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MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 4 • Jan. 28–Feb. 4, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Theater: Lauding Montana Rep’s hilarious Leading Ladies Scope: Writer Eileen Myles brings her post-punk style to UM Flash in the Pan: Pay homage with an authentic Haitian meal


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 4 • Jan. 28–Feb. 4, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Theater: Lauding Montana Rep’s hilarious Leading Ladies Scope: Writer Eileen Myles brings her post-punk style to UM Flash in the Pan: Pay homage with an authentic Haitian meal


Missoula Independent

Page 2 January 28–February 4, 2010


nside Cover Story On Dec. 8, 2009, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia settled one of the largest class-action lawsuits in the nation’s history. Cobell v. Salazar was fought for nearly 14 years in federal courts prior to the $3.4 billion settlement, and is now considered the greatest victory people in Indian Country have ever witnessed. We sit down Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters with lead plaintiff Elouise Cobell, a Montana native and member of the Blackfeet Tribe, to discuss her historic victory...............................14 Letters Questioning the questionnaire and Haiti .....................................................4 The Week in Review School starts, bark beetle funding and more quakes .............6 Briefs Black Star, smog and scooters .........................................................................6 Etc. Farewell Furious George .....................................................................................7 Up Front Accessibility issues raise questions at AmVets.............................................8 Ochenski Problems continue to plague Tester’s wilderness bill ............................10 Writers on the Range Kudos to Interior Secretary Salazar’s new approach..........11 Agenda Project Homeless Connect. .........................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan A Haitian meal ..............................................................................19 Happiest Hour Forest Lounge Steak House............................................................20 Ask Ari Much ado about MSG..................................................................................21 8 Days a Week Staying away from Q&As for a while ..............................................22 Mountain High Moonlight cross-country ski trip at Lubrecht Forest.....................33 Scope Writer Eileen Myles brings her post-punk style to UM..................................34 Noise Prefuse 73, Eyedea and Abilities, Dave Rawlings Machine and Shrinebuilder......................................................................................................35 Theater Montana Rep times Leading Ladies just right ...........................................36 Film Jackson buries substance in The Lovely Bones ................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

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PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith EDITORIAL INTERN Kyle Lehman CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

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Page 3 January 28–February 4, 2010


STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning at the University of Montana’s University Center.

Q:

This week UM President George Dennison announced that he’ll retire in August. What’s your lasting impression of his 20-year reign? Follow-up: What would you like to see Dennison’s successor list as his or her top priority?

Grace Decker: I’ve never known the University of Montana without him. Most haven’t. I think it will have a large impact that he’s leaving. Budget crunch: I think they’re going to have their hands full managing the budget cuts in this economy while trying to make sure neither staff nor students are negatively impacted.

Jacob Anderson: I really like him. I know in the last year there has been some controversy with the sweatshop and athletic clothes, but my impression is that he did a pretty good job. This old campus: I think that one main priority should be renovation of older buildings on campus instead of building new ones. In the grand scheme of things I guess it’s not that important, but it’s something I would like to see.

Zack Metesch: I’ve only been here two semesters so most of what I know of him I hear from friends, and they say he doesn’t take crap from nobody. Miles of red tape: Working out some of the bureaucratic problems with the process of registration and getting financial aid. Figuring it out is like pulling teeth.

Marc Hatten: I don’t think he took a lot of risks. He stuck to the status quo. It’s probably time for him to retire. We need some new blood. Technolog y is the future: Integrate more technology into the classrooms and provide more online classes.

Missoula Independent

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Uncivil questionnaire I am both concerned and dismayed by the growing threat posed by the group who have authored the “Questionnaire for Sheriffs and County Commissioners” (see “Patriot petition,” Jan. 21, 2010). This is no true questionnaire, but rather a proclamation of intent set forth by a disruptive, malevolent group whose purported goals and actions border on sedition. This body of malcontent agitators is a spin-off from the organization Celebrating Conservatism, which is in effect an incubator for extremism in the Bitterroot Valley. When discussing this extremist activity with a former Hamilton city councilman, I was taken aback to hear him assert that “militia groups are endemic” to the Bitterroot. Why is that, and is this something the rest of us care to invite or accept? Frankly, I consider this group’s behavior uncivil, intimidating, and a clear display of what happens when the deliberately intellectually disenfranchised permit themselves to be misguided and misled. The militia movement is neither generic nor easily dismissed as a “comic” subject. Their tendency to extreme anti-government ideology, combined with their paranoid-delusional conspiracy theories and fascination with weaponry and paramilitary structure, predictably result in militia members acting out in ways that underscore and justify the concerns expressed by public officials, law enforcement, and the general public. I thought it might prove informative to review some of the traits common to extremist groups: name calling and labeling; irresponsible sweeping generalizations (simple answers to complex issues); inadequate proof for assertions; advocacy of double standards; tendency to view opponents or critics as essentially evil; tendency toward argument by intimidation; use of slogans, buzzwords, and thought-stopping clichés; assumption of moral or other superiority over others; doomsday thinking; a belief that doing bad things in the service of a “good” cause is permissible; an emphasis on emotional responses, with less importance placed on reasoning and logical analysis; a tendency to believe in far-reaching conspiracy theories; inclination toward “groupthink;” and the use of supernatural rationale for their beliefs and actions, such as God is on their side. Do these character traits sound like something this community would care to see proliferate, to grow to become the norm? Or do you find the notion distressing? Mona Docteur, the self-proclaimed leader of Celebrating Conservatism, appears to love her time in the limelight, strutting around the stage with a handgun strapped to her hip. As a veteran of two combat tours, as an individual who has personally zipped many more bodies into body bags than the number of people who signed this absurd “Questionnaire,” I’m

Page 4 January 28–February 4, 2010

here to tell you that it’s only a fool who thinks there is anything glorious about armed conflict. Richard T. Landry Hamilton

CO2 and climate change In the global climate change debate (see “Climate unchanged,” Dec. 31, 2009), little is said about the adverse effects of high levels of carbon dioxide on all who breathe

This is no true “questionnaire, but rather a proclamation of intent set forth by a disruptive, malevolent group whose purported goals and actions border on

sedition.

oxygen. Because CO2 reacts with the oxygen in the atmosphere, as the amount of carbon dioxide in the air we breathe goes up, the oxygen level goes down. Both the atmospheric oxygen and the oxygen levels in the world’s oceans are decreasing and this is shown by simple measurements. Atmospheric CO2 levels are easily measured and have been measured for decades. The measurements show that CO2 is increasing. If CO2 levels continue to rise, oxygen deficiency will occur, especially to those who are most sensitive, the young and the old. According to a recent comprehensive study of fossil forms from the ocean bottom, we now have the highest levels of carbon dioxide in the last 2.1 million years. In spite of major climate shifts during that time, the carbon dioxide level remained amazingly constant until recently. That fact makes today’s carbon dioxide level of 385

ppm look even more unnatural and strongly indicates recent human activities are having a very serious effect. The debate over whether the climate is becoming warmer because of natural cycles or because of human caused effects is somewhat irrelevant with regard to the future of life as we know it. Increasing CO2 levels can and will have a disastrous effect. Our own survival should be our ultimate reason for cutting carbon dioxide emissions. Our CO2 problems require immediate action and solutions. Let’s work with Sens. Baucus and Tester to pass strong clean energy legislation out of the Senate early in 2010. Let our congressional offices know you are ready for action to lower CO2 levels before it is too late. Judy Hoy Stevensville

Haiti and clean energy With the recent devastation in Haiti, all hearts are heavy and saddened (see “Right place, right time,” Jan. 21, 2010). This goes for our children as well. I am a mother of two boys, and recently as I was driving them to school, my oldest son was asking questions about it. He is a beautiful child who tends to look for the positive lesson in everything. After expressing sadness (mostly for the children there) he told me that maybe this is a good reminder to take really good care of our Mother Earth. He is always pushing my husband and me to be better when it comes to our planet and all on it, which brings me to the purpose for my letter. I believe, even in this terribly sad time, to keep in the front of our mind just how important care for our environment is. Clean energy is in the forefront of this movement, and it will do far more than clean up this Earth that we will be leaving to our children and theirs. It will also assist in creating jobs, and comprehensive energy and climate policy will save American families an average of $900 a year by 2030. Comprehensive climate and energy policies can save businesses nearly $130 billion a year by 2030. We can save American households $1,050 a year by 2020 and $4,400 a year by 2030 through energy efficiency. As a mother who is trying to make ends meet while still upholding the wishes of my children to care for the planet they will be raising their families on, these statistics look good. In fact, the benefits of a clean energy economy are clear, the cost of doing nothing is too high. Now is the time to assist with life saving, cleanup and rebuilding in Haiti. Still, through our time of grief, and even while we assist those in their devastation and struggle, please, don’t put down this movement. Our children are counting on us. Beth Schreiber Stevensville


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Missoula Independent

Page 5 January 28–February 4, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 20

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announces $1.8 million in federal funds to help lowincome Montanans pay their 2010 energy bills. According to requirements on the agency’s website, a four-person family in the state must have a combined income of less than $37,412 to be eligible.

• Thursday, January 21 Pro-choice advocates rally at the state capitol in Helena to celebrate the 37th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. Speakers from Montana’s Reproductive Rights Coalition urge attendees to fight what they say is a rising tide of anti-choice legislation. Allyson Hagen of NARAL Pro-Choice Montana estimates that around 100 people attend the event.

• Friday, January 22 The U.S. Department of Agriculture announces $20 million to help fight bark beetle infestation in Montana’s forests. The money will help contain some of the 2.7 million acres of infected pine trees in the state, but the amount of individual forest allotments have yet to be determined.

• Saturday, January 23 Poor shooting dooms the Griz basketball team in a loss to cross-state rival Montana State, 61-52, in Bozeman. UM shoots just 17 of 42 from the field, including 2 for 11 from behind the 3-point line. On the bright side, the Lady Griz top MSU earlier in the day for the team’s first road win of the season.

• Sunday, January 24 At 11:09 a.m., seismograph stations monitored by the University of Utah detect a 3.0 magnitude earthquake in Yellowstone National Park followed minutes later by a 3.1 magnitude quake. The tremors are part of an ongoing series of rumblings that started on January 17.

• Monday, January 25 Students brave snow flurries and chilly winds—as well as, perhaps, wicked hangovers—to attend the first day of spring semester classes at the University of Montana. Following a five-week winter break, one student is overheard on her cell phone lamenting, “This has been, like, the longest day of my life.”

• Tuesday, January 26 A line snakes out the door at the Montana Caregivers Network’s Cannabis Convention at the Hilton Garden Inn in Missoula. Hundreds pay as much as $150 and wait as long as three hours to see a doctor who, in most cases, approves them for the medical use of marijuana.

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Molly Moody, community organizer for Health Care for America Now, leads local residents and MoveOn.org members from Sen. Max Baucus’ Front Street office to the Higgins Avenue bridge for a health care rally. The Tuesday gathering called on Democrats to immediately pass a strong health care reform bill, and not give up or scale back on the effort in the wake of Scott Brown’s Senate victory last week.

Smog

Montana eludes regs When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed strict new smog standards earlier this month, it released a map highlighting the counties around the country likely to be affected. Montana was the only state in the lower 48 completely free of colored blobs representing potential violations, and state air quality experts say that big swath of clean air is a big deal. “Ozone,” says Bob Jeffrey, air quality specialist with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “is one of the toughest pollutants this country has. In large part it results from personal lifestyle choices that we make as Americans, mostly having to do with all the motor vehicles we drive around.” The EPA’s proposal would set the standard for ozone within a range of 60 to 70 parts per billion (ppb), down from the current 75 ppb standard set in 2008. Montana’s monitoring stations haven’t detected ozone levels within that range. But a cou-

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Page 6 January 28–February 4, 2010

ple locations—including, interestingly, Glacier National Park—are close. Billings, Jeffrey explains, has the highest ozone level in the state. Between 2005 and 2007 it averaged 59 ppb. Meanwhile, a monitoring station in West Glacier detected an average of 57 ppb between 2006 and 2008. “What could be going on in West Glacier—and this is just pure speculation on my part—is that…we could be getting emissions generated in the Flathead Valley getting transported toward Glacier Park,” Jeffrey says. Some have used Glacier’s ozone level as a reason to oppose the proposed standards, arguing that if pristine parks in the West can barely achieve them then cities have little chance. But Glacier’s ozone level hardly stands out among all national parks. According to National Park Service data, a few national parks in California consistently record ozone levels above 100 ppb. The only impact new standards would likely have in Montana, Jeffrey says, would be to add more monitoring stations, perhaps in Missoula.

“It’s the second-biggest urban area in the state behind Billings,” he says, “and maybe that stuff sits there and stews long enough that we’re getting some ozone formation.” Matthew Frank

Wheels

Scooterville owners sell A little over a year since relocating from downtown Missoula to a storefront on Brooks Street, Scooterville Montana has made yet another big move. On Feb. 1, Missoula’s sole scooter outlet will reopen in a Quonset hut at Flanagan Motors. Flanagan Motors owner Shannon Flanagan says his automotive dealership should close on a deal to purchase Scooterville from owners Nancy McCourt and Gary Stein in the coming weeks. The couple approached Flanagan in December with the proposal, citing economic concerns unrelated to the store’s previous move in late 2008. “Sales were not good in ’09, and it’s anybody’s guess where the economy is going from here,”


Inside

Letters

Briefs

McCourt says. “So while we expect to sustain, especially with this new blending of our business into Flanagan’s, this is just part of being cautious.” Flanagan didn’t need much time to consider the opportunity. The dealership lost its Jeep franchise last year during Chrysler’s national restructuring. He also says he pursued the Vespa franchise in Missoula about eight years ago, but their retail requirements were too demanding at the time. It’s ironic, Flanagan says, that Stein should call him now. “Nancy describes it as sort of a quirky, unique business and I totally agree,” Flanagan says. “It’s just another thing we can add to the Flanagan Motors nameplate. In terms of motorized wheel transportation, we’re going to be your go-to guy.” McCourt and Stein finished transporting the store’s 30 scooters and mopeds to Flanagan’s this week. Retail and maintenance services will remain unchanged, but McCourt will be the only present staff member to follow Scooterville. “It’s been a real bumpy scooter ride,” McCourt says of the store’s seven-year run. “We’ve seen really nice growth…so it feels really good to have accomplished that with a seasonal business.” Flanagan and McCourt express mutual optimism over the purchase, which McCourt views as a “creative” business strategy. Flanagan says the venture was as risk-free as the dealership could ask for, and he has no desire to make unnecessary changes to Scooterville’s established reputation. “I love their name, and I like their product,” Flanagan says. “We felt that was a pretty good fit for us.” Alex Sakariassen

Beer

Black Star back on tap Whitefish’s Great Northern Brewing Company is celebrating a frothy revival. After a seven-year hiatus, Black Star Double Hopped Lager will again flow from Flathead Valley taps. “People miss the beer,” says Great Northern Manager Marcus Duffey. Minott Wessinger, Henry Weinhard’s great-great grandson, built Great Northern in 1994 specifically to brew Black Star. But after crafting the hoppy brew, Wessinger, who owns the beverage manufacturer McKenzie River Corp., says he found himself juggling too many projects. So the beer baron opted to put Black Star on the back burner until he could free up more time. “I just never wanted to give it anything but the best,” he says.

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

In 2002, Wessinger sold the business to Whitefish attorney Dennis Konopatzke. Great Northern hummed along, producing 12 brews, including Buckin’ Horse Pilsner, Hellroaring Amber Lager and its popular hefeweizen, Wheatfish. In 2006, Wessinger’s McKenzie River sold its Sparks and Steel reserve brands to MillerCoors for $215 million. The deal helped clear Wessinger’s dance card and, after deeming the timing ripe, he approached Konopatzki and broached the subject of bringing back Black Star.

The partnership could very well be a boon for the Whitefish business, as Great Northern will be the exclusive brewer and distributor of Black Star in Montana. With that in mind, Duffey’s got his eyes on tapping out the brewery’s 8,000-barrel capacity. Great Northern currently produces about 2,750 barrels of brew per year. If Great Northern hits capacity, Wessinger says he’s arranged to brew additional Black Star at a MillerCoors plant in Milwaukee. For now, the first step is stirring demand in Montana. And to do that, Great Northern must put the beer in peoples’ hands. “Our goal is to first and foremost dominate the Flathead Valley,” Duffey says. Great Northern will roll out Black Star during a party at the brewery on Feb. 6. The event is open to the public and coincides with both the Whitefish Winter Carnival and the brewery’s 15year anniversary. “We’ve brewed the first batch,” Duffey says. “It’s in our tank now.” Jessica Mayrer

Agenda

News Quirks

Exotic species

Frogs may hurdle red tape It would seem the biggest barrier to exotic species gaining entry into Montana would be the many miles they have to travel. Instead, it proves to be the state’s miles of red tape. A national pet store chain and a frog breeder petitioned Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) in mid-2009 to allow three exotic wildlife species to be possessed and sold as pets in the state—the Eritrea clawed frog, Cameroon volcano frog and the hermit crab. With the public comment period for the species classification ending Jan. 21, their fate will soon be decided. The three species’ journey has been a long one. After the petitions were submitted, explains FWP commercial wildlife permit manager Tim Feldner, the species went before the agency’s Classification Review Committee. The committee— composed of representatives from FWP, the Department of Livestock, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Public Health and Human Services, and two Montana residents, one involved in the exotic wildlife industry—made a recommendation to the FWP Commission to classify the species as “noncontrolled.” The commission made a tentative administrative rule, and then sought public comment. In March, most likely, the commission, after reviewing the roughly 30 public comments, will finalize it, one way or the other. “I’m encouraged that we’re getting these comments,” Feldner says. “A lot of them have been, ‘No, don’t let any exotics in, it will ruin our wildlife.’ That’s exactly the point. That’s why we’re here.” The Eritrea clawed frog (Xenopus clivii) is native to Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya and Sudan. The Cameroon volcano frog (Xenopus amieti) is native only to the highlands of western Cameroon. There are many species of hermit crabs, which are increasingly sold as pets. “To completely ban exotics in Montana is impossible,” Feldner says. “Walk into any pet store and you will understand why. It is also not necessary, as our function is to make sure that exotics that are allowed for private possession in Montana would not have any impacts on Montana’s wildlife, habitat, agriculture or human safety.” Matthew Frank

BY THE NUMBERS

1,700,000

Estimated budget cuts at the University of Montana for fiscal year 2011. President George Dennison announced the figure at his public address Monday.

etc.

George Dennison’s Monday convocation in the University Theatre started with the expected doom-andgloom of a speech on potential budget cuts for the coming year. But King George wowed many in the audience with a surprise follow-up: Come Aug. 15, he’ll be retiring as president of the University of Montana. If the wells of inspiration ever run dry at Six Flags theme parks, might we suggest a roller coaster based on the ups and downs of Dennison’s 20-year legacy at his alma mater? From record enrollments to sweatshop apparel dustups, each year has brought a new round of criticisms and accolades for Dennison. In 2006 alone, he was raked over the coals for his proposed code of ethics. The voices of opposition came from both in state and out, with skeptics claiming the university clause breached rights of free speech. Months later, the president was praised for his lead in fighting the much-ballyhooed Constitutional Initiative 97, a damaging cap on state spending. The man’s made friends and enemies aplenty, left an indelible mark on the campus and community, and taken his share of knocks—trust us, we dished out a few ourselves. He’s also responsible for the most rampant rash of construction in UM history, repeatedly denying that he has an “edifice complex.” It’s certainly no overstatement, then, to say Dennison has left some Paul Bunyan-sized boots to fill. And whoever slips into those boots will have to hit the ground at full sprint. In the coming months, regents will conduct an intense search process for Dennison’s successor. Commissioner of Higher Education Sheila Stearns says it’s still too early to say who the likely candidates might be, but we’re willing to bet not even Superman could make a seamless transition. Several shovels from building projects remain in the ground, relations with faculty and staff are tenuous at best, graduation rates are embarrassingly low and officials have already stated UM is “cutting into bone” financially. Indeed, alongside his retirement, Dennison announced future budget cuts could include raising tuition and moving to a four-day workweek. It’s no wonder the new president’s salary is expected to be $75,000 more than what Dennison makes—it’ll have to be to attract a worthy candidate. Regardless of who steps in to fill Dennison’s boots, we wish Furious George all the best in his retirement. He says he plans to use his free time to write a history of UM. And hey, if Six Flags doesn’t pick up our pitch, he could always build the roller coaster himself. We know he’s good with buildings.

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Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Cut off Accessibility issues raise questions at AmVets by Jessica Mayrer

they had to leave by 10 p.m., while everyone else was allowed to stay, the case for discrimination would be cut and dry, Brenneman says. “If you start talking about it in terms of gender or race, it’s absolutely outrageous,” she says. “And it really is not very different, frankly. She’s an adult, for goodness sakes.” Mike Might, AmVets’ owner, says he’s not aware of specific incidents involving Raunig. Ultimately, though, he acknowledges his bar just isn’t equipped for wheelchairs. And, as is usually the case, alcohol complicates the situation. Might points to incidents involving groups of friends who brought mobilityimpaired people and left them at the bar. That, he says, puts his staff in a tough spot. “What happens is we have drunk customers hauling them out of there,” he says. “I think the big thing is, who’s going to haul her back out?” Might, who has a prosthetic leg himself, says he’d like to make AmVets Photo by Cathrine L. Walters accessible for everyone, but doing so would be University of Montana student Tess Raunig, who was born with cerebral palsy, says prohibitively expensive. AmVets discriminates against her and other disabled patrons. “They’re denying people “If she wants to give with disabilities the right to go into their establishment,” she says. me $200,000 for an elevator, then we’ll do it,” he “I walked down the stairs with the help says. “I wish we had a ramp. I wish we had generally go out of their way to give her a an elevator.” hand getting in and out of the club. But of a drag queen,” she says. More importantly, Might maintains his Once inside, AmVets staff told her she that isn’t the case at Missoula’s unofficial gay bar, AmVets, and it’s put Raunig at the needed to leave early, Raunig says. She has- business doesn’t discriminate. In fact, he center of a dispute that speaks to the very n’t gone back since, and has called for an thinks that’s not the real issue. He says Raunig’s complaints are just the latest in an all-out boycott of the bar. identity of the establishment. “It makes me really mad that we still ongoing battle for AmVets’ identity. Might “AmVets is the most blatant issue I’ve had to deal with as far as access goes,” have that kind of blatant discrimination says his bar is and always has been a veterans’ establishment, and that doesn’t sit well says Raunig. “They’re denying people going on,” she says. Legally, AmVets is not required to be with the queer community. with disabilities the right to go into their “We are not a gay bar,” he says. “They handicapped accessible. The building was establishment.” Even able-bodied patrons sometimes constructed before Congress passed the want it as theirs exclusively.” Raunig acknowledges she’s seen bad have a tough time navigating the steep Americans with Disability Act in 1990, stairs to the basement bar on Ryman Street. which means it doesn’t have to follow the blood between the proprietor and memBut Raunig isn’t one to be put off. In the stricter accessibility standards in new con- bers of the local queer community. But she past, she’s had friends carry her down struction, says Disability Rights Montana says that’s not what this is about. It’s about providing the same opportunities to all AmVets’ stairs, much to the bar’s dismay. Attorney Beth Brenneman. But Brenneman says AmVets enters people. She says during the course of two years, “My issues with him are strictly based staffers increasingly tried to limit her alco- dangerous legal territory if it forces a dishol intake and time spent inside the bar. abled person to comply with a different set on the access,” she says. “It’s not because Presumably, she says, they were concerned of rules—like limiting servings or leaving I’m gay…It’s not accessible. That’s the point. And I don’t know if the gay commuearly—than able-bodied individuals. about her safety. “That’s a whole other bag of ham- nity necessarily wants his bar.” Though irritated, Raunig initially didn’t make waves. But the discrimination got mers,” Brenneman says. If a black person or a woman were told worse, she says. During an incident last jmayrer@missoulanews.com Most of the time, not much slows down Tess Raunig. And that’s fortunate, considering the wheelchair-bound University of Montana student, who was born with cerebral palsy, has a lot to do. Raunig, 23, sings in a band, is the reining Ms. Gay Missoula and dons a mustache every so often for drag shows around town. When Raunig goes out in the evening, the bars she frequents are usually wheelchair accessible. If not, Raunig says staffers

Page 8 January 28–February 4, 2010

winter, an AmVets employee stopped her as friends carried her down the stairs, saying she was a fire hazard and couldn’t enter the club. “The bouncer comes up and he’s like, ‘You can’t be down here.’ And I’m like, ‘I’m halfway down the stairs, okay? Just let me come down.’” Raunig recalls he then said, “‘Well, you can get up as easily as you came down.’” Friends hoisted Raunig back up the stairs, and she tried a different approach.


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

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Hoss is a really big dog with so much energy that he could probably light our building if we could figure out how to attach him to a generator! Get him some training, and he'd be an awesome pet.

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Silvia may look tough, but don't be fooled by that expression on her face. She's actually quite shy, and now that her companion cat was adopted without her, she's also lonely. She's ready to be rescued!

549-3934 REGGIE

SOPHIE

Sophie has practically grown up at the shelter, and it's past time for her to have a real home and family. She's been very patient, but it's hard for her to stay hopeful when she keeps getting passed over for adoption.

STEPHEN

Stephen has such a handsome, fluffy coat that at first glance he seems like a big cat, but he's actually rather diminutive under all that hair. However, he has a big personality to make up for his physical size! Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

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2310 Brooks

For more info, please call 549-0543 3075 N Reserve

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

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PA U L

SHILOH

Shiloh is a nine-monthold Border Collie/Jack Russell Terrier cross. As you can probably guess, she is filled with energy just waiting for an outlet! She needs an active companion devoted to keeping her mind and body busy!

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Paul is big and handsome, and he loves -really loves! -- people. However, he doesn't like other cats, which makes life in our cat room something of a trial for him. He longs for a home where he's the only feline in sight.

Reggie's family decided to clean house, and brought all their pets in to our shelter. He is a great young fellow with so much energy and camaraderie to bring to his new family. Perhaps you want to take him home Feb. 12th or 13th at our 4th annual Adopt-A-Thon.

CANDY

Candy is quite large for a female cat, and she has wonderful tabby markings in her coat. And, yes, we must admit that we named her Candy because she's so sweet!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

WRANGLER

You can just see the intensity pouring from his eyes. Wrangler is super smart, focused, and aiming to please. He just needs a job to do, whether it's working on a farm or ranch or just being your best friend.

NORMA JEAN

Like her name suggests, Norma Jean is absolutely stunning. She has a lush white coat with sparkling blue eyes. Although she is very playful and affectionate, she does expect to be treated like a princess.

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CLOVES

Would you believe me if I told you Cloves has been here since he was just a few weeks old?? And even more unbelievable, he keeps getting cuter and friendlier! He loves being hand-fed yummy snacks, and playing with his bunny buddies!

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CLAUDINE

Anyone that hasn't met Claudine just must come down to the Humane Society and visit her. She is a very special little girl. She was born deaf, but couldn't possibly let it slow her down any less! Loubelle Wissler 240-0753 KC Hart 240-9332 fidelitykc@montana.com

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These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 MAXIMUS

He knows he's fortunate enough to have gotten a second chance at life and will graciously thank you by cuddling with you if you come to see him. His tummy is full for the first time in years.

LOLLIPOP

Scheduled for "Routine Disposal," because her owners didn't want to pay for her annual shots anymore, Lollipop's blessing came in the form of a guardian angel that thought there should be nothing "routine" about the end of her life. She is a sweet girl who is looking for a family who will value her as much as she will love them.

MISTY

Emaciated and matted, she was found underneath a trailer house with her six newborn kittens. She fought against the elements to protect them and herself, her boldness securing their survival. Her kitties were cute as buttons and most of them have found loving homes.

EMMA

Born in a woodpile just as the temperatures started dropping, an elderly lady brought her inside against the protests of her grumpy husband. When the kindly woman died her husband didn't waste a minute tossing Emma back out into the cold. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Missoula Independent

Page 9 January 28–February 4, 2010


Beer Drinker’s Profile "Missoula/Seattle Connection"

Andrew

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

The great unwinding Problems continue to plague Tester’s wilderness bill

How do you like the rain/snow/slush mix? It's winter. I think that's what it should do. To me, it's beautiful. Are you a skier? I'm visiting from Seattle - not known for its ski resorts but if you earn it by hiking in, the backcountry in the Cascades skis wonderfully. Plus you can ski on volcanos. Why do choose the Iron Horse? It's high on my list of favored places when I visit - big windows and a comfortable atmosphere. Where I can watch it snow. Beer of choice? Big Sky Brewing IPA

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Missoula Independent

This week’s announcement by Montana’s lone congressional representative, Republican Denny Rehberg, that he can’t support the wilderness and logging legislation introduced by Montana’s junior senator, Jon Tester, should come as no surprise to anyone who has watched Rehberg’s political career over the last three decades. He has never supported wilderness and, as they say, leopards don’t change their spots. What his announcement does do, however, is signal the great unwinding of all the secretly negotiated backroom deals upon which Tester’s legislation is founded. Those with long memories may recall that Rehberg entered the Montana political scene as a 30-year-old state representative from Billings in 1985. Having already cut his teeth as a legislative aide and congressional campaign finance director a few years earlier, suffice it to say his role as a key Republican political operative was both well rehearsed and predictable. His tenure in the state legislature saw a quick rise for Rehberg and in 1989, he became the obvious successor to Republican heavy-hitter Jack Ramirez, whose smooth style and lawyerly demeanor hid a ruthless drive to achieve Republican political and policy goals. It was that year, as many will recall, that Montana’s senior U.S. senator, John Melcher, was replaced by Conrad Burns, a political novice with the southern twang of his native Missouri, a folksy manner and an ag radio show. Despite his lack of statewide political experience, Burns narrowly beat Melcher in the ’88 elections based on a couple of significant issues. One was the “let it burn” policy for Yellowstone National Park, which had seen about 2 million acres scorched during that long, hot summer. And the other was the Montana Wilderness Bill passed by Congress that designated 1.4 million acres of new wilderness in the state—more than twice the acreage Sen. Tester’s bill contains and including none of the more onerous provisions of Tester’s bill, such as mandated logging levels or release of currently protected Wilderness Study Areas. Although Rehberg was not formally in the House Republican leadership at the time, he was very active in campaign issues and Ramirez, his fellow Billings rep, was the House minority leader who would go on to become Conrad Burns’ first chief of staff at the end of the ’89 session. Like virtually all Republicans, Rehberg and Ramirez had no use whatsoever for Melcher’s wilderness bill and succeeded in getting then-President Ronald Reagan to kill the measure by pocket-vetoing it, which many say significantly influenced

Page 10 January 28–February 4, 2010

the Melcher-Burns race and led to Burns’ victory. Zipping ahead 20 years, we’re once again treated to now-Rep. Denny Rehberg entering the steamy political atmosphere surrounding designation of new Montana wilderness. And once again, anyone that expects Rehberg to support new wilderness is likely to be disappointed. After Tester introduced his wilderness and logging bill, Rehberg went statewide to hold some 22 meetings in the areas that would be most affected by the new wilder-

Until Rehberg “introduces his own version of a Montana wilderness bill, which is highly unlikely, those hoping he will bring resolution to the issue are probably living in fantasy

land.

ness designations. Not surprisingly, the feedback he received centered on the critical component of Tester’s bill most raised by opponents—that the wilderness designation would take place upon passage of the legislation, but the mandated logging levels (70,000 acres over 10 years) would perhaps never take place since the public’s right to legally challenge actions on national forests would remain intact. “If you don’t fix the appeals process, you haven’t fixed the process,” Rehberg told reporters. “I don’t think this bill accomplishes what it’s intended to accomplish and I’m for resolution of this issue.” Ah yes, “resolution” of the wilderness issue is just what Conrad Burns promised Montanans after the veto of Melcher’s bill and, as most will recall, he never went on to support a single acre of new wilderness in his 18 years in the Senate. Until Rehberg

introduces his own version of a Montana wilderness bill, which is highly unlikely, those hoping he will bring resolution to the issue are probably living in fantasy land. More to the point, Tester’s bill already garnered significant and perhaps fatal criticism from Agriculture Undersecretary Harris Sherman at its Senate hearing in December. According to Sherman, the bill’s mandates for logging, the funding required, and localizing decisions on national forest lands that belong to all Americans, would “Balkanize” the national forest system and lead to fund-shifting that make the mandates “likely unachievable and perhaps unsustainable.” And already, the wilderness acreage has been reduced through Tester’s changes to the bill at the behest of other special interests. For instance, the Butte Highlands were originally designated wilderness. But a single company in Butte asked Tester to allow military landings in wilderness—an unheard of provision—and knowing that such a precedent would never pass congressional muster, Tester simply removed the wilderness designation for the Highlands. Similar reductions of wilderness, bifurcating wilderness with motorized and mountain bike routes, and allowing motorized sheep herding have changed the original “partnership” agreement in only one direction—less wilderness. The moral of the story—and it’s applicable to many more policy issues than Tester’s bill—is the fallacy of using “collaboration” to put such measures together. As even Rehberg has pointed out, “collaboration” is simply an agreement among a limited number of participants, which is significantly different than widespread consensus. The backroom deal-cutters believed that once they decided for the rest of us what the boundaries and provisions would be, they would remain intact. That, however, reveals an unbelievable amount of naiveté as to how the legislative process actually works. Once introduced, a bill’s sponsor has no control over what the sub-committee, committee or full Senate and House will do to the measure. In fact, entire bills have been completely rewritten through amendment whether the sponsor agreed with it or not. Rehberg’s demands to “fix” the appeals process is just the start. Add to it the slow but steady disintegration of the wilderness acreage and it should be apparent that the great unwinding of Tester’s bill has definitely begun, but is far from over. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Balance of power

Say yes to “Your Highness!” A new volume collection from TIGI!

Kudos to Interior Secretary Salazar’s new approach by Thomas Power

As an economist, it startles me when representatives of the business community ignore basic economic relationships such as supply and demand. Yet oil and gas interests have been doing exactly that recently. It is hard to believe anyone in the country could not know we are in a deep recession. It has dramatically cut the demand for and, therefore, the price of most basic raw materials, especially energy. But the oil and gas industry keeps pretending this has not happened and instead has been blaming Interior Secretary Ken Salazar for the decline in the leasing of and drilling on federally owned lands and the resulting job losses. Oil and gas firms know better. Randy Teeuwen, spokesman for EnCana, North America’s largest oil and gas producer, characterized the current slowdown in drilling more accurately this past spring. He told the Pinedale Roundup in Wyoming, “We’re like most industries right now— banking, finance, auto industry, real estate. All the economic sectors are experiencing some downturn, and are sort of at the mercy of the national economy and the local economy.” In June, EnCana announced it would shut down large numbers of its producing natural gas wells in Canada and the United States until natural gas prices rose again. Other natural gas companies have done the same, as have most coal companies. So it makes no sense to blame Secretary Salazar for the decline in interest in new federal oil and gas leasing. Blame the recession for causing the prices of oil, natural gas and coal to tumble dramatically, by 40 to 70 percent between the summer of 2008 and the summer and fall of 2009. That is why there has been less enthusiasm among companies for leasing more federal lands for oil and gas development. It is also why only 3,267 wells were

drilled last year, even though the Obama administration’s BLM issued 4,487 drilling permits. Access to leases is simply not an issue these days for the oil and gas industry. Nationwide, over 65 percent of the onshore oil and gas leases that industry held in 2008 were not being developed. These undeveloped leases cover a huge amount of land that’s mostly in the West—over 32.5 million acres.

Our nation “is better served by a measured approach that reduces the boom-and-bust extremes the West has suffered through in the

past.

On Jan. 6, Secretary Ken Salazar introduced a new set of onshore oil and gas lease reforms, arguing they will provide more economic certainty for the industry and increased savings for the taxpayer. Going slower, according to Salazar, will reduce the likelihood of legal battles. Only 1 percent of oil and gas leases were protested in 1998, he said, as opposed to 40 per-

cent in 2008. Fewer protests mean fewer costs for the American taxpayer, because less money ends up going to help resolve protests and lawsuits. Reform will also provide more certainty for the industry, as companies will not end up bidding on leases that then turn out to be inaccessible due to unresolved protests. Yet, for some reason, we continue to hear industry arguing that reform of leasing policy will curb development of domestic resources. Secretary Salazar has an enormous responsibility over the management of our public lands and our need for energy development. The current slowdown in oil and gas drilling is an opportune time to find the right balance between our need for fossil fuels, our continued development of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, and the long-term health and safety of our air, water and wildlife. As Salazar recently put it, “Trade groups for the oil and gas industry need to understand they don’t own the public lands. Taxpayers do.” He is right, and he needs to work to strike the right balance. After eight years of an energy policy highlighted by a tilt toward industry and a historic lack of oversight, it is perhaps understandable that oil and gas companies now resist a more balanced approach. Our nation is better served by a measured approach that reduces the boom-and-bust extremes the West has suffered through in the past. That’s especially true for those communities where resource extraction is occurring.

www.tanglesmt.com

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

You want a great newspaper. . .

Thomas Power is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He has been an economics professor at the University of Montana for 40 years and is the author of six books on natural resource economics.

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Page 11 January 28–February 4, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks 829 S Higgins Mon - Sat 11-6 543.1179

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Sometimes the simple things many of us take for granted suddenly become out of reach. I’m talking about a warm meal, having a fresh pair of socks on hand, and having enough blankets to keep you toasty at night, among other things. If you find yourself in this situation—and you’re homeless or think you’re at risk of becoming homeless—you’ve got a chance Thursday to take advantage of a number of essential services during Project Homeless Connect. It’s a one-day event where local businesses, professionals and nonprofit organizations offer medical, dental and

THURSDAY JANUARY 28

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Give granny a meal she’ll appreciate by volunteering as a substitute driver for Meals on Wheels, a program where you’ll deliver hot meals to seniors around Missoula when needed. Call Missoula Aging Services at 728-7682. If you’ve been down on your luck lately, and are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, don’t miss Project Homeless Connect, which starts at 10 AM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free to attend, with no appointments necessary. Includes access to medical, dental and eye care, food, clothing, haircuts, credit counseling and other services. Call 258-4980. Lois Lane sticks it to the man: The Progressive Democrats of America present a discussion by Margot Kidder about why she thinks it’s necessary to increase pressure on our congressional reps to strengthen pending federal legislation—especially legislation most vital to Montana— from 5–8 PM at the Missoula Public Library’s large meeting room, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 543-5276. If you’d like to have a voice regarding Missoula’s active transportation system, consider heading to the 2010 Missoula Active Transportation Plan Community Workshop, which starts at 5:30 PM at the University Center Ballroom. Free to attend. Call 258-4989 and visit co.missoula.mt.us/transportation. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with a community approach to creative conflict resolution during a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com.

SATURDAY JANUARY 30 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

SUNDAY JANUARY 31 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP. Down a heady brew or two to help fund a field that oftentimes goes underfunded in this society during a Bitter

eye care, as well as food, blankets, clothing and a haircut, all for free. A number of folks will also offer counseling on credit, employment and mental health. You can also get legal advice and housing assistance, receive help with benefits enrollment, and take advantage of birth certificate/ID services. –Ira Sather-Olson Project Homeless Connect is Thu., Jan. 28, from 10 AM—3 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, with no appointment necessary. Call 258-4980.

Root Brewing Pint Night Fundraiser for the Hamilton Players, which runs from 4–7 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free to attend. $5 for your first beer, discount price for subsequent beers. Includes music by Free Range. Call 363-PINT.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 1 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 2 Get grubby for Haitians when the Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., hosts a Haitian Relief Fundraiser during the day featuring traditional Haitian dishes like “voodoo chicken.” The service staff will contribute 50 percent of their tips to agencies providing disaster relief for Haiti, and the Pub plans to match their contributions dollar for dollar. Free to attend, but you’ll have to pay for the grub. Call 721-7399. Volunteering as a barback at your favorite watering hole doesn’t cut it: UM’s Office for Civic Engagement offers you the chance to learn about volunteer opportunities in the Garden City during its Spring Volunteer Fair, which runs from 10 AM–2 PM in the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-5531. Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 4 Be a force for positive change by becoming a YWCA advocate for women and children in crises, or as a mentor for girls aged 9–18, during a volunteer orientation session from 5:30–7 PM at YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. RSVP by calling Diana Thompson or Jen Euell at 543-6691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org to download an application. Nab some shocking insight from experts in the know during a Peace and Justice Film Series screening of Rethink Afghanistan, which starts at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 January 28–February 4, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - After robbers used heavy metal drain covers to smash their way into a Welsh bank in Cardiff and make off with $171,156, police quickly identified the culprits because a witness remembered the personalized license plate—“J4MES”—on the sporty blue BMW used as the getaway vehicle. Police found James Snell, 27, and his brother Wayne, 34, holding more than $48,944 of the loot and rounded up the rest of the gang. “It was the distinctiveness of the car which contributed to the robbers’ undoing,” prosecutor Daniel Williams said. After receiving a report of a City Transfer truck broken down outside Renton, Wash., state police arrived to find a 19-year-old Tacoma man claiming the truck had run out of gas. At the same time, a City Transfer worker reported spotting the stalled vehicle, saying it had been stolen from City Transfer yard in Sumner. Shortly after police arrived, a City Transfer worker who witnessed the theft arrived and identified the 19-year-old as the thief. After the suspect’s arrest, Trooper Dan McDonald said the truck hadn’t run out of gas; the suspect had filled it with unleaded gas instead of diesel fuel. PROCUREMENT FOLLIES - Cities that installed energy-efficient traffic lights are discovering the new LED bulbs don’t burn hot enough to melt snow and can become crusted over in a storm, leading to accidents. As a result, crews are being dispatched after storms to clean off the snow by hand. “It’s a bit labor-intensive,” said Green Bay, Wis., police Lt. Jim Runge.

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ELBOW ROOM - The Wanxiang-Tiancheng shopping center in Shijiazhuang, China, opened a parking garage with extra-wide spaces to accommodate women drivers. The bays are 3 feet wider than normal and painted pink and purple. In addition, the shopping center hired female attendants to guide women into their spaces. “The added space helps us to park safely,” a driver identified only as Miss Zhang told the Hebei Youth Daily newspaper. “I think it shows respect for women.” ON THE CUTTING EDGE - Police in Beloit, Wis., said that when Yvone Coleman, 31, became suspicious of text messages from other women to boyfriend Lester Burks, 33, she confronted him with a knife. Burks responded by attacking her with a sword. Coleman required six stitches on her forearm. After police arrested Jared Weston Walter, 22, for snipping off the hair of a woman sitting in front of him on a bus outside Portland, Ore., they identified him as the “TriMet barber,” who prosecutor Chuck French blamed for “a number of incidents” in which women have either had their hair cut with scissors or “superglued” on TriMet buses. CUNNING MOVE - Canada’s second-oldest magazine is changing its name because its unintended sexual connotation has caused the history journal to run afoul of Internet filters and turned off potential readers. The Beaver, founded in 1920 as a publication of the Hudson’s Bay Company, will become Canada’s History with the April issue, editor-in-chief Mark Reid announced. “Market research showed us that younger Canadians and women were very, very unlikely to ever buy a magazine called The Beaver, no matter what it’s about,” Reid said. PATRIOTIC DUTY - Champion hurdler Jana Rawlinson had her breast implants removed to better her chances of winning a medal for Australia at the 2012 Olympics. Rawlinson told Woman’s Day magazine she “loved having bigger boobs” but didn’t want to “short-change Australia.” WHEN THE HEIMLICH MANEUVER FAILS - While handcuffing assault suspect Andrew Grande, 23, sheriff’s deputies in Bay County, Fla., said they observed him swallowing what turned out to be a “large bag of marijuana.” When deputies ordered him to “spit it out,” he continued to resist. Deputies tased him, whereupon he fell to the ground and choked to death, sheriff’s officials concluded, on the marijuana. WHERE’S WALDO? - Five years after Mark Weinberger, 46, fled from justice, authorities found him living in a tent high up in the Italian Alps, surviving on dried and canned food and snow he melted on a portable stove. Sought by U.S. law enforcement for performing unnecessary surgery to defraud insurance companies, Weinberger ran a clinic in Merrillville, Ind., and earned, according to his abandoned wife, Michelle, $200,000 a week before he wound up on the FBI’s most-wanted list. He had been sighted as far away as China before two Carabinieri officers located him atop Mount Blanc. After his capture, Weinberger asked to use the lavatory, where he pulled a hidden knife and cut his throat. Despite being an expert surgeon and an ear, nose and throat specialist, he missed the artery he appeared to be aiming for and was treated for a minor wound. MARKETING PARTNERS - Melt Bar & Grilled in Lakewood, Ohio, began offering 25 percent off to customers who show a tattoo of a grilled cheese sandwich. Meanwhile, neighboring Voodoo Monkey Tattoo is offering discounts on its grilled cheese designs. JUSTICE JUST ISN’T - Munir Hussain, 53, fought off three knife-wielding intruders who broke into his home and threatened him, his wife and children, then chased them down the street in Buckinghamshire, England, joined by his brother. They managed to bring down one of the fleeing men, Walid Salem, and conked him on the head with a cricket bat. Salem, who has 50 previous convictions, received a two-year supervision order, but Munir Hussain was sentenced to 30 months in prison, and his brother, Tokeer Hussain, got 39 months, both for using “excessive force.” THE NOSE KNOWS - Rather than stimulating the appetite, aroma may be the key to controlling it, according to scientists at an independent food-research firm in the Netherlands, who say they’ve found a way to enhance the familiar smells in food enough to activate areas of the brain that perceive stomach fullness. “It’s all about flavor release,” lead researcher Rianne Ruijschop explained, “without adding anything artificial.” EXPLODING UNDERPANTS AFTERMATH - Full body scanners being introduced at British airports to improve security may be breaking that nation’s child pornography laws. Terri Dowty of Action for Rights of Children warned that the scanners could violate the Protection of Children Act of 1978, which makes it illegal to create an indecent image or a “pseudo-image” of a child. Dowty and others want the government to exempt people under 18 from the scans.

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 January 28–February 4, 2010


n Dec. 8, 2009, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia settled one of the largest classaction lawsuits in the nation’s history. Cobell v. Salazar was fought for nearly 14 years in federal courts prior to the $3.4 billion settlement, and is now considered the greatest victory people in Indian Country have ever witnessed. The case, filed against the Department of the Interior, sought compensation for more than a century of mismanagement of Individual Indian Money (IIM) trust

O

accounts. Since passage of the Dawes Severalty Act in 1877, the U.S. government has accepted responsibility for managing millions of dollars accrued from resource development on land held in trust for thousands of individual Indians. Many see the settlement as merely a drop in the bucket compared to the vast sums American Indians are truly owed. “We still have a long way to go,” Sen. John Tester said in an official announcement shortly after the settlement, “but as a member of the Indian Affairs Committee, I’ll keep working with folks on the ground

to empower Montana’s sovereign tribes and make sure the federal government meets its trust responsibilities.” Lead plaintiff Elouise Cobell, 64, a Montana native and member of the Blackfeet Tribe, first uncovered evidence of account mismanagement by the U.S. Department of the Interior in the early 1990s while serving as treasurer of the Blackfeet Indian Nation. At the time her office was primarily investigating mismanagement of collective tribal trust accounts. But growing concern about the state of IIM accounts and the sums

robbed from them over decades prompted Cobell to file a lawsuit in 1996. The case dragged on for over a decade, with Cobell relying heavily on private donations and a legal team led by Washington, D.C., attorney Keith Harper. Cobell v. Salazer was punctuated by minor victories as well as harsh national criticism. Harper refers to the case as a “long road, a tough road,” rife with delays and unique defenses on the part of the U.S. government. Presidential administrations under Bill Clinton and George W. Bush failed to give the situa-

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

“There’s always an iconic figure that represents shifts in history,” says Keith Harper, lead attorney in Cobell v. Salazar. “The person that refuses to sit at the back of the bus, for example. In the issue of the government mismanaging Indian moneys, that figure is definitely Elouise.”

Missoula Independent

Page 14 January 28–February 4, 2010


Photos by Cathrine L. Walters

tion much attention. Those closest to the case hail President Barack Obama’s early interest in the plights of Indian Country, including tours to reservations during his presidential campaign, as a major milestone on the road to settlement. Cobell has come off publicly as something of a powerhouse over the course of her lawsuit. Part of that reputation stems from her roots as a Montana rancher and the strength of her connection to the Blackfeet. She’s the greatgreat-granddaughter of Mountain Chief, whose refusal to live exclusively on the Blackfeet Reservation launched a manhunt resulting in the 1870 Marias Massacre on the Marias River. Cobell exhibits that same strain of independence, openly displaying a reluctance to conform to the U.S. government’s historical views of Indian Country as a place in need of close federal supervision. She founded Blackfeet National Bank, the first tribally owned national bank in the country, in 1987. Now Cobell runs the Native American Community Development Corporation, a nonprofit affiliate of the Native American Bank. “Anybody who knows her knows that she has a spine of steel,” says Harper, a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. “She will speak truth to power without blinking, and she has a profound ability to galvanize people.” The Independent sat down with Cobell at her second-floor office in downtown Browning a month after her historic victory. Surrounded by numerous awards and an impressive collection of Elvis Presley memorabilia—she is an unabashed fan of the King of Rock ’n’ Roll—Cobell spoke about the origins of the case, the misperceptions about the victory and, above all, how this is just the beginning of a greater future for her people.

Independent: So how long have you noted problems with the management of Individual Indian Money accounts on the part of the United States government? Cobell: Forever. We all grew up in our communities, in our families, with people saying they had land and they weren’t getting any money. It was just a natural conversation at the dinner table in the evenings, and normally had a lot of relatives and friends and neighbors that

were constantly talking about how the government was cheating them. In fact, they’ve known since the 1800s, when the very first trust was established for individual Indian account holders in 1887, that it was corrupt. In one of the hearings that I had in Congress, [someone mentioned] a newspaper from the 1800s that said, “Indian trust funds in shambles, fraud.” So they were reporting the fraud on these trust accounts since the 1800s, and they had a photo of that in one of the hearings.

Independent: What do you think your chances of pursuing a case like this would have been 100 years ago?

Independent: So, in essence, you’re continuing what Mountain Chief started?

Cobell: If I would have done what I’m doing today back then, I would probably have been dead. The government killed people like me that asked questions, called them renegades. My great, great grandfather [Mountain Chief] was one of those people. He didn’t want to conform to staying just on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation because

Cobell: I would say so. It’s accountability, and I think the entire thing is making the United States government accountable to Indian people. They said when they did the Allotment Act that they would manage our trust land and moneys to the highest fiduciary standards. Where did that get us? They

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Elouise Cobell recounts her 14-year legal battle against the U.S. Department of the Interior one month after landing a $3.4 billion settlement. Cobell, a former treasurer for the Blackfeet Tribe, sued the department over mismanagement of accounts held in trust for individual Indians in the country.

Independent: But individual Indians had no influence in establishing these trusts, back in the 1800s? Cobell: It was a trust that was forced on individual Indians. They basically said, “You’re all incompetent, you’re all stupid. You can’t manage your assets so we will manage that land for you, we will collect the money and we will manage it to the highest fiduciary standards.” People never had control of their lands, and that was a trust that was forced on the people that’s still there today.

the Blackfeet country was the entire state of Montana. He felt that was wrong. They wanted everyone to stay right here and hand over their firearms. He didn’t want to do that. When they had the Baker [or Marias] Massacre back in the 1800s, that’s who they were after, Mountain Chief. I’m sure that anybody who challenged the way we challenged, there would have been hell to pay. Fear, I think, was a big thing for a lot of the Indian people, why they didn’t take it on earlier. And they didn’t have money to sue. That’s why it went on for so long—100-plus years before somebody filed a lawsuit.

got away with never having to audit, for 100-plus years…I would say we have to carry on a lot from where our ancestors at one point in time felt they were free and part of this land, and not continue to always live by somebody else’s standards. Maybe we should start living by our own standards. Independent: When you first entertained the thought of this lawsuit and started gathering steam toward litigation, did you realize how big an undertaking it would be?

Missoula Independent

Page 15 January 28–February 4, 2010


Cobell: Absolutely not. How we can get justice working with the different branches [of government] and their separations of power—I really believed in that. Gosh, if you could only let the president know. If you could get the attention of the president. I was such a pollyanna. Independent: Surely having served as treasurer for the Blackfeet for 13 years, you had some idea of the scale of mismanagement? Cobell: I started working on this with several other financial officers from other tribes—when I was working on the tribal trust accounts—because we knew there was a big mess there. It was through many hearings that a congressman out of Oklahoma who was the real champion in starting this, [Rep. Mike] Synar, began holding hearings and bringing the government in and questioning them on the accounting. He held his ground, and it was through that process that we got started. Then, after we had determined someone was listening, [Rep. Sidney] Yates, who was in charge of the appropriations committee back in the ’80s, approved appropriations for the Department of the Interior to reconcile and certify all the trust accounts. Not only the tribal trust accounts, but the individual trust accounts. Congressman Synar put four of us on an ad-hoc committee from Indian Country. So we got to be in the room when they contracted a huge accounting firm to look at these accounts. Every time they reported back, we got to hear what they said and that really empowered us. Independent: How did your family and friends react when you decided to take on the government? Cobell: I don’t even think they really understood what the effects would be. “Oh, yeah, I’ll sue the government.” I think every other Indian always says that, but a lot of people don’t go through with it. I think in this situation a lot of private people thought, “How’s she going to sue the government?” They underestimated what would happen. Independent: As the case progressed, did anyone believe you had a shot at winning? Cobell: I don’t think a lot of Indian people across the country would think we’d ever have a victory. I used to give these talks after we’d win a great big portion of this case, like in 1999 when the judge said the Department of the Interior was in breach of trust and all the systems were broken and had to be fixed. That was a huge victory. You’d go out to Indian Country and tell people about it and they’d go, “Yeah, yeah, ho hum.” I’d go, “What’s wrong with winning? Can’t you understand what a victory is? You’re so used to losing that you don’t even understand what it’s like to win.” Independent: So how did you convince yourself that you could win?

Missoula Independent

Cobell: I knew I was right. I really knew I was right, just from being the tribal treasurer and watching how they managed the tribal trust accounts. Money was missing from those accounts and they couldn’t reconcile them. I wasn’t a super intelligent person. Anybody could just watch the accounts and see that money was going out of them. I wasn’t taking it out, and I was the treasurer. So who was taking it out? I knew we were right. And I was just very fortunate to get a legal team…that understood that this was a financial issue, not an Indian issue. They stole money. I was just thinking of reading you a little note I got yesterday: “I wanted to congratulate you on your recent victory. I just happened to be listening to NPR the day

Indians.” That’s not true. It’s our money. It’s our own money that they stole from us. And people still think that Indians get government checks. Well, those checks are for the oil and gas and timber…from their own land. People in Montana are the hardest to educate. I just got off the phone with a lawyer from New Mexico that has worked with tribes for a number of years…He just called to congratulate me, and said, “I hope you understand, Elouise, this is one of the largest victories Indians have ever had in the history of Indian relationships with the government.” It is. It’s one of the largest, ever, and people just don’t get it. Independent: Over the past 14 years, you’ve become something of a folk

Photo courtesy of the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

Ken Salazar was one of four secretaries of the Interior to face off against Cobell in federal court. The parties reached a $3.4 billion settlement on Dec. 8, under pressure from President Barack Obama to end the lengthy dispute.

they announced it. I got very emotional about the whole thing”—and these are nonIndians, by the way—“During the ’40s and ’50s, our family lived at Fort Washakie, and I vividly remember all the oil trucks that passed by our house coming from the oil fields at the north end of the reservation. Members of the tribe would get a small per capita yearly, but it was nothing compared to what they were owed. I so remember the poverty on that reservation and how so much suffering could have been prevented if the government and the oil companies had been fair and honest. I can just imagine how muddled those records were when your attorney was trying to untangle them. My dad, Charles Spencer, was later superintendent up at Browning Agency, and although I am 10 years older than you I am familiar with your family names.” Independent: Just from talking to people locally in the past month, do you think people have a grasp of what this settlement means? Cobell: Nobody gets it, and Montana is bad for it. My husband was down in Valier or something and someone said, “Tell your wife congratulations, I’m really proud of her. But we don’t agree because this is our taxpayers’ money that’s going back to individual

Page 16 January 28–February 4, 2010

hero in Indian Country. Did you sense that reputation materialize during the lawsuit? Cobell: There’s a lot that stems from not just fighting for justice, but realizing what capacities have to be built into your community so that the government doesn’t get away with this, so you don’t have to have a Cobell v. whomever. This has really pushed me toward the work I do in community development. I’m the executive director of Native American Community Development Corporation…What we do is really build the capacities of our communities to access financial abilities as far as credit and capital. By having the government managing our assets, we were never able to do that. You could own 320 acres of land and have 20 oil wells pumping on it, and you couldn’t get a loan to send your kids to college. What’s wrong with that picture?…What I want out of this lawsuit is that history does not repeat itself, that we become smart enough as individual Indians to hold that government accountable if they’re going to continue to manage our trust assets…One of these days, we need to say, “Department of Interior, go take a hike. We’re going to manage all our own assets.” If we allow them to manage as

they have in the past, we won’t end up with any assets. We’ll be gone as a people. Independent: Your role as lead plaintiff in this case also came with a degree of unpopularity. What criticisms have you heard over the last 14 years? Cobell: I remember the older people were so accustomed to Indian agents, doing everything the Indian agents wanted. There was one old guy—I was in this big meeting out in the state of Washington—and he says, “You leave the BIA [Bureau of Indian Affairs] alone. The BIA has done nothing.” And I said, “So, is that why billions of dollars are missing from our trust accounts?” There were certain things that you had to take on like that, which I didn’t mind. I really didn’t mind. I kept thinking to myself, “What can they do to you? The only thing they can do to you is kill you. So what the hell, I’ll go for it.” The divide and conquer thing was a dangerous situation to be in, but the government has used that very effectively in Indian Country to win. I really didn’t take the negatives that seriously. The government did a lot of retaliation against me personally…A lot of lies the government’s told. I’ve been to situations where I’m supposed to speak, and the government’s said, “If she speaks, we can’t provide the funding for this conference.” They can make it hard on you. My income taxes have been audited every year to a degree no one can believe. Independent: Was there ever a point when you lost faith in what you were doing? Cobell: When the Clinton administration came in, I really breathed a sigh of relief. I thought, “This is going to be so easy now, because all I have to do is get to the secretary and things will change.” Then it was complete stonewall. [Interior] Secretary [Bruce] Babbitt wouldn’t even meet with me. It just became harder and harder. Independent: How did you deal with those moments? Cobell: There are times that you just have to pray. Fortunately I have a 27mile drive from here to my home. After they say something like “You can’t speak” or “You’re stupid,” you’d think, “Why did I do this?” I’d be driving and I’d look over at Ghost Ridge, out there at Old Agency, where all those people starved to death during Starvation Winter. They didn’t get their rations because the government hoarded their rations, and over 500 people starved to death. They just opened up these big old pits and covered them up. I’d look over there and I’d think, “Oh my God, why do you ever feel sorry for yourself? What would it be like to be a mother and have your children starving with you and dying?” Just like that you’d snap out of it and go, “I’m going to fight them till the end.”


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Missoula Independent

Page 17 January 28–February 4, 2010


Independent: Can you be more specific about those challenges? Cobell: When I filed this case, I really needed money. I only had $675,000 and I knew that I needed at least $3 million to start out and I was projecting we could have the government settle in three years. I had proposals out to all the foundations that have social justice focuses, then all of a sudden in 1997 I won that [John D. and Catherine T.] McArthur Genius Award. The president of the Lannan Foundation was reading the story in the New York Times and I was the lead-in to the story. So he called his office in Santa Fe and said, “Do you know this Blackfeet woman that won the McArthur Genius Award,” and she said, “No, but I just read one of the most dynamite

lost his leg below the knee, then got very, very sick and had to be on dialysis. The only thing that was going to save him was a new kidney, so I gave him one of my kidneys in 2004. That was when this lawsuit was going on full-blast. But it was just like the lawsuit; you have to do what you have to do. If you want him to live, then you have to do it. And it saved his life, because it made him eligible for a pancreas transplant in 2006. Now he has no more diabetes. He’s healthier than I am, gets around really good. But those were really trying times, and trying to juggle one of the largest class-action lawsuits in history with that was really tough. Independent: You work a fulltime job here in Browning. You’ve served

In the long run, I’ve really sacrificed a lot for this case.

poverty, and maybe we can get out of that poverty mode.

Independent: Were those personal sacrifices worth this settlement and everything it represents?

Independent: So what’s the next step as far as Cobell v. Salazar is concerned?

Cobell: I really think it is. Where you really get your strength as an older person who’s been through something like this is from younger people. I was back in Washington in Sen. [Byron] Dorgan’s office. This young man came up to me—he was from an Indian tribe in California—and he said, “I want to have my picture taken with you. In high school, I read about you.” In high school he read about me? Now he’s graduated from college and he’s an attorney? He

Cobell: Getting the settlement approved by Congress. That’s a big thing. It’ll have to be attached to a bill, because I don’t think it’s big enough to be a standalone bill. Somehow Congress will have to approve it, and they’ll have to do it by the end of February. If not, it’ll go to the Supreme Court…We kept that door open. If Congress approves it, then it goes to the judge for a fairness hearing. He’ll hear any complaints, and that’s what I tell people. If you don’t like it, then go to the fairness hearing. Then it’ll be approved and we move on. Independent: What chance do you think the settlement has of passing Congress? Cobell: Everybody, even [Sen. John] McCain, has said they support the approval of it. I don’t see why anyone wouldn’t. Independent: What’s next for you?

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Numerous awards line the walls and shelves of Cobell’s office in Browning. She’s been singled out for excellence for her founding of the Blackfeet National Bank, her work with the Native American Community Development Corporation, and her role in successfully suing the Department of the Interior.

proposals that was rejected by us from her.” She read the proposal that was rejected and he said, “Pack your bags. We’re going to Browning, Montana.” …We met up in East Glacier at a little café and he asked, “How much money do you need?” And I just was shaking, because I didn’t know what to ask for. I said, “A million dollars? I could use a million dollars.” He said okay. They spent I don’t know how long talking about the case, and by the time they reached the Great Falls airport he said, “We decided we’re going to give you $1.5 million.” By the time they got back to their trustees and had a meeting, they called me back and said, “We’re going to give you $2 million.” Independent: You’ve been bouncing between Washington, D.C., and Browning, Montana, for 14 years now. How difficult has all that travel been on your life back here? Cobell: Personally, we’ve gone through some really tough times. My husband [Alvin] got really sick in 2004 and almost died. He had diabetes really bad,

Missoula Independent

on the state Board of Directors for the Nature Conservancy and helped start the Blackfeet Land Trust. On top of all that, you and your husband own a ranch. You’ve been involved in so much beyond just the case in the last 14 years, how did you manage to juggle all that? Cobell: The lawsuit took me away from things I really loved. I eventually had to get off the Nature Conservancy board, which I wanted to stay on forever. It seemed like every time there was something really wonderful that you could really be happy about and go to, there’d be a hearing. When I won that McArthur Award, they take care of you for five years, and every year they take people on an expedition. The first year I was there, they said, “We’re going to Montana. We’re going to visit Egg Mountain and the dinosaurs and Elouise.” But the next year it was Turkey. I ran and got my passport for the first time and was all excited to go to Turkey, and that’s exactly when our trial started. So I felt really sad about that.

Page 18 January 28–February 4, 2010

kept saying I’m his hero and he just kept saying, “I’m going to keep going because I think what you’re doing is so important.” So it was inspiration I was able to give to younger people, and to a lot of women. You just can’t believe how many Indian women write to me and say, “I’m so inspired, because it makes me want to keep doing what I’m doing or makes me want to go into a career.” That’s been so rewarding. It’s so rewarding to hear back from younger people who think that this was a great achievement and it’s given them inspiration to go on and change their lives and do what they want to do. Independent: Is that what you’ll take away from all these years of litigation? Cobell: I learned this from my parents: Make life better for our children. I don’t like all the poverty. I don’t like houses that have trashy yards and wrecked cars. I don’t like what some of our communities have come to, and I just want to make sure that changes for the future. I know a lot of it is driven by

Cobell: I really want to work on making sure Native American Bank is very successful. And I think after a couple years I want to retire, continue to work on fun stuff that I’ve always liked to work on. I love living out in the country on our ranch, where I was born and raised, so I want to enjoy that more. I want to see my granddaughter, Olivia, more…And I’d like to spend more time with the Blackfeet Land Trust, because that’s really been neglected and we have to raise money for it. It’s one of the last pristine pieces of property that has the plants that exist nowhere else on the Rocky Mountain Front…I’d like to work hard there, fundraising to protect more lands and educate more of our young people to respect the land. Independent: So you’re glad to finally pick up where you left off back home? Cobell: When I leave Washington, I feel like I’m drained, like everyone’s taken all the blood out of me. But as soon as you drive into your driveway and you see those mountains, you’re puffed up again…you’re back to normal and you’re human again. When you’re younger, you think, “God, I just need to get away from here. I don’t like it. I want to get someplace where the action is and things aren’t as hard.” I always wanted to live in the cities. I lived in Denver and I loved it. I lived in Seattle and I loved it. I was never going to move back here. But once you come home, you know in your heart this is where you’re supposed to be. It’s a good feeling to live here at Blackfeet. asakariassen@missoulanews.com


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the

Good Food + Good Price = Good Mood

A Haitian meal FLASHINTHEPAN Eating Haitian food won’t directly aid earthquake survivors, and it isn’t a substitute for sending cash or other forms of assistance. But eating Haitian for an evening is a way of paying attention to a brighter side of Haitian life, and can be a valuable reminder that there is more to Haiti than suffering. Already, citizens of the world are catching up on their Haitian history and learning that long before the quake Haiti was the poorest nation in the western hemisphere, and one of the most environmentally degraded, politically oppressed and violent, too. If the disaster helps focus attention on this sore spot, perhaps someday we’ll recognize a silver lining to this tragedy. Whether you’re breaking bread together, taking a meal to a sick friend, or learning about another culture through its food, eating can be a bonding experience. So while our thoughts and support go out to the people in Haiti, how about a virtual trip there via an evening’s victuals, to remind us that Haitians deserve respect as well as help? While Haiti’s experience under French rule did much to set its tumultuous trajectory, a country could do worse, from a culinary perspective at least, than to be colonized by France. Our first dish, in fact, bears a vague resemblance to the French dish duck a l’orange. It’s called griot, a word that also refers to West African minstrels. Griot the dish is pork marinated in sour orange juice and then browned—a sort of pork a l’orange, if you will. It’s one of the most treasured dishes of Haiti, and very rare in a country where pork is a luxury. Sour orange, one of griot’s key ingredients, isn’t as easy to obtain as simple oranges gone bad. Sour orange is a distinct fruit in the orange family, and if you can get your hands on some, by all means do. Alternatively, Goya markets a sour orange marinade called Naranja Agria. Otherwise, limes can be used as well, or a mixture of lime and orange juice. If using fruits, cut them into quarters and squeeze the juice into a bowl. Save the peels.

Cut 2 pounds of pork chop or pork shoulder into half-inch cubes and toss the cubes in salt until they’re coated. Stir the peels of the squeezed fruit in with the salted meat, so the zest from the rinds can permeate the meat. Let it sit for half an hour. Now rinse the meat cubes under cold water. Place them in a pot and cover them with the juice. Add a sliced jalapeno pepper, a teaspoon of thyme, a quarter cup of chopped scallions (or onions), a quar-

ter of a bell pepper, diced, and a few sprigs of chopped parsley. At this stage, some recipes will tell you to marinate overnight, but as one seasoned blogger notes: “All Haitian grandmas will tell you that if you want your griot right away, you got to take the proper measures for that.” In other words, you don’t have to marinate it overnight to meet authentic Haitian approval. Add just enough water to the juice to cover the meat and seasonings, and simmer until the chunks are soft enough to push a spoon through—about 45 minutes. Remove the pork chunks from the pot and slowly fry them in oil until nicely browned on all sides. Then add the onions, parsley and peppers that remained in the pot, and a quarter cup of the liquid, stirring occasionally. When the liquid cooks off, turn off the heat. Serve the griot with cornmeal porridge, prepared as follows:

by ARI LeVAUX

Bring 8 cups of water with a teaspoon of salt to a boil and whisk in 2 cups of cornmeal. Keep whisking until all lumps disappear. Add crushed chile flakes if you wish. Simmer for 15 minutes, or until the grains are no longer crunchy. As it cooks, add water if necessary, and be vigilant with a scraper so nothing sticks to the bottom. When the cornmeal is soft, cook until it’s as thick as oatmeal, stir in a tablespoon of butter or olive oil, and pour into a wide, shallow dish to cool. Cut into pieces and serve. There are a lot of flavors going on in this meal. Griot, like the African minstrels of its namesake, is a storyteller. It sings a harmony of dissonant notes: the pungent heat of the jalapenos, the sour and sweet penetrating acidity of the citrus, the richness of the pork and its satisfying brown coat. The porridge’s creamy and subtle corn flavor carries the griot, and creates a wonderful juxtaposition of flavors and textures. It’s a pairing so complete that once you start eating them together you aren’t satisfied Photo by Ari LeVaux eating one without the other. But the reality is, just as Haitian meals are more likely to consist of cornmeal porridge alone, your griot will probably run out before the cornmeal porridge. If so, consider slowly frying slices of the leftover porridge in oil the next morning for breakfast. It develops a crispy skin and nutty flavor that’s surprisingly satisfying. Perhaps once you’ve eaten their food, you’ll feel connected to the Haitian people in a way that’s different from the connection you felt when you sent money to an earthquake relief organization. It’s a feeling of respect for the culture that created this amazing meal, rather than pity for the poor people whose pitiful world has come crashing down on their heads. In the end both respect and pity are worth indulging. After you enjoy your meal, consider how far the money you spent on that pork chop could go toward the Haitian relief effort. Let’s open our wallets as well as our mouths.

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as

artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burri-

tos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

LARGE 14" GOURMET RANCH HOUSE

$14.99

Chicken Breast, Bacon, Red Onions Tomatoes, Ranch Sauce Mention Coupon When Ordering

549-5151 • Delivery or Carry-Out • 11-11 Daily

Page 19 January 28–February 4, 2010


the

dish

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Resolve to treat yourself to the best in 2010 with home-made, super-premium ice-cream and ice-cream cakes! Stop by and try our shakes or ice-cream cupcakes! If you've other resolutions, keep them with fresh smoothies or home-made, fat-free, nosugar-added "Sinless" ice-cream! It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm, Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted freerange chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, crois-

HAPPIESTHOUR Forest Lounge Steak House Claim to fame: An unapologetic alternative to Missoula’s more progressive, Suburu-driving, granola crowd. The parking lot is full of rusted Jeep Wagoneers and Chevy El Caminos. Blue-collar patrons wear grease-stained pants and dirt under their fingernails. And barflies aim to protect that heritage: a bumper sticker behind the bar reads, “Loggers, Miners, Ranchers and Farmers are the endangered species.” Another noteworthy sticker behind the bar: “Guns kill people like spoons made Rosie O’Donnell fat.” What you’re drinking: A full bar offers a range of well drinks. Domestic drafts run $2.50 and a tall cold Busch will set you back $2.25. Who you’re drinking with: Almost entirely men in tractor caps, suspenders and flannel shirts. What you’re eating: Gizzards, “shrooms” and cheese sticks, along with four-piece chicken

dinners complete with jo jos, garlic toast and coleslaw. A chicken dinner runs $6.50 any day of the week, while Wednesday night’s $7.50 prime rib special lures employees of mechanic shops and truck stops across town, says Forest Lounge bartender Tuni Lefever. Happy Hour specials: When a full meal with a couple of drafts sets you back only $10, Lefever says the Forest Lounge doesn’t need a happy hour. “We’re always happy,” she says. How to find it: Look for the parking lot full of rusted rigs at 3695 West Broadway. It’s 2.2 miles from Russell Street as you head from downtown Missoula toward the Missoula International Airport. —Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour is a new column that celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

THE BLUE CANYON/BIG SKY BEER DINNER! ~$65 PER PERSON / $120 PER COUPLE + GRATUITY ~6:30PM FRIDAY FEBRUARY 5TH - IN THE BLUE CANYON BISON ROOM 1ST COURSE

3RD COURSE

BABY GREENS SALAD, APPLE CIDER VINAIGRETTE, DEHYDRATED APPLE CHIPS, SPICED PECAN-CRUSTED AMALETHIA GOAT CHEESE BEER: BIG SKY POWDER HOUND

CRISPY SEARED HUTTERITE DUCK BREAST, BLACK GARLIC SPAETZLE, BLACKBERRY-FIG BALSAMIC GLAZE BEER: BIG SKY KRIEK

2ND COURSE

BRAISED SMOKED BRISKET, CRISPY WIDMER CHEDDAR PEROGI, PORT DEMI BEER: BIG SKY ROBUST PORTER

INTERMEZZO

MILK CHOCOLATE, BAVARIAN MOUSSE, PEANUT BUTTER BOMBE, KHALUA CREME ANGLAISE BEER: BIG SKY IVAN THE TERRIBLE

4TH COURSE

HERB GRILLED SEA SCALLOP, CARAMELIZED SHALLOT ORANGE GLAZE, TARRAGON FOAM BEER: BIG SKY BELGIUM TRIPLE ("BREAKFAST BEER")

5TH COURSE

BASIL, WATERMELON SORBET BEER: BIG SKY SCAPE GOAT

THERE IS LIMITED AVAILABILITY SO BE SURE TO CALL 541-BLUE (2583) TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!!

Missoula Independent

Page 20 January 28–February 4, 2010


sants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 Join Pearl Cafe each Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday evenings for Bistro Night. Menus change weekly. February 1st - 3rd. Beat, Walnut & Cambazola cheese on a bed of winter greens. Veal braised in lemon cream with parsley rice. Pear & Almond Tart. one glass of Cote du Rhone. $30. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$

A

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ What’s For Dinner Meal Delivery Service • 406-207-2203 Delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door. Fresh dinner menu changes weekly, frozen dinner and dessert menus change monthly. Order by noon on Monday, deliveries are made Tuesday. Meals start at only $7.50 per portion. Menus and ordering available at www.WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com $-$$

$$–$$$…$15 and over

NOT JUST

Much ado about MSG

It’s true, the anti-monosodium glutamate bandwagon is one of the few conspiracy theories I haven’t signed onto. I don’t understand how a substance made from two things we commonly eat—sodium and glutamate— could be evil incarnate. I haven’t felt the effect myself, and I haven’t seen any studies that support the claims that MSG causes these reactions. MSG was first isolated from kelp, as a way of mass-producing the “umami” flavor that Japanese chefs have long known kelp broth to impart. Nowadays, most MSG is produced by cultivating the bacteria Micrococcus glutamicus on nutrientrich media and concentrating and purifying its MSG laden waste product.

Valentine

Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

ASKARI Q

COFFEE

Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. With two convenient locations, it’s easy to call in your order and pick it up on your way to play. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

Dear Flash, Please tell me it ain’t so! A while ago you wrote a column in which you actually appeared to be extolling the supposed virtues of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Since I regard MSG to be nothing less than evil incarnate, please explain. —My Sore Gut

MISSOULA'S BEST

It’s possible that something about this process does make people have a reaction to the product. It’s also possible that some folks are allergic to it. But people are allergic to peanuts, too. Does that make peanuts evil incarnate? Anyone who uses soy sauce or liquid aminos is adding sodium and glutamate to their food. Many cheeses and fermented products also have it. In fact, our bodies even synthesize glutamate. And sodium is a common component of table salt. And if you think combining the two harmless components creates a monster that’s more evil than the sum of its parts, that’s not the case. On contact with water, monosodium glutamate breaks apart into its two pedestrian components. My gut feeling is that there is something else going on behind the kitchen doors of some Chinese restaurants that may explain the famous “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome” in the late 1960s that lead to the MSG witch hunt.

SUSHI NIGHT EVERY MONDAY

403 N. HIGGINS AVE. • 549-7979

WWW.SUSHIHANAMISSOULA.COM

Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net.

Missoula Independent

Page 21 January 28–February 4, 2010


8

Arts & Entertainment listings January 28–February 4, 2010

days a week THURSDAY

THURSDAY October

29

January

28

You’re crafty, you get around: Organizers with the first annual Bitterroot Valley Spring Thaw Expo are currently looking for businesses and crafters who’d like to participate in the vending event, which occurs on March 13, from 10 AM–4 PM. Call Amber at 3631963 or visit bvspringthaw.webs.com for further info. Give granny a meal she’ll appreciate by volunteering as a substitute driver for Meals on Wheels, a program where you’ll deliver hot meals to seniors around Missoula when needed. Free to volunteer. Call Missoula Aging Services at 728-7682.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. If you’ve been down on your luck lately, and are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, don’t miss Project Homeless Connect, which starts at 10 AM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free to attend, with no appointments necessary. Includes access to medical, dental and eye care, food, clothing, haircuts, credit counseling and other services. Call 258-4980. (See Agenda in this issue.) If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Stick a brown bag on your head and surround yourself with others in order to enjoy convo on D’arcy McNickel’s book The Surrounded during another installment of the Bitterroot Public Library’s “Brown Bag It” book club, which meets at noon at the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Teens let html know who’s the boss of their binary code during “Teens Give Me MySpace at the Library,” a brainstorming session where kids grades 7–12 share their ideas for the Missoula

Photo courtesy of Terry Cyr

The avant-garde teapot. UM dance students host a benefit concert to help them attend the upcoming American College Dance Festival Northwest Regional Conference. Performances are Fri., Jan. 29, and Sat., Jan. 30, at 7:30 PM both nights at the Open Space, on the bottom floor of UM’s PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2832. Public Library’s MySpace page at 3 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Grab your art appreciation goggles and be ready to become the gatekeeper of aesthetic knowledge during an art guide training session from 4–6 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Cost TBA. Call Education Curator Renee Taaffe at 728-0447 Ext. 228.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. That “medicine” you enthusiastically puff just might be the cause of your parched eyes. Find out the true cause from an eye expert when Dr. Chad Nedrud leads the lecture “The Eyes Have It—Treating Dry Eyes” at 5 PM in the Gallagher Day Room at the Rehabilitation Instituate of Montana, at Community Medical Center, 2827 Fort Missoula Road. Free. Call 327-4141. While the types of art to be shown are TBA, you can bet your aesthetic juices will be bubbling over during the UM Artist Collective exhibit,

Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural. H A N D M A D E

F U T O N S

125 S. Higgins 721-2090 Mon – Sat 10:30 – 5:30 smallwondersfutons.com

Missoula Independent

Page 22 January 28–February 4, 2010

which hosts an opening reception from 5–7 PM at the University Center Gallery, in UC Room 227. Free to attend. Call 243-4991. Lois Lane sticks it to the man: Margot Kidder clues you in on why it’s vital that Montanans put pressure on congressional reps to strengthen pending federal legislation during a discussion presented by The Progressive Democrats of America from 5–8 PM at the Missoula Public Library’s large meeting room, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 543-5276. If you don’t bike, walk or run to this, don’t go. Just kidding. But if you’d like to have a voice regarding Missoula’s active transportation system, consider heading to the 2010 Missoula Active Transportation Plan Community Workshop, which starts at 5:30 PM at the University Center Ballroom. Free to attend. Call 258-4989 and visit co.missoula.mt.us/transportation. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Nov 29, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


Random bursts of thought have always led to some sort of creative revelation, right? Find out during The Creative Movement, a class taught by local artist Katie Ludwick where you’ll blend up writing, drawing, object exploration, and works on paper to create an idea smoothie of creative potential from 6–8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $10. Call 549-7555 to register.

(yes, he’s a descendent of Django), Itamar Erez and Stephen Bennett gently shred the night away during International Guitar Night, a mobile guitar festival that starts at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’ Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $27/$20 depending on seats. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org or call 862-5371 for tickets. Don’t expect to be speaking in binary code when Brian Jameson offers a devotional singing and chanting program with live music and a casual vibe at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Common Ground Center, 258 Roosevelt Lane. $3 donation requested. Call 381-0617.

An arm wrestling match is no match for Bruce Threlkeld, who pins opponents to the ground and teases them with his mix of pop, reggae, rock and bluegrass at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

Satan is not allowed in the building: The Rhythm Angels bring their radiant Americana straight from Nashville up to Polson when they play the Polson High School Auditorium, 111 Fourth Ave. E., at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance at True Value Hardware in Ronan or Fiddlesticks Music in Polson. Visit accessmontana.com/bigproductions.

Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with a community approach to creative conflict resolution during a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com.

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, scuzz punk—every Thu. at 6 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.

Bowling and karaoke go together like corporate “free speech” and democracy during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Two Rwandan buds try to smash the notion that “Hutus and Tutsi are supposed to be enemies” during the Bitterroot Public Library’s “Foreign Film Night” screening of Munyurangabo, which starts at 7 PM in the west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Let the flying spaghetti monster be your guide to questioning everything under the sun during another installment of Socrates Cafe, a philosophy discussion group which meets at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Scotty Wright gets beamed down to deliver steaming jazz piano licks and vocals when he plays with Eden Atwood at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com. Give guitarists permission to tickle you with their strings when Brian Gore, Lulo Reinhardt

Upcoming Lady Griz Basketball Conference Games

Want to entertain a large group of people at an upcoming Griz or Lady Griz basketball game? We offer great group rates in a couple of different packages. Call 243-2250 for more info.

Friday, January 29th @ 7:00pm Big Sky Conference Game Mismo Cheer Halftime Performance

Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Saturday, January 30th @ 7:00pm Big Sky Conference Game UM Dance Team Halftime Performance

Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

*All games played in Dahlberg Arena (Adams Center)

Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Bow down at the altar of a glitch-hop master when avant-garde instrumental hip-hop producer Prefuse 73 plays with Los Angeles’ The Gaslamp Killer and Voices Voices at 9 PM at the Palace. $12 presale at Ear Candy Music. (See Noise in this issue.) Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free.

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The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383.

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Page 23 January 28–February 4, 2010


Give Wartime Blues an ounce of your love and they’ll let you soak in their torrential downpour of tender Americana when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Tale,” a lecture presented by Wilmot J. Collins at 2 PM and again at 6 PM at the Blake Hall Board Room of the college, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. Free to attend. Call 756-3945.

He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free.

nightlife

FRIDAY

29

January

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia with Jody Mosher, every Friday at 9 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia by Joan Biskupic. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. Toddlers always find something to intellectually suckle or gnaw on at Toddler Story Time, which features age appropriate stories from 10:30–11:15 AM in the downstairs meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. This has nothing to do with the 1988 Eddy Murphy comedy: Flathead Valley Community College presents “Coming to America, An African Refugee’s

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Page 24 January 28–February 4, 2010

Those in Whitefish enjoy a preemptive strike of art during its 2010 Whitefish Artwalk, which starts at 5 PM and includes a slew of downtown businesses showing a variety of works including blown glass, mixed media and pottery. Free to attend. Guided tours of the walk are at 5 PM and 7 PM. To join a tour, meet at those times at Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave. A reception at the studio follows from 6–8 PM. Call 862-5929 and visit stumptownartstudio.org. Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Bad parenting not encouraged: Families First Montana presents its Parent Expo, which features workshops and informational sessions on parenting tips from experts from 5:15–9 PM at Mismo Gymnastics and Cheer, 1900 W. Broadway St. $40 couple/$25 person. Register by visiting thelifelonglearningcenter.com or calling 549-8765. Visit familiesfirstmontana.org for a full schedule of events. Jazz mandolin? Only in gypsy jazz when Le 3-Oh wanders to the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St, to play at 5:30 PM. Free. Touch others, well, almost: Dianne Keast, EFT Practitioner, presents a Free Reiki Level One and Reiki Share beginners training starting at 5:30 PM at 2500 Great Northern Ave. Free. Space is limited, RSVP required by e-mailing dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com or by calling 1800-809-0112. More specific directions included when you RSVP. Scotty Wright gets beamed down to deliver steaming jazz piano licks and vocals when he plays with Eden Atwood at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $25, includes dinner and drinks.

RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Don’t be such a hater: the Montana Museum of Art and Culture presents “It started with 4000 copies of The White Man’s Bible,” a discussion by the Montana Human Rights Network’s Travis McAdam about how the network obtained the books used in the exhibit Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, at 7 PM in the Masquer Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 543-3955. It’s like Girls Gone Wild, except with symphonic music, no nudity and no alcohol: the Missoula Symphony Orchestra presents its family concert “The Symphony Goes Wild,” described as a “roaring, soaring musical safari,” at 7 PM at UM’s University Theatre. $6, all ages. Call 721-3194 or visit missoulasymphony.org. Some say you’re more likely to get hit by lightning than get married after age 40, but that could change. Find out during a meeting of Singles of Missoula, a group for those ages 45 and up that meets with a “New Beginnings Social” at 7 PM at Paradise Falls, 3621 Brooks St. Free to attend. The group plans to go dancing at the Eagles Lodge later that night. Call Cletius at 541-2333. Get to know a man who knew how to get dirty with his hands during a screening of potter George McCauley’s documentary Archie C. Bray Jr.: Life at the Brickyard, which starts at 7 PM at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St., Unit A. Free. Call 543-0509. Get a taste of culture on the silver screen from our friends in East Asia during Chinese Cinema night, which features a host of TBA films, at 7 PM in Room 330 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2988. Gleefully watch others kickbox and beat each other around using a mixture of fighting styles during a Mixed Martial Arts and Kickboxing fight, which starts with the first fight at 7:15 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $10 at the door or advance by calling 544-0028. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and


Northwest Regional Conference during a benefit dance concert— which includes work by students, staff, as well as choreographer Bebe Miller—that starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, downstairs in UM’s PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2832. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Give Will & Keila a reason to break out a Ouija board when they summon the spirits of modern rock at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Their reign over Antarctica could only last so long: The Country Kings thaw bodies and melt souls when they play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Anthony B isn’t just another fish in the sea when he plays roots reggae Sat., Jan. 30, at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $22/$17 presale at Rockin Rudy’s. Locals E-Team open. cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue.) Help keep the garden of my old elementary school green by attending the Lowell School “Helping Hands Garden” benefit concert and silent auction, which features music by Tom Catmull and Jacob Kuntz, and starts at 7:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. E-mail sally.painter@umontana.edu. Let him bang your drum: Billy Jonas, the self-styled “industrial re-percussionist” brings his buckets, water jugs and guitar for you to watch him slap and strum when he plays the Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, at 7:30 PM. $15/$12.50/$10, depending on seats. Call 363-7946 for tickets or visit hamiltonpas.org. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Get your organ lovin’ on when Bruce Neswick plays an organ recital at Holy Spirit Episcopal Church, 130 S. Sixth St. E., at 7:30 PM. $10/Free children and UM students with ID. Call 542-2167. Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com.

Obedient peeps not allowed: It’s punk, metal and more punk during Rebel Fest 2010, a music festival f e a t u r i n g G n a r w a i L , Va l s a l v a Maneuver, Twitch’d and others starting at 8 PM at the Flathead Valley Community College Convention Room, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. $3, all ages. Admission gets you into the show tonight, as well as the 1 PM show on Sat. All funds go towards the Paul Mosby Memorial Scholarship.

Congratulations and Way to Go!

Domineering strings and arresting vocals merge delicately with a story about love and racial prejudice when the Alpine Theatre Project presents its rendition of South Pacific, featuring music by the Glacier Symphony and Chorale, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $30–$10 depending on seats. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets.

Sean Carlson

Mode of Sustainable Transportation: I bike when it is not icy; otherwise I take the bus or share a ride. How many days did you commute by sustainable transportation to work in December? Two or three times. I am better about biking in the summer. Why do you choose to use sustainable transportation to commute to work instead of driving alone? Biking is a nicer way to get around Missoula; also there is nowhere to park at work.

Dancers need artistic nourishment, too. Help raise money for UM dance students to head to the American College Dance Festival

Profession: Computer Programmer/Analyst What is Sean’s prize for being December’s winner? $100 gift card from Southgate Mall.

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Page 25 January 28–February 4, 2010


Belt out a few bars of somethin’ ridiculous at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hiphop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678.

every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

every Sat. at 646 Sixth St. W., at 11 AM. $10, includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247.

Zeppo MT leads an all out war on inertia when they command hips to wiggle to their blues and R ‘n B concoction at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

Little Georgia O’Keefes find their muse during the Zootown Arts Community Center’s Little Artists’ Program: Drawing Dragons, where kids explore and create through various mediums and techniques from 11 AM–12 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $15. RSVP by calling 5497555 or visiting zootownarts.com.

Business executives beware: Blue Collar plays variety music for a range of laboring brothers and sisters at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277.

Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free.

Showdown skirts you through the matrix of confusion and into the realm of rock when they play Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free.

If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free.

He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Miller Creek oozes the jam with the rock while Secret Powers lets the power pop pop out of their axes when they play a double header show at the Top Hat, at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327.

Wartime Blues snaps fingers and slaps feet in the most benevolent of ways when they play Americana at The Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free.

Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. She knows disco never died: Say goodbye to KBGA DJ Halfpint during her going away party “Last Days of Disco,” where donning flaming hot polyester is encouraged while swaying to the sounds of DJ Mermaid, Siren and others at 9 PM at the Badlander. Free. Drag queens and kings give panties something to scream about during the 2010 Panty Rock Drag Show, a night of drag, dancing and debauchery featuring Lexis Load LaRose de la Luna presiding over proceedings and DJ Kris Moon bringin’ fresh beats, at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Proceeds from the event go toward the UM Women’s Resource Center production of the Vagina Monologues. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment

Missoula Independent

The “Spread Eagle Beagle” goes beyond just a Melvins song during Birds and Art for Adults with Kate Davis and Bev Beck Glueckert, where you’ll draw from live raptors using graphite, ink and other materials from noon–2:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Nobody likes a bleeding appendage, so grab some tips on how to keep your furry friends free from leg traps during a Footloose Montana sponsored “Trapped Pet Release Workshop,” which meets

from 1–3 PM at the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Hwy. 93 S. in Missoula. Donations accepted. Call 274-7878 or visit footloosemontana.org. Get in the carnie spirit. The Hellgate Elementary PTA presents its annual Family Fun Winter Carnival, which features games, a cake walk, bounce houses and other activities from 1–5 PM at the middle school building of Hellgate Elementary, 2385 Flynn Lane. $15/$12 pre-sale at Hellgate Elementary. Call Sandy at 721-2145.

SPOTLIGHT bucket banger

SATURDAY

30

January

Heavy breathing and cold air become bedfellows during the Frost Fever 5k run/walk, which starts at 10 AM at McCormick Park, 600 Cregg Lane, and features a course which winds itself along Missoula’s riverfront trails. $25 registration fee, through 9 AM on Jan. 30. Register at Currents Aquatics Center at McCormick Park, or visit missoulaparks.org and call 721-PARK.

Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Pocket Purses” with Odette Grassi. Free, but donations appreciated and accepted. Register by calling 5495329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Kick it to the core for a Core-Kicking Pilates Class with Alison Laundrie

Page 26 January 28–February 4, 2010

Back in 1980, a group of Germans decided to make music with scraps of metal, tin drums and an assortment of other objects in order to make a cacophonous chorus of noises. These Deutsch lads, known as Einstürzende Neubauten, are considered pioneers in the genre of industrial music. Fast forward, decades later, to Billy Jonas. He doesn’t exactly play industrial music, but the Asheville, N.C., artist does utilize a similar approach to create “funky folk music for the whole family” by hammering out rhythms on plastic buckets, water jugs and other homemade instruments that he endearingly calls “industrial re-percussion.” And this dude really knows how to bang out complex rhythms on ordinary objects. That shouldn’t be a total surprise, considering he started slapping pots and pans as a high schooler, had a band in college that WHO: Billy Jonas WHEN: Fri., Jan. 29 at 7:30 PM WHERE: Hamilton Performing Arts Center, 327 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton HOW MUCH: $15/$12.50/$10, depending on seats played only found/recycled homemade instruments and studied under the late Nigerian drumming master Babatunde Olatunji. But Jonas isn’t just about busting out slick grooves. He sings with a chilled voice reminiscent of James Taylor, all the while flipflopping between cranking out beats and expertly strumming an acoustic guitar. His varied repertoire—which includes his selfstyled “Neo-tribal Hootenanny,” as well as children’s

songs—hits the Bitterroot this week. Considering the dexterity of his digits and songwriting ability, there’s no doubt in my mind that his performance should create a lasting sound. —Ira Sather-Olson


Freeform hippie dancing is probably not on the agenda: The Downtown Dance Collective invites movers and shakers of all ages to its Day of Dance, which includes demos and the chance to participate in a brief segment of DDC’s classes, from 1–3 PM at the collective, 121 W. Main St. Free to attend. Call 541-7240.

Library Tour, a presentation/discussion which he describes as “an instrument of civil relations” based in part on the belief that math is an ideal tool for learning, from 3:30–5:30 PM in the large meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit linkstarbureiy.com to find out more.

Indulge in a day of rebellious music for a good cause during the second day of Rebel Fest 2010, where punk and metal bands including Brothers of Sasquatch, Dead Deer Boy and others play at 1 PM at the Flathead Valley Community College Convention Room, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. $3, all ages. All funds go towards the Paul Mosby Memorial Scholarship.

nightlife

Feel free to ask “Is this Working?” when Chance Eaton leads an EFT training class at 1 PM, at Missoula Friends Meeting House, 1861 S. 12th St. W. $40. RSVP by calling 529-3252 or visit theovermanproject.com. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Sop up the sights of a true DIY Missoula institution during an open tour of the Zootown Arts Community Center, which runs from 2–3 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Free. RSVP by e-mailing Hanna at info@zootownarts.com. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 2 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue) Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. I’m bad at both magic and math, but maybe you’re not. Link Starbureiy presents the MAGICampaign:

Mudslide Charley gives state unemployment statistics the middle finger—well, not exactly—when they cure your woes with blues at the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Malarkey dunks the heads of drivel mouthed fiends into a bucket of only the finest whiskey when they play Irish ballads, jigs and jams at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Never let them do your taxes: The Discount Quartet slings jazz to eager eaters at Finn & Porter, 100 Madison St., at 7 PM. Free. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com. Domineering strings and arresting vocals merge delicately with a story about love and racial prejudice when the Alpine Theatre Project presents its rendition of South Pacific, featuring music by the Glacier Symphony and Chorale, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $30–$10 depending on seats. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets. Dancers need artistic nourishment, too. Help raise money for UM

dance students to head to the American College Dance Festival Northwest Regional Conference during a benefit dance concert— which includes work by students, staff, as well as choreographer Bebe Miller—that starts at 7:30 PM in the Open Space, downstairs in UM’s PARTV Center. $5 suggested donation. Call 243-2832.

Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free.

CSA Share with Garden City Harvest. Grab an app at gardencityharvest.org or call 523-3663. Applications are due Feb. 15.

The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200.

Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996.

Transport yourself back to a time when men wore ridiculous wigs during an English Country Ball, which runs from 7:30–10:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $15 couple/$8 person. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com.

DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, bootybusting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free.

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

They will shred, but ever so lightly: An acoustical smorgasbord of epic proportions goes down when Jessica Kilroy and Kier Atherton, Burke Jam, Nate Hegyi, Travis Sehorn, Jesse Netzloff, Hermina Harold and Lisena Brown, as well as Izaak Opatz play the Palace at 9 PM. $5.

Bring John Patrick Williams a side of chicken fried steak and he’ll make sure you get the gravy when he slings acoustic songs at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361.

Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

The Country Kings lead the fight against taxation without musical representation when they rip out country hits at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Set “Fire Pon Rome” with a crowd of like-minded irie souls when Kingston, Jamaica’s Anthony B burns one down with his reggae/roots music at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $22/$17 presale at Rockin Rudy’s. Locals E-Team open. Visit myspace.com/montanareggae. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all laughing at your shortcomings at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free.

A hammer and sickle is no match for Ball N’ Jack, who make staunch authoritarians worship liberty with a dose of rock at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Blue Collar liquifies all working class haters when they rock variety tunes at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. The Lifers scan your body for the best place to place a barcode when they rock Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Cottownwood Draw tickles your fun glands with bluegrass when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY

31

January

Who doesn’t enjoy a few chemicals in their vegetables? I certainly don’t. If you agree, consider getting a weekly supply of locally grown veggies and fruits this summer by applying for a

Missoula Independent

Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “Thanks Supreme Court, no really, thanks for making democracy a joke! “ Free. Call 543-7154. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Domineering strings and arresting vocals merge delicately with a story about love and racial prejudice when the Alpine Theatre Project presents its rendition of South Pacific, featuring music by the Glacier Symphony and Chorale, with a performance at 3 PM in the Flathead High School Auditorium, 644 Fourth Ave. W. $30–$10 depending on seats. Call 862-SHOW or visit alpinetheatreproject.org for tickets. Margery Whatley assures no ivory or black key goes without her embrace when she tackles the piano during a recital at 3 PM at UM’s Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $25 reserved/$10 general/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. Can’t wait for another episode of “Glee”? Get a taste of something similar but altogether different when the A capella ensemble Dolce Canto performs choral and solo vocal music at 3 PM at the Plains United Methodist Church, 206 Meany St. in Plains. $6 at the door. Call 826-8585. Down a heady brew or two to help fund a field that oftentimes goes underfunded in this society during a Bitter Root Brewery Pint Night Fundraiser for the Hamilton Players, which runs from 4–7 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free to attend. $5 for your first beer, discount price for subsequent beers. Includes music by Free Range. Call 363-PINT.

Page 27 January 28–February 4, 2010


Seek connection, mutual life, or even death using the ancient Japanese strategy game Go when a group of enthusiasts meets to play the game this and every Sun. at 4:30 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Email goinmissoula@yahoo.com.

nightlife Lose yourself in a cavernous setting where beer flows with narrative during another installment of the Second Wind Reading Series, featuring MFA student and fiction writer Megan Kruse and Hugo Visiting Writer Eileen Myles, at 5 PM at the Palace. Free. (See Scope in this issue.) Whet your kayaking whistle in more ways than you can handle during a whitewater kayak pool session hosted by the Montana River Association, which runs from 6–8 PM at Currents Aquatic Center, 600 Cregg Lane. $7/$5 students with ID. Call Kevin Brown at 370-4436. Improvisational movement with others takes on an extemporaneous vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Give voice to your creativity and spirituality with a devotional, improvisational song circle that meets the first, third and fifth Sun. of every month at 7 PM at Unity Church, 546 South Ave. W. A $2 donation is requested, but don’t let lack of funds (or shyness) be an obstacle. Call 542-1066. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Josh Farmer, the Freemole Quartet and DJ Mermaid. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. An array of oral narratives continues tonight at the Palace when Minneapolis’ Eyedea & Abilities bring smoldering hip-hop to the masses at 9 PM. $8. Includes opening sets by tour mates Dosh and Onry of Grayskul. (See Noise in this issue.) Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations during Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Sun. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

Missoula Independent

Page 28 January 28–February 4, 2010

MONDAY February

01

Quit that dead-end job and head down to the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center, 310 S. Curtis St., where you can brush up on your reading, writing and math skills in order to pass the GED or enroll in college during free adult education courses, every Mon.–Thu. from 8 AM–12 PM and 1–3 PM, as well as every Tue.–Thu. from 6–8 PM. Call 542-4015. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

nightlife Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Start down the path that leads to you being somebody’s private dancer during Birds & Bees LLC’s strip fitness class, which meets at 6 PM for women, and again at 7:30 PM for anyone, this and every Mon. for six weeks at Birds & Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St. $48 for the six-week class. Includes instruction on lap dances, floor work and isolations. RSVP by calling 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins lessons at 6:30 PM and then square dance party mode beginners’ sessions free/$4 273-0141.

Square Dance with beginners’ moves into full at 8. First two thereafter. Call

You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.alanon.alateen.org. Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. All those in favor of the hip-hop alias Boonedizzler, say aye: David Boone brings his acoustic folk flava to the masses when he plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. Joining up with UM’s French Club Le Cercle Francophone means you can repeatedly ask people “Pourquoi suis-je en vie?” or just brush up on your French skills when the club meets this and every Mon. at James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., at 7 PM. Free At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Rawk ‘n Roll Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Also includes a free nacho bar.


Alcohol and bowling go hand over foot during Monday Madness at Five Valley’s Bowl, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which features $1 bowling after 9 PM as well as $1.25 Coors Light cans this and every Mon. at the bowling center. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Get wobbly with free pool and bass-heavy music during Missoula Area Dubstep Monday, a new monthly dubstep DJ night which this month features Ebola Syndrome, at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM. Free. Men drink on the cheap and can enjoy a game of pigskin, as well as karaoke, during men’s night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Mon. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277.

TUESDAY February

02

If you suffer from fibromyalgia, consider easing your pain with a free, non-invasive test to be conducted by the Foundation for Wellness Professionals at 5:30 PM, Tue., March 16 at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. Space is limited to the first 10 callers, so RSVP quick by calling 541-2281. Get grubby for Haitians when the Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., hosts a Haitian Relief Fundraiser during the day featuring traditional Haitian dishes like “voodoo chicken.” The service staff will contribute 50 percent of their tips to agencies providing disaster relief for Haiti, and the Pub plans to match their contributions dollar for dollar. Free to attend, but you’ll have to pay for the grub. Call 721-7399. Volunteering as a barback at your favorite watering hole doesn’t cut it: UM’s Office for Civic Engagement offers you the chance to learn about volunteer opportunities in the Garden City during its Spring Volunteer Fair, which runs from 10 AM–2 PM in the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-5531. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Shadow or no shadow? Kids ring in Groundhog Day with a host of activities including drawing, games, stories and more during the North Valley Public Library/Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge’s Groundhog Day celebration, which starts at 11 AM at the refuge, just north of Stevensville. Cost TBA. RSVP by calling Patricia at 777-5061. Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656.

nightlife Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. Hey, we all overindulge sometimes, but when you’ve had enough, head down to Take off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a meeting which starts with a weigh-in between 5 and 5:30 PM, followed by a meeting at 5:30, this and every Tue. at the Rocky Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 6510 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 862-1233. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess what family of animalia the epihippus came from during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4152.

Times Run 1/29 - 2/4

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Mine the depths of your mind to strike creative black gold during the class “Oil Painting Fundamentals with Stephanie J. Frostad,” which meets this and every Tue. for eight weeks from 6–8:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $160/$144 members. RSVP by calling 7280447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

The Road

Beginners have to start somewhere, even if it means a few misshapen pieces: The Clay Studio of Missoula presents its beginning pottery class, an intro to wheel throwing techniques, glazing and all things clay when it meets this and every Tue. from 6–9 PM for eight weeks at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St., Unit A. $168/$160 members. Includes a one-half of total cost, nonrefundable down payment. Call 543-0509.

Precious

(R) Nightly at 7 & 9:05 Sunday matinee at 1 & 3:05

The Young Victoria Nightly at 7 Sunday matinee at 1 NO show Fri. 1/29 or Sat. 1/30

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave.

Nightly at 9 Sunday matinee at 3 NO show Fri. 1/29 or Sat. 1/30

Downtown Missoula

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521

Keep your mind outta the gutter. Learn what exactly the “backdoor” is while wrapping your head around the “stop and go” and slurping down a fuzzy navel or sex on the beach during free poker lessons at 6 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Includes drink specials. Call 549-4152. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Brown Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. Get stuffed with awareness so as not to get entombed in tufts of snow during an Avalanche Awareness Workshop which starts at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free to attend. Includes the option to attend a $10 field trip training that weekend for skiers, snowboarders and snowmobilers which you sign up for after a second lecture at 7 PM Wed., Feb. 3. Call 243-5172 and visit missoulaavalanche.org/events. Get your dramatic wheels spinning and hone in on that thing called a “voice” during the 406 Writers Workshop titled “First Chapters,” a salon-style workshop where novelist David Cates helps you churn out the beginnings of your novel this and every Tue. from 7–9:15 PM for six weeks at a TBA location. $150. Location will be disclosed after you register at 406writersworkshop.com. Call 493-0746. You’ll just have to figure out how to make Bmovies yourself: The 406 Writers Workshop presents a “Screenwriting Workshop” with screenwriter Catherine Jones this and every Tue. from 7–9:15 PM for six weeks at a TBA location. $150. Location will be disclosed after you register at 406writersworkshop.com. Call 493-0746. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.)

Missoula Independent

Page 29 January 28–February 4, 2010


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Your Exclusive Haulmark Dealer For Western Montana Financing Available OAC. All Major Credit Cards Accepted The holy grail hides in a herd of chalices when UM art prof Julia Galloway shows her work with other artists during the UM School of Art’s faculty exhibition, which hosts an opening reception Thu., Feb. 4, from 5–7 PM at the UM Gallery of Visual Arts, on the first floor of UM’s Social Sciences building. Free to attend. Call 243-2813. Exhibit officially opens Tue., Feb. 2. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? Which country is bordered by both the Atlantic and Indian oceans? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. If beer’s your game, Two Dollar Tuesdays at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, might be the place to be, where all domestic beer and well drinks are $2, as are shots. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Give Elephant Gun the authority to examine your body with their riflelike proboscis when they experiment with experimental rock at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent

Page 30 January 28–February 4, 2010

WEDNESDAY

03

February

Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. Volunteering as a barback at your favorite watering hole doesn’t cut it: UM’s Office for Civic Engagement offers you the chance to learn about volunteer opportunities in the Garden City during its Spring Volunteer Fair, which runs from 10 AM–2 PM in the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-5531. Kids get lost in the ether during Preschool Story Time at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton, when storyteller Star Jameson presents “Flying High With Kites” from 10:30–11:30 AM. Free. Call 363-1670. Bev Glueckert peddles only the best aesthetics to youngsters when she leads Art for Homeschoolers, an art class for kids ages 5–12 that meets this and every Wed. for four weeks from 1–2:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $45/$40.50 members. RSVP by calling 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Wed. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. Call 721-2665. Get the kids away from the world of digital clutter and into something gooey during Clay Classes for Kids, which meets this and every Wed. from 4–5:30 PM for six weeks at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St., Unit A. $65 for the six

week class. Call 543-0509 and visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org. Teens put a halt on indecision during the Bitterroot Public Library’s Teen Advisory Board, which meets at 4 PM in the downstairs west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free to attend. Call 363-1670.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts from a live model into a work of genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s non-instructed figure drawing classes, from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers


engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool cue, consider joining a weekly pool tournament at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which runs this and every Wed. starting with a sign up at 6:30 PM and the game starting at 7. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight players, includes one free drink per player. Call 830-3277. Gobbling down fried chicken followed by drinking copious amounts of alcohol probably isn’t a regimen included in “Diet, Exercise and Chiropractic,” a health basics lecture by Dr. Philip Guignard which starts at 6:30 PM at New Leaf Chiropractic, 410 W. Spruce St. Free to attend, but RSVP by calling 549-0119. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy both cravings by attending bimonthly meetings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running science fiction convention, the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. Get stuffed with awareness so as not to get entombed in tufts of snow during during an Avalanche Awareness Workshop which starts at 7 PM at UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free to attend. The lecture also includes a sign-up for a $10 field trip training that weekend for skiers, snowboarders and snowmobilers. Call 243-5172 and visit missoulaavalanche.org/events. Scratch “getting liquored up” from your list of seduction techniques: Birds & Bees LLC presents the workshop “Art of Seduction: The Keys to Confidence and Catching A Mate,” with instructor Billie Becker from 7–8:30 PM at Birds & Bees, 1515 E. Broadway St. $8, with a price reduction for bringing friends. Call 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other likeminded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will

help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: The country of South Africa is bordered by both the Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean.

nightlife

Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Girl You Know It’s True” by Milli Vanilli , (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free.

Squirt some mountaineering knowledge into your dome—especially if you plan to head to Peru this summer with members of UM’s Outdoor program—during the presentation/Q&A session “Mountaineering and Trekking in the Andes,” which runs from 5–6 PM in UM’s Fitness and Recreation Center. Free to attend. Call 243-5172.

Get a wicked case of “bowling finger” during Five Valley’s Bowl’s Wicked Wednesday, which features $2 bowling after 9 PM plus $2 cans of Bud Light this and every Wed. at the bowling center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Be sure you’ve grabbed yourself a designated driver so you can imbibe during Wasted Wednesdays at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers drink specials and starts at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. If you’ve been feeling a little snarly lately, let Luau Cinder mellow you out with their dub/funk sounds when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY

04

February

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Someone always gets to create a family jewel of some sort during a Family Glass Class, where families learn the basics of glass fusing with simple step-by-step instruction from 1–2 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $20. Open to those ages 7 and up. RSVP by calling 549-7555 or visiting zootownarts.com. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on Guitar Hero, Rock Band and more on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Use that dome to express yo’ self when Lineage Dance of Los Angeles presents a dance workshop from 3:30–5 PM for participants of all levels at the Missoula International School, 1100 Harrison St. $15 family/$10 person. Your piece will then be performed at 6 PM at the school during Lineage Dance’s benefit concert for Zane Goicovich. Call Karen at 327-6629.

Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

They put the edge in cutting edge: The UM School of Art hosts its faculty exhibition, featuring works by profs Cathryn Mallory, James Bailey, Edgar Smith and a slew of other aesthetic purveyors with an opening reception from 5–7 PM in the UM Gallery of Visual Arts, on the first floor of UM’s Social Sciences building. Free to attend. Call 2432813. The exhibit officially opened Tue., Feb. 2. Be a force for positive change by becoming a YWCA advocate for women and children in crises, or as a mentor for girls aged 9–18, during a volunteer orientation session from 5:30–7 PM at YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. RSVP by calling Diana Thompson or Jen Euell at 543-6691 and visit ywcaofmissoula.org to download an application. Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with a community approach to creative conflict resolution during a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Feel free to ask them a question, but don’t expect a verbal answer: Lineage Dance of Los Angeles hits the Garden City to explore lyrical grace, athleticism, as well as present dance work that “asks questions” and “reveals answers” with a performance at 6 PM at the Missoula International School, 1100 Harrison St. $15 for family of four/$10 person, with tickets at the door. All proceeds benefit Zane Goicovich, a child who suffers from epilepsy and Aspberger’s Syndrome. Call Karen at 327-6629. Pour some Mrs. Butterworth’s syrup on ye so you can get sticky to the sounds of the W.C. Worth Blues Players, who pour blues tunes down willing ear canals when they play the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Even the Hi-Line gets a shout out via contemporary dance during the H e a d w a t e r s D a n c e C o .’ s “Montana Suite” Premiere Gala B e n e f i t Pe r f o r m a n c e , w h i c h includes a silent auction, performance as well as a post-performance party starting at 6 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $25, with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and headwatersdance.org. Call 728-1131.

Missoula Independent

Page 31 January 28–February 4, 2010


Sharp wit hits the screen in HD during a special digital broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor, streaming live from St. Paul, Minn., at 6 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $19 plus fees with tickets available at all GrizTix locations and griztix.com. Visit morrisproductions.org. Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Some people might call him cheap, I’d just call him smart: Willie Weir, cyclist extraordinaire, discusses his worldly travels by bike and on the cheap during the lecture “A Frugal Cyclist’s Guide to the Universe,” at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-5172. Haters, stay at home: The Montana Museum of Art and Culture presents a discussion by Katie Knight, curator of the exhibition Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, at 7 PM in the Masquer Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. Keep your cynicism levels high in regards to the war effort in Afghanistan while also nabbing some shocking insight from experts in the know during a Peace and Justice Film Series screening of Rethink Afghanistan, which starts at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night

of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Theater in this issue.) Alissa Hannah makes her viola strings weep with joy when she performs a student recital at 7:30 PM at the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. The title sounds eerily similar to Nas’ classic hip-hop track “N.Y. State of Mind.” Columbia University assistant prof Josef Sorett presents the lecture “Empire State of Mind: Civil Rights Politics in the Age of Black Presidents and Hip-Hop Aesthetics,” at 7:30 PM in UM’s Urey North Underground Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-2088. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace at 9 PM every Thu. Free.

If you need some therapy via bass tones that shake you to your core and make your insides tingle, don’t miss Bassface, a monthly dubstep DJ night featuring a number of TBA DJs at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free.

If you enjoy boogieing on the dance floor, and watching drag queens and kings strut their stuff on stage, consider heading to this year’s 2010 Panty Rock Drag Show this Fri., Jan. 29, at 9 PM at the Palace. For just $5 you get to witness a drag show and soak in an array of dance-worthy tunes from my homeboy DJ Kris Moon. The party serves as a benefit to help the UM Women’s Resource Center put on the Feb. 13 and Feb. 14 production of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues. In fact, the evening’s auction gives you a chance to lock down a date for a performance of the show. Seems like a worthy cause to me. If you think so too, slap on your best dancin’ shoes and check it out. Before you do that, though, keep me in the know of your upcoming benefits, concerts and the like by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 29 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

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If you’ve never biked in and around Missoula in the wintertime under the light of the moon, after a fresh snow and away from those urban artifacts called “lamp posts,” try it sometime. While it can certainly be dangerous—think black ice—I find it pretty tranquil. It has something to do with the way the moon radiates off the snow, giving your surrounding environs an alluring glow. On Fri., Jan. 29, you can enjoy the luster of moonlit snow during a free Sunset/Moonlight Cross-Country ski trip at Lubrecht Forest. The trip, a joint outing between the Montana Chapter of the Sierra Club and the Rocky Mountaineers, starts at a TBA time and is apparently an easy jaunt for people not prepped for low-light skiing. The outing also includes a long break, so bring snacks and a jug with your strongest hot toddy mix—or perhaps just some hot cocoa. To find out where to meet, or to rideshare, contact Steve Schombel at 721-4686, or e-mail John Wolverton at yodelingdog@hotmail.com. Grab further deets by clicking to rockymountaineers.com. Perhaps your legs and loins ache for competition. If so, rest up and wake early on Sat., Jan. 30 so you don’t space the 28th annual OSCR Trail Head Series Race Cross-Country Ski Marathon, which starts at 8 AM with in-person registration at the Seeley Creek Nordic Ski Trails, near Seeley Lake just off Hwy. 83. The competition itself starts at 9 AM with a “head start” on the 50k race for slower skiers, and resumes at 10 AM for those more experienced. A 20k race hits the ground at 10:15 AM, followed by a 10k at 10:30 AM. $40 for the 50k/$30 for the 20k/$25 for the 10k. Grab a registration form at missoulanordic.com and call Lynn at 677-2343 or Adrian at 677-7474. Or, you could get your frost on and breathe heavy with your Garden City brethren. In that case, stick around town for Missoula Parks and Rec’s Frost Fever 5k Fun Run/Walk, which starts at 10 AM on Sat., Jan. 30, at McCormick Park, 600 Cregg Lane. Once you’ve dusted off that pair of old-school Saucony shoes and slapped on your sweetest running garb—just leave the short shorts at home, okay?—be prepared to dash around Missoula’s riverfront trails with

which starts with a barbecue at 1 PM, followed by a practice session on rail features that lasts until 2:30, and finally slipping into the rail jam by 3. $10 to enter, with registration due at noon at the mountain lodge. Visit ltpark.com/comps. Once Tue., Feb. 2, rolls around, play dress up for a day and carry around a groundhog—since it’s Groundhog Day—but don’t act surprised if people give you dirty looks or think you need to be institutionalized. Actually, nix that idea and go register for a snowshoeing/track ID trip on Sat., Feb. 6, since registration is due Tuesday. The trip will be led by outdoors maestro Lee Metzgar, a retired wildlife bio prof and “interpretive naturalist,” whatever that entails. $30. Visit life.umt.edu/crec/Outdoor/classes.php for more info and call 243-5172 to register. Whacking around balls is always encouraged during our next event: Missoula Parks and Rec’s Youth Winter Indoor QuickStart Tennis Program, which meets for kids ages 7–8 on Tue., Feb. 2, from 4:30–5:30 PM at the City Life Community Center Gym, 1515 Fairview Ave. This class meets this and every Tue. until Feb. 23. $40 resident/$32 non-resident. Register by calling 721-PARK. A class for kids ages 9–11 meets at the same time and place starting Thu., Feb. 4. Later that night, let avalanches know you aren’t gonna take their threats anymore by attending an Avalanche Awareness Workshop, which starts at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall. Free. A subsequent lecture meets at the same time and place on Wed., Feb. 3. The lectures culminate in two separate field trips that weekend for skiers/snowboarders and snowmobilers. That costs $10, and you’ll sign up for that at the end of the second lecture. Visit missoulaavalanche.org/events. Finally, check these events on Thu., Feb. 4: Willie Weir, an adventure cycling junkie of the highest order, presents the Photo by Cathrine L. Walters talk “A Frugal Cyclist’s Guide to the Universe” at 7 PM in quick rundown: Your dog pulls your lazy, Nordic skiing derriere UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall. Free. Also, don’t forget that around a course using a harness. Sound fun? Then register by calling Feb. 4 marks the start of the Telemark Evening Race Series at the center at 888-5454 or ring Whitefish’s Animal Hospital at 862- Montana Snowbowl. Find out specifics by e-mailing info@mis3178. Click to blog.glacierraftco.com/dog-skijoring-race-slated-for-jan- soulatelechallenge.com and visit missoulatelechallenge.com for a 30th for more info. registration form. Shredders of all ages will likely froth at the mouth during this next And with that, I’ll see you on the flipside, perhaps under the offering on Sat., Jan. 30: Lost Trail’s Freestyle Park—at Lost Trail effulgence of our lunar neighbor. Powder Mountain, off Hwy. 93 South near the Montana/Idaho borcalendar@missoulanews.com der—hosts its Second Annual Uncle Justin Ale Ham Rail Jam, the intent of kicking snow and taking names, or something along those lines. $25, with registration open until 9 AM on Jan. 30. Register in person at Currents Aquatics Center, 600 Cregg Lane, or online at active.com/running/missoula-mt/frost-fever-5k-fun-runwalk-2010. Call 721-PARK and visit missoulaparks.org. Sat., Jan. 30, also offers Cujo the opportunity to score some winter action during the Second Annual Dog Skijoring Race, which starts at 12 PM at the ski track behind the Glacier Outdoor Center, located off Hwy. 2 just outside of Glacier National Park’s west entrance. $25 pre-registered/cost TBA day-of, with 40 percent of the registration fee donated to the Humane Society of Northwestern Montana. If you’re completely unfamiliar with the sport, here’s a

Missoula Independent

Page 33 January 28–February 4, 2010


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Strong words Writer Eileen Myles brings her post-punk style to UM by Erika Fredrickson

Writer Eileen Myles has been described as the rock star of modern poetry. She was born in Boston in 1949, but she spent her post-college years in Manhattan’s East Village, befriending other poets like Allen Ginsberg and Alice Notley. She gave her first reading at CBGB’s—the now shuttered club that once hosted punk rock groups the Ramones and the Patti Smith Group. Though she’s published 20 volumes of poetry, fiction, articles, criticism, plays and libretti, she’s probably most famous for her lively readings. As the University of Montana’s Hugo Visiting Writer this spring, Myles will teach graduate classes in both poetry and non-fiction, as well as offer two public readings. Her recent book, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, riffs on everything from working class speech to queer Russia to flossing. We spoke with Myles about her book, academia, the term “queer” and what not to ask a poet. Independent: How has the poetry world changed since your days in the East Village? Myles: When I first came around there was definitely more of a mixture between the generations. It wasn’t understood that one has to get an MFA in order to be a poet. You went and hung out with the poets. But also there was more money given to public art institutions. It seemed a little more worldly and unprotected—but it might be that it was a more bountiful time. A lot of things that have happened in the last 20 or 30 years have changed the shape of real estate, of disease. Everything sort of shifted things to a more institutionalized place, I guess. I think that’s part of the challenge now.

municate. I like to throw some breadcrumbs in the woods so that conceivably one could follow me. Independent: Do you hit on other themes in the book? Myles: Yeah. The enacting of poetry by being a poet in the world and looking at things from that perspective. And being a lesbian. I think I use the word lesbian not that many times, but for a book that’s not about being queer, it’s an extraordinarily queer book. And I want the word “queer” to be a generous term, too. To call oneself a lesbian is to not claim to be from a Greek island. Especially

Myles: I think that’s always been the boring question that people like to ask of poets. Over the years I can’t tell you how many panels I’ve seen or been on where it’s like: “Does poetry matter? Is poetry political?” These are very empty questions. Poetry is anything you want it to be. It’s just language. And that vague question seems like a recipe for tedium. You could say: “Is poetry political, are oranges political, is a door political?” What the hell does that mean? I think poets should get better about refusing dull questions and, instead, talk about interesting things that could be very specific.

Photo courtesy of Andy Kropa

Eileen Myles, the University of Montana’s Hugo Visiting Writer this spring, is nothing if not outspoken. “A lot

Independent: Tell me about The of poetry magazines are pretty boring, and I think one of the biggest reasons is that they’re all poetry or all literary,” she says. Importance of Iceland. Myles: It’s a big mishmash book of Independent: You’ve criticized big-time poets for every bit of non-fiction I’ve ever written that doesn’t pur- in a country like America where we’re encouraged to port to be a story exactly. It’s fake catalog essays I wrote inform, I think queerness is just kind of the sign of the delivering poetry like a lecture. What sort of criticism have for [art] shows, and columns. Coming up in New York, artist. There certainly are a lot of queer artists, but I think you gotten over the years that you’ve either taken to heart there was kind of a tradition of poets being art writers and most artists would claim to be queer in some way in terms or blown off? Myles: I feel like people are always ready to make I was pretty resistant to it. But after a while I realized it of being oddly shaped or a misfit in some way. you think that what’s wrong is that you said anything at was a way to gain an audience, to make money, to engage Independent: You taught at UC San Diego. How all. Particularly for women I think people would rather we with another art form. So I wanted to put together a book would just shut up and smile at the work that we’re hearthat was very playful about what art writing could mean. I have you dealt with being a poet in an academic realm? went to Iceland for the first time in 1996 and I was comMyles: I thought of all the things I had encountered ing. And by the time you’ve earned your right to speak pletely excited about the country. It became an obsession. in my years of coming up as a poet, and the positive and publicly there are always plenty of people who have a lot I decided to write the longest non-fiction essay I’ve ever negative influences hadn’t stopped me, so why should to say about why you should or shouldn’t have said somewritten about Iceland and put that in as the planet in the the academy? But right away the problem was how to be thing. People like to get into that more bourgeois way of middle of the book that everything else can revolve me, how to be an artist inside of this institution. But I critiquing the style of the delivery rather than to say that around. like the idea of coming to Missoula for a semester they actually were completely furious at what you think. I because I like to teach. I like the sociality of an academ- think a lively culture is driven by people’s passionate Independent: Like Richard Hugo, you seem to write ic community but I like to know that I’m kind of a fleet- thoughts. We need more of that publicly. Eileen Myles reads at the Palace Sunday, Jan. 31, in a playful way that’s accessible outside of academia. ing part of it. for the Second Wind Reading Series with MFA fiction Myles: It’s important to me to put some handles in the work for various types of readers to apprehend, Independent: A lot of people don’t understand writer Megan Kruse at 5 PM. Free. whether it’s poetry, fiction or non-fiction. I don’t think poetry, but I also often hear poets ask that question, efredrickson@missoulanews.com any one of them has more responsibility or less to com- “Does poetry matter?” Do you hear that a lot?

Missoula Independent

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Prefuse 73

Everything She Touched Turned Ampexian Warp Records

Guillermo Scott Herren exceeds all expectations with his fifth full-length album under the alias of Prefuse 73. Everything She Touched Turned Ampexian is a head trip into a densely packed forest of mostly experimental, instrumental hip-hop. Considered by many to be a forefather of the “glitchhop” genre—much to his chagrin—Herren’s latest showcases swaggering beats hugged by a dizzying array of spliced, stretched and affected recordings of instruments, voices, clangs, synth blips and other sounds. It’s a familiar approach, but much more psychedelic and airy this time, thanks to the fact that Herren recorded these tunes on analog tape. He also keeps

Eyedea and Abilities By the Throat Ryhmesayers

I’m not intimate enough with rap and hip-hop to know what all the classifications and sub-genres are, although I’m certain that they must exist. Hell, every other style of music has them. But if there isn’t one called “art rap,” or how about “art hop,” then I am creating it and putting Eyeday and Abilities on the list. I’m not just talking about the packaging and artwork that

Dave Rawlings Machine A Friend of a Friend Acony Records

Finally. After years as “the guy who plays with Gillian Welch,” Dave Rawlings has released his own solo album. And, not surprisingly, the lanky tenor with the signature flatpicking guitar style has created one humdinger of a debut. (Even if it is awfully short at just nine songs.) Drawing deeply on Appalachian folk, bluegrass and old-time country, Rawlings proves definitively that his Americana-roots style played on archtop guitar is well on its way to legendary status. Yet to call this a solo album is misleading. Despite being released under the Dave Rawlings Machine name,

Shrinebuilder Shrinebuilder Neurot Recordings

Rumors of this thunderous collaboration gurgled to the surface more than a year before it actually happened. Unlike most “supergroup” projects, however, the result does not disappoint. Comprised of Scott “Wino” Weinrich (Obsessed, Saint Vitus, The Hidden Hand), Al Cisneros (Sleep, Om), Scott Kelly (Neurosis), and Dale Crover (Melvins), this project is the unleashing of a massive five-song epic that

Film

Movie Shorts

things ultra succinct, with many of the 29 tracks on this album clocking in at a minute or less. It all flows seamlessly together, and the conciseness keeps things crisp and intriguing. But I’d also argue the lengthier songs make this release shine: “No Lights Still Rock” at times sounds like a chorus of androids arguing over a sinuous, slinky beat, while “Regalo” pairs gorgeous Flamenco-esque guitar riffs and gritty rhythms with vaporous female vocals. As a whole, Herren yet again delivers the goods on all fronts, and makes the case that he’ll always be an innovator who outshines imitators. (Ira Sather-Olson) Prefuse 73 plays the Palace Thursday, Jan. 28, at 9 PM with The Gaslamp Killer and Voices Voices. $12 advance at Ear Candy. comprise the CD either, though it is excellent. This isn’t a CD you are going to throw on at a dance party. None of the songs feature big, butt-shaking rhythms, and the raps aren’t collections of clever rhymes and shout-along choruses. This is like dictation from a poetry slam event set to music influenced more by Sonic Youth than James Brown. Darkness reigns in the stories of bad relationships (“Spin Cycle”), drug abuse (“Junk”), and social commentary (“Smile”). No one will call this feel good music! Five or six spins are not enough to digest this record, and the listening experience is difficult to pin down. Fans of free verse poetry and slightly electronic-based music will likely find Eyedea and Abilities particularly intriguing. (Chris La Tray) Eyedea and Abilities plays the Palace Sunday, Jan. 31, at 9 PM with Dosh and Onry. $8. it could just as easily be another “Gillian and Dave” duet album; she sings on nearly every song. And in keeping with the “friend of a friend” theme, Rawlings welcomes not only Welch, but Old Crow Medicine Show fiddler Ketch Secor, and covers tunes by Bright Eyes, Neil Young and Ryan Adams. Not that his penchant for collaboration and covers is a bad thing; that distinct, sometimes-bouncy, sometimes-wistful, low-fi sound that we all associate with Rawlings wouldn’t be the same if it truly was just him playing alone. Here’s to a perfect springtime, front-porch album. Gather some buddies—Rawlings is best heard with friends, both his and yours. (Melissa Mylchreest) meets, if not exceeds, expectations. It should not come as a surprise. None of these guys hail from bands that do anything by the numbers. Each artist’s back catalog is a journey through doom, metal, prog and art rock. The recurring theme here is mood; the songs are dense and trippy, heavily dynamic, with vocal duties shared by three voices (Cisneros, Kelly and Wino). The dream team rhythm section of the always-innovative Cisneros on bass, and Crover on drums, is the perfect anchor for compositions that roll through the speakers like the ocean under heavy surf. Detractors will say it does not sound like a cohesive “band” effort, that the output is a little all over the place. That is valid, but irrelevant. This is a document of what four giants of a little known genre are capable of creating when they get in a jam room together. One should expect uncharted territory. (Chris La Tray)

Missoula Independent

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Natural women Montana Rep times Leading Ladies just right by Erika Fredrickson

In a 1992 episode of “Seinfeld,” George and Jerry of cross-dressing before that relies on the inane notion find themselves stranded at the airport. To get home that men dressing in women’s clothing is comical in they con a limo driver into thinking they’re his clients, itself. It’s so demeaning to be female! But Tuomi and Colin O’Brien and Dylan Murphy. Realizing the limo is O’Brien don’t lean on that notion alone, fortunately. headed to Madison Square Garden, the two assume the Their improv (or illusion of it) feels like it naturally men they are impersonating must be headed to a Knicks stems from likable men who dream of love and good and Bulls game. Lucky them! But the plot turns when fortune. Throughout the tomfoolery and outrageous sitGeorge and Jerry find out they are impersonating white uations, you never lose your investment in them as supremacists on their way to a convention. That’s farce real—however ridiculous—people. Nora Mundé Gustuson plays Leo’s love interest, for you. “Seinfeld” dabbles in farcical plot lines, but its mod- Meg, with the wit and physical comedy of Lucille Ball. ern take sheds the slapstick (with the exception of She’s classically lovely and adorably funny. Seth Kramer) for more psychological, darker comedy— Bowling, who always plays villains well, relishes Duncan’s nasty pout though the plot lines and big dollop of narremain just as improbacissism making him ble. Hyper dramatics the perfect straight and banter have been man to Tuomi’s and replaced with a subtle O’Brien’s zaniness. wink and dialog Hannah Kanengieter steeped in absurd as Audrey pretty much minutiae. In old farce, steals every scene with love is on the line. In her odd social awkshows like “Seinfeld,” it wardness. In some could be as trivial as a ways she fulfills the bowl of soup. Photo Photo courtesy courtesy of of Terry Terry Cyr Cyr dumb-blonde stereoIt’s funny how Ken L u d w i g ’ s L e a d i n g Barret O’Brien, left, and Bret Tuomi star in the type, but she’s far, far more intriguing with Ladies, which first pre- Montana Rep’s production of Leading Ladies. her roller skates and miered in 2004, doesn’t fit the profile of farce’s evolution from physical slapstick impression of Marlon Brando. She’s gullible, but weird, to dark comedy. Perhaps that’s because the story itself and gut-wrenchingly hilarious. Throughout the knock-down-and-drag-out antics, takes place in 1958, in the era of “I Love Lucy.” Without a thread of modern styling, there’s something antiquated you’ll notice how professional the cast is: how spot-on about the show. And yet, it’s perhaps that very fact—its they gesture or smirk or scream. But it’s not just about the acting. Christine L. Milodragovich’s costumes are return to disarming slapstick—that makes it so lovable. The Montana Rep’s Leading Ladies production is a practically their own characters—classic and breathtakmust-see, and that’s coming from someone who prefers ing for Meg, and absolutely outrageous when it comes dry comedy. It’s performed at a sprinter’s speed, to Maxine and Stephanie’s garish, sometimes fairyunabashedly silly and cheerfully animated—and trying winged, often hideously poofy women’s wear. And John to be a sophisticated, reserved audience member does- Shaffner’s and Joe Stewart’s striking pastel stripes-andn’t work; you will laugh uncontrollably. Director Greg flowers set design gives the illusion of an uncorrupted Johnson creates ever-revolving energy and momentum home perfect for the contrast of sexual innuendo and by keeping the effect of chaos strategically and decep- shenanigans. Leading Ladies embraces a sort of joyful innocence tively on an organized track. Leading Ladies tells the story of two friends, Leo and predictability you don’t find in current sitcoms. But (Bret Tuomi) and Jack (Barret O’Brien), Shakespearian predictable plots don’t diminish it. The show is almost actors doomed to the Moose Lodge circuit. They per- an athletic event in its demand for comedic timing (the form a mishmash of Shakespeare’s famous lines and three-minute ending reenacting the whole play in engage in dramatic swordfights to lukewarm crowds. reverse is breathtaking) and the actors’ ability to give They’re at their wits end. On the train they learn of an their characters depth, makes it all the richer. For old lady in York, Pa., who plans to give her fortune to Johnson, who marks his 20th year as the Montana Rep’s Max and Steve, short for, as it turns out, Maxine and artistic director, it’s a home run. Stephanie—her long lost nieces. The duo ransacks their On opening night, the show spurred the audience costume trunk and dress up as the nieces and claim the to jump to its feet and explode with applause. You money. Of course, it’s not so easy. Romantic mix-ups couldn’t help it. I predict that’ll be the reaction every ensue. Jealousy and suspicion threaten to reveal their night for the production’s entire tour. plot. Leading Ladies continues at the Montana For all their over-the-top antics, O’Brien (former Theatre inside UM’s PARTV Building Thursday, Jan. Missoula playwright for Eating Round the Bruise and 28–Saturday, Jan. 30 and Tuesday, Feb. 2–Thursday, Breach) and Tuomi play their characters with layered, Feb. 4, with a final performance on Sat. Feb. 6. 7:30 subtle quirks. Despite thieving intents, you gain empa- PM nightly. $18/$14 students and seniors/$8 kids 12 thy for Leo’s bright-eyed idealism and Jack’s sweet and and under. dim will to follow his friend anywhere. The actors keep those personas even in drag. And, we’ve seen this kind efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 36 January 28–February 4, 2010


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No marrow

RADON: TEST. FIX. SAVE A LIFE

Jackson buries substance in The Lovely Bones

NOW IS THE TIME TO TEST YOUR HOME FOR RADON

by Scott Renshaw

Yes, of course: A book is a book, and a movie is a movie, and only in some mutant form shall the twain meet. A filmmaker adapting a literary work—especially a well-known or much-loved literary work—faces a daunting task in satisfying fans of the source material, despite the fundamentally different demands of the two media. “It wasn’t as good as the book” often becomes a clumsy way of saying, “I like my eggs over easy, and you gave ’em to me scrambled.”

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ing the case, Jackson starts to spend huge chunks of screen time on George. We see him attending to the creepy dollhouses that are his hobby; we see him hiding a key piece of evidence during a police interview; we see him planning what may be his next crime. The growing suspicions of Susie’s younger sister, Lindsey (Rose McIver), and some tense set-pieces of her exploring George’s house are drawn straight from the book, but Jackson pulls that subplot into a bigger picture—

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On paper, it probably seemed to Peter Jackson that he had a take on Alice Sebold’s The Lovely Bones that was inherently more cinematic—more “movie-ish”— than the story Sebold told. But the problem isn’t necessarily that Jackson attempted something radically different than what appears in the book. The problem is that he didn’t succeed. Plenty of the most fundamental plot elements are the same, of course. We learn early on through the voice-over narration by 14-year-old Susie Salmon (Saoirse Ronan) that she was murdered in December 1973, and is telling her tale from beyond the grave. The perpetrator was a neighbor named George Harvey (Stanley Tucci), who is able to go on about his life while Susie’s parents (Mark Wahlberg and Rachel Weisz)— who know only that she has disappeared, no body or suspect having turned up—fail miserably at overcoming their grief. Susie, meanwhile, watches from a limbolike afterlife, pondering the life she never got to live and worrying over the family members left behind. Susie’s unresolved post-mortem existence serves as the metaphorical heart of Sebold’s novel, which concerns itself not just with the tragedy of Susie’s murder but the compounded tragedy of a family torn apart by a lack of closure. Jackson literalizes Susie’s world as a shifting, luminous dreamscape, similar to the one he created 15 years ago for Heavenly Creatures. And it often seems a bit too reminiscent of the cotton-candy heaven from the saccharine 1997 Robin Williams drama What Dreams May Come. At least in those scenes, though, Jackson is sticking to his source. His downfall really comes when it becomes clear that he sees The Lovely Bones as a gritty thriller. As Susie’s father becomes obsessed with resolv-

including an embarrassingly misguided final scene for George—that makes The Lovely Bones feel like capturing the killer is the entire point of the story. It’s hard to imagine that approach making the film anything but a conventional serial-killer thriller under the best circumstances, but it’s undermined completely by Tucci’s performance. Ordinarily a reliably understated actor, Tucci here turns into an absurd caricature of the Creepy Guy Down the Street. He prowls around his darkened house with his greasy comb-over, sits in his basement staring at a suspicious safe, and generally does everything but wear a flashing red “PSYCHO!” sign. Inexplicably, Tucci is being touted as an Oscar candidate—which would put him in good company with Mystic River’s Oscar-winning Tim Robbins in the category of “Least Subtle Representation of Emotional Instability Ever.” The shame of it is that, at least early on, it seems possible that both Tucci’s performance and Jackson’s approach could work. The scene between Tucci and Ronan in George’s underground “playhouse” builds a sinister tension, as we become aware along with Susie of the deep trouble she’s in. And Ronan is impressive throughout, particularly as the still-living Susie experiencing the first twinges of a grown-up emotional life. Once Susie dies, however, The Lovely Bones no longer seems interested in how its non-insane characters think and feel. Jackson was under no obligation to produce a duplicate of Sebold’s book. But it would have been nice to see him at least produce something real. The Lovely Bones continues at the Carmike 10. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 37 January 28–February 4, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK EDGE OF DARKNESS Mel Gibson plays a retired detective who shatters windows, pulls guns on peeps and fights tooth and nail to find out the true cause of his daughter’s death. But things get even hairier when he realizes his daughter’s political activism means he’ll have to sift through heaps of b.s. involving cover-ups and other treachery. Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:05 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:20, 4, 6:50 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30.

Noise

Theater

Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:55, 3:45, 6:40 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05. 3:45, 6:40 and 9:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15. DR. WAYNE DYER: WISHES FULFILLED What’s your purpose in life, to take up space? Motivational speaker Dr. Wayne Dyer certainly doesn’t think so when he hits the screen to talk about how you can focus on your aspirations. Carmike 10: 7:30 only on Thu.

Film

Movie Shorts

7:30 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Pharoahplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:05, 7:20 and 9:45. THE LOVELY BONES Peter Jackson leaps back to the screen sans aliens, wizards and hobbits in a story about a brutally murdered teen who keeps watch over her family in an elysian, “in-between” world. Can she keep her desire for retribution under wraps, or will she let her killer get caught? Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:05 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:55, 3:35, 6:40 and

THE TOOTH FAIRY Dwayne Johnson plays a cynical hockey player who has no qualms about dispelling myths to eager ears, but everything changes when he gets summoned to the joyous job of sticking money under the pillows of toothless children. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:50, with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:20 with additional Fr i . – S a t . s h o w a t m i d n i g h t . Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

NOW PLAYING

Missoula Independent

Page 38 January 28–February 4, 2010

SHERLOCK HOLMES Robert Downey Jr. plays Sherlock Holmes and busts kneecaps with the help of his cane-wielding sidekick Jude Law (aka Dr. Watson) in order to save England from annihilation. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Village 6: 7 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:40, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:30. TO SAVE A LIFE Randy Wayne learns to be a little nicer to the freaks, geeks and outcasts at his high school after a childhood friend commits suicide. But will his popular friends accept Wayne’s new love of social diversity? Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:05 and 6:35

WHEN IN ROME Kristen Bell is a happily single New Yorker until a trip to Rome lands her in the sight of Journo Josh Duhamel. Her prospects seem promising until she snatches up coins from a “fountain of love,” which in turn gets dudes like Danny Devito and Will Arnett begging her for dates. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:45 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:05 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:20, 7 and 9:40.

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE SQUEAKQUEL In case you didn’t get your fill the last time around, your favorite animated rodents are back—highpitched voices and all—in order help bail out a sinking school music program by shredding in a battle-of- “The liquor cabinet is that way, silly.” When in Rome opens the-bands competition. Carmike 10: 4:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES 12:10, 2:25, 4:40 and 7 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, Harrison Ford suits up to save the day as an over4:15 and 7. worked doctor trying to cure a rare disorder. Will Brendan Fraser be able to convince him to save AVATAR his children? Village 6: 7:30 and 9:50 with addiSam Worthington gets a 3-D makeover as he tional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium plays an ex-Marine whose alien body and human 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and mind is sent to pillage a new planet for its 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight resources, but does a chance encounter with a and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40. female humanoid help keep his eyes on the Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:20 with bounty? Carmike 10: 4:30, 5:30, 8 and 9, with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 2. Village 6 in 2-D: 8 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and IT’S COMPLICATED 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with Alec Baldwin hooks up with his ex-wife Meryl Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Streep, even though he’s remarried, only to then Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1:30, 3:30, 5, 7 and 8:30 with have Steve Martin barge in and rain on his love additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:30 and midnight parade. Village 6: 7 and 9:50 with additional and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 4:30, 7 and 8:30. Sat.–Sun. show at 1 and 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 3:50 and 9:10 with additionTHE BLIND SIDE al Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Entertainer in Ronan: Sandra Bullock plays an upper-crust mom who 4, 6:50 and 9:10. takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:10 LEAP YEAR and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:25. Amy Adams has a heart on for Adam Scott, and Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25 and wants to tie the knot by taking matters into her 6:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight own hands. Along the way, Matthew Goode steps and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10 and 6:30. in and screws up her plans in the best way possible. Carmike 10: 7:05 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in THE BOOK OF ELI Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 3:15 and 9:15 and Denzel Washington meanders through a wretched Mon.–Thu. at 4 and 9:15. post-apocalyptic wasteland, toting around a special book he claims is the key to saving the last scraps LEGION of humanity. But when Gary Oldman gets word of God smites earthlings like Dennis Quaid—but can its power, who comes out alive? Carmike 10: 4:15, fallen angel Paul Bettany save the day by leading 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. peeps to the second coming of Christ? Village 6:

McCarthy novel. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9:05 nightly, with no shows on Fri. and Sat., and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:05.

Friday at the Carmike 10.

9:20 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:05, 6:40 and 9:20. NINE This dance-tastic adaptation of the musical follows Daniel Day-Lewis as he deals with creative roadblocks and literally struggles to keep his pants on as he juggles all the women in his life, including Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz, Nicole Kidman and others. Village 6: 7:15 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 4:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. PRECIOUS An African American teen in Harlem gets dealt many blows: she’s impregnated by her father, her mom is an abusive she-devil, and she’s illiterate. But can a vigorous alternative school teacher help her find hope? Wilma Theatre: 9 nightly with Sun. matinee at 3. No shows Fri., Jan. 29, and Sat., Jan. 30. THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG New Orleans finally gets positive, post-Katrina exposure in this animated tale about a prince turned frog who hopes to leap back to manhood with the help of a naïve girl, voodoo practitioner and other bayou dwellers. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. THE ROAD Viggo Mortensen plays a dad trying to navigate his son through a post-apocalyptic world full of frenzied cannibals, decimated landscapes and scarce resources in this adaptation of the Cormac

UP IN THE AIR George Clooney likes to fly, a lot. But when his employer skimps out on frequently flying him places, he worries that he might lose out on a romantic interlude with fellow traveler Vera Farmiga. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. WINTER DAYDREAMS Take an animated trip into NoWhereLand and other astonishing lands with your kids’ favorite piglet Olivia, as well as sidekicks Franny and Maggie, as they embark on a number of fanciful expeditions to do things like save reindeer and play in enchanted tufts of snow. Village 6: 1 only Sat.–Sun. THE YOUNG VICTORIA British aristocracy hits the screen in this movie about the early reign of Britian’s 19th century empress Queen Victoria, and her quest to wed and bed Prince Albert. Wilma Theatre: 7 nightly with a Sun. matinee at 1. No shows Fri., Jan. 29, and Sat., Jan. 30. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan 29. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 39 January 28–February 4, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

Jan. 21–Jan. 28, 2010

www.missoulanews.com

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Purple Jumpsuit We were the only two in the locker room. I was just getting out of the shower. You were wearing a purple jumpsuit and sweatbands. You look really familiar. Have I seen you around town? Man to Man January 22nd

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PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS

VOLUNTEERS

By Amy Alkon

THE LOVE BLOAT Are we fighting human nature in trying to be monogamous? I’m dating a guy I dated five years ago. Back then, he was sexually inexperienced. Now that he’s been around the block, he totally disagrees with monogamy and wants us to have a sexually open relationship. I’m very open-minded and have no problem with people in these relationships, but know they’re not for me. We can’t discuss the issue because he gets so defensive and riled up, civil conversation is impossible. He accuses me of looking down on him and finding him “disgusting,” which I don’t. He almost has me convinced that the only successful relationships are the open ones, and that I’m one of a minority of people who want monogamy. –Turned Around Yes, the suburbs are just teeming with wives calling to their husbands as they’re going out the door for work, “Honey, want me to TiVo your dinosaurs thing in case your sex date runs long?” Actually, it seems clear that vast numbers of people are having sex with somebody other than their partner or spouse. They just do it behind that person’s back, as did the then-married Newt Gingrich, probing Clinton about lying about l’affaire Lewinsky—when Gingrich wasn’t too busy probing his naked congressional aide. Other married cheaters will roll out of a motel room bed, then snarl about how horrible and disgusting it is for other consenting adults to have sexually open relationships: those where partners honestly confront the fairytale notions that one person can meet another person’s every need; that two people can remain together “till death do us part,” and not get to the point where keeping the spark alive is a job for a Panty Bomber-load of PETN explosive. The Bible is no help to those who claim that the multiply partnered are immoral and wrong. Gideon, the guy the hotel room editions are named for, had lots of wives and a concubine. King Solomon had hundreds of both. In Biblical Literacy, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin writes that “Biblical law permits a man to have more than one wife,” but he adds that “biblical narrative … depicts multiple marriages as almost always leading to multiple miseries.” Even Nena O’Neill, coauthor of the ’70s bombshell Open Marriage, came around to that point of view. She subsequently wrote in The Marriage Premise that couples may agree to sexual nonexclusivity, but often experience jealousy, insecurity, resentment, anger, and feelings of abandonment—“sometimes as strongly as they do when a clandestine affair is discovered.” So, a person can make lofty pronouncements about not wanting to

deny their partner any of life’s pleasures— until the difference sinks in between having extra hot fudge and having the hairy guy next door. As for your situation, are you in a relationship or a really tiny cult? You’ve made it clear the open thing just isn’t for you. If your boyfriend cared about you, he’d say, “Aw, gee whiz, wish you felt differently,” and probably be on his way. But, he’s determined to have his cake and a bunch of other people’s cake, too, so he’s trying to bully and head-game you into believing you’re small-minded and boring. He’s got you so sidetracked defending yourself against bogus charges (looking down on him, finding him “disgusting”) that you’re on your way to glancing up from your relationship and finding that you’re no longer part of a couple but a face in the crowd. Ditch this guy and find one who’s open to discussing your needs—beyond how you’ll need to let him keep the key to your heart in a cabinet he bought off somebody running a valet parking concession.

FELON LIKE SOME COMPANY I’d appreciate if you’d introduce me to a lady between 35 and 65 for friendship and more. I’m 48, six feet tall, 220 pounds. I’m an artist, writer and musician. I’m currently in prison, but I’m not guilty, so I expect to get out of here soon. –Jailhouse Rocker I guess you’re asking me to post a personals ad for you: “Enjoyed long walks on the beach; now enjoying short walks between electrified fences.” Sure, the incarcerated man has his merits: There’s no wondering where he is at night or worrying he’ll run off with another woman (at least not for another 10 to 20). Of course, a woman who goes for a man behind bars almost always has something seriously wrong with her. Luckily, like almost all the prisoners who write me, you’re innocent. Put your time into attracting a lawyer, and maybe you can invite a lady to your house instead of your House of Corrections. You’ll get a better class of woman when you can say you’re a 48-year-old artist/writer/musician rooming with another guy because you need to pick up extra cash, not because he got caught leaving three bodies in a ditch.

Humane Society Volunteer Orientation. Do you love animals and have a few hours to spare? If so, please attend a onehour volunteer orientation session on Saturday, January 30th at 11a.m. to learn how you can help improve the lives of homeless cats and dogs at the Humane Society. Located at 3499 Hwy 93 N in Kalispell, the Humane Society is home to the Charlotte Edkins Animal Adoption Center. The volunteer program is open to adult volunteers who are at least 16 years old and to children ages 10 – 15 who are accompanied at all times by a parent or guardian. Volunteers are needed to assist with animal care, community education, reception area/ client relations, foster care, fundraising, mobile adoptions, dog walking, and many other capacities. For more information, please call 752-PAWS (7297) or visit www.hsnwmt.com. WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call Collegebound Network Today! 1-877892-2642 Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call Collegebound Network Today! 1-877892-2642

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PET OF THE WEEK "Rosie"- Rosie's picture doesn't even begin to do her justice. She is a gorgeous long haired Calico, almost exotic looking. She isn't your typical confident calico, instead she holds back waiting for your permission for a visit. Once you have her though, she's content in your lap for as long as you'll allow her to stay. Visit our website, www.myhswm.org for information on The Humane Society's upcoming 4th annual Adopt-A-Thon February 13th and 14th.

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 January 21–January 28, 2010

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! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-9656520 ext. 278

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Exper ience not required. Call 877-308-1186

BOOKKEEPER, F/T, Msla. Heating and Air Conditioning company needs full time, full charge bookkeeper. EXCELLENT BENEFIT PACKAGE AVAILABLE. Health, 401k, paid vacations & holidays after probationary period. Pay is $12.00/hour, more depending on skills and or experience. #2976850 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Now Hiring Visit www.Target RangeSWD.org to submit proposal for water & sewer district manager position.

CASHIERS, P/T, Msla. CVS Pharmacies is hiring a part time cashier. Must be able to work varied shifts. This involves stocking shelves and cashiering. Cash handling experience is a must. The store hours are 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 9:00 pm Saturday and from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Sunday. Days and shifts will vary between these hours. Wage is depending on experience. Successful candidates must pass a background check. #2976844 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COMMERCIAL CLEANER, P/T, Msla. Missoula cleaning service is seeking part time cleaners, experienced preferred but will train. This position entails cleaning professional and medical offices: vacuum, sweep, empty trash, dust, clean restrooms, sanitize, wash indoor windows and other cleaning as assigned. Need to be reliable, honest and hardworking. Must have attention to detail, able to follow oral and written instructions, manage time effectively, and work independently as well as be a team player. Must have phone for contact with employer. Background check will be conducted. Primarily evening and weekend work. Some flexibility in hours is offered. Excellent “second job.” Pay will start at $8.50 with potential for raise. #2976830 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HABILITATION AIDES, F/T & P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking both full & part time HABILITATION AIDES to work with adults with developmental disabilities. Duties are primarily assisting with daily activities, providing social interaction. Applicants must have experience with people with developmental disabilities. Must have high school diploma or GED and valid Montana driver’s license. Full and part-time positions available. Job description available at Missoula Job

OFFICE ASSISTANT - FULL TIME, F/T, Msla. OFFICE ASSISTANT - FULL TIME working for the Director of Finance at a Missoula, family oriented, membership based, nonprofit community service agency. Associate’s degree or certificate from college or technical school in accounting or related field; and/or six to twelve months related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. #2976836 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OFFICE MANAGER / BOOKKEEPER, F/T, Superior. Superior Employer is seeking and experienced OFFICE MANAGER / BOOKKEEPER to work approximately 35 hours per week. Duties Include: Managing the office environment; bookkeeping, taking and posting payments, processing payroll, processing monthly and quarterly taxes and report quarterly income to accountant, answering multiline phone and customer service. A Minimum of 12 Months Office Manager Experience Required, Peachtree Experience a Strong Plus! Work will be Monday through Friday, 9AM - 4PM. Pay is $13.00 per hour or more depending on experience and qualifications. #2976839 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 REHAB AIDE-GRAVEYARD SHIFT, P/T, Msla, Seeking Rehab Aide workers for an addiction services organization to work in residential facility setting. Graveyard shift on Thursday & Friday nights, with opportunity to pick up other shifts. Pay is $11/hour. #2976846 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 REHAB AIDE, P/T, Msla. Seeking Rehab Aide workers for an addiction services organization to work in residential facility. Day & wwing shifts available, to work 3 to 4 shifts/week, 24 or more hrs/wk, with opportunity to pick up other shifts and work on-call if desired. Pay is $10/hour. #2976845 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout

Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL ATTORNEY, F/T, Msla. Statewide process serving company is seeking an attorney to work as full time in-house counsel in Missoula office. Duties include human resource matters for 30 employees, as well as general corporate, process serving, trustee sales, and private investigation matters. You must be able to deal with difficult people on a daily basis while maintaining your composure. Knowledge of process serving, private investigation, trustee sales, and bankruptcy code helpful. Salary will be dependent on experience and qualifications. Benefits include paid time off, health insurance, profit sharing, and 401K. #2976851 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CITY OF HARDIN, Employment Opportunity. CHIEF of POLICE-New Department. Competitive Salary-Benefit Package. DEADLINE: Friday 2/5/2010. Details and Online Application www.hardinmt.com or call 406-6659292 E.O.E. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN SPECIALIST, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time Instructional Design Specialist for new organization in Missoula. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience in instructional design/curriculum development required and at least three years corporate training experience. Salary is dependent on experience. #2976825 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR FABRICATORS, F/T, Temp., St. Regis. St. Regis. MT lumber mill is seeking experienced fabricators for a temporary position that could work into full-time. Prefer experience with industrial machinery. Will be installing additional sawmill to existing facility. This is not a training position. Pay is dependent on experience. Drug test is mandatory. #2976838 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MILLWRIGHTS, F/T, Temp., St. Regis. St. Regis. MT lumber mill is seeking experienced millwrights for a temporary posi-

tion that could work into full-time. Prefer experience with industrial machinery. Will be installing additional sawmill to existing facility. This is not a training position. Pay is dependent on experience. Drug test is mandatory. #2976837 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 OTR independent contractor with passport and TWIC to deliver high-quality customer freight to Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. Part-time opportunity to start. Call 800-927-5702, Ext. 125 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION *Art & Craft Instructors * Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd. A-10 (located off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) needs instructors to teach beginning Macrame and Weaving classes, as well as other art classes. If you are interested in teaching or taking the current drawing and painting classes for both adults and kids, call 239-4460. ELECTRICIAN CAREERS U.S. NAVY. Paid training, financial security, medical/dental, vacation, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 HIGH-TECH CAREER in U.S. Navy Nuclear Program. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call MonFri 800-437-6044 *Matting Instructor Needed* Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd., A-10 (just off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) is looking for someone to teach workshops to beginners on mat cutting and mounting their artwork. If you are interested in this position or have any questions regarding our other kids & adults drawing and painting classes, please call 239-4460. NUCLEAR POWER TRAINEE Career with potential. Paid training w/benefits plus $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-8870952

SPECIAL OPS U.S. Navy. Elite training. Daring missions. Generous pay/benefits. HS grads ages 17-34. Do you have what it takes? Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSE/LICENSE PRACTICAL NURSE, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time Registered Nurses or Certified Licensed Practical Nurses to work in St. Ignatius area. Requires valid Montana’s driver’s license and own vehicle to get to different job sites. Nursing license verification needed upon application process. Work week will vary and include weekends. Will be working 10 hour shifts that include both day and night shifts. Starting pay depends on experience and qualifications. Medical and Dental offered after probationary period. #2976841 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SALES DIRECT SALES REPRESENTATIVES, F/T, Msla. Cable contractor is seeking fulltime DIRECT SALES REPRESENTATIVES to sell cable television, telephone and highspeed Internet services. Duties include: Door-to-door direct sales of Bresnan services, following up on customer leads and upgrading current Bresnan customers for cable, phone and internet services. Previous experience in sales or customer service and knowledge of Excel preferred. Must have High School diploma or equivalent and be able to pass a background check. Must have own vehicle and cell phone for communication purposes. Will be working approximately 40 hours per week, Monday-Saturday. Work shifts will vary and wages will be commission based. #2976843 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Need Income? Laid off? Make a difference and earn great income. Distributors needed for expanding wellness co. Training provided. P/T or F/T. Call for interview. 406-273-4223

faction; assist/inform customer with purchase info/decisions; inventory walk; complete daily phone log; keep an accurate count of floor traffic; additional duties as assigned. Ability to read and comprehend instructions and information. Previous Retail Experience and Computer knowledge preferred. Requires excellent communication and managerial skills and take pride in your professional personal appearance. Requires a valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Work varied days and hour. Guaranteed $2,500/month for first six months. #2976834 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

OPPORTUNITIES

MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED. Earn $150 to $300 Per Day. All Looks, Types and Ages. Feature Films, Television, Commercials, and Print. No Experience Necessary. 1-800-340-8404 x2001

ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 Bartenders in demand. No experience necessary. Make up to $300 per shift. Part-time, day, evening, night shifts available. Training, placement, certification provided. Call 877-879-9153 EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film,

HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com Learn To Roast Coffee JumpinGoat Coffee Roasters-As seen on CNN Live now offers training to become a Master Coffee Roaster Great income potential from home. 706-219-1820

WORK WANTED CAREGIVER. Female, 50s available hourly, daily, hospice or assist with 24 hour care. Price negotiable with situation. Excellent references from clients & agencies. 543-3060 or 370-3225

CASE MANAGER – HELENA FT position providing targeted case management services by coordinating support services to persons age 16 or older with developmental disabilities. Minimum Requirements: BA Degree in Human Services and 1-yr experience with developmental disabilities. M – F: Days. $15.14/hr. Closes Tuesday 2/2/10, 5pm. Exc. Benefits including: generous amount of paid time off, retirement, medical & dental insurance, etc, plus the privilege of working with professional and caring fellow staff. Valid MT Driver’s License. No Record of Abuse, Neglect/Exploitation. Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

SALES CONSULTANT, F/T, Msla. Busy dealership hiring up to four full-time SALES CONSULTANTS. DUTIES INCLUDE: Guaranteeing customer satis-

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 January 21–January 28, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are the lord of all you survey! I swear to God! I’m almost tempted to say that you now have the power to command whirlwinds and alter the course of mighty rivers! At the very least you will be able to mobilize the ambition of everyone you encounter and brighten the future of every group you’re part of! Act with confident precision, Taurus! Speak with crisp authority! Your realm waits expectantly for the transformative decisions that will issue from the fresh depths of your emotional intelligence! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s time for you to fly away—to flee the safe pleasures that comfort you as well as the outmoded fixations that haunt you; to escape at least one of the galling compromises that twists your spirit as well as a familiar groove that numbs your intelligence. In my astrological opinion, Gemini, you need to get excited by stimuli that come from outside your known universe. You need fertile surprises that motivate you to resort to unpredictable solutions.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I never meet anyone who admits to having had a happy childhood,” said writer Jessamyn West. “Everyone appears to think happiness betokens a lack of sensitivity.” I agree, and go further. Many creative people I know actually brag about how messed up their early life was, as if that was a crucial ingredient in turning them into the geniuses they are today. Well, excuse me for breaking the taboo, but I, Rob Brezsny, had a happy childhood, and it did not prevent me from becoming a sensitive artist. In fact, it helped. Now I ask you, my fellow Cancerian, whether you’re brave enough to go against the grain and confess that your early years had some wonderful moments? You’re in a phase of your cycle when recalling the beauty and joy of the past could be profoundly invigorating.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Usually I overflow with advice about how to access your soul’s code. I love to help you express the unique blueprint that sets you apart from everyone else. Every now and then, though, it’s a healing balm to take a sabbatical from exploring the intricacies of your core truths. This is one of those times. For the next ten days, I invite you to enjoy the privilege of being absolutely nobody. Revel in the pure emptiness of having no clue about your deep identity. If anyone asks you, “Who are you?”, relish the bubbly freedom that comes from cheerfully saying, “I have no freaking idea!”



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TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 W. Broadway. 543-8287.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s a good time to take inventory of all the stories you allow to pour into your beautiful head. Do you absorb a relentless stream of fear-inducing news reports and violent movies and gossipy tales of decline and degeneration? Well, then, guess what: It’s the equivalent, for your psyche, of eating rotting bear intestines and crud scraped off a dumpster wall and pitchers full of trans fats from partially hydrogenated oil. But maybe, on the other hand, you tend to expose yourself to comedies that loosen your fixations and poems that stretch your understanding of the human condition and conversations about all the things that are working pretty well. If so, you’re taking good care of your precious insides; you’re fostering your mental health. Now please drink in this fresh truth from Nigerian writer Ben Okri: “Beware of the stories you read or tell; subtly, at night, beneath the waters of consciousness, they are altering your world.”

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This horoscope borrows from one of my favorite Sagittarian visionaries, Jonathan Zap. The advice he gives below, which is in accordance with your astrological omens, is designed to help you avoid the fate he warns against. Here it is: “Many of the significant problems in our lives are more about recognizing the obvious rather than discovering the mysterious or hidden. One of the classic ways we deceive and hide from ourselves is by refusing to recognize the obvious, and shrouding what is right before us in rationalization and false complexity. We often delay and deny necessary transformation by claiming that there is a mysterious answer hidden from us, when actually we know the answers but pretend that we don’t.” (More at bit.ly/ZapOracle and Zaporacle.com.)

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope that you saw the horoscope I wrote for you last week. And I hope that you acted on my advice and refrained from all sweating and striving and struggling. These past seven days were designed by the universe to be a time for you to recharge your psychic battery. Assuming that you took advantage of the opportunity, you should now be ready to shift gears. In this new phase, your assignment is to work extra hard and extra sweet on yourself. By that I mean you should make your way down into your depths and change around everything that isn’t functioning with grace and power. Tweak your attitudes. Rearrange your emotional flow. Be an introspective master of self-refinement.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): French novelist Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) is generally regarded as one of the greats. His book Madame Bovary appears on many lists of the greatest novels of all time. And yet writing didn’t come especially easy for him. He worked as hard as a ditchdigger. It wasn’t uncommon for him to spend several agonizing days in squeezing out a single page. On some occasions he literally beat his head against a wall, as if trying to dislodge the right words from their hiding place in his brain. He’s your role model in the coming week, Virgo. You can create something of value, although it may require hard labor. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): My theory is that right now the whole world is in love with you. In some places, this simmering adoration is bordering on infatuation. Creatures great and small are more apt than usual to recognize what’s beautiful and original about you. As a result, wonders and marvels are likely to coalesce in your vicinity. Is there anything you can do to ensure that events unfold in ways that will yield maximum benefits for everyone concerned? Yes: Be yourself with as much tender intensity as you can muster.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Shakespeare got modest respect while he was alive, but his reputation as a brilliant bard didn’t gel right away. It wasn’t until almost 50 years after he died that anyone thought his life and work were notable enough to write about. By then, all his colleagues and compatriots were gone, unable to testify. He himself left little information to build a biography around. That’s why next to nothing is known about the person who made such a dramatic impact on the English language and literature. I suggest you take this as a metaphorical prod that will inspire you not to be blasé about the greatness that is in your vicinity. Don’t take superlative intelligence, talent, or love for granted. Recognize it, bless it, be influenced by it.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the coming week, I predict that you will NOT experience disgusting fascinations, smiling-faced failures, sensationalized accounts of useless developments, or bizarre fantasies in the middle of the night. You may, on the other hand, have encounters with uplifting disappointments, incendiary offers of assistance, mysterious declarations of interdependence, and uproars that provoke your awe and humility in healing ways. In other words, Aquarius, it‘ll be an uncanny, perhaps controversial time for you — but always leading in the direction of greater freedom.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Congrats on your growing ability to do more floating and less thrashing as you cascade down the stream of consciousness. I think you’re finally understanding that a little bit of chaos isn’t a sign that everything’s falling apart forever omigod the entire planet’s crashing and evil is in ascension…but rather that a healthy amount of bewildering unpredictability keeps things fresh and clean. My advice is to learn to relax even more as you glide with serene amusement through the bubbling and churning waters of life. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 January 21–January 28, 2010

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BE MY VALENTINE

PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners (the “Board”) of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”) will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, February 17, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., M.T., in Room 201, 2nd Floor of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, for the purpose of conducting a public hearing on a proposal that the County issue revenue bonds (the “Bonds”) under Montana Code Annotated Title 90, Chapter 5, Part 1, as amended (the “Act”), and designate them as recovery zone facility bonds under the Internal Revenue Code. The Bonds would be issued on behalf of Paul and Susan Tiede and Christian and Shelli Kenworthy (the “Applicants”) in order to finance a portion of the costs of acquiring the old Thurman’s Building located at 3020 South Reserve Street in Missoula and remodeling, renovating, furnishing and

equipping the building as a modern medical and dental condominium facility to be known as the Larchmont Building (the “Project”) and to pay certain costs of issuance of the Bonds. The Project is expected to cost approximately $3,640,000. When finished, the Larchmont Building will provide approximately 18,000 square feet of high quality medical and dental office space and off-street parking for approximately 51 cars. The Project will be owned by the Applicants or a legal entity to be formed under Montana law comprised of the Applicants (the “Borrowers”). The maximum aggregate principal amount of the proposed Bonds issuance is $3,140,000. The Bonds will be secured by a pledge of the revenues to be derived by the County from a loan agreement with the Borrowers and by such other security devices, if any, as may be deemed advantageous, including a mortgage or trust indenture on the Project. The Bonds will be a special, limited obligation of the County, and

the Bonds and interest thereon will be payable solely from the revenues of the Borrowers pledged to the payment thereof. The holder of the Bonds will never have the right to compel any exercise of the taxing power of the County to pay the Bonds or the interest thereon, nor to enforce payment thereof against any property of the County except money payable by the Borrowers to the County and pledged to the payment of the Bonds. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard at the public hearing at the time and place stated above or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the date of such hearing. Further information regarding the proposal is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For additional information on the proposed resolution, contact Dale Bickell, Chief Administrative Officer, or Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, Missoula County, 200 West Broadway,

Missoula, Montana 59802 or by calling 406-721-5700. Dated: January 20, 2010 /s/ Michelle Landquist BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: Name of road if any: A portion of Lewis & Clark Drive and a portion of a petitioned county road referred to as the Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs Road. And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit as: Aportion of Lewis & Clark Drive and a portion of a petitioned county road referred to as the Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs Road. Attached is a map showing the location

of the properties that would be affected by the abandonment of Lewis & Clark Drive and the portion of the 1895 Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs road, and the portions proposed to be abandoned. Petitioners request the abandonment of the road from the east boundary of Tract 2 of COS 5520, through Parcels A&B of COS 2441, Tracts 1 and 2 of COS 2937, and through property owned by William M. and A. Ramona Holt to U.S. Highway 12. The property owners have legal access for their properties to Highway 12. See attached copies of COS 2937, COS 5520 and COS 2441. The exact location of Lewis & Clark Drive and the 1895 Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs road through these properties is unknown. According to Missoula County Public Works records, the Road Inventory states that Lewis & Clark Drive only extends 699 feet west of its intersection with Highway 93 South. That distance does not reach the portion of the road that is proposed for abandonment. According to the records, a road was

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 January 21–January 28, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES established by the County in June of 1895 as a “wagon road from Smith’s ranch at (sic) mouth of Lolo Creek to the Lolo Hot Springs.” See Road Plat Book A, page 141 and Commissioner’s Journal, Book G pages 247 and 250 (April & June 1895) attached hereto. Apparently, part of this road is now known as Lewis & Clark Drive. See Surveyor’s Note to attached COS 5520. The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The road is not used by the public. 2. The location of the road is unknown or unclear. 3. The road is not maintained by Missoula County. (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor., Missoula MT) A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 3, 2010 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date.

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/s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 By Kim Cox , Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk and Recorder/Elections 406) 258-3241. Date: January 6, 2010 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 2, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. Missoula County Growth Policy 2005 Update: Amendments proposed Due to changes in state law, the Missoula County Rural Initiatives Office has been directed to develop minor amendments to the County’s 2005 Growth Policy dealing with sand and gravel extraction and the Wildland Urban Interface. The amendments are proposed to be adopted as an appendix to the Growth Policy after review by the Planning Board and the County Commissioners through the public hearing process. The Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the proposed amendments on February 2, 2010 for the purpose of making a recommendation on the amendments to the Board of County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will conduct public hearings on this item on dates yet to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The amendments are now available for public and agency review and can be obtained at the Rural Initiatives office or on-line at www.co.miss oula.mt.us/rural or via email at: ri@co.missoula.mt.us . Call 258-3432 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. Comments should be directed to ri@co.missoula.mt.us or Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning & Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANK-MISSOULA, INC., a Montana corporation Plaintiff Against KENNETH REIBER, SUSAN J. KNIGHT, and ELK SPRINGS RANCH, INC., Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 11th day of February A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula,

AUTOMOTIVE I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

GENERAL 2009 Fuel Effcient Van/SUV 2009 Mazda5 with 6,500 miles. Perfect condition. Selling to downsize monthly bills. 21 city 27 highway. $17,900 WAY lower than Blue Book. All reasonable offers entertained. 406-544-7820

IMPORTS ‘02 TDI VW Jetta Wagon. Must sell. $8,000. New Tires & snow tires on rims. 50 mpg HWY. 170K. Excellent condition. Laura 363-6627.

QUALITY WORKMANSHIP "GUARANTEED"

$49 Pre-purchase Inspection 1414 Montana St. 406-728-3144

County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 6001, located in the SW1/4 of Section 36, Township 11 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 21st day of January A.D., 2010. MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-09-9 Dept. No. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III CITATION IN THE MATTER OF, J.B.M., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: ANNIE PLENKOVICH YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition has been filed in the above-entitled Court by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (hereinafter DPHHS), 2677 Palmer St., Ste. 300, Missoula, MT 59808 requesting that DPHHS be granted Permanent Legal Custody and Termination of your Parental Rights to the above named child, J.B.M. NOW, THEREFORE, YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear on the 15 day of March, 2010 at 3:00 o’clock p.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Missoula County Courthouse in Missoula, Montana then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why said Petition should not be granted, and why DPHHS should not be awarded Permanent Legal Custody of J.B.M., with the right to consent to his adoption. J.B.M. was born on: January 2, 2009 in Missoula, Montana. You have the right to be represented by an attorney in these proceedings. If you are unable to afford an attorney, you have the right to ask the Court to appoint an attorney to represent you. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in the above-named children, which denial may result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the petition. A copy of the Petition is filed with the Clerk of District Court in Missoula County: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Robert L. Deschamps, III, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 12 day of January, 2010. /s/ Robert L. Deschamps, III. HON. ROBERT L. DESCHAMPS III, District Court Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-10-8 Dept. No. 2 IN RE THE ESTATE OF DARLENE C. NYQUIST, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Aaron Morse has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Aaron Morse, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Mt. 59807-8234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of January, 2010. CEDERBERG LAW OFFI CES, P.C. 269 W. Front St., PO Box 8234, Msla, MT 59807-8234. /s/ Dan G. Ceder berg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate Case No. DP-09-196 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of EUGENE F. KUEHNLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the abovenamed estate. All person having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Co-Personal Representatives, Jay H. Kuehnle and Diana B. Kuehnle, return receipt requested, at 5605 Lavoie Lane, Missoula, Montana 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 30th day of November, 2009. /s/ Jay Kuehnle /s/ Diana B. Kuehnle, CoPersonal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-10-6 Honorable John W. Larson, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ASTRID B. BATCHELDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kelly S. Batchelder, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, P.L.L.P., PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 8th day of January, 2010. /s/ Kelly S. Batchelder, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DR-09-809 SUM-

MONS FOR PUBLICATION IN RE THE CUSTODY OF JIN Y. BURNS, Petitioner, and BENNY DAVID BURNS, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: YOU, THE RESPONDENT, ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Amended Petition in this action which is filed in the office of the abovenamed Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Petitioner’s attorney within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you be default, for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. GIVEN under my hand this 11th day of January, 2010 at the hour of 10:27 o’clock a.m. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court (SEAL) By: Maria A. Cassidy, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DV-76 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ROD ALLEN MCDONALD, TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO ROBERT ALLEN COONEY. Notice is hereby given that Petitioner, Rod Allen McDonald, has filed a petition with this Court for permission to change his name from Rod Allen McDonald tot Robert Allen Cooney. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the matter that a hearing on the petition will be held at the courthouse in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana on the 4th day of March, 2010 at 9:00 a.m., at which time objections to the petition will be heard. Any person desiring to object to the granting of the petition may do so by filing said objection in writing with the clerk of said court no later than the time set for the hearing. DATED this 22nd day of January, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Susie Wall, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate Case No. DP-10-4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of HELEN HARBECK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, William James Lucas, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of January, 2010. /s/ William James Lucas, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-10-11 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONALD O. NORDSTROM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Doris M. Nordstrom, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane, P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 15th day of January, 2010. /s/ Doris M. Nordstrom Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-10-13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARLINE R. CASE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to TERRY CASE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 S. 5th Street E., Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 22nd day of January, 2010. /s/ Terry Case, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 January 21–January 28, 2010

assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $719,705.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.North westtrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/06/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200500471, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which David A. Fuschino and Mindy L. Fuschino was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. DBA Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC. Was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 177 of Pleasant View Homes No. 2, Phase IV, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200803864, Book 813, Page 959, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 7, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $155,996.50. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $146,634.22, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender

of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01535) 1002.114202-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/31/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200900014 Bk. 831 Pg.444, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Tyler J. Harbour, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 461 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $274,743.73. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $264,712.74, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.North westtrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09011) 1002.141031-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/12/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200308773, Bk. 701, Pg. 551, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Laramie D. Loewen, an unmarried person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. dba Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The West 10 feet of Lot 11, all of Lots 12, 13, 14 and the East 25 feet of Lot 15 in Block 66 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 199 of Micro Records at Page 2284. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Bk. 845, Pg. 859, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 11, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $212,254.03. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $198,274.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance

and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 22, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.North westtrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06305) 1002.131339-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200527308, BK 762, PG 554, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Ward J. Veneklasen and Pamela L. Veneklasen, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Block 4 of Linda Vista Tenth Supplement Phase I, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 8, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $275,693.60. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $259,200.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 19, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06348) 1002.131336-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 17 and 18 in Block 1 of Hellgate Pines Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Stephen Alfred Johnson and Lisa A Johnson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to


PUBLIC NOTICES Allen L Karell, Esq, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Aames Funding Corporation DBA Aames Home Loan, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 12, 2002 and recorded on December 18, 2002 in Book 695, Page 802, under Document No. 200237760. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank nka as Bank of New York Trust Company NA as trustee for SASCO Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-AM1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,341.26, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 19, 2009 is $107,591.07 principal, interest at the rate of 9.620000% now totaling $18061.02, escrow advances of $7305.05, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3299.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 3, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/3/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Miranda Marx Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 05/05/2015 ASAP# 3403437 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF MALONEY RANCH PHASE VIII, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: 3878703 Anatoly A. Levchenko and Larisa A. Levchenko, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 3, 2008 and Recorded on November 7, 2008 under Document # 200825115, in Book 829, Page 102. The beneficial interest is currently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,731.60, beginning May 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 18, 2009 is $392,093.74 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75% now totaling $12,322.74, late charges in the amount of $574.55, and other fees and expenses advanced of $51.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $61.77 per diem, late

charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 4, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 4, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3403429 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 16, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 33 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase IV, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Brett Huston and Stacey Huston, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 9, 2005 and Recorded November 21, 2005 in Book 764, Page 930, under Document No. 200530946. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-1. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,367.69, beginning March 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 27, 2009 is $133,076.40 principal, interest at the rate of 9.125% now totaling $20,149.50, late charges in the amount of $932.23, escrow advances of $4,905.27 and other fees and expenses advanced of $7,187.28, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.62 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. , Beneficiary, has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3408187 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 23, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 2C-3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2755, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4) OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR A PRIVATE ROAD AND PUBLIC UTILITIES ALONG AND ACROSS THE 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT-OF-WAY WHOSE CENTER LINE IS THE LINE COMMON TO TRACTS 2C-1 AND 2C-2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2583. Brian E. Bache and Colleen M. Bache, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 15, 2004 and Recorded on April 20, 2004 under Document # 200410518, in Bk-729, Pg-1879. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,031.62, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 22, 2009 is $303,643.81 principal, interest at the rate of 4.5% now totaling $5,340.79, late charges in the amount of $507.24, escrow advances of $-561.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $37.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $37.44 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 122, 213, 214, 205, 124, 136, K139 and K140. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, vehicles & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, February 1st, 2010 by appt only by calling (406) 7287867. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 8700 Roller Coaster Rd, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 13, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 13, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged

to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3416247 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF BITTERROOT MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Christian J Halverson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 12, 2006 and Recorded on July 12, 2006 under Document # 200617036, in Bk778, Pg-1096. The beneficial interest is currently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HET 2006-16. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1253.83, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2009 is $191865.84 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $5363.05, late charges in the amount of $211.80, and other fees and expenses advanced of $68.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.83 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed Missoula County Government

Missoula County Government

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 16, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. The Target Range Neighborhood Plan Considera tion of the proposed TARGET RANGE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN as an amendment to the 2005 MISSOULA COUNTY GROWTH POLICY. The Target Range Neighborhood Plan is a document created by the Target Range Neighborhood Planning Committee in consultation with the Office of Planning and Grants. The Neighborhood Plan addresses key resources and assets in the neighborhood. The plan contains strategies and implementation tools that manage change and growth within the Target Range neighborhood. Plan sections include the Natural Environment and Human Envi-ronment. See Map G for the Tar-get Range Study Area (the area affected by this amendment).

The Board of County Commissioners and the Missoula City Council will conduct public hearings on this item on dates yet to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The draft plan is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants or online at ftp://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgftp/Urban/TROH/Targ etRange/TargetRangeNeighborPlan1 22309.pdf. Call 258-4657 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Ken Jenkins for a special exception permitting Montana Northwest Company’s new office building to be located on the parcel legally described as Lot D2 of Block 21 of the Amended Plat of East Missoula Addition, Block 21, Lots B1, D1 and D2 Section 24 Township 13N Range 19W. The subject property is zoned C-C2, General Commercial. A variance from Section 4.04 (B) (1) of Resolution #76-113 is also being requested. Section 8.10 and Section 8.14 of Resolution #76-113 requires that all special exceptions and variances go before the County Board of Adjustment for approval. See map J.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request, you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

d s

"Special Effects"--with a little extra thrown in.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS 1 Leaning typeface: abbr. 5 ___ Wonderful (juice brand) 8 Low point on a director's resume 14 "Julie & Julia" director Ephron 15 Bus. alternative to a partnership 16 Klutzy 17 Healthy bread ingredient that produces oil 19 You may want to get in them if they're good 20 One may check you out with a hammer 22 Singers Anita and Molly 23 Paper that reports on the DJIA 24 Genetic messenger material: abbr. 27 Bon ___ (witticism) 28 Auntie on Broadway 31 WWII craft 33 Composer with a brass instrument named after him 35 Soprano henchman ___ Walnuts 36 Mail-in movie, perhaps 39 Really broad toast 40 Tiny amounts 41 Father of the casa 42 High-end German cars 43 Mil. subordinate 46 "Dexter" channel, for short 47 Abbr. for people lacking parts of names 49 "If You Stub Your ___ the Moon" (Bing Crosby song) 51 He led a band of Merry Men 56 Entreaty to get some cojones 58 Futuristic MTV cartoon turned into a live-action Charlize Theron movie 59 Accuse of a crime in court 60 It's game

Last week’s solution

61 Frigid ending? 62 Like some grins 63 Shaker ___, OH 64 Total disaster

DOWN 1 Come ___ the cold 2 Holy U.S. city? 3 1994 Nobel Peace Prize co-winner 4 In a careless way 5 "Yo Gabba Gabba!" character who's a "magic robot" 6 Spread on the table 7 1450, in Rome 8 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Wade 9 High demand? 10 Thought ___ (considered) 11 Old phonograph brand 12 Real ending for a Brit? 13 Sounds of indifference 18 His, to Henri 21 Come up short 25 Complete, with "down" 26 Took in a snack 28 Stubborn beast 29 "___ Lay Dying" 30 Magazine that debuted with Christa Miller on the cover 32 "No ifs, ands or ___" 33 Slammer 34 "Orpheus in the Underworld" composer Jacques 35 Loyal companions 36 Lexicographer Webster 37 Legendary Cadillac? 38 Sudoku component 39 Does some minor vandalism, briefly 42 Recycling receptacle 43 Singer-songwriter McKay 44 Hearts of Paris 45 Banded gems 48 Like many toothpastes 49 Boatload 50 UK-based confederation that deals with human rights 52 Leave off 53 Inaugural reading 54 Achievement 55 Captains' books 56 Took the worm 57 Ambient musician Brian

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0452

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 January 21–January 28, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES (including costs and expenses actually incurred and - attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 16, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3416236 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010

of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE

SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 26, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE% OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5572. Thomas W. Hobbs and Kathleen E. Hobbs, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 24, 2004 and Recorded on September 29, 2004 under Document # 200427792 in Bk-740, Pg1028. The beneficial interest is currently held by NationStar Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the month-

ly payments due in the amount of $2,558.65, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 5, 2009 is $216,436.61 principal, interest at the rate of 5.25% now totaling $7627.17, late charges in the amount of $890.08, and other fees and expenses advanced of $24.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.13 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the benefici-

ary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest” to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be post-

poned by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 16, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On Nov. 16, 2009, before me, a not ary public in & for said County and State, per sonally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Suc cessor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Not ary Public Stark County, North Dakota Com mission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 341 6250 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT A8-3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2935, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-

QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. John M. Brazier, III, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 1, 2006 and recorded March 3, 2006 as document number 200604886 in Bk-769, Pg-1348.. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L2, Residential Mortgage-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-L2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $794.72, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 10, 2009 is $119,208.39 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $9,318.02, late charges

HOME PAGE

Everyone is asking: “How’s the market?” By Brint Wahlberg, 2010 MOR President That’s probably the most common question a real estate agent receives on a daily basis. With the amount of information floating around online, in the news, and from people in the real estate industry, it’s tough to tell which news is accurate, and which isn’t. So, how is our market here in Missoula? Much like many national trends Missoula has a bifurcated market, meaning it is split. Certain price ranges of our market are showing much better activity than others. The Missoula Organization of REALTORS® has an internal process that tracks the market’s absorption rates and furthermore, it breaks down the market in price sections. What this data has constantly revealed is that throughout the year, the price brackets for residential properties priced at or below $275,000 show a healthy market with many sales and steady inventory. However, the trend for properties priced over $275,000 shows inventory in excess of 12 months, which suggests some over-supply.

Looking forward, the first time homebuyer tax credit will continue, but requires buyers to have a home under contract on or before April 30th, and to have closed on the sale by June 30th. In addition there is a new aspect to this tax credit – current homeowners who have owned their home for at least 5 out of the last 8 years can purchase a new primary residence and receive a $6,500 tax credit. For this existing homebuyer credit you do not have to have your prior home sold first, and the same end-dates apply to this credit as to the first time homebuyer credit. For the first half of this year, these two tax credits will dominate the market activity, so homes that fit the needs for first time homebuyers will be a hot commodity. It also means there will be good incentive for people to move up to their next home, so the upper end of our market should be influenced as well. With higher than normal inventories and the small trickle of foreclosures

UN

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$219,900 MLS#10000453

• EMO Delight • 5 Bed, 2 Bath, exquisitely remodeled • Tile, granite, stainless appliances • New insulation & windows • Mountain views

861 Dakota Ave Missoula

240-SOLD (7653)

Coming Soon!

• 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • One level on quite cul-de-sac • New roof in 2008 • New flooring in main area

$204,500

2115 Inverness Missoula

MLS# 908346

Two Westside homes near the park. Upgraded and priced for first-time home-buyers!

Coming in early Feb.!

Sustainability is my specialty!

JAY GETZ

Hank Trotter

jay.getz@prumt.com www.JayGetzMissoula.com

hank@prudentialmissoula.com

Pat McCormick pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

While these numbers are not the official final numbers, the 2009 sales information from the Missoula Organization of REALTORS® indicates sales volume for 2009 is about equal to that of 2008, right around 900 residential homes sold. The median sales price looks to have continued to shift down a little; in 2008 the median sales price was $215,000 and for 2009 it will be close to $209,000. This shifting of the sales price suggests continued market correction in values and reflects the impact of the first time homebuyer activity.

FEATURED LISTING

NEW LISTING CT RA

in the market, certain segments could provide some excellent buying opportunities.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 January 21–January 28, 2010

(406) 214-4016

406-360-7991


PUBLIC NOTICES person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under

the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 18, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/18/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally

appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument & acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Com mission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3419684 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010

APARTMENTS

HOUSES

Great Local next to river on Easy St. Close to Campus. W/D Big Kitchen, Clean, easy going, Mike @ 406-544-3394

1024 Stephens #8 2bd/1ba, off-street parking, new furnace, storage $650. Grizzly Prop. Management 542-2060

1131 Sherwood: 3-bedroom, wood floors, enclosed back porch, front deck, hook-ups, $825, GCPM, 5496106 gcpm-mt.com (Duplex)

large community space, kitchen and bathroom facilities and parking. $200/month. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center 543-3955.

in the amount of $361.35, escrow advances of $1,210.66, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,557.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $23.68 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 29, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 28 OF HAWTHORN SPRINGS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THERE-

OF. Darrin L Knudsen and Crystal L Knudsen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated March 23, 2007 and Recorded March 30, 2007 at 3:14 o’clock P.M. in Book 794, Page 803, under Document No. 200707506. The beneficial interest is currently held by National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,964.29, beginning December 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which month-

RENTALS

1101 S. 3rd St. W. #201 Luxury Studio Condo, wood floors, stainless steel appliances, huge deck, gas fireplace, W/D hkps, garage $875 1509 10th: 1-bedroom, dining area, onsite laundry, deck, heat & cable paid, $625, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 1801 Howell St. #2, $675 2bd/1ba Hkps, off-street parking, shared fenced yard, storage. 3320 Great Northern Apartments-Rent $495-$570 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional dpst/ documents. 721-8990 4202 Bordeaux, 2bd 2ba NEWER HOME, wood floors, unfinished basement, W/D hkps, dishwasher, microwave, ceiling fans, yard. $895 721 Palmer. 3 bdrm 1 bath gas heat washer and dryer hookup and off street parking. Rent $750 721-8990 Quiet, private, partly furnished 1 bedroom. 8 miles from town with river view. No smoking, no pets, very responsible. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV, high-speed Internet. Available soon. Taking applications now. 273-2382 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

1&2

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

Great Space Main St. Historic Building

1000 sq. ft. for Gallery, Offices (?).

543-8723 Spacious, Newer 3BD/2 BA Home • W/D Included • Pets on approval • $995/month

Great 3b/2ba house 1 blk E. Good Food Store. $1195 + utilities. Call Devan w/ Prudential Missoula 406-241-1408 for showings. house for rent 2/3 bedroom pet friendly fenced yard/garden near bike path washer/dryer garage $1,000 per mo. call 544-5824

COMMERCIAL Office space on the Hip Strip. Includes furnishings, utilities, access to

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

ROOMMATES Old Northside rental roommate needed. NS. Pets maybe. Skier/mountainperson preferred. $270 + utilities. No lease or deposit. 721-8905 Room For Rent Roommate Needed. $400/mo. Nice Spacious House in

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

1 BD Apt 113 Johnson, $425/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $575/mo. 2 BD, 2 BATH, 4905 Lower Miller Ck. $850/mo.

One bedroom available in cozy, newer home, quiet East. Missoula neighborhood. Share bathroom with one, reasonable energy with two. Includes: w/d, off-

street parking, W/S/G. Garage, off street parking, and big closets! Close to river, Mountain Line, 1.5 miles from campus. $350/mo. Call 978-314-0653.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

GardenCity Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

Join the Montana Landlord's Association

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ly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 30, 2009 is $280,052.54 principal, interest at the rate of 7.375% now totaling $22,294.91, late charges in the amount of $294.63, escrow advances of $1,112.36, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,994.68, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.59 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred & thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may

be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 19, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/19/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3420942 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010, 02/11/2010 SHERIFF’S SALE Dept. 1 Cause No. DV-09-898 COMMUNITY BANK, INC., A Montana corporation, Plaintiff, Against JOHN L. CROSS, LEI ANN CROSS, LOUIS L. CROSS, JORDAN C. CROSS, LUCAS S. CROSS, WHOLESALE FIREWORKS STORES, INC., ABSOLUTE WATER SPORT RENTALS, INC., and 5 STAR FINANCE AND MORTGAGE, INC., Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 23rd day of February A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, those certain real properties situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: “Lots 34, 35, and 36 of Gleneagle at Grantland Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof” (hereinafter the Gleneagle Property) Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 28th day of January, 2010. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy

REAL ESTATE HOMES 10250 Valley Grove Dr., Lolo MLS#902264 - $299,000 Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath log home 5 minutes from Missoula Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 131 S. Higgins 6-4 & 6-5 - MLS# 907544 - $389,000 Luxury 6th floor condo in historic Wilma Building. Up scale living in the heart of Msla. Anne Jablonski - Windermere RE - 546-5816 2663 Stratford, Target Range - MLS# 907889 - $216,000 Well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath ranch. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3 Bed/2 Bath/2 Car Garage, Lg kitchen, hickory cabinets. In floor radiant heat, fireplace. Fenced and landscaped yard. $234,000 • MLS# 10000024. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com Text:44133 Message: 12887 for pics 3322 B Connery Way - MLS#908163 $191,000 Unique 3 level condo. 2 bd, plus loft & 3 bath. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185

www.YourMT.com

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, twocar garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185

www.YourMT.com

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 ac, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-frame cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Mo nica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185

www.YourMT.com

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics 4322 Capy Ln. - MLS#904419 $435,000 Wonderful executive style

home on 1 acre lot. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185

www.YourMT.com

5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS#906641. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12591 for pics 5999 Cunningham Ct., Florence MLS#905057 - $390,000 Beautiful 3 bedroom, 4 bath home on 3 acres. Just minutes from Missoula. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 928 Elm St. - MLS#904910 $229,000 Great rental property in lower Rattlesnake. Turn key & low maintenance. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Can’t get your house sold? Call Beverly Kiker @ Prudential Missoula. (406)5440708 Fully remodeled 3 bd, 2.5 ba, 1 car garage condo new carpet, paint & appliances. Fully furnished w/ leather couches, flat screen TVs, & oak & walnut furniture. $156,000. MLS#908062. Pat McCormick,240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 January 21–January 28, 2010


REAL ESTATE GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS LOLO HOME WITH PRIVATE LAKE FRONTAGE. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage. New roof, new interior & exterior paint, new baths, wrap-around covered porch, tons of storage. $339,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GREAT NORTHSIDE LOCATION. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, Heated garage/shop, huge back yard, lots of trees, Walk/Bike to Downtown Missoula. $180,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

house for sale 727 Charlo Street in Missoula-2 bdrm, 1 bath-large 2 car garage-large fenced yard-on 2 lots$180,000 obo. 406-531-3582 Lot 1 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905530 - $109,000 2.87 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Lot 2 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905531 - $129,000 2.25 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 NHN Applegate & Prarie Rd., Helena MLS#809493 - $2,500,000 - Great investment to get in at the very beginning of a cemetery development. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate 546-5816

DUPLEXES HWY 93 Com Trade 4 Duplex Hwy 93 Commercial shop & residence $225K TRADE for Missoula DUPLEX 406-883-6700 or 406-2124680 Agent

LAND FOR SALE

3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great local 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek & w/ valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential MT. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185

Over 10 years of Real Estate Experience

Jodie L Hooker • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com • 406.239.7588 Quality Service Certified Realtor® • www.MissoulaValleyHomes.com

Beautiful home w/ beautiful views PRICE REDUCTION! MLS # 907106 • $199,000

3 bed, 2 bath with double garage. Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, views of Bitterroots, immaculate inside & out. Sit on the front porch swing and enjoy life.

Joy Earls

333 Martin Lane, Florence New carpet and UG sprinklers with an easy commute make this home a perfect life style choice. Paved Road to property! 1 Mile south of Florence with views all around. Porch swing, hot tub, and storage shed are all included.

Call me for more good values on Missoula area homes & investments.

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com 358 Mari Court, Msla $305,900 • MLS# 908482 Beautiful Home Granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, stone fireplace. Built-in lockers off garage entrance, lots of storage, 2 hot water heaters, RV pad, RV dump and a hot & cold water spicket, backyard adjourns a park.

4 BD, 2 BA 2,097 sq.ft with hardwood floors, cozy fireplace, loft area over family room & a wonderful private deck. Just a short drive from Missoula. www.SaintMarysLakeRoad.com

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $269,900 • MLS# 908640

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 822.7653 1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

Large 5 BD Home

www.YourMT.com

5BD/2BA home in a great neighborhood with a 2 car garage. Lots of storage, finished basement, kitchen updates.

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413

www.YourMT.com

AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

1839 W. Central • $189,900 Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

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Real Change is in the AIR!!

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900 1500 W. Broadway Missoula • MT, 59808

Is rebranding to

SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit...

Jerry Hogan REALTOR®, QSC® 406-546-7270 • jerryhogan.point2agent.com Specializing in: Investment Properties

www.mindypalmer.com

Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Home has been well cared for, many updates. It is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large garage plus a huge storage shed. There is a master bedroom, 2 additional bedrooms. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. MLS# 907496

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR®, CSR® 406-239-7588 • www.MissoulaMultifamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

www.mindypalmer.com

Well cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home with hot tub, A/C, & UG sprinklers. Near parks and trails. $319,900. MLS#908771. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

www.YourMT.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185.

DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/profes-

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185.

for Missoula DUPLEX 406-883-6700 or 406-212-4680 Agent

Polson HWY 93 Commercial shop & residence .8 acre $225K or TRADE

call Hooker.

Beautiful 14 acre parcel just west of Huson. Meadow with trees & pasture. Modulars or double wides on foundation ok. $184,900. MLS#906774. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics

Price Reduction! Beautiful home with views of the Mission Mountains! 4BD/2BA. Hardwood floors, fireplace, loft over the family room, basement, large carport and private deck! $199,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit...

Missoula Tanning Salon Major Price Reduction - Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

When you are ready to work with a professional,

www.YourMT.com

3 Quizno’s Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! Major Price reduction now $580,000! May be purchased separately. Missoula, MT. Hutton Ranch also available- Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753, 543-4412 or Fidelity Real Estate 721-1840.

www.YourMT.com

www.mindypalmer.com

19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $79,999 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Message:12890 for pics

Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185

www.YourMT.com

sional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit...

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, WHS, QSC®, PSC® 406-544-8570 • www.MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

1230 N. First St Hamilton, MT 59840 406.363.4450

1500 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59808 406.549.3353

www.GreaterMontanaRE.com

Kevin Plumage REALTOR®, ABR®, E-Pro 406-240-2009 • kevin@greatermontanare.com Specializing in: Affordable Housing

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 January 21–January 28, 2010

www.marysellsmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE

RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are Still You H i may s t o rbe i c aable l l yto:L o w ! You may be able to: • Lower your monthly • Lower your monthly payment payment

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1255 sq ft, 3 bd/2 ba one level townhomes.

6112 Rains Place/Mullan Rd West Includes radiant heated floors, garage, fire suppression sprinklers, covered back porch. Green features include low voc interior paint, lifetime wood treatment on exterior, and energy star appliances!

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185.

$179,000

Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

www.YourMT.com

Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 370-7689, Prudential Missoula.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-Bankable

contact me today.

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 Astrid Oliver Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Home Mortgage Consultant Cell: 406-550-3587 1800 S. Russell St. Ste. 200 Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Missoula, MT 59801 http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ Phone: 406-329-4061 astrid-oliver Cell: 406-550-3587 astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver Credit is subject to approval.

Astrid Oliver

Some restrictions apply. This

Credit is subject to approval. Some restrictions apply. information is accurate as of and is This information is accurate as of date of printing datewithout of printing subject subject to change notice. and WellsisFargo Home change without Wells Mortgage is a to division of Wells Fargonotice. Bank, N.A. 2009 Fargo Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, All rights reserved. #63731 11/09-01/10 N.A. © 2009 Wells Fargo

Bank N A All rights

priscillabrockmeyer.com

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Proper ties

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 January 21–January 28, 2010


USDA Organic Romaine Hearts

$2.49

Gold'n Plump Natural Drums Or Thighs

$3.99

Bee & Flower Bar Soap

Newcastle Brown Ale Cans

69¢

$6.49

4.4 oz.

6 pack

56 oz.

3 pack

USDA Organic Extra Fancy Fuji Apples

Family Pack Boneless Pork Sirloin Steak

Mezzetta Anchovy Stuffed Olives

99¢

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$3.39

lb.

$6.49 6 pack

10 oz.

lb.

Canadian Portabellas

$4.99 lb.

Tropicana Premium Naval Oranges

49¢

Sam Adams Or Alaskan Ales

lb.

Family Pack Bone-In Beef Ribeye Steak

Napoleon Morocco Anchovy Paste

Leaping Horse California Wines

$4.99 lb.

99¢

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1.6 oz

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IQF Tail Off Medium Shrimp

$9.99 2 lb. bag

Fattorie & Pandea Italian Fornini

7.75-11 oz. Fritos Or Cheetos

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3 For $5

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Tropicana Premium Grapefruit

2 For $1

Westpac Whole Baby Okra

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Earth Tones Fair Trade Organic Coffee

Rubschlager Jewish Deli Rye

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i B g s ’ S y A LE d W o r l d u R Headquarters All compact discs, new & used $2 off All Jewelry 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off • All Clothing 25% off All Body Products 25% off • All Posters & Art 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off

Rudy’s II Record Heaven All Vinyl - New & Used 25% off All Turntables, Cartridges & Stereo Equipment 25% off SALE ENDS 1/31/10

The Bitterroot Performing Arts Council Presents

Billy Jonas Friday, January 29, 7:30pm, Hamilton Performing Arts Center A Billy Jonas performance is an explosion of energy - Frank Zappa meets Headwaters Dance Co. Pete Seeger! Presents

Tickets and info: bARTc.org or 363-7946

"Montana Suite" (a premiere performance)

Four Montana landscapes, four choreographers, four dances, four years in the making! February 4-6, MCT 7:30pm nightly; 2:00pm Saturday matinee

Tickets: Rockin Rudy's or headwatersdance.org

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