law enforcement, primarily, just wants to know that all the medicine going to patients is legal Montana medicine, and that none of the medicine produced is going to anyone but legal patients. There’s no area of that with which patients would disagree. The question then becomes: How do we rework a solution that makes it all possible?”


cian that we’ve certified this for you?’ And the Across the room, another caregiver sat majority of the patients don’t want us to do with small jars of marijuana on his table, the that, and we’re not going to if they don’t want names of the strains written in Sharpie on us to,” Llovet says. strips of duct tape—“Blueberry” and “Train Practitioners like Christensen and Llovet Wreck,” among others. The older man said he take specific steps to honor the “bona-fide was among the 417 workers let go by Smurfitphysician/patient relationship” as required by Stone Containerboard Corp. earlier this year the Medical Marijuana Act, and operate like a when it shut down its Frenchtown linerboard traditional doctor’s office. But others, most plant, where he worked for 30 years. The notably the Montana Caregivers Network man, who wished to remain anonymous, said (MCN), take a different approach. it’s too late to go back to school for retrainThe group, led by director Jason Christ, ing. He came to the Cannabis Convention, his drives RVs all over the state and operates first, in hopes of adding another patient or “Cannabis Conventions” where, for $150, two to the six he currently supplies. patients can see a roving doctor, sign up with “I’m 51 years old and this is my best a caregiver, and even get legal advice. Some shot,” he said. critics call this one-stop-shop approach “docs With so many caregivers flooding the in a box” or an assembly line of medicine. market, prices are getting pushed down, Christ says he’s revolutionizing modern patients and caregivers say. Barry George, a health care. caregiver with Helping Hands, reports drop“What we’re doing, the community that is ping the price for an ounce by $50 to stay arising out of this, is changing the face of competitive. John Masterson, the director of medicine,” Christ declares. “It’s working. the Montana chapter of the National We’ve registered over 7,000 or 8,000 people Organization for the Reform of Marijuana in six months through our program.” Laws (NORML), says competition has become MCN’s recent run through Kalispell, Great so fierce that some resort to aggressive tactics Falls, Billings, Bozeman and Missoula drew, to sign up new patients. He tells of one according to Christ, a total of 4,500 people, instance in which a grower cornered a dis3,850 of whom received recommendations for abled person in a bar offering to be their medical marijuana cards. Christ says the caregiver. majority of those who didn’t left not because Shaneca Adams, a caregiver with Grizzly the doctor rejected them, but because the wait Organics, says there’s “definitely some scanwas too long. dalous stuff ” happening in the industry. Christ says about 800 people—most “Caregivers are basically guiding potenappearing to be in their 20s and 30s; some tial patients into the process of signing up so dreadlocked, some in shirt and tie—showed they can end up as their caregiver,” he says. up at the Cannabis Convention at Missoula’s “It’s kind of like a preying market—people are Hilton Garden Inn Jan. 26. Attendees regislike sharks looking for the old ladies who tered with MCN staffers, then waited as long don’t know any better.” as three hours to see one of three doctors in And if growers can’t persuade patients to small rooms down the hall. A fourth doctor designate them their caregiver, they often, saw patients through a video feed, part of according to some observers, sell to them MCN’s trademarked “TeleClinic” program. anyway. (Christ declined to provide the names of the “A lot of these places around here, if you doctors because of past attempts to report have a card, you can get smoke, you can get At the end of 2008, Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) reported them to the Montana Board of Medical 1,557 registered medical marijuana patients in the state. One year later, there were 7,339. Based on marijuana,” says George. “That ain’t right…A Examiners.) current trends and estimates from those in the industry, the state likely added another 3,000-plus couple places in town are just treating it like In the meantime, prospective patients patients to the rolls in January. California [where card holders don’t have to could meet the few dozen caregivers sitting at get medicine from just one caregiver].” booths circling the room, each displaying difWhile it would appear caregivers are nonprofit.) He says ounces typically sell for between Choosing a caregiver ferent strains of medicine in hopes of signing up new cashing in, most claim that’s not the case. They tell The Medical Marijuana Act allows patients to $300 and $350, but often less based on an incomepatients. Or, prospective patients could go to the next of failed crops and $600 electric bills from their grow six plants and possess one dried ounce of mar- based sliding scale. room and listen to Great Falls attorney Carl Jensen high-wattage grow lights, or more significant investA few booths down from MPM, Zoo Mountain ijuana. Patients may also purchase medicine from a lecture on the limits of the medical marijuana law. ments in storefronts and legal teams to make sure registered caregiver who is allowed to cultivate six Natural Care displayed its strains in glass boxes and Occasionally, a woman would read names into a they stay on the right side of the law. plants per patient, as well as hold an ounce of smok- gave passersby a lighted magnifying glass with which microphone, and patients would head toward their “In the current environment,” Adams says, to examine the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) crystals appointment. Five patients said their visits with a doc- able marijuana for each. Patients can only buy from “you’re working with a few select people. It’s almost their registered caregiver. There’s no limit to the coating its products. Run by 20-year-old Logan Head like a coffee shop but you have a very limited clientor lasted between five and 20 minutes. and his two business partners, Zoo Mountain would “Our doctors want to publish what we’re doing number of patients to whom a caregiver can provide tele. So I think there’s a limit to the profit that can have a fruitful day: Head said afterward that about 30 be made off of it. A lot of caregivers that I talk to are medicine. in the New York State Journal of Medicine and they The caregivers courting patients at last week’s patients signed up, giving the clinic, which has a store- seeing that it’s not as profitable as they thought it want to talk to Cambridge about it,” says Christ. Cannabis Convention provide a sense of the variety. front on the corner of Orange and Front streets, about would be. And especially right now, because there “These doctors are very well connected. They’re Montana Pain Management (MPM), owned by 160 patients between its three caregivers. Head says are so many people getting set up.” going to the state’s Medical Board of Examiners and explaining what they do and how they do it, because Rick Rosio, stood out in the exhibit hall. The corner Zoo Mountain’s success has to do with its prices—all booth featured a large flat-screen TV displaying strains are $225 an ounce—and he claims to donate 10 Growing at home they believe in it.” The Medical Marijuana Act allows for patients to Christ is proud of MCN’s work, and also not shy close-up images of its strains, as well as physical to 20 percent of profits back into the community. Farther down the row sat Terry Lucke, dubbed designate a caregiver, as well as grow as many as six about the group’s financial status. He says MCN examples. Rosio’s operation, which is located on Third Street, is perhaps Missoula’s largest “dispensa- in his advertisements as “The Fat Hippie.” He and his plants themselves. Evidently many are trying, because grossed about $1 million in sales its first year. “God, I’m going to be a millionaire in a year,” he ry” by volume. Rosio estimates that he’s the caregiv- two business partners have fewer than 50 patients, indoor gardening stores are sprouting up right alongsays. “But I don’t care. It’s not about the money at er for more than 500 people, meaning he can legal- he said, but they’re still in the process of finding a side Missoula’s medical marijuana clinics. The owner all. Period. My goal is to help end suffering. And if I ly grow more than 3,000 marijuana plants. (A person storefront and obtaining a business license from the of one store, who wished to remain anonymous can do it en masse, great.” has to be listed as the caregiver, not a business or city. Lucke sells ounces for between $275 and $325. because she doesn’t want to associate herself too

Missoula Independent

Page 17 February 4–February 11, 2010


closely with the industry, acknowledged that her business probably wouldn’t have opened last October if not for Montana’s medical marijuana program. “It wasn’t so much the law passing,” she says. “It was more when the federal government said that they wouldn’t be prosecuting people as much, and everybody in Montana started getting their cards and doing these bigger indoor operations.” The Green Light in downtown Missoula, a store that sells organic and ethically produced products, has dramatically expanded its offerings of grow supplies in recent months to meet demand, says coowner Steve Luedecke. He devotes almost a quarter of the store’s space to it now. As he walks through the inventory pointing out everything an individual needs for indoor gardening—ballasts, bulbs, reflec-

tors, ventilation systems and various soils— Luedecke says a basic system with a 400-watt bulb can be had for as little as $275. “There’s been a lot of activity, as far as people growing,” Luedecke says. But customers tell him that the learning curve is steep, beset with trials and errors—and expensive ones. After all, caregivers are caregivers for a reason. “I don’t think this is something that you can go buy a book, some grow lights and some water pumps, and come out with a medical grade product without some background,” says Lucke from “The Fat Hippy.” The plethora of rookie growers has also sparked another occupation within the medical marijuana industry: grow coaches.

David Drake doesn’t necessarily call himself one, but he fits the job description. The 27-year-old Missoulian started the website Smokereports.com— “Home of the largest cannabis (marijuana) database ever created!”—and consults patients and caregivers across the state. “When people have problems they know to get a hold of me,” he says. “I help people get set up. Or if there’s a caregiver with a few hundred plants that are about to die, then sometimes they’ll call me and I’ll help make sure that doesn’t happen.” Drake’s expertise serves as an example of the breadth of marijuana knowledge quietly cultivated over the years suddenly seeing the light of day. And it’s just another example of how much the medical marijuana program has impacted the local economy.

“We’re in a time when more traditional businesses have cut back and more people are hurting financially, and people see opportunity in the medical marijuana business,” says Tom Daubert, founder of Patients and Families United, a group that lobbies for marijuana patients’ rights in Helena. “But I don’t think the opportunity is as real as they expect…And I think the trend is potentially unfortunate for patients, and certainly laden with political risks that I am deeply concerned about. I think we all agree that this is moving very fast.” Skylar Browning contributed additional reporting to this story. mfrank@missoulanews.com

Now what? Following the sudden rise in new patients, storefront businesses and bold interpretations of the state law, we look ahead at the next big things in Montana’s medical marijuana movement.

Looming legislative fight Little can be done to change Montana’s current Medical Marijuana Act until the 2011 Legislature takes up the issue. And all indications are the fight in Helena will be intense. “There is a lot of improvement needed in the Medical Marijuana Act. Have we as a city gotten together a complete list of our concerns? No. We’re working on it,” says Keithi Worthington, deputy city attorney in Missoula. “And I’ve been in discussion with one of the county attorneys to talk about ways that we can gather our concerns and put them together both as a county and as a city to get those concerns to the Legislature.” Tom Daubert, the founder of Patients and Families United, a lobbying group that organized “Cannabis at the Capitol Day” during the last legislative session, says he sees areas of common concern between patients and law enforcement. But he also acknowledges that certain caregivers and entrepreneurs have undone a lot of the headway his group made in Helena. “I’ve been told by law enforcement officials that we’re further behind today than we were at the beginning of the last legislative session, politically,” he says, “and my own read of the situation confirms that.”

Zoning The main fight may be waged in Helena next year, but some Montana cities are already using zoning to chip away at medical marijuana businesses. Whitefish City Council passed an “urgency ordinance” in early December banning medical marijuana businesses for three months so the Whitefish Planning and Building Department could investigate ways to appropriately zone them. In the decision, the council determined that such establishments “could be immediately detrimental to, harmful to, and a threat to the peace, property, health, safety, and welfare of the city and its inhabitants.” Billings tabled a similar ordinance in November. Just this week, Great Falls passed a zoning ordinance that prohibits medical marijuana businesses from opening within city limits for three months. Allen St. Pierre, director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), says that land use and zoning is “the great frontier” in marijuana law reform. He says hundreds of communities, most notably in California and Colorado, have moved to ban medical marijuana. Most recently, the Los

Missoula Independent

Photo by Chad Harder

The 2009 legislative session featured “Cannabis at the Capitol Day,” above, an event aimed at educating lawmakers on the benefits of medical marijuana. Tom Daubert, founder of Patients and Families United, which organized the event, expects a difficult debate in 2011.

Angeles City Council passed a new ordinance in January that puts strict controls on where dispensaries can operate, and will force hundreds to close.

Expert analysis One of the main concerns about the rising number of patients and increased competition among caregivers is the quality of the actual medicine. Montana Botanical Analysis (MBA), based in Bozeman, calls itself the first state laboratory “dedicated to the study and analysis of medical cannabis.” Founded by Dr. Michael Geci last year, the lab purports to, among other things, measure the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in strains of medical cannabis, as well as test for mold, pesticides, heavy metals and other potentially harmful contaminants. A similar operation in Missoula, CannabAnalysis Labs, expects to open in the next month or two. Rose Habib, a chemist and founder of the lab, says she’ll test product for its cannabinoid profile, with a special focus on working with extracts for edibles. “We will make your extract, and test it,” she says. With more and more caregivers cropping up, quality control labs could serve as an important step for concerned caregivers and patients as they try to bring legitimacy to their medicine.

Page 18 February 4–February 11, 2010

Decriminalization or legalization The pro-marijuana movement has never had as much political momentum, media exposure and general support as it does today. A huge portion of that swing is due to 14 states legalizing the use of medical marijuana and generations of Drug War rhetoric being stripped away. St. Pierre recently told OC Weekly the movement’s “almost at a zeitgeist,” meaning enough favorable forces have come together to help make reform possible. “I definitely think the tide of public opinion is moving rapidly toward favoring legalization for adults with regulation and taxation,” says Daubert of Patients and Families United. “I think probably the biggest driving factor in that is budget considerations.” Harvard economist Jeffrey A. Miron says legalizing marijuana would benefit taxpayers nationwide by roughly $25 billion per year in both generating new tax income and eliminating the cost of enforcement. John Gettman, a former NORML president who now works for DrugScience.org, claims legalizing marijuana would benefit taxpayers by $42 billion per year. “The solution to many of the current medical marijuana program’s woes and complexities and gray areas,” says John Masterson of Montana NORML, “is to just drop the ‘medical’ and have a regulated system for all adults.”


dish

the

We're The Perfect Place To Sit, Sip, Meet and Eat!

Fried stone FLASHINTHEPAN Perhaps you’ve heard the story of stone soup. Some hungry travelers arrive at a village during a famine, set up a kettle in the town square, put a rock in it, and start cooking. “We’re making stone soup” is the travelers’ response to the obvious question, and they invite the villagers to join them. One by one the villagers arrive, each with a little something to contribute. In the end, everyone enjoys a great meal, and nobody eats the stone. I relived this drama the other day. Searching the fridge for my morning meal, I saw lots of leftovers, including a Thai take-out box full of rice. I decided on fried rice for breakfast. Soon my wok was full of sizzling goodies. I reached for that take-out box and found it nearly empty. Curses! Someone poached a midnight snack. Although I had only a few grains of rice to work with, I didn’t go hungry since all the bacon, sausage, squash, peas, onions, garlic, egg and chile I had prepared to mix with that rice amounted to an adequate meal of its own. I had made the fried-rice equivalent of stone soup. Fried stone, if you will. The fried rice most of us are used to is composed of mostly rice and just a few bits of vegetables and flecks of meat. But fried rice, like soup, is more a concept than a recipe. It’s flexible enough to handle all the leftovers and creativity you can throw at it. There are few important rules when it comes to fried rice, and only one that need be followed to the letter. And while the other rules can be broken, they should at least be broken respectfully. Rule 1: Traditional Chinese fried rice contains fish sauce. If you were flailing in front of your wok trying to figure out what to add next and you opened a jar of fish sauce and took a whiff, you’d probably say something like, “I don’t think so.” But fried rice without fish sauce is missing something important. When you add that something, your kitchen will stink, but only for a moment. Afterward, all is good. I can’t call this an unbreakable rule because your fried rice will still be edible if you don’t

by ARI LeVAUX

pepperoni slices. Along with the sausage I added slices of leftover squash, so they could brown. I had to add a little oil since the sausage was lean, but if I had used bacon, oil probably wouldn’t have been necessary. If I hadn’t had leftover squash I might have browned some julienned carrots. After browning them on one side, I flipped the sausage and squash. When they finished cooking I pushed them to the side of the pan, added another tablespoon of oil, and into that puddle I poured a beaten egg. I let the egg form a bottom, as if making an omelet, tilting the pan to pour the uncooked egg onto any vacant areas. When the egg started cooking through to the top I sliced it with the spatula and scrambled it around the pan. Then I removed the egg, squash and sausage. Another tablespoon of oil, and then some garlic, fresh ginger and onion. Once this had cooked a bit I added some pecans (whereas tradition dictates peanuts), frozen snap peas from last year’s garden, chopped roasted green chiles (for New Mexico-style Photo by Ari LeVaux fried rice), and a few shakes of fish tofu, etc. Or you can skip additional proteins alto- sauce. I stirred that all around then added a cup of leftover wild rice (by no means need the rice be gether without much penalty. Rule 3: The rice must be cold, ideally having white) and a pour of sherry (because I was afraid cooled overnight in the fridge. This rule must never, stuff was about to start sticking). After mixing the ever be broken. If you break this rule and add just- rice around I added my egg and browned sausage cooked rice to the wok or pan, it will smear into a and squash, stirred it together, killed the heat, and disgusting soggy goop. Cooling the rice shrinks and seasoned with soy sauce. Some cooks don’t use soy sauce in fried rice, hardens the grains so they’ll separate gracefully, with a pleasing crunch when fried. So if you’re making relying on the fish sauce for salt. I prefer to use fried rice and you discover you don’t have any, or both. But while it’s better to add fish sauce early, very much, leftover rice in the fridge, do not attempt giving its flavor time to mellow, I add soy sauce after to make a new pot of rice. Remember my fried-stone I’ve killed the heat so it won’t burn to the bottom of the pan. fable, take heart, and add more other stuff. Fried rice works anytime, but I eat it most often Because every batch of fried rice is dictated largely by what’s available, I won’t micromanage you for breakfast. Morning, obviously, is the first opporwith a specific recipe. Instead, I’ll give an example of tunity to fry rice that sat in the fridge overnight. And how I prepared a recent batch as a guideline you can since my fried rice often contains eggs and bacon, and since last night’s leftovers are still fresh, and follow, however closely or distantly you like. I began with some sausage slices—sweet Russian since it tastes very good with coffee, fried rice—or sausage from the farmers’ market and homemade elk fried stone—just makes sense to start the day. add fish sauce. Nonetheless, it will suffer. If you don’t have fish sauce, consider bending this rule by adding oil from a jar of anchovies. Rule 2: Many purists claim that fried rice must contain Chinese sausage, aka Lap Cheong, which is sweet, fatty and mildly spiced. With all due respect to Lap Cheong, this rule was made to be broken. You can use bacon pieces. You can use shredded leftover chicken. You can use Italian sausage, pepperoni,

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as

artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burri-

tos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

Times Run 2/5 - 2/11

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Messenger

(R)

Nightly at 7 & 9 Sun. matinee at 1 & 3 NO show Fri. 2/5 Sat. 2/6 • 7 ONLY

FULL BAR AVAILABLE

Precious Nightly at 7 • Sun. matinee at 1 NO show Fri. 2/5 or Sat. 2/6

The Road

(R)

Nightly at 9 Sun. matinee at 3

www.thewilma.com

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Page 19 February 4–February 11, 2010


the

dish

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Resolve to treat yourself to the best in 2010 with home-made, super-premium ice-cream and ice-cream cakes! Stop by and try our shakes or ice-cream cupcakes! If you've other resolutions, keep them with fresh smoothies or home-made, fat-free, nosugar-added "Sinless" ice-cream! It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted freerange chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, crois-

HAPPIESTHOUR James Bar Claim to fame: A decidedly hip, urban feel with several enlarged, vintage chic, black-and-white photos featuring, among others, Janis Joplin, Keith Richards and a very young Willie Nelson. The outside front of the bar sports a long quote from Hunter S. Thompson, and the back of the building includes this Jimmy Buffett line: “We are the people our parents warned us about.” The décor also includes dark wood beams with black trim, chandeliers with candlelike lights, a gas fireplace and cozy booths. Cozy, but definitely not a dive bar. What you’re drinking: Bartender Andrew Benson, pictured above, says the Lemonade James ($7) has summer flair, but patrons drink it all year. How the barkeep makes it: - One shot Effen Black Cherry Vodka - Equal parts cranberry juice and lemonade - A dash of Rose’s Lime Juice - Sugar rim What you’re eating: A full menu includes everything from sliders—you choose between

lamb, lobster, bison, elk, pulled pork or beef—to smoked gouda mac and cheese. But the hottest item is something even simpler: tater tots with a side of ranch and ketchup. Who you’re drinking with: Afternoons see younger regulars drinking, chatting at the bar or studying. When the lights dim in the evening, it’s couples’ night out. Large groups also congregate around the stump tables or in the sizeable plush booths. The crowd is usually swanked up a bit by Missoula standards. Happy hour: Wine happy hour—$5 glasses—runs 2 to 5 p.m. Reverse happy hour from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. features Pabst tallboys for $2.50. How to find it: 127 W. Alder Street Happiest Hour is a new column that celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage f o r H a p p i e s t H o u r, e - m a i l e d i t o r @ missoulanews.com.

Friday, Saturday, or Sunday February 12th, 13th, or 14th In addition to our regular menu offerings, Chef Larry has created a five course culinary masterpiece (menu below), complete with suggested wine pairings for only $99 per couple... Perfect for romance!

Dinner Reservations starting at 5pm Friday and Saturday, 4pm Sunday (complimentary champagne with Sunday's dinner!)

PLUS live entertainment: Kevin VanDort & Jimmy Rogers (Fri/Sat 8pm) Ellie Nuno and Cats & The Fiddle (Sun 6pm)

Don't Forget Our VERY SPECIAL

Valentine's Day Brunch Sunday February 14th 10am-2pm Enjoy a variety of fresh salads, seafood, prime rib, ham, traditional breakfast favorites, plus a phenomenal selection of desserts ...And so much more!

$29 per person, $50 per couple

Missoula Independent

Page 20 February 4–February 11, 2010


sants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. With two convenient locations, it’s easy to call in your order and pick it up on your way to play. $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic French Roast Fair Trade $9.75/lb.

Va l e n t i n e

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

COFFEES, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ What’s For Dinner Meal Delivery Service • 406-207-2203 Delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door. Fresh dinner menu changes weekly, frozen dinner and dessert menus change monthly. Order by noon on Monday, deliveries are made Tuesday. Meals start at only $7.50 per portion. Menus and ordering available at www.WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

NOT JUST

ASKARI Curry conundrum Dear Flash, I really love Thai curry dishes, but have no idea how to use curry while cooking at home. Do you have a yummy recipe for curry soup to warm me up in these cold winter months? Thanks for your help. —Curry Crazy

Q

The easiest way to make a good Thai curry is by using canned coconut milk and curry paste. Purists may protest, but there’s really nothing impure about it. In Thailand it’s common to buy curry paste premade at the market, and Thailand is perhaps the world’s biggest market for coconut milk. Almost any store will sell curry paste in the ethnic section. The pastes come in red, yellow, green and sometimes panang or massaman, all of which are variations on the theme that includes ginger, chile, lemongrass, lime leaf, shallot, shrimp or fish paste, garlic, and other spices, all ground into a paste. Green curry will have basil or cilantro, yellow curry will have

A

Februar y

turmeric, etc. The containers of curry paste will have directions for use, but here is generally how it’s done: If you want proteins in your curry—tofu, chicken or meat—cook them first. I like fish to be crispy in large pieces; beef, tofu or chicken in small pieces. In a pan or wok, heat some cooking oil on medium heat, and add an onion, chopped. When the onion browns, stir in two tablespoons of curry paste. Add a little water to make sure nothing burns, and add other veggies you want, like broccoli, greens or mushrooms. When the veggies are cooked, add your proteins. Stir-fry it all together and then add coconut milk. When it’s all mixed together, add soy sauce, lime and fish sauce to taste. If you want a thicker curry sauce, cook on low and let it thicken. If you want soup, add water to thin it out, adjust seasonings, and serve.

SUSHI NIGHT EVERY MONDAY

403 N. HIGGINS AVE. • 549-7979

WWW.SUSHIHANAMISSOULA.COM

Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Page 21 February 4–February 11, 2010


Arts & Entertainment listings February 4–February 11, 2010

8

days a week

THURSDAY October

29

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit These guys have some fruity intentions. Wilco plays UM’s Adams Center Sun., Feb. 7, at 7:30 PM. $32 plus ticket fees at all GrizTix locations or online at griztix.com.

We're proud THURSDAY February to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

04

Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on Guitar Hero, Rock Band and more on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Even if your toddler makes some smooth

dance moves, your 3- to 6-year-old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the vinyasa-style flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. and Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

NOW OPEN! 11 am to close M-F 10 am to close Sat-Sun HAPPY HOUR Mon – Fri 4 to 7pm $.50 off all drinks Live Poker Wed – Sat 9pm

Missoula Independent

Page 22 February 4–February 11, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT 7 Days a week at 9:30pm • Karaoke: Sun-Wed • Live Band Karaoke: Thurs • Fun Bands to Dance with: Fri & Sat

New! Serving Breakfast on the Weekends New Expanded Menu Terrific Food for a great price!

They put the edge in cutting edge: The UM School of Art hosts its faculty exhibition, featuring works by profs Cathryn Mallory, James Bailey, Edgar Smith and a slew of other aesthetic purveyors with an opening reception from 5–7 PM in the UM Gallery of Visual Arts, on the first floor of UM’s Social Sciences building. Free to attend. Call 243-2813. Gypsies come out during a Routine/ Improv Student Troupe Bellydance class every Thu. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb 5, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


Katie Knight, curator of the exhibition Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, at 7 PM in the Masquer Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. War mongers just might warm up to peace when taking in a story about a Japanese girl who gets cancer thanks to the atomic bomb when students of St. Joseph Elementary School present a performance of Kathryn Schultz Miller’s A Thousand Cranes, at 7 PM at the school, 503 Edith St. Free. Call 549-1290. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of crossdressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. Alissa Hannah makes her viola strings weep with joy when she performs a student recital at 7:30 PM at the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. They ain’t about clowning around: The Open Field Artists present a multimedia performance that touches on ego, competition and devastation—as well as healing and connection—with dance, theater, music, poetry and “clown wisdom” during Da Floresta, which starts at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10, with presale tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and Worden’s Market. Call 396-3104. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should call 541-8463. Bowling and karaoke go together like liposuction and chewing the fat during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace at 9 PM every Thu. Free.

Griz Basketball Games This Weekend Weber State Wildcats

Want to entertain a large group of people at an upcoming Griz or Lady Griz basketball game? We offer great group rates in a couple of different packages. Call 243-2250 for more info.

Friday, February 5th @ 7:00pm Allegiant Airplane Toss! – Toss a paper airplane on the court for a chance to win free airfare. The Halftime Dodgeball Tourney resumes with semi-final matches. Special Promotions Sponsored by Coca-Cola: Mattress Pile, Dash for Cash, and Tuition Stimulus Giveaway.

Idaho State Bengals

Saturday, February 6th @ 7:00pm Brought back by popular demand: The Community Medical Center Baby Race UM Dance Team Halftime Performance Monte Growth Chart Night

*All games played in Dahlberg Arena (Adams Center)

2

2 inc

M

Caregivers: contact us for booth space

n

for every class you can make it to/ $8 dropin. Call Wendy at 541-0667. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Feel free to ask them a question, but don’t expect a verbal answer: Lineage Dance of Los Angeles hits the Garden City to explore lyrical grace and athleticism, as well as present dance work that “asks questions” and “reveals answers” with a performance of “The Brain in Motion” at 6 PM at the Missoula International School, 1100 Harrison St. $15 for family of four/$10 person, with tickets at the door. All proceeds benefit Zane Goicovich, a child who suffers from epilepsy and Aspberger’s syndrome. Call Karen at 327-6629. Pour some Mrs. Butterworth’s syrup on ye so you can get sticky to the sounds of the W.C. Worth Blues Players, who pour blues tunes down willing ear canals when they play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Even the Hi-Line gets a shout out via contemporary dance during the Headwaters Dance Co.’s “Montana Suite” Premiere Gala Benefit Performance, which includes a silent auction, performance as well as a post-performance party starting at 6 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $25, with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and headwatersdance.org. Call 728-1131. (See Dance in this issue.) Sharp wit hits the screen in HD during a special digital broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion With Garrison Keillor, streaming live from St. Paul, Minn., at 6 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19 plus fees with tickets available at all GrizTix locations and griztix.com. Visit morrisproductions.org. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. You might do the push, whip or the jitterbuglindy when Cathy Clark slings beginning swing dance lessons every Thu. at 7 PM, and then moves to beyond basics swing lessons at 7:30 PM, at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. Haters, stay at home: The Montana Museum of Art and Culture presents a discussion by

on

tan

a Me

dical Cannabis

tif Cer

ic a

ti o

Do you need a medical marijuana card? Don't risk losing your card at a pop-up clinic! Trust your health to a full service clinic. Ask your friends; choose the best! Discounts for veterans & disabled determined at time of appt. Insurance reimbursement possible

Not a dispensary

Highest quality professional care private * confidential * thorough Includes complete physical, holistic health assessment & recommendations.

742 Kensington

541-M2C2

Missoula Independent

associated w/ River City Family Health

Page 23 February 4–February 11, 2010


Photo courtesy of Amanda Opitz

Nature versus clown nurture. Don’t miss a truly local, multimedia performance that’s been a year in the making when Open Field Artists present Da Floresta, Thu., Feb. 4, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10, with presale tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and Worden’s Market through Sat., Feb. 6., at 7:30 PM nightly. Call 396-3104.

BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 Join Betty's Divine for our February First Friday celebration. B. Martinez, artist/illustrator/writer/mother/daughter/girl with super-vision/bridge builder/most recently voted Queen of Recess by a whole class of Kindergartners...was born near the Red Desert ages ago in the high plains of Wyoming. She began her art career at a kitchen table in a small apartment in Cheyenne around the age of four, when her mother gave her scraps of fabric, a bottle of glue, a piece of paper and some crayons. Today she still works with mixed media on re-claimed/recycled and liberated paneling/particle board/canvas/wood. Come see her latest creations on Betty's walls. 5-8pm. Cookies and wine. BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Join us at Butterfly Herbs for our First Friday celebration where we will feature a brilliant new installation piece by Nathan & Natalie McTague. Friday, January 8th at Butterfly Herbs, from 5-8pm.

HIGHLAND WINDS GALLERY/SHOP 1520 S. 7th St. W., 541-7577 This First Friday, come browse the oil paintings and Giclees in our collection. In honor of Valentine's Day, chocolate, of course, will be served between 5-8. The Highland Winds Art Gallery offers a variety of paintings and photographic Giclees, some signed editions. The shop includes its herbal line, jewelry, cards, and dramatic writings. Address: 1520 S. 7th St. W. (just west of Russell); 541-7577 (hours: 4-9 Fridays, 9-4 Saturdays, or by appointment. MISS ZULA'S 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 Local artist Scott Woodall will be featured during the month of February at Miss Zula's. The paintings and artwork in this series/show are inspired by the natural works of art and life that are ever present in the great Montana outdoors. The artist's reception will be held February 5 from 5-8pm during Missoula's First Friday celebration.

Featuring the art of Scott Woodall

Valentine Gift? Art. Come see our Giclees and Fine Photographic Art! Highland Winds Art Gallery & Shop 541-7577

1520 S. 7th Street W. (west of Russell) 4-9 Fridays; 9-4 Saturdays or by appt.

Missoula Independent

Miss Zula’s

Page 24 February 4–February 11, 2010

111 N Higgins Missoula, MT • 541-7376

See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. If you need some therapy via bass tones that shake you to your core and tingle your insides, don’t miss Bassface, a monthly dubstep DJ night featuring a number of TBA DJs at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free.

MONTE DOLACK GALLERY 139 West Front St., 549-3248 Join us for a reception at the Monte Dolack Gallery in historic downtown Missoula on Friday, February 5th, from 5 – 8pm during First Friday Gallery Night. Fresh Paint, an Exhibition of paintings and studies that explore the rich, lush colors and big sky of the high plains and prairies of Montana will be on display. The exhibition will run from February 4 – March 4. Always on view at the Gallery are Dolack’s award-winning original paintings, lithographs, limited edition prints and fine art posters, as well as paintings, prints and posters by Mary Beth Percival. Visit us at the gallery or online.139 West Front Street Call 549-3248 www.dolack.com Open Weekdays 10-5:30 and Sat 11-5. NOTEWORTHY PAPER & PRESS 101 Higgins, 541-6683 Join Noteworthy* Paper & Press this Friday as we welcome local artist Martha Elizabeth and her show "Masks and Marbling." This show contains both two- and three-dimensional faces: framed marbled prints and hand-built sculpture. From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 101 S. Higgins Ave., near the Wilma. See you there!


FRIDAY February

05

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia with Jody Mosher, every Friday at 9 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, The Republic by Plato. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com.

nightlife He knows a good iconic image when he sees one: Bozeman artist William Hawkins Hunter, referred to as an “urban artist caught in a small town” presents a First Friday reception for his paintings—which feature bears, escalators and other images culled from perusing second hand stores—at 5 PM at Alara Jewelry, 312 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Celebrate her majesty before she melts away: The Montana Natural History Center presents a First Friday opening celebrating Glacier National Park with fourteen pieces of park themed art with a reception from 5–8 PM at the center, 120 Hickory St. Free. Includes comments by park superintendent Chas Cartwright, as well as appetizers and beverages. Call 327-0405. Break out the particle board, ‘cause this momma’s itchin’ to make her mark: Local artist/illustrator B. Martinez presents a First Friday opening for her reclaimed/recycled paneling, particle board, canvas and wood mixed media pieces with a reception from 5–8 PM at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Includes cookies and wine. Smell the sweat, feel the tight pants: Photog Tom Robertson presents a series of his photos during an opening for his exhibit Tom Robertson: Cycling Photographs, with a First Friday reception from 5–8 PM at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography Gallery, 216 N. Higgins Ave. Free. She’ll trap you, but in a fun way: Natalie Smith presents a First Friday opening for her exhibit Venus Flytrap, a collection of acrylic paintings and found objects, with a reception from 5–8 PM at Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave. Free. You needn’t worry, these aren’t made out of human skin: Local artist/crafter Krissy Frost shows off her gleaming handcrafted lamp shades while hair-chopping maven Katt Ahlstrom presents a series of her new window pane paintings during a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at the Cutting Crew, 220 Ryman St. Free. If you don’t recognize these images, well, you’re just not paying attention. The Artists Shop, 304 N. Higgins Ave., presents a First Friday opening for artist Clay Pape with a collection of his pastel works—many of which feature Missoula streetscapes—during

a reception from 5–8 PM at the shop. Free. Dudley brings tha heat: The Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., presents a First Friday opening with paintings and other work by San Francisco artist Alan Chan, Bozeman artists Troy Collins and Laura Blue Palmer and Montucky artist Theodore Waddell from 5–8 PM at the gallery. Free. She gives a thumbs down to seasonal affective disorder: Photographer Sarah Ross presents a series of her photos and asks “Why not lift your spirits?” from the winter doldrums with a First Friday opening reception from 5–7 PM at Front Street Pasta and Wraps, 247 W. Front St. Free. Greg “The Octupus” Nowak gets an artistic homage along with the loving embrace of a couple when Kalon Baughan presents drawings “in celebration of the human body and life” while Gavin Hudgeons presents a series of figurative, abstract and landscape oil works, all during a First Friday opening reception from 5–7 PM at The Catalyst, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. If she makes it to 100, you owe her a drink. No, not really. Local artist Laura Blaker presents more than 14 of her oil paintings— with the intent of completing 100 in a year— during a First Friday opening reception for her exhibit One Hundred Paintings in a Year, which runs from 5:30–8 PM in the Little Gallery, 210 N. Higgins Ave. Free. She ain’t no drama queen with a camera: UM student Katie Hilmer exhibits her black and white photography of Montana that “reflects an interest in dramatic lighting and solitary places,” with a First Friday opening reception from 5–8 PM at Bernice’s Bakery, 190 S. Third St. W. Free. Don’t be a fool, just get up closer to his work: The Missoula Art Museum presents an artists reception with Tom Foolery for his exhibit of impressively detailed narrative dioramas titled The Vendorama Series from 5–8 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. A gallery talk with Foolery starts at 7 PM. Call 728-0447. (See Scope in this issue.) Don’t expect the expected during First Friday at the Monte Dolack Gallery, 139 W. Front St., which hosts an opening for Fresh Paint, an exhibition of paintings and studies of the big sky and high plains of Montucky with a reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Call 549-3248. Check out the “Made in Montana” shirts; they’re pretty rad. Blackbird Kid Shop hosts a First Friday opening featuring a new line of silhouette-style kids T-shirts with a reception from 5–8 PM at the shop, 525 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-2899. Stare, dance, and then stare some more: Contraption Visual, 610 S. Higgins Ave., presents a First Friday opening with a variety of media works by Luke Childress, Jeremy Haas and Kinch with a reception from 5–8 PM. Free. Hot DJ action from DJ Kris Moon begins at 8 PM and runs until midnight. Visit contraptionvisual.com They make awesome cars, and sweet animation. Japanese culture gets a shout out in Missoula during a First Friday opening featuring anime-inspired art by Miranda Mundt and Natalie Linn with a reception from 5–8:30 PM at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St. Free. Call 541-7100. Jason Bohman mixes it up with mixed media works while Butter keeps the folk/Americana churning during a First Friday opening at the Top Hat, which starts at 5 PM and features music by Butter at 6. Free.

Missoula Independent

Page 25 February 4–February 11, 2010


headwatersdance.org. Call Even they know how to get dirty in 728-1131. (See Dance in this the Queen City: The Clay Studio of issue.) Missoula presents a First Friday opening reception featuring work Feel free to ask them another by artists from The Helena Clay question, but don’t expect a Arts Guild from 5:30–9 PM at the verbal answer: Lineage studio, 1106 Hawthorne St., Unit A. Dance of Los Angeles hits Free. Call 543-0509. the Garden City to explore lyrical grace and athleticism, as He’s the creative dad I wish I had: I first had the experience of stumbling across one well as present dance work Local artist Akhilesh presents a as a youngster in my old elementary school’s playthat “asks questions” and series of his detailed and surrealisground. It was lying on the ground, and had been “reveals answers” with a pertic pen and ink images with a First used. I have to admit it was a perplexing scene to my formance at the Downtown Friday opening reception from virgin eyes. Later on in life I’d learn more about this Dance Collective, 121 W. Main 5:30–7:30 P M at Computer magical thing known as a rubber, jimmy hat or, as it’s St., at 8 PM. $18/$12 stuCentral, 136 E. Broadway St. Free. most commonly called, a condom. And now, much dents/$15 advance/$10 to my surprise, that device is the chief ingredient for This ain’t no bleeding hearts club, advance for students at the some of the slickest dresses, ties, bras and suits that this is Kate Wenninger’s exhibit of DDC and Loopy Knit Crochet. I’ve ever seen. color photos inspired with heart All proceeds benefit Zane titled With Love...Possibilities You’ll be able to get a glimpse of these latexGoicovich, a child who suffers are Endless, which opens during a laden threads during Blue Mountain Clinic’s Off the from epilepsy and Aspberger’s First Friday reception at the Western Rack, the third annual fundraiser/fashion show Syndrome. Call Karen at 327Montana Community Center, 127 where models stroll around the Wilma Theatre’s 6629. N. Higgins Ave., from 5:30–7:30 stage donning locally produced clothing made in He’s not a nihilist, he just PM. Free. part, if not entirely, out of condoms. As you might wants a hug: Scott Moore of guess, the show’s not just about fashion. It aims to Expect a high-class time when jazz the Bad Larry’s plays a solo spark a discussion on healthy sexual behaviors. With and wine mingle during the Real acoustic set at the Raven Bar that in mind, know that all proceeds from the event Book Jazz Jam and Wine and Grill in Woods Bay, 4.5 support the Montana Access Project, an offshoot of Tasting, which occurs the first and miles south of Bigfork on 39 the nonprofit that seeks to increase awareness of third Fri. of each month from Orchard Lane, at 8 PM. Cover healthy sexuality, prevention of STDs and access to 5:30–8:30 PM at the Loft, 119 W. TBA. Call 837-2836. reproductive health care. Main St. Free, but wine tasting is $10. Call Carla at 360-8746. Your treelike appendages get The night also offers rollicking folk/Americana stroked and stoked when Spuds, as well as some fluid moves from members sets by locals Butter and Tractor Jack and The Muddy Gobbling down psychedelics is not Bruce Threlkeld soothes you of the Downtown Dance Collective. Of course, it required: The FayRay artist collecwith acoustic vibrations at the wouldn’t be complete without a cameo or two. tive presents its interactive arts WHAT: Third Annual Off the Rack Fashion Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, Weather maven Mark Heyka once again co-emcees experience Wonderland Bizarre, Show 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No the proceedings, while Mayor John Engen and his which is described as a place where cover, but pass-the-hat donapredecessors, Mike Kadas and Dan Kemmis, all plan WHEN: Sat., Feb. 6, at 8:30 PM “you are Alice, everyone is Alice, tions welcome. Call 741-2361. to show their faces, likely in raincoat-covered attire. taking in a Bedouin environment WHERE: Wilma Theatre filled with dancers, artists, illusions, Hypochondriacs always find A sneak preview reception earlier in the night, music” and other delights at 6 PM something fun to worry about from 6 to 8 p.m., at The Loft of Missoula includes a HOW MUCH: $20/Loft preview: $50. Purchase at the Palace. $5 suggested donawhen The Wild Coyotes rock chance to check out the garments before they hit tickets for both at The Green Light or tion. All profits go to Home them with rock at the Eagles the stage, and features food, drink, a silent auction, Blue Mountain Clinic Resource and the ZACC. Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at and a ticket to the main show. 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. MORE INFO: 721-1646, bluemountainclinic.org They’re not your private dancers, so —Ira Sather-Olson don’t ask: The Downtown Dance Belt out a few bars of someCollective presents a First Friday thin’ ridiculous at East opening for photographs of the Missoula’s Reno Casino and Headwaters Dance Company titled Cafe’s karaoke night, brought Montana Suite Stills—taken by Neil Chaput, Rick Bass assures us he won’t yak about The Canyon Creek Ramblers help heal to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Terry Cyr and others—with a reception from the Yaak when he reads from his most your lesions when they spread hippie tonk Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. 6–8 PM at the collective, 121 W. Main St. recent nonfiction work at the Dell Brown over your body with a set at Whitefish’s It’s time for an all-request video dance party Free. Also includes photos taken by Room, in UM’s Turner Hall, at 7 PM. Free. Crush Wine Bar, 124 Central Ave., at 7 PM. to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Free. Headwaters choreographers and tango Call 243-5267. Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with instructor Abby Croteau. Call 541-7240. Get your fly tied in more ways than one dur- They ain’t about clowning around: The Open The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Local acoustic songstresses Kira Means ing Drake Magazine’s 2010 Fly Fishing Field Artists present a multimedia perform- Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. and Amy Martin shred softly for Haitians Film Tour, which features films like Hoodoo ance that touches on ego, competition and Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. during a “Stand for Haiti” benefit concert, Style and High in the Lowlands at 7 PM at devastation—as well as healing and connec- Be thankful that the freedom to speak which starts at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 the Wilma Theatre. $16/$14 advance at tion—with dance, theater, music, poetry and includes the freedom to sing when you sidle N. Higgins Ave. $5 suggested donation. Grizzly Hackle, the Missoulian Angler and “clown wisdom” during Da Floresta, which up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, All proceeds go to the nonprofit organiza- The Kingfisher. Visit flyfishingfilmtour.com. starts at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 kicking off at 9 PM. Free. S. Higgins Ave. $10, with presale tickets at tion Partners in Health. Call Warren at (See Spotlight in this issue.) 546-9033. No really, thank you: Five Valleys Land Trust Rockin Rudy’s and Worden’s Market. Call If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets 396-3104. I don’t mean to crush your hopes, but David would like to extend its gratitude towards Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay Anderson won’t be doing a cover version of Missoulians for our stewardship spirit during Brendan McGlynn toots his own horn in orcs to at 9 PM. Free. more ways than one when he performs a Our Extraordinary Place, a multimedia Snoop Dogg’s “Gz Up, Hoes Down” when the vocalist performs an array of love songs program inspired by Western Montana fea- trumpet recital at 7:30 PM in the UM Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez at 6:30 PM at Stevensville’s North Valley turing music by violinist Eugenia Choi and Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Public Library, 208 Main St. Free to attend. pianist Christopher Hahn, along with $10/$5 students and seniors. Call Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. words by the Nature Conservancy’s M. 243-6880. Call 777-5061. Sanjayan at 7 PM at the University Theatre. Even the Hi-Line gets a shout out via con- Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues Stare, and then wear: Cat’s Eye Designs Free to attend. Call 549-0755 and visit temporary dance during the Headwaters when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the presents a First Friday Cat’s Eye Fashion fvlt.org. (See Agenda in this issue.) Dance Co.’s Montana Suite, a series of Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Show featuring handmade clothing, bikinis and belly dancing gear starting at 7 PM I’ll take the leather one with the extra spiky four dance pieces dedicated to Montana Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call at the shop, 137 E. Main St. Free. Also fea- spikes, please: Selvedge Studio presents landscapes which starts at 7:30 PM at the 531-8327. tures paintings from Joe Goertzen and a First Friday fashion show featuring jackets MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst Becca Carson, as well as food and wine. made by customers at 7 PM at the studio, 509 Adams St. $15/$10 students and seniors, busting out your best version of Hall and with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 541-7171. Call 541-7466,

SPOTLIGHT safety apparel

Missoula Independent

Page 26 October 29–November 5, 2009


Hurting From A Car Wreck? If you've recently been involved in a car wreck and suffer from any of the following... • • • • • •

Neck pain Sharp, shooting pains in the arms Numbness and tingling in the arms or hands Painful headaches or dizziness Unrelenting muscle soreness Low back pain

My name is Dr. Shane Cutting, I've been helping people heal and be pain free after car wrecks for 10 years. Chiropractic treatment has proven to be a very effective method of healing whiplash injuries. Here are the results of one chiropractic study... “The results of this retrospective study would suggest that benefits can occur in over 90% of patients undergoing chiropractic treatment for chronic whiplash injury.” -- European Spine Journal

...there may be cause for concern. This may be the most important article you will ever read about your injuries. It's amazing how different life can be after a split second collision. One minute everything is fine, the next you are hurting for days and uncertain if life will ever get back to normal. Tasks you used to perform with ease, like reading, concentrating or even sleeping, now take more energy and cause annoying pain. If you feel like this, or have any of the symptoms listed above, you could be suffering from whiplash. Whiplash is an injury to the spine caused by a jerking motion, either backward, forward or from the side. Whiplash can severely damage your ligaments, even if you feel just a little sore after the accident. If not healed properly, painful scar tissue will develop, causing misery in your neck joints for decades.

Special Opportunity To Have A Professional Evaluation For 10 days only, I’m running a very special offer where you can find out how bad your injuries are and if I can help you. What does this offer include? Everything I normally do in my “Car Wreck Evaluation”. Just call before February 15, 2010 and here’s what you’ll get… • An in-depth consultation about your problem where I will listen…really listen…to the details of your case. • A complete neuromuscular examination. • A full set of specialized x-rays to determine if a pinched nerve in the neck is contributing to your pain. This is an important step in collecting proof of your injury. • A thorough analysis of your exam and x-ray findings so we can start mapping out your plan to being pain free. • You’ll see everything first hand and find out if this amazing treatment will be your pain solution, like it has been for so many other patients.

One medical study concluded 43% of patients "will suffer long-term symptoms following 'whiplash' injury, for which no conventional treatment has proven to be effective."

Until Feb 15, 2010, you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $27. The normal price for this type of evaluation including x-rays is $250 -- you’re saving a considerable amount on this offer.

This means that almost half the people who have neck trauma from a car wreck will suffer for years. Plus the traditional methods of treatment like neck collars, “wait-and-see,” and pain pills are not working.

Don’t let scar tissue build up and be painful for life. Take me up on my offer and call today 406-543-1955.

paid advertisement

Missoula Independent

Page 27 October 29–November 5, 2009


Carlo's One Night Stand

Bat h i n g Beauties

Beads

50 25 % Off

% Off

Every day in February

Every day in February

NEW LOCATION! 109 S. 3rd W.

501 S. Higgins Ave.

543-6350 • 12-6 Daily • On the Hip Strip

543-0018 • Open 10-6 Daily

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11TH, 7 PM AT UM'S UREY LECTURE HALL FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! Join renowned polar explorer, writer, and photographer Will Steger for slides and stories documenting his first-hand observations of dramatic changes occurring in the Arctic and Antarctic. This dramatic presentation is one of hope… Learn about Montana-made solutions, policy options, and what you can do! Major sponsors include Montana Audubon, National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, Repower America, Montana Conservation Voters, The Wilderness Society, and the Will Steger Foundation.

WHAT ELSE: Resource Fair begins at 6:30 - information tables from sponsoring organizations. Additional co-sponsors include UM's Climate Change Studies Program, the Clark Fork Coalition and the Trailhead!

Contact Amy Cilimburg amy@mtaudubon.org;

Billings - Tuesday, February 9th • Bozeman - Wednesday, February 10th

406-465-1141

the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. He’s a good dude, just don’t let him smoke all your stash: Houston’s Devin the Dude, described as being “known more for blunts and Budweiser beer than bullets and bling,” brings his heady raps to the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., for a show at 9 PM. $17 presale at Peace of Mind and Ear Candy Music. Ambedext, Slopstar, The Linx and DJ Coma open. VIP tables available. Call 240-6730. Wartime Blues gives xenophobes something to fear when they play a tour kick-off show with a tasty platter of Americana at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5. Little Smokies and other guests open. Just leave the Power Glove at home, unless you want really weird looks: Dress up as your favorite Nintendo character so you can dance to DJs spinning dubstep and other kinds of electronic music during a Nintendo Party, which starts at 9 PM in the banquet room above Higgins Alley Restaurant, 426 N. Higgins Ave. $5. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Cabin Fever gives you a case of the “hot armpits” and “fun sweats” when they rock Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. Zoo City gives you the keys to their gastronomical hearts when they rock some rock at at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Full Grown Men let their instruments lead the fight against gingivitis when they let blues and jazz reign supreme at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Just keep an eye on the trumpet player, sometimes he goes on a tooting binge. Zeppo MT brings the R ‘n B to the blues when they bust out a smooth set at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SATURDAY February

06

They probably won’t be playing Blackalicious’ first album on repeat, but you can still get down with some lively movement of the same name when Cathy Jenni leads a Nia class every Sat. at 9 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com. Learn to mix and match your bellydance styles during Beginner/Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Sat. at 10:30 AM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for as many classes as you can make it to/ $8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family

Missoula Independent

Page 28 October 29–November 5, 2009

Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Shred, in more ways than one: The Backwoods Project presents its inaugural Ride Montana Festival, which features ski and snowboarding competitions on an open terrain park, starting at 11 AM at Marshall Mountain, 5250 Marshall Canyon Road. Music from Miller Creek and a host of DJs and MCs follows at 4 PM. $10 insurance fee to ride/free to attend. Even more music follows at 8 PM with sets by Meggeddon, Blessiddoom, Universal Choke Sign and Undun. Visit thebackwoodsproject.com. It’s a thriller, but Jacko doesn’t make a surprise appearance: The Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave., hosts another installment of The Met: Live at the Roxy with Verdi’s gripping political thriller Simon Boccanegra, which starts at 11 AM at the theater. $18/$16 students and seniors plus ticket fees at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. Visit morrisproductions.org. It’s sort of like “Dance Dance Revolution,” but not really: Los Angeles’ Lineage Dance presents a contemporary dance workshop that includes “athletic lifts” and “graceful floor work” from noon–2 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. This workshop continues as a benefit for Zane Goicovich. Call 541-7240. Just touch the doughy substance, it’ll feel great: The Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., presents a Pottery Painting Class where you can learn decorating techniques or hand-build with wet clay from 1–3 PM at the center. $20, with snacks included. RSVP by calling 549-7555 and visit zootownarts.com. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles. Info at missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Even the Hi-Line gets a shout out via contemporary dance during the Headwaters Dance Co.’s Montana Suite, a series of four dance pieces dedicated to Montana landscapes which starts at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $15/$10 students and seniors, with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and headwatersdance.org. Call 728-1131. (See Dance in this issue.)

nightlife Get your rubber appreciation on before others do during the Off the Rack Sneak Preview Reception, which runs from 6–8 PM at The Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., and includes a sneak peek of the wearable art featured in Off the Rack, a silent auction, as well as a ticket for the 8:30 PM show. $50, with tickets available at The Green Light and Blue Mountain Clinic. All proceeds go towards the Montana Access Project, an initiative of Blue Mountain Clinic to increase awareness of healthy sexuality. Call 721-1646. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Joan Zen delivers an Om in one when she plays an amalgamation of soul, reggae and jazz tunes at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.


These moms know how to lay the smack down thick: Families First Montana presents Parent’s Night Out, a series of parentthemed comedy sketches, game show segments, songs and other entertainment by Teresa Waldorf and Ann Szalda-Petree, starting at 6:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $25/$20 advance. Call 7217690 for tickets and visit familiesfirstmontana.org. Childcare also available for a fee. Those with haphephobia might benefit: Get touched and embraced with grace when Patrick Marsolek and Grace Hodges lead Tango Night, which starts with beginning tango at 7 PM, intermediate tango at 8 and Milonga at 9, all at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $15 entire evening/$7 class/$5 Milonga only. Call 541-7240. Go ahead, give them a dollar and see how they react: Jazz swingers and slingers the Discount Quartet make the meat and taters go down easy when they play Finn & Porter, 100 Madison St., at 7 PM. Free. They ain’t about clowning around: The Open Field Artists present a multimedia performance that touches on ego, competition and devastation—as well as healing and connection—with dance, theater, music, poetry and “clown wisdom” during Da Floresta, which starts at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10, with presale tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and Worden’s Market. Call 396-3104. Even the Hi-Line gets a shout out via contemporary dance during the Headwaters Dance Co.’s Montana Suite, a series of four dance pieces dedicated to Montana landscapes which starts at 7:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $15/$10 students and seniors, with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and headwatersdance.org. Call 728-1131. (See Dance in this issue.) Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of crossdressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. Lauren Gibson lets her fingers do the talking when the flautist performs a flute recital at 7:30 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Even anticommunist contras find reason to shake a tail during another Missoula Folklore Society contra dance, which starts with a beginners workshop at 7:30 PM and glides into dance mode with music by the Sleeping Child String Band and calling by Mitchel Frey at 8 PM at the Union Hall, 209 E. Main St. $8/$6 Missoula Folklore Society members. Visit montanafolk.org. Larry Hirshberg never lets his axe get agitato when he slips folk tunes to peeps at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Let The Wild Coyotes stick leeches on your body so you can joyously pull them off under the vibrations of rock and country when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346.

Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Your appreciation for jimmy hats goes up a notch or two during Off the Rack, Blue Mountain Clinic’s third annual benefit fashion show which features models donning wearable art made of condoms, music by Butter and Tractor Jack and the Muddy Spuds, and more at 8:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $20, with tickets available at The Green Light and Blue Mountain Clinic. All proceeds go towards the Montana Access Project, an initiative of the clinic to increase awareness of healthy sexuality. Call 7211646. (See Spotlight in this issue.) If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all laughing at your shortcomings at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. When DJ Sanchez commands the turntables every Sat. at 9 PM at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, nobody’s exempt from the mandatory “dance down the bar” rule. Free. Call 363-6969. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bassheavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Scuzz out with your fuzz out so you can enjoy punk and garage rock from Bozeman’s Out the Lights and The Salamanders, who play the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Opening support from locals Rooster Sauce and Logan Dachtler. (See Noise in this issue.) The Thug Nasties let you pour them stiff shots of espresso when the garage/trash punks celebrate the release of a full-length album with a show at 9 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $2, all ages. Outlaw folk punk band Whiskey Whore joins them in celebration of their debut EP release, and Shramana and a TBA guest opens. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Give Cabin Fever an excuse to lock you in a room and torture you in a compassionate way when they rock Florence’s High Spirits Club and Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 273-9992.

Approximately 12 million barrels of oil are used every year to make plastic bags for American consumption.

THE 30 DAYS OF HAIR CONTEST is in full swing! Find out how you can win a CUT & COLOR @ boomswaggersalon.blogspot.com

Your Complete Hobby Store for All your Racing Needs 1/18 Scale Mini-Rock Crawler • $239.99 The ready-to-run 1/18-scale Mini-Rock Crawler incorporates the key design principles of full-scale rock crawlers into a 1/18-scale package. The truly innovative Mini-Rock Crawler features a multi-link suspension, heavy-duty metal ring and pinion gears, a 3-gear center transmission with a spool and slipper, a hightorque motor and an Electronic Speed Control (ESC) that has been re-tuned specifically for rock crawling.

THE TREASURE CHEST Crafts & Hobbies 1612 Benton • 549-7992

Help us rescue lives in Haiti. Go to theIRC.org/haiti to donate. Missoula Independent

Page 29 October 29–November 5, 2009


real estate auction

alentines

)BNJMUPO)PNF4FMMJOH'FCUI

Inspiring gifts for someone sweet Nominal Opening Bid: $100,000 HAMILTON, MT t8ZBOU-O Very private mountain home on 12.15+/- ac with spacious rooms. Features a beautiful, rustic log staircase, a stone fireplace and more. 0QFOIPVTF1-4pm Sun Feb 7th, 14th and 2 hours before sale. 4FMMT 4pm, Mon, Feb 15th

See web for complete listings Buyer’s Premium May Apply MT RE LIC 15289 JUDSON GLEN VANNOY BROKER

800.801.8003

williamsBVDUJPO.com/wyant

Owned & operated by local, trained herbalists 180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice’s • M-F 10-6 • Sat 11-5 • 728.0543

They aren’t just any band, they’re A Street Band, and they come from Kalispell to rock some rock and variety tunes at at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Liposuction is not the answer when Russ Nasset and The Revelators plead for you to stay as you are with a set of rockabilly and country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. They love freedom, but their machines love the sting of discipline: Fargo, N.D.’s Sovereign Sect bring their electronic/downtempo antics to the Rockies when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Miller Creek opens.

SUNDAY February

07

Shred again, in more ways than one: The Backwoods Project hosts the second day of the Ride Montana Festival, which features an open ski and snowboarding contest on an open terrain park, starting at 11 AM at Marshall Mountain, 5250 Marshall Canyon Road. $10 insurance fee to ride/free to attend. Also includes music by Voodoo Horseshoes and other artists and DJs throughout the day until 8 PM. Visit thebackwoodsproject.com. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “I love you, but I hate myself! “ Free. Call 543-7154. Just so you know, Jennifer Gookin Cavanaugh probably won’t bust out a version of Barry Manilow’s “Copacabana� when she plays an oboe recital at 3 PM in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880.

nightlife

THIS SUPER SUNDAY, WATCH THE BIG GAME HERE! JOIN US AT 3 PM AT MISSOULA'S FAVORITE SPORTS BAR

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS INDIANAPOLIS COLTS FEATURING $1 PINTS OF KOKANEE & PBR 25% OFF ALL PIZZAS • LARGE WINGS FOR 25¢ EACH Halftime Drawings for Hats, Shirts, and Other Great Prizes!

Missoula Independent

Page 30 February 4–February 11, 2010

Give her a beer, and she’ll read you plenty of bedtime stories: UM MFA student and writer Molly Kruse cruises down to the Palace at 5 PM to read to eager ears during another installment of the Second Wind Reading Series. Free. Improvisational movement with others takes on an extemporaneous vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. Pianist Geoffrey Keezer lets vibraphonist Joe Locke tease him with a nice set of vibes when both artists play a simmering set of jazz at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave., at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Seth Quay takes delight in hammering away at keys in order for hammers to hit strings when he plays a piano recital at 7:30 PM, in the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Donna Smith, The Front Street Jazz Group, and DJs Gary Stein and Ryan Wendel. Go see if Wilco can succeed in breaking your heart when they rock UM’s Adams Center at 7:30 PM. $32 plus fees. Tickets available at all GrizTix outlets or online at griztix.com. Call 243-4051. Can’t pay attention...must concentrate: The Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a Black Curtain staged reading of Lisa Loomer’s Distracted, a play that touches on ADD and its treatment, with a performance at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $8 at the door. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

MONDAY February

08

Soon-to-be mommas with buns in the oven can feel empowered, relaxed and nurtured during a prenatal yoga class, this and every Mon. at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave., at 4 PM. $11/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. Two sessions of World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class hits Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon. At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month, drum rental available. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

nightlife Rejuvenate your mind and body from the Monday blues during a Vinyasa Yoga class this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave. $12/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8.


Aesthetic ascension is all the rage when local artist B. Martinez presents a First Friday opening reception for her work Fri., Feb. 5, from 5–8 PM at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. Free.

First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. You’ll probably want to take out those metallic studs when you head to Gothic Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 per month for each class you can make it to/$8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Pianist Geoffrey Keezer lets vibraphonist Joe Locke tease him with a nice set of vibes when both artists play a simmering set of jazz at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave., at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. They won’t squeeze your grapes, even at a discount: jazz kings The Discount Quartet bring it mellow when they play the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated.

Can’t pay attention...must concentrate: The Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a Black Curtain staged reading of Lisa Loomer’s Distracted, a play that touches on ADD and its treatment, with a performance at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $8 at the door. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Wear your heart on your sleeve while dancing in a quadratic fashion during a Solo Stars Valentine’s and Sadie Hawkins Dance, which runs from 8–10 PM at the Lolo Square and Round Dance Center, 9955 Lolo Creek Road. $4. Call 273-0652. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Rawk ‘n Roll Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Also includes a free nacho bar. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM. Free. San Francisco’s Montana Slim String Band shows up just in time for your intervention when they sling stringy bluegrass and roots music at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Missoula Independent

Page 31 February 4–February 11, 2010


RADON: TEST. FIX. SAVE A LIFE NOW IS THE TIME TO TEST YOUR HOME FOR RADON Missoula County Health Department 301 W Alder • 406-258-4755 www.missoulapublichealth.org Radon Test Kits $6 with this ad!!

TUESDAY February

09

If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost o f p o t t e r y. C a l l 54 9 - 7555 o r v i s i t www.zootownarts.com.

nightlife Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the vinyasastyle flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. and Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. In case you missed the first transmission, sharp wit hits the screen in HD again during a special encore digital broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor, streaming live from St. Paul, Minn., at 6 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19 plus fees with tickets available at all GrizTix locations and griztix.com. Visit morrisproductions.org. Beginners can try their hand with more experienced folks during a Beginner/ Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance class, which takes place every Tue. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for every class you can make it to/$8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@ hotmail.com. You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with signup at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. Poet David Biespel lets love, desire and the human condition bleed off the page when he reads and signs copies of The Book of Men and Women at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every

Missoula Independent

Page 32 February 4–February 11, 2010

Tue. at 7:20 PM, when Horton Hip-Hop puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What soup uses a calf’s head as its main ingredient? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Will play for a can of Sunkist: Locals Orange Shades bring what could be rock, pop rock, or neither, to the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Get caught in a flurry of deft rhymes from some Minnesotans in the know when Minneapolis’ P.O.S. melts you with his punk influenced hip-hop at 9 PM at the Palace. $10. Opening support from tour mates Dessa and Grieves with Budo. (See Noise in this issue.) If you got lost in a stupor last night, San Franciso’s Montana Slim String Band continues your intervention with another set of bluegrass/roots music at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

WEDNESDAY February

10

Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free.

nightlife Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117.


Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Red Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Lick your lips for a dramatic kiss that involves love and one man’s mid-life crisis during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s dinner theater rendition of Robert Caisley’s Kissing, which

starts with dinner from The Silk Road at 6 PM, followed by the show at 7:30 PM, at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $50 dinner theater/$15 theater only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experi-

ences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Puppy gods and candy snatchers are bound to abound during a celebration for the publication of Rattlesnake Elementary School’s Poetry Anthology, where fourth graders share their poetic wisdom with readings starting at 6:30 PM, followed by fifth grade readers at 7:30 PM, all at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call Jeremy at 721-1664. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good

Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:20 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com.

Downtown, where Missoula shops

Stocks, Bonds, and a Whole Lot More.

Workshops!

Join us for one of our fun & creative classes! Next up: Valentine’s Card Making for Kids! Saturday, Feb. 6th @ 10:30 a.m. - $15 - call to sign up!

• Investment Planning • Professional Money Management • 401(k) Direct Rollovers • Trust Services • Retirement Planning • College Planning • Monthly Income Programs • Managed No-Load Fund Programs

406-543-8244 or 1-800-332-1615 283 West Front Street, Suite 101 Missoula, MT 59802

Missoula Independent

Page 33 February 4–February 11, 2010


Call ahead, make an impression with our special Valentine’s week package. One dozen premium, long-stemmed roses with a box of chocolates for

$69.99.

To be delivered between Monday, February 8th & Friday, February 12th. *Delivery in city limits $6.95*

Extend yourself beyond regular ballet using emotion through movement to tell stories and interpret music when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Lyrical Class every Wed. at 8:30 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Mock turtle soup uses a calf’s head as its main ingredient. Tasty, eh? The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Hey Ya!” by Outkast, (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Orlando’s Rising Lion stuffs their influences into an auditory blunt and lets you smoke it when they play rock/jazz/hip-hop influenced roots reggae at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY

11

February

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Ty k e s , a c l a s s f o r k i d s 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 3- to 6-year-old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. If well-cooked batter warms your soul, don’t miss the Missoula Senior Center’s Swedish Pancake Supper, which starts with supper at 4 PM followed by bingo at 6:30 PM at the center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5, for all you can eat pancakes. Call 543-7154.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from

Missoula Independent

Page 34 February 4–February 11, 2010

5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the vinyasa-style flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. and Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Gypsies come out during a Routine/Improv Student Troupe Bellydance class every Thu. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for every class you can make it to/ $8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, crust punk—every Thu. at 6 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Lick your lips for a dramatic kiss that involves love and one man’s mid-life crisis during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s dinner theater rendition of Robert Caisley’s Kissing, which starts with dinner from The Silk Road at 6 PM, followed by the show at 7:30 PM, at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $50 dinner theater/$15 theater only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. He’ll never be your indentured servant, so don’t ask: David Boone lets his guitar break free when he plays the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066.


SPOTLIGHT

watch and release

Five fly-fishing bums and their buddies decide to head to the vast terrains of Northern British Columbia on an obsessive mission to catch some wild steelhead trout…but then giardia gets in the way, as does a run-in with the border po-po, along with a touch of Mother Nature’s wrath. Sound like the begining of a joke? An overheard conversation between college dropouts at a local sports bar? Well, it’s neither. Instead, it’s the premise of the fly-fishing documentary Metalhead, one of seven films that hits the Wilma Theatre Friday for The Drake Magazine’s 2010 Fly Fishing Film Tour, which dubs itself “the world’s largest fly-fishing film event of its kind.” Even if you’ve never picked up a rod, there’s really more than enough variety on the screen to satiate WHAT: The Drake Magazine’s Fly Fishing Film Tour 2010 WHEN: Fri., Feb. 5, at 7 PM WHERE: Wilma Theatre HOW MUCH: $16/$14 advance at Grizzly Hackle, the Missoulian Angler and Kingfisher

your lust for storytelling, action and comedy. Off the Grid, for instance, features amazing footage of truly off-the-beaten-path fishing spots in places as near as Montana and Wyoming and as far as Alaska and Mexico. And then there’s High in the Lowlands, which delves into the slippery and potentially dangerous world of saltwater fly-fishing in Southwest Florida. You’ll see dudes get jerked around and come close to falling off their boats while trying to catch colossal species of fish like tarpon, bonefish and snook. As a bonus—unless this is just in the trailer— you get a soundtrack that features music by hip-hoppers Black Sheep and punk rockers Fugazi. That’s always a plus in my book. In any case, there’s plenty to get hooked on here.

MORE INFO: flyfishingfilmtour.com

You might do the push, whip or the jitterbug-lindy when Cathy Clark slings beginning swing dance lessons every Thu. at 7 PM, and then moves to beyond basics swing lessons at 7:30 PM, at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. Email cathyc@missoulabone andjoint.com. Josh Wagner brings The Land of the Dead to your storytelling appreciation doorstep when he reads and signs copies of Deadwind Sea at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Gut-busting narrative replaces talk of municipal budgets, weather patterns and public radio when Mayor John Engen, KECI weatherman Mark Heyka and Zed from Montana Public Radio read their favorite humorous short stories during “adult story time” at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. They’ll give you a nasty case of “jighead,” but you’ll like it. Celtic duo Willson and McKee bring their talents to Montana to play Ronan’s

Performing Arts Center at Ronan Middle School, 35885 Round Butte Road, at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance at True Value Hardware in Ronan. Call 800-823-4386 or visit www.accessmontana.com/ bigproductions. It’s like a literal orgy of folk tales during the UM School of Music and MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Stephen Sondheim’s Into The Woods, which combines

—Ira Sather-Olson

Brothers Grimm tales like Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood into a musical, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY and visit mctinc.org for tickets. Bowling and karaoke go together like liposuction and chewing the fat during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Missoula Independent

Page 35 February 4–February 11, 2010


Dog home alone? Needs Exercise? Try our Play Groups

"Dedicated To the Love & Care of All Dogs Great & Small"

Take a wild guess what Greg “The Octupus� Nowak has on his mind when artist Gavin Hudgeons presents a series of oil works, including this one of Nowak, during an opening reception Fri., Feb. 5, from 5–7 PM at The Catalyst, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Also features works by artist Kalon Baughan.

Our Dog Care Facility Features:

Located in The Bitterroot Valley, Off HWY 93,on East Carlton Cr. Rd., Between Florence and Lolo, MT Just 12 minutes from Missoula!

Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

Unique, Fenced Dog Pastures Dogs Separated by Age, Energy Level & Size Indoor Heated Facilities for All Dogs Experienced, Committed, Trained Staff Dog Walking (Only 1-2 dogs at a time)

406-273-4899

Dog Training (Positive Training)

5353 E. Carlton Creek Road

Board and Train - 2 weeks, minimum

www.BearDogs.org

Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free.

120 Acre Ranch for Owner/Dog Walks

windriver@BearDogs.org ZZZVSHFWUXPXPWHGX‡

3XEOLF+RXUV7KXUVSP‡6DWDP30

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the

)OLJKW3K\VLFV 6 D W    ) H E   W K    D P   S P QGDQGUGJUDGHUV‡

+DQGVRQ+HDOWK

1 H Z H V W ([KLELWLRQ

Â&#x160;5HJLVWHUHG0DUNVRI%OXH&URVVDQG%OXH6KLHOG$VVRFLDWLRQDQDVVRFLDWLRQRILQGHSHQGHQW%OXH&URVVDQG%OXH6KLHOG3ODQVÂ&#x160;/,9(60$57/,9( +($/7+<,VDUHJLVWHUHGPDUNRI%OXH&URVVDQG%OXH6KLHOGRI0RQWDQDDQLQGHSHQGHQWOLFHQVHHRIWKH%OXH&URVVDQG%OXH6KLHOG$VVRFLDWLRQ

Missoula Independent

Page 36 February 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 11, 2010

$31

James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy them too many shots of Jameson: Whitefishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jameson & The Sordid Seeds sorts out your life with a set of soul, blues and reggae at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. So many events, so little space. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot on tap this week and hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one event of many worth checking out: The FayRay artist col-

lectiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wonderland Bizarre. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fri., Feb. 5, from 6 PMâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2 AM at the Palace and is billed as an interactive marketplace where everyone is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aliceâ&#x20AC;? from Alice in Wonderland. The catch is that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a Bedouin environment, soaking up dancers, artists, music and food. It costs a $5 suggested donation, and all proceeds help two local nonprofits: The ZACC and Home Resource. It sounds like a pretty wicked, surreal time. Perhaps Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see you there. In the meantime, keep me up to date on your collective pursuits be it musical, visual or otherwise by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 5, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see a link that says â&#x20AC;&#x153;submit an event.â&#x20AC;?


Willie Wier is a man who knows how to get a lot of mileage out of two wheels. And by “a lot” I mean he’s logged over 60,000 miles on his bike, crisscrossing the world in places like Venezuela and Thailand. When not traveling the globe, he calls Seattle his home, and he gets around The Emerald City solely by bike. I’d imagine Wier’s got some pretty intriguing stories up his sleeve, so start this week off by going to see what he’s all about on Thu., Feb. 4, at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall when he gives the talk “A Frugal Cyclist’s Guide to the Universe.” Free. Call 243-5172. On Fri., Feb. 5, I’d plan on hightailing it down to the Wilma Theatre, 131 S. Higgins Ave., so you can catch the start of the Fly Fishing Film Tour, which begins at 7 PM. The event, the world’s largest fly-fishing film tour of its kind, features footage from 25 waterways in nine different countries. Check out our “Spotlight” on the event in this week’s calendar for more info, or click to flyfishingfilmtour.com. $16/ $14 advance at the Grizzly Hackle, Missoulian Angler and King Fisher shops. If the only fishy thing you like to do is ingest fish oil, or slap it on your skin for spiritual purposes, skip the film tour and swim over to UM’s University Theatre at 7 PM, Fri., Feb. 5, for the program Our Extraordinary Place, a multimedia showcase presented by Five Valleys Land Trust. Due to space, I’ll have to direct you to our “Agenda” section for more of the skinny. Call 5490755 and visit fvlt.org. If your derriere starts to feel sore from sitting, avoid the potential for any nasty bedsores on your behind by getting active on Sat., Feb. 6, with members of the always dexterous Rocky Mountaineers during an overnight stay at their cabin in the Bitterroots, as well as a ski/snowshoe trip up to Little Saint Joe Summit. The plan is to meet at 7:30 AM on Saturday at the old Big Lots parking lot. You’ll then head up to the cabin, drop off your overnight gear and slosh around in your skis/snowshoes if time allows. Call Shawn Bennett at 493-4892 or e-mail him at shawnedwardbennett@gmail.com to RSVP. You can also

e-mail Chris Dunn at hammaneater@gmail.com, as he might be going up on Fri., Feb. 5. Or you could get what I’d call a benevolent “shredsore” on Sat., Feb. 6, during The Backwoods Project’s Ride Montana Festival, a freestyle ski and snowboarding terrain park competition, which starts at 11 AM at Marshall Mountain, 5250 Marshall Canyon Road. $10 insurance fee to ride/free to attend. The event includes heady music by Miller Creek at 4 PM, followed by more tunes from local DJs, hip-hop MCs and metal bands. The shredding—on skis and snowboards—starts again on Sun., Feb. 7, at 11 AM during an open ski and snowboard contest, with music by Voodoo Horseshoes and others throughout the day. Visit thebackwoodsproject.com.

Underwater Wildlife: Aquatic Insects in Glacier National Park,” which starts at 7 PM in the Community Room of The Summit, 205 Sunnyview Lane in Kalispell. Free. Visit flatheadaudubon.org. Or kick it closer to Missoula by letting your avian appreciation spill out during the Five Valley’s Audubon Society sponsored lecture “Montana’s Birds, Wildlife and People in a Warming World,” which starts at 7:30 PM in Room L14 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Amy Cilimburg, director of bird conservation for the Montana Audubon, leads the talk, which centers on how that great thing called “climate change” is affecting our birds and wildlife. Visit fvamissoula.org. On Tue., Feb. 9, let experts rub you down with tips on how to wax your board and sharpen your edges—I’m talking about snowboards and skis here, people—by signing up for the UM Outdoor Program’s Ski and Snowboard Maintenance Class, which starts at 6 PM Wed., Feb. 10, at the Outdoor Program HQ, located in UM’s Fitness and Rec Center. $5. RSVP by calling 243-5172 Later on Tue., Feb. 9, hop on your tricked out two-wheeler and scoot to Adventure Cycling, 150 E. Pine St., so you can attend the 7 PM February meeting of Missoulians on Bicycles. Free. Expect an agenda overflowing with deets on their upcoming spring rides. Visit missoulabike.org. Get lusty for adventure on Wed., Feb. 10, with members of the Rocky Mountaineers during their monthly meeting, which starts at 7 PM at Pipestone Mountaineering, 129 W. Front St. Free. Mike Hoyt, a man who just can’t resist snapping photos when he hikes, plans to give a multimedia presentation on his 2009 climbs in the Bitterroots. If photos of the outdoors aren’t your bag, you can hoot it up Photo by Catherine L. Waters with fellow owl enthusiasts on Wed., Feb. 10, at 7 PM at the Younger kids also get to shred, but in a totally mellow way, on Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., during a lecture Sun., Feb. 7, during the sixth annual Sons of Norway 2010 on flammulated owls. UM grad student Mat Seidensticker brings Barnelopet, a non-competitive cross-country ski event tailored for the knowledge to your dome with a talk on this particular owl’s hisyoungsters that starts with registration at 11:45 AM at the Lubrecht tory, as well as its status in our valley. $4 suggested donation. Call Experimental Forest, 38689 Hwy. 200 E. near Greenough. Free. The 327-0405 and visit montananaturalist.org. skiing kicks off at 1 PM and culminates with prizes and medals for Go on now, get frugal on your own set of wheels and make every participant. Call Karen at 721-4947 or Leslie at 273-2815. Willie proud. Then bug out with the Flathead Audubon Society on Mon., Feb. 8, when entomologist Joe Giersch presents the lecture “Glacier’s calendar@missoulanews.com

O N S A L E N OW !

APRIL 13, 2010 AT 7:30PM THE ADAMS CENTER FOR TICKETS

Griztix.com or call (888) MONTANA for more BėĔĆĉĜĆĞIēMĎĘĘĔĚđĆ .com

information visit

Missoula Independent

Page 37 February 4–February 11, 2010


scope

Terror in tiny town

Missoula Independent

Tom Foolery’s miniature attack on cowboy chintz by Andy Smetanka

If you’ve ever had the misfortune of mentioning painter or nude model. Delightful surprises prevalent gauge in model railroading, which has dioramas in my presence, you can imagine how abound—and a few naughty ones as well. Here you opened up vast online storehouses of miniature excited I was to interview Tom Foolery. Like him, I are encouraged to play the Peeping Tom. You half props. Even with off-the-rack scenery, though, Foolery concedes there’s no shortage of meticulous love tinkering with tiny things in time-consuming expect Grace Kelly to come up behind you. ways. This gave us a lot to talk about during a recent One thing you can’t miss is Foolery’s disdain for and time-consuming work to do on it. His buildinterview. kitschy cowboy art, as depicted in the dozens of fin- ings—many of them vaguely familiar, though perOne of the things we talked about most was what gernail-sized paintings in the miniature galleries, all haps misleadingly so—seem to have dispositions, if awesome dioramas Montana seemed to have when we of which in turn have threadbare clichés or bald par- not personalities. August and dignified, many with were growing up, albeit some decades apart. We both odies for names: the Last Chance, the Gold Dust, the ghost signage clinging to their painted brick skins, adore the battle dioramas in the Little Bighorn inter- Happy Heifer, the Giddy-Up Gauche, the Boot Shill. the 19th century structures seem saddened by the pretive center (on a recent visit, Foolery was pleased to Far from diorama for diorama’s sake, the Vendorama tawdriness of all this new commerce: crummy galsee how little they had changed since his childhood), Series is a sustained lambasting of “cowboys and crit- leries and family fitness centers throwing open and each of us was inspired at a young age by equally ters” art and artists, tongue-in-cheek but no less bit- their doors with only crummy paper banners for memorable miniature scenes on view far from the Custer crowds. Mine was at the Yellowstone County Museum in Billings: The awe-inspiring diorama of 16 Crow warriors riding their horses over Sacrifice Cliff in a desperate gesture of self-sacrifice during a smallpox epidemic. Foolery’s was in another small history museum, an exhibit demonstrating how electricity arrived in rural Montana. The miniature light-up cabin in the middle of a miniature prairie spoke to an incipient love of models and miniatures. Both examples, I think, Artist Tom Foolery makes many of his miniatures from scratch, and he creates dioramas that often satirize the illustrate how anything with cowboy kitsch of Western art. His Vendorama Series exhibit includes 17 repurposed gumball machines and tabletop a diorama involved is often jukeboxes with street scenes and storefronts like the Last Chance, the Gold Dust and the Happy Heifer. the most memorable part of a museum trip. They also shed light on the unusu- ing for that. After growing up in Montana and places signage. The sheer volume of advertising informaal place the medium occupies at the crossroads of around the West, Foolery wound up in San Francisco tion in each piece makes these old downtowns the art and education. Dioramas, most often seen in for 17 years, where he says he gained an insider’s rivals of sign-crazy North Reserve. history and natural history museums, are typically perspective on the fatuousness of the commercial art But miniature humans are still the main attracthere to educate. Any fine- or folk-art qualities they world. Before moving back to Montana in 1993, tion. For the most part, Foolery’s tiny people do embody are secondary, subsumed by the demands Foolery says he’d had it with modern and postmod- not appear perpetually frozen on the verge of the of the host discipline. I feel like we unconsciously ern but still wasn’t quite prepared for the horrors of kind of telegraphed melodrama or physical comedemand a lot of museum dioramas and dio- contemporary Western. dy you’d expect as they act out their tiny narratives. ramists—realistic perspective and lifelike badger“I guess I knew it was going to happen,” Foolery Few of their poses seem staged or intentional. For eyes and convincing splashes of fiberglass water— says of the surge in bourgeois cowboy kitsch, “but I’d the most part, they look free to wander in and out without giving them the proper credit when they forgotten how much bad Western art proliferates in of the miniature buildings like so many First Friday succeed. Then again, perhaps a diorama only truly places like Montana.” strollers. When I ask whether Foolery, spending as succeeds when we forget somebody made it. Since building his first “miniature environment” much time with them as he does, is privy to richer In any case, peer into one of the 17 repurposed into the dashboard of a Nash Rambler some three inner lives and more complex personal interacgumball machines and tabletop diner jukeboxes in decades ago, Foolery’s art has gradually transitioned tions than even the closest observer can extrapoFoolery’s Vendorama Series and before long you’re from painting and assemblage to miniatures almost late, he laughs. He says he puts some thought into too caught up in the act of voyeurism to think exclusively. In a previous series, old theater spotlights what characters might be thinking, but he doesn’t about much else. Each scooped-out vending provided the appropriate miniature stages for Foolery get lost in the politics and melodramas of his machine contains a tiny street scene centered to present pieces that both encouraged and comment- miniatures. around a street-level storefront, typically an art ed on voyeurism. The vending machines in the latest He’s happy if other people do, though. In fact, it’s gallery, in a composited three-dimensional neigh- series, Foolery says, gave him more space to mount his the whole point. borhood of photographed backgrounds and exquis- pieces—he uses the term to describe both the miniaitely detailed buildings. Here a dog lifts his leg on a ture human theater in the galleries and the boxes The Missoula Art Museum presents Tom car, there a man slinks off into a dark alley, every- themselves—with a commensurate increase in Foolery’s artist reception and gallery talk for the where miniature art patrons mill around looking at voyeuristic possibilities. Vendorama Series Friday, Feb. 5, at 5 PM. Free. painting and sculpture. Art flourishes on the upper Foolery makes many of his tiny components floors as well, where every ninth resident of the from scratch, but adds that his work has evolved typical Tom Foolery tinytown seems engaged as a over time to conform to 1:87, or “HO” scale, the arts@missoulanews.com

Page 38 February 4–February 11, 2010


YOU’VE TRIED EVERYTHING ELSE

Scope

Noise

Dance

Film

Movie Shorts

NOW TRY WHAT WORKS with

The Salamanders Hellbender self-released

The Salamanders play garage country spiked with reverb surf guitar, dipped in Chuck Berry riffs and slathered in fiery punk flavor. On Hellbender, the Bozeman band shows a sneaky ability to lure you in with a flirtatious intro before taking you on a wild ride through Appalachian landscapes dotted with whirlwind guitar solos. “Black Genie” starts with a bump-and-grind intro, then hurls itself into a rockabilly hurricane seasoned with minor key pop punk à la the Ramones. The twangy “Sugar Tree” takes pause before exploding into a dance song that could induce a room of pomade-styled boys and girls to break out in the jitterbug. “We Got the Twist” builds walls of whining guitar and fuzz over what

Dessa

A Badly Broken Code Doomtree

Physical geography isn’t supposed to matter anymore, but there’s something about midsized midwestern cities. A few years ago the hype was all about Omaha, but I’ve always been charmed by Minneapolis. The first full-length album by Doomtree Collective MC and former poetry-slam junkie Dessa only strengthens my affection for the Twin Cities. Dessa rhymes with poetic intelligence and hiphop wit, and is unafraid to fly her nerd flag when she can get away with it. On the addictive “Dutch,” she

P.O.S.

Never Better Rhymesayers Entertainment

Listening to P.O.S.’s rapid-fire rhymes is a lot like trying to catch snowflakes on your tongue. You can only absorb so much at once, so repeated listens of his third full-length—and close scrutiny of his lyrics—is a must. And that’s not a bad thing. Take “Drumroll (We’re All Thirsty),” in which P.O.S. drops lines like, “In a world where the world ends at the end of your block/and them uh, little whirlwinds spin friction round the clock.” It’s both perplexing and awesome, and sounds especially remarkable underneath the beat he concocted—a crisp drum roll mixed with a distorted bass guitar. The album continues down this lyrically dense path

Pierced Arrows Descending Shadows Vice Records

I keep insisting that Pierced Arrows (now and when they were called Dead Moon) has got to be one of the most romantic bands I’ve ever heard. Feverish gang vocals and gritty melodies, topped off with climaxing guitar solos, give the band an air of manic passion. In songs like “Let it Rain,” the idea of precipitation washing “away all the pain” isn’t cheesy when guitarist Fred Cole and bassist Toody Cole yell it at the top of their lungs like it’s the

could be a Dead Milk-men bassline. It’s all kind of familiar, but genuinely contagious. Some songs, like “Gasoline” and “Future Shock,” don’t quite get off the ground in comparison, but only because they’re just good, not electric. If you loved Bozeman’s now-disbanded The Touchers, whose albums overflowed with galloping, neurotic madness, you’ll find comfort in the Salamanders. At any rate, it’s the kind of cool group I daydream about fronting, though I could never beat Peter King’s sassy, gravelly vocals. (Erika Fredrickson) The Salamanders play the Palace Saturday, Feb. 6, at 9 PM with Out the Lights, Rooster Sauce and Logan Dachtler. $5. brags: “Chicago Manual of Style keeps the prose right crisp, Minneapolis edition, well it goes like this,” and, “I keep Pope in the glove box, Plath on the dash.” Dessa is clearly influenced by laid-back and smart alternative hip-hop acts like A Tribe Called Quest, Digable Planets and The Fugees. In keeping with this tradition, Dessa and her Doomtree collaborators incorporate elements from other musical genres. Where Digable Planets used jazz to make hits back in the day, Dessa raps and sings (beautifully) over synths and orchestral instruments including harp, cello, clarinet and vibraphone, bringing indie rock and synth-pop elements into the mix. It works. A Badly Broken Code is currently my album of the year. Thanks, Minneapolis. (Ali Gadbow) Dessa plays the Palace Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 9 PM with P.O.S. and Grieves with Budo. $10.

HCG WEIGHT LOSS CLINIC EASY FAST SAFE

Lose 30lbs in 30 DAYS! (406) 752 —LOSE (5673) 1075 N. Meridian Rd. Kalispell, MT 59901 www.hcgwlc.com

COME OUT for TROUT! U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Bull Trout Critical Habitat Designation – Agency Open House Feb. 16th, 3 – 8pm at MT. Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 3201 Spurgin Rd., Missoula.

Includes 3,094 miles of streams and 223,762 acres of lakes in Montana!

Protecting and restoring bull trout habitat will • Help recover this threatened species, • Improve water quality throughout the Northwest, • Spur investment in watershed restoration and, • Help support Montana’s $226 million fishing industry.

Can’t make the hearing? visit www.sierrasportsmen.org to learn more about this important step in Bull Trout Recovery – Let the USFWS know you Support Critical Habitat! Paid for by Sierra Club www.sierrasportsmen.org

as he touches on his cynicism toward American politics with searing one-liners (“Savion Glover”), and personal narratives about his own life, like when he recounts his days as an isolated teen who found solace in punk rock (“Out of Category”). Couple these lyrics with production that veers toward punk-influenced hip-hop, and you have one hell of a record that stands on its own weight. In a genre that’s seen a recent groundswell of releases that all seem to sound so similar, Never Better is a refreshing and remarkable departure. (Ira Sather-Olson) P.O.S. plays the Palace Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 9 PM with Dessa and Grieves with Budo. $10. biggest truth of the universe. The duo—along with stellar drummer Kelly Halliburton—portray mercurial, wandering bards when it comes to apocalyptic scenarios in “On the Move.” They refuse to be complacent in a world of too much technology, like in “On Our Way” when Fred says, “Toody disconnect the phone,” and she answers with, “We trace our lives like the rivers wind, washed away what was left behind.” The truth is, it’s hard to separate the music from the personalities. Toody and Fred, who, in one form or another have been playing rough, uncompromising rock music since the 1960s, have always seemed to make their own rules. They’re rebels, realists and romantics—and that spirit is exactly what feeds this tight new album. (Erika Fredrickson)

Missoula Independent

Page 39 February 4–February 11, 2010


Scope

Noise

Dance

Film

Movie Shorts

Moving to Montana Headwaters unveils multi-year dance project by Skylar Browning

Even Hi-Line residents admit the beauty of their employs stage-length ropes and stiff parchment coshomeland lies in vast nothingness, and that beauty can tumes to convey rolling wheat fields and frozen dresssometimes be tough to appreciate. But when New es on a clothesline. York choreographer John Jasperse set a work of mod“This is a huge state, so there’s a lot of variaern dance on Missoula’s Headwaters Dance Company tion, both in landscape and culture,” says after spending nearly two weeks on the wind-swept Ragsdale, who admits she skewed the project stretch, one hardened Hi-Line native saw the land- slightly by focusing on more rural areas. “But scape through a new lens. there are certain themes that come up over and “This woman from somewhere outside of Great over…like the resilience and the perseverance of Falls came up to me after the performance and she the people. I think for these four choreographers had a tear in her eye,” recalls Amy Ragsdale, coming from New York, they’re struck by the fact Headwaters’ artistic directhat the life is not easy. tor. “She was in tears after It takes a lot of work. she saw it and she said, ‘I It’s hard here—not just always thought there was physically, but finannothing there and I wantcially and emotionally.” ed to get away as fast as I While many aspects could, and I did. This is the of the multi-year project first time I’ve ever’—and worked out, Montana this is going to make me Suite wasn’t without its teary—‘that I’ve ever recogchallenges. Ragsdale nized that it can be beautihoped the pieces would photo courtesy of Amanda Opitz ful.’ So there was somehelp Headwaters land thing in that piece that Donna Uchizono’s “100 Miles from more touring opportuniallowed her to see some- Forsyth” is one of the dances featured in ties around the state and thing completely different Headwaters’ Montana Suite project. country, but the recesthan what she saw growing sion has made that an up there.” uphill climb. It’s currently only slated to be staged in It’d be hard for Ragsdale to relay a more powerful Missoula and Helena. Headwaters has also experiand telling example of her ambitious Montana Suite enced turnover with its dancers since the project project. The complete program, which has been four started, forcing Ragsdale to hold auditions in Salt years in the making, started as a way to make Lake City to help fill her company. Ironically, the Montana’s only professionally touring modern dance Montana Suite will feature work from four New York company “more Montanan,” as Ragsdale puts it. choreographers performed by dancers flown in from Starting in 2005, Ragsdale tapped one prestigious New out of state. (Two dancers, Brian Gerke and Joy York choreographer each year, convinced him or her French, are alumni of the company and the University to travel to Montana and, with little more than a list of of Montana dance program.) contact names and some local history, sent them off to “It’s been hard,” Ragsdale says. “The recession has a region of the state for a week or two. Jane Comfort, really hurt us. But we never once thought about not known for her social and political themes, tackled finishing it. I’m the type of person who, once it’s Butte and Helena. Jasperse, critically acclaimed for going, it’s going.” twisting time and space in dance, immersed himself in In fact, Ragsdale views this week’s premiere as the Hi-Line. Lar Lubovitch, who typically uses sweep- more of the project’s beginning rather than its culing, lush movements, traveled to the Rocky Mountain mination. She hopes Thursday’s fundraising concert Front. Donna Uchizono explored eastern Montana, can help the company afford a booking agent, and drawing inspiration from Crow and Cheyenne culture, that the new hire will solve the issue of getting and attended a sacred Sun Dance. Together, the four Montana Suite out into other communities. Ideally, individual pieces present a mostly abstract but certain- she says, the next two to three years will be commitly recognizable reflection of the people and places that ted to touring. make Montana what it is. The full-length evening per“We’ve toured in a lot of small towns, and modern formance premieres this week. dance as an art form is still really foreign,” says “Montana has given us a lot,” says Ragsdale. “I was Ragsdale. “So how can we use this art form to talk trying to find a way to give back to Montana in a way about something that will give people less familiar that Montanans would find important and moving and with the art form a framework? I think the Montana relevant to them.” Suite does that, and I think it helps people open up Ragsdale didn’t realize exactly what she was in about art and Montana in a new way.” for—or what the finished product would look like— when she launched the project. Each choreographer Montana Suite premieres at the MCT Center for worked independently, and never saw any of the other the Performing Arts Thursday, Feb. 4, at 7:30 PM, pieces. But by blind luck and some strategic match- with a benefit concert and silent auction. $25. It making, the concert mixes a range of different dance continues Friday and Saturday at 7:30 PM, with a 2 styles and aesthetics. For instance, Comfort’s take on PM Saturday matinee. $15/$10 students and seniors. Butte’s mining culture uses literal imagery—actual mining costumes and props—whereas Jasperse sbrowning@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 40 February 4–February 11, 2010


Scope

Noise

Dance

Film

Movie Shorts

Duly noted The Messenger offers no simple tidings by Katie Kane

The Messenger is a hard movie. It demands its soldier to look at a tree: “I said look at that fucking viewers’ service in the same way that the army tree; it’s the same age as my son.” Foster registers requires further duty of Staff Sgt. Will Montgomery the reality of loss using only his eyes, which soften (Ben Foster) after he is wounded in Iraq and and strain as they begin to see what the bark and returned home. The film opens with scenes of leaves mean in the life of the family. It’s a subtle, Montgomery struggling to regain focus in his sight: restrained and psychologically acute performance. His wound is located in his eye. So begins a film On separate paths, Montgomery and Stone develop about learning to see and to witness the reality of a relationship that reveals the full spectrum of costs assodeath—both for Montgomery and for the viewer. ciated with military service in wartime. They are initially Having seen and triggered death in battle, at odds with one another. Stone is a twitchy, tweaking, Montgomery becomes a “messenger” in America wreck of a man who is an only barely sober, straight-up when he is transferred into the Army’s Casualty Notification service, that branch of the military charged with the brutal work of notifying families when a soldier is killed. The film unflinchingly and repetitively moves through six “notification calls” where the pitiless bureaucratic protocols of “engagement” with relatives of dead soldiers—the next of kin—tax the viewer as much as they do Montgomery and his Someone always has to be the lazy rower. superior and partner, Capt. Tony Stone ( Woody skirt chaser. Montgomery, on the other hand, is a species Harrelson). of contained explosion whose uncanny physical and verThe job of casualty notification, it’s clear, is hard bal quiet masks an internal chaos that is best signaled by work: unpredictable, emotionally messy, and almost the heavy metal music that accompanies him throughout wholly without clean comfort or satisfaction. But the the film (Clutch’s “Profits of Doom”). movie itself is complicated in much the same way. It’s The song “Home on the Range” is used as a way not a simple parable about the wages of war in which to indicate the men’s growing sense of a mutually the goal is to play with audience sentiment. Instead, shared estrangement. Together they sing the song at the film attempts something more difficult as it brings a wedding party that they do more than crash. In together a number of narratives that intersect at the fact, they invade it, half-drunk and bloodied from an crossroads of death in wartime. It’s at once an explo- encounter with teenage boys. But the tune also ration of the complex relationship between military shows up in other odd corners of the film. “Home men as they encounter and come to know death and a on the Range,” the quintessential song of the meditation on the sense of homelessness war often American wanderer who can’t find a place to rest, creates for soldiers. It’s also a study of how difficult it becomes their anthem. They wander between home can often be after military service to learn to be human and the range—the “out there” of war. again. The heart of the film lies in those aspects of the Moverman chooses, unfortunately, to allow story, but The Messenger also opens up other fronts, other stories to interfere with the central concern of making forays into romance (Montgomery is tenuous- The Messenger. The tentative and unrealized romance ly involved with two women) and addiction. All togeth- between Montgomery and a woman whom the two er, The Messenger pursues a busy theater of opera- men visit in their rounds is both too easy and too tions. It may, ultimately, be too much grunt work for complex for the screen time allotted to it. It’s as if the the film and the viewer to take on. conventional male-female story is loosely woven into The Messenger’s actors provide the main the plot like a fallback strategy: put there in order to strength of the film. Between Harrelson and Foster, allow for the potential reintegration and easy resoludirector Oren Moverman is able to establish a moral- tion a romance could provide. The connection ly and emotionally compelling drama on the back of between Montgomery and Olivia Patterson, played what is a species of the buddy film. Harrelson is epic with a graceful economy by Samantha Morton, also in his role—extravagant, larger-than-life, able to per- seems unnecessary and, finally, distracting. fectly portray a braying, wounded, foolish heroism. The thing is, Montgomery’s routes back home Foster, though, is more than a match for and to his humanness are already mapped out in his Harrelson’s monster performance. He’s on a slow interactions with the families of the dead and in his burn. Shuttering his character behind sunglasses developing relationship with Stone, his fellow dark early in the film, Foster takes his time working his angel of next of kin notification. way into Montgomery, using measured timing to The Messenger opens at the Wilma Theatre reveal what his character feels and what he may be Friday, Feb. 5. able to feel once again. For instance, during one of his calls, Montgomery is told by the father of a dead arts@missoulanews.com

Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural. H A N D M A D E

F U TO N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

The Crystal Limit • STOREWIDE SALE!! “gemstones, jewelry, beads, & more” Fri. Feb. 5th – Sun. Feb. 14th

40% OFF ROCKS & FOSSILS • JEWELRY • BEAD STRANDS • SINGLE BEADS Excludes all other offers WINTER CLASS SCHEDULE • PRIVATE PARTIES • BEST SELECTION IN MONTANA CHECK OUT OUR 2010 BEAD SHOW SCHEDULE, CLEARANCE ITEMS, AND CATALOG AT CRYSTALLIMIT.COM

1920 Brooks St. • 406.549.1729 • Hours: M-Sat. 10-7 • Sun 12-5

Second Chance Sale

50%

off

Clothing & Shoes February

5th & 6th

Help women & children get a second chance at life by supporting YWCA Missoula programs.

920 Kensington

Monday - Saturday, 10 – 6; Sunday noon to 5

1136 W. Broadway

Monday - Saturday, 10 – 6; Sunday noon to 5

1221 Helen Ave.*

Monday – Saturday, 10:30 – 5:30 *No donations, please.

Shop. Donate. Make a difference. Missoula Independent

Page 41 February 4–February 11, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK CRAZY HEART Jeff Bridges plays a hard-drinkin’ country singer down on his luck, low on dough, and relegated to playing the small-town circuit. But things might turn for the better during a chance meeting with music journalist Maggie Gyllenhaal. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:15, 7:10 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. DEAR JOHN Amanda Seyfried falls for Special Forces soldier Channing Tatum after running into him at the beach. Things go well until Tatum gets deployed, again and again. Does distance make Seyfried’s heart fonder, or does she grow cold and ditch her unavailable warrior? Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Village 6: 7:20 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:50, 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. FROM PARIS WITH LOVE Jonathan Rhys Meyers sits low on the CIA operative totem pole as a part time agent in Paris. That’s until his first major assignment with special agent John Travolta—a bald and bellicose ass kicker. Can the duo bring down a terrorist organization, or do Travolta’s manic ways jeopardize the situation? Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:15 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:35, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4, 7:15 and 9:45. THE MESSENGER Ben Foster is freshly home from a stint in Iraq and gets paired with Woody Harrelson for the unfortunate job of notifying families when a soldier has died. Foster tries to keep his distance from every widow he meets, but Samantha Morton starts breaking down his façade. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9 nightly, with 7 only shows on Fri.–Sat. and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

NOW PLAYING ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE SQUEAKQUEL In case you didn’t get your fill the last time around, your favorite animated rodents are back—high-pitched voices and all—in order help bail out a sinking school music program by shredding in a battle-of-the-bands competition. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:30 and 3:55. AVATAR Sam Worthington gets a 3-D makeover as he plays an ex-Marine whose alien body and human mind is sent to pillage a new planet for its resources, but does a chance encounter with a female humanoid help keep his eyes on the bounty? Carmike 10: 4:30, 5:30, 8 and 9, with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 2. Village 6 in 2-D: 8 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1:30, 3:15, 5, 6:45 and 8:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 4:30, 7 and 8:30.

Missoula Independent

Noise

Dance

THE BLIND SIDE Sandra Bullock plays an upper-crust mom who takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:10 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:25. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 6:30 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE BOOK OF ELI Denzel Washington meanders through a wretched post-apocalyptic wasteland, toting around a special book he claims is the key to saving the last scraps of humanity. But when Gary Oldman gets word of its power, who comes out alive? Carmike 10:

Film

Movie Shorts

Fri.–Thu. at 1:25, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES Harrison Ford suits up to save the day as an overworked doctor trying to cure a rare disorder. Will Brendan Fraser be able to convince him to save his children? Village 6: 7 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:10 and 7:05. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. IT’S COMPLICATED Alec Baldwin hooks up with his ex-wife Meryl Streep, even though he’s remarried,

alternative school teacher help her find hope? Wilma Theatre: 7 nightly, with no shows Fri.–Sat. THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG New Orleans finally gets positive, postKatrina exposure in this animated tale about a prince turned frog who hopes to leap back to manhood with the help of a naïve girl, voodoo practitioner and other bayou dwellers. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. THE ROAD Viggo Mortensen plays a dad trying to navigate his son through a post-apocalyptic world full of frenzied cannibals, decimated landscapes and scarce resources in this adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel. Wilma Theatre: 9 nightly with a Sun. matinee at 3. SHERLOCK HOLMES Robert Downey Jr. plays Sherlock Holmes and busts kneecaps with the help of his cane-wielding sidekick Jude Law (aka Dr. Watson) in order to save England from annihilation. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:40, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:55, 6:45 and 9:30.

“That’s correct sir, I’m just scoping out all these new medical marijuana clinics.” The Messenger opens Friday at the Wilma Theatre.

4:15, 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:55, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. EDGE OF DARKNESS Mel Gibson plays a retired detective who shatters windows, pulls guns on peeps and fights tooth and nail to find out the true cause of his daughter’s death. But things get even hairier when he realizes his daughter’s political activism means he’ll have to sift through heaps of b.s. involving cover-ups and other treachery. Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:05 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:20, 2:30, 4, 6:50 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4, 6:50 and 9:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. AN EDUCATION A teenage British girl falls for Mr. Moneybags, only to find out he might not be the one. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell:

Page 42 February 4–February 11, 2010

only to then have Steve Martin barge in and rain on his love parade. Village 6: 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25 and 6:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15 and 6:30. LEGION God smites earthlings like Dennis Quaid— but can fallen angel Paul Bettany save the day by leading peeps to the second coming of Christ? Village 6: 7:30 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 3:15 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 4:10 and 9:15. THE LOVELY BONES Peter Jackson leaps back to the screen sans aliens, wizards and hobbits in a story about a brutally murdered teen who keeps watch over her family in an elysian, “in-between” world. Can she keep her desire for retribution under wraps, or will she let her killer get caught? Village 6: 7:05 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 4:10. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 3:45 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. PRECIOUS An African-American teen in Harlem gets dealt many blows: she’s impregnated by her father, her mom is an abusive shedevil, and she’s illiterate. But can a vigorous

THE TOOTH FAIRY Dwayne Johnson plays a cynical hockey player who has no qualms about dispelling myths to eager ears, but everything changes when he gets summoned to the joyous job of sticking money under the pillows of toothless children. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:50, with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 4:05, 6:35 and 9:10 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 4:05, 6:35 and 9:10. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:05. WHEN IN ROME Kristen Bell is a happily single New Yorker until a trip to Rome lands her in the sight of Journo Josh Duhamel. Her prospects seem promising until she snatches up coins from a “fountain of love,” which in turn gets dudes like Danny Devito and Will Arnett begging her for dates. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:15, 7:20 and 9:40. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Feb 5th. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–5417469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in H a m i l t o n – 9 61- F I L M ; R o x y Tw i n i n H a m i l t o n – 36 3 - 5141 . S t a d i u m 14 i n Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 43 February 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 11, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

Feb. 4–Feb. 11, 2010

www.missoulanews.com

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Table of contents Brought to you by

Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Freewill Astrology . . . .C4 Sustainafieds . . . . . . .C11 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C12 This Modern World . .C15

WORKER’S COMP DENIED? Call Eric at Bulman Law Today! 721-7744 • Bulmanlaw.com 416 E. Pine Missoula MT 59802

Help make our community a safer place. Sponsored By:

THE BONDSMAN

WANTED Rodney Fairchild

25 YEARS

OFFENSE:

EXPERIENCE

Contempt of Court following a conviction for felony Common Scheme

24 Hours A Day • 7 Days A Week ALL COURTS • ALL AMOUNTS

728-0844 • 1-800-335-0844 When you find yourself in a tight spot, call us for help. If a suspect is sighted, do not approach or attempt to apprehend them. If you have information regarding this suspect, contact the United States Marshals Service at (406) 247-7030 or Local Law Enforcement. Birth Mama Doula Training Locally made. May 21, 22, 23 bearruncreek@aol.com 251-4401 Free- Build A Recycled Recumbent or 4 Wheel Bike SUNDAYS: Please CALL to RSVP & for Meeting Times. 2 hours volunteering required. Contact “Bob Ruby” @ 800-809-0112 See Details & Pics “Build a Bike Group” @ http://missoulaareaevents.ning.com

Be my forestry date? Saw you in the library on campus today. You were at the computer across the way wearing a pink jacket and a purple scarf. You seem nice and are definitely crazy hot. I’ve got an extra ticket to the Foresters’ Ball; go with me? Man to Woman February 1st Green Hat on Orange You: walking north over the Orange Street bridge. Me: Driving south. Whoa, your good looks almost made me get in an accident! Woman to Man January 26th

Sunshine…On My Shoulder Makes Me Happy! Thank you, Sun, for showing yourself to the beautiful city of Missoula today. It's been so dark and gloomy, it's nice to finally have some bright days. Woman to Man January 29th Thanks for helping me move To my totally kick ass friends! You Rock! Thanks for helping me move, paint, and drink beer this weekend. I couldn’t have done it without you!!! Woman to Woman January 29th

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Luna Says,

AGE: 58 HEIGHT: 5’7” HAIR COLOR: BROWN EYE COLOR: BLUE

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-5832101. www.continentalacademy.com

MONTANA COMMUNITIES AND WILDFIRE CONFERENCE, February 2527, Fairmont Hot Springs, Information O n l i n e w w w. f i r e s a f e m t . o r g . Landowners, Insurance, Realtors, Developers, Planners, Contractors, and Concerned Citizens are all invited! PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray

Don't forget to frame your Valentine! 20% Off Custom Framing

Post your own I Saw U or Shout Out online at

themix.bigskypress.com cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

WEDNESDAYS ~ Free Reiki Share (All Levels) + Reiki Level 1 Weekly Reiki Share + Beginners Training ON FEB. 10 & FEB 17 @ Union Place Apts., 2500 Great Northern Ave. (Behind Target). Space is limited, get specific directions when you RSVP. Drop in any time during this event, leave early if you need to, we try to make it easy for you to fit us into your life. Be Sure To RSVP To Reserve a Comfy Cozy Recliner. 5:30pm- Chat & Snack 6:00pm- Beginner Instruction Starts

709 Ronan St. Missoula 541-7100 montanaart.com 7:00pm- All Level Share Starts 9:pmClose. SPACE IS LIMITED PLEASE RSVP @ dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com or call 1-800-809-0112

LOST & FOUND LOST CAT NEAR HIGGINS AREA! Completely black with yellow-

ish green-ish eyes, and extra toes. No collar. His name is Jack. Please call 3962444 if you find him! LOST CAT! University Dist. Samson is a long-haired Siamese mix with blue eyes missing since 1/18/10.He is approximately 9 years old and 10 lbs and very missed. Call with any information! Jen: 396-4933. THANK YOU!


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

LESS IS AMOUR I had a disturbing conversation with this older married woman at a party. She asked my boyfriend how long we’ve been together (two years). Before he went to get us drinks, he made a crack about how different our apartments are. The moment he was out of earshot, she turned and lectured me that if you don’t live together, you don’t experience “really hating each other,” and that getting through that is “the triumph of true love.” I said I didn’t see it that way, and that we might never live together. She then snapped that perhaps I’ll someday “grow up and have a real relationship!” Well, my boyfriend and I love each other, but don’t see moving in together as an automatic next step. By living separately, are we really missing out on some higher level of relationship? —Naive? The course of true love doesn’t always run smooth, but must it really run around the house waving a frying pan and screaming obscenities? People romanticize living in close proximity to other human beings. The truth is, humans are smelly, annoying, and leak a lot. They’re often lazy and pick fights over the littlest things. Anybody who’s ever been around another human knows this, but for many, being in a grown-up relationship involves understanding human nature but living in total denial of it: expecting your partner to still look longingly at you when you pick dead skin off your toes and collect it in a little dish. Mrs. Socrates here wears her misery like a Girl Scout badge—whichever one they’d give you for spending decades sitting silently across from your supposedly beloved at Denny’s. The reality? Maybe she’s a little long in the tooth and light in the Botox to compete with the hot young things in bars. Maybe she only feels like somebody as Mrs. Somebody. And, chances are, it never occurred to her that there’s an alternative to living like two hens in a pen. But, there’s no going back now, only snarling at happy young women at parties that they, too, might someday experience “the triumph of true love.” Which, for her, plays out as “Never go to bed angry. Stay up and try to commit murder-suicide.” Sure, many couples prefer living together, or, in this economy, prefer it to living separately in their cars. And, if you have kids, it’s best if you can say “Wait till your father gets home” instead of “I’ll give your father a call and see what he’s doing tonight.” If you do end up living together, it

helps if you each have a room of your own, where house rules don’t apply—providing you don’t break any marriage vows or fire laws. Of course, it helps even more if you’re both exceedingly easygoing, lobotomized, or comatose. The reality is, you greet a guy way differently when you’ve had a chance to miss him than when he’s always there missing the toilet. Living apart also means you’re more likely to act like you’re still in the pursuit phase: trying to be witty and interesting and dressing suggestively when he comes over, and not in a way that suggests you’re halfway through cleaning out the garage. As for Mrs. S’s notion that you can hate your way to true love, researcher John Gottman found that expressions of contempt are actually the most poisonous to a relationship. In other words, the path to true love might be a bit of a drive: whatever it takes so your boyfriend isn’t always in your face, doing whatever it is you’d gnaw off your right hand to have him stop doing—like breathing, chewing, and having large pores.

LEAVE WILL KEEP US TOGETHER Thanks to your column, I’m a recovering wimp, now asking women out. So, any pointers for first dates? Dinner or drinks? Things to avoid doing or saying? —Girlfriend-Seeking For best results, sell yourself like soap. When Procter & Gamble wants you to try a new laundry detergent, they mail you a little packet of the stuff; they don’t throw a two-gallon jug over your fence and kill your dog. Likewise, the point of the first date is seeing if it makes sense to go on a second date, not letting a girl know how ashamed you were when you wet the bed at sleepaway camp. Too much emotional intimacy right away can feel creepy in retrospect. Or, you run the risk of getting attached first, then finding out how wrong a girl is for you later. To avoid going into overtime, overspend, and overshare, make the first date cheap, local, and short. Meet for a drink, for maybe an hour and a half. Have something you have to rush off to afterward. Even if it’s just a conference call at your place. With your hamster listening in on the extension.

FREE CYCLES MISSOULA. Kids bikes are always free. Monday & Thursday: 3:00-7:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00-3:00. 732 South 1st West LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

ANNOUNCEMENTS Rinzai Zen Dharma Talk Please join us for a Dharma Talk in the Rinzai Zen Tradition with Genchoku Patrick Johnson. Sat Feb. 6th at 7:30 at the Open Way (702 Brooks). Sunday Feb 7th at 8am sharp we will have sitting meditation practice. No experience nec.Voluntary donarion.

PET OF THE WEEK Barney It’s easy to see how staff and volunteers fell in immediate love with Barney. His story is even more sad than his eyes. In spite of all he’s been through he still loves all people, and just wants one of his own. Mark your calendars, Feb. 12th and 13th is the Humane Society’s 4th annual AdoptA-Thon, where we plan to see all our favorites, like Barney, meet their match and leave with happy endings! For complete details visit our website myhswm.org or call us at 549-HSWM.

VOLUNTEERS WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call Collegebound Network Today! 1877-892-2642 TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Peace happens... One heart at a time. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Weaving / Spinning Classes

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Telaluna Studio winter class schedule:

telalunastudio.com

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

BodyTalk Works, LLC Natalie Morrow, MS, CBP 406-370-8170 www.bodytalkworks.com

The BodyTalk System™

Wildflower Montessori School

Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals Ages 2-6 • 830-3268 1703 S. 5th West

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

T'ai Chi 728-0918 missoulataichi.com

Can you handle it?

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Clip coupon for free 15 min chair massage

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, C A 9 0 4 0 5 , o r e - m a i l A d v i c e A m y @ a o l . c o m (www.advicegoddess.com).

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 February 4–February 11, 2010

• Customized, Thai Yoga, Prenatal, Hot Stone, Couple's & Chair Massage • Reflexology & Reiki • Body Scrubs & Wraps • Insurance Billing Available • Now offering Body Care by Michelle: waxing, facials, pedicures 1116 S. Russell • (406) 543-8500 www.MontanaSpirited.com Open 7 Days A Week • M-Sat 9-7 Sun 12-5

• Color • Cut • Texture • Extensions • Cornrows • Twists • Dreadlocks

317 SW Higgins


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Escape With Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU RECEIVE A COMPOSIX KUGEL MESH PATCH between 1999-2008? If the Kugel patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark- (406)728-2629 Paradigm Reiki Balancing and Healing Session- $40 549-0289 Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 5428090

For free confidential help after an abortion • Arthritis & Chronic Fatigue • Allergies, Intolerances • Injuries & Illnesses • Headaches/Migraines • Learning Disorders

• Maintain Health & Wellness • General, Neck & Back Pain • Viruses & Bacteria • Sports Performance • and much more...

Art Salon 1804 North Ave

$5 OFF

Call Word of Hope at

406-549-6565 "The reality of my abortion has broken my heart. It has crushed me and left me in despair."

There’s nothing to match curling up with a good book when there’s a repair job to be done around the house – Joe Ryan FACT & FICTION 220 N. HIGGINS AND ON CAMPUS

Shear

EXP. 2/11/10 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * Depression * Empower yourself

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

• Regular Health Care • Bio-Identical Hormones • HCG Weight Loss Tired of living with chronic illness?

• Check-ups • Same day Appt’s

maintaining your optimal health

We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid

Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine www.BlackBearNaturopaths.com 542-2147 • 521 S 2nd

restoring and

541-8090

Black Bear Naturopathic

Dr. Christine White, ND

A natural path to

Dr. Philip Guignard 410 W. Spruce

Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington

Missoula, MT 59802

Corner of Bow & Kensington

549-0119

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

EMPLOYMENT Information Technology/Programming Assistant

CASE MANAGER-LEGAL SECRETARY, F / T, M s l a . # 2 9 7 6 8 5 9 M i s s o u l a Workforce Center 728-7060

Local company seeks IT professional with general tech/programming background. Salary is competitive and dependent on experience. Customer Service experience is a plus.

ENROLLMENT SPECIALIST, F/T, Msla. Seeking a full time ENROLLMENT SPECIALIST for a local civic agency. Pay is $12/hr with benefits package including: Health insurance, retirement, annual paid leave & 12 paid holidays. #2976877 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

.Net Experience Preferred • SQL Experience Preferred HTML Experience Preferred • User Support Preferred Interested parties should send resume/cover letter to Box 4345, Missoula, MT 59806. ACTIVITIES AIDE, P/T, Msla. Small skilled nursing center is seeking a part time Activities Aide. Pay is $7.25 to $8.00 to start depending on experience and proven performance. #2976883 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 BANK TELLER / MEMBER AGENT, P/T, Msla. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Customer service skills, money handling experience, teller experience preferred, 10 key & computer proficiency. DAYS/HOURS include: Mon/Tues, 9:00am to 6:15pm and Wed/Thurs, 7:15am to 2:00pm. Potential for more hours to fill-in at other branches as needed. #2976885 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-9656520 ext. 278 BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER/MEDICAL RECORDS, F/T, Msla, Missoula skilled nursing and assisted living center is seeking a team player for Business Office Manager & Medical Records position. Will work 32-40 hours per week. Pay is $12 to $16, depending on experience and ability. Benefits: Paid partially by employer Health, Dental, Vision insurance; vacation and sick leave; 401K available after 1 year. #2976882 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

GENERAL FARM/RANCH WORK AVAILABLE. Recent experience required. Alcohol, drug, tobacco-free workplace. Resume, references to: Blind Box 374, Box 900, Lewistown, MT 59457 Now Hiring Visit www.TargetRange SWD.org to submit proposal for water & sewer district manager position. OFFICE MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Local Benefit Administrator Company is seeking a full-time Office Manager for their Care Management Division. #2976876 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PHYSICIAN CREDENTIALING REPRESENTATIVE, P/T to F/T, Temp, Msla. Immediate need for PHYSICIAN CREDENTIALING REPRESENTATIVE in a medical office in Missoula. Position will move from part-time, temporary to fulltime, temporary by April and will last for 3 months. Pay will be $13 per hour. To apply for this position, PHYSICIAN CREDENTIALING IS REQUIRED. #2976881 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RESTAURANT MANAGER, F/T, Msla. A family restaurant in Missoula is seeking

a permanent, full-time RESTAURANT MANAGER. For the right candidate we offer a competitive salary $525.00 or more per week to start, quarterly bonuses based on profit, paid vacation, meal plan and insurance options. Background checks required for this position in Missoula. #2976880 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL CITY OF HARDIN, Employment Opportunity. CHIEF of POLICE-New Department. Competitive Salary-Benefit Package. DEADLINE: Friday 2/5/2010. Details and Online Application www.hardinmt.com or call 406-665-9292 E.O.E. FireSafe Montana seeking applicants for Executive Director position. Will be responsible for all aspects of operation, community outreach, advocacy, program development, and implementation. Visit www.firesafemt.org LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER/ L A C, P/T to F/T, Superior, Mineral County. Employer is seeking a Dually LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER / LICENSED ADDICTION COUNSELOR

to work in a small private practice in Mineral County. Would consider someone who is license-eligible. This is a potential opportunity to work in a setting already established. Will be doing Intensive Outpatient and Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment; Anger Management Group, Parenting, Social Skills for Adolescents, work with Adult Treatment Court and Youth Drug Court as well as a thriving business in individual counseling. Opening a GYM to be a part of an Addiction-free Pain Management Program. This person would need to move to Mineral County and become part of the community with intent to put down roots. Business is exceedingly busy and would welcome someone who could see the need and invest hard work and caring into this most vulnerable population. Will work Monday through Friday; part-time, days with opportunity to expand to full-time (limited only by your own effort). Pay is $15.00 per hour or more depending on experience and qualifications. Excellent opportunity for the right person to develop a rewarding career. #2976855 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TECH SUPPORT/DOCUMENTATION /SOFTWARE TESTER, F/T, Msla. Fulltime TECH SUPPORT/TECHNICAL D O C U M E N TAT I O N / S O F T WA R E TESTER needed for Missoula employer. Duties would include: working with the latest technology. Looking for individuals that are self-starters with good attention to detail, writing skills and able to work with analytical thinking abilities. Excellent written and verbal communication required. Knowledge of some of the following a plus: Wise Install, MS SQL

Server, Scripting Language, Visual Test and Microsoft Office. Hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm. Wage is $9.00 or more depending on experience. #2976863 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR CITY P AND D DRIVER, P/T, Msla. Local transportation company is accepting applications for a part-time CITY PICK UP AND DELIVERY DRIVER. This route will include local and out of town travel but will be home daily. Requires a Class A CDL with doubles endorsement, Hazmat certification and minimum of one year experience. Must be able to pass a drug & alcohol test and criminal background check. This is a part-time permanent position. Work days will vary Monday - Friday, approximately 20 hours per week. Hours will vary between 7:00am to 6:00pm. Wage will be $15.00 - $17.00 depending on experience. #2976860 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OWNER OPERATORS: Your hard work, along with our great rates, miles and dispatch = Success! Montana based refrigerated carrier. Call 406-266-4210 PAINTER - AIRCRAFT COMPONENTS, PT, TEMP, Msla. Experienced automobile quality painter needed for position of an AIRCRAFT COMPONENTS PAINTER, for a Missoula company. This is a parttime temporary position. Initially this job will be 35 hours per week, but could

occasionally require more than 40 hours in a week. In those cases, overtime will be paid. Applicants MUST have at least 1 year of painting experience to automotive standards. You will be painting aircraft components and occasionally parts of an aircraft. Duties will include but not be limited to: Cleaning, prepping, masking, sanding and painting. Must be able to lift items weighing 100 pounds. Work days are Monday through Thursday 7:00AM until 5:30PM. Starting wage is $14 to $15 per hour depending on experience. MUST pass an Airport Background Check, a Drug Screening, and a Driver’s License Records check. #2976879 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION *Art & Craft Instructors * Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd. A-10 (located off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) needs instructors to teach beginning Macrame and Weaving classes, as well as other art classes. If you are interested in teaching or taking the current drawing and painting classes for both adults and kids, call 239-4460.

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 February 4–February 11, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Those who know how to win are much more numerous than those who know how to make proper use of their victories.” So said the ancient Greek historian Polybius, and now I’m conveying the message to you. I hope it will serve as a spur in the wake of your recent triumph. Will you be content with merely basking in the glow, frittering away the provocative potentials? Or will you get down to business and use your new advantages to upgrade your destiny to what we might refer to as Aries 2.0? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Whatever shines should be observed,” said 19th-century astronomer William Herschel, discoverer of the planet Uranus. He was referring to his specialty, heavenly bodies, but I’d like to expand the meaning for your use. According to my analysis, it has become very important for you to notice, observe, and think about anything that shines. Doing so will tune you in to exactly what you need to know in order to make the best decisions in the coming weeks. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “One doesn’t discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time,” wrote French author Andre Gide. I’m guessing that 2009 was a time when you embarked on such a search, Gemini—a half-blind, groping exploration that asked you to leave the past behind without knowing where the future lay. By now, though, I suspect you have sighted the shore of your new frontier. If you haven’t yet, it’ll happen soon.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): I wonder if you can you handle this much healing intensity, Cancerian. The possibilities for transforming difficult parts of your life are substantial. I’ll name a few ways this could play out: 1. A confusing riddle may be partially solved through a semidivine intervention. 2. A sore spot could be soothed thanks to the power of your curiosity. 3. An ignorance that has caused you pain may be illuminated, allowing you to suffer less. 4. If you can summon the capacity to generously tolerate uncertainty, you may find and rehabilitate an orphaned part of your life. I’m not saying for sure that any of this stuff will happen, but the odds are favorable that at least one will.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What will it be, Leo? A time of rampaging ids and slamming doors and lost opportunities? Of strange smells and sweeping views of other people’s hells? Or will this be the week you finally slip into the magic sanctuary and track down the secret formula? Will this be the breakthrough moment when you outmaneuver the “dragon” with that non-violent “weapon” you’ve been saving for when it was absolutely necessary? It really is up to you. Either scenario could unfold. You have to decide which one you prefer, and then set your intention.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I don’t mean to alarm you, but I think you may be in a light hypnotic trance right now. It’s possible that the thrumming hum of your routine has shut down some of your normal alertness, lowering your awareness of certain situations that you really need to tune in to. Let’s do something about this! When I count to three, you will hereby snap out of your daze and become fully awake. 1…2…3. Now look around you and get yourself more closely in touch with your immediate environment. Make an effort to vividly see and hear and smell everything that’s going on. This will have the effect of mobilizing your subconscious mind. Then, for a period of at least five days, you’ll have a kind of X-ray vision.

EMPLOYMENT *Matting Instructor Needed* Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd., A-10 (just off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) is looking for someone to teach workshops to beginners on mat cutting and mounting their artwork. If you are interested in this position or have any questions regarding our other kids & adults drawing and painting classes, please call 239-4460. Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSE/LICENSE PRACTICAL NURSE, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time Registered Nurses or Certified Licensed Practical Nurses to work in Missoula. Requires valid Montana’s driver’s license and own vehicle to get to different job sites. Nursing license verification needed upon application process. Work week will vary and include weekends. Will be working 10 hour shifts that include both day and night shifts. Starting pay Depends on experience and qualifications. Medical



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Last week was the anniversary of my very first weekly horoscope column, which appeared years ago in the Good Times, a newspaper in Santa Cruz, California. My initial effort was crude and a bit reckless compared to what I eventually learned to create. And yet it was imbued with a primal fervor and heartfelt adventurousness that had a certain charm, and many people seemed to find it useful. Today I bow down to that early effort, honoring it for the seed it sprouted and thanking it for the blessings it led to. I encourage you to do something similar to what I just described, Scorpio: Pay homage to the origins that made it possible for you to be who you have become.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the Choctaw language, there are two kinds of past tenses. In one, you speak about an event or experience that you personally know to be a fact. In the other, you deliver information that you have acquired second-hand and therefore can’t definitely vouch for. In my perfect world, you Sagittarians would find a way to incorporate this perspective into all your communications during the coming week. In other words, you would consistently distinguish between the unimpeachable truth and the alleged truth. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this would give you great power to influence the rhythms of life to flow in your favor.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The great composer does not set to work because he is inspired,” wrote music critic Ernest Newman, “but becomes inspired because he is working. Beethoven, Wagner, Bach, and Mozart settled down day after day to the job in hand. They didn’t waste time waiting for inspiration.” I think what Newman said applies to those working in any field where creativity is needed—which is really just about every field. Given your current astrological omens, Capricorn, it’s especially apropos for you now. This is an excellent time to increase your mastery of the kind of discipline that spurs inventive thought and surprising breakthroughs.

 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I wish you could aim tachyon particles through an inverted positronic array while simultaneously modulating synaptical relays through an anti-matter torquebuffer. This would bend the space-time continuum back to a point before your recent detour began. Then, armed with knowledge of the future, you’d be able to navigate your way more elegantly through the crazy mash of illusions and misunderstandings. But since the high-tech solution I described may not be possible, I suggest that instead you clear your head of theories about why people are doing what they’re doing. Slow yourself down so completely that you can see the majestic flicker of eternity hidden in every moment. Be a flame of love, not a swamp of self-justification. And send humble notes and witty gifts to anyone whose links with you got tweaked.

Need Income? Laid off? Make a difference and earn great income. Distributors needed for expanding wellness co. Training provided. P/T or F/T. Call for interview. 406-273-4223 SALES POSITION, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full time experienced salesperson. Need to have at least 2 years experience with door hardware. Will be working primarily on the phone. Requires strong computer skills. NO EXCEPTIONS. Must be well organized and able to work effectively in a fastpaced environment. Need to work well with customers, owners and coworkers, have professional demeanor, and ability to represent the company and products in a positive manner. Need current MT driver’s license with clean driving record. Monday through Friday, day shift, 40 hours per week. Base pay will be $10.00/hour plus commission. #2976869 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

H E L P WA N T E D . E x t r a I n c o m e ! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2 4 5 0 h t t p : / / w w w. e a s y w o r k greatpay.com

OPPORTUNITIES

MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED. Earn $150 to $300 Per Day. All Looks, Types and Ages. Feature Films, Television, Commercials, and Print. No Experience Necessary. 1-800-340-8404 x3501

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 Bartenders in demand. No experience necessary. Make up to $300 per shift. Part-time, day, evening, night shifts available. Training, placement, certification provided. Call 877-879-9153 EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in w e a k e c o n o m y. D e t a i l s a t http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

LDR Kennel

L e a r n To R o a s t C o f f e e JumpinGoat Coffee Roasters-As seen on CNN Live now offers training to become a Master Coffee Roaster Great annuity income potential from home. 706-219-1820

WORK WANTED CAREGIVER. Female, 50s available hourly, daily, hospice or assist with 24 hour care. Price negotiable with situation. Excellent references from clients & agencies. 543-3060 or 370-3225

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

10% OFF W/ GRIZ CARD

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments

Crystal Limit Consignment Gallery COMING SOON! Consign Your

HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

MISC. GOODS

COMPUTERS

CATTLE FEED FOR SALE: Green Barley, underseeded alfalfa. Large round bales. Excellent quality, clean. $78.00/ton McCord, Saskatchewan (40 miles north of Opheim, MT). Montana customer references available. Contact: Monty Poirier - Phone: 306-266-4222, Cell: 306-6408300, Email: mmrb@sasktel.net

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800475-0876

ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 7285014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

ELECTRONICS DISH NETWORK. $19.99/mo. Why Pay More for TV? 100+ Channels. FREE 4-room install. FREE HD-DVR. Plus $600 sign-up BONUS. Call now! 1-877-8688670 Get Dish -FREE Installation–$19.99 /month. HBO & Showtime FREE-Over 50 HD Channels FREE Lowest Prices–No Equipment to Buy! Call Now for full Details- 1-877-238-8413 Get Dish with FREE Installation – $19.99/month. HBO & Showtime FREE - Over 50 HD Channels FREE Lowest Prices – No Equipment to Buy! Call Now for full Details 1-877-482-6735

MUSIC

All strings are 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533 TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 5439824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

Furniture ~ Art ~ Lamps Rugs ~ Home Decor

PETS & ANIMALS

207-7897

Two Sweet Horses Two mares, 13 and 14 yrs, ridden with halter; gentle. Tri-color paint and black paint. To good home only, just make reasonable offer. 626-0800

Outlaw Music Specializing in Stringed Instruments

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 February 4–February 11, 2010

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I got an email from an Aquarian reader complaining that the astrologers she consulted in early 2009, including me, were wrong about the year ahead. All of us said it would be a time of expansion and opening for your tribe, a phase of rapid growth and fresh energy. But according to this reader, 2009 turned out to be very different. Every Aquarius she knew had a tough ride. Here’s my response: Expansion and opening did indeed occur, but their initial effects weren’t what you expected. They shattered the old containers of your life in order to make it possible for you to create new, bigger containers that would be more suitable for the person you’re becoming. And this year, 2010, is when you will work in earnest to create those new containers. Now’s a good time to dig in.

SALES

WIRELESS CONSULTANTS, F/T, Msla. Experienced full-time WIRELESS CONSULTANTS needed for the Missoula area. Duties include: Selling services and products to customers. Must have previous commissioned sales experience. Retail sales experience and customer service skills a plus. Requires High School Diploma or equivalent. Work days and hours vary. Starting wage is DOE plus commission. #2976878 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

MARKETPLACE



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You would stir up some good fortune for yourself if you brought meals to shut-ins or gave a little presentation at an old folks’ home or donated your old laptop to a low-income family. Oddly enough, it’s also an excellent time for you to scratch and claw for a bigger market share, or to get the upper hand on a competitor, or to bring your creative ideas to people in a position to help you. That’s the odd thing about this week. Capitalist-style self-promotion and actualized compassion will not only coexist—they’ll have a symbiotic relationship.

and Dental offered after probationary period. #2976858 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

WANTED TO BUY BUYING historical items from Montana, Wyoming and the West. Photos, firearms, furniture, art, clothing, mining, towns, cowboys, Indian, documents, tokens, paper items. Anything historical. 1-800-962-2427 CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

MISSOULA’S go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. North Reserve Business Complex (Behind Johnny Carino's) unit k3 406.542.1202

WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201


montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 February 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 11, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES Missoula County Government

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Ken Jenkins for a special exception permitting Montana Northwest Company’s new office building to be located on the parcel legally described as Lot D2 of Block 21 of the Amended Plat of East Missoula Addition, Block 21, Lots B1, D1 and D2 Section 24 Township 13N Range 19W. The subject property is zoned C-C2, General Commercial. A variance from Section 4.04 (B) (1) of Resolution #76-113 is also being requested. Section 8.10 and Section 8.14 of Resolution #76-113 requires that all special exceptions and variances go before the County Board of Adjustment for approval. See map J.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request, you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, February 17, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., M.T., in Room 201, 2nd Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Paul and Susan Tiede and Christian and Shelli Kenworthy (the “Applicants”) in order to finance a portion of the costs of acquiring the old Thurman’s Building located at 3020 South Reserve Street in Missoula and remodeling, renovating, furnishing and equipping the building as a modern medical and dental condominium facility to be known as the Larchmont Building (the “Project”) and to pay certain

costs of issuance of the Bonds. The Project is expected to cost approximately $3,640,000. When finished, the Larchmont Building will provide approximately 18,000 square feet of high quality medical and dental office space and off-street parking for approximately 51 cars. The Project will be owned by the Applicants or a legal entity to be formed under Montana law comprised of the Applicants (the “Borrowers”). The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bonds issuance is $3,140,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrowers and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County, and the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrowers pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County except money payable by the Borrowers to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution, contact Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, or Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, Missoula County, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 or by calling 406-721-5700. Dated: January 20, 2010 /s/ Michelle Landquist BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., a Montana corporation Plaintiff Against KENNETH REIBER, SUSAN J. KNIGHT, and ELK SPRINGS RANCH, INC., Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 11th day of February A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 6001, located in the SW1/4 of Section 36, Township 11 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 21st day of January A.D., 2010. MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-09-9 Dept. No. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III CITATION IN THE MATTER OF, J.B.M., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: ANNIE PLENKOVICH YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition has been filed

in the above-entitled Court by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (hereinafter DPHHS), 2677 Palmer St., Ste. 300, Missoula, MT 59808 requesting that DPHHS be granted Permanent Legal Custody and Termination of your Parental Rights to the above named child, J.B.M. NOW, THEREFORE, YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear on the 15 day of March, 2010 at 3:00 o’clock p.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Missoula County Courthouse in Missoula, Montana then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why said Petition should not be granted, and why DPHHS should not be awarded Permanent Legal Custody of J.B.M., with the right to consent to his adoption. J.B.M. was born on: January 2, 2009 in Missoula, Montana. You have the right to be represented by an attorney in these proceedings. If you are unable to afford an attorney, you have the right to ask the Court to appoint an attorney to represent you. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in the above-named children, which denial may result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the petition. A copy of the Petition is filed with the Clerk of District Court in Missoula County: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Robert L. Deschamps, III, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 12 day of January, 2010. /s/ Robert L. Deschamps, III. HON. ROBERT L. DESCHAMPS III, District Court Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-10-8 Dept. No. 2 IN RE THE ESTATE OF DARLENE C. NYQUIST, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Aaron Morse has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Aaron Morse, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of January, 2010. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C. 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234. /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-15 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGRETHA FRIEDA MEYER, a/k/a MARGRETHA F. MEYER, Deceased. Notice is given that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Alvin L. Meyer, personal representative, return receipt requested, at Dye & Moe, P.L.L.P., PO Box 9198, 216 West Main Street, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. Dated: January 25, 2010. /s/ Alvin L. Meyer, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-204 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT A. LATRIELLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mark LaTrielle has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce Street, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 20th day of January, 2010. CHRISTIAN, SAMSON & JONES, PLLC. /s/ Liana J. Messer for Richard J. Samson MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DIS-

TRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate Case No. DP-09-196 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of EUGENE F. KUEHNLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named estate. All person having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Co-Personal Representatives, Jay H. Kuehnle and Diana B. Kuehnle, return receipt requested, at 5605 Lavoie Lane, Missoula, Montana 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 30th day of November, 2009. /s/ Jay Kuehnle /s/ Diana B. Kuehnle, Co-Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-76 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ROD ALLEN MCDONALD, TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO ROBERT ALLEN COONEY. Notice is hereby given that Petitioner, Rod Allen McDonald, has filed a petition with this Court for permission to change his name from Rod Allen McDonald tot Robert Allen Cooney. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana on the 4th day of March, 2010 at 9:00 a.m., at which time objections to the petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the petition may do so by filing said objection in writing with the clerk of said court no later than the time set for the hearing. DATED this 22nd day of January, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Susie Wall, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-10-11 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD O. NORDSTROM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Doris M. Nordstrom, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane, P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of January, 2010. /s/ Doris M. Nordstrom Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-10-13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARLINE R. CASE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to TERRY CASE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street E., Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of January, 2010. /s/ Terry Case, Personal Representative NOTICE OF SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated January 9, 2006 Grantor: Cornerstone, Inc. 2503 Windemere Lane, Missoula, Montana 59804 Original Trustee: First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. P.O. Box 549 Missoula, Montana 59806 Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula P.O. Box 4506 Missoula, Montana 59806 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807—8957 Date and Place of Recordation: January 10, 2006 in Book 767, Page 473, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 25th day of May, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 February 4–February 11, 2010

Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: Unit Number A-4 of North Reserve Business Center Condominium as said Units are shown and described in the Declaration of Condominium Under Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to North Reserve Business Center Condominium, dated August 30, 2001 and recorded on September 4, 2001 in Book 667 at Page 729, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana, as amended by the terms of Amendment No. 1 to Declaration of Condominium Under Unit Ownership Act dated April 23, 2003 and recorded on May 9, 2003 in Book 705 at Page 923, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana, and as further amended by the terms of Amendment No. 2 to Declaration of Condominium Under Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to North Reserve Business Center dated January 25, 2005 and recorded February 1, 2005 in Book 747 at Page 722, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana and as further amended by the terms of Amendment No. 3 to Declaration of Condominium Under Unit Ownership Act Pertaining to North Reserve Business Center dated September 16, 2005 and recorded October 18, 2005 in Book 762 at Page 783, Micro Records of Missoula County, Montana (as amended the “Declaration”). TOGETHER WITH each Unit its proportionate undivided ownership interest in and to the general common elements, as such general common element ownership interest is set forth in the Declaration. FURTHER TOGETHER WITH for such Unit any interest in limited common elements reserved for use by such Unit, either exclusively or in common with another Unit or Units, as such limited common element interest are set forth in the Declaration Subject to easements and encumbrances of record. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the Deed of Trust in the amount of Four Hundred Twenty-one and 75/100ths Dollars ($421.75) for the months of May 2009 through December 2009; together with late charges in the amount of Two Hundred Twenty-five and 87/100ths Dollars ($225.87); and the failure to pay real property taxes and assessments for the years 2007, 2008 and 2009 (first onehalf).. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust Thirty-nine Thousand Eighty-eight and 48/100ths Dollars ($39,088.48) in principal; plus interest thereon at the rate of Seven and Three-quarters Percent per annum (7.75%) from and after the 3rd day of May, 2009 to December 11, 2009, in the amount of One Thousand Eight Hundred Thirty-eight and 14/100ths Dollars ($1,838.14); plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Eight and 30/100ths Dollars ($8.30), plus all late charges, costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law. DATED this 18th day of December, 2009. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807—8957 STATE OF MONTANA) :ss. County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 18th day of December, 2009, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. (SEAL)) /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the state of Montana Residing at Lolo, Montana My commission expires January 6, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County,

Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008-AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $719,705.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/06/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200500471, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David A. Fuschino and Mindy L. Fuschino was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. DBA Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC. Was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 177 of Pleasant View Homes No. 2, Phase IV, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200803864, Book 813, Page 959, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 7, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the

Loan was $155,996.50. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $146,634.22, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01535) 1002.114202-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/31/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200900014 Bk. 831 Pg.444, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Tyler J. Harbour, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 461 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $274,743.73. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $264,712.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in


PUBLIC NOTICES the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09011) 1002.141031-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/12/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200308773, Bk. 701, Pg. 551, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Laramie D. Loewen, an unmarried person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. dba Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The West 10 feet of Lot 11, all of Lots 12, 13, 14 and the East 25 feet of Lot 15 in Block 66 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 199 of Micro Records at Page 2284. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 845, Pg. 859, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 11, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $212,254.03. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $198,274.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 22, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06305) 1002.131339-FEI

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200527308, BK 762, PG 554, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ward J. Veneklasen and Pamela L. Veneklasen, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Block 4 of Linda Vista Tenth Supplement Phase I, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $275,693.60. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,200.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06348) 1002.131336-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/12/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200614430, Bk 776, Pg 1238, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert R. Black, a married person and Katherine M. Black, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Block 2 of Missoula’s Highland estates, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust.

According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 17, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $327,239.51. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $316,156.78, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 28, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09136) 1002.141483-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730740, Bk 809, Pg 641, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David M. Jamsa and Alicia M. Jamsa, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 8 in Block 5 of Spring Hills Addition No. 6, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 15, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $184,356.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $179,275.48, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 27, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified

checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09142) 1002.141368-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/24/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822332, Bk 827, Pg 117, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Patricia L. Morgan and Dennis R. Morgan as joint tenants was Grantor, Acceptance Capital Mortgage Corporation was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 20 of Wallace Creek Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200822333, Bk 827, Pg 118, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 14, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $263,245.08. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $253,372.09, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 26, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09403) 1002.141380-FEI

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/10/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200514314, BK-754, Pg619, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jacob J. Martin Jr. was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 11 in Block 1 of First Supplement to Highland Heights, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 17, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $248,390.52. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $242,562.92, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 28, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.03920) 1002.141441-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 2, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The North 45 feet of the South Half of Lot 53 and the North 45 feet of the South Half of Lot 54 and the North one-half of Lot 53, and the North One-Half Lot 54, Orchard Homes Company’s Addition No. 6, according to the official plat thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office of Missoula County, Montana. Excepting and excluding from the foregoing real property, the North 80 feet of the West 100 feet of Lot 53, Orchard Home Company’s Addition No. 6, according to the recorded plat thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office of Missoula County, Montana Recording Reference: Book 800 of Micro Records at Page 1167. Laura A Knight, as Grantor(s), con-

veyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust June 29, 2007 and recorded July 3, 2007, in Book 800, Page 1168, under Document No 200716963. The beneficial interest is currently held by Greenpoint Mortgage Funding, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,955.20, beginning February 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 30, 2009 is $410,724.73 principal, interest at the rate of 7.75% now totaling $60,886.25, late charges in the amount of $2,068.64, escrow advances of $10,257.18, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,292.94, plus accruing interest at the rate of $87.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 18, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 18, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3425404 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010, 02/18/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 2, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The North 45 feet of the South Half of Lot 53 and the North 45 feet of the South Half of Lot 54 and the North one-half of Lot 53, and the North One-Half Lot 54, Orchard Homes Company’s Addition No. 6, according to the official plat

thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office of Missoula County, Montana. Excepting and excluding from the foregoing real property, the North 80 feet of the West 100 feet of Lot 53, Orchard Home Company’s Addition No. 6, according to the recorded plat thereof as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office of Missoula County, Montana Recording Reference: Book 800 of Micro Records at Page 1167. Laura A Knight, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust June 29, 2007 and recorded July 3, 2007, in Book 800, Page 1168, under Document No 200716963. The beneficial interest is currently held by Greenpoint Mortgage Funding, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,955.20, beginning February 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 30, 2009 is $410,724.73 principal, interest at the rate of 7.75% now totaling $60,886.25, late charges in the amount of $2,068.64, escrow advances of $10,257.18, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,292.94, plus accruing interest at the rate of $87.21 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 18, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 18, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3430943 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010, 02/18/2010

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 February 4–February 11, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 5, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT FIFTEEN (15) OF CANYON VILLAGE NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. R. Steven Nuckols and Joanna M. Nuckols, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED APRIL 27, 2005 AND RECORDED ON APRIL 29, 2005 IN BOOK 751, PAGE 799, UNDER DOCUMENT NO 200509868. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,950.57, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 26, 2009 is $254,385.88 principal, interest at the rate of 5.625% now totaling $14,096.81, late charges in the amount of $1,079.82, escrow advances of $3,388.77, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,027.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $39.20 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3429678 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010, 02/18/2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 5, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO-WIT: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 5 OF SEELEY LAKE HOMESITES ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO TRAVIS SIMON AND MACHELLE L. SIMON, AS JOINT TENANTS BY DEED FROM TRAVIS SIMON RECORDED 11/03/2000 IN DEED DOC. # 200342157, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Travis Simon & Machelle L Simon, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Old Republic, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 21, 2005 and Recorded October 3, 2005 in Book 761, Page 771, as Document No. 200526001. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as trustee for the benefit of the Certificateholders of Popular ABS, Inc. Mortgage PassThrough Certificates Series 2005-D. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1087.37, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 19, 2009 is $107426.48 principal, interest at the rate of 9.88% now totaling $12,524.51, late charges in the amount of $1,227.55, escrow advances of $2,679.73, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,215.07, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.08 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing

instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3429650 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010, 02/18/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 16, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 33 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase IV, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Brett Huston and Stacey Huston, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 9, 2005 and Recorded November 21, 2005 in Book 764, Page 930, under Document No. 200530946. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-1. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,367.69, beginning March 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 27, 2009 is $133,076.40 principal, interest at the rate of 9.125% now totaling $20,149.50, late charges in the amount of $932.23, escrow advances of $4,905.27 and other fees and expenses advanced of $7,187.28, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.62 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. , Beneficiary, has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota

Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3408187 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 23, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 2C-3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2755, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4) OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR A PRIVATE ROAD AND PUBLIC UTILITIES ALONG AND ACROSS THE 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT-OF-WAY WHOSE CENTER LINE IS THE LINE COMMON TO TRACTS 2C-1 AND 2C-2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2583. Brian E. Bache and Colleen M. Bache, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 15, 2004 and Recorded on April 20, 2004 under Document # 200410518, in Bk729, Pg-1879. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,031.62, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 22, 2009 is $303,643.81 principal, interest at the rate of 4.5% now totaling $5,340.79, late charges in the amount of $507.24, escrow advances of $-561.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $37.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.44 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 13, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 February 4–February 11, 2010

58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 13, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3416247 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF BITTERROOT MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Christian J Halverson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 12, 2006 and Recorded on July 12, 2006 under Document # 200617036, in Bk778, Pg-1096. The beneficial interest is currently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HET 2006-16. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1253.83, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2009 is $191865.84 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $5363.05, late charges in the amount of $211.80, and other fees and expenses advanced of $68.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.83 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and - attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 16, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097

State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3416236 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE% OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5572. Thomas W. Hobbs and Kathleen E. Hobbs, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 24, 2004 and Recorded on September 29, 2004 under Document # 200427792 in Bk-740, Pg-1028. The beneficial interest is currently held by NationStar Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,558.65, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 5, 2009 is $216,436.61 principal, interest at the rate of 5.25% now totaling $7627.17, late charges in the amount of $890.08, and other fees and expenses advanced of $24.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.13 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest” to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 16, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor

Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3416250 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT A8-3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2935, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. John M. Brazier, III, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 1, 2006 and recorded March 3, 2006 as document number 200604886 in Bk-769, Pg-1348.. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential MortgageBacked Trust, Series 2006-L2, Residential Mortgage-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-L2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $794.72, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 10, 2009 is $119,208.39 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $9,318.02, late charges in the amount of $361.35, escrow advances of $1,210.66, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,557.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.68 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT


PUBLIC NOTICES A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 18, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/18/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3419684 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 28 OF HAWTHORN SPRINGS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Darrin L Knudsen and Crystal L Knudsen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated March 23, 2007 and Recorded March 30, 2007 at 3:14 o’clock P.M. in Book 794, Page 803, under Document No. 200707506. The beneficial interest is currently held by National City Mortgage

a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,964.29, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 30, 2009 is $280,052.54 principal, interest at the rate of 7.375% now totaling $22,294.91, late charges in the amount of $294.63, escrow advances of $1,112.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,994.68, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.59 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immedi-

ately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 19, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/19/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J.

Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3420942 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 41926675 TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 5, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 27 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 219, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 20 AND THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS AS RECORDED IN BOOK 172 AT PAGE 701 MICRO RECORDS, BOOK 223 AT PAGE 1016 MICRO RECORDS AND BOOK 223 AT PAGE 1492 MICRO RECORDS. Larry A Chamberlain and Trudi S Chamberlain, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 12, 2005 and Recorded on October 17, 2005 under Document # 200527371, in Bk-762, Pg617. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pur-

suant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,313.28, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 30, 2009 is $309,201.52 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75% now totaling $8820.54, late charges in the amount of $474.15, escrow advances of $926.37,and other fees and expenses advanced of $180.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $48.71 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders,

certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 23, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 23, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is sub-

scribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 9/22/2012 ASAP# 3429259 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010, 02/18/2010 SHERIFF’S SALE Dept. 1 Cause No. DV-09-898 COMMUNITY BANK, INC., A Montana corporation, Plaintiff, Against JOHN L. CROSS, LEI ANN CROSS, LOUIS L. CROSS, JORDAN C. CROSS, LUCAS S. CROSS, WHOLESALE FIREWORKS STORES, INC., ABSOLUTE WATER SPORT RENTALS, INC., and 5 STAR FINANCE AND MORTGAGE, INC., Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 23rd day of February A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, those certain real properties situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: “Lots 34, 35, and 36 of Gleneagle at Grantland Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof” (hereinafter the Gleneagle Property) Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 28th day of January, 2010. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 February 4–February 11, 2010


BE MY VALENTINE

Zootown Dolls Schedule your Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Glamour shoots today! Special pricing until Feb. 11th

239-2941

In February

FREE Mini Facial featuring

Arbonne International Swiss Skin Care!!

Enjoy and learn the benefits of the RE9 age reversal system with a vitamin c clay mask and hot towel wrap.

Ask about booking a

Chics & Chocolate Girls Night & get FREE Arbonne Product

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 February 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 11, 2010

Shear Art Salon exclusively using Arbonne & Paul Mitchell to offer Healthy hair. Healthy body. Healthy you.

For a

Free Facial Call

406-214-3112 Dana Wheeler or Shelley Young At Shear Art Salon

Arbonne is 100% free of animal bi-products, chemicals, dyes, fragrances and mineral oil


SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

Local businesses dedicated to creating a more sustainable world

For More Information Contact:

• Custom Portfolios • Shareholder Advocacy • Community Investing • Screening

John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A Missoula, MT 59803 (406) 543-0708 johnfaust@pwfinancial.net

Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

GREEN HANGER

SUSTAINAFIEDS Eco-Friendly Dry Cleaners Laundromats • WI-FI Alterations • Free Laundry Soap Clean & Comfortable

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!! 146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Oasis Montana’s 12.7KW array Strawhouse Market Helena, MT

mydesign: We provide residential and commercial remote and utility-tied power systems, and also focus on solar water pumping. Call us about your power project!

Award winning design & illustration from children's books to posters, from magazines to environmental art, online and inhand. mydesign specializes in working with non-profits and educational organizations.

406-777-4309

www.my-design.net

Ask about our line of efficient and gas appliances

www.oasismontana.com www.grid-tie.com www.PVsolarpumps.com www.LPappliances.com Our office is located in Western Montana, open weekdays

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 February 4–February 11, 2010


JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r

d s

SERVICES

"Burns, Baby, Burns"–it's a growth industry.

Northwest Homes “The Affordable Choice...”

by Matt Jones Improving Your

Outlook!

880-6211

STORAGE SHEDS MontanaShedBuilders.com

Mark Hamilton 546-1837 NorthwestHomesMT.com

0-6 year-old openings Encourages Nature, Adventure & Arts!

grew a long white beard 65 Vancouver runner, in 2010 66 Actor Kristofferson 67 Diagnostics 68 Recipe amt

DOWN 1 Soak in the glory 2 Roll along independently 3 Corporation in 2008 news alongside Freddie Mac 4 Go droopy 5 "This ___ stickup!" 6 It may be in a pickle 7 Australia's national bird: var. 8 Small grove of trees 9 Some campus figures in the '70s 10 Like gamma, in the Greek alphabet 11 Singing cowboy Gene 12 Times to give gifts, briefly 15 Geese formation 18 Mind-boggling time 22 Professor of board games? 24 Actor McBride 25 Apiary offerings 27 Hooker and Maxx 29 Lawrence with a bubble machine 30 607, in Rome 31 He'll agree to anything 33 Military strength 34 Cheery tune 35 "Hold up just a second!" 36 1980s Saturday morning cartoon characters who lived underwater 40 Before, to poets 42 Team leaders, initially 43 Metric opener 47 Singer with the 2001 album "Vespertine" 48 Worse, like some excuses 49 Singer Coppola 51 Have dinner 53 It coordinates the USAF and USN 54 Part of QED 55 Suffix with million 56 "___ the perfect time!" 58 Pass over 61 Wasted 62 Nav. rank

Last week’s solution

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0453

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

Sh

546-5541

ig

Your local yurt company

ns

(406) 295-4661 shelterdesigns.net

All-around Handyman & Home Improvement Services

Christian Rivera

Get Your Tankless Water Heater

newerapandh.com

Silvertip

529-8125

Commercial & Residential Interior & Exterior All Phases Historic Restoration Licensed & Insured

2002 Subaru Outback All wheel drive, standard transmission 107,000 miles. New Michelin tires! $7,800.00 OBO. 240-5823

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Custom Passivhaus Bldg • Solar Retrofitting • Envelope Retrofitting

369-0940 OR 642-6863

naturalhousebuilder.net

406-880-1540

I'm Cool TOO.

H e a t i n g & A i r, I n c .

Me: wishing I was at 2012. You: the adult women at New Moon. Don't deny you were swooning at Taylor's abs. You should know that I also have abs. You just have to look a bit harder to find them. Man to Woman November 20

Furnaces, fireplaces, AC, gas piping New construction & Remodels Exp. Lic. Bonded. Ins. Refs. Leonard 493-0081 or 207-0201

themix.bigskypress.com

ADULT

4X4

SPORT UTILITY

MISCELLANEOUS Valentine’s Glamour Shoots Schedule your Valentine’s Day Pin-up or Glamour shoot today. Special pricing until Feb 11. (406) 239-2941

AUTO 1998 Chevy Silverado 1998 Chevrolet Silverado Ton Z71 4-wheel drive with topper. 160,000 miles, $6,300 OBO. 240-5823

SEAMANS HOME IMPROVEMENT Restore, Repair, Remodel, Maintenance, Additions, Green Building and Energy Upgrades, and everything in between! Visit us @ www.seamansconstruction.com or call Mark 531-2123. Lic/Ins/Reg in MT

Rivera Works, LLC

543-6465

406-546-1246 ACROSS

e elt

Winter Special!

GENERAL CONTRACTORS

Sam's Painting

Affordable, Durable, Delivered

1 Pal until the end, for short 4 Lesser-known part of a record 9 Attack your peas with a fork, say 13 Longtime Notre Dame coach Parseghian 14 *Author Isaac who sported enormous white mutton chops 16 Low-impact sound 17 Person from Dakar 19 Actress Moreno 20 Number-picking game 21 *He sported close-cropped sideburns playing Dylan McKay on TV 23 Rope device that can tow a car 26 "The ___ Not for Burning" (1948 comedic play set in the Middle Ages) 27 It's a genuine article 28 "___ they do that?" 31 That's a laugh 32 *Flight of the Conchords member with big sideburns 37 Burn quickly 38 *Impersonators grow their sideburns to imitate him 39 Architect Ludwig Mies van der ___ 41 *Motorhead frontman famous for his mutton chops 44 Security measure built into some credit card processors: abbr. 45 "Take ___ a compliment!" 46 Portland-to-Las Vegas dir. 47 It may float over a stadium 50 "___ of Mine" (1991 Genesis song) 52 *Short-lived screen icon who kept his sideburns short 57 Crafts questioned by skeptics 59 Country near the Strait of Hormuz 60 Camden Yards facility 63 "Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes" musical 64 *Charles who had mutton chops before he got older and

PAINTING

35 Years Experience Interior & Exterior Free Estimates

r Des

Commercial or Residential improvingyouroutlook.com

CORNERSTONE

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C12 February 4–February 11, 2010

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE!  www.missoulanews.com

FALLING ANGELS ESCORT Now Hiring Women In Missoula and Kalispell.

546-0486


RENTALS ROOMMATES PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

APARTMENTS 1024 Stephens #8 2bd/1ba, off-street parking, new furnace, storage $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1101 S. 3rd St. W. #201 Luxury Studio Condo, wood floors, stainless steel appliances, huge deck, gas fireplace, W/D hkps, garage $875 1801 Howell St. #2, $675 2bd/1ba Hkps, off-street parking, shared fenced yard, storage. 3320 Great Northern Apartments-Rent $495-$570 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 7218990 3901 O’Leary 2-bedroom, carport, hook-ups+laundry, dishwasher, storage, private deck, free cable, $795, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com (Apartment). 503 S. 5th Street E. #B Spacious upper level 3bd 1ba Apt within walking distance to the U. $895 721 Palmer. 3 bdrm 1 bath gas heat washer and dryer hookup and off street parking. Rent $750 721-8990 Quiet, private, partly furnished 1 bedroom. 8 miles from town with river view. No smoking, no pets, very responsible. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV, high-speed Internet. Available soon. Taking applications now. 273-2382 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com Studio apartment for rent. Newly remodeled, walking distance to campus. 550/month Call Heather. 270-841-7290 SUSTAINABLE APTS 307 Woody St Sustainably remodeled historic building. Low VOC paint, on-site recycling center. Coin ops, elevator, AC, storage,

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. Old Northside rental roommate needed. NS. Pets maybe. Skier/mountainperson preferred. $270 + utilities. No lease or deposit. 721-8905

no pets. 2 bdrm $575/mo all utilities pd. Quiet, end unit on top floor. Studio $450/mo all utilities pd. End unit. Must meet income restrictions. Call MHA Management 549-4113

Room For Rent Roommate Needed. $400/mo. Nice Spacious House in Great Location next to river on Easy St. Close to Campus. Washer/Dryer Big Kitchen, Clean, easy going home, Mike @ 406-544-3394

DUPLEXES

Large room. Great view. Nice house close to UM & busline. Fireplace, pool table, deck, shared bath. $385. 8808228

Creek Crossing Court 2-bedroom, Rattlesnake, garage, dining, yard, hook-ups, pet OK, $825, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com (Duplex)

HOUSES 5BD/2BA Farmhouse on one acre. Target Range area. New construction, new appliances, close to good schools. $1500/month. 406-250-6281.

Spacious, Newer 3BD/2 BA Home • W/D Included • Pets on approval

Great 3b/2ba house 1 blk E. Good Food Store. $1195 + utilities. Call Devan w/ Prudential Missoula 406241-1408 for showings.

• $995/month

house for rent 2/3 bedroom pet friendly fenced yard/garden near bike path washer/dryer garage $1,000 per mo. call 544-5824

Management

LOGHOME 2BR on Petty Creek $900, surrounded by NF 552-1346

COMMERCIAL Office space on the Hip Strip. Includes furnishings, utilities, access to large community space, kitchen and bathroom facilities and parking. $200/month. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center 543-3955. SUSTSTAINABLE OFFICE SPACE 300 W Broadway. Great office space in sustainably remodeled historic building, 648 sq ft, Asking $900 – 1100 /mo depending on terms. Shared conference room, leased parking available. Call 532-4663 x17.

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com

Plum Property

406.493.1349 www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

$325/mo.

1 BD in newer home E. Missoula.

Big closets! Close to river, Mountain Line, 1.5 miles from campus. Reasonable energy with two. w/d, W/S/G.

978-314-0653

Great Space Main St. Historic Building

1000 sq. ft. for Gallery, Offices (?).

543-8723

1&2

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Jane's Place

Hot Springs, MT • $65 & up Vacation Rental/Night/Week/Month

406-546-0404

pets welcome

janesplacemontana@gmail.com

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms

Specializing in single family homes & horse properties in Missoula, Lolo, Florence & Stevensville.

4 0 6- 2 4 1 - 0 0 95 w w w .ki n gpm .c om

Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent! Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

Professional Property Management

Call PPM for all your rental needs ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

406-721-8990

251- 4707

1 BD Apt 117 Johnson $425/mo.

Expect the best from

MISSOULA

2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $575/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

Finalist

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C13 February 4–February 11, 2010


REAL ESTATE 1,2,3 bedroom homes with money to help first time homebuyers. 327-8787 porticorealestate.com 3 Bd/ 2 Bth home w/ open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, views of Bitterroots. 1 Mile S. of Florence, views all around. Porch swing. Hot tub, and storage shed are all included. $259,900 MLS# 10000160 JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 3 Bed, 2.5 Bath home on West Sussex. Close to parks, school, and shopping. Hardword floors and fenced yard with detached garage. $212,500. MLS#10000137. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com 3 Bed/2 Bath/2 Car Garage, Lg kitchen, hickory cabinets. In floor radiant heat, fireplace. Fenced and landscaped yard. $234,000 • MLS# 10000024. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com Text:44133 Message: 12887 for pics

Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

Great house with hardwood floors and big backyard, 3 bdr., updates. 933 Wo o d f o r d 3 2 7 - 8 7 8 7 p o r t i c o r e alestate.com

GORGEOUS LOLO HOME WITH PRIVATE LAKE FRONTAGE. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage. New roof, new interior & exterior paint, new baths, wrap-around covered porch, tons of storage. $339,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit...

GREAT NORTHSIDE LOCATION. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, Heated garage/shop, huge back yard, lots of trees, Walk/Bike to Downtown Missoula. $180,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

www.mindypalmer.com

Includes radiant heated floors, garage, fire suppression sprinklers, covered back porch.

New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances

$179,000 358 Mari Court, Msla $305,900 • MLS# 908482 Beautiful Home Granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, stone fireplace. Built-in lockers off garage entrance, lots of storage, 2 hot water heaters, RV pad, RV dump and a hot & cold water spicket, backyard adjourns a park.

5BD/2BA home in a great neighborhood with a 2 car garage. Lots of storage, finished basement, kitchen updates.

I love being a Seller's Agent and working solely for YOU.

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Affordable, nice, newer home in central Missoula with 3 br, only $174,500, 1947 12St 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

406.239.2049

www.BuyInMissoula.com

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

Broker/Owner

Joy Earls SOLD 1/10 2904 Tina Ave #203 $145,000 • MLS#980145

SOLD 12/09 6549 Kiki Court, Msla $299,900 • MLS#808566

SOLD 11/09 1852 S. 8th West $179,900 • MLS#904867

SOLD 10/09 737 Evans, 1 block to U $399,870 • MLS#902594

• 40x82 insulated free span building • 1 acre with security fence • Three 14' overhead doors • 9292 Futurity Drive • $324,900 MLS#901478 Text:44133 Message: 12595 for pics

• Cute 2 bdrm mobile on 4 acres • Large double detached garage • Irrigation well on property • Owner financing available OAC • $169,900 • MLS# 905771 Text:44133 Message: 12884 for pics

• 23645 Mullan / Huson • Beautiful 14 acre parcel • Meadow with trees & pasture • Modulars or double wides ok • $184,900• MLS#906774 Text:44133 Message: 12881 for pics

• 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home • Addition for possible den or office • Shop & extra space in dbl garage • Zoned for multifamily or commercial • $135,000 • MLS#906610 Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics

1839 W. Central • $189,900 Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

$129,900

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900

Fully remodeled 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 1 car garage condo w/ new carpet, paint and appliances. Fully furnished w/ leather couches, flat screen TVs, and oak & walnut furniture. $156,000. MLS#908062. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Home has been well cared for, many updates. It is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large garage plus a huge storage shed. There is a master bedroom, 2 additional bedrooms. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. MLS# 907496

Price Drastically Reduced!!

4666 Scott Allen Drive • MLS#907272 Views of Missoula. 2 fireplaces. Spacious yard, vinyl siding & deck w/ beautiful landscaping & hot tub! NOW ONLY $399,900 $12,000 Buyer’s incentive if UC by 2/7/10.

Call me for more good values on Missoula area homes & investments.

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Darling 2 bd condo located in Lolo, close to shopping and schools. This is an end unit! Pergo floors, new tiled bathroom floor, new deck off of living room, upgraded light fixtures, bath fixtures and vanity. Outside storage off of deck. Access to large yard. Covered parking in the front!

See more pictures at: www.115ATylerway.com

There's Still Time to Take Advantage of the $8000 First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit or $6500 Move Up Buyer Tax Credit. Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

Learn More and Search all area listings at

Older Home with Vintage charm in great central Missoula neighborhood. 321 Tremont 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

115A Tyler Way, Lolo

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $285,000.

Nice, spacious home in South Hills close to Chief Charlo, updated kitchen $224,900 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

One owner - built 10 years ago, 5 acres on a branch of the Clark Fork. Trout & ducks. House sits towards water. Private s h o w i n g s o n l y. $ 6 7 9 , 9 9 9 . M L S # 9 0 6 9 2 6 . JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Large 5 BD Home

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. M L S # 9 0 3 5 9 6 . JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

RICE TEAM

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $269,900 • MLS# 908640

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit...

house for sale 727 Charlo Street in Missoula-2 bdrm, 1 bath-large 2 car garage-large fenced yard-on 2 lots$180,000 obo. 406-531-3582

Log cabin with no close neighbors. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 906248 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics

6112 Rains Place/Mullan Rd West

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, twocar garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

www.mindypalmer.com

www.mindypalmer.com

Immaculate home in a great neighborhood. 3 bdrms, sauna, nice yard, 135 Kensington 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

1255 sq ft, 3 bd/2 ba one level townhomes.

3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

Mary Mar ry

Call Kevin & Monica at 406-544-3098 Today!

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow

www.YourMT.com/TaxCredit

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C14 February 4–February 11, 2010

Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE

Price Drastically Reduced!! 5 bed, 4 bath & 2 car garage. 4666 Scott Allen Dr. • WAS $475,000, NOW ONLY $399,900 w/ $12,000 buyer’s incentive if UC by 2/7/10 call about specifics. • MLS#907272 JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 Price Reduction! Beautiful home with views of the Mission Mountains! 4BD/2BA. Hardwood floors, fireplace, loft over the family room, basement, large carport and private deck! $199,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

University area home, 3 bd, 2 ba, nice studio apartment above garage. 616 E Sussex 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2 Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths $279,900 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com

Real Change is in the AIR!!

DUPLEXES HWY 93 Com Trade 4 Duplex Hwy 93 Commercial shop & residence $225K TRADE for Missoula DUPLEX 406-883-6700 or 406-212-4680 Agent

LAND FOR SALE 19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $79,999 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Message:12890 for pics 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to

74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere.com Text:44133 Message:12589 for pics Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. $99,999. MLS#908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics QUALITY +/-8527 ACRE DEEDED RANCH, (+/-2742 cropland currently in grass/hay), well fenced/watered, +/2.5 miles Timber Creek, available immediately. www.montanalandauctions.com, Russell Pederson, Broker 406-939-2501

COMMERCIAL 3 Quizno’s Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! Major Price reduction now $580,000! May be purchased separately. Missoula, MT. Hutton Ranch also available- Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753, 543-4412 or Fidelity Real Estate 721-1840. DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings,

storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Polson HWY 93 Commercial shop & residence .8 acre $225K or TRADE for Missoula DUPLEX 406-883-6700 or 406-212-4680 Agent Rare income producing property in town. Call Beverly Kiker @ Prudential Missoula. (406) 544-0708 Fire Sale! $30,000 - Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

OUT OF TOWN

MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 370-7689, Prudential Missoula.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-Bankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan,

Is rebranding to The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 priscillabrockmeyer.com

Start MIXin' it up! 1230 N. First St Hamilton, MT 59840 406.363.4450

1500 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59808 406.549.3353

www.GreaterMontanaRE.com

themix.bigskypress.com

FEATURED LISTING • Well Cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home • Hot tub, A/C, U/G sprinklers • Near parks & trails • On a cul-de-sac, adjacent open space

5501 Bonanza Missoula

$319,900 MLS # 908771

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

pat@properties2000.com www.properties2000.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C15 February 4–February 11, 2010


Family Pack Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

$2.89

lb.

Organic Hass Avocados

99¢ each

Kona Coast Ginger Chili Hot Pepper Sauce

$1.19

15 oz.

Corona, Pacifico, Negro Modelo

$11.99 12 pack

Boneless Beef Cross Rib Roast

USDA Organic Premium Pinova Apples

$1.99

99¢

lb.

lb.

Don Julio Tortilla Chips

$1.19

10 oz.

Pabst & Rainier

$13.99

Gold'n Plump 14-16 oz. Chicken Tenders

USDA Organic Garnet Yams

Assorted 11-12 oz.Lays Potato Chips

Stone Cellars California Wines

2

99¢ lb.

Buy 1, Get 1 Free!

$4.59

For

$7

24 pack

.75 liter

USDA Organic Jumbo Red Onions

Assorted Rosarita Refried Beans

Roland Cherrywood Smoked Oysters

79¢

98¢

$1.39

lb.

16 oz.

3.66 oz.

Lynn Wilson 8" Thin Flour Tortillas

California Lemons Or Large Limes

Casa Fiesta Taco Seasoning Mix

Bean Cuisine Island Black Bean Soup

89¢

3 For $1

59¢

$2.49

1.25 oz.

15 oz.

Bar S Jumbo Meat Franks

$1 16 oz.

15 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


SEE WILCO FEB. 7TH AFTER THE BIG GAME! Tickets Tickets only only $25 $25 at at Rockin Rockin Rudy’s Rudy’s

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of politics, people and culture