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MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 3 • Jan. 21–Jan. 28, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

by Alex Sakariassen

Scope: Food ticket exhibit captures the culture of a coffee shop Up Front: Apostle’s audacious plan aims to curb dropouts Flash in the Pan: Savoring the flavor of a shredded salad


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 3 • Jan. 21–Jan. 28, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

by Alex Sakariassen

Scope: Food ticket exhibit captures the culture of a coffee shop Up Front: Apostle’s audacious plan aims to curb dropouts Flash in the Pan: Savoring the flavor of a shredded salad


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Page 2 January 21–January 28, 2010

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nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Ten years ago, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks uncovered only a handful of cases involving poaching and illegal commercial outfitting in Montana annually. Now those activities dominate much of what the agency’s law enforcement division does on a daily basis, with game wardens investigating nearly 40 such cases a year .......................14

News Letters Praying for the Montana Catholic Conference .............................................4 The Week in Review Bull trout, Lady Griz and MLK ................................................6 Briefs Haiti, petitions in the Bitterroot and medical marijuana................................6 Etc. Jonathan Weber moves on from NewWest ..........................................................7 Up Front Missoula airport considers switch to private security................................8 Up Front Apostle’s audacious plan aims to curb dropouts.......................................9 Ochenski What Massachusetts’ U.S. Senate vote means to us ................................10 Writers on the Range Old pesticides make an unwelcome return........................11 Agenda A Bitterroot benefit for Haiti. ......................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment

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Flash in the Pan Shredded salads............................................................................19 Happiest Hour Flipper’s..........................................................................................20 Ask Ari Something’s fishy.........................................................................................21 8 Days a Week Gone huntin’...................................................................................22 Mountain High Montana Snowshoe Championships .............................................33 Scope Food ticket exhibit captures the culture of a coffee shop ............................34 Noise Ten Foot Tall & 80 Proof, Lizz King, Megasus and Tegan and Sara................35 Soundcheck Perseverance pays for local MC Tonsofun ..........................................36 Film Linklater latches on to an offbeat Orson Welles ..............................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ................................................................................................C-11 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-15

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

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President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2010 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

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Page 3 January 21–January 28, 2010


STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning on the corner of Third and Myrtle streets, outside of Bernice’s Bakery.

Q:

This week the Indy reports on Missoula International Airport’s likely switch to a private security company rather than using the TSA. How would you grade the current security system at Missoula’s airport? Follow-up: On a national level, there’s talk of full body scans and other enhanced security measures at airports. How much is too much when it comes to screening passengers?

Leah Lodge: It could use improvement because it’s the easiest airport to get through. The security’s so minimal. Clothing not optional: When you have to take off your clothes, it’s almost uncomfortable. In this day and age we should have the technology to not have to take off our shoes, our coats or take out our laptops.

Jolyn Montgomery: I think it’s good only because I haven’t had any issues. But I also haven’t tried to get a gun through. Never too much: I don’t think there is such a thing as too much. On a flight you are so vulnerable. A full body scan would be fabulous. It’s just not worth a flight of 250 people going down.

Trisch Macmillan: It looks fine, but when you read that they are missing guns at security points it doesn’t give you much faith. Cause and effect: If you have nothing to hide you shouldn’t be so afraid of [full body scans].

Anya Cloud: I think it’s pretty good. It feels effective without being laborious. No Total Recall: Fingerprinting, eye scanning and full body pat downs and scans feel like too much.

Missoula Independent

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Pray for understanding I was distressed to read that the Montana Catholic Conference (MCC) is “already working on a plan” to counter the Montana Supreme Court’s recent ruling on physician-assisted death (see “Fight to the end,” Jan. 7, 2010). I assumed that this was just another case of well-intentioned but misguided, believers trying to “save souls” by enforcing their own morals on everyone, believers and non-believers alike (and for the record, I count myself among the former group). But just to make sure I was getting both sides, I decided to check out what the MCC had to say about why they were opposed to allowing the terminally ill to end their own suffering. Now I’m even more distressed. Not only does the MCC oppose physician-assisted death, they don’t even know what it is. To wit, their official statement points to the fact that Montana has the third highest suicide rate in the nation and mentions that the state has hired a “Suicide Prevention Officer” and has a “Suicide Prevention Plan.” So, apparently, the MCC can’t see any difference between a distraught individual overcome by a temporary state of hopelessness and a terminally ill patient with no prospects but excruciating pain for the rest of their life. Further on, Bishop Michael W. Warfel is quoted as saying, “vulnerable populations…can very easily be manipulated into accepting a prescribed death if they feel they are a financial or emotional burden to their families. Proper health care should address the problem, not accept prearranged death as the appropriate solution.” I say, what an incredible slander against the entire medical profession! Is he actually suggesting that trained doctors will “manipulate” otherwise normal patients into offing themselves? The MCC’s statement on the ruling declares, “Catholic teaching upholds the dignity and inherent worth of every life,” but it’s difficult to see how telling someone they must suffer for as long as we can keep them alive is respecting that person’s dignity. As Hebrew University professor Ze’ev W. Falk points out, “The Jewish belief that human beings were created Imago Dei does not necessarily exclude the possibility that they can end their lives. On the contrary, just because of this belief, death may be preferable to certain situations, which might be seen as desecration of God’s image in the world.” One would think that a priest would be hip to the difference between an eternal soul and a transient body and know that the “dignity and inherent worth” lie in the former and not the latter. Perhaps this is overly subtle metaphysics for the MCC, but really it’s a pretty basic concept. I am greatly disheartened that the

Page 4 January 21–January 28, 2010

Catholic church has decided to throw its weight behind the cause of needlessly prolonged suffering. If the MCC gets its way, it won’t mean that terminally ill patients won’t continue to make the choice to end their lives, only that more of them will have to take the route of Janet Murdock (self-starvation) or my friend’s mother who, lacking a medical alternative, finally decided to end her

Is he “actually suggesting that trained doctors will ‘manipulate’ otherwise normal patients into

don’t understand or subscribe to the concept of how “culling some will strengthen the whole.” But that concept helped make America a world leader in wildlife conservation. There is no logical reason why populations of wild horses cannot be managed in the same way as elk and deer. The American rancher is not the boogey man, either. He works hard to make the land provide us with sustenance and his herds graze the land for its own good as well. Secretary Salazar offers possible solutions such as fertility control and more sanctuaries. These may work in some areas but would prolong the inevitable problem of too much competition for too little habitat. Remedies cannot be based on emotion. We must use common sense. We don’t live in a zoo. Wild things need wild places but since man lives here too, and in greater and greater numbers, there has to be a balance. Only a balance will work. M. David Allen President and CEO Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Missoula

Seeking Denny’s support

offing

themselves?

years of battling MS with the tried-andtrue method of a .45 discharged into the roof of her mouth. She was a good Irish Catholic woman, and though it’s too late to ask her now, I bet both she and her children who found her the next morning would have much preferred something a little more dignified. So let’s all hope the Supreme Court decision sticks and that the MCC doesn’t get its way. Let’s all hope…and pray. Josh Davis Missoula

Emotional baggage I respect and applaud Interior Secretary Ken Salazar’s perspectives on solving the wild horse crisis. All wildlife will suffer if we continue to manage wild horses according to the status quo. Wild horse herds are flourishing. Some people feel we must give them more space but land is a limited commodity. There’s only so much to go around, and elk, deer and other wildlife, as well as farmers and ranchers, are already using our dwindling open landscapes. The concept of harvesting wild horses is an emotional topic for people who

I first learned how to fly-fish on the Gallatin River in the late ’50s and still today, 50 years later, Montana remains a fisherman’s paradise. I’m writing because I want it to stay that way. After attending two “town hall” meetings hosted by Rep. Denny Rehberg on Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act, and listening to the pros and cons put forward by different advocates, I was quite amazed at the compromises made by both the environmentalists and members of the timber industry for a bill that would take into consideration the wants of both sides. I would like to thank Rep. Rehberg for holding the meetings around the state and giving people a chance to express their opinions on this piece of legislation. I would also hope that Rep. Rehberg will give his support to Sens. Baucus and Tester in getting this incredibly important bill through Congress so that our future generations may enjoy the incredible beauty provided by the wilderness as well as the jobs provided by the lumber industry. Finally, I would like to request that the congressman schedule a similar type of meeting in Missoula, where the recent closing of Smurfit-Stone and several other lumber companies have given Missoula an economic blow unlike any experienced by any other city in Montana. Once again, thank you congressman for your interest in our opinions of this bill. Robin Poole Missoula


Missoula Independent

Page 5 January 21–January 28, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, January 13

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to designate approximately 22,679 miles of streams and 533,426 acres of lakes and reservoirs in Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Nevada as critical habitat for the bull trout, a threatened species protected under the Endangered Species Act.

• Thursday, January 14 Michael A. Tenenbaum, 31, a registered medical marijuana caregiver, appears in Missoula County Justice Court after police found in his home 36 marijuana plants, 12 more than the law allowed him. Police also discovered seven pounds of pot, 225 grams of hashish and more than $14,000 in cash. Authorities allege Tenenbaum dealt to individuals not registered as his patients.

• Friday, January 15 The Lady Griz beat Sacramento State, 77-61, at Dahlberg Arena in Missoula. Senior Lauren Beck drops a career-high 19 points and four others score in double figures as UM improves to 3-2 in the Big Sky Conference and 8-9 overall. The Hornets drop to 0-27 against Montana.

• Saturday, January 16 Freezing rain causes at least five accidents on a nearly impassable portion of Highway 200 east of Bonner near Gold Creek Road. The conditions prompt the Montana Highway Patrol to close the slick stretch of road for an hour and a half to allow the Montana Department of Transportation to sand it.

• Sunday, January 17

Two hikers trek along the Mount Sentinel trail Sunday to rise above a thick inversion covering the valley.

Haiti Right place, right time

Just before midnight, Missoula policeman Bob Campbell responds to a fire on Connell Avenue and pulls a 31-year old man from his burning second story apartment. Campbell is briefly hospitalized for smoke inhalation and the man is in stable condition. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

• Monday, January 18 Hundreds gather at Caras Park to commemorate the life of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. more than four decades after he was murdered in Memphis. Event speakers say more work needs to be done to ensure people across racial, socioeconomic and sexual orientation spectrums have access to equal rights.

• Tuesday, January 19 A morning earthquake registering 3.3 on the Richter scale emanates from Yellowstone National Park. As of Tuesday morning, scientists tally 424 earthquakes during a three-day “swarm.” The Yellowstone Plateau, which includes multiple earthquake faults, is home to one of the largest super-volcanoes in the world.

Less than an hour after Montana nurse Michele Sare arrived in Haiti, the shaking started. The founder and CEO of the Granite Countybased Nurses for Nurses International had safely landed in Port-au-Prince on Jan. 12 and traveled 20 miles by car to a nursing school in Leogone. Then a 7-magnitude earthquake rattled the impoverished island country, leaving an estimated 200,000 people dead and 1.5 million homeless. “It actually felt like someone was going to turn the vehicle over,” explained Sare from the Seattle International Airport Tuesday afternoon on her way back home to Montana. “...It was a very violent shaking. And it just kept coming. [The aftershocks] were one right after another.” Sare, who lives in Hall, near Drummond, founded Nurses for Nurses less than a year ago. The nonprofit aims to educate and empower health care workers in poor nations. While in Haiti, she

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 January 21–January 28, 2010

planned on gathering information to later teach a public health class for local nurses. But that all changed once the earthquake hit. Rubble blocked roads. Gas lines lit on fire. People frantically flooded the streets. “I’m not sure how to capture in words the horrific scenes driving from the airport through the city Port-au-Prince en route to Leogone,” she said. “You’ve all seen the images on TV. Now imagine that that’s your home. Imagine that’s your child inside.” Sare cleaned cuts and cared for the injured from an impromptu trauma hospital on the grass in Leogone. All she had to quell pain was over-thecounter painkillers. Even so, “They’d say, ‘Merci,’ and give me a hug,” she said. The overall character of the Haitian people struck Sare. One woman who had been trapped beneath rubble for four days apologized to Sare for crying. “You have never seen such strength, such beauty, such kindness,” Sare said. That’s why she asks those following media coverage of the disaster at home not to get lost in sto-

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ries of valor personified by local heroes. “It’s not about me. It’s not about the nurses,” she said. “It’s about the people of Haiti.” Jessica Mayrer

Marijuana Filling the chamber During the Missoula Chamber of Commerce’s monthly Business After Hours event last Tuesday, membership director Bill Samsoe introduced one of the organization’s newest members: Zoo Mountain Natural Care, the first medical marijuana business to join the chamber, and likely the first to join any chamber in the state. “When he announced us I think a couple of [the other members] were a little shocked,” says 20year-old Zoo Mountain co-owner Logan Head. “But once we told them who we are and what we do, they were actually for us, which was great…After the meeting, five or six people came up to us to ask how to get a card and get them legal.” The chamber held a ribbon cutting ceremony


Inside

Letters

Briefs

outside the clinic Wednesday afternoon, presenting Head and his business partner, Tayln Lang, 35, with a framed $1 bill, their “first dollar of pure profit.” “I felt like being a member of the chamber was a way to educate everyone there who isn’t familiar with medical marijuana,” explains Head of his decision to join. The clinic’s inclusion in the chamber demonstrates the strides the medical marijuana movement has made since Montana voters passed Initiative 148 more than five years ago. It follows a rapid uptick in the number of medical marijuana businesses in Missoula and elsewhere in the state since the Obama administration announced last October that federal authorities would defer to state marijuana laws. Based on recent events, Samsoe says joining the chamber is “not a big deal.” “Don’t make a big deal out of it,” he says. “They’re a legitimate business…They want to be very out in the open. They want to do everything per the law.” Allen St. Pierre, director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), says medical marijuana businesses—or “cannabusinesses,” as he calls them—joining chambers of commerce is becoming commonplace around the country in states with medical marijuana programs. “It’s the normalization of the whole thing,” he says. Matthew Frank

Veterans Telepsychology on the rez A new facility designed to treat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, will open in the coming weeks on the Flathead Indian Reservation, part of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) efforts to extend services to reservations and other rural areas. “The need on all reservations is extremely high,” says W.J. “Buck” Richardson, the minority outreach coordinator for the VA’s Rocky Mountain Network, “because you don’t have the outreach, you don’t have the care, you don’t have the services, and the distance to them is often too far to travel.” According to the VA, military enlistment among American Indians is the highest, per capita, of any other race or ethnic group in the country. The new treatment facility, located in the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes’ Tribal

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Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Complex in Pablo, aims to ensure that veterans receive their VA benefits, including any medical or psychological care they may need. One day a week, Richardson says, the facility will operate PTSD clinics using videoconferencing technology to connect veterans with VA counselors at the University of Colorado. “It’s not just for tribal veterans,” Richardson says. “It’s for any veterans who come and ask for help with their benefits. It doesn’t matter if they’re tribal members or not.”

“Telemedicine,” and specifically “telepsychology,” is increasingly used by the VA to reach veterans in far-flung communities. The Rocky Mountain Network conducts more than 16,000 telemedicine visits every year in its largely rural nine-state region. Facilities employing the technology have opened on reservations across the West, Richardson says, through partnerships with the VA, Indian Health Services and local tribal health agencies. In Montana, the Flathead and Blackfeet reservations are the last to receive them. Roger Shourds, a tribal member and Vietnam veteran who facilitates the reservation’s independent PTSD Talking Circle, welcomes the facility, but warns that effective outreach will be critical due to the aversion many tribal people have toward government agencies. Shourds also questions the value of videoconferencing, which, he says, can be too impersonal. Still, “It’s another tool,” he says. Matthew Frank

Agenda

News Quirks

Bitterroot Patriot petition Conservatives have again stirred the political pot in Ravalli County, this time with a list of weighty demands sent to county commissioners and Sheriff Chris Hoffman. Stevensville resident Robert Gairing and several others submitted a two-page petition last week calling for elected officials to reaffirm their constitutional obligations and execute a number of tasks. Hoffman says he was “taken aback” by the request. “The entire document disturbed me,” Hoffman says. “I feel like I’ve upheld my oath. I take my direction in terms of my duties from Montana Code Annotated.” The petition’s most drastic demand calls for Hoffman to “form and command a County militia.” Critics of the Bitterroot’s conservative activists have long feared a new militia movement in the area. But backers of the petition condemn the “demonizing” of the term militia. “It’s not an aggressive stance we’re taking,” says Mona Docteur, founder of the group Celebrating Conservatism. “It’s a, ‘Jeez, let’s help each other out here,’ just in case we have something happen like what’s happening in Haiti right now.” According to the petition, failure of officials to sign will result in “immediate suspension and a Grand Jury hearing.” How exactly citizens would enact those measures escapes Gairing, a co-author of the petition. In Montana, only a district court judge can convene a grand jury. And citizens don’t have the power to suspend public officials. “Clearly, the mechanism [of suspending officials] as far as I can see is not in place,” Gairing says. Many of the details of the petition mattered little to Docteur, one of roughly 175 individuals who signed it. Docteur says that while Celebrating Conservatism—the subject of an Independent cover story in October 2009—doesn’t sanction the effort, she did allow the authors to collect signatures during group meetings. “I just wanted to make sure that these officials didn’t have a problem reaffirming their oath of office,” Docteur says. The petition also seeks to lift requirements for permits for concealed weapons, prohibit U.S. Census Bureau personnel from gathering certain information, and ban the Environmental Protection Agency from entering Ravalli County without permission from the sheriff. Alex Sakariassen

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etc. NewWest.Net, the Missoula-based new media company that for nearly five years has tinkered on the cutting edge of next-generation journalism, may have lost its last foothold. On Thursday, the site’s co-founder and lead visionary, Jonathan Weber, announced he is leaving Missoula and will assume the role of editor-in-chief at a similar online venture, Bay Area News Network, in San Francisco. It’s too soon for an outright obituary—Weber says NewWest will continue in his absence with a new part-time publisher—but the venture’s promise has certainly waned. Weber’s departure comes after a year of layoffs that reduced the Missoula staff of eight full-time employees a year ago— plus numerous other contracted contributors throughout the region—to just six part-time workers now. “It has always been a difficult business as a business, and that remains the case,” says Weber. “But I believe we’re still in a decent position with our core team to continue in my absence, and I believe there continues to be a lot of potential in the idea.” Weber’s not alone. Industry leaders have always kept a watchful eye on his vision of innovative, communitybased reporting. “NewWest is very ambitious,” says Douglas McLennan, founder of Arts Journal and a leading figure on web-based journalism. “There are all sorts of things to admire about the effort, and I think all around the country a lot of people who have been following the evolution of journalism have been watching NewWest with a great deal of interest.” Count us among NewWest’s many admirers. Weber and co. raised the bar for online publishing. The company’s successful business conferences sparked important debate on topics like development in the West. And many of the site’s award-winning original stories—Hal Herring’s 2005 series on meth in the Flathead comes to mind— eclipsed any other work on the topic, including our own. Competition among journalists makes for better coverage, and a better city, and we’ll be as disappointed as NewWest’s dedicated readers if it goes offline. In any case, our loss is the Bay Area’s gain. Weber’s passionate about what he does, something he actually touched on in a recent business column for Slate. “A lot of companies are about more than just making a good return,” he wrote. “They’re about creating something great, something that the founders really care about and think is important. Sometimes you have to take the view that failure simply isn’t an option…And if you fail, well, you’ll have learned a lot.”

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Page 7 January 21–January 28, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Screened out Missoula airport moves toward private security by Jessica Mayrer

During the height of last month’s holiday travel season and a week before an alleged al-Qaeda operative attempted to bomb an international flight traveling to Detroit, officials in Bozeman witnessed a similar security breakdown. A Montana man unknowingly cleared through the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) checkpoints at Gallatin Field Airport with a handgun in his carry-on bag. Once he realized the error, the man turned himself in, prompting authorities to re-screen every passenger, including those already aboard a plane slated to take off. The TSA didn’t publicly acknowledge

eral employees, gaining all of the benefits that go along with being a government worker. But an opt-out clause in the original legislation opens the door for airport managers to hire private firms to replace TSA screeners. So far, 19 airports across the country have done so, including seven in eastern Montana. With airports in Missoula, West Yellowstone, Kalispell and Butte also primed to make the switch, Montana appears to be leading the airport security privatization movement. Last month’s incident in Bozeman is just the most recent example of the frustra-

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Missoula International Airport is poised to replace its current government-run security with a private firm. “Local control is certainly more responsive than a federal agency that is headquartered in Washington, D.C.,” says airport director Cris Jensen.

the Bozeman incident until last week, and officials say that sort of delayed communication—not to mention the security breach itself—is why airports across the state are poised to replace government screeners with private contractors. “Local control is certainly more responsive than a federal agency that is headquartered in Washington, D.C.,” says Cris Jensen, director of the Missoula International Airport. “And so, we think there’s some benefit to having [local management] here.” Jensen says he put the wheels in motion to replace federal security with private contractors months ago. He says the move will improve communication, responsiveness and efficiency. If all goes as planned, the change will happen by the end of 2010. “September of this year would be the earliest opportunity,” he says. Congress created the TSA after 9/11 as part of the Department of Homeland Security. When the new agency took over, thousands of airport screeners became fed-

Page 8 January 21–January 28, 2010

tion airports face with TSA. Long-time Gallatin Airport Authority board member Richard Roehm says local officials wanted to notify the public immediately of the problem, but red tape prevented any full disclosure. “Nobody from the TSA was available,” he says. “It was either no response or we can’t issue anything until it’s cleared by Washington.” In an interview with the Independent, TSA spokesman Dwayne Baird says policy mandates the agency not comment on active investigations. He adds that the TSA employee responsible for the Gallatin Field breach was reprimanded and sent back for remedial training. Roehm, a former colonel in the armed forces, says he understands security specifics sometimes need to stay under wraps to better ensure safety. But he maintains TSA takes it too far. “TSA wraps itself in a cloak of security and says, ‘We can’t discuss it,’” he says. “The public needs a greater transparency in all of this stuff.”

Communication is just one drawback with TSA. Jensen says the agency’s sprawling bureaucracy is too cumbersome, tough to navigate and expensive. “People have lots of examples with lots of federal agencies about the inefficiencies just due to the size,” he says. “I’m not talking necessarily about just the screening of passengers. I’m talking about the management of the operation and things of that nature, some of the overhead, some of the other expenses that are related to operating. So, there’s a substantial amount of money we believe that can be saved.” The financial impact of a switch worries the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE), which represents TSA employees across the country. The union believes private industry will rely on fewer employees to do more work, leaving American airports less protected. AFGE representatives are lobbying Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano’s staff to ask for a moratorium on any more privatization. “For profit means you always cut corners,” says AFGE’s Tim Shorrock. If an airport privatizes its security, local management is legally obligated to offer existing screeners work with the same benefits and pay. But Shorrock says private companies can eventually cut salaries and, inevitably, lure cheaper, less qualified labor. “This is our line of protection here in the U.S.,” he says. “We want well-trained, efficient government workers…not the lowest common denominator.” Jensen disagrees, pointing to what he maintains are thriving and efficient private security enterprises at airports in San Francisco, Jackson Hole and Kansas City. He says if Missoula goes private, training and staff would remain nearly identical, and passengers would notice little difference. In addition, TSA would maintain regulatory oversight. “My family flies. My friends fly. If I thought for a moment that it was going to be substandard, we would never consider this,” Jensen says. “In fact, I believe just the opposite—it’s every bit as good and potentially even better. A lot of that just comes from the local control.” Three companies have submitted proposals to the Missoula County Airport Authority Board so far: Firstline Transportation Security, Covenant Aviation Security and McNeil Security. Jensen says the board may select a proposal during its Jan. 26 board meeting, setting into motion a long application process to officially drop the TSA. jmayrer@missoulanews.com


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Head of the class Apostle’s audacious plan aims to curb dropouts by Alex Sakariassen

That push to bring the broader Missoula community into the public school system appeals to administrators like Bennett for a host of reasons, primarily the potential for non-traditional revenue streams. Bennett says dollars from the private sector could go a long way in replacing mismatched computer terminals and antiquated monitors at Willard and other schools with equipment shortfalls. “I’ve heard students at MCPS referred to as ‘time travelers,’” Bennett says. “They live in the 21st century, and they leave it to step into the 1980s during the school day.” Not all of Apostle’s decisions to date have been met with wholesale optimism, however. Perhaps his most controversial move was the reassignment of Bennett from Hellgate High School—where she’d worked as principal for six years—to Willard. The decision came suddenly last June, and generated initial backlash from parents and students at Hellgate in the form of a petition and letters to the MCPS Board of Trustees. “There was just a lot of confusion Photo by Cathrine L. Walters in the beginning on everyone’s part,” Superintendent Alex Apostle, left, has gone about changing Missoula’s says Kelly Youbles, president of the volpublic school district at breakneck speed since entering the position in fall unteer parent group Knights of the 2008. Apostle’s new goal calls for a 100-percent graduation rate among Round Table. “The way it was Missoula students. announced, the way everything went of skepticism. He’s an unapologetic idealist equates to a playbook for MCPS to achieve down. But in the end we realized that dead-set on shaking up the county’s strug- a 100-percent graduation rate, a list of five schools are like any company and decitasks he believes will take the district “with- sions are made for reasons outside of gling school system. “My feeling is that America’s students in striking distance” of success in three what we may see or not see.” can and will and must compete against stu- short years. Some see Apostle as the disApostle maintains that Bennett’s reasdents from anywhere,” says Apostle in full trict’s first action-oriented leader with a signment and that of two other principals Knute Rockne mode. “Not only compete, clear and consistent objective. in the district were necessary changes in his “He keeps student achievement right long-term goal to take student achievement but win. That’s the type of system we’re tryin the center of the bull’s eye,” says Jane into the 21st century. Sometimes a superining to create here in the city of Missoula.” Apostle puts the current dropout rate Bennett, principal at Willard Alternative tendent must make tough and unpopular at MCPS at 20 percent, a figure he regards High School. “I am positive that people decisions, he says, but standing by them scathingly as “unacceptable.” It’s challenges within the school district are starting to isn’t hard when they’re made with 8,500 like this that dragged him out of retirement realize and appreciate that this superin- children in mind. He adds Bennett is and into Missoula a year and a half ago. tendent means business and that we will primed to make Willard the model for Now he’s falling back on a full career in accomplish these lofty goals.” reform across MCPS. But Apostle’s vision for the future of public school administration in Tacoma, “Jane Bennett is doing a fantastic job at public education in Missoula isn’t con- Willard,” Apostle says. “She’s doing a fantasWash., to make MCPS succeed. “We need to create an environment tained to MCPS. Students need opportuni- tic job in an area that she has great expertwhere students just don’t sit in a row and ties to learn outside of school, he says. That ise as far as 21st century learning. She’s kind the teacher lectures up in front,” Apostle means internships with local businesses, of our point person for our 21st century says. “Our kids are bored. That’s a reason support from groups like the Rotary Club, schools.” that some kids are dropping out of school. and collaboration with the University of As far as Apostle is concerned, the last So what we need to do is actively involve Montana in forging what Apostle calls a year-and-a-half of change at MCPS is only “seamless K-20 approach.” our students in the education process.” the beginning. Missoula has a long way to “We don’t want any finger-pointing,” go in achieving the kind of success he Apostle hit the ground running in fall 2008, initiating a series of sweeping Apostle says. “We don’t want the commu- demands, and his playbook is far from reforms. He divided the district into three nity pointing at the schools and the exhausted. separate regions, delegating evaluation and schools pointing at the community in “This won’t be the last of restructuring oversight of certain schools to a trio of terms of where we’re going. We want to be in the Missoula County Public Schools,” executive directors. He played musical together and we want to be able to pick Apostle says. chairs with several MCPS principals last each other up as we move forward on this summer. And on Jan. 19, MCPS officially journey.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com Superintendent Alex Apostle sounds something like a coach giving a lockerroom pep talk when outlining his longterm plans for the Missoula County Public School District (MCPS). Days before launching his latest audacious initiative—a 100-percent graduation rate among the district’s 8,500 students—Apostle pounds the table, passionately raises his voice and shows no patience for even the slightest bit

kicked off Apostle’s Graduation Matters Missoula initiative designed to reduce Missoula’s dropout rate to zero. “It’s not idealistic,” Apostle says. “I believe it’s achievable in Missoula. Somewhere else it may not be, but in Missoula it can be.” The coach-in-the-locker-room analogy stretches even deeper into Apostle’s work with the district. He’s designed what

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Game-changer Massachusetts sends strong message to Baucus, Dems

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WiLD A roaring, soaring musical safari from the Missoula Symphony Orchestra. It’s our most adventurous Family Concert yet! With 70 musicians at his command (and the help of every kid and parent), Darko Butorac will capture the nature of instruments — solo or stampeding. Join a thrill-a-minute voyage as melodies come alive and jump from calm to crazy. Darko Butorac, Music Director • Plus a Dashing Special Guest Friday, January 29, 7 PM • The University Theatre Tickets: $6 • Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 East Main Street

Missoula Independent

A year after President Barack Obama took office in a wild celebration filled with hope and buoyed by the energy from a tidal wave of fervent supporters, the voters of Massachusetts turned their backs and the tables on the Democrats. In an election that has been called “epic” and “stunning,” the U.S. Senate seat held by the late Edward Kennedy for 47 years went to a virtually unknown Republican. The loss of that single seat means the Democrats no longer have the 60 votes needed to prevent Republican filibusters in the Senate, and ensures that President Obama’s agenda will face a much tougher road in the future. Sad to say, the Democrats brought this on themselves, having carelessly blown their historic opportunity to lead the nation to a brighter future. Massachusetts has been called “the bluest of the blue” states, long known for sending strong liberals to Congress. The special election, held to seat Kennedy’s replacement after his death, took place in the midst of a snowstorm. Nonetheless, voters turned out in huge numbers, which is generally good news for Democrats who still fancy themselves the “party of the people.” But on Tuesday, those voters showed up not to cast their ballots for the state’s Democrat candidate, Attorney General Martha Coakley, but for Republican Scott Brown, who ran on an anti-Obama platform highlighted by his pledge to vote against the sorry excuse for health care reform still awaiting the congressional approval that now may never come. How it happened is no real mystery, even though Obama said he was “surprised and shocked” by the outcome. Perhaps, as much as anything, the vote was a bitter vindication for those who expected both the president and the Democrat-controlled Congress to keep their promises to truly change America and its role in the world. Instead, the Democrats bowed to the same corporate interests that have controlled both parties for most of the last century, spewed ineffective and piecemeal legislation, maintained the supremacy of the military-industrial complex, escalated the wars started by George W. Bush, and generally ignored the outraged cries of those who had brought them to office. Nowhere was this more evident than in the case of Sen. Max Baucus. It won’t take much of a memory to recall the Montana senator’s haughty rejection of true health care reform when he declared that single-payer, universal health care enjoyed by every other indus-

Page 10 January 21–January 28, 2010

trialized nation in the world was “off the table” in favor of some grotesque doppelganger he referred to as “a uniquely American” plan. Surrounded by his nodding yes-men and insulated by the bales of money lavished on him by health-interest lobbyists, Baucus ignored the weekly protests at

The Democrats “brought this on themselves, having carelessly blown their historic opportunity to lead the nation to a brighter

future.

his Montana offices by single-payer advocates, ignored the pleas by the 18,000 members of the Montana Education Association-Montana Federation of Teachers and ignored the demonstration at Big Sky against Camp Baucus, where he squeezed yet more money from his corporate cronies. Max, in his ego-driven obsession, told us he would put together a historic health care bill on his own terms, which just happened to be terms that were very friendly to big pharma, big insurance and big hospitals. Ironically, for his model he chose to mimic the Massachusetts state plan. The sorry excuse behind which he hid while blowing off real health care reform was that he had to craft a bill that would “get 60 votes” in the Senate. Now, after nearly half a year of missing deadline after deadline to pass the health care legislation, the bumbling Democrats find themselves not just shy of the 60 votes they once controlled, but facing an energized, committed and vehemently opposed Republican block of 41 votes against which no amount of

Baucus-style pandering will make the least bit of difference. The outcome of this election proves what many progressives have been saying for some time now—that the Democrats have left their base dispirited and de-energized by failing to provide real leadership. The mass of independents that brought Obama and the Democrats to power have likewise turned away in bitter disappointment at the continuation of “business as usual” under the Democrat majorities. In the meantime, the Republicans are now more empowered than ever, having sacked a party stronghold and carried away the precious Senate seat thanks to the Democrats’ naïve arrogance. Obama, meanwhile, is scrambling to try and make sense of what happened to his once-shining presidency and his own promises of hope and change. When he gives his State of the Union address to Congress on January 29 he will no doubt eloquently detail what he believes are the many accomplishments of his first year in office. But as we say here in the West, it’ll be “a day late and a dollar short” to have any impact on the race for Kennedy’s seat. The turn of events has left the Democrats stunned, like deer in the headlights as electoral doom bears down upon them. Predictably, some whine that the loss shows they moved too far, too fast, a ridiculous rationale in light of the minimal progress they have actually made. Having failed to deliver and now reeking of fear and timidity, their future efforts are likely to be even more milquetoast than their sorry performance of the last year. That, in turn, will only sow more disappointment among their base, turn more independents away in disgust and provide more fodder for their growing number of critics. It’s tough to see how the Democrats pull out of this leadership nose-dive. Their response, especially from those facing elections later this year, will most likely be to scuttle like crabs to the right, emulating the Republicans against whom they must run. Is it exactly the wrong thing to do? Yes, it is. But as the saying goes, never underestimate the ability of the Democrats to pull defeat from the jaws of victory—a feat they have just performed once again on a historic level. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Pick your poison Old pesticides make an unwelcome return by Ted Williams

“Biocides” was Rachel Carson’s term for pesticides that kill indiscriminately. They haven’t been much talked about since the banning of DDT and relatives in the 1970s— until now. As Pete Gober, who heads the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s effort to save the black-footed ferret, America’s most endangered mammal, put it recently: “The incredibly dumb things we did 40 years ago are coming full circle.” He then asked if I had heard of a biocide called Rozol? I had not. Rozol makes creatures that ingest it bleed from every orifice and stagger around for the week or two or three it takes them to die, attracting predators and scavengers. Whatever eats the anticoagulant-laced victim dies, too. Rozol was registered for black-tailedprairie dog control in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas and Wyoming by George W. Bush’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and, in May 2009, by Barack Obama’s EPA in the rest of the range—Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota and North Dakota. Now, this biocide is killing golden eagles, bald eagles, ferruginous hawks, owls, magpies, turkey vultures, badgers, swift foxes, coyotes, raccoons, red-winged blackbirds, wild turkeys and, almost certainly, ferrets. Because Rozol-poisoned prairie dogs leave their burrows, people who apply the poison are legally required to return and bury carcasses. They don’t, and would find few carcasses if they did. As one applicator told Gober, “You put it out and you go fishing.” Prairie dogs have been eliminated from 95 percent of their habitat, and where cattle aren’t overstocked there’s no evidence they compete with them for grass. Moreover, prairie dogs benefit or sustain at least 150 vertebrate species including ferrets, which can’t exist without them. But Gober’s agency isn’t asking ranchers to stop killing prairie dogs, only to poison them with the more selective alternative, zinc phosphide. It’s cheaper and easier to use—if you assume that applicators actually take the time to obey the law and bury Rozol-contaminated carcasses. “We’ve hammered EPA with our con-

cerns about Rozol and about permitting it without consulting us on endangered species impacts,” said Gober. “They just blow us off.” Pressure for expanded Rozol use is intense. Whipped to a froth of fear and loathing by the Farm Bureau and county

Rozol makes “creatures that ingest it bleed from every orifice and stagger around for the week or two or three it takes them to die, attracting predators and

scavengers.

commissions, property-rights zealots who hate all things federal save farm support are using Rozol to neutralize the Endangered Species Act and eliminate black-footed ferrets. I found the best example in western Kansas where the Logan County Commission is exterminating ferrets and their food supply by inciting the public against prairie dogs and nuking ferret habitat with Rozol. In 2007, after a 50-year absence, ferrets were returned to Kansas because two brave and enlightened ranchers invited the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to use their properties near Russell Springs as a release site. For protecting prairie dogs and welcoming ferrets, Larry Haverfield and Gordon Barnhardt have become local pari-

ahs. Most of their neighboring ranchers filed an unsuccessful lawsuit against them for allegedly creating a regional prairie-dog infestation. Because Rozol is so deadly to all wildlife, the law requires that it be placed inside prairie dog holes. Instead, the county commission’s applicator showed up uninvited on the Haverfield ranch, tossing Rozol-laced bait around like confetti. The state has ordered him to pay a $2,800 fine. When I visited commission chair Carl Uhrich, he made it clear that he hates blackfooted ferrets at least as much as prairie dogs. “Ranchers,” he told me, “don’t like having an endangered species because they bring all the federal rules with them. We sent the Fish and Wildlife Service a copy of our resolution, and they just ignored it. I said, ‘Well, you can take your ferrets and go home then.’” The resolution, legally meaningless, wrongly calls ferrets “not indigenous” and proclaims “that no person or agency shall bring into Logan County one or more blackfooted ferret or any…endangered species.” The commission has been harassing Haverfield and Barnhardt with meritless court actions. And it is vainly attempting to enforce an unconstitutional, century-old Kansas statute that authorizes it to enter private property “infested” with prairie dogs, “exterminate” them and then send the bill to the landowner. Late last summer I joined Haverfield and Ron Klataske, the director of Audubon of Kansas, in a ferret survey organized by the Fish and Wildlife Service. I operated the spotlight while Haverfield drove. A few ferrets were seen by other volunteers, none by us. “The surrounding landscape has been saturated with Rozol,” remarked Klataske. “If any ferrets left the property, chances are they’re dead.” From the perspective of the county commission, Farm Bureau and most of the ranching community, that’s the whole idea. Ted Williams is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He writes the Incite column for Audubon Magazine and lives in Massachusetts.

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At this point, I’m guessing you’ve probably been inundated with Facebook status updates and e-mails from friends asking you to lend your monetary support to the earthquake ravaged people of Haiti. If you’ve been ignoring those messages, here’s another chance to make good—and hear some talented local musicians. A benefit concert at the River Street Dance Theatre in Hamilton features the hip-shaking dance tunes of the Big Sky Mudflaps, the reggae/funk/soul stew of Joan Zen, as well as the sounds of Kirby Erickson and Friends. This night of benevolent boogieing also

includes a silent auction, with all funds from the event going to Plan USA, an organization focusing on the needs of children and currently distributing emergency supplies to families in Haiti. –Ira Sather-Olson A benefit concert for the citizens of Haiti occurs at 7 PM Sat., Jan. 23, at the River Street Dance Theatre in Hamilton, 421 N. Second St. Suggested donation: $20 family/$8 individual/$5 with potluck item. Drop off silent auction items at the theater anytime after 1 PM. Call Al at 363-0965.

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THURSDAY JANUARY 21 Find out just what kind of student private schools churn out during the Missoula Area Private Schools Information Night, which features info booths and the opportunity to talk with teachers, administrators and parents from Missoula private schools like Sussex, Clark Fork and Valley Christian from 5–8 PM in the Governor’s Room of the Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 542-9924.

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The Sustainable Business Council presents the lecture “Power Down: Energy Usage by Utilities and their Customers,” which features comments on energy consumption and conservation from the Blackfoot Telecommunications Group, Northwestern Energy and others at 6 PM at the Blackfoot Telecom Group, 1221 N. Russell St. Free to attend. Includes a social preceding the panel at 5:30 PM. RSVP by e-mailing sbcedinfo@gmail.com. Visit sbcmontana.org. Consider this universal food care: enjoy a free potluck dinner in order to show support for health care reform efforts during the Montana Change That Works sponsored “Appetite for Change: A Community Dinner to Bring Health Care Reform Home to Montana,” which starts at 6 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call John at 531-6958 and visit changethatworks.net.

SATURDAY JANUARY 23 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Show cancer the door by grabbing info from doctors and survivors during a Missoula County Relay for Life rally from 1–3 PM at Clock Court in Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. Call Diane at 240-9953.

SUNDAY JANUARY 24 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP.

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Missoula Independent

Page 12 January 21–January 28, 2010

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30

PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org.

TUESDAY JANUARY 26 Put your friendly hands to good use as a volunteer for the 2010 Winter Special Olympics, which occurs at the Lost Trail Powder Mountain ski area, off Hwy. 93 near the Montana/Idaho border, all of today and tomorrow. No winter sports skills are required, just an eagerness to help. Call Carla Christofferson at 363-3028 to sign up. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Help granny get a delicious meal delivered to her home while you mow down a stir fry meal during the “helping hands” fundraiser for Meals on Wheels at HuHot Mongolian Grill, 3521 Brooks St., from 4–9 PM. Free to attend, but you’ll have to part with money for food. HuHot plans to donate grill tips and 10 percent of sales to Meals on Wheels during the event. Call Keri McWilliams at 728-7682. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 27 Help a young woman become the next Elizabeth Cady Stanton, or a similar strong female, by volunteering as a mentor for GUTS!, a YWCA of Missoula project that helps empower women between the ages of 9–18 through a variety of after-school activities and projects. Open to all interested women. Applications are due today and can be downloaded from ywcaofmissoula.org. Call Jen Euell at 543-6691 or e-mail her at jeuell@ywcaofmissoula.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Massachusetts State Police who stopped Francis Viliar, 36, for speeding said he showed troopers a driver’s license that had the name Luis Gomez but a different signature. When they asked him his birth date, he failed six times to match the one on the license, prompting his arrest. At the Brockton police station, officers noticed the pads of Viliar’s fingers were covered with scar tissue. They took fingerprints anyway, and federal officials were able to determine his identity and that he was wanted on 13 warrants. Viliar said he paid someone $400 to cut his fingers vertically, from the fingertip to the knuckle joint, so his prints would be unreadable. “Fortunately,” police official David Procopio told the Boston Globe, “our efforts to identify [suspects] are keeping pace with their efforts to mutilate themselves.” Michael Anthony Randall Jr., 19, tried to rob a convenience store in Athens, Ohio, but when he tried to pull a sawed-off shotgun from his coveralls, he shot himself in the leg and foot, according to AthensClarke police, who said the blast caused extensive nerve, muscle and tissue damage. The Athens Banner-Herald said investigators believe Randall had his finger on the trigger of the shotgun with the barrel extending down his left leg when he tried to withdraw it. AS GOD IS MY WITNESS, I THOUGHT TURKEYS COULD FRY - Allegedly intending to demonstrate the dangers of frying a turkey, morning disc jockeys on radio station WFLZ in Tampa, Fla., planned to use a crane to drop a turkey carcass through the open roof of a plumbing van into a vat of hot oil. The stunt began to unravel, according to the St. Petersburg Times, when the vat on a burner burst into flames that shot through the van’s roof. By the time the turkey landed in the vat, flames had engulfed the van. Station employees tried to put out the fire with handheld extinguishers before giving up and summoning the fire department. Noting that one of the firefighters injured himself pulling hoses off the truck, fire Capt. Bill Wade called the incident a violation of an understanding that, because of several previous stunts involving burning objects, the station needed permission anytime DJs planned to set anything on fire. TEMPER TANTRUM - A dispute over a $70 electric repair bill caused a member of a church in Spokane, Wash., to use his truck to ram the church several times with his truck, apparently trying to break in. KREM.com reported that when Mark Heitman did get inside, he broke nearly every window, television and computer screen, and most of the lighting fixtures. He also reportedly smashed the church instruments and even crushed the toilets. “He’d done work on the church, and we paid him with a check, not cash,” pastor Dan Eubank of Country Crossroads Christian Church said. “I didn’t have cash, and he got mad.” Eubank added that before his rampage at the church, Heitman had stopped by and broken the windows in the parson’s truck.

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ACTS OF COW - Authorities in Hawkins County, Tenn., reported that Jerry Lynn Davis called to complain because a neighbor’s cows had been licking his house and caused about $100 in damage by ripping off a screen window, cracking the glass and pulling down a gutter. The Kingsport Times-News noted that Davis’s home is just a couple of feet from a fence enclosing the cows’ pasture, but Deputy Chris Funk, who investigated, didn’t indicate what might have attracted the herd to the house. THE PARTY’S OVER - A 49-year-old man who dropped his son off at a birthday party in Wauconda, Ill., returned to pick him up a few hours later but went to a house a block away. According to police Cmdr. John Thibault, when the homeowner who answered the door insisted he didn’t have the 11year-old boy, the father and his 15-year-old son forced their way into the home, prompting the homeowner to shoot them. The 15-year-old was treated for wounds, but his father was hospitalized in critical condition. “They must have got lost in the snow and gone to the wrong street,” Thibault told the Chicago Sun-Times, adding, “We still have lots of questions.” WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - Authorities charged Joseph Stancato, 33, with assault after they said he hit another man upside the head with his banjo. Noting the banjo is considered “a deadly weapon” under Colorado law, the Aspen Daily News reported the incident occurred on New Year’s Eve when Stancato got into an argument with two men at a bus stop. In reporting the dismissal of weapons charges against John Mark Tillmann, 48, the Chronicle-Herald of Halifax, Nova Scotia, noted that authorities had also charged Tillmann with assaulting his elderly mother with a pencil.

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Indianapolis police broke up a drugstore robbery by arresting suspect Dustin Abney, 27, who they said was armed with a water-hose nozzle. The Indianapolis Star reported that Abney approached an employee who was taking a smoking break outside the store, announced he was going to rob the store and asked whether the employee wanted any money or pills. The employee declined the offer but called police.

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CONSPIRING CONTRIVANCES - Firefighters investigating a house fire in Dubois, Wyo., determined the cause was a magnifying glass. The Associated Press reported that the sun was shining at just the right angle to hit the glass, which magnified the sunbeam and ignited a nearby pile of mail. Sheriff’s Sgt. Jerry Evagelatos said the fire was extinguished before it damaged the home.

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Falling furniture causes 300 deaths a year and 14,700 injuries, according to a study in the journal Clinical Pediatrics by researchers from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio, who reviewed reports from 100 emergency rooms. Television sets caused almost half the injuries. The injury rate has risen significantly over the past 17 years, despite the increase in the number of households replacing heavy cathode-ray TVs with lighter flat screens, which are not front-heavy. SECOND-HAND SMOKE FOLLIES - Less than a week after the world’s fastest train began service in southern China, a smoker triggered an alarm that delayed the train for two and a half hours—about the time the train takes to make its 684-mile journey. “Smoking is strictly forbidden on the WuhanGuangzhou high-speed train, even in the toilet,” a railway official told Reuters, which reported the unidentified smoker fled the scene before the alarm sounded.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 January 21–January 28, 2010


uring a recent patrol around Missoula County, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) Game Warden Aaron Berg pulls into the lot at Kelly Island west of town. The agency’s TIP-MONT hotline reached him by cell phone a few minutes earlier, reporting someone spotted a group of waterfowl hunters trespassing on private property near McClay Bridge. The hunters meandered downstream, the tipster said, so Berg figures they parked their rigs at a public access point nearby. He jokingly sums up the sight at the boat ramp as “classy.” A yellow Dodge four-door pickup sits with one back door wide open. Lashed to the hitch is a pair of deer testicles—clearly a sign of the owner’s prowess this past hunting season. A few magpies flit around the rear of the truck, snacking on the vulgar display. Berg doesn’t see the owner, but he’s fairly certain he knows who it is. He

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won’t name names, and only comments that FWP law enforcement has run into this individual before. “I hope it’s not him,” says Berg. “He’s already been in trouble.” A call to dispatch with the truck’s plate number confirms his suspicions about the owner. However, Berg says there’s nothing to suggest the pickup’s owner is a suspect in the TIP-MONT call. The warden decides to move on to the tipster’s house to collect whatever account of the incident he can. “It’s bad enough to drive around town with a deer rack sticking out of the bed of the truck, you know?” Berg says, still going on about the testicles as he cruises down Spurgin Road. “People that aren’t really familiar with hunting or educated about it, that’s their first image of it—these egos. Somebody who’s not really into it or moved here from somewhere else sees that and they’re just like, ‘Idiot.’

by Alex Sakariassen • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

Warden Aaron Berg checks a deer head inside the locker at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Missoula office. The room contains shelves of evidence in ongoing poaching and illegal outfitting operations, but Berg says not all of the body parts here are the result of criminal activity.

Missoula Independent

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That’s what they’re thinking, and they’re asking, ‘Are all these people like this?’” The moment speaks to a steady erosion of the Montana hunting ethic as Berg and many of the state’s roughly 550,000 licensed hunters have known it throughout their lives. A select minority place ego— and, in more extreme cases, money—above the traditional beliefs of subsistence and

for the rest of his life. He was required to pay $52,744 in fines, restitution and court costs two years after FWP law enforcement stormed his Seeley Lake home, confiscating evidence that would eventually prove Payton had illegally killed 86 deer, antelope, elk, moose, black bear and mountain goats since 1990. A five-year statute of limitations

is extreme, and the penalties they face when law enforcement catches up with them are equally harsh. According to FWP, John McDonald ran an illegal commercial poaching ring near Gardiner for more than 10 years. For his role in killing 44 animals, McDonald was sentenced to one year in federal prison, paid $50,000 in fines and

MOGA sees these illegal operations, dubbed “rogues” by the legitimate outfitting community, as a threat to more than just wildlife conservation. Minard says that with legitimate outfitting contributing so much to state tourism, there’s a trickle down effect that hits everyone. It’d be nice if the problem was exclusive to the industry, he says, but illegal operations “reflect badly on

“It’s gotten to the point where, beginning in 2002, there’s a part-time special prosecutor assigned to Fish, Wildlife and Parks cases with the attorney general’s office. That should be some indication of the degree of [poaching].” —Mike Korn, assistant chief of law enforcement at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks connection to nature, Berg says. And the buck doesn’t stop with antlers and testicles. Ten years ago, FWP uncovered only a handful of cases involving poaching and illegal commercial outfitting in Montana annually. Now those activities dominate much of what the agency’s law enforcement division does on a daily basis, with game wardens investigating nearly 40 such cases a year. Convictions for felony violations alone have generated more than $38,000 in fines and $179,000 in restitution payments to FWP since 2004, and have resulted in the cumulative loss of 174 years of hunting, trapping and fishing privileges for convicted felons. “It’s gotten to the point where, beginning in 2002, there’s a part-time special prosecutor assigned to Fish, Wildlife and Parks cases with the attorney general’s office,” says FWP Assistant Chief of Law Enforcement Mike Korn. “That should be some indication of the degree of it.” Like the majority of Montana hunters, Berg grew up with a simple, more traditional view of the sport, what he calls a “time to spend with your dad and your brothers and your grandpa.” But his job at FWP requires Berg to regularly face the uglier side of hunting. Since becoming a game warden in 2003, he’s used a combination of modern forensic science and what he calls “good, old-fashioned police work” to build so many cases that he’s lost count of the total. The evidence is hard to look at— scores of antlers, piles of hides, photo after photo of big game shot in the name of bragging rights and discarded in the field without remorse. Because of the very nature of poaching, FWP biologists have no way of determining how many animals are taken from localized populations each year. The extent of the devastation to the resource remains a troubling mystery for those charged with monitoring big game numbers. “Social poaching groups have gotten so big and people’s egos have gotten so big about illegally taking animals, they allow themselves to do serious damage to the resource,” Berg says. “They’re taking trophy game out of the gene pool.”

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n December 2007, the Missoula district court stripped Philip Mark Payton of hunting, fishing and trapping privileges

meant Payton could only be charged for the killing of 30 of the animals. Berg still remembers executing the 2005 search warrant, back in his early days with the division. “Just to go through his house, it took 10 or 12 hours,” Berg says. “There were more than a dozen of us there, and we took everything. Most of it was illegal.” The case Berg helped build against Payton proved Payton had broken nearly every regulation in the state’s hunting laws. Berg says Payton had given duplicate tags to family and friends, hunted big game at night and out of season, and even went so far as to hire himself out as an outfitter without licensing or insurance. While Payton earned the distinction of being one of the largest cases of illegal hunting in Montana in decades, he stands as just one example of the characters FWP has come to know all too well in recent years. “We’re seeing it more and more, we’re uncovering it more and more,” Korn says. “But we still believe we’re just scratching the tip of the iceberg. Whether it’s the commercialization end or just individuals who are hell bent on getting the biggest Boone and Crockett [Club] bull they possibly can…we’re all disturbed about it. Not only does it take away from people who really commit themselves to hunting and are, due to their legitimate efforts, able to take a prize like that, it’s outright theft. People are stealing from the state, from the people of this state.” The severity of hunting violations varies greatly in FWP’s books. Some offenses seem minor, like a father shooting two deer and placing his son’s tag on one. Others require poachers to go out of their way to break state laws. Wardens often get calls about hunters casting lights across fields at night—an act known as spotlighting. Poachers also typically hunt before or after the general season, which lasts from late October through November, and might exceed harvest limits or down game that require specialized permits. Financial profit lifts the problem to even more damaging heights. Outfitting pours some $187 million into the state’s economy each year, and there are those who seek to cash in on the trade without proper licensing, land access permits or insurance. Their impact on the resource

restitution, and lost his hunting, fishing and trapping rights for life. Due to Montana’s participation in an interstate wildlife violator compact, McDonald lost the same rights in 19 other states. “The licensed outfitting community has an enormous amount of regulation

the entire state.” Those at FWP agree, and decry the financial motives behind it. “The real commercialized end of it, the felonious end of it, it’s people who are willing to pay a lot of money for really quick gratification and people who are willing to basically sell Montana’s soul—

Aaron Berg, a game warden with FWP, inspects a juvenile bald eagle carcass on the banks of the Bitterroot River. There’s little left of the bird, but Berg suspects it was shot illegally. With no leads and no additional evidence, there’s nothing the warden can do to create a case.

that they are managed under,” says Mac Minard, executive director of the Montana Outfitters and Guides Association (MOGA). “And the consequences of violation are so large—loss of your livelihood, loss of your license—the reputable outfitter just isn’t going to mess around with that.”

the resources we have here—for money,” Korn says. “It comes down to cold hard cash, and it’s too bad.”

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oney plays into another immediate problem for FWP law enforcement: As poaching and illegal commercial outfitting

Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010


Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010


FWP law enforcement collects and stores dozens of pieces of evidence from past and ongoing investigations into poaching activity. Mixed in with that evidence are dead animals gathered by FWP biologists in the interests of monitoring the health and vitality of local wildlife populations.

rise in Montana, so to does the agency’s trouble in hiring and retaining staff. FWP employs only 71 game wardens statewide. An additional 27 sergeants, captains and special investigators work throughout the agency’s seven administrative regions, but field patrols and initial investigations fall primarily on the shoulders of wardens. According to Korn, each is responsible for covering square mileage roughly the size of the state of Delaware. “There are so few of us and we’re spread so thin across the state,” Berg says, “it’s hard to be everywhere at once.” Staff limitations at the division are due partly to low pay. Korn puts the starting wage for wardens at $17.63 an hour— about $5 an hour less than what most county deputies in Montana make, he says. FWP funds its law enforcement branch through money from hunting and fishing license sales, as well as supplemental dollars from excise taxes on firearm and fishing gear sales. FWP reports revenue has dropped almost $2 million since 2003 while expenses have risen by more than $6 million. Possible budget cuts now on the table for FWP include leaving vacant enforcement positions open. And with wardens struggling to support families—Berg says his wife also has to work to keep them afloat—vacancies are becoming a growing concern. “It’s very frustrating, because it costs money to train guys,” Korn says. “But they find that, yeah, they’d love to stay here, but they can make way more as a campus cop. They have a family to feed.” FWP law enforcement isn’t the only one to recognize a lack of financial stability on its part. Their presence in the field has a direct impact on the average hunter, limiting the reach of illegal activities and preserving wild game for the conservation-conscious majority. “There’s always going to be poachers operating in Montana,” says Land Tawney, co-founder of the Hellgate

Hunters and Anglers (HHA). “But the more resources we can get…the better handle we can get on the situation. One of the biggest ones we need to address that we haven’t yet is the pay of our wardens.” On the ground, Berg can’t stress enough how big a problem funding is for FWP law enforcement. Meager salaries hardly compensate wardens for the long hours they work simultaneously patrolling for daily compliance and putting together complex cases. If FWP is already having trouble holding on to the wardens it has, Berg says, what chance does it have of conducting more hires to lighten the incredible load on those now employed? “It’s just not uncommon to get home, sit down to eat dinner, just get your uniform off and the phone rings,” Berg says. “You end up working 16-, 17-, 18-hour days sometimes.” FWP’s need for better financial support hasn’t escaped those with a voice in state politics. In 2007, a number of agencies and organizations across the state— among them MOGA and HHA—backed a set of four bills deemed the “Poacher’s Package.” Those bills aimed at increasing the weight of the book Montana courts throw at wildland offenders and the amount of money available for law enforcement’s efforts. Sen. Larry Jent, D-Bozeman, spearheaded the legislative effort and helped get all four bills passed. “That’s been the favorite piece of legislation I’ve worked on,” says Jent, who served in the state’s House of Representatives for three years and faces his third session with the state Senate in 2011. “I’ve been interested in this for a long time, since I was a kid…I realized the best ways I could protect the wildlife resource in Montana was to act on bills that would be supported by sportsmen and law enforcement.”

Jent, who once considered a career as an FWP game warden before entering law school, is particularly proud of the increased penalties the Poacher’s Package put in place for large-scale criminal activity toward wildlife. Senate Bill 100 raised the charge from outfitting without a license from a misdemeanor to a felony, ensuring that criminals would face jail time as opposed to a slap on the wrist. “A lot of times I’ll see a poaching case and I’ll see the penalties they got,” Tawney says of HHA’s motivation for supporting the Poacher’s Package. “I always think it’s not big enough. They’re getting away with murder, they really are.” Jent’s efforts also rewrote state law to place the first $60,000 of restitution

payments for wildlife crimes right into FWP law enforcement’s pocket, a victory of which he’s particularly proud. With the division as strapped as it is, Jent says someone has to find ways to keep enforcement strong. “The trouble with game wardens right now is they’re being captured by other states and agencies with high salaries,” he says. “We need to figure out what wardens should be paid.” Jent had hoped to introduce a bill in the 2009 session aimed at raising existing wardens’ salaries for the purposes of personnel retention. However, in light of the state’s economic troubles, Jent put the draft on hold. He fully intends to introduce the legislation in 2011, and he’s not alone in recognizing the need. “These are not easy cases to make,” Minard says. “They require an awful lot of resources and time…Even with [the Poacher’s Package] in place, which is substantially better than what they had before, they’re still understaffed, and they’re still under-gunned, and these are very difficult cases to make.” Jent says he’s “cautiously optimistic” about future attempts to boost funding for FWP. Still, as a lifelong hunter in the Bozeman area, he realizes the issue won’t hit the session floor without some controversy. “You get more questions and more debate with fish and game legislation,” Jent says, “because everybody who’s had a hunting tag since age 12 thinks he’s an expert.”

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WP doesn’t make front-page busts on a daily basis. Far more often, law enforcement finds itself dealing with individuals wreaking havoc on wild game with no thought of money. Berg’s dealt with enough casual poachers to know just what he’s looking for. “You can pick these guys easily out of a crowd,” Berg says. “They’re the types

Berg responds to a TIP-MONT call from Missoula area resident Mike Kennedy, who called the state hotline when he noticed waterfowl hunters trespassing on his Bitterroot River property. Incidents like this have a detrimental impact on hunter-landowner relations. “It gets worse with every year,” Kennedy says of illegal hunting. “People have less and less respect.”

Missoula Independent

Page 17

January 21–January 28, 2010


that bring their deer head to work. I’m not generalizing, but it’s largely ego. They want the biggest and they think they’re the best.” Berg has seen more than his share of wasted game during patrols. After killing an animal, poachers often take the head for the antlers and leave the meat to rot. Berg has no patience for these incidents. They’re symptomatic of the same blatant disrespect that breeds commercial poaching operations. “It usually involves one or two animals instead of 80 to 100, like in that case,” Berg says, referencing the Philip Mark Payton case that involved 86 illegal kills. “But if they’re doing that this time, how many years in a row have they been doing it?” With limited staff resources to devote to regular enforcement, wardens like Berg rely on a long and varied list of tactics in nabbing poachers. For starters, Berg says, people would be surprised how helpful Internet social networking sites have been in uncovering illicit activities. FWP regularly scouts Facebook,

and simply being a presence in the wild are a warden’s strongest advantages. Building a case calls for a similarly diverse set of tools, or “the CSI stuff,” as Berg calls it. Search warrants and crime scenes offer any number of possibilities for incriminating evidence. Ballistics, fingerprints and animal hair fibers have proven useful, as well as DNA, both human and animal, to place suspects at a crime scene. “We were able to pull some bullets from some of the animals, and during the search warrant we pulled DNA from all the animals we found,” Berg says of one case from a few years back involving a group of young men slaughtering animals near Lincoln. “There was also a Gatorade bottle that had been littered by one of them and we took that. We had the DNA swab from all these suspects, and the crime lab here in Missoula matched DNA from the saliva or skin cells or whatever that ended up on the Gatorade bottle to one of the suspects. It was a one in, I don’t remember, 250 million chance.”

Deer testicles tied to the hitch of a pickup shows one hunter’s success during the 2009 hunting season—and offer a prime example of the disrespect some hunters have for Montana’s wildlife.

In 2009, Berg took more hotline calls than any other FWP warden in the state—a total of 105, just under half of which materialized in solid cases, he says. With so much ground

“You can pick these guys easily out of a crowd. They’re the types that bring their deer head to work. I’m not generalizing, but it’s largely ego. They want the biggest, and they think they’re the best.” —Aaron Berg, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks game warden hunting forums and market sites like eBay for possible leads. They’ve relied on remote cameras, animal decoys positioned in places off-limits for hunting and even the occasional undercover assignment to bust minor poachers and major illegal outfits. Mainly, though, Berg says good relationships with landowners

Thanks in part to that Gatorade bottle, the case Berg cites ended in sentencing and restitution fines, and the responsible parties answered for killing one moose, two elk and several deer well past hunting season. Berg has come to rely more heavily on the TIP-MONT hotline over the past six years than nearly any other enforcement strategy.

Berg has served as an FWP game warden in Missoula for six years. He says he got involved with the agency to protect a resource he’s valued his entire life. Catching poachers and busting illegal commercial outfitters now constitute the bulk of his time.

Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010

to cover, the agency is forced to count on the general public to police itself. While some of the calls can be vague, Berg says, the calls get more detailed every year. “It’s becoming very well used, and the information we get has become a lot more reliable,” says FWP TIP-MONT Coordinator Brian Shinn. “The average citizen has become more vigilant. We are seeing people carrying cell phones and getting license plate numbers, and the information they’re giving is more exact. We’re able to make convictions off it whereas in the past it was more people calling in general saying, ‘Oh, somebody’s shooting deer,’ and then hanging up. It’s turning out to be quite a good tool for enforcement.” According to FWP, TIP-MONT calls have not only increased in quality but in quantity. The last few years saw a dramatic spike in the total number of calls the program has received, from 1,300 in 2006 to 2,000 last year, Shinn says. And few tipsters seem interested in the cash rewards FWP offers. “Last year we gave over $16,000 in reward money to people that turned in legitimate cases,” Shinn says. “That’s a very small percentage of people who were actually eligible.” Two TIP-MONT calls to FWP in late 2008 led wardens to an elk gut pile along Ninemile Road west of Missoula, and a further tip involving portions of an elk rotting in a backyard landed the agency a search warrant. According to the warrant, filed with the Missoula district court, DNA from the gut pile matched that of

the carcass in Ryan Pollock’s yard. One of the tips included information that the individual behind the killing conducted the hunt by spotlighting from the road. The case is one of several currently under investigation by FWP.

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erg ends his patrol in the north hills, where a special post-season elk hunt has entered its second week. Hundreds of elk have congregated under a tree on private property, out of legal reach of hunters. Berg doesn’t expect to catch any poachers, but the view of the Missoula Valley is spectacular. The Kelly Island TIP-MONT call has led to a dead-end so far. He has plate numbers in case any suspects turn up, but with the limited evidence he has the incident is hardly a priority. Now he sits at the edge of a hillside development, watching the elk through his binoculars and discussing the impacts humans have on local wildlife. “They’re creatures, too,” Berg says. “They were here before we were, in a sense. Look at that housing development over there. Years ago, before that existed, you’d see maybe three or four or five hundred head of elk standing there. Since all these developments in all these drainages have gone in, these elk have been separated into numerous herds. We’re having an effect on these animals, and we have to try to minimize that by keeping people around to enforce the laws.” Despite the problems plaguing FWP law enforcement, Berg insists the division continues to have a positive impact. He spends part of his time teaching hunter safety courses and says education can go a long way in stopping poachers before they ever start. With the size of some egos and the amount of money to be made, Berg realizes illegal hunting activities will never fully disappear. But he has a personal warning for anyone looking to cash in on Montana’s most prized asset. “You’re going to get caught eventually,” Berg says. “There’s always somebody watching.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


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Shredded salads FLASHINTHEPAN Eating local during the summer is easy. Anyone can go to the farmers’ market, or choose a salad made with local greens off a restaurant menu. It’s what you eat in the winter that separates the talkwalkers from the wannabes. The hardest part of eating local in winter isn’t finding enough to eat, because there’s plenty. What’s more difficult is giving up foods that are locally sourceable only in summer, and salad is the poster child of such fleeting meals. Some folks can’t live without ripe tomatoes. Others need their lettuce. But if you can hurdle these hang-ups, a bounty of local winter salads can be yours. I was introduced to winter salad in Siberia, where eating local year-round is not only a fact of life, but also one of life’s joys. While Siberia has a reputation as sub-prime real estate, I wonder if this isn’t just a smokescreen to keep away the land speculators. It’s a beautiful landscape, with large tracts of butterflyinfested forest and clean rivers full of fish. But as I rode the train from Ulan Bator, Mongolia, to Irkutsk, Siberia, what struck me the most were the picturesque villages whizzing by my window, in which nearly every home had a greenhouse attached. During my travels in the Siberian countryside I was served all kinds of preserved delicacies from jars, including pickled mushrooms, wild berry jam and ginseng vodka. I was also initiated into the Siberian custom of putting mayo—a fresh winter staple as long as the chickens are laying—on everything. And I learned that Siberians look forward to retirement so they can spend more time in the garden growing food for their families. One evening after a cold afternoon in the mountains above Lake Baikal, in a house with an attached greenhouse, I had my first taste of winter salad. After a warmup, literally, of beef broth, we feasted on fried trout and a salad of shredded carrots and shredded garlic. It wasn’t the most complex salad, but it suggested possibilities, and I came home with some ideas. While local leaves are hard to come by in winter, save cabbage and frozen greens, root crops like carrots, turnips, parsnips, beets, garlic and onions abound. Shredding the roots gives them a leaf-like softness and increases the surface area, allowing more contact with the dressing. These shredded raw roots provide the base for a salad in which almost anything goes.

Last summer we had a bumper crop of tomatoes, and put away quite a few by sun-drying them (in less sunny climates, a dehydrator works just as well). If the tomatoes are completely dry and crispy, they store fine in sealed plastic bags. If you leave them a bit chewy, keep them in the freezer. I like to crumble sun-dried tomatoes on top of shredded roots tossed in vinaigrette, and then grate some shavings from a hard local goat cheese on top. Presented as such, my sun-dried tomatoes are every bit as satisfying as ripe juicy ones in summer—which can’t be said about the albino cardboard winter

Photo by Ari LeVaux

imposters imported from the southern hemisphere. Many other summertime morsels, properly preserved, are worth adding to your winter salads as well, including dried fruits like cherries and apples; plant proteins like pecans, pine nuts or pumpkin seeds; animal proteins like dried or smoked fish, canned deer, bacon bits or chopped boiled eggs; pickled products like cucumbers or peppers; and what leaves and greens are available in winter, like chopped frozen kale or grated cabbage. Many people have window boxes or greenhouses that allow them to grow limited amounts of spinach or salad greens during the winter. If you’re so lucky, then tossing a handful of these winter-

by ARI LeVAUX

greens into your root-based salad adds some nice leafy diversity. Another option for fresh, local winter greens is sprouts, which can be grown from many of the seeds available in the bulk section of your local store. Wheat, beans, mustard seeds, lentils, sunflower seeds and peas can all be easily sprouted at home. It’s an inexpensive way to provide nutrient-rich fodder for your winter salads. To make sprouts, soak 1 tablespoon of seeds or 1/3 cup of beans in a quart of tepid water overnight. This is the only time sprout seeds should actually soak, and they’ll ferment if they aren’t completely drained. The next day, rinse the seeds thoroughly in tepid water and drain. Place in a quart jar covered with a dampened washcloth that’s fastened with a rubber band, and store in the dark. Rinse the seeds or beans twice each day, making sure excess moisture is drained off each time. Wheat berries are ready in two days; mung beans and lentils in three days. Alfalfa sprouts take five. If you don’t have the patience to sprout seeds, you can cook them. Wheat berries can be cooked like rice until soft. Beans, like pintos, are a bit trickier if you want them soft but not soggy. Rinse a pound in cool water, removing any debris and shriveled specimens, then soak for 2 to 6 hours. With the beans covered by at least an inch of water, cook on high heat for five minutes and then reduce to a simmer. Add a tablespoon of olive oil, a chopped clove of garlic and a chopped medium onion. Cook, partially covered, until the beans are soft, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Then drain, cool, and add to your salad. I’m not going to micro-manage you with exact salad recipes. You know what you like to eat and what you have, so shred and embellish accordingly. Unlike actual cooking, there’s no particular salad alchemy requiring specific proportions. But to get you started I’ll give you my vinaigrette recipe: three parts olive oil, one part apple cider vinegar, one part balsamic, and a splash of soy sauce. Despite the plethora of winter salad options, many will still wish for a little romaine in their salad bowls. But skipping the imported leaves gives you something to look forward to in summer time. And if rooty salads like this can help nourish Siberians through their infamous winter, they should be enough for you.

Missoula's Original Brain Food www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 3pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as

artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burri-

tos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

LARGE 14" GOURMET RANCH HOUSE

$14.99

Chicken Breast, Bacon, Red Onions Tomatoes, Ranch Sauce Mention Coupon When Ordering

549-5151 • Delivery or Carry-Out • 11-11 Daily

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January 21–January 28, 2010


the

dish

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Resolve to treat yourself to the best in 2010 with home-made, super-premium ice-cream and ice-cream cakes! Stop by and try our shakes or ice-cream cupcakes! If you've other resolutions, keep them with fresh smoothies or home-made, fat-free, nosugar-added "Sinless" ice-cream! It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted freerange chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Page 20

Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, crois-

January 21–January 28, 2010

HAPPIESTHOUR Flipper’s Claim to fame: The people. It’s easy to say that about any bar, but Flipper’s seems to attract a particularly endearing mix of opinionated barflies. Donny Morey, who’s done a little bit of everything at Flip’s during 13 years of employment, concurs. “It’s always been the people,” he says. “It’s a mellow, welcoming crowd for a Montana bar.” What you’re drinking: Kettlehouse specially brews Rosco’s Amber ($4 a pint), the bar’s signature draft beer. What you’re eating: A pint of Rosco’s Amber goes well with a Flip’s burger (just $5.75 with fries), which many have called the best in town. Who you’re drinking with: The night we stumbled in, we found two people at the bar doing crossword puzzles—with a hardbound thesaurus, no less—and overheard a table of four in a heated debate over health care reform. “What if you want a sex change?! How are you going to pay for that?!”

Bartender Fianna McClain says this scene is par for the course. “It’s generally a smart, open-minded crowd,” she says, noting the usual talk of politics, religion and media criticism. “No one’s afraid to speak their mind in here.” Atmosphere: Completely nondescript. Avid gamblers usually fill the darkly lit casino (open 24 hours), and regulars saddle up to a bar filled with the usual assortment of TVs and beer signs. Happy Hour specials: 50 cents off “all beer” from 4 to 6 p.m. every weekday. How to find it: 125 S. Third Street W., just off the Hip Strip. —Skylar Browning Happiest Hour is a new column that celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.


sants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

$…Under $5

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. With two convenient locations, it’s easy to call in your order and pick it up on your way to play. $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$

MISSOULA'S BEST

Januar y

COFFEE

COFFEE SPECIAL

Colombia Supreme Italian Roast $9.75/lb Missoula’s Best Coffee

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ What’s For Dinner Meal Delivery Service • 406-207-2203 Delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door. Fresh dinner menu changes weekly, frozen dinner and dessert menus change monthly. Order by noon on Monday, deliveries are made Tuesday. Meals start at only $7.50 per portion. Menus and ordering available at www.WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

ASKARI Something’s fishy Dear Flash, I’m trying to eat more fish, but my recipes stink more than three-day-old salmon. Can you offer a kitchen-impaired dude a few delicious—and healthy—fish recipes? —Feel Like Making Fish

Q

Eating fish these days can be a slippery endeavor, ethically, thanks to overfishing and some destructive aquaculture practices. I suggest choosing your fishes from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch (www.montereybayaquarium.org) list of environmentally friendly recommendations. It turns out that some species of fish are okay if they come from a certain region, while the same species are not okay if they come from elsewhere. Choose carefully. I’m instinctively a crispy fried fish guy, but when I was in China I learned to override my belief that steamed fish is mushy and gross. Turns out, the Chinese have figured out that steamed fish is a delicacy when served with a ginger and scallion sauce.

A

Here’s how to make it: Position your oven racks in upper and lower thirds of the oven. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Place a long piece of aluminum foil on a large, shallow baking sheet (foil should be longer than sheet). Place fish on sheet. Season both sides with salt and pepper. In a bowl, whisk together 1/2 cup sliced scallions (green part only), 2 tablespoons julienned ginger, 1/2 cup soy sauce, 1/4 cup peanut oil, 1 teaspoon sesame oil and 1/2 teaspoon sugar. This amount of sauce is good for 4 pounds of fish. Depending on how much you are cooking, spoon the appropriate amount of sauce over each fish. Seal the foil loosely around each fish to create a somewhat roomy pocket. Bake 10 minutes per inch of thickness of fish at its thickest part (typically 20 to 25 minutes for a 2-inch-thick fish). Remove foil and serve with juices. Damn, FLMF, you made me drool on the keyboard. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010


8

days a week THURSDAY

THURSDAY October

Arts & Entertainment listings January 21–January 28, 2010

29

January

21

Every human being could use some extra knowledge in its noggin. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM is currently offering sign ups for a plethora of their classes for Missoulians aged 50 and older. $60 class, plus $20 for a membership. Call 243-2905 and visit umt.edu/ce/plus50. Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

“I am a bubble shooting high for the stars.” Or something like that. Your seventh to ninth graders can scribble whatever they please during the Missoula Public Library’s Scribbles Writers Group, which meets at 4 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St., to share writing and take part in creativity exercises. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Find out just what kind of student private schools churn out during the Missoula Area Private Schools Information Night, which features info booths and the opportunity to talk with teachers, administrators and parents from Missoula private schools like Sussex, Clark Fork and Valley Christian from 5–8 PM in the Governor’s Room of the Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 542-9924. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 22, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Just keepin’ it real. The Montana Actors’ Theatre continues its run of Patrick Marber’s Closer at 7:30 PM Thu., Jan. 21, at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Show runs Jan. 21–Jan. 23 and Jan. 27–Jan. 30. $15 for Fri.–Sat. shows/$10 Wed.–Thu. shows. Visit mtactors.com

Times Run 1/22 - 1/28

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Road

(R) Nightly at 7 & 9:05 Sunday matinee at 1 & 3:05

The Young Victoria Nightly at 7 Sunday matinee at 1 NO show Monday 1/25

Precious Nightly at 9 Sunday matinee at 3 NO show Monday 1/25

www.thewilma.com

Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521


All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, anti-folk—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Russ Nasset slings country tunes while you simmer in an aesthetic stew of over 50 works of art during Artini: Home Sweet Home, which features a preview of the Missoula Art Museum’s upcoming Benefit Art Auction, music by Nasset and food from the Red Bird from 5:30–9 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. The Sustainable Business Council presents the lecture “Power Down: Energy Usage by Utilities and Their Customers,” which features comments on energy consumption and conservation from the Blackfoot Telecommunications Group, Nor thwestern Energ y and others at 6 PM at the Blackfoot Telecom Group, 1221 N. Russell St. Free to attend. Includes a social preceding the panel at 5:30 PM. RSVP by e-mailing sbcedinfo@gmail.com. Visit sbcmontana.org. Your shaky hands find a moment of comfort gripping glass while making pendants or an art tile during an adult glass class from 6–8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $25, with $10 deposit required. Preregistration required. RSVP by calling 549-7555 or visiting zootownarts.com. Sour D and the Pipecleaner leave you in a pile of your own gunge when they shower others with a set of their “bus stop blues” at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Consider this universal food care: Enjoy a free potluck dinner in order to show support for health care reform efforts during the Montana Change That Works sponsored “Appetite for Change: A Community Dinner to Bring Health Care Reform Home to Montana,” which starts at 6 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call John at 531-6958 and visit changethatworks.net. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com.

Bowling and karaoke go together like milk and black tar heroin during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Lady Griz Basketball Games Down the Road

Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

Follow the Griz through:

Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free.

Web: www.montanagrizzlies.com

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace at 9 PM every Thu. Free.

Friday, Jan. 29th: vs. Northern Colorado Facebook: UM Grizzly Athletics

Saturday, Jan. 30th: vs. Northern Arizona

Twitter: UMGRIZZLIES

Good luck to the Griz and Lady Griz in Bozeman this weekend. BEAT THE CATS!

Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free.

Want to bring a group to a Griz or Lady Griz Basketball game? Call 243-2250 for information on special ticket packages for groups of 20 or more.

Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free.

*All games played in Dahlberg Arena (Adams Center)

Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Clench your facial muscles and get ready for bass to tickle your insides during this month’s round of Bassface, a dubstep/jungle DJ night at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free. Features sets by Kris Moon, Ebola Syndrome, E-Team and DJ Glucose.

FRIDAY January

22

Sorry buddy, your hangover headaches don’t apply. The Montana Caregivers Network presents a doctor patient clinic/class for medical marijuana, which runs from 8 AM–10 PM at the Kalispell Red Lion Inn at the Mall, 20 N. Main St. $150–$100 or lower. Includes a free class about Montana’s medical marijuana program from noon–6 PM. To register call 2077078 and visit montanacaregivers.net.

Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463.

Mom gets to enjoy the rush of her caffeine addiction while her little pre-school beastie plays in the company of other kids during preschool playtime, which runs from 9:30–11:30 AM at City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave. $5 for one parent and one child, $1 for each additional child. Admission includes a latte for the parent and a snack for the child. Call 532-1550.

Let Butter pour lactose down your gullet while Wartime Blues whips it up with richness when they both play Americana at Sean Kelly’s Stone of Accord, 4951 N. Reserve St., at 8 PM. Free. Call 830-3210.

The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Missoula Independent

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January 21–January 28, 2010


Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

A wooden spoon won’t ward off chipper conversation. David Mills-Low, left, plays Ben Silverman and Justin Fatz plays Willie Clark in the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, which opens Fri., Jan. 22, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Show runs Jan. 22–24 and Jan. 27–31. Call 728-1911 and visit mctinc.org. Toddlers always find something to intellectually suckle or gnaw on at Toddler Story Time, which features age appropriate stories from 10:30–11:15 AM in the downstairs meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670.

nightlife Bozeman’s Luke Flansburg gives his guitar a comb-over when he plays an acoustic set with members of Pinky and The Floyd at 5 PM at the Brooks and Brown Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Cover TBA.

This week

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ts ty lo 3 ci erton, n o lb e f hom ard in A Ray o ice a N enced y Monica 5 B 1 f 8 / 3BD privacy evin & -207-11 with ,000 Ky at 406 MT.com 5 r $12 ss Realt ww.You w Acce

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CLASSIFIEDS

BUY IT

Keep the historical appreciation glands of others pumping during the 2010 Travelers’ Rest Benefit Auction, which assists all Travelers’ Rest State Park Education programs for students and adults, and runs from from 5:30–8:30 PM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $45 per person. Includes auctions, catered dinner and a no host bar. Call 273-4253 or e-mail info@travelersrest.org. Also visit travelersrest.org. The Canyon Creek Ramblers lead a chorus of juiced up jackals when they play smokin’ “hippie-tonk” at the Piggyback Barbeque in Whitefish, 102 Wisconsin Ave., at 7 PM. Free, all ages. You never know what to expect, except for a rollicking good time, duri n g Tu r n i n g t h e W h e e l ’ s Community Romp, which includes improvisational dance/theater games and runs from 7–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $8 families/$4 individuals. Call 853-0361. Info is scant, but cowgirls and exspouses are likely to be portrayed on stage for your dramatic appreciation during A Mid-Winter Showcase, which features the premier of Wendy Woollett’s radio play My Ex-Husband’s Visit, as well as The Lost Montana Monolog, at 7 PM at the Dunrovin

January 21–January 28, 2010

Ranch Dance Hall in Lolo, 5375 Terry Lane. $20. Also serves as a benefit for the Guardian Angels Foundation. RSVP by calling 273-7745 or by emailing info@dunrovinranchmontana.com. Also visit dunrovinranchmontana.com for specific directions. Our padded puck hitters the Missoula Maulers help slap out hunger—while you get to see them play for a discount—when you bring cans of non-perishable food items to their game against the Butte Roughriders, at 7:30 PM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Cost of discounted admission TBA. All cans of food will be donated to the Montana Food Bank Network. Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com. Let Steve Betz assume the role of Dr. Feelgood for the night when he slings “feel good Americana” at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Give The Roadhouse Band permission to rub salt on your bruise just for fun when they slay you with a set at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ ridiculous at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free.

It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. If any band can drink you under the table, it’s Bozeman’s Ten Foot Tall & 80 Proof who let loose the roots and country music at the Badlander at 9 PM. $5. Opening support from the River Creek Stream Boys. (See Noise in this issue.) The deep bass tones might just rumble your gut and make your nose hairs tickle with delight when Los Angeles’ Propa Tingz brings his dubstep and “glitch step” flava to the Palace at 9 PM. $10. Opening support from DJ Kris Moon and Mikee Sev.


Learn how to kick someone to the curb when that’s your only option to stay safe during a Women’s Self Defense Class, at 10 AM at Championship Training, 2419 Benton Ave. $25. Visit championshiptrainingmt.com and call 531-4253. If leather and motorcycles rev your engine, and you’re a female, don’t miss the Montana Harley-

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Channel your disgust with American politics into something icy and smooth during the Missoula Figure Skating Club’s Learn to Skate Basic Skills Session 2, an eight-week ice skating class which starts at 10 AM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. $110 for the eight-week session. Visit missoulafsc.org to download a registration form, or arrive at the rink early on Jan. 23 to register in-person.

Twist your body into a pretzel-like pose and feel good doing it during a celebration of Yoga USA Day, which runs from 1–3 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Specific schedule and pricing TBA. Call 541-7240.

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Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arching their back, so why arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you? Celebrate Yoga USA Day at Inner Harmony Yoga with a number of yoga classes, which run from 9:30 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 PM at the studio, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. All classes by donation. Visit yogainmissoula.com for a full schedule. Call 581-4093.

The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spread Eagle Beagleâ&#x20AC;? goes beyond just a Melvins song during Birds and Art for Adults with Kate Davis and Bev Beck Glueckert, where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll draw from live raptors using graphite, ink and other materials from noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

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Nowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the time to touch up all those not-so-flattering college party photos. Get skills on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding the Basics of Adobe Lightroomâ&#x20AC;? during a course taught by Heather Yoder, which meets today and tomorrow from 9 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 PM at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 216 N. Higgins Ave. $279. RSVP by Calling 543-0171 or e-mailing SueL@rmsp.com.

Just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go near any yellow snow: the Daly Mansion, 251 Eastside Highway near Hamilton, presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snow Day at the Daly Mansion,â&#x20AC;? which runs from noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 PM and includes a hill open for family sledding, sled contests, food and other activities. $5/$2 for children/Free children 6 and under. Call 363-6004 ext. 3 and visit dalymansion.org.

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If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

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Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Cocktails, saddle shoes and dancinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mix with dramatic sages Barret Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and Bret Tuomi as they grace the stage for a night of crossdressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Reper tory Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening night gala per formance and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fabulous â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s Partyâ&#x20AC;? for Ken Ludwigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leading Ladies, which starts with cocktails at 6:30 PM in UMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PARTV Center lobby, followed by a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, also in the PARTV Center. $25. Includes dessert and dancing after the show from 10 PMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;midnight in the Masquer Theatre. RSVP required by calling Salina Chatlain at 243-6809 or visiting montanarep.org. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

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Feel free to release your inner Syd Barrett when Pink Floyd tribute band Pinky and The Floyd takes the stage to deliver kaleidoscopic hits at 10 PM at the Top Hat, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if you awaken in a straight jacket because you thought melting your face was a good idea. Cover TBA.

Make your thumbs green in order to grow something headyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for your eyes and taste buds, that isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;during a Bigfork/Ferndale Community Garden Workshop, which specifically aims for you to become an expert at square foot gardening, at 10:30 AM at St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church in Ferndale, at the corner of Montana Highway 209 and S. Ferndale Drive near Bigfork. Free. Call Michelle at 837-0982.

Bring the Gas-X and prepare to gorge during Seeley Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dessertfest/ Winter Feast, which features cocktails, a soup/chili cook off, dessert and entertainment from 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM at the Seeley Lake Community Hall in Seeley Lake, 3248 Hwy. 83. $100 table of eight/$25 advance for a pair/$15 at the door. This event is part of Seeley Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winterfest, so click to seeleylakechamber.com for more events. Call 677-2880.

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He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Free. Call 728-8799.

When her guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; you best be a knockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: Andrea Harsell brings her supple voice and dexterity with strings to the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, for a show at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

8,

Son of a Gun returns from their mandatory turpentine binge to resonate you with rock and country when they play Florenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High Spirits Lounge & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free.

Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program â&#x20AC;&#x153;Simple Writing/Creative Phrasesâ&#x20AC;? with Lori Mitchell. Free, but donations appreciated and accepted. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org.

Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

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Shane Clouse & Stomping Ground squirt you with their special blend of â&#x20AC;&#x153;cowboy cactus juiceâ&#x20AC;? when they play country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

Davidson Beauty and the Bike Photo shoot, which runs from 10 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 PM at Missoulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Montana Harley-Davidson Store, 5106 E. Harrier. $150â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$70, depending on photos. Call 721-2154 and visit mtharley.com.

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They canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help you go to the bathroom after a few too many, but they can help you rock out: Party Trainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d plays variety tunes at Harry Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277.

Party Like It's 1955

Show cancer the door by grabbing info from doctors and survivors during a Missoula County Relay for Life rally from 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 PM at Clock Court in Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St. Free. Call Diane at 240-9953. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition of Neil Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

nightlife Her transcendent vibes turn beer into bratwurst: Joan Zen pushes a stew of funk, soul and reggae onto eager sud sippers when she plays the

The Montana Rep Annual Opening-Night Gala The Montana Repâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 touring production of LEADING LADIES runs in Missoula January 26-30 & February 2-6 prior to its national tour. Visit www.montanarep.org for more information

January 23, 2010 montana theatre, par/tv center, um

call Sal for reservations at 243-6809 6:30 pm hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres, no-host cocktails and music 7:30 pm live performance of the comedy LEADING LADIES 10:00 pm champagne, desserts and dancing to umâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steel drum Quartet Caribe cost dress

only on $25 fabulous f â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s

tickets also available at the door, at the um par/tv center box office and at www.montanarep.org

Missoula Independent

Page 25

January 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 28, 2010


Info is scant, but cowgirls and ex-spouses are likely to be portrayed on stage for your dramatic appreciation during A Mid-Winter Showcase, which features the premier of Wendy Woollett’s radio play My Ex-Husband’s Visit, as well as The Lost Montana Monolog, at 7 PM at the Dunrovin Ranch Dance Hall in Lolo, 5375 Terry Lane. $20. Also serves as a benefit for the Guardian Angels Foundation. RSVP by calling 273-7745 or by e-mailing info@dunrovinranchmontana.com. Also visit dunrovinranchmontana.com for specific directions. Give the Canyon Creek Ramblers a token and they’ll tiptoe you through their own version of Spinal Tap when they play “hippie-tonk” at The Great Northern Brewing Company, 2 Central Ave. in Whitefish, at 7 PM. Free. Their lives are in peril, so do your part: a benefit concert to help victims of the earth-

Missoula Independent

Page 26

quake in Haiti starts at 7 PM at the River Street Dance Theatre, 421 N. Second St. in Hamilton, and features music by the Big Sky Mudflaps, Joan Zen and Kirby Erickson and Friends. Also includes a silent auction. Suggested donation: $20 family/$8 individual/$5 with a potluck item. Drop off items to donate to the auction at the theater after 1 PM. Call Al at 363-0965. (See Agenda in this issue.) Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com. Georges Bizet brings forth pleasures of the flesh, mixes in a little violence, and adds a pinch of racism and enlightenment to an array of arias when his opera Carmen gets the HD

January 21–January 28, 2010

treatment during another installment of The Met: Live at the Roxy, which starts at 7:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $18/$16 students and seniors, plus ticket fees. Get tickets at any GrizTix outlet or call 2434051. Visit morrisproductions.org.

Canes will tap with gaiety during the Community Winter Wonderland Ball, which features the rockin’ sounds of Lockwood’s Versatilles and runs from 8–11 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5. Call 543-7154.

Dance peacefully for Odin, or not. Whatever you do, get down with your inner spiritual self when The Dances of Universal Peace meets at the First Christian Church in Hamilton, 328 Fairgrounds Rd., at 7:30 PM. $3 donation. Call Star at 363-4026 or e-mail tsitlali@montana.com.

Put the belt down and nobody gets hurt: the Belton Blues Band busts out—you guessed it—blues at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361.

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

The Roadhouse Band gives you an excuse to show off your stylish bruises when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.


If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all laughing at your shortcomings at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. These Montucky boys slice your jugular with some razor sharp rhymes: locals Tonsofun and Traffic celebrate the release of their respective solo efforts with a show at the Palace at 9 PM. $3. Opening support from Linkletter and DJ Brand One. (See Soundcheck in this issue.) Shodown gives bro-workers (coworkers that are buds) something to raise their glasses about when they play country at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. Russ Nasset and the Revelators lead you through a hearty regimen of swigging calisthenics when they rock rockabilly and country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Son of a Gun gives you another reason to use whiskey as mouthwash when they distill a set of rock and country at Florence’s High Spirits Lounge & Casino, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Free. Roll down a psychedelic rainbow when Voodoo Horseshoes play experimental bluegrass at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY January

24

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy, so be sure to don your best bling before you head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a

spiritual message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. If leather and motorcycles rev your engine, and you’re a female, don’t miss the Montana Harley-Davidson Beauty and the Bike Photo shoot, which runs from 10 AM–6 PM at Missoula’s Montana Harley-Davidson Store, 5106 E. Harrier. $150–$70, depending on photos. Call 721-2154 and visit mtharley.com. Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “It’s time for dolphin paste!” Free. Call 543-7154.

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THE TREASURE CHEST Crafts & Hobbies 1612 Benton • 549-7992

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Info is scant, but cowgirls and ex-spouses are likely to be portrayed on stage for your dramatic appreciation during A Mid-Winter Showcase, which features the premier of Wendy Woollett’s radio play My Ex-Husband’s Visit, as well as The Lost Montana Monolog, at 2 PM at the Dunrovin Ranch Dance Hall in Lolo, 5375 Terry Lane. $30, includes the show, a light barbeque dinner and a cast party afterwards. Also serves as a benefit for the Guardian Angels Foundation. RSVP by calling 273-7745 or by e-mailing info@dunrovinranchmontana.com. Also visit dunrovinranchmontana.com for specific directions. Give those arms a workout by throwing pierced objects at boards during the Lucky Strike Bar’s last chance to sign up for winter dart leagues, which starts with sign ups at 2 PM at the bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Includes a coupon for a free appetizer. Call 549-4152. Eradication is always a good thing when Friends of Two Rivers hosts Heritage Timber for a discussion about deconstructing buildings at the Bonner Mill and around the region, which starts at 2 PM at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Bonner, 8985 Hwy. 200. Free to attend. Visit friendsof2rivers.org. Lucifer makes sure to stray far away when the Rhythm Angels bring their radiant Americana straight from Nashville up to Seeley Lake to play Seeley-Swan High School, 456 Airport Road in Seeley Lake, at 3 PM. $14/free for kids. Call Polly Huppert at 549-0933. This event is part of Seeley Lake’s Winterfest, so click to seeleylakechamber.com for a schedule of more events.

Missoula Independent

Page 27

January 21–January 28, 2010


If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool cue, consider joining a weekly pool tournament at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which runs this and every Sun. starting with a sign up at 4:30 PM and the game starting at 5. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight players, includes one free drink per player. Call 830-3277.

nightlife Lend a hand to a hurting youngster during a pizza/salad buffet benefit for Zane Goicovich, who suffers from epilepsy and Aspberger’s Syndrome, which runs from 5–8 PM at Biga Pizza, 241 W. Main St. $10/$7 kids under 12. Fifty percent of the proceeds go to Zane’s fund. Visit zanesworld.org. An informational/volunteer party occurs earlier in the day at Biga Pizza at 3:30 PM. Call Noreen at 544-5588.

Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations during Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Sun. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.al-anon.alateen.org. Spend Monday night getting tranquil and learning the intricacies of Buddhism during the class Finding Happiness in a Difficult World: An Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism and Meditation, which runs this and every Mon. from 7–8:30 PM at the Unitarian Universalist

SPOTLIGHT

When it comes to character, actor Barret O’Brien prefers kindness and understanding. “What I’m attracted to most in characters right now is heart,” he says. “Human beings that have an excess of heart…less shield, and more joy and love.”

“He’s got such an open heart, and he’s so open to the world,” he says.

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children ages 18 and u n d e r . C a l l 7 2 8 - P L AY o r v i s i t mctinc.org for tickets.

WHAT: Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies

Bow down at the altar of a lost dog, not Bob Dobbs, when Reverend Craig and Sister Debby celebrate ritual and “do what we want, until we change our minds,” during the Third Annual Church of the Lost Dog, which starts at 7 PM at Free Cycles Missoula, 732 S. First St. W. Free to attend. Call Craig at 550-3033.

WHO: Montana Repertory Theatre WHEN: 7:30 PM Tue., Jan. 26–Sat., Jan. 30 with additional shows Feb. 2—4, 6 and a gala opening performance Sat., Jan. 23 WHERE: Montana Theatre, UM’s PARTV Center

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Donna Smith, the Front Street Jazz Group, and DJs Gary Stein and Ryan Wendel.

HOW MUCH: $25 for the gala performance/ $18 general/$14 students and seniors/$8 children 12 and under

MONDAY

25

January

The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248.

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798.

Two sessions of World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class hits Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon. At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month,

Page 28

Photo courtesy of Terry Cyr

Leading Ladies features, from left, Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi. can try to pass themselves off as her “nieces” and score the loot. “I think Jack totally believes in Leo and will follow him to the end of the Earth,” O’Brien says. “And this particular scheme that Leo gets him into this time, it kind of pushes Jack’s limits.” The production marks O’Brien’s return trip to the Garden City. You might recognize him as the author of Eating Round the Bruise and Breach, two plays which were produced by Montana Rep Missoula in 2005 and 2006, respectively. After his stint in Missoula, O’Brien enrolled at Yale’s School of Drama, where he received his MFA in acting last summer. Although he was too consumed with his studies to write any new material during that time, a handful of his plays did grace the stage in places like New York City and Seattle. Seeing O’Brien back on the local stage will, no doubt, be a treat for Missoula audiences.

Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. Missoulians who suffer from Alzheimer’s can find help and support from others at an Alzheimer’s Support Group, which meets this and every fourth Mon. of the month from 6:30–8:30 PM in Conference Room B of St. Patrick’s Hospital, 500 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. Call Gale at 273-2429. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone

January 21–January 28, 2010

At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Rawk ‘n Roll Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Also includes a free nacho bar.

Alcohol and bowling go hand over foot during Monday Madness at Five Valley’s Bowl, 1515 Dearborn Ave., which features $1 bowling after 9 PM as well as $1.25 Coors Light cans this and every Mon. at the bowling center. Free to attend. Call 549-4158.

O’Brien says Jack, the character he plays in the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, fits that mold perfectly.

Still, Jack’s warmness won’t translate into total seriousness when the play opens this week. Ludwig’s story is a full-on farce, which O’Brien describes as fast, furious and funny. The story follows Jack and his buddy Leo (Bret Tuomi), two actors who try to eke out a living by performing scenes from Shakespeare in Pennsylvania’s Amish country. At one point, the duo gets word that a woman in York, Pa., named Florence is about to kick the can and plans to leave a wad of cash for her nieces to inherit. So, of course, Jack and Leo dress the part in drag so they

Chad Fadely and Bill Neeves let deep musical hues of indigo waft in the air when they sling bluegrass while you sip fermented grape juice at 7 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free.

Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

hearty lads

Improvisational movement with others takes on an extemporaneous vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com.

Missoula Independent

nightlife

What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992.

Whet your kayaking whistle in more ways than you can handle during a whitewater kayak pool session hosted by the Montana River Association, which runs from 6–8 PM at Currents Aquatic Center, 600 Cregg Lane. $7/$5 students with ID. Call Kevin Brown at 370-4436.

Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free.

drum rental available. RSVP 3963352 or visit tangledtones.com.

—Ira Sather-Olson Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. Suggested Donation: $10 per class. Call 961-5131 or e-mail info@tibetanlanguage.org. Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. If voice imitations and energetic storytelling wins out over dark sarcasm, comedian Gabriel Iglesias is your go-to man when he commands guffaws during a stop in Missoula for his Fluffy Shop Tour, which starts at 7 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $32.50, with tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and ticketfly.com.

Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. This week: the Zookeeperz keep party animals in check with sets by Mankiisi, Lui, Hase and the Milkcrate Mechanic. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM. Free. Men drink on the cheap and can enjoy a game of pigskin, as well as karaoke, during men’s night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Mon. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277.

TUESDAY

26

January

Sorry buddy, your hangover headaches don’t apply: the Montana Caregivers Network presents a doctor patient clinic/class for medical marijuana that runs from 8 AM–10 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $150–$100 or lower. Includes a free class about Montana’s medical marijuana program from noon–6 PM. To register all 207-7078 and visit montanacaregivers.net. Put your friendly hands to good use as a volunteer for the 2010 Winter Special Olympics, which occurs at the Lost Trail Powder Mountain ski area, off Hwy. 93 near the Montana/Idaho border, all of today and tomorrow. No winter sports skills are required, just an eagerness to help. Call Carla Christofferson at 3633028 to sign up. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a


movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Help granny get a delicious meal delivered to her home while you mow down a stir fry meal during the “helping hands” fundraiser for Meals on Wheels at HuHot Mongolian Grill, 3521 Brooks St., from 4–9 PM. Free to attend, but you’ll have to part with money for food. HuHot plans to donate grill tips and 10 percent of sales to Meals on Wheels during the event. Call Keri McWilliams at 728-7682. Burn off even more of that bulk you gained from holiday overindulgence during springboard classes which occur this and every Tue. and Thu. at 4:30 PM, followed by Pilates mat classes at 5:30 PM, all at Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. D. $12 per class. Call Avril at 360-7421.

nightlife Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. Hey, we all overindulge sometimes, but when you’ve had enough, head down to Take off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a meeting which starts with a weigh-in between 5 and 5:30 PM, followed by a meeting at 5:30, this and every Tue. at the Rocky Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 6510 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 862-1233. Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the vinyasa-style flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. and Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Learn how to alert others when in danger of being swallowed up by snow during an Avalanche Transceiver Workshop, which runs from 5–8 PM, and at the same time on Thu., Jan. 28, at UM’s Outdoor Program in the Fitness and Recreation Building. $15. RSVP by Jan. 25 by calling 243-5172. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. See if your buzzed mind can correctly guess what family of animalia the epihippus came from during Buzz Time Showdown Trivia, which features free trivia—along with drink specials—and runs from 6–9 PM this and every Tue. at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4152. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

Take part in collective thoughts and actions for healing and enlightenment at the Healers’ Gathering Meeting, which takes place the last Tue. of each month at 6:30 PM at the Eagles Lodge meeting room, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Call 273-2871. Rock out with your independent documentary appreciation appendages out during a volunteer meeting for the 2010 Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, which runs from 6:30–8 PM at Missoula’s City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free to attend. Includes a Q&A sesh and sign ups for volunteer shifts. Visit bigskyfilmfest.org/bsdff/festival/volunteers and e-mail volunteer@bigskyfilmfest.org with questions. You never know what you’ll find— except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-oneget-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Brown Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. Just don’t break out the cardboard, it’s not that kind of dance. Enjoy Chinese Culture Week at UM with a Chinese dance recital at the University Theatre at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-2988. It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every Tue. at 7:20 PM, when Horton Hip-Hop puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 2434581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What country produces the largest amount of that dark caffeinated goodness known as coffee? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night

features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 2739992 to reserve your spot. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Ka l e i d o s c o p e Ka ra o k e e v e r y Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Celestial Chaos dares you to take shots of entropy and hail all that is nebulous when they play rock at the Badlander, at 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY

27

January

Help a young woman become the next Elizabeth Cady Stanton, or a similar strong female, by volunteering as a mentor for GUTS!, a YWCA of Missoula project that helps empower women between the ages of 9–18 through a variety of afterschool activities and projects. Open to all interested women. Applications are due today and can be downloaded from ywcaofmissoula.org. Call Jen Euell at 543-6691 or e-mail her at jeuell@ywcaofmissoula.org. Your chance to mark your artistic territory on a four-wheeled vehicle of sorts comes to fruition during a call for artists for On Deck V, the fifth annual skateboard art auction for the Montana Skatepark Association that occurs in May. Submissions are due t o d a y, s o c l i c k o v e r t o m o n tanaskatepark.org/ondeck for more info. Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. Imaginations spark during preschool story time, where storyteller Paula Prescott leads kids into narrative admiration mode with the program “Wild About Books,” from 10:30–11:15 AM in the children’s corner of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. 2 PM ain’t the time for a stiff drink. But it is time for a hearty helping of screwball comedy when the Missoula Public Library presents a matinee screening of Top Hat at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Missoula Independent

Page 29

January 21–January 28, 2010


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MontanaMassage.com • 406-549-9244 • 1629 South Avenue West Los Angeles’ Propa Tingz proves laptop musicians aren’t just wrapped up in their MySpace music pages when he drops his dubstep and “glitch step” sounds at 9 PM Fri., Jan. 22, at the Palace. $10. DJs Kris Moon and Mikee Sev open. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Wed. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. Call 721-2665.

ment at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which runs this and every Wed. starting with a sign up at 6:30 PM and the game starting at 7. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight players, includes one free drink per player. Call 830-3277.

nightlife

Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com.

Keep your greens local—I mean vegetables, not those “other” greens—by downing a heady brew or two during a Community Unite Pint Night that benefits Garden City Harvest, and runs from 5–8 PM at the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from every pint sold goes to Garden City Harvest. Visit gardencityharvest.org. Free Range learns to enjoy the crowded confines of a steely cage when they play the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool cue, consider joining a weekly pool tourna-

Missoula Independent

Page 30

January 21–January 28, 2010

In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Thankfully, an enema isn’t a prerequisite to attend: Grab some info on the benefits/risks of flushing out toxins from your system during a free nutritional cleansing lecture with acupuncturists Caroline Burdulis and Bryan Watrous at 7 PM at the Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St. W. Free. Sure, I bet he didn’t take any spiritual “medicine”: Jon Turk regales you with stories of how he met an elderly Siberian shaman when he gives a presentation and signs copies of The Raven’s Gift: A Scientist, a Shaman, and Their Remarkable Journey Through the Siberian Wilderness, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Popping and locking not included: Get cultured with a Chinese dance workshop presented by the Rocky Mountain Ballet Theatre at the University Center Ballroom, at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-2988.


Just don’t get too aroused: Birds & Bees LLC presents “tantalizing techniques for touch” taught by the founder of beasexpert.com during an erotic massage workshop at 7 PM at Birds & Bees, 1515 E. Broadway St. $8. Call 531-1667 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Here’s your chance to say “The Sky is Falling!” to the National Weather Service: A severe weather spotter training session for citizens in Ravalli County occurs at 7 PM at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free to attend. Call Trent Smith at 329-4840. Release that mid and late week stress during Tai Chi Chuan classes every Wed. at 7:30 PM and every Sat. at 10 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $10/class. Call Chris at 7280918. Visit terangaarts.googlepages.com. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com.

Wednesdays at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers drink specials and starts at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Don’t make them go on strike: The Workers bring enough blue-collar grit to scare away the scabs when they play an amalgamation of rock, bluegrass and Americana at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY January

28

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Stick a brown bag on your head and surround yourself with others in order to enjoy convo on D’arcy McNickel’s book The Surrounded during another installment of the Bitterroot Public Library’s “Brown Bag It” book club, which meets at noon at the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670.

Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471.

Teens let html know who’s the boss of their binary code during “Teens Give Me MySpace at the Library,” a brainstorming session where kids grades 7–12 share their ideas for the Missoula Public Library’s MySpace page at 3 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Impale your senses without getting bloody with a narrative of Jesus’ last seven days during a performance of the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar, which starts at 8 PM at UM’s Adams Center. $47/$42/$37, depending on seats. Visit griztix.com for tickets or call 243-4051.

Grab your art appreciation goggles and be ready to become the gatekeeper of aesthetic knowledge during an art guide training session from 4–6 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Cost TBA. Call Education Curator Renee Taaffe at 728-0447 Ext. 228.

Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children 18 and under. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

nightlife

You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: You might not know it, but “Brazil is unquestionably the biggest coffee producing country in the world.” That’s according to the National Coffee Association of U.S.A. Inc. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Let Me Ride” by Dr. Dre , (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Get a wicked case of “bowling finger” during Five Valley’s Bowl’s Wicked Wednesday, which features $2 bowling after 9 PM plus $2 cans of Bud Light this and every Wed. at the bowling center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free to attend. Call 549-4158. Folk leanings cavort naughtily with electronic beats, handclaps and hip-hop when Baltimore’s Lizz King plays with Detroit/San Francisco’s Breezee One at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Opening support from local noisemakers Bryan Ramirez and Colin Johnson. (See Noise in this issue.) Be sure you’ve grabbed yourself a designated driver so you can imbibe during Wasted

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Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. That “medicine” you enthusiastically puff just might be the cause of your parched eyes. Find out the true cause from an eye expert when Dr. Chad Nedrud leads the lecture “The Eyes Have It–Treating Dry Eyes” at 5 PM in the Gallagher Day Room at the Rehabilitation Instituate of Montana, at Community Medical Center, 2827 Fort Missoula Road. Free. Call 327-4141. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, anti-folk—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Random bursts of thought have always lead to some sort of creative revelation, right? Find out during The Creative Movement, a class taught by local artist Katie Ludwick where you’ll blend up writing, drawing, object exploration, and works on paper to create an idea smoothie of creative potential from 6–8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $10. Call 549-7555 to register.

Missoula Independent

Page 31

January 21–January 28, 2010


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Hamilton, MT

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200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224.

Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

You might do the push, whip or the jitterbuglindy when Cathy Clark slings beginning swing dance lessons every Thu. at 7 PM, and then moves to beyond basics swing lessons at 7:30 PM, at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. Two Rwandan buds try to smash the notion that “Hutus and Tutsi are supposed to be enemies” during the Bitterroot Public Library’s “Foreign Film Night” screening of Munyurangabo, which starts at 7 PM in the west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670.

Bead & Rock Blowout!! Huge!! Saturday January 30 10-6

An arm wrestling match is no match for Bruce Threlkeld, who pins opponents to the ground and teases them with his mix of pop, reggae, rock and bluegrass at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

Sunday January 31 10-4

Free admission Bitterroot River Inn conference center Never seen before merchandise.

1920 Brooks St. • 406.549.1729 • Hours: M-Sat. 10-7 • Sun 12-5

Let the flying spaghetti monster be your guide to questioning everything under the sun during another installment of Socrates Cafe, a philosophy discussion group which meets at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Dramatic sages Barret O’Brien and Bret Tuomi grace the stage for a night of cross-dressing, plans of deceit and cackles galore during the Montana Repertory Theatre’s rendition of Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $18/$14 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Internet chatroom sex bumps and grinds with cheating couples and struggles with intimacy during the Montana Actors’ Theatre rendition of Patrick Marber’s Closer, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com. Give some guitarists the permission to tickle you with their strings when Brian Gore, Lulo Reinhardt (yes, he’s a descendent of Django), Itamar Erez and Stephen Bennett gently shred the night away during International Guitar Night, a mobile guitar festival that starts at 7:30 PM at Whitefish’s O’ Shaughnessy Center, 1 Central Ave. $27/$20 depending on seats. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org or call 862-5371 for tickets. Don’t expect to be speaking in binary code when Brian Jameson offers a devotional singing and chanting program with live music and a casual vibe at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Common Ground Center, 258 Roosevelt Lane. $3 donation requested. Call 381-0617. Satan is not allowed in the building: The Rhythm Angels bring their radiant Americana straight from Nashville up to Polson when they play the Polson High School Auditorium, 111 Fourth Ave. E., at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance at True Value Hardware in Ronan or Fiddlesticks Music in Polson. Visit accessmontana.com/ bigproductions. Two curmudgeonly coots reunite for song, dance and cantankerous antics during the MCT Community Theatre’s rendition of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys, with a performance at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts,

Missoula Independent

Page 32

January 21–January 28, 2010

Bowling and karaoke go together like milk and black tar heroin during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Bow down at the altar of a glitch-hop master when avant-garde instrumental hip-hop producer Prefuse 73 plays with Los Angeles’ The Gaslamp Killer and Voices Voices at 9 PM at the Palace. $12 presale at Ear Candy Music. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Give Wartime Blues an ounce of your love and they’ll let you soak in their torrential downpour of tender Americana when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Here ye, here ye, this week I present you with two “calls for art” of sorts. The first is a solicitation from the Dana Gallery for its May 2010 exhibit known as the Second Annual Celebration of Missoula Artists. If you’ve got an aesthetic itch, grab an app by going to the gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave., or e-mail info@danagallery.com. The deadline for submissions is April 1. Call 721-3154 for more info. The second isn’t necessarily a call for art, but for artifact. Specifically, the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula is looking for your memories, photographs and paraphernalia—I mean, memorabilia—of “The Merc,” which currently—but not for much longer—houses Macy’s. Contact Jason Bain, curator of collections, at 728-3476 Ext. 2 with your relics. As for you, keep sending me all of the events you hope will become your cherished memories by following my simple mantra of sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 22, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


While the exact date is up in the air, experts estimate the world’s first snowshoes made their debut on the calloused soles of humans about 6,000 years ago in Central Asia. Back in the days of yore, those slices of tightly woven wood were used as a means to survive the wrath of walking in snow—and probably served as a convenient way to walk over frozen animal excrement. But these days, snowshoeing as a sport is apparently taking off in leaps and bounds. You have the opportunity to push your own pair of snowshoes to the limit during the 2010 Montana Snowshoe Championships, which starts at 10 AM Sat., Jan. 23, at the Homestake Lodge just east of Butte off of exit 233 on I-90. Register early by clicking to www.active.com/running/buttemt/montana-snowshoe-championships-2010, or by getting to the lodge at 8:30 AM. Get in on the excitement of the 10k race, or give your pups an easier option with the 5k. Here’s the price breakdown: $30 for the 10k race/$25 for the 5k. Give Chris a ringer at 585-8052 for any extra questions and visit homestakelodge.com. If you’d rather spend Sat., Jan. 23, popping shots at targets and blazing around on cross-country skis with competitive drive, then don’t space the 2010 Seeley Lake Challenge Biathlon, which starts at the Seeley Lake Nordic Trails with day-of registration from 8–9 AM, followed by a safety class, target practice and race meeting, finally jumping into the race at 11 AM. The competition is open to all ages, so be prepared to shell out $30 the day of, or $25 by registering early. Call Cheryl Thompson at 6772309 for more info. This biathlon is part of Seeley Lake’s Winterfest weekend, which includes an array of parades, music and grubbing, so call the Seeley Lake Chamber at 677-2880 or visit seeleylakechamber.com. Those of you up yonder in the Flathead who get hot and bothered at the thought of barreling down slick terrains ought to bring your able appendages up to the Whitefish Whiteout Ski Mountaineering Race, which starts at 8:30 AM at Chair One Plaza at the Whitefish Mountain Resort. The race is open to AT/Touring, tele-

mark skiers or split board snowboarders. The event also includes a recreation course, which features two ascents and descents. Grab specifics by scrolling over to skiwhitefish.com/ calendar_of_events.php. $50/$30 for the recreation course. Call 8622910 for course questions. Carving ice meets up with elegant poses–but probably not leotards—during the Missoula Figure Skating Club’s Learn to Skate Basic Skills Session Two, an eight-week ice skating class which starts at 10 AM Sat., Jan. 23, at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. $110. Visit missoulafsc.org for a registration form, or arrive early Saturday to sign up. Just when you thought your options on Sat., Jan. 23, were exhausted, the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) comes along

Your knuckle dragging underlings ages 5 and up get to have all the fun later in the day during the MNHC program “Winter Ice Painting!”, which starts at 2 PM at the center, 120 Hickory St. Expect your happy little beast to be slipped some facts about ice and snow, play a game or two, and lend their budding aesthetic senses to an art activity where they’ll paint with ice—that should make for some “cool” art, eh? $2 per child/free MNHC members. Once they’ve had their ice fill, use Sun., Jan. 24, as an excuse to plop your youngling between the ages of 5–12 onto the hill at Whitefish Mountain Resort so their wee legs can compete at the Tommy Moe Kids’ League Giant Slalom competition, which starts with registration at 9 AM at the Fireside Room at the resort. A complimentary coaching sesh follows, with the competition running from 1–3 PM. $12 per participant. Register early by calling 8622909 and visit skiwhitefish.com. Later on Sun., Jan. 24, zoom dat derriere back down to Zoola in order to whet your kayaking whistle during the first of two whitewater kayak pool sessions hosted by the Montana River Association, with the first session from 6–8 PM at Currents Aquatic Center, 600 Cregg Lane. $7/$5 students with ID. Open to all ages and abilities. Call Kevin Brown at 370-4436. Mon., Jan. 25 offers the chance for your aching legs to get some running tips from an expert when Anders Brooker delivers the talk “Can You Start from Zero and Still Run the Missoula Marathon or Half-Marathon?,” at 7 PM at the Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St. W. Free. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Once Tue., Jan. 26, rolls around, learn how to call for help when you’re in danger of getting buried in snow by getting frisky with technology during an Avalanche Transceiver Workshop, which runs from 5–8 PM on Jan. 26, and at the same time on Photo by Cathrine L. Walters Thu., Jan. 28, at UM’s Fitness and Recreation Center. $15. RSVP by to pack your adventure pipe with a helping of heady events. The first Jan. 25 by calling 243-5172. Top off your week by tearing pow pow a new one during is a Winter Tracking Workshop with Northwest Connections that starts at 9 AM and runs all day at TBA locales near Missoula. Montana Snowbowl’s Alpine Evening Race Series, which starts Here’s the lowdown: Tom Parker and Adam Lieberg train your animal at a TBA time on Wed., Jan. 27. Sign-up and grab specifics by calling tracking senses into skills that a CIA operative would be proud of when Deb Demmons at 258-5260 or e-mailing debdem@q.com. ‘Til we meet again, be sure to boot up, shoe up and get down wit‘ they cover basic habitat requirements, gait patterns, track identification in the snow, and top it off with a bit o’ history on various wildlife. cha snow loving self. $65/$60 members. Space is limited, so speed dial 327-0405 to calendar@missoulanews.com RSVP. Visit montananaturalist.org.

Missoula Independent

Page 33

January 21–January 28, 2010


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Missoula Independent

Food ticket exhibit captures the culture of a coffee shop by Erika Fredrickson

Nearly 2,000 food order tickets cover the wall at are you doing?’ But then I read a guerrilla art book about Part of the installation also includes a tally of Butterfly Herbs coffee shop. When the back door opens, art that you do with what’s available, wherever you want names that appear most often on food orders. Some the wind often makes them flutter, giving the illusion that to. So then I started to get on board.” common names like “Dave” (which shows up 43 They decided not to alter the tickets, except to stamp times) and “Steve” (23 times) actually refer to six difthe wall itself is moving. Each ticket documents an order—bagel, salad, soup—and gives a short description them with a few symbols—a bagel for bagel orders, “stay” ferent regulars with those names. Variations on other of the customer so servers know to whom they should if the customer eats at the shop, and a mark for whether names—“Janine/ Jeannine/Genine”—are also lumped deliver the order. The descriptions are brief and curious, the customer was male or female. together, whereas there’s only one “Bjorn” and one “We realized what we’re stamping is actual relation- “Wally.” It’s not a science, but McTague says it was like “Red lipstick,” “multiple green coats,” “the sleepy girl,” “dark blue Waldo” and “French girl.” Some display ships and interactions,” says Christensen. “It’s like people another way to share data and, in part, pay tribute to actual names, like “Cindy, et al,” indicating regular cus- watching through their food orders. It’s a shred of evi- at least some regulars. tomers who’ve established a first name basis with the dence you’re trying to work with.” As a longtime employee, McTague also recognized They didn’t come to exact conclusions about people that some regulars wouldn’t show up on tickets because employees. The wall of tickets is an art installation titled Butterfly through food orders, but patterns did emerge. They they only get coffee or they’re such institutions at Herbus Regularis created by local artists and partners found that women tend to order skinny lattes and cucum- Butterfly they don’t need a ticket. For them, the artists’ Nathan McTague and Natalie Christiensen. Aesthetically, bers and that it’s rare that two men order together even if statement offers this tribute: “There is a subset of the pale green and white tickets add subtle color to the wall, while the sheer quantity of them provides a stunning effect. The information on the tickets themselves gives a sort of forensic study of a coffee shop that’s known for its diverse customer base. In fact, it could be argued that there are few places in Missoula besides Butterfly—the oldest coffee shop in town—where this kind of installation would make sense. “This show catalogs the community hub that this place is,” says McTague. “It’s an eclectic group in the largest possible sense. It’s almost like a safe zone where the 19-year-old grungy punk can be sitting down playing chess with the 78-year-old conservative guy. That’s sort of expected, that intermingling.” McTague and Christensen acknowledge the culture with a tongue-in-cheek artists’ statement, which reads like a government letter from the fictional department of the “United States Federal Government Nathan McTague and Natalie Christensen’s art installation, Butterfly Herbus Regularis, consists of close to 2,000 o f C u l t u r a l a n d S o c i o l o g i c a l food tickets collected over the last two years at the downtown coffee shop. “It’s very much a thank you to this Awareness.” It states: “The following place, and it’s sort of a mirror,” says McTague, who has worked at Butterfly Herbs since 1998. “It catalogs interis a sampling of data and material actions of people—employees and customers—who make this place eclectic.” collected between September 2006 and January 2010. This material clearly indicates Butterfly they’re seated together. They could tell the season and Butterfly Herbus Regularis that appears with such freHerbus Regularis’ primary goal: to attain nourishment, even the day sometimes by how a customer is described. quency as to find no need to officially order. Their moveboth social- and substance-based. Butterfly Herbus A “plaid scarf and parka” probably means winter and “girl ments go undocumented.” Regularis commonly drinks coffee and eats bagels. The with flowers in hair” often indicates someone who’s just McTague say they’ve gotten a wide range of reactions visited the summer farmers’ market. feeding grounds are often quite populated.” to the installation. Art seekers sometimes look puzzled as The tickets sometimes hint at relationship changes they peruse the wall, not quite sure what they’re looking The Butterfly project started two years ago when McTague, an on and off employee of the coffee bar since when, for instance, a regular customer appears alone for at. Frequenters of the coffee shop often scan for their 1998, began saving order tickets in the hopes that the several orders and then, suddenly, begins showing up name to verify their history with the place. Meanwhile, with a companion. paper waste could be used in some artistic manner. the employees continue to collect tickets out of habit. A ticket can also hint at the personality or mood of an “I didn’t know what I’d do with them,” McTague says, “And, in fact, I can’t turn them off,” laughs McTague. “whether I would use them as a canvas or make paper employee; describing a customer in just a few short “I told them that we’re done, but they’re still piling them words is a subjective matter. “Cute guy Nicaragua blue” up. It makes me realize though, Natalie and I take credit mâché out of them.” Christensen, on the other hand, watched as the tick- and “Hot guy with glasses,” perhaps gives away tempo- for the show but it’s obviously—with employees and cusets piled up in the couple’s already stuffed house; rary attractions or secret admirations of employees for tomers—a total collaboration.” Christensen and McTague have three young children. She customers. Butterfly Herbus Regularis continues on display There are just a few negative descriptions, but noth- at Butterfly Herbs through the end of January. Free. wondered if it was worth it. “He was bringing home stacks to our tiny house,” she ing out of line. If a customer’s consistently stingy, he or says, laughing, “and I am not a collector. I’m like, ‘What she might be described as “Non-tipper.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com

Page 34 January 21–January 28, 2010


Soundcheck

Ten Foot Tall & 80 Proof Another Round self-released

I’m a sucker for the Dobro. Also, for loping guitar riffs punctuated with a deep pluck à la Johnny Cash’s intro to “Folsom Prison Blues.” And there’s nothing better than vocals with a smoky twang. Ten Foot Tall & 80 Proof ’s new album ties in all these elements, especially on the swampy swagger of “You Back on My Mind” and the wistful boot stomp of “One Night Man.” Still, Another Round begins with the superficial sentiments of so many bad pop country bands. “Feelin’ Alright” suffers from lines like “Thank God for HD TV” and “Tap the keg, turkey’s fryin’, touchdown—the other team’s cryin’.” It’s almost as endearing as a “Friday

Lizz King All Songs Go To Heaven Ehse Records

With her gritty electro-dance tune “Booty Queen,” Baltimore’s Lizz King launches a sneak attack worthy of Werner Herzog. It’s a catchy, spooky little number featuring the refrain “Oo la la, she’s just a baby” over samples covering the history of the Big Bad Wolf in pop culture. By the line “JonBenet Ramsey wants some candy,” you’re already halfsinging along. And so King briefly implicates her listeners in a set of unpleasant associations involving baby beauty queens.

Megasus Megasus 20 Buck Spin

Tegan and Sara Sainthood Sire

To be extremely accessible is not a sin. Don’t dismiss it as saccharine just because it’s honest pop. Tegan and Sara’s Sainthood is the best collection to date by these prolific and muchdiscussed Canadian twins. It’s also a clear homage to some of the best female pop of the last 30 years—especially acts like the Bangles and Joan Armatrading—yet somehow not overtly retro. (One exception is “Alligator,”

Movie Shorts

Night Lights” episode, but leans too far into the cheeseball suburban country of Brad Paisley’s “American Saturday Night.” Similar problems sprout up with “That’s My Girl,” wherein lead singer Kris Clone gets caught up in the bland story of a generic curvy girl at a bar. Yawn. But the Bozeman-based band sets itself apart from mainstream detritus by the album’s last half. A nod to Jerry Reed, well placed puns (“Haggard & Cashed”) and, mostly, the smarts to ride that line between tough country talk and candid self-deprecation makes this a strong recording. (Erika Fredrickson) Ten Foot Tall & 80 Proof plays the Badlander Friday, Jan. 22, at 9 PM with the River Creek Stream Boys. $5. King likes to play with expectations, and her debut album is full of surprises. An inconsistent but intriguing effort, it alternately flirts with feminist electro-fuzz and swoons on Cole Porter’s doorstep. The industrial “Mr. Fella” incorporates snippets from “I Walk the Line,” references Madonna’s “Express Yourself,” and features the words “I love you so much” spoken with impressive rancor. What is love, anyway? These fuzzy, electronic, sample-heavy experiments are fun the first few listens, but the album’s strength lies in several stripped-down torch songs, including “Teeth and Lips,” “Tongue Tied” and “Either/Or.” Strumming a ukulele or plucking a banjo, King sings with a low, throaty croon. At her best, she is frank, intimate and saucy like a latter-day Marlene Dietrich. (Ali Gadbow) Lizz King plays the Palace Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 9 PM with Breezee One, Bryan Ramirez and Colin Johnson. $5. High on Fire. It’s a metal sound I haven’t heard before, with much more emphasis on the midrange frequency rather than the low end. It’s also a sound that proves worthy of the band’s roots— the members, including Lightning Bolt bassist Brian Gibson on drums, all hail from the American noiserock capital of Providence, R.I. From the first lumbering chord to the last crushing drumbeat, the eponymous album is drenched in a distinct infectious layer of buzzy amplified edge. That’s exactly what makes Megasus stand out. I’m not sure if the band just created a metal subgenre, but whatever Megasus has done, I’m pleased. (Ira Sather-Olson) which rides roller-rink rhythms unmistakably inspired by early Madonna.) Though it’s easily digestible, I wouldn’t call Sainthood sweet. Ingenuous—as in honest—is a better word. The lyrics read like a diary, but use an accessible pop vocabulary that avoids overweening angst or poppsychology cliché. In “Northshore,” the central problem of there being “something so sick about this” relationship is exemplified by a satisfyingly fresh image: “I’m singing to you over my shoulder.” Tegan and Sara have been hyped to the corners of the earth, but Sainthood proves the critics right. This is truly an album, a cohesive series of catchy, well-crafted songs with no lag, no drag and no distractions. Every single song is good. This may sound like lazy criticism, but it’s simple fact. Sainthood is great pop, and promises to age well. (Ali Gadbow)

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Page 35 January 21–January 28, 2010


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Perfect storm Perseverance pays for local MC Tonsofun by Erika Fredrickson

third annual

Missoula Federal Credit Union

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4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

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Get the word out about your eco-friendly business or non-profit organization at the 3rd Annual MFCU Sustainability Fair, on Tuesday, March 23, 2010. Participants are required to apply for inclusion. Applications are available at www.missoulafcu.org or at any branch location. More than you expect

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Missoula Independent

Page 36 January 21–January 28, 2010

Jim Spurlock wrote his first rap song for the band producer, local rapper Linkletter, Spurlock had already Neato Bandida Frito in 2000 at age 17. The song also penned new songs, and the final attempt ended up served as his senior project at Hellgate High School being his favorite take. Plus, it was tons of fun. “I was in a buddy’s bedroom in a haze of smoke and he titled it “Senior Project to Poop On.” His teachand beer,” he says. “Before he did the mastering, you ers were not impressed. “I think it was specifically because I thumbed my could hear either me burping or opening a beer nose at them,” he says. “If I had went at it a little more before every single track. I did dedicate it to Pabst subtly, I probably could have gotten away with more. because it had a large part to do with it. They owe me But that’s never my style. I’m going to tell you [how I a sponsorship.” feel] to your face, regardless if you’re a teacher grading The recording is a combination of playful lyrics—an me or not.” a capella ode to vodka, for instance—and more serious, Spurlock says he took a jab at the school because the scope of the project was changed at the last minute from a collaborative, community-based activism assignment to a regular inschool task. But while the scope changed, it was still graded by both teachers and a panel of community members. He says the community members gave him an “A.” His teachers gave him an “F.” With that, a populist contrarian MC was born. Two years after high school, Neato Bandida Frito was still getPhoto courtesy of Linkletter ting requests at the now-defunct Jay’s Upstairs for “Senior Project to Poop On.” But it wasn’t long Jim Spurlock, aka Tonsofun, performs this week to celebrate before Spurlock’s strong person- the release of his debut album, Pohbuddy’s Nerfikt. ality got him in trouble again. This time, it was his bandmates who got after him, giv- personal storylines set against a series of badass beats. ing him the boot. They soon went on to form one of There are songs about girls and songs about, in generMissoula’s most popular hip-hop groups, the al, perseverance. Certain lines speak to Spurlock’s curiNHUMANS, and Spurlock was left on his own. rent hardships: He’s been unemployed since June 2009, “I was doing some unruly things,” he says. “Back and, without his own car, has somehow found a way to then I’d be late for this interview and probably be split his time between Missoula and Clinton, where he drunk already.” grew up and where he goes to take care of his grandparFor several years, Spurlock rapped at parties for ents. Songs like “Flash in the Pan” include a countryfun, but didn’t attempt anything serious. Finally, in styled slide guitar, reflecting his roots. 2008, after he moved back from a short stint living in “It’s the joke that I’m the hippie of Clinton, which Washington state, the iNHUMANS asked Spurlock to is funny because when I’m in Missoula hanging out open up for them at the Badlander. He put some songs with friends, I’m the redneck,” he says. “I think there’s together, billed himself with the moniker Tonsofun that underlying theme in my music that I’m a country and set his sights on taking music seriously again. boy. I always say I have a country swagger and I defi“I give [the iNHUMANS] mad credit for me being nitely have country hospitality.” Tonsofun,” he says. “July 11, 2008, was my first show— Spurlock says he never thought he’d get to the my rebirthing so to speak. I remember it. I don’t think point of putting out an album. But he never got tired of it went well, but it kickstarted everything. I didn’t even writing rhymes, even when friends tried to get him to have trajectory before they gave me that show. I didn’t quit dreaming about being an MC because he wasn’t exist.” following through on his commitments. Now, he says, In the 18 months since that show, Spurlock has with six producers sending him beats, he’s on a roll. written numerous new songs, played several local “I’m flawed in many, many ways,” he says. “But all shows and is currently slated to open up for his it took was me finally having the balls to do this for favorite artist, Lyrics Born, in February. He also recent- myself. As soon as I did start doing it, I only spent 18 ly finished recording his debut solo album, months to [release] the album, and now I’m opening Pohbuddy’s Nerfikt. The title plays off the phrase up for my favorite MC. I’m 27 so I got a pretty late “nobody’s perfect,” and speaks to Spurlock’s personal start. But it’s a start.” journey. It’s also an apt name for an album that took Tonsofun plays a CD release show at the Palace four attempts to record. Saturday, Jan. 23, at 9 PM with Traffic, Linkletter “Twice the computer crashed and one other time and DJ Brand One. $3. the guy I was working with was just not working out,” he says. When he finally met up with his friend and efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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New York times Linklater latches on to a sparse Orson Welles by Andy Smetanka

Much of the dialogue in Me and Orson Welles The 1937 New York that Richard Linklater strives so earnestly to recreate in Me and Orson Welles feels seems written with the rhythms of this uniquely overrun with time travelers but truly inhabited by no American (and wholly artificial) sing-song in mind, and one. The setting is the Mercury Theatre, with the future a few of its characters actually perform it that way, in Charles Foster Kane (played by Christian McKay) still a lively nasal voices (from a time when male strangers few years away from the movies. Into the creative melee purportedly addressed each other as “mac”) and with steps Richard (Zac Efron), a New Jersey teen playing all the attendant ’30s comedy mannerisms. Others, like hooky to be where the action is and finding himself Claire Danes, convey the effervescence of the dialogue through their physical comportment, not their actual front and center in Welles’ Hamlet. There’s a wonderful precedent for bygone eras in voices. A bewildered Zac Ephron plays Richard with no the Linklater filmography: Dazed and Confused. But affect at all, bolt upright on the monorail with eyes that was, admittedly, a rather more recently bygone era than the 1930s. As a period picture, Me and Orson Welles only goes halfway, at least on purpose. It’s only really interesting when it goes all the way unintentionally. There’s an intentional quality to the movie’s artifice, as though Linklater weren’t truly trying to recreate 1937 New York, but rather New York as a 1937 Hollywood soundstage. Most of the scenery is confined to a grand old theater, the theater office, and the Zac Efron reads his fan mail everywhere. sidewalk in front of the theater. There’s not a lot of New York dollar on the screen, fixed straight ahead. Luckily his role is primarily that of so to speak; it’s barely more multidimensional than the observer. It all adds up to a very strange exercise in retro city glimpsed cautiously through Venetian blinds by criminals hiding out in a stage drama. There’s a fakeness stylings. You have to hand it to Linklater for trying to to the extras strolling past, a posed quality to gangs of restore some of this lost film language, but he’s clearly workmen in the street—and no mistaking Linklater’s still learning the vocabulary (to be fair, most of the native speakers have been dead for decades). Still, the New York for, say, Martin Scorsese’s, that’s for sure. I’m not complaining. Without ever setting foot in loudest echoes of the ’30s here are the intentional the city, one can construct a perfectly serviceable imag- ones: The overlapping monorail tracks of dialogue in a inary New York composited of favorite screen versions: vintage 1937 Hollywood movie had a way of forcing Rosemary’s Baby, Rear Window, The Sweet Smell of actors into performances that seem hermetic and isolatSuccess, Ghostbusters and Splash, a continuum stretch- ed by today’s standards—kind of every man for himing back to the birth of the feature film. Nominal real- self—and that comes through here as well. Unlike ’30s directors, however, Linklater was not ism is not required; consider Wes Anderson’s Harlem forced by the Hays Code into concealing racy material fantasia in The Royal Tenenbaums. Linklater’s version merely adds an element of with an OED-thick lexicon of symbols and shibboleths thrift. This is as much 1937 New York as he was willing for sexuality and homosexuality, perhaps the era’s most to pay for, and it is what it is, as they say. A few clumsy elegant contribution to the increasingly complex landetails actually detract from the atmosphere. guage of film. There’s not much racy about Orson Linklater’s New York is less a livable illusion than an Welles and Me but, what little there is, it’s presented assemblage of wares from a well-stocked prop house with a refreshing pre-Code frankness. Overall, Me and Orson Welles exists to justify laid out in a layered cone-shape whichever way the camera is pointing. I didn’t feel I was there, or any- Christian McKay’s freakishly right-on rendition of Welles. Perhaps because he’s less well-known to where but a sound stage, for a second. There’s a further two-ply artifice to the dialogue, in Americans than Danes or Ephron, we give ourselves which actors freshly teleported from the 21st century, over to him in a way we don’t with them. He’s a with all contemporary speech intonations intact, run palimpsest, a fresh discovery and, strangest of all, his smack up against the demanding banter of recreated larger-than-life Welles is the one thing about Me and 1930s screenwriting. Dialogue from 1930s movies is a Orson Welles that makes us forget we’re watching conlittle like a monorail, carried forward by its own strange temporary actors in a fake Old New York. Me and Orson Welles concludes its run at the logic and not by what 2010 Americans would recognize as conversational spontaneity. The actor has no choice Wilma Theatre Thursday, Jan. 21. but to climb aboard this hurtling dialogue and find a way to see it through to the end. arts@missoulanews.com

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Missoula Independent

Page 37 January 21–January 28, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK DR. WAYNE DYER: WISHES FULFILLED What’s your purpose in life, to take up space? Motivational speaker Dr. Wayne Dyer certainly doesn’t think so when he hits the screen to talk about how you can focus on your aspirations. Carmike 10: 7:30 only on Thu. EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES Harrison Ford suits up to save the day as an overworked doctor trying to cure a rare disorder. Will Brendan Fraser be able to convince him to save his children? Village 6: 7:30 and 9:50, with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 3:45 and 6:50 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 9:20 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4, 7 and 9:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

Noise

Soundcheck

9:50 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:55, 4:20, 6:45 and 9:10. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

NOW PLAYING ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE SQUEAKQUEL In case you didn’t get your fill the last time around, your favorite animated rodents are back—highpitched voices and all—in order help bail out a sink-

Film

Movie Shorts

of humanity. But when Gary Oldman gets word of its power, who comes out alive? Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 3:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:15 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05. 3:40, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:45. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15.

LEGION God smites earthlings like Dennis Quaid—but can fallen angel Paul Bettany save the day by leading peeps to the second coming of Christ? Village 6: 7:30 and 10, with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:30. Pharoahplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 i n K a l i s p e l l : Fr i . – S u n . a t noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7:20 and 9:55 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:10, 7:15 and 9:40. NINE This dance-tastic adaptation of “Step away from my shower.” The Road opens Friday at the Wilma Theatre. the musical follows Daniel DayLewis as he deals with creative roadblocks and literally struggles to keep his ing school music program by shredding in a battle- IT’S COMPLICATED pants on as he juggles all the women in his life, of-the-bands competition. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:15 Alec Baldwin hooks up with his ex-wife Meryl including Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz and and 9:30 with additional Fri.–sun. show at 1:15. Streep, even though he’s remarried, only to then Nicole Kidman. Village 6: 7:15 and 10, with addi- Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:30, have Steve Martin barge in and rain on his love 4:45, 7:05 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at parade. Village 6: 7 and 9:50 with additional tional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 4:15. midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:15, 6:30 and 9. Sat.–Sun. show at 1 and 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:05, 6:35 and 9:10 with additional THE ROAD Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, Viggo Mortensen plays a dad trying to navigate AVATAR his son through a post-apocalyptic world full of Sam Worthington gets a 3-D makeover as he plays 6:35 and 9:15. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 6:50 frenzied cannibals, decimated landscapes and an ex-Marine whose alien body and human mind and 9:10. scarce resources in this adaptation of the is sent to pillage a new planet for its resources, but Cormac McCarthy novel. Wilma Theatre: 7 and does a chance encounter with a female humanoid LEAP YEAR help keep his eyes on the bounty? Carmike 10: Amy Adams has a heart on for Adam Scott, and 9:05, with Sun. shows at 1 and 3:05. 4:30, 5:30, 8 and 9, with additional Fri.–Sun. wants to tie the knot by taking matters into her shows at 1 and 2. Village 6 in 2-D: 8 with addition- own hands. Along the way, Matthew Goode steps TO SAVE A LIFE Randy Wayne learns to be a little nicer to the al Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in in and screws up her plans in the best way possifreaks, geeks and outcasts at his high school Hamilton: 7 only with Sat.–Sun. show at 3. ble. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:05 and 9:30 with addiafter a childhood friend commits suicide. But will Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1:30, tional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in his popular friends accept Wayne’s new love of 3:30, 5, 6:55 and 8:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. Hamilton: 9 only with no 9 show on Sun. Stadium social diversity? Stadium 14 in Whitefish: shows at 10:30 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 2:40, 4:55, 7:25 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 4 and 7 with additional 3:30, 4:30, 7 and 8:30. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 3:55, 7:05 and 9:20. Fri.–Sat. shows at 9:40 and midnight and THE BLIND SIDE Mon.–Thu. at 1:50, 4:35, 7:10 and 9:50. Sandra Bullock plays an upper-crust mom who THE LOVELY BONES takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his Peter Jackson leaps back to the screen sans aliens, THE TOOTH FAIRY Dwayne Johnson plays a cynical hockey player dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 7:10 and wizards and hobbits in a story about a brutally murwho has no qualms about dispelling myths to 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:25 and dered teen who keeps watch over her family in an eager ears, but everything changes when he 4:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, elysian, “in-between” world. Can she keep her gets summoned to the joyous job of sticking 6:30 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at desire for retribution under wraps, or will she let her killer get caught? Carmike 10: 4:10, 7:05 and money under the pillows of toothless children. midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10 and 7:20. 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15. Stadium Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:50, with addi14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:35, 3:35, 6:40 and tional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in THE BOOK OF ELI Hamilton: 7 and 9, with additional Sat.–Sun. Denzel Washington meanders through a wretched 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 post-apocalyptic wasteland, toting around a special Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:05, 6:50 and 9:35. in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and book he claims is the key to saving the last scraps

Missoula Independent

Page 38 January 21–January 28, 2010

PRECIOUS An African American teen in Harlem gets dealt many blows: she’s impregnated by her father, her mom is an abusive she-devil, and she’s illiterate. But can a vigorous alternative school teacher help her find hope? Wilma Theatre: 9 with an additional Sun. show at 3 and no show on Mon. THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG New Orleans finally gets positive, post-Katrina exposure in this animated tale about a prince turned frog who hopes to leap back to manhood with the help of a naïve girl, voodoo practitioner and other bayou dwellers. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. SHERLOCK HOLMES R o b e r t D o w n e y J r. p l a y s Sherlock Holmes and busts kneecaps with the help of his cane-wielding sidekick Jude Law (aka Dr. Watson) in order to save England from annihilation. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Village 6: 7 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:40, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:45, 6:40 and 9:25. THE SPY NEXT DOOR Jackie Chan furthers his acting career by playing a spy who has to temporarily take on the role of Mr. Mom, only to then employ his hoard of little rugrats as defenders against a Ruskie bent on destruction. Carmike 10: 4 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:15, 4:35, 7:05 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 3:35, 5:55 and 9:05. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. UP IN THE AIR George Clooney likes to fly, a lot. But when his employer skimps out on frequently flying him places, he worries that he might lose out on a romantic interlude with fellow traveler Vera Farmiga. Carmike 10: 7 and 9:40. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 3:50. THE YOUNG VICTORIA British aristocracy hits the screen in this movie about the early reign of Britian’s 19th century empress Queen Victoria, and her quest to wed and bed Prince Albert. Wilma Theatre: 7 with additional Sun. show at 1 and no show on Mon. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan 22. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-F I LM; S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l – 752 - 78 0 4 . Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 39 January 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 28, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

Jan. 21–Jan. 28, 2010

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Table of contents Brought to you by

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Snow Days are for Lovers Some friends and I were headed up Blue Mountain snowshoeing, you were on the way down on XCSkis. You: wearing glacier goggles and looking super hot. Maybe next time we could go up together. Meet you at the bottom! Woman saw Man January 12th

Reading Steven King at Library We were both sitting by the windows in the big comfy chairs. You were reading S.King wearing black glasses. I was trying to read some Shelley but you were distracting me. I’d like to take you out sometime. Man saw Woman January 10th

Union Club on Friday You were dancing with your girlfriend when you caught my eye. I ran into her in the bathroom and she was totally talking smack about you. Dump that witch, she doesn’t deserve your rugged good looks. Woman to Man January 8th Your name is Jill? Thursday at Dead Hipster. You: wearing striped tights and drinking Pabst. Me: wearing vest and fedora. We danced to a couple songs and some girl spilt her drink on me. Let’s meet up before the party next week! Man to Woman January 7th

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5700 or 443-6400 or visit online: www.mtboatshow.com Two Sisters: Wedding Open House 111 N. Higgins, The Florence Building, 2nd Floor - The Govenor’s Room Join us and see the lovely Governor’s Room, enjoy complimentary light appetizers, and plan the happiest day of your life! Saturday, January 23, 2010 11:00am - 2:00pm

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COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS

VOLUNTEERS

By Amy Alkon

HOUSE SWARMING Six months ago, after my boyfriend and I had been together a year, we started living together. We’re in our late 20s. Shortly after I moved in, he asked if another couple, his friends, could move in with us so they’d save some money. I said yes—on the understanding that they’d be out by early 2010. My boyfriend soon started hanging with them constantly and ignoring our relationship. I pointed out that we needed our alonetime together. He made excuses, but showed that he had no intention of making time for us. I hid my unhappiness, but finally had to sit him down and tell him what needed to change. Several days later, he said he wanted to take a break, and I should move out—although the problem couple can afford to leave but are using him for cheap rent. He offered to help me move, and into a safe place. I told him I think our situation is fixable with a little effort and understanding. —Hurt When you’ve just moved in with your boyfriend, you should be doing unspeakable things all over the couch, not trying to get on the waiting list for a comfortable seat for Bananagrams. Never mind that your boyfriend’s slacker friends needed a cheap crash pad. Moving in with your girlfriend and immediately moving in your friends is like booking the honeymoon suite and asking, “Oh, yeah, can we get a cot for my mom?” Of course, this ended up working out perfectly for him and his friends. They’re using him for cheap rent; he’s using them for a cheap breakup. It’s the passive-aggressive breakup, where you don’t bother telling somebody their girlfriend or boyfriend services are no longer wanted; you just make them so miserable they stop dreaming of you and start dreaming of U-Haul. Your boyfriend may have “yeah, okay, cool”-ed you on moving in together, but panicked when two toilet brushes became as one. Maybe one small step for man started looking like one giant step toward married-kind: your being the last woman he’ll ever have sex with and trading in his sport package wheels for a minivan. Maybe he’s “just not that into you,” or maybe all he’s good for is picking you up at 7 a few nights a week. Okay, fine, this is stuff a couple have to work through—or discover they can’t. But, thanks to what may have started as a misguided act of charity, he’s always had an out: “Why try to resolve the conflict when I can take advantage of these conveniently located human shields?”

Oh, has he offered to help you move? How sweet. You’ll be out of his life in half the time! And do go. It’s possible he’ll miss you and want you back. But, do you really want him? He’s been hostile, unloving and unkind. His “taking a break” is probably another easy way out: “Here, have some false hope!” (Anything to keep from mopping your tears off the linoleum.) Your big concern should be how you treated you. Like many 20-something women, you were probably too accommodating, from letting these people move in to hiding your unhappiness. The answer isn’t being difficult, but standing firm on what does and doesn’t work for you: Yes, to entering into a more committed relationship, no to managing a very small Holiday Inn. Maybe, to living in a house that’s haunted, but with more traditional “free spirits”—the kind that fly around in bedsheets saying “Wooo!” and when they do make stuff disappear, it isn’t always all your beer.

DESPERATELY REEKING SUSAN A friend wants to break up with a woman he’s started seeing because he can’t stand her smell (her natural scent; it’s not a hygiene issue). Friends say he’s being too nitpicky, and this is not a reason to break up. P.S. He isn’t someone who normally goes around being put off by people’s smell. –Sympathetic It’s hard enough to apply latex before sex without breaking the mood. Try telling your girlfriend that you just have to hose her down with Febreze. This friend of yours could love this woman’s heart, mind, and spirit, but that isn’t going to cut it if, for him, “a rose by any other name” is pretty much “goat vomit.” His friends shouldn’t blame him. Chances are, his genes make him do it. Research by biologist Claus Wedekind and others suggests we evolved to prefer the smell of a partner whose immune system is quite different from ours, probably so we’ll produce children with a broader set of defenses from parasites and diseases. Your friend needs to end it before this woman gets attached and, especially, before he loses it and blurts out, “What the hell’s that perfume you’re always wearing, Eau Did Your Septic Tank Back Up Again”?

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area. WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 5433550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

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Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 January 21–January 28, 2010

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ASHER, P/T, Msla. A local golf club is seeking part-time DISHWASHER. Primary responsibility will be washing dishes, cutlery, cooking utensils, pots & pans. Will also assist with light prep work and cleaning kitchen area. Work days will vary. Pay is 7.25 an hour to DOE. #2976815 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

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rivercityfamilyhealth.com

HOUSEKEEPER, F/T & P/T, Idaho. Picturesque lodge located 57 miles west of Missoula near the Powell Ranger Station in Idaho is seeking a part-time or full-time HOUSEKEEPER. Minimum starting rate $8 or depends on experience. There is housing available if desired: $125/month with shared common areas. Employer can offer a fuel supplement if employee wants or needs to commute from Missoula or Lolo area! Meals are provided during working shifts. Enjoy the fantastic scenery & recreational opportunities of the area during your free hours. Interviews and training to start immediately. #2976804 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 HOUSEKEEPER/SERVER, P/T & F/T, Idaho. Picturesque lodge located 57 miles west of Missoula near the Powell Ranger Station in Idaho is seeking a full-time HOUSEKEEPER/SERVER. No experience necessary. Minimum starting rate $8 or depends on experience. There is housing available if desired: $125/month with shared common areas. Employer can offer a fuel supplement if employee wants/needs to commute from Missoula or Lolo area! Meals are provided during working shifts. Enjoy the fantastic scenery & recreational opportunities of the area during your free hours. Interviews and training to start immediately. #2976809 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 JANITOR - NIGHTS, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking part-time NIGHT JANITOR(s) for private club. Work day would be 4-5 hours/day and could start as early as 7PM but on nights when functions occur, work may not start until midnight. Schedule is available two weeks in advance. Pay starts at $8.00/hour depending on experience. Must have reliable transportation to get to work. #2976816 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

JANITORIAL CREW WORKER, P/T, Msla. National cleaning service is seeking a part-time JANITOR to clean commercial buildings in Missoula. Background check will be conducted; may be subject to drug testing. Work is 15-20 hours per week 5-6 days per week, 5:00am to 8:00am. Must be able to work weekends. Schedule to be discussed at interview. Excellent advancement opportunity. Pay is $9.00-$10.00/hour depending on experience. #2976823 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 PROJECT DATA SPECIALIST, P/T, Msla, Employer is seeking a MODULAR BRIDGE PROJECT DATA SPECIALIST at a large fabrication plant. This is a part-time position of 15-25 hours/week with a potential for flexible schedule. Rate of pay is $10/hr. No benefits are included. Must have high school degree, GED, or equivalent work experience. Must be computer literate. Driver’s license is not required. #2976817 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ROOMS DIVISION MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Missoula business seeking a full-time ROOMS DIVISION MANAGER for their nationally known hotel. Work hrs & salary to be discussed at interview. #2976810 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

RV DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RVs, boats and trucks for Pay! Deliver to all 48 states and Canada. For details log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com SALES ASSOCIATE, F/T, Msla, A Missoula flooring business is seeking an enthusiastic SALES ASSOCIATE. Average salary of full time associates is $41,197/yr. The first 6 mo.; guaranteed base salary, then goes to 100% commission with a $1500.00 draw per month details to be discussed at interview. This company offers many great benefits including excellent compensation, 401K, major medical, paid vacations, great hours, a generous bonus structure, merchandise discounts, advancement opportunity & more! #2976808 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Missoula Aids Council Executive Director Exp. w./Grantwriting, nonprofit mgnt req. Beg. salary mid 30's Apps to be rec'd by Jan. 29 No phone calls please. Full job descrip. avail. at www.mtnonprofit.org

We’ve been looking for you. Loan Originator. PNC is an established, growing and successful financial services company, with businesses organized around mortgage, retail and commercial banking, asset management and funds processing. Recent acquisitions have enabled us to become the fifth largest bank by deposits in the U.S. PNC is committed to offering competitive benefits packages. As a Loan Originator, you will become part of PNC Mortgage, a specialized subsidiary of PNC, a full-service mortgage company that originates, acquires, markets and services residential loans. You will enjoy offering standard loan products to customers in addition to rehabilitation, remodeling, manufactured home and government loans. We’re looking for a talented sales professional with strong relationship-building skills, who will listen to and analyze client needs and respond with solid financial solutions. Qualifications include: · High school diploma or educational equivalent · Thorough understanding of underwriting criteria and guidelines · Mortgage banking background preferred with a proven track record of success · Ability to generate annual production volumes of $10 to $12+ million · Public speaking skills with the ability to make presentations

Visit pnc.jobs and search reference 62137BR. No agency resumes. PNC will not pay fees to any unsolicited third party agency or firm for this posting.

©2010 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. M/F/D/SO

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 January 21–January 28, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Philosopher David Pearce is committed to the abolition of suffering. While he acknowledges that we’ve got a long way to go before accomplishing that goal, he believes it’s possible, mostly with the help of technology. (More at http://bit.ly/8oTsCV.) More than two millennia ago, Buddha also articulated a vision for the cessation of suffering. His methods revolve around psychological and spiritual work. In light of your current astrological omens, Aries, I think it’s an excellent time to contribute to this noble enterprise. Your level of suffering is rather low these days, which could give you a natural boost if you set in motion some long-term strategies for reducing the pain that you experience and the pain that you cause. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I don’t mean to sound melodramatic, and I certainly don’t want to encourage you to do something foolish, but if you’ve been pondering the possibility of storming the castle, this would be a good time to do so. What exactly am I implying with the phrase “storming the castle”? Well, anything that involves a brave effort to fight your way into the command center of the empire … or a heroic attempt to take back the sanctuary you were exiled from … or a playful adventure in which you work your way into the heart of the king or queen. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Let us not underestimate the privileges of the mediocre,” wrote Friedrich Nietzsche. “Life becomes harder and harder as it approaches the heights—the coldness increases, the responsibility increases.” I bring these thoughts to your attention, Gemini, because in the next two months you’ll be in a prime position to renounce some of the “privileges” of your laziness. Please hear me out. I’m not saying that your lackadaisical attitudes are any worse than mine or anyone else’s. But there come times in everyone’s cycle when he or she has a chance to outgrow those lackadaisical attitudes so as to reach a higher level that’s both more demanding and more rewarding. This will be one of those times for you.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): According to a poll conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, there are as many people who give credence to astrology as call themselves Catholic. Believers in reincarnation are another sizable minority; their numbers equal those who put their faith in the Pope and in the planetary omens. Based on this evidence, we can safely conclude that at least some supposedly woo-woo notions are no longer just for woo-woo-ers. You can’t be considered a New Age weirdo or pagan infidel if you’re receptive to the possibility that the world is exceedingly mysterious and a long way from being all figured out. That’s good news for you Cancerians. According to my analysis, your belief system is ready to crack open and allow a surge—maybe even a flood—of new data to rush in.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): How are your wooing skills? Have you enhanced your seductiveness in any way during the last few months? Have you been working on boosting your ability to attract the bounty you need? I’m not just speaking about your power to corral love and sex and tenderness and thrills. I’m referring to the bigger project of enticing all the resources that would be helpful as you pursue your quest to become the best and brightest version of yourself. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to ramp up your efforts.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We should feel excited about the problems we confront and our ability to deal with them,” said philosopher Robert Anton Wilson. “Solving problems is one of the highest and most sensual of all our brain functions.” I wholeheartedly agree with him, which is why I expect that in the coming weeks you will be getting even smarter than you already are. The riddles you’ll be presented with will be especially sexy; the shifts in perspective you’ll be invited to initiate will give your imagination the equivalent of a deep-tissue massage.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dear Rob: I’ve been listening to your audio messages on my laptop in my bedroom. And I’ve noticed a curious thing: My cat goes NUTS trying to get to you. She never shows any interest in the other videos and music I play. But when your voice comes on, she does everything she can to try to get into my computer, to find the source of your voice. What’s going on? –Libralicious.” Dear Libralicious: Maybe it’s because in all versions of my recent Libra horoscopes, I’ve been putting subliminal messages designed to draw out and energize your tribe’s inner feline. It’s that time in your cycle when you have a mandate to be graceful and inscrutable and sleek.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This would be an excellent time for you to do a lot less of everything. You’re entering a phase when you can actually help your long-term goals by being less ambitious. The point is not to give up your drive to succeed, but rather just put it to sleep for a while. Let it recharge. Allow it to draw energy from the deeper psychic sources that it tends to get cut off from when it’s enmeshed in the frenzy of the daily rhythm. Do you have the courage to not work so much, not try so hard, and not push so relentlessly?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Cartoon character Homer Simpson is on record as saying that whenever he learns something new, it pushes some old stuff out of his brain. For example, when he took a course in home winemaking, he forgot how to drive. But I don’t see this being a problem for you as you enter the High-Intensity Educational Season, a time when your capacity to find and absorb new teachings will be at a peak. If you push hard to learn new lessons, you will certainly not cause the expulsion of old lessons. On the contrary, you’ll dramatically enhance the power and brightness of what you’ve already learned.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take what you really need, Capricorn, but don’t take what you just sort of want. That’s my advice to you. Haggle with life, yes, but insist only on the specific essentials and forgo irrelevant goodies. A similar principle applies as you seek the information you crave: Formulate precise questions that will win you the exact revelations that are necessary to help your cause and that won’t fill your beautiful head up with useless data.

 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I have a Piscean friend who does modern-day cave paintings. She hikes out to underground caverns and abandoned gold mines, where she creates murals on stony walls. Only a few friends know about her unusual hobby. She shows us photos of her work, but otherwise keeps it secret. She says it’s a pleasurable spiritual practice to offer these beautiful mysteries as a gift to the earth, without any expectation of getting recognition or money. I don’t normally recommend such behavior for Pisceans; in general, I believe you should err of the side of being somewhat self-promotional to compensate for your self-deprecating tendencies. But I do suggest that you try it in the coming weeks. I think you’ll conjure up an epiphany or two if you offer life your favors without worrying about whether they’ll be returned. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

MARKETPLACE

SERVICE ADVISOR. Looking for a Service Advisor with strong customer & communication skills for a busy Dodge Chrysler/Jeep Dealership in SW MT. We offer great benefit pkg. 5 day/week & great pay and retirement plan. Fax resume to: 406-556-9055 or email lgaliger@msn.com

(just off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) is looking for someone to teach workshops to beginners on mat cutting and mounting their artwork. If you are interested in this position or have any questions regarding our other kids & adults drawing and painting classes, please call 239-4460.

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-475-0876

STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

HIGH-TECH CAREER in U.S. Navy Nuclear Program. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-4376044

MONTANA CENTENNIAL GUNS. 3030 Winchester, 22 Winchester, 44 Magnum Ruger pistol all

TEACHER’S AIDES, P/T, Msla. Missoula area nonprofit is seeking part time TEACHER’S AIDES for 2 different shifts. Will assist teachers with implementation of planned lessons and classroom activities, while providing quality care for preschool aged children. Pay is $7.25/hour. CLOSES Friday 01/22/2010. #2976821 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 WEEKEND MOTEL MANAGER, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking WEEKEND MOTEL MANAGER to work Friday night starting at 6 P.M. through Sunday 6 P.M. Will be doing room rentals, make reservations, do record keeping, do money management, checking cleaned rooms. Prior motel management experience preferred. Will also do some computer software work. Will be paid by the day $90 to $95 per day DOE. Must be able to pass a background check and drug test. HIRING IMMEDIATELY. #2976813 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL AGENCY RELATIONS AND VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking an AGENCY RELATIONS & VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR for local nonprofit agency. Some travel req’d. Wage is $12.24/hr with benefits. Full job description is available at Missoula Job Service front desk. #2976822 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Finan cial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Msla, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION *Art & Craft Instructors * Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd. A-10 (located off North Reserve, behind Johnny Carinos) needs instructors to teach beginning Macrame and Weaving classes, as well as other art classes. If you are interested in teaching or taking the current drawing and painting classes for both adults and kids, call 239-4460. ELECTRICIAN CAREERS U.S. NAVY. Paid training, financial security, medical/dental, vacation, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 *Matting Instructor Needed* Shadow Mountain Art Studio, 2825 Stockyard Rd., A-10

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 January 21–January 28, 2010

MISC. GOODS

SPORTING

NUCLEAR POWER TRAINEE Career with potential. Paid training w/benefits plus $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 SPECIAL OPS U.S. Navy. Elite training. Daring missions. Gener ous pay/benefits. HS grads ages 17-34. Do you have what it takes? Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289

HEALTH CAREERS PCA/CNA, P/T & F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking qualified fulltime and part-time PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS or CERTIFIED NURSE AIDS. Need valid Montana driver’s license and own vehicle with current insurance to get to different job sites. Must also have a working phone. Part-time will be working up to 20 hours per week, full-time 36-40 hours per week. Will be working various shifts consisting of mornings, afternoons, evenings and some overnight. Starting pay will be $10.50 an hour. Medical and Dental offered after probationary period. Will be required to do a drug test and possibly a pre-employment physical upon hiring. #2976805 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Need Income? Laid off? Make a difference and earn great income. Distributors needed for expanding wellness co. Training provided. P/T or F/T. Call for interview. 406-273-4223 TRIP PLANNER - SALES, F/T, Msla. A dynamic Missoula company is seeking a highly motivated individual for a full-time TRIP PLANNER SALES to plan and ultimately sell our trips for South and Central America. Foreign travel experience is desired to Latin America, Africa, or Asia. We offer progressive compensation (Base plus commission for first year compensation of $28,000 to $40,000 Depending on experience and performance), health insurance, SIMPLE IRA, continuing education stipend, and travel benefits. DEADLINE: Wed, 01/27/10. #2976812 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068

ELECTRONICS KBGA Electronics Sale! High quality used recording equipment! Good Condition. Tascam 122 MKIII, D.A.T. Panasonic SV3700, Sony MDS E11, Otari MX-5050MK IV-2 B11. For Info/prices call Duane at (406)243-6758

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214

Pass It On Learning Center Preschool and Childcare Now Enrolling! Ages 1-5 546-8209 www.passitonlearningcenter.com

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252 NEW YEAR! NEW HOME!

MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. North Reserve Business Complex (Behind Johnny Carino's) unit k3 406.542.1202

SALES DNI IN LEWISTOWN is hiring fulltime salesperson. Unlimited income potential. Must be motivated to make money and have outgoing personality. Call Ryan at 406-5353455

#231/250, partly gold, signed. Model 1886 Browning 45-70 #238/1200. Factory mint condition. Entire collection $135,000 obo. 406-586-6502

COMPUTERS

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

MUSIC ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com AFFORDABLE WEDDING BAND FOR HIRE. “No Shame” plays classic rock. Book now, calendar filling fast. Call John @ 2071698 All strings 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. On the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Mon. 12-5pm, Tues.-Fri. 106pm, Sat. 11-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533 TOM CATMULL currently accepting beginning students for introductory guitar instruction. For questions call 543-9824 or email tom@tomcatmull.com WWW.GREGBOYD.COM One of the world’s premier music stores. (406) 327-9925.

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

Outlaw Music Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of the musical Jonas Brothers got married last month. Up until then, 22-year old Kevin Jonas was a virgin, having long ago pledged himself to abstinence until his wedding day. At Huffingtonpost.com, humorist Andy Borowitz reported that when Jonas and his bride returned from their honeymoon, he had some shocking news. “To be honest, sex was not worth the wait,” Borowitz quoted Jonas as saying. “After we did it, I was kind of like, that’s it?” I haven’t been able to verify that Jonas actually said what Borowitz claims, but if it’s true, I must protest. How could Jonas reach such a definitive conclusion based on so little experience? Wouldn’t it be wise to consider the possibility that over time he might uncover secrets and plumb mysteries that are unknown to him in his unripe state? Learn from his apparent mistake, Aquarius. In the coming weeks, cultivate a humble, innocent, curious attitude not just about sex, but about everything.

EMPLOYMENT

WANTED TO BUY CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201


BE MY VALENTINE

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721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments

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406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

STORAGE SHEDS

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Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Custom Passivhaus Bldg • Solar Retrofitting • Envelope Retrofitting

Water Heater

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546-5541

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060

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Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

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Rivera Works, LLC All-around Handyman & Home Improvement Services

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Toddler & Preschool openings.

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Montana Bathroom Solutions Custom Bathroom Remodel & Design

Zach Long 544-6264

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MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula County Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, until 10:00 AM, on February 4, 2010 and will then be opened and publicly read in the Public Works Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: APPROXIMATELY 3 MILES OF BIKE/PEDESTRIAN PATH AND APPURTENANCES FROM FLYNN LANE TO COTE LANE. APPURTENANCES INC- LUDE SIGNAGE, MARKINGS, ADA RELATED IMPROVEMENT, AND CULVERTS. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project

Manual addressed to Missoula County Public Works, attention Tim Elsea, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for Missoula County Public Works Project 09-5527 Mullan Road Bike/Pedestrian Path”. The envelopes shall also be plainly marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number and the following words: Federal Aid Project #: ARRA 8123(1) Project Name: Mullan Road Bike/Pedestrian Path MDT UPN: 6999. The contract documents consisting of Plans and Specifications (Proposal) may be examined or obtained at the Engineer’s office: TerritorialLandworks, Inc.; 620 Addison, PO Box 3851; Missoula, MT 59806. The bid proposal will be available for a

deposit of $60.00 per set, which is not refundable. A $10.00 shipping and handling fee will be charged if plans are mailed. In addition, the bid proposal may also be examined at the following locations: Missoula Plans Exchange (406) 549-5002 Flathead Builders Exchange (406) 755-5888 Helena Plans Report (406) 442-4162. Persons or firms desiring to qualify or bid on this construction on the basis of a joint venture shall declare their intention by executing a Declaration of Joint Venture and Power of Attorney. Joint Venture affidavits must be included with the Bid Proposal. There will be a non-mandatory Pre-bid Conference at 10:00 AM January 15th, 2010. Interested Contractors are encouraged to attend and shall convene at MSLACO Public Works at the

above said time. Contractors and any of the Contractors’ subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA39-9-211. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-800556-6694. Contractors are required to have registered with the DLI prior to executing the contract. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with Missoula County Business Licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by Contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work

shall be paid wages at rates as set out in the bid proposal. Any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement is subject to all appropriate Federal Laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Missoula County Public Works hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this invitation; disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation. The Disadvantaged Business Enterprises’ contract goals are 0% In accordance with Section 49-3-207, MCA, Contractors agree that for this contract all hiring will be made on the basis of merit and qualifications and that there will be no discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, political

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 January 21–January 28, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES ideas, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental disability, or national origin by the persons performing the contract. Each bid proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, Bank Money Order, Bank Draft, or Bid Bond payable to Missoula County Public Works, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful bidder(s) shall furnish an approved Performance Bond and a labor and materials Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a Certificate(s) of that insurance

ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

829-6394

NOW HIRING

EROTIC Entertainment

406-543-1851 FALLING ANGELS ESCORT Now Hiring Women In Missoula and Kalispell.

546-0486

AUTO IMPORTS ‘02 TDI VW Jetta Wagon. Must sell. $8,000. New Tires & snow tires on rims. 50 mpg HWY. 170K. Excellent condition. Laura 363-6627.

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

shall be provided prior to issuance of the Notice to Proceed. And objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with Missoula County prior to the bid opening at 10:00 AM on February 4th, 2010. Attn: Tim Elsea, Assistant Director of Public Works. PUBLICATION NOTICE DATES: Missoula Independent: January 7th, 14th, 21st, 2010. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified on the first page in this Invitation to Bid. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period not to exceed sixty (60) days, & to accept the bid, which is in the best interests of Missoula County. Missoula County Public Works provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the County. To request accommodation, contact Tim Elsea at Missoula County Public Works 406258-3773. Missoula County Public Works is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Published in Missoula, Montana, this 4th day of January, 2010. Territorial-Landworks, Inc. P.O. Box 3851, Missoula, MT 59806 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: Name of road if any: A portion of Lewis & Clark Drive and a portion of a petitioned county road referred to as the Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs Road. And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit as: A portion of Lewis & Clark Drive and a portion of a petitioned county road referred to as the Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs Road. Attached is a map showing the location of the properties that would be affected by the abandonment of Lewis & Clark Drive and the portion of the 1895 Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs road, and the portions proposed to be abandoned. Petitioners request the abandonment of the road from the east boundary of Tract 2 of COS 5520, through Parcels A&B of COS 2441, Tracts 1 and 2 of COS 2937, and through property owned by William M. and A. Ramona Holt to U.S. Highway 12. The property owners have legal access for their properties to Highway 12. See attached copies of COS 2937, COS 5520 and COS 2441. The exact location of Lewis & Clark Drive and the 1895 Lolo to Lolo Hot Springs road through these properties is unknown. According to Missoula County Public Works records, the Road Inventory states that Lewis & Clark Drive only extends 699 feet west of its intersection with Highway 93 South. That distance does not reach the portion of the road that is proposed for abandonment. According to the records, a road was established by the County in June of 1895 as a “wagon road from Smith’s ranch at (sic) mouth of Lolo Creek to the Lolo Hot Springs.” See Road Plat Book A, page 141 and Commissioner’s Journal, Book G pages 247 and 250 (April & June 1895) attached hereto. Apparently, part of this road is now known as Lewis & Clark Drive. See Surveyor’s Note to attached COS 5520. The abandonment of this county road is necessary & advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The road is not used by the public. 2. The location of the road is unknown or unclear. 3. The road is not maintained by Missoula County. (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor., Missoula MT) A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on February 3, 2010 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT. Interested parties are to be present at that time to

be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 By Kim Cox , Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder/ Elections 406) 258-3241. Date: January 6, 2010 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 2, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. Missoula County Growth Policy 2005 Update: Amendments proposed Due to changes in state law, the Missoula County Rural Initiatives Office has been directed to develop minor amendments to the County’s 2005 Growth Policy dealing with sand and gravel extraction and the Wildland Urban Interface. The amendments are proposed to be adopted as an appendix to the Growth Policy after review by the Planning Board and the County Commissioners through the public hearing process. The Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the proposed amendments on February 2, 2010 for the purpose of making a recommendation on the amendments to the Board of County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will conduct public hearings on this item on dates yet to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The amendments are now available for public and agency review and can be obtained at the Rural Initiatives office or on-line at www.co.missoula. mt.us/rural or via email at: ri@co.missoula.mt.us . Call 258-3432 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. Comments should be directed to ri@co.missoula.mt.us or Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. If anyone atten ding any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hrs advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning & Grants will provide auxiliary aids & services. Missoula County Government SHERIFF’S SALE COMMUNITY BANKMISSOULA, INC., a Mon tana corporation Plaintiff Against KENNETH REIBER, SUS AN J. KNIGHT, and ELK SPRINGS RANCH, INC., Defen dants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 11th day of February A.D., 2010, at Ten o’clock A.M., at the front door of the Court House, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Tract 2 of Certificate of Survey No. 6001, located in the SW1/4 of Section 36, Township 11 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, MT. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 21st day of January A.D., 2010. MICHAEL R. McMEEKINSheriff of Missoula County, Montana By Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-09-9 Dept. No. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps, III CITATION IN THE MATTER OF, J.B.M., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: ANNIE PLENKOVICH YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition has been filed in the above-entitled Court by the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (hereinafter DPHHS), 2677 Palmer St., Ste. 300, Missoula, MT 59808 requesting that DPHHS be granted Permanent Legal Custody and Termination of your Parental Rights to the above named child, J.B.M. NOW, THEREFORE, YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear on the 15 day of March, 2010 at 3:00 o’clock p.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Missoula County Courthouse in Missoula, Montana then and there to show cause, if any

you may have, why said Petition should not be granted, and why DPHHS should not be awarded Permanent Legal Custody of J.B.M., with the right to consent to his adoption. J.B.M. was born on: January 2, 2009 in Missoula, Montana. You have the right to be represented by an attorney in these proceedings. If you are unable to afford an attorney, you have the right to ask the Court to appoint an attorney to represent you. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in the above-named children, which denial may result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the petition. A copy of the Petition is filed with the Clerk of District Court in Missoula County: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Robert L. Deschamps, III, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 12 day of January, 2010. /s/ Robert L. Deschamps, III. HON. ROBERT L. DESCHAMPS III, District Court Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-09-211 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BETTE JOAN HAFFNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Pat Haffner and Lee Koch have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the above named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Pat Haffner and Lee Koch, Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of December, 2009. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C. 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-10-8 Dept. No. 2 IN RE THE ESTATE OF DARLENE C. NYQUIST, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Aaron Morse has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Aaron Morse, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan G. Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 12th day of January, 2010. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C. 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234. /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-1529 Honorable Ed McLean Presiding. NOTICE OF HEARING ON CHANGE OF NAME In the Matter of the name Change of Taylor Gibbs Noland, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Taylor Gibbs Noland to Taylor Britton Gibbs. The hearing will be on 2/10/2010 at 1:30 p.m.. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated 12/21/09 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court, By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-1530 Honorable Ed McLean Presiding. NOTICE OF HEARING ON CHANGE OF NAME In the Matter of the name Change of Lisa Christina Bruce, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Lisa Christina Bruce to Lisa Christina Gibbs. The hearing will be on 2/10/2010 at 1:30 p.m.. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated 12/21/09 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court, By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate Case No. DP-09-196 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of EUGENE F. KUEHNLE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the abovenamed estate. All person having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Co-Personal Representatives, Jay H. Kuehnle and Diana B. Kuehnle, return receipt requested, at 5605 Lavoie Lane, Missoula, Montana 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 30th day of November, 2009. /s/ Jay Kuehnle /s/ Diana B. Kuehnle, CoPersonal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 January 21–January 28, 2010

Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-10-6 Honorable John W. Larson, Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ASTRID B. BATCHELDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kelly S. Batchelder, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, P.L.L.P., PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 8th day of January, 2010. /s/ Kelly S. Batchelder, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DR-09-809 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION IN RE THE CUSTODY OF JIN Y. BURNS, Petitioner, and BENNY DAVID BURNS, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: YOU, THE RESPONDENT, ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Amended Petition in this action which is filed in the office of the abovenamed Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Petitioner’s attorney within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you be default, for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. GIVEN under my hand this 11th day of January, 2010 at the hour of 10:27 o’clock a.m. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court (SEAL) By: Maria A. Cassidy, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate Case No. DP-10-4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of HELEN HARBECK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, William James Lucas, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 7th day of January, 2010. /s/ William James Lucas, Personal Representative MONTANA TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, COUNTY OF LAKE Probate No. DP-09-61 Department 2001 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT HOLLENSTEINER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Fredrick LeRoy “Lee” Artis, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o SOL & WOLFE Law Firm, PLLP at 101 East Broadway #300, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court at Lake County Courthouse, 106 Fourth Avenue East, Polson, Montana 59860. DATED this 27th day of December, 2009. /s/ Fredrick LeRoy “Lee” Artis c/o SOL & WOLFE Law Firm, PLLP, 101 East Broadway #300, Missoula, MT 59802 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER MONTANA DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated December 22, 2004 Grantor: Charlie Beigarten, 501 South First Street, Hamilton, Montana 59840 Charlie Beigarten, 2079 Pulsar Avenue, Livermore, California 94550. Original Trustee: First Montana Title Company of Hamilton, Inc., 250 West Main Street, Hamilton, Montana 59840. Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula, P.O. Box 4506, Missoula, Montana 59806. Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law, Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC, P.O. Box 8957, Missoula, Montana 59807- -8957. Date and Place of Recordation: January 3, 2005 as Document No. 547234, Records of Ravalli County, Montana. The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 4th day of May, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. in front of the Ravalli County Clerk and Recorder’s Office, 215 South Fourth Street, Suite C, Hamilton, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the abovenamed Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: Lots 1, 2, 3, 4

and 5, Block 12, Southside Addition to Hamilton, Ravalli County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Excepting from said Lots 1, 2 and 3, the west 50 feet thereof as recorded in Book 141 of Deeds, page 930. Recording Reference: Book 213 of Deeds, page 543. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 501 South First Street, Hamilton, Montana 59840. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the abovenamed Grantor, and all of his successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the Deed of Trust in the amount of Two Thousand Five Hundred Eighty-six and 38/100ths Dollars ($2,586.38) for the months of August 2009 through November 9, 2009; together with late charges in the amount of Three Hundred Fifty Dollars ($350.00).. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Two Hundred Nineteen Thousand Eight Hundred Thirtynine and 47/100ths Dollars ($219,839.47), plus interest thereon through November 9, 2009, at the rate of 8.11% in the amount of Three Thousand Four Hundred Sixty-nine and 44/100ths Dollars ($3,469.44) (Federal Home Loan Bank rate plus 3.5%); plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Fortyeight and 84/100ths Dollars ($48.84); plus all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law.. DATED this 24th day of November, 2009. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC, P.O. Box 8957, Missoula, Montana 59807 -8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 24th day of November, 2009, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. /s/ Roxie Hausauer ( Notary Public for the State of Montana. (NOTARIAL SEAL)) Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 17, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $739,688.24. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 29, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access

sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/18/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200821741, Bk. 826, Pg. 925, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Eldon M. Little and Hailey N. Little, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Guild Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Unit B of Rochepofahlchz Condominium, a residential condominium complex as shown and defined in the Condominium Declaration of the Montana Unit Ownership Act, and survey map and set of plans, as recorded on August 5, 2008 as CONDO000180 in the records of Missoula County, Montana and according to the Condominium Declaration and together with its exhibits as recorded on August 5, 2008 in Book 824 of Micro Records at Page 265 and By-laws if said Condominium recorded on August 5, 2008 in Book 824 of Micro Records at Page 269. Together with an undivided 50% interest in the general common elements, areas and facilities appertaining to said unit, as defined in the Declaration and defined in the plan’s specifications attached thereto. Together with such Unit’s interest in the limited common elements appertaining to such Unit as set forth and defined in the Declaration and the plans and exhibit attached thereto. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 18, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $148,456.74. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $141,325.30, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 29, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.03582) 1002.138831-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/27/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200512679, Bk 753, Pg 623, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Eric J. Zarn, Connie Zarn, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Home Mortgage was Beneficiary and Stewart Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3 in Block 2 of West View Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. By written instrument ,


PUBLIC NOTICES beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 18, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $158,932.52. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $154,146.27, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 30, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.08462) 1002.139086-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $719,705.17. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the

Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE .SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 5 OF MOUNTAIN SHADOWS SUBDIVISION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Willa R Carr Lande and Richard L Lande, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 27, 2006 and Recorded on October 02, 2006 under Document # 200625151, in Bk-784, Pg-400. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,439.76, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 31, 2009 is $309,766.38 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $8044.75, late charges in the amount of $442.55, escrow advances of $-582.20 and expenses advanced of $137.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $53.04 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor,

COPPERSTONE STOR-ALL will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 122, 213, 214, 205, 124, 136, K139 and K140. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, vehicles & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, February 1st, 2010 by appt only by calling (406) 7287867. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 8700 Roller Coaster Rd, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAIN ED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/02/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3397898 01/07/2010, 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Tract A1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6090, located in the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter (NE1/4SE1/4SE1/4) of Section 23, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Stuart Williams, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 15, 2001 and recorded October 22, 2001 at 4:30 o’clock P.M., in Book 669, Page 1585, under Document No. 200126283. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,082.96, beginning January 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 21, 2009 is $79,893.07 principal, interest at the rate of 7.625% now totaling $2872.05, late charges in the amount of $234.42, escrow advances of $1083.41, and other fees and expenses advanced of $65.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.68 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent 50, 82, for the following units:5 85, 137, 159, 304, 369, 370, 477. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be viewed starting Monday, January 25, 2010 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, January 28, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 2, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and

Missoula County Government

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, February 16, 2010, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. The Target Range Neighborhood Plan Considera tion of the proposed TARGET RANGE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN as an amendment to the 2005 MISSOULA COUNTY GROWTH POLICY. The Target Range Neighborhood Plan is a document created by the Target Range Neighborhood Planning Committee in consultation with the Office of Planning and Grants. The Neighborhood Plan addresses key resources and assets in the neighborhood. The plan contains strategies and implementation tools that manage change and growth within the Target Range neighborhood. Plan sections include the Natural Environment and Human Envi-ronment. See Map G for the Tar-get Range Study Area (the area affected by this amendment).

The Board of County Commissioners and the Missoula City Council will conduct public hearings on this item on dates yet to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The draft plan is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants or online at ftp://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgftp/Urban/TROH/Targ etRange/TargetRangeNeighborPlan1 22309.pdf. Call 258-4657 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The Office of Planning and Grants will provide auxiliary aids and services.

acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3397631 01/07/2010, 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT D-1-B-A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3044, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. James D Otto, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 17, 2007 and Recorded on January 22, 2007 under Document # 200701612, in Bk-790, Pg-1150. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $679.77, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 19, 2009 is $87,298.17 principal, interest at the rate of

Missoula County Government

NOTICE OF HEARING

The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the following project: 1. Seeley Lake Regional Plan Update. The Plan would be adopted as an area-specific amendment to the County's Growth Policy. The intention is to zone in accordance with the Plan’s land use designations soon after Plan adoption. After public hearings from June through October 2009, the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board recommended adoption of the Plan update with additional changes. The October 2009 Seeley Lake Regional Plan UpdatePlanning Board Draft is available for review at www.co. missoula.mt.us/rural. See Map A for the Seeley Lake Regional Plan Area (the area affected by this amendment). The County Commissioners will conduct their hearing to take public comment on

the Plan Update in Seeley Lake on Thursday February 4 at 6 p.m. at the Seeley Lake Elementary School, 200 School Lane. Additional public meetings to consider the Plan Update may be held in Seeley Lake and/or in Missoula at times and dates to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. Hard copies of the draft plan are on file in Seeley Lake at the Barn and High School, and in Missoula at the County Commissioners Office, Rural Initiatives Office, and the Office of Planning and Grants. CD copies are available through the Rural Initiatives Office, 258-3432. The public comment file is also available for review at the Rural Initiatives Office. Comments may be directed to the Missoula Board of County Commissioners, c/o Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or via email: ri@co.missoula.mt.us If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

d s

"That Bowls"--football overload!

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Begins to like, with "to" 6 It goes with you after a sneeze? 11 Harley Davidson's stock ticker symbol, appropriately 14 Sound covering an expletive 15 Get ready for a bodybuilders' competition 16 Bruins great Bobby 17 Party in San Antonio? 19 ___-tzu (Chinese philosopher) 20 Palindromic precious metal in Panama 21 Roll-on places 23 Let the moon show? 28 "The Dude ___" ("The Big Lebowski" line) 29 Eerie glows 30 House of Commons figs. 32 ___-Locka, Florida 33 Pitt who played Benjamin Button 34 Michael Jackson video set in a pool hall 36 European designer's monogram 39 Put an embargo on 40 Gives refuge to 41 ___ Speedwagon 42 Math class with equations: abbr. 43 Play opener 44 Flour mixture used to thicken soup 45 Ltr. holder 47 5th or Mad., e.g. 48 "Siddhartha" author 49 Sarah Palin et al.? 52 Nervy quality 54 State at the "Heart of Dixie" 56 "Burn Notice" channel 57 Tater ___ (lunchroom nugget) 58 Carnival food, as you might as well call it? 64 "___ Trippin' " (2008 Snoop Dogg album) 65 Gives it a "go"? 66 Go straight to the courthouse to wed, perhaps 67 Damascus's country: abbr. 68 George of "Cheers" 69 Throat bacteria, for short

1 Ring org. with a "Minimumweight" category (less than 105 pounds) 2 The whole shootin' match 3 Actor Stephen of "V for Vendetta" 4 It's for scribbling 5 Newscast segment 6 "Sk8er ___" (Avril Lavigne hit) 7 Detector detection, ostensibly 8 Lanchester of "Bride of Frankenstein" 9 Kama ___ 10 Automated programs that send junk e-mail 11 Flower given on Mother's Day, perhaps? 12 Speak to one's countrymen 13 "Disgusting!" 18 In support of 22 "Great Expectations" boy 23 "Yabba ___ doo!" 24 Far from the city 25 Chomper with a peachy hue? 26 Code of silence in Puzo novels 27 Location in "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" 31 High on the ganja 34 Anti-___ hand soap 35 Indignation 37 His 1960 best-seller had only 50 different words 38 They're usually cut thin at the deli 40 Sweat big-time over something 44 French automaker currently allied with Nissan 46 Stunted end 48 Bad sounds from the house 49 Motel postings 50 The end of studying? 51 "Up in ___" (Cheech & Chong movie) 53 Derringer, e.g. 55 ___ impasse 59 The ___-Bol man (classic TV ad character) 60 East, in Germany 61 "Tarnsman of ___" (sci-fi book that launched an ongoing series) 62 Tarzan raiser 63 Sales agt.

Last week’s solution

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0451

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 January 21–January 28, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES 6.250% now totaling $2,556.16, late charges in the amount of $169.90, escrow advances of $593.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $92.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $14.95 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property

to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation

SUSTAINAFIEDS

secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTADEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/02/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared

Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3397817 01/07/2010, 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 17 and 18 in Block 1 of Hellgate Pines Addition No. 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof

Stephen Alfred Johnson and Lisa A Johnson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Allen L Karell, Esq, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Aames Funding Corporation DBA Aames Home Loan, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 12, 2002 and recorded on December 18, 2002 in Book 695, Page 802, under Document No. 200237760. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank nka as Bank of New York Trust Company NA as trustee for SASCO Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-AM1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of

$1,341.26, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 19, 2009 is $107,591.07 principal, interest at the rate of 9.620000% now totaling $18061.02, escrow advances of $7305.05, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3299.74, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be

added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the

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Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 January 21–January 28, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTADEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 3, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 11/3/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Miranda Marx Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 05/05/2015 ASAP# 3403437 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF MALONEY RANCH PHASE VIII, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: 3878703 Anatoly A. Levchenko and Larisa A. Levchenko, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 3, 2008 and Recorded on November 7, 2008 under Document # 200825115, in Book 829, Page 102. The beneficial interest is currently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,731.60, beginning May 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of

October 18, 2009 is $392,093.74 principal, interest at the rate of 5.75% now totaling $12,322.74, late charges in the amount of $574.55, and other fees and expenses advanced of $51.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $61.77 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, suc-

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Office space on the Hip Strip. Includes furnishings, utilities, access to large community space, kitchen and bathroom facilities, and parking. $200/mo. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center 543-3955.

cessor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTADEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 4, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On November 4, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3403429 01/14/2010, 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 16, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 33 in Block 2 of El Mar Estates Phase IV, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Brett Huston and Stacey Huston, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated November 9, 2005 and Recorded November 21, 2005 in Book 764, Page 930, under Document No. 200530946. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-1. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,367.69, beginning March 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 27, 2009

is $133,076.40 principal, interest at the rate of 9.125% now totaling $20,149.50, late charges in the amount of $932.23, escrow advances of $4,905.27 and other fees and expenses advanced of $7,187.28, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.62 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. , Beneficiary, has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the

sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On November 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3408187 01/21/2010, 01/28/2010, 02/04/2010

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1024 Stephens #8 2bd/1ba, offstreet parking, new furnace, storage $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1509 10th: 1-bedroom, dining area, on-site laundry, deck, heat & cable paid, $625, GCPM, 5496106, gcpm-mt.com 2303 Summit, 3bd 3ba LARGE HOME, new carpet & paint, pool table room, deck, W/D, 2 bonus rms, views, 2 fireplaces. $1,295 3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$570 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990

3 bedroom Northside house 3 Bd 1.5 ba Northside home. Large fenced yard,w/d hookups, 2 car garage, established garden, & fruit trees. Pets Ok! $1200/mo + dpst. Grbg/Sewer paid. 529-2500 or 529-2503 for more info. Available Jan. 2010

4202 Bordeaux, 2bd 2ba NEWER HOME, wood floors, unfinished basement, W/D hkps, dishwasher, microwave, ceiling fan, yard. $895

3 bd, 2 ba house. Hardwood floors, dishwasher, new W/D, garage. Near UM. No pets $1100. 406-425-2278

720 Turner St. – ‘A’ 3bd/ 1.5 ba $695 Off-street parking, hkps, pet?

FREE Foreclosure Listings! Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-817-5290

721 Palmer. 3 bd. 1 ba. gas heat w/d hookup and off street parking. Rent $750 721-8990 Quiet, private, partly furnished 1 bdrm. 8 miles from town with river view. No smoking, no pets, very responsible. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV, highspeed Internet. Available soon. Taking apps. now. 273-2382 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 4 0 6 - 4 9 3 - 1 3 4 9 jenniferplum@live.com Rent the “Yellow Coconut” — Walk to U, HipStrip, Dwtn, from charming U area bungalow. 2 apts. and

FREE FORECLOSURE LISTINGS. Over 400,000 properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call NOW! 1-800-283-9034

ROOMMATES One bdrm available in cozy, newer home, quiet East. Missoula neighborhood. Share ba. w/one, reasonable energy with two. Includes: w/d, off-street parking, W/S/G. Garage, off street parking, & big closets! Close to river, Mountain Line, 1.5 miles from campus. $350/mo. Call 978-314-0653. Room For Rent Roommate Needed. $400/mo. Nice Spacious

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Spacious, Newer 3BD/2 BA Home • W/D Included • Pets on approval • $995/month

Plum Property

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Great Space Main St. Historic Building

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UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

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Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson, president

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 January 21–January 28, 2010


REAL ESTATE HOMES 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $129,900. MLS# 906610. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Msg: 12594 for pics 2 bdrm, 2 bath one level home with garage, central air, fenced yard, u/ground sprinkling and patio. $169,500 MLS# 908650 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 www.missoulahomesonline.com Text: 44133 Msg:12889 for pics 2 Bedroom ground level condo with patio and private backyard. Convenient and economical living. One owner—immaculate. New to market! 2904 Tina Avenue #203. MLS# 908154. $145,000 JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 2 bd/1 ba Mobile Home on four fenced acres. Great for horses. Newer carpet and paint. Large detached double garage, plenty of out buildings for storage. Owner will finance with 20% dpwn OAC. $169,900. MLS# 905771. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@winder mere.com. Text:44133 Msg:12884 for pics 3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com 4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Beautifully remodeled and updated home with build-outs and sky lights. 3 bedroom 2 bathroom. $229,900. Pat McCormick 240SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Featured Listing! Turn Key 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath condo w/garage. Central location. $156,000. MLS#908062. 1816 #D

Wyoming, Missoula. Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential MT. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bd/2 ba/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS# 903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 NEW LISTING! 4Bed/2.5Bath/ double garage. On a cul-de-sac in Grant Creek Prospect Park. 5501 Bonanza, Missoula. $319,900. MLS#908771. Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com One owner-built 10 yrs ago, 5 acres on a branch of Clark Fork. Trout & ducks. House sits toward water. Private showings only. $679,999. MLS# 906926. Joy Earls@windermere.com 531-9811 Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Price Drastically Reduced!! 5 bed, 4 bath & 2 car garage. 4666 Scott Allen Dr. • WAS $475,000, NOW ONLY $419,000 w/ $12,000 buyer’s incentive if UC by 1/10/09 • MLS#907272 JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 Price Reduction! Beautiful home with views of the Mission Mountains! 4BD/2BA. Hard wood floors, fireplace, loft over the family room, basement, large carport and private deck! $199,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

LAND 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder avail-

able. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home.

finding your PERFECT house and YOU.

406.239.2049

Joy Earls SOLD 1/10 2904 Tina Ave #203 $145,000 • MLS#980145

SOLD 12/09 6549 Kiki Court, Msla $299,900 • MLS#808566

SOLD 11/09 1852 S. 8th West $179,900 • MLS#904867

SOLD 10/09 737 Evans, 1 block to U $399,870 • MLS#902594

COMMERCIAL 3 Quizno’s Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! Major Price reduction now $580,000! May be purchased separately. Missoula, MT. Hutton Ranch also availableCall Loubelle for info: 240-0753, 543-4412 or Fidelity Real Estate 721-1840. 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $324,900 MLS# 901478 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595

Price Drastically Reduced!!

4666 Scott Allen Drive • MLS#907272 Views of Missoula. 2 fireplaces. Spacious yard, vinyl siding & deck w/ beautiful landscaping & hot tub! NOW ONLY $419,000

Call me for more good values on Missoula area homes & investments.

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com

Real Change is in the AIR!!

DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Is rebranding to

Missoula Tanning Salon Major Price Reduction - Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

Broker/Owner

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com • Affordable one level living close to park • 2 bed / 2 bath / 2 car garage • Fenced yard w/patio, UG sprinkler • Updated lighting & paint • $169,500 • MLS#908650 Text:44133 Message: 12889 for pics

• Bonner area 5 Bed / 2 Bath on 2 acres • Large kitchen w/ island • Chain link fence in front yard • Private deck in back, mature trees • $219,900 • MLS#906641 Text:44133 Message: 12591 for pics

• 3Bed/2 Bath/2 Car Garage • Lg kitchen, hickory cabinets • In floor radiant heat, fireplace • Fenced and landscaped yard • $234,000 • MLS# 10000024 Text:44133 Message: 12887 for pics

• 4 Bed/3 bath cedar home on 11 acres • Private location with lots of trees • 28 x 28 garage / large parking lot • Near Potomac with easy access • $349,900 • MLS#906884 Text:44133 Message:12886 for pic

1839 W. Central • $189,900 Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900 Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Home has been well cared for, many updates. It is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large garage plus a huge storage shed. There is a master bedroom, 2 additional bedrooms. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. MLS# 907496

Rare income producing property in town. Call Beverly Kiker @ Pru dential Missoula. (406) 544-0708

OUT OF TOWN

I love being a Buyer's Agent, negotiating the best deal for

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com Nice 1+ acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. Close to fishing, golfing, park and shopping on Reserve. Sale contingent of final plat approval. $99,999. MLS# 908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics

Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 370-7689, Prudential Missoula.

1230 N. First St Hamilton, MT 59840 406.363.4450

1500 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59808 406.549.3353

www.GreaterMontanaRE.com

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful

Beautiful home w/ beautiful views PRICE REDUCTION! MLS # 907106 • $199,000 4 BD, 2 BA 2,097 sq.ft with hardwood floors, cozy fireplace, loft area over family room & a wonderful private deck. Just a short drive from Missoula. www.SaintMarysLakeRoad.com

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 822.7653 1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 January 21–January 28, 2010

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

www.YourMT.com


REAL ESTATE

358 Mari Court, Msla $305,900 • MLS# 908482 Beautiful Home Granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, stone fireplace. Built-in lockers off garage entrance, lots of storage, 2 hot water heaters, RV pad, RV dump and a hot & cold water spicket, backyard adjourns a park.

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $269,900 • MLS# 908640 Large 5 BD Home 5BD/2BA home in a great neighborhood with a 2 car garage. Lots of storage, finished basement, kitchen updates.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

370.7689 priscillabrockmeyer.com

Level Lot in Wonderful Rattlesnake Neighborhood end of cul-de-sac location with privacy in the heart of the Rattlesnake. Bring your house plans. Lot D; 13,956 sq ft MLS#10000174 • $165,000

Beautiful Rattlesnake gradually sloped building lot with end of the road privacy. View of Lolo Peak & surrounding hills. Bring your house plans! Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft MLS#10000172 • $165,000

Pat McCormick •

406.240.7653

pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

115A Tyler Way, Lolo $129,900

Darling 2 bd condo located in Lolo, close to shopping and schools. This is an end unit! Pergo floors, new tiled bathroom floor, new deck off of living room, upgraded light fixtures, bath fixtures and vanity. Outside storage off of deck. Access to large yard. Covered parking in the front!

See more pictures at: www.115ATylerway.com For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 January 21–January 28, 2010


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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


ZANE'S WORLD VOLUNTEER PARTY AND FUNDRAISER SUNDAY, JANUARY 24TH AT BIGA PIZZA

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WORLD HEADQUARTERS CDs - Gifts - Jewelry - Clothing

237 Blain e • 542-0077

World Headquarters All compact discs, new & used $2 off All Jewelry 25% off All Cards, Journals & Paper Products 25% off All Toys 25% off • All Clothing 25% off All Body Products 25% off All Chocolates & Candies 25% off All Posters & Art 25% off

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Missoula Independent