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MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 1 • Jan. 7–Jan. 14, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Is recent ruling the last word on death with dignity? Etc.: Downtown looks to regroup after Macy’s closes up shop Scope: Jim Todd’s woodprint portraits cut to the core


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

Vol. 21, No. 1 • Jan. 7–Jan. 14, 2010

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Is recent ruling the last word on death with dignity? Etc.: Downtown looks to regroup after Macy’s closes up shop Scope: Jim Todd’s woodprint portraits cut to the core


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Page 2 January 7–January 14, 2010

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nside Cover Story

Cover photo by Emily Underwood

Of the roughly 8,000-member Northern Arapaho tribe, there are fewer than 250 fluent speakers left, and all are over the age of 55. Those numbers don’t bode well for University of Montana professor Stephen Neyooxet Greymorning, who has worked for 17 years on the Wind River Reservation to help save the tribe’s language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

News Letters All hail Denise Juneau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Week in Review New coach, new council and a shootout . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Briefs Treasure State Bank, First Night Idol and human waste . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Etc. Macy’s becomes the canary in the coal mine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Up Front Ruling not the last word on physician-assisted death . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Ochenski A fantastical look at what could be in 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Writers on the Range Column about weather leads to reporter’s exit . . . . . .11 Agenda Learning about cap and trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

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Missoula Independent

Page 3 January 7–January 14, 2010


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday morning outside of Break Espresso on N. Higgins Avenue.

Q:

The Montana Supreme Court decided last week that state law doesn’t impede physician-assisted death. Do you think physician-assisted death should continue, and why? Follow-up: What’s another issue you’d like to see debated in front of the state Supreme Court?

Ed Shaw: I think we should join Washington and Oregon in supporting the individual’s right to die. Bank on it: Corporate bankruptcy. You shouldn’t be able to go bankrupt and keep your assets. It’s a big scam.

Kurt Werst: Yes. I think when people reach that point they should have the option to end their life in a dignified manner and not suffer anymore. Drawing a blank: I can’t think of anything.

Thank you, Juneau I want to publicly thank State Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau for her “no” vote at the December Land Board hearing on leasing the Otter Creek coal tracts (see “Coal in their stockings,” Dec. 24, 2009). I am a former teacher in Birney, Ashland, Lame Deer and Sheridan, Wyo., and have lived and ranched in Birney for many years. I am familiar with the negative impacts of strip mining in this area and its relatively short-term effect of generating revenue, as opposed to the very long-term productivity of our present agricultural economy. Throughout the entire process used by the Land Board, there has been no consideration of what coal strip mining would do to this area. Maybe this project would create jobs and produce tax revenues, but the costs of developing Otter Creek are enormous, and those costs have not yet been discussed. The productive agricultural economy of the area would be changed forever and critical aquifers would be destroyed with strip mining. Our area is not equipped to deal with the influx of new people who would bring a myriad of problems as has been seen in the Wyoming energy-boom areas. The Tongue River Railroad has its own set of problems that would take the costs of Otter Creek far beyond our local area. This critical decision was about far more than generating money for the School Trust Fund. I appreciate Ms. Juneau’s commitment to her role as a public official and her depth of understanding of all the issues involved. Thank you, Ms. Juneau, for your vote. Nancy Carrel Birney

Otter Creek history Dave Sands: I think they should. It’s a person’s right to choose if he or she wants to die or not. Saying “I don’t”: Gay rights issues. Specifically, gay marriage. It shouldn’t be allowed.

Nasir Jaffery: Everyone wants to die in peace. I don’t agree that even if you have cancer you should be allowed to choose. It makes it more complicated. The good life: Nothing. Life is good in Missoula and Montana.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 January 7–January 14, 2010

I attended the State Land Board Hearing on December 21 to watch a major decision regarding the future of Montana. The rationalization that emerged to cause four of the five board members to vote in favor of leasing Otter Creek Coal was that somebody was going to supply the coal, so why not us. After all, regulatory safeguards will protect us. It was, however, not possible to view the proceedings solely in the context of Otter Creek coal. There was more before the board than a simple decision to lease or not to lease coal. The testimony relative to pollution, high-sodium coal, ruptured aquifers, tons of carbon emissions, destructive

railroads and un-sustainability mounted as witnesses presented their views. The board’s carefully crafted responses, however, caused my mind to drift back to the words of Charles “Buffalo” Jones, a 19th century commercial hide hunter: “Often while hunting these animals as a business, I fully realized the cruelty of slaying the poor creatures. Many times did I ‘swear off,’ and fully determine I would break my gun over a wagonwheel when I arrived at camp…The next morning I would hear the guns of

“It was her great-greatuncle Walt who shot that lonely bull above the Tongue River in 1883. It was her great-greataunt Nannie who clipped the old bull’s curly mane to stuff a

pillow.

other hunters booming in all directions and would make up my mind that even if I did not kill any more, the buffalo would soon all be slain just the same.” In the winter of 1882-1883, ranch hands of Levi Howe shot the last buffalo on Horse Creek, a tributary to Otter Creek. In the summer of 1883, rancher Walt Alderson shot one lonely old bull near the Tongue River—the last of mil-

lions. This hearing was about the very same landscape—only deeper! The majority presenting testimony pleaded for the current sustainable ranch economy, the people’s fish and wildlife, and a healthy planet. The commercial boosters argued for jobs and revenue. They and the politicians promised that the Montana regulatory structure would protect us. The fact is the regulatory structure put in place over 35 years ago has been severely depleted by legislative erosion and a lack of regulatory resolve. Those original protections were enacted in a precious period in Montana history, a time when there were progressive politicians on both sides of the political aisle. That “golden moment” in history has been replaced, and the reliance on regulations may well be a misplaced hope. I was struck by the testimony presented by Jeanie Alderson relative to the value of sustainable agriculture and the benefits of non-industrial landscapes. Her testimony returns the buffalo to the story, since it was her great-great-uncle Walt who shot that lonely bull above the Tongue River in 1883. It was her greatgreat-aunt Nannie who clipped the old bull’s curly mane to stuff a pillow. The Alderson testimony was a dramatic demonstration of the conservation ethic that emerged and grew strong in our Montana culture, generation upon generation. It is a land ethic now held at the grassroots level in this state. It is an ethic that deserved better political representation than the single lonely vote of one board member. For the Montana Land Board it is now the same “next morning” experienced by Charles “Buffalo” Jones. Four of the five could only “hear the guns” of other planetary polluters. Only one had the courage to “break my gun over a wagon-wheel” and stand on principle. Denise Juneau was that person when she voted “no” and told us why. They are words that warrant repetition. “We cannot vote as if we have blinders on and only see our present economic picture,” she said. “We must take lessons from the past seven generations and also look forward and provide for the interests of the next seven generations.” She only had one vote, but it keeps hope alive. Jim Posewitz Helena Correction: Our Dec. 24 “etc.” column misspelled the name of Griz receiver Jabin Sambrano. The Indy regrets the error.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 January 7–January 14, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, December 30

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

VIEWFINDER

Agenda

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

A federal judge in Helena swears in Michael Cotter as U.S. attorney for Montana. Cotter, an attorney in Helena and Great Falls for more than 30 years, was among three choices Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester submitted to President Obama. One of those choices was Melodee Hanes, Baucus’ live-in girlfriend, who later withdrew. Cotter replaces Bill Mercer.

• Thursday, December 31 The University of Montana names Robin Pflugrad head coach of its football team. Pflugrad, 51, served as the Grizzlies’ receivers coach in 2009. He replaces Bobby Hauck, who, five days after losing his third Football Championship Subdivision title game in seven seasons with the Griz, accepted the same position with UNLV.

• Friday, January 1 A Missoula man dies after rolling his Chevy Silverado near Box Elder in north-central Montana, causing him to be ejected from the vehicle. Law enforcement officials say excessive speed and alcohol both appear to be factors contributing to the first highway fatality of the New Year.

• Saturday, January 2 A 36-year-old man dies after exchanging gunfire with a Hamilton police officer. Law enforcement says the suspect, Raymond Thane Davis, started shooting when an officer pulled him over for a traffic stop at about 2 a.m. After they returned fire, Davis drove his vehicle into the Ravalli County Road Department shop, where he was pronounced dead at the scene.

• Sunday, January 3 The Missoula High School Holiday Classic hockey tournament ends at Glacier Ice Rink with Missoula falling to Spokane in the championship game, 8–0. Spokane cruised through the tournament, outscoring its opponents 28–6.

• Monday, January 4 The Missoula City Council welcomes its newest alderman, 28-year-old Roy Houseman, to his first meeting. The outgoing president of Local 885 at Smurfit-Stone Container Corp. was the only successful candidate from five contested council races to beat out an incumbent. John Hendrickson lost to Houseman in Ward 2 by nearly 300 votes.

• Tuesday, January 5 On the same day Macy’s announces it’s closing its downtown storefront, Terry Brady of Brady’s Sportsman’s Surplus says he’s retiring after 38 years and shutting the store. All remaining merchandise in the Trempers Shopping Center location goes on sale at 9 a.m. Thursday.

Classmates bring flowers to a memorial for Ashley Patenaude and Taylor Cearley, two Hellgate High School freshmen killed by a drunk driver on Dec. 26. The two members of the freshman basketball team were honored after Saturday’s game against Sentinel with a procession to the Hellgate campus courtyard.

Wild Horses Island gets an addition The lone horse on Flathead Lake’s Wild Horse Island finally has a running mate. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) added a second horse to the island in late December, its first step to bolster the population of the state park’s namesake. The timing of the new addition came as a pleasant surprise to the agency. Original plans called for as many as four new wild horses to be moved onto the island in spring, but FWP adjusted its strategy when a horse from the Pryor Mountain herd, famous for genes traced to horses of the Spanish Conquistadors, became available. The horse was adopted at a Bureau of Land Management auction and apparently escaped from its owner. “The owner must have had it for a while and then it got loose and they never came back to claim it,” says Dave Bennetts, park ranger for the Flathead. Livestock inspectors held the horse in

Missoula until officially designating it “abandoned property” and donating it to the island. FWP’s plans to hold the horse in Kalispell until spring didn’t pan out because the horse was causing a ruckus with the other horses. “Because it wasn’t getting along with the other horses they had boarded there we were forced to put a plan into motion that wasn’t ready to go,” says Bennetts. “Luckily, all at the same time, the barge was available, the weather was good and we had the window.” Bennetts says FWP’s next step will be getting three or four more horses from holding places in either Ulm (south of Great Falls) or Billings to finally fulfill the island’s wild horse capacity and give visitors even more reason to visit the state park. “I don’t think everybody always fully appreciates what’s really out there,” says Bennetts. “It’s 2,500 acres with a healthy bighorn sheep and mule deer population, as well as the wild horses, whose population will hopefully be bolstered soon.” Erika Fredrickson

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Page 6 January 7–January 14, 2010

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Economy Credit crunch comes home Missoula-based Treasure State Bank signed off on an agreement with regulators last week to shore up its finances, providing a reminder that Montana is not immune to the national banking crunch. “We’re seeing the ramifications of the problems with our economy in the Gallatin, Flathead and Lake county areas. And certainly, as you know, in Missoula,” says Annie M. Goodwin, commissioner of Montana’s Division of Banking and Financial Institutions. Treasure State’s agreement with federal regulators, called a “consent order,” aims to address losses to the bank resulting from loans gone bad. The agreement specifically states that Treasure State neither denies nor confirms unsound lending practices. “I do know that Treasure State has had delinquencies and more credit quality issues,” Goodwin says.


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Both Goodwin and Treasure State President James A. Salisbury attribute the bank’s financial challenges largely to a lackluster real estate market. As the economy lingers in the doldrums, developers are having a tough time paying back loans. When loans aren’t paid back, banks feel it in the pocketbook. “It’s occurring across the board,” Goodwin says. Salisbury also stresses the agreement with regulators was voluntary and points to action the institution is taking to ensure a healthy balance sheet. Specifically, the consent order calls for Treasure State to raise capital. The bank recently raised $1.5 million through stock sales and is working to purge bad real estate loans from its portfolio with sales to other institutions and foreclosure proceedings. Salisbury says they’ll continue steering away from commercial development loans. “There’s just no more lending in that area,” he says. Goodwin cautions that Treasure State isn’t alone. She says banks in development-oriented economies, like Gallatin, Flathead and Missoula counties, are working to beef up cash reserves to ensure loan losses are covered and the bottom line stays in the black. Going forward, Salisbury, who stepped up as bank president in October, says Treasure State will continue cutting liabilities and raising capital. “You just hunker down and get through this,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Ravalli County Fecal fecundation A Ravalli County septic company’s plan to spread human waste over 120 acres of property a half-mile from the Bitterroot River has neighbors and environmental groups fearing contamination of the river and local wells. Brown’s Septic Services Inc., based in Florence, has an agreement with rancher Ed Cummings to apply as much as 100,000 gallons of human excrement from residential septic tanks and 5,000 gallons of grease trap waste per year to portions of his 1,000-acre ranch outside Stevensville. The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is set to approve

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

the agreement barring any problems identified before the comment period ends Jan. 12. There are close to 170 such sites around the state, according to DEQ. The deal would be mutually beneficial to Brown’s Septic Services and Cummings. The septic company wants to shorten the distance it transports the waste. (Some of it is currently land-applied on the outskirts of Missoula.) Cummings hopes the waste will improve his land’s fertility by adding nutrients and balancing its pH level. There’s also, he says, a modest financial incentive. But neighbors like Dan Pace say they, and the river, will ultimately pay the price. “There’s an active stream 100 yards away,”

Pace says. “If you dump this waste there, and if you get run-off, or you get rain, guess where the sewage is going to end up? It’s going to end up in the river and everyone’s land downhill from the dump site. That doesn’t make any sense to me. And the other neighbors feel pretty much the same way.” After inspecting the site, DEQ concluded in its October environmental assessment (EA) that the excrement poses no such threat, calling it “a beneficial reuse of a waste product.” The EA drew about 30 comments, many more than most EAs, according to Renai Hill of DEQ’s Solid Waste Section/Septic Tank Pumper Program. The response prompted the agency two weeks ago to release a supplemental EA to provide additional information on local hydrology and geology.

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

But no matter the science, Pace, for one, sides with a simple truth: “Shit don’t go uphill.” Matthew Frank

4

First Night Idol in bloom It’s hard to believe that Kira Means gets more nervous performing in front of her parents at home than she did when taking the Wilma Theatre stage for the annual First Night Idol talent competition. But it’s true, she says. And it showed when the precocious 14-year-old Hellgate High freshman confidently belted out her poppy, selfpenned song, “Hello,” on New Year’s Eve. The performance brought the crowd to its feet, and earned Means the title. “I didn’t really believe it for a while,” she says. “It didn’t really hit me until the next day. It was pretty overwhelming. I couldn’t stop smiling.” Means is more Norah Jones than Kelly Clarkson when it comes to being a music idol. She writes all of her own songs, plays guitar and piano, and her mom says the budding musician is eyeing the cello as her next musical challenge. Local musician Eden Atwood serves as Means’ voice coach and another Missoula luminary, Tom Catmull, is teaching her new guitar techniques. Means frequently plays gigs around town, bringing her guitar to perform at the farmers’ market, charity fundraisers and Sean Kelly’s. She’s also laid down four tracks at Missoula’s Club Schmed Recording Studios and plans on returning to record a few more after the semester ends. “I’ve been singing since I could talk, practically,” she says. For First Night Idol, Means sailed through the preliminary rounds and then beat 12 other Missoula area high school students in the final. By the time she reached the Wilma stage, Means said her usual nerves had disappeared. “It didn’t even really feel like a competition,” she says. Fresh off her win and a flurry of other gigs, Means says she’s taking a breather. But she’ll keep writing music as the mood strikes. “It seems like every time I write a new song,” she says, “it becomes my favorite.” Jessica Mayrer

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In September 2008, a visiting consultant with Crandall Arambula warned Missoula of the importance of its Macy’s department store. “Losing Macy’s would be the canary in the coal mine,” said project manager Jason Graf. “It’s a critical site for strengthening the retail market downtown.” Well, the bird kicked the can this week. Macy’s Inc. announced Tuesday that it’s shuttering its Missoula storefront in 60 days. Fifty-five local employees will lose their jobs in what the corporation calls an “annual process to selectively prune underperforming locations.” Like last month’s Smurfit-Stone announcement, the Macy’s closure has broader impacts than just the loss of jobs. The historic downtown corner location—home over the years to the Missoula Mercantile, Bon Marche and, since 2005, Macy’s—has always been a vital part of the downtown economy. During the creation of Missoula’s much-needed Downtown Master Plan, Crandall Arambula dubbed the store an “anchor,” a key component to luring shoppers away from Southgate Mall and Reserve Street to Higgins Avenue. “Our assumption was that Macy’s might be able to weather the economic downturn…,” said firm principal George Crandall upon hearing the news. “I think adjustments can be made [to the plan], but it certainly is a setback.” The thing is, Macy’s closure was hardly unforeseen. The company downsized its regional divisions considerably in February 2008, shedding $100 million in expenses. Longtime Missoula General Manager Rich Boberg left his position in September 2008, further throwing the stability of the location into question. This week’s announcement was simply the final nail in the coffin. “It’s definitely tough news,” says Linda McCarthy, executive director of the Missoula Downtown Association (MDA). “It’s definitely not something that we wanted to see happen.” Nevertheless, city officials did their best to find an optimistic spin. Mayor John Engen says urban renewal district funds could help rehabilitate the 120-year-old building and make it more attractive to new buyers. He also stresses the city is well positioned to take the hit. “If this were 1978, we would think of this as a dead blow to downtown,” he says. “Today, we think of it as a painful setback, but a circumstance from which we can recover.” McCarthy added her own shred of optimism, ending an e-mail to MDA members by writing, in part, “With change comes opportunity. Chin up!” That sentiment certainly holds true for the Macy’s corporation, which operates more than 800 department stores nationwide, plus more than 40 Bloomingdale’s locations. Tuesday’s release about the store closing included news of a Bloomingdale’s storefront going up in Dubai this year. Perhaps they’re at work on a Downtown Master Plan, as well.

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Page 7 January 7–January 14, 2010


Missoula Independent

Page 8 January 7–January 14, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Fight to the end Will ruling be last word on physician-assisted death? by Alex Sakariassen

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Bill Clarke still occasionally refers to practice illegal, but stopped short of cessfully introduced a bill aimed at clarihis friend Janet Murdock in the present determining whether the Montana fying the previous district court ruling in tense. It’s a jarring slip, considering her Constitution guarantees the right. 2009, but it never made it to a vote. He death last summer launched Clarke into Montana is the third state to allow believes a similar bill will be necessary in physicians to prescribe life-ending med- 2011. the state’s heated right to die debate. “I know there will be legislation—I Murdock died June 14, 2009, at the ication to mentally competent, terminalage of 67, from a terminal case of ovarian ly ill patients, following Oregon and will introduce legislation if nobody else does—that’s intended to address some of cancer. She’d completed chemotherapy in Washington. Groups on both sides of the the concerns that people inevitably have early 2008, but her cancer count rose steadily after initial treatment. Clarke says right-to-die debate quickly responded about how this should be done in pracwhen faced with the option of continuous to the ruling. PAD supporter tice,� Barrett says. Barrett has no idea how strong the chemo treatments, Murdock found the Compassion & Choices said the pain and dependence too intolerable for Montana Supreme Court is “the first opposition to PAD could be during the the long-term. He adds she’d accepted state high court to find protection of next session, but those supporting the practice believe the chances death and even hosted a living of a serious challenge are wake for herself in Bonner highly unlikely. Park in July 2008. “The court decided there “It’s hard to appreciate was nothing inherently differhow much people liked ent about a decision to ask Janet,� Clarke says. “She was your doctor for life-ending very forward about what she medication than a decision to would say, which would get ask your doctor to take away her in trouble because she your dialysis or ventilator,� would say what she thought. says Compassion & Choices When she got to the nursing President Barbara Coombs home, I told her, ‘Janet, you Lee. “I think it would be can’t say what you think all very difficult for the the time.’ There was a little Photo by Cathrine L. Walters Legislature to essentially tell nursing assistant in the room at the time who said, ‘That’s The Montana Supreme Court’s ruling last week to dying Montanans, ‘Well, the not true. That’s why we all uphold a Montanan’s right to physician-assisted death court felt you were competent love her, because she’s so came six months too late for Bill Clarke, who lost one and capable of making those of his closest friends to ovarian cancer in June. decisions, but we do not.’� real.’� Coombs Lee realizes that not everyMurdock spoke to physicians in her this choice.� It’s an option the group one who pursues PAD will take the medfinal months hoping someone would feels is long overdue. But opponents of PAD believe the ication. According to Oregon’s Public agree to help her end her life. Clarke says none were ready to risk their practices nature of the court’s ruling on statutory Health Division, one third of the patients over the controversial procedure, grounds, not constitutional ones, leaves who acquire life-ending medication from despite a 2008 decision from a Montana the issue open for revision in the next a physician never use it. Oregon legaldistrict court judge supporting a legislative session. The Montana Family ized PAD in 1998, and 341 people have patient’s right to die. Instead, he Foundation—a strong voice against enacted the law since. “Some number will ask for the prewatched as one of his closest friends con- PAD—went so far as to call the decision a sciously stopped eating and drinking and “partial victory� for that very reason, stat- scriptions, some smaller number will fill wasted away, spending her final days in ing it’s “definitely not what we wanted, the prescriptions, and some much smaller number will ingest the medication,� but not as bad as it could have been.� extreme pain. The Montana Catholic Conference Coombs Lee says. “Patients don’t want “Janet’s life suffered a lot anyway,� Clarke says. “It was cruel and unusual (MCC) viewed the decision as bitter- necessarily to take the medication. They and nasty to make her suffer like that at sweet. While the state’s two Roman want to have the medication so that if the end. When she said, ‘I’ve had Catholic bishops were disappointed, their worst nightmare happens, they enough, I want to go,’ we said, ‘You MCC Executive Director Moe Wosepka have an escape route.� Although the decision comes too know, that’s fine. We’ll help you do this. says the church is already working on a late for Murdock, Clarke says he’ll conWe’ll be there with you, we’ll comfort plan to counter the ruling. “Those people who are opposed to tinue actively supporting PAD in you, we’ll have your family here, anything you want.’ But no, they made her legalized physician-assisted suicide in the Montana by sharing her story. “I would do anything that was necesstate of Montana will be joining together starve herself to death.� While it was too late to help to work on options that we can pursue in sary,� Clarke says. “The saddest thing is I Murdock, Clarke found some solace in the next legislative session,� Wosepka wish I could find something to say to the Montana Supreme Court’s decision says. “This will be a very high priority for people that would open their eyes on this and get them to just be more rationlast week to uphold the district court rul- us, in fact.� Rep. Dick Barrett, D-Missoula, antic- al about it.� ing in support of physician-assisted death (PAD). The court stated it found ipates multiple pieces of PAD legislation asakariassen@missoulanews.com nothing in Montana statutes to deem the appearing next session. Barrett unsuc-

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Missoula Independent

Page 9 January 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 14, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Dream on A fantastical look at what could be in 2010

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Missoula Independent

Last year the whacky world of politics taught us that anything can happen, even if it’s not what you had hoped or expected would happen. So, just to be optimistic about the first year of the new decade, here are some projections of political actions that could happen in the coming year. And if you think they’re just fantasies, well, they just might be. In the fantasy future, Montana’s senior U.S. senator, Max Baucus, will suddenly come out of the emotionally induced haze that has enveloped him during his illicit affair with a top staffer and realize that he has totally blown it on health care reform. He will realize that he has been little more than a pawn for the insurance and medical industries that have so generously larded his campaign war chest with donations and seek to make amends. First, he’ll swear off taking another dime from the rascals, saying that just because those mega-wealthy industries can buy whatever influence they need in Washington, D.C., it’s simply unfair to elevate their concerns over those of the people who actually voted to send him to the Senate. Baucus will then donate the millions those industries have given him to open several free community health care centers in Montana, announcing he won’t need the money because he isn’t running again. Next, he’ll use the unorthodox method the Democrats intend to employ to iron out the differences between the Senate and House versions of the health bill by getting rid of about three-fourths of the 2,000-page legislation and replacing it with a much simpler and effective single-payer plan that basically ensures Medicare for all Americans. The same plan he earlier declared “off the table” will, now that the fog has cleared from his mind, be the obvious solution to the health care crisis. Baucus’ colleague, Sen. Jon Tester, will have his own awakening when he realizes his behavior at the Senate hearing on his logging bill was totally out of line and based on the false assumption that the bill he sponsored was inclusive, rather than the secretive, exclusive backroom deal it really is. This revelation will be bolstered when he recalls the testimony of the head of the Forest Service, warning that the mandated logging levels in the bill are “unreasonable,” as are the taxpayer-funded subsidies required to carry out those mandates. The epiphany will be complete when he finally understands that, contrary to his statements

Page 10 January 7–January 14, 2010

that he is seeking input from Montanans, he can’t really change the bill without blowing the so-called “collaborative” deal upon which it was based. Dispirited, but not defeated, he will pull the bill and turn to a truly open and inclusive process to put together a new bill which,

Rehberg will “introduce his own wilderness bill, which will designate all the existing Wilderness Study Areas as wilderness in honor of former Sen. Lee Metcalf.

unlike this one, will include the word “wilderness” in the title. Gov. Brian Schweitzer, meanwhile, will suffer severe depression after no one bids on the Otter Creek coal leases for which he and his fellow Democrats on the Land Board have already suffered national criticism. One night, he’ll accidentally mix up his little vials of coalderived liquid fuel with the pre-bed shot of Jack Daniels he keeps on the nightstand. Falling into a deep dream, he’ll see his big idea for mining and burning those millions of tons of coal is, literally, going up in smoke. When he wakes the next morning, he’ll have diesel breath, but go forth and make the announcement that he is done with his stint as the Coal Cowboy, reject coal, and dedicate his considerable energy to taking care of Montanans in his last two years in office. His first actions will include implementing massive state-wide conservation and weatherization efforts and supporting a plan to force companies deriving their energy from Montana’s resources to deliver that energy to Montanans on a cost-plus basis rather than the deregulation rip-off former Gov. Marc Racicot

spawned. Montanans will cheer like it was 2004. Then there’s Rep. Denny Rehberg, Montana’s lone Republican congressman. The year will see a return to Kazakhstan for Rehberg where, thanks to another bout with the ubiquitous vodka of the region, he will fall off another horse. This time, however, it’ll knock some sense into him. Shaking his head, he’ll suddenly understand that the Republicans have done nothing for the country except obfuscate the issues and obstruct the process and will literally see the light. He’ll introduce his own wilderness bill, which will designate all the existing Wilderness Study Areas as wilderness in honor of former Sen. Lee Metcalf and give permanent protection to millions of acres of currently roadless lands from further abuse. When Tester reads the bill, he’ll fall off his own horse. On a higher plane, President Obama will find his Buddha moment while reading Uncle Remus’ Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby to an elementary school class. As he tells the students about how Brer Rabbit got one paw, then another, then all of them totally stuck in the Tar Baby, he’ll understand that he has done the same thing with the War on Terror, realizing he’s been duped by the militaryindustrial complex. Enveloped in an aura of enlightenment, he’ll promise to veto any future military spending for Bush’s wars, request Congress to cut the bloated $636 billion military budget in half and declare the rest will be spent to pay for universal health care instead of forcing citizens to buy insurance or raising taxes. The response from the populace will be so overwhelming that Obama will remember those dreams of hope and change of which he spoke so eloquently on the campaign trail, realizing they can become reality. Sensing a greater purpose, he’ll move to lower, not raise, the debt ceiling, redirect any remaining or future Wall Street bailout funds to ensuring more citizens don’t lose homes and jobs, and fire all of the Goldman Sachs advisers and Democrat strategists who have been steering him so wrong. Fantasy? You bet. But it can’t hurt to hope. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Snow job Column about weather leads to a reporter’s exit by Bob Berwyn

There’s an old saying in Colorado’s ski country regarding weather reports and predictions of snowfall: “I’ll believe it when I’m shoveling it.” That’s what I was thinking to myself several weeks ago as I sat on my couch, sifting through some ideas for a weekly opinion column in the western Colorado-based Summit Daily News, where I was, until recently, employed as a reporter. Little did I know that my musings on the weather would lead to the sudden end of my reporting career with that newspaper. As I often do when I’m writing, I turned on The Weather Channel. Like many avid skiers, I’m always on the lookout for snow as the season approaches. On this particular weekend, a wicked upslope storm was pounding the Denver area and the foothills with snow. When The Weather Channel zeroed in on Colorado, I looked up to see a former colleague at the Summit Daily doing a stand-up interview with weather reporter Mike Seidel. These days, the exSummit Daily reporter works public relations for Vail Resorts, by far the biggest ski company in Colorado. So I set down my laptop and watched, getting the distinct impression that Vail Resorts was trying to create a perception of widespread snow in Colorado. In my mind, the simple fact that Vail Resorts was represented in the interview was part of that effort; otherwise, why not interview a weather expert who might present some fact-based information? I understand that The Weather Channel is as much about entertainment as it is about the weather. But many people still rely on the station for accurate information. So it irked me to see that there was no mention of the fact that on

my side of the Rockies—the western side— it was warm, dry and sunny. No snow at all, no boon for skiers at Vail Resorts. That glaring omission seemed another sign that truth in weather reporting was at risk. I wouldn’t call it a conspiracy to sell more season passes, but then again, those pass-

As icing on the “cake, the paper offered me about $3,000 not to talk about the termination. I didn’t take it.

es are a key source of revenue for Vail Resorts these days. About that same time, the chairman of Vail Resorts sent out a photo of snow on the deck of his house near Boulder—on the eastern side of the Rockies. That’s when I decided to write a column about the weather; how it’s reported and how it’s sometimes subject to a bit of massaging by the ski resorts. The first part was easy. I explained the conditions that lead to an upslope storm. Then I gently chided Vail Resorts for its spin on the weather and suggested that the ski areas and the mountain “communities nearby would be better served in the long term by honesty and transparency.

Apparently, I hit a nerve, because Rob Katz, the CEO of Vail, called me a few hours after the column was published to complain that I had questioned his personal integrity. I told him that I’ve lived in the mountains for a long time and that I recognize a snow job when I see one. Katz replied that the column called into question his company’s ability to work with me and my newspaper. A few days later, I was called into the publisher’s office. I was told that the ski company had pulled its advertising and that as a result it would be difficult for the newspaper to make up a quarterly budget shortfall. I was also told that I had a lot of groveling to do if I wanted to repair the situation. I was shaken at first, but a few days later, I asked my editor to back me up. Wishful thinking on my part. I was fired a week later, for reasons “not directly related to the column,” according to an e-mail from the editor, who claimed that my termination was the consequence of a long record of issues that had been documented in annual reviews. As icing on the cake, the paper offered me about $3,000 not to talk about the termination. I didn’t take it. This whole thing leaves me still shaking my head. Not that I’ve given up reporting the facts as I see them. These days, I write stories for my new website, the Summit County Voice. I’m planning to set it up as a nonprofit, grassroots community news source, published only online. I may even take some time out to enjoy some skiing—when it snows.

Montana’s Greatest Snow Place

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Bob Berwyn is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He writes in Frisco, Colo.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 January 7–January 14, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

If your eyes glaze over every time you hear someone utter the words “cap and trade,” I think it’s high time you grabbed a bottle of eye drops and started paying attention. Trust me, it’s not as complex as you think. Basically, it’s an environmental policy whereby an industry puts a “cap” on the crap that they shoot into the air, also known as greenhouse gases. This entity is also given a certain amount of “trade” credits, which equals the amount of pollutants they can belch into the sky under the cap. So, if one company pollutes less, they can “trade”—or sell— these emission credits to industries that pollute more. The idea is to tighten the cap over time to help lower emissions. This month’s City Club Missoula forum offers you the chance to get a thorough analysis of the concept, as well as specifics about the sweeping

“cap and trade” program proposed under the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009. Local experts like Keegan Eisenstadt, CEO of ClearSky Climate Solutions, and James D. Jensen, executive director of the Montana Environmental Information Center, will lead the discussion of what this new system might mean for us here in the Garden City. —Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY JANUARY 7

Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12-Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www. al-anon.alateen.org.

If you know a young woman between the ages of 14–18 who you think would make a great leader, consider nominating them for YWCA Missoula’s Young Women LEAD project, which includes attendance at two seminars as well as a community service project. Free to participate. To nominate, call the YWCA’s Jen Euell at 543-6691. Nominations are due by Mon., Jan. 11. Find out exactly what you can expect when expecting with tips on nutrition, exercise, labor, birth preparations and more during a free early pregnancy information night, which runs from 6:30–8 PM in the small meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. E-mail Krista at naturalchildbirthclasses@gmail.com.

SATURDAY JANUARY 9 If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Sorry Missoula conservatives, local Dems won big this year, and now it’s time to partay. So join in on the festivities during the Missoula County Democrats’ Red, White and Blues Ball, which features music by the Mike Bader Blues Band and appearances by Mayor John Engen and City Councilman Roy Houseman at 7 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Suggested donation of $15, plus a dry or canned good for the Missoula Food Bank. Call Emily Brock at 546-6552.

SUNDAY JANUARY 10 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-8090112 to RSVP.

MONDAY JANUARY 11 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator

City Club Missoula’s forum discussion “Cap and Trade: Is This the Answer to Decreasing Carbon Emissions?” is Mon., Jan. 11 from 11:30 AM–1 PM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $16/$11 members/$5 for no-lunch option. Reservations are due Fri., Jan. 8 by noon. Call 541-2489 and visit cityclub missoula.org.

TUESDAY JANUARY 12 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 13 Sop up some suds to help gramps get support for his independence, dignity and health during a Kettlehouse “Community Unite” pint night, which runs from 5–8 PM at the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from every pint sold benefits Missoula Aging Services. Call 728-1660.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 January 7–January 14, 2010


Griz Basketball Games This Week

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Brier Cutlip, 22, and Paul Bragg, 25, were arrested for firearms possession, a felony parole violation, after sheriff’s deputies in Randolph County, W.Va., found two rifles in Cutlip’s truck. The deputies thought to look for incriminating evidence because the two men showed up at their parole meetings together dressed in blaze orange. WBOY-TV News said the men admitted hunting earlier that day. COMMUNITY INVESTMENTS - Hoping to capitalize on their success, Somali pirates have set up an exchange to sell shares of their raids to investors. Operating mostly out of Haradheere, sea gangs have made tens of millions of dollars from ransoms, according to Reuters, and their success is attracting Somali financiers in other nations to back their sea raids. “The shares are open to all, and everybody can take part, whether personally at sea or on land by providing cash, weapons or useful maters,” a pirate named Mohammed explained, adding, “We’ve made piracy a community activity.” Haradheere’s deputy security officer agreed. “Piracy-related business has become the main profitable economic activity in our area, and as locals we depend on their output,” Mohamed Adam said. “The district gets a percentage of every ransom from ships that have been released, and that goes on public infrastructure, including our hospital and our public schools.”

VS. Come support the Griz Basketball Team as they enter Big Sky Conference play.

Eastern Washington Eagles Friday, January 8th @ 7:00pm Introduction of new Head Football Coach, Robin Pflugard First 500 fans will receive a special commemorative t-shirt Big Sky Conference Game Super Skippers Halftime Performance

VS.

A group of inner-city activists in Los Angeles announced the start of bus tours of rundown public housing, sites of deadly shootouts and racial unrest, and the birthplace of many of the city’s most famous gangs, including Crips and Bloods. “This is ground zero for a lot of the bad in this city,” former gang member Alfred Lomas, who is spearheading L.A. Gang Tours, told the Los Angeles Times. “It could be ground zero for a lot of the good, too.” Lomas calls the venture “true community empowerment.” The nonprofit group is charging adults $65 for the two-hour tours of South L.A., Watts and Florence-Firestone, and notes it uses the money to create jobs and start similar tour franchises in other inner cities. Organizers will sell souvenir Tshirts painted on the spot by a graffiti tagger, and one organizer said he hopes to stage a dance-off among the locals where tourists pick the winner. Organizers did decide against having kids shoot tourists with water pistols, followed by the sale of T-shirts that read: “I Got Shot in South-Central.” FINDERS KEEPERS - Jesus Leonardo, 57, told the New York Times he makes more than $45,000 a year by cashing in winning tickets on horse races that betters throw away. “It is literally found money,” he said, explaining he spends more than 10 hours a day at a New York City off-track betting parlor. “This has become my job, my life. This is how I feed my family.” Leonardo collects the betting slips by picking through the OTB parlor’s trash each night. He also pays two friends $25 a bag to bring him the trash at four other OTB parlors around the city. Leonardo collects 2,000 to 7,000 discarded tickets a day and hauls them to his New Jersey home. He and two other friends bundle them in stacks of 300 for Leonardo to tote to the city the next morning and spend hours scanning each ticket to find any winners. “It is such exhausting work,” Leonardo said, “that I give myself a lunch hour.”

Portland State Vikings Saturday, January 9th @ 7:00pm Big Sky Conference Game Monte and MO!! *All games played in Dahlberg Arena (Adams Center)

JOLTING NEWS - The Brazilian Coffee Industry Association (ABIC) has intensified its crackdown on rogue roasters, who cut corners and costs by adulterating their products. “The most common thing is to find wood from the (coffee) tree and shells from the beans, but you can also find corn or caramel, which is much cheaper than coffee,” Almir Jose da Silva, ABIC’s chairman, told Reuters. “These coffees can make you feel unwell in the stomach or make you burp a lot.” Brazil is the world’s No. 1 coffee grower and No. 2 consumer, and since most of the exported coffee is raw beans, the tainted coffee is largely a domestic problem. Noting that the ABIC ousted 10 members this year for deliberately bulking up their products, Silva said the crackdown is aimed at thwarting efforts to recruit new coffee drinkers. “Quality is what develops consumption,” he said. LIKE SHOOTING PORK IN A BARREL - Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., earmarked $100,000 of taxpayer money to go to the library in Jamestown, S.C., which is in his district. But Congress mistakenly designated the money for Jamestown, Calif., a town that doesn’t even have a library. “That figures for government, doesn’t it?” Chris Pipkin, who runs the one-room library in Jamestown, S.C., told the Washington Times. Pipkin added that he had requested only $50,000 to buy computers and new bookshelves, but Clyburn’s office told the paper the congressman decided to double the request after visiting the library and finding books strewn on the floor because of the lack of shelving. As part of the same $1.1 trillion catchall spending bill, Congress upped a request for funding for bus shelters in Bal Harbour, Fla., from $100,000 to $250,000. And the airport in Wasilla, Alaska, hometown of former governor Sarah Palin, is getting $500,000 to expand airplane parking space. UNSURPRISING CONCLUSION - A University of Montreal researcher studying the impact of pornography on men intended to interview subjects who had never been exposed to pornography but couldn’t find any. “Guys who do not watch pornography do not exist,” assistant professor Simon Louis Lajeunesse told the Montreal Gazette. He said he switched projects and will now study how consuming X-rated material affects men’s sexual identity and shapes their relationships with women. SOCIAL NETWORKING - A Detroit man who took a bus to Madison, Wis., to spend a week dating a woman he met on Facebook told police that when his visit ended, she pretended to drive him to the bus station but robbed him. Considering that Facebook arranged the meeting, a police official told the Wisconsin State Journal, “We have significant leads.” WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED - When a man spotted a prowler at a nearby vacant home in Kelso, Wash., he grabbed his hunting bow and chased the suspect for more than three blocks before shooting him with an arrow when he refused to stop. Police Capt. Vern Thompson told the Daily News that a 32-year-old suspect later sought treatment for an arrow wound at a hospital.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 January 7–January 14, 2010


Through sameness of language is produced sameness of sentiment and thought; customs and habits are molded and assimilated in the same way, and thus in process of time the differences producing trouble would have been gradually obliterated. —Indian Peace Commission, 1868

by Emily Underwood

hen William J. C’Hair’s young granddaughter asked him to give her an Arapaho name, he spent a long time trying to think of one that would be right for her. Then one day, outside his house in Wyoming, the Northern Arapaho heard it in a meadowlark’s song: Cooxuceneihii. Meadowlarks are fluent in Arapaho, explains C’Hair. Like birdsong itself, as well as other tonal languages such as Chinese, Arapaho uses pitch to carry meaning. It is also polysynthetic, compressing many meanings into single words. Cooxuceneihii, for instance, not

the Wind River Reservation for 17 years— he even dubbed the movie Bambi in Arapaho. But Greymorning says he’s tempted to give up. At the request of the Northern Plains Education Foundation, Greymorning came to the reservation in the early ’90s to improve Arapaho instruction. At the time, children were receiving only about 15 minutes of instruction, a couple of times a week. Greymorning started an hour-long, five-day-a-week kindergarten class to see if more time would help. The results were dramatic: After 18 weeks, most of the children had mastered more than 160 words and phrases, compared

only means meadowlark, it also means “it speaks Arapaho” and “it speaks well.” When an Arapaho child is slow to start talking, the yellow-breasted bird is fed in a ceremony meant to help the child communicate. The word is also related to cooxuutit: stories traditionally told by Arapaho warriors upon their return from battle. Today, the struggle to protect the Arapaho way of life continues, but the battleground has shifted. For the last 30 years, the Arapaho have resisted assimilation by attempting to revitalize their language. It has been a losing fight. Of the roughly 8,000-member Northern Arapaho tribe, there are fewer than 250 fluent speakers left, and all are over the age of 55. Josh Oldman, a young Marine who recently returned from Iraq, says, in frustration, “It’s like the torch is being passed from person to person down the line, until the person holding the torch is at the end of the line. He’s supposed to be at the front but instead he’s behind, and everyone’s marching blindly.” Unless the tribe can turn the tide, William J. C’Hair’s granddaughter will be among the last to grow up hearing Arapaho in her home. By naming her Cooxuceneihii, C’Hair hopes to pass on the values of his ancestors. Like most of his generation, he wonders whether his grandchild will be able, or willing, to follow them.

to students in the three control classes who knew less than 20 words by the end of an entire school year. Encouraged by this success, Greymorning started a halfday immersion kindergarten class in the public school, and then a preschool program modeled on Hawaiian and Maori “language nests.” In the language-nest model, English is never spoken in the classroom, and fluent elders pair with younger teachers to immerse children in the language, starting in preschool. Parents are strongly involved. These programs have been so successful in Hawaii and New Zealand that speakers can now attend graduate schools conducted in their native languages. However, Greymorning soon discovered that sustaining the programs would not be easy. With unemployment on the reservation running as high as 70 percent, funding for the preschools was precarious. Teachers sometimes worked for $5 an hour or less and paid for student lunches out of their own pockets. Today, the two immersion preschools struggle to maintain a $350,000–$400,000 annual budget. It will take more than preschools to produce fluent speakers, says Greymorning. Once students leave the immersion programs, they lose much of what they learned. A truly successful program would require immersion beyond preschool, and it would recruit young, energetic apprentice teachers. But as the pool of fluent elders dwindles, time to train these new teachers is running out.

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Tribal elder Mark Soldier Wolf greets his granddaughter at the inauguration of a new language immersion school on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Of the roughly 8,000-member Northern Arapaho tribe, there are fewer than 250 fluent speakers left, and all are over the age of 55. Photo by Kevin Moloney

Missoula Independent

Page 14 January 7–January 14, 2010

iry and intense, with a gray-streaked ponytail, professor Stephen Neyooxet Greymorning says his determination to be a torchbearer for the Arapaho language was inspired by the Plains Indian Dog Soldiers, who tied themselves to stakes and refused to yield their ground. A Southern Arapaho and professor of anthropology and Native American studies at the University of Montana, Greymorning has worked with the Northern Arapaho on

T

he Arapaho language is so different from its relatives in the Algonquin family, such as Blackfoot, Cheyenne and Cree, that linguists call it a “rogue.” They speculate that the tribe might have adopted its own private slang to set itself apart as it migrated from the Great Lakes region toward the Rocky Mountains. There are


no written records of the language prior to the 1700s, so linguists can only attempt to reconstruct its origins using a kind of linguistic archaeology—matching analogous fragments of contemporary words like shards of ancient bone. The Southern and Northern Arapaho split into two separate bands during the 1840s. After white settlers invaded the Rockies, the Southern Arapaho were sent to an Oklahoma reservation in 1867. In 1878, the Northern Arapaho were forced to retreat, leaving a nomadic life in the forests and mountains of Colorado for the grassy plains of the Wind River Reservation in western Wyoming. Fixed beneath a volatile sky, the Arapaho put down new roots beside their traditional enemies, the Eastern Shoshone. By this time, the Indian Wars had shown the federal government that assimilating American Indians was cheaper than killing them outright. Language was identified as “two thirds of the trouble” in pacifying American Indian nations. The government began to fund the infamous English-only boarding schools, where children were brutalized for speaking their native languages and following tribal ways. There were four such schools on the Wind River Reservation until the 1950s. These days, only around 10 percent of the roughly 300 indigenous languages once spoken in North America are still commonly learned by children. And at least half of the world’s linguistic diversity—more than 3,200 of the 6,500 languages spoken in the world today—will disappear within the century. The Arapaho tribes’ traditional form of education—oral storytelling—had largely died out by the 1950s. Most parents of the World War II era avoided speaking Arapaho to their children, hoping to make their assimilation easier. However, in the 1960s and ’70s, attitudes toward Native language began to shift. The 1975 Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act gave tribes greater, though by no means total, freedom to run their own schools. Elders and activists, particularly those involved with the American Indian Movement, began to fight for the preservation of indigenous languages and a return to traditional values. But at the time, no one knew how to save an endangered language. William J. C’Hair describes a disastrous early language camp. He and other fluent Arapaho speakers barricaded an area on the reservation with signs that said “Arapaho only.” They cooked food, and waited for interested tribal members to arrive. Within hours, curious, hungry Arapaho overran the camp—speaking only English. White teachers outnumbered Native teachers in reservation classrooms, as they largely do today. However, disagreements about Arapaho language instruction in the reservation’s Western-style public schools divided Indian and nonIndian faculty alike. For teachers already struggling to help their students meet

state standards in English and math, Arapaho seemed like an extravagance. Complicating things further was the fact that no proven method for teaching Arapaho existed in the ’70s, partly because the language lacked a written form until 1982. Fluent Arapaho speakers asked to teach the language rarely had training in teaching. Their students memorized lists of plant and animal names, but did not learn how to “think” in Arapaho. Many Arapaho see the loss of their language as a kind of spiritual test. Without it, the tribe’s ceremonies can’t be conducted correctly. “You lose the lan-

to conduct yet another teach-in on the Wind River Reservation. Hands on hips, he stares down the small group assembled before him, talking about his immersion program at UM. “In my [college] classroom, after nine hours, students have learned 200 phrases they can manipulate in three different ways,” he says. “Can any of the kids who graduate from schools here do that?” The teachers murmur and shake their heads. No. This is unheard of in the immersion or public school programs— even for students who’ve taken Arapaho from kindergarten through high school.

“It’s like you’re swimming around in circles,” says Greymorning, referring to teachers’ tendency to lapse into English. “I’m here trying to throw you a rope, but you keep trying to do the same thing that isn’t working.” The teachers stare back at Greymorning, some of them balefully. One commanding middle-aged woman makes a point of talking to her neighbor as he speaks. Easy for you to say, her attitude suggests. You try controlling a classroom full of rowdy preschoolers without ever using English. (Greymorning gets a frosty reception from some people on the reservation. “Greymorning left,” they

“The privilege of being from the rez is understanding that language is a spiritual thing. I want to pray to my ancestors through my own language. It has to come from the heart. The English version is not from the heart.” —Robert Hall guage, you lose the soul,” says Sergio Maldonaldo, director of tribal education. Mike Redman, who teaches Arapaho at the elementary-school level, believes that if the Arapaho lose their language, it will be because the Creator deemed them unworthy of it. He nearly came to blows with another Arapaho involved in education this spring over an argument about how his program is administered. Money and politics, he says, have corrupted the tribe: “Arapahos are being anti-Arapaho. The government did a good job.”

Greymorning is convinced that the problem lies in teachers’ failure to implement his curriculum. His system doesn’t introduce writing and reading until students have mastered speaking. This grates against standard methods of teaching a second language, especially in the public school system, which relies heavily on written assessment. Greymorning also forbids the use of English as a crutch—perhaps the hardest rule for teachers to adhere to, particularly if their own knowledge of Arapaho is not solid.

say, suggesting that if he’d really wanted to help, he would have stayed.) Unfazed, Greymorning suddenly tells me to stand up. He takes me over to a wall of pictures that are grouped according to his system, which is tailored to Arapaho grammar. A few of the older ladies smile encouragement. Greymorning points at the first image—a little girl—and says, distinctly: “Hiseihihi’.” “Hiseihihi,’” I repeat, palms sweating. “Ci’ nihii beeseitii,” says Greymorning. Try again, his expression

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n a school day last year, squealing, shouting preschoolers riding red and yellow bouncy balls stampede across the Hinono’eitiino’oowu’ (Arapaho Language Lodge) language immersion classroom in Ethete. They swarm strangers, grinning gap-toothed grins, and show off what they know in Arapaho, pointing to the images that cover the walls from floor to ceiling—raindrops, stars, turtles, a rabbit jumping over a fence, a couple dancing. “Come to my workshop, and I’ll teach you 16 phrases in Arapaho in 10 minutes,” Greymorning had told me over the phone as I began to research language revitalization efforts on the Wind River Reservation. Greymorning left the reservation in 1994 for UM. He still advises the immersion programs from afar. Over the years, however, he has been consistently frustrated by what he considers teachers’ and administrators’ failure to implement his methods for teaching Arapaho. So in 2009, Greymorning decided to make what he described as a “final” trip from Montana

University of Montana professor Stephen Neyooxet Greymorning has worked with the Northern Arapaho on the Wind River Reservation for 17 years. He once dubbed the movie Bambi in Arapaho in an effort to teach the language to younger members of the tribe.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 January 7–January 14, 2010


says, but louder, more confidently. After we go through the first set of words, Greymorning quizzes me. I slap my hand down on the images as he names them, repeating the words again. It feels like a game—a far cry from filling in bubbles on multiple-choice tests. As we build quickly from four to 16 words, however, I start to make mistakes. “Wo’ooo,” the word for “cat,” is hard to pronounce—the vowels trip over themselves, surging forward. When I can’t figure out what Greymorning means by “3i’okuuto’oo,” the Arapaho word for “chair,” he tells me in Arapaho to sit down in a chair, and then to stand up. At first, I can’t figure out what he’s referring to. Then it clicks: In Arapaho, the word “sit”—“ceenoku”—is related to the word “chair.” I point to the

we need encouragement,” notes an older man. The group nods agreement. Hall looks around, a little sadly, and says, “We all need help. Our elders need help. I need help.”

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omeday soon, as fluent speakers disappear, Arapaho immersion will no longer be possible. Andrew Cowell, a linguist at the University of Colorado at Boulder, is preparing for that day. Many linguists spend six months or so in a language community, writing down lists of words and making dictionaries. Then they leave to make their contribution to linguistic theory. Cowell, in contrast, has come to the Wind River Reservation for nearly 10 years to document and analyze

which focused on extracting information from languages for the sake of science. In the words of another language activist, Euchee Indian and University of Tulsa professor Richard Grounds, preservation means “pickling” languages rather than helping them survive in all their complexity. Cowell argues that the nuances he documents make Arapaho language and culture what it is. Such distinctions can’t be taught at the most basic levels, and time with the elders is running out. Without such tools as grammar books and conversational videos, subtle but crucial aspects of the culture will disappear forever. He offers examples, describing the ceremonial tense, which is indicated by a slightly different sound at the

Photo by Kevin Moloney

An artist paints a native symbol inside the Arapaho Language Lodge immersion school on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Northern Arapaho tribal leaders hope the school will help kids from the reservation find a better cultural identity and succeed in education.

image of the chair and bask in applause, feeling like a precocious 5-year-old. Next, Greymorning quizzes Robert Hall, a 20-year-old Blackfoot man who has studied Arapaho with him at UM. As the older people listen to Hall—who isn’t even Arapaho—give life and breath to their language, the atmosphere in the room thaws. “I used to think [my native language] was an old person’s language,” says Hall. But after he left for college, he realized that “the privilege of being from the rez is understanding that language is a spiritual thing. I want to pray to my ancestors through my own language. It has to come from the heart. The English version is not from the heart.” Nowadays, young people are more likely to say “S’up” than “Tous” in greeting, more likely to learn Spanish and dress like L.A. gangsters than to speak Arapaho, laments Arapaho teacher Liz Lone Bear. But sometimes, she admits, the elders make it worse by making fun of young people who are trying to learn. “That’s real ignorant. Instead of laughing,

Missoula Independent

Arapaho. He recently co-authored an Arapaho grammar textbook with Arapaho storyteller Alonso Moss Sr. He has also developed curricula and dictionaries for the tribe and plans to film at least 25 hours of conversation so that future learners can see how gestures help create meaning. Gawky and with a shy smile, Cowell’s quiet self-effacing manner is nothing like Stephen Greymorning’s acerbic zeal. The two academics are respectfully critical of one another’s work. Cowell sees Greymorning’s approach as admirable but sometimes “basic” and not always linguistically precise. As for Cowell’s recent grammar book, Greymorning says, “Here’s the problem with a book like that—it’s resource material…Most people are not going to be able to understand how to apply it.” Greymorning notes with frustration how hard it is to find grant money to start language nests and master-apprentice programs. Academics find it far easier to obtain funding to document dying languages. He thinks this imbalance stems from the colonialist approach,

Page 16 January 7–January 14, 2010

end of a word, and explaining the Arapaho love for long, elaborate puns.

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espite their differences, activists and linguists agree that the crux of the matter lies in how young people perceive the endangered language. Some young American Indians, such as Hall and Brandon Culbertson, who is studying Arapaho at the tribal college, believe the language has an important role to play in the future of the tribe. “It provides us tools to cope,” Culbertson says. “A better, more thoughtful, more intelligent existence.” Teenagers on the Wind River Reservation have plenty to cope with. Suicide rates among American Indian teenagers are 3.5 times the national average, and Plains Indian youth are most at risk. Poverty and unemployment are compounded by drugs, alcohol, neglect and abuse. Out of five random students, says high school culture teacher Eugene Ridgely Jr. III, “four of them won’t be able to tell you what they’re going to do

tomorrow. They may not even know where they’re going to spend the night.” Ridgely Jr. III teaches at St. Stephen’s Indian High School, a former missionary boarding school on the reservation. Liz Lone Bear, who attended St. Stephen’s as a child, says she can still feel the sting of the sisters’ rulers when she speaks Arapaho. The school came under American Indian control in 1975; however, even though teachers at St. Stephen’s now reward students for speaking Arapaho rather than beating them, Ridgely Jr. III says lingering mistrust of formal schools, especially among the elders, contributes to sky-high rates of truancy. There have been days, he says, when more than 1,000 students on the Wind River Reservation were unaccounted for. In May 2009, at St. Stephen’s Indian High School graduation, a round-cheeked teenager named Danika wears a white satin cap and gown and sparkly turquoise eyeliner. One of seven graduates, she is beating the odds. Official records say that Arapaho dropout rates are around 20 percent, says education director Sergio Maldonaldo, but “we know damn well they’re more like 60 percent.” Absenteeism goes both ways: Maldonaldo guesses that nearly half of St. Stephen’s faculty didn’t show up for the graduation ceremony. Like many American Indian youth, Danika says she wants to join the military. She craves the faster pace of life, the discipline. I ask if she will ever come back to the reservation. She hesitates. Even though her teachers have encouraged her to go to college, she knows her family and friends don’t want her to leave. It can be hard to return once you’ve left. “What if you have kids?” I ask. “Do you want them to be raised with traditional Arapaho values? Will they learn the language?” Wrong question, I think, as her eyes tear up. She already has a baby. She got pregnant in her junior year. It’s taken all she has, she says, just to keep her grades up and stay on the basketball team. As for learning Arapaho and following traditional ways in addition to succeeding in school, she says, “The [elders] don’t understand how hard it is.” After the graduation ceremony, what seems like hundreds of relatives and friends fill the Wind River Casino ballroom to celebrate. People line up to get food from the steaming buffet table, then sit down. But no one eats. Instead, they wait for a tiny, elderly woman wearing a fuchsia windbreaker to push her walker to the front of the room. A pod of tattooed teenagers comes in late, dressed like gangsters and looking hungry, but, in keeping with Arapaho custom, they stop cold before they cross the woman’s path. Even though the elder’s words are nearly drowned out by pulsing techno from the game room, the teenagers form a half circle around her and bow their heads. In Arapaho, she blesses the food. This story originally appeared in High Country News (hcn.org ). Emily Underwood writes from Coloma, Calif..


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Hot springs, hotter food FLASHINTHEPAN On a recent business trip through southwest Montana, I had my evenings free. That allowed me to make the 30-mile trip from Bozeman to Norris Hot Springs. I’m usually lukewarm on developed hot springs, preferring the rustic wilderness settings in all respects, except perhaps the sleazy dude with his tent set up in viewing range of the pools so he can conveniently appear when a party of ladies shows up. But Norris Hot Springs, also known as Water of the Gods, is a special place. The large, wood-clad soaking pool is filled with deep water at the right temperature—I’d guess 102. At the foot of the pool is a stage sheltered by a geodesic dome, where live music occurs on weekend nights. One evening I floated in the warm waters while Missoula’s Tom Catmull played, sending buttery blues notes toward the pool. The low-key ambience at Norris inspires a certain peaceful camaraderie among the soakers. The vibe is interesting, with a mix of liberal-intellectual types, mountain men, hermits, rednecks, hippies, college students and would-be rowdy kids kept in line by a squad of poolside patrollers who quietly make sure everyone behaves and nobody drowns. The patrollers’ job is complicated by the fact that the on-site restaurant, the No Loose Dogs Saloon, serves beer and wine, including offerings from Missoula’s own Tenspoon Vineyard and Kettlehouse brewery. I came for the soaking, found myself pleasantly surprised by the tunes, and ended up staying for the food, which was an unexpected and inspiring treat. The No Loose Dogs Saloon serves a small but lovingly crafted menu of food made from largely local ingredients. Many of the vegetables come from the Norris Hot Springs’ garden. The meats are local too, as is most of the cheese. “About 95 percent of the ingredients in our food is local,” estimates Rebecca Heemstra, kitchen manager at the No Loose Dogs Saloon. I had a great bowl of cheddary potato leek soup, washed down with a refreshing glass of Tenspoon St. Pepin, which cut through the warm cheesy richness to bring out the fine bouquet of the soup. Then I had a chicken quesadilla that was crispy in all the right

places, with just the right amount of salsa to send it home. It was peppery, garlicky hot, featured the right balance of chicken and cheddar, and was unusually spiced. “Is there, like, coriander and cumin in that quesadilla?” I asked. The kitchen help, impressed with my tasting prowess, rewarded me with a Norris Hot Springs bumper sticker that said “Hot,” because those were indeed the spices.

by ARI LeVAUX

in the tomato basil soup to be served alongside the four-cheese mac and cheese. Future specials include black bean soup and turkey pot pie (local turkey, “all our veggies”). Heemstra also makes a point of keeping vegetarian and vegan options on the menu. The food is cooked in a commercial kitchen onsite, portioned out, and reheated poolside in the No Loose Dogs Saloon. It’s then served in the cozy dining room. With the nearest grocery store more than 30 miles away, sometimes Heemstra is forced to

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That helped ease the pain of having been taunted by the dry erase board that still advertised yesterday’s special: lamb meatballs with curried aioli and kamut pilaf. Heemtsra has been at the helm of the No Loose Dogs Saloon for two and a half years. In addition to helping build the garden program at Norris, she’s been building relationships with local farmers. The grass-fed, grass-finished beef in the freezer is from the Sabo Ranch in Harrison. All four cheeses— including the goat cheese—in the four-cheese macaroni and cheese are local, as are the breadcrumbs, while the sundried tomatoes are from the Norris garden. So are the oven-roasted tomatoes and the basil

wing it. She says those conditions have forced the creation of some of her most popular dishes. As is often the case with locally based diets, things really pick up in the summer. Grilled zucchini and asparagus, all from the garden, are a regular fixture when they’re in season. As are garden salads. And she has high hopes for garden salads all year round in the near future, thanks to an ambitious plan to build a greenhouse that’s heated by hot water from the springs. The world needs more places like Norris Hot Springs: tight ships with a down-home feel that are light on the earth, good for their local economy and that feed the bodies and souls of their guests.

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Tickle Your Taste buds in 2010 www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 3pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan

Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the Great Room; visit with the chefs and dine in the Kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: M-Th 11am10pm; Fr-Sa 11am-11pm; Sun 10am-10pm; Sun brunch 10am-2pm; Tavern til Midnight Su-Th, 2am Fr-Sa. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

Page 17 January 7–January 14, 2010


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Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Resolve to treat yourself to the best in 2010 with homemade, super-premium ice-cream and ice-cream cakes! Stop by and try our shakes or ice-cream cupcakes! If you've other resolutions, keep them with fresh smoothies or homemade, fat-free, no-sugar-added "Sinless" ice-cream! It's a Great Day for Ice Cream! $-$$

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Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 3pm Fri & Sat 7am - 3pm Sun 8am - 3pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All of our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch and dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on all-natural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries,

Page 18 January 7–January 14, 2010

HAPPIESTHOUR Silver Dollar Bar Claim to fame: Ever since it opened in 1935, the Silver Dollar’s been owned and operated by the Martello family. Today, patriarch Ben Martello and his three sons—Kevin, Scott and Benji—run the place. “We might be the oldest family-run bar in the city,” says Brian Patterson, who’s tended bar here for 10-plus years. “I know Al’s & Vic’s opened in 1937, so we’ve got them beat by two years.” This year, of course, marks the bar’s 75th anniversary. Atmosphere: Appropriately sparse workingman bar—think tall stools, Budweiser signs and softball trophies—but with “Buck Hunter Safari,” three pool tables and a digital Touch Tunes juke box in the back (this bar once ruled the Indy’s reader poll in the now antiquated Best Juke Box category). Most significantly, The Silver Dollar boasts its Wall of Fame, a row of framed color photos of beloved regulars that hangs above the bar. It’s sort of like a poor man’s version of Lee Nye’s famous black-and-white portraits in Charlie B’s, except, as Patterson points out, “ours are taken by the owner with a cheap digital camera outside the bar. And you need more than just a leathery face to get up there.” The latest induction to the wall: Crystal Video owner Tim Huffman. What you’re drinking: PBR or whiskey. “I was asked to make a Purple Nipple once,” says

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Patterson. “We’re not exactly a fruity drink establishment.” Who you’re drinking with: Happy Hour attracts a no-nonsense, blue-collar crowd, many of whom are pictured above the bar. Late night brings in more of the youngsters. Happy Hour specials: None. When the PBR tallboys run $1.75, there’s no need for specials. How to find it: 307 Railroad Street, one block west of The Depot. —Skylar Browning The Happiest Hour is a new column that celebrates western Montana watering holes. To r e c o m m e n d a b a r , b a r t e n d e r o r beverage for The Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.


dish

the

croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$

Januar y

COFFEE SPECIAL

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins 542-2206 123 E Main 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. With two convenient locations, it’s easy to call in your order and pick it up on your way to play. $-$$

Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$

Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$

MISSOULA'S BEST

COFFEE

Colombia Supreme Italian Roast $9.75/lb Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ What’s For Dinner Meal Delivery Service 406-207-2203 Delicious, affordable meals delivered to your door. Fresh dinner menu changes weekly, frozen dinner and dessert menus change monthly. Order by noon on Monday, deliveries are made Tuesday. Meals start at only $7.50 per portion. Menus and ordering available at www.WhatsForDinnerMissoula.com $-$$

ASKARI Color bind Hi Ari, Do you know where one might find dried beet and spinach powders in Missoula? I’d like to use them as natural food coloring in homemade pasta (they have some nutritional value as well, unlike commercial food coloring). The Good Food Store has an allnatural food coloring set that is prohibitively expensive, but does not stock the dried vegetable powders. Any ideas? Thanks! —True Colors

Q

Dear True Colors, As far as I can tell, you’re outta luck for Missoula options. But I did some online research and found an interesting website that will ship you what you’re looking for at a very low price of about $1 an ounce—which is insanely low considering how much raw material goes into dried veggies. Barry Farm in Ohio has your spinach and

A

beet powder, as well as powdered tomato, carrot, asparagus and pumpkin powder. Based on the photo, the pumpkin powder appears bright yellow. And it comes with the curious note: “Dried pumpkin powder can also be used as a natural colorant to foods. This is especially helpful if you are trying to color yogurt coating for dog biscuits.” Wow, to think that all of this time that I’ve been making my own yogurt coating for my dog’s biscuits, but not even coloring them. No wonder Stinky is such a head case. I’m glad to know that for less than the price of a Missoula parking ticket I can color her yellow yogurt-covered dog biscuits bright yellow. Hallelujah! Barry Farms also sells powdered vegetables that don’t seem to give any color, like artichoke. To see the entire list of offerings, go to www.barryfarm.com/veggies.htm. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

WE’RE OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER. AND THE LEFTOVERS MAKE FOR A PRETTY GOOD BREAKFAST.

DELIVERY ALSO AVAILABLE Downtown Missoula • 137 W. Front St. • 721.0077 North Missoula • 5210 Grant Creek Rd. • 721.0099 www.mackenzieriverpizza.com

Missoula Independent

Page 19 January 7–January 14, 2010


8

Arts & Entertainment listings January 7–January 14, 2010

days a week THURSDAY

THURSDAY October

Witness how 4,000 books of white supremacist propaganda were transformed from something hateful to works of art that touch on social justice issues and more during an opening reception for Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, from 5–7 PM in UM’s Paxson and Meloy Galleries, in UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019.

29

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

January

07

If you know a young woman between the ages of 14–18 who you think would make a great leader, consider nominating them for YWCA Missoula’s Young Women LEAD project, which includes attendance at two seminars as well as a community service project. Free to participate. To nominate, call the YWCA’s Jen Euell at 543-6691. Nominations are due by Mon., Jan. 11.

Gypsies come out during a Routine/Improv Student Troupe Bellydance class every Thu. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for every class you can make it to/ $8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667.

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352.

Hopefully the hard stuff won’t wear you out before the workout. Hot toddies and cider compliment a workout for your legs during a free snow sports prep clinic/open house at 5:30 PM at Stafford Downtown, 218 E. Front St. Ste. 100. Call 549-2832 and visit staffordfitness.net.

If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, noise pop—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.

Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com.

Get those endorphins pumpin’ late in the day when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for tempo runs and drills during Thursday Tempo Runs, every Thu. at 5:30 PM starting with a stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA/free to Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org.

Create something complex and open to interpretation with fine grained soil under the firm guidance of Orville Chigbrow when The Clay Studio of Missoula presents an eight-week open instructed class, from 1–4 PM this and every Thu. until March 25 at the studio, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/$160 members. Includes a one-half of total cost, non-refundable down payment. Call 543-0509 to register or visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on Guitar Hero, Rock Band and more on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 3- to 6-year-old might need some

Resolve to reuse what you can. Nature Boy 829 S. Higgins M-Sa, 11- 6 728-1408

A 1950s housewife irons your candy in artist Shalene Valenzuela’s “Chew, Don’t Swallow.” Valenzuela and a host of other artists present their work during the Missoula Art Museum’s Benefit Art Auction Exhibition, which opens Wed., Jan. 13, at 10 AM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

Times Run 1/8 - 1/14

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Young Victoria

PG Nightly at 7:00 and 9:00 Sunday matinee at 1:00 and 3:00

Precious

Nightly at 7:00 and 9:00 Sunday matinee at 1:00 and 3:00

www.thewilma.com

Missoula Independent

Page 20 January 7–January 14, 2010

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Catch some hot pickin’ while you do a little lickin’ inside your pint glass when The Acousticals play bluegrass at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 8, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S


The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Find out exactly what you can expect when expecting with tips on nutrition, exercise, labor, birth preparations and more during a free early pregnancy information night, which runs from 6:30–8 PM in the small meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. E-mail Krista at naturalchildbirthclasses@gmail.com. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066.

karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Spend time with your favorite folk slinging uncle when Helena’s Adam Nordell, who goes by the name “Uncle Adam Nordell” on MySpace, strums up the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post,

Invigorate that spine of yours during a Classical Pilates Mat Class taught by Alison Laundrie every Fri. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 11 AM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com. Clean the junk outta your chakras during a twoday Chakra Vinyasa Yoga workshop with Nancy Ruby, which starts with a lecture/practice from 4–6 PM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. A “Chakra Journey” class featuring meditation, yoga asana and music follows from 9 AM–5 PM on Sat., Jan. 9. $95 for the full workshop/$20 Fri. night/$25 Sat. from 9-11 AM. Register at yogamotion.com or call 585-9600.

You just might do the push, whip or the jitterbug-lindy when Cathy Clark slings beginning swing dance lessons every Thu. at 7 PM, and then moves to beyond basics swing lessons at 7:30 PM, at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com.

Bowling and karaoke go together like red meat and toothbrushes during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosterone-fueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace at 9 PM every Thu. Free. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the

Middle schoolers create mayhem—in a wholesome way—during Friday Night Hang Out: Middle School Mayhem, Friday Night Lights, which runs from 7–10:30 PM at the City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave. $3. Open to grades sixth through eighth only. Call 532-1555. Stanzas creep off the page when local poet Mark Gibbons reads excerpts from his book Connemara Moon—while also signing copies of Mauvaises Herbes, the French version of his book—at 7 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Includes readings of Mauvaises Herbes in French by Sean Gibbons and UM prof Michel Valentin. Call 549-9010. (See Spotlight in this issue.) A Palestinian walks into a forced suicide mission in Tel Aviv. No, this isn’t a joke, this is For My Father, a movie which explores the Palestinian/Israeli conflict from a personal angle and screens at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. It’s the whitest porn you’ll ever see: the Cold Smoke People’s Choice Awards ski porn fest hits town with such titillating titles as Swift Silent Deep and Snow Kite Masters at 8 PM at the Badlander. $2. Expect ice packs to melt when DJ Monty Carlo fires up dance tunes after the screenings. Visit coldsmokeawards.com for a full list of films.

The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should call 541-8463.

Stand tall and feel comfortable without the use of booze during a free improve your balance clinic, which features a chance to peep state of the art exercise equipment at 5:30 PM at Stafford Downtown, 218 E. Front St. Ste. 100. Call 549-2832 and visit staffordfitness.net.

The Bruciest Bruce of them all proves there’s nothing like the real thing when Bruce Threlkeld thrills with acoustic guitar work at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361.

Members of Salt Lake City’s Gorgeous Hussies experiment with their own version of Avatar when they play the Palace Sat., Jan 9, at 9 PM with Wolf Redboy and Elephant Gun. $5. 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY January

08

Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia with Jody Mosher, every Friday at 9 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10. Call 541-7240. Fine tune your breathing, sun salutations, posture and more during a Sivananda Yoga Class which meets this and every Fri. from 10–11 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. Free, but donations appreciated. Call Gina at 518-928-7523 or e-mail gina.mauro@gmail.com. Toddlers always find something to fight for when enjoying books like The Encyclopedia of Libertarianism by Ronald Hamowy during Toddler Story Time, which features age appropriate stories (of course), from 10:30–11:15 AM in the downstairs meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Local artist and ace latte slinger Aaron Fields brings psychedelia to the canvas and frame with help from fellow barista L. Alexander Wolfe when both artists present their paintings and photography during a Second Friday reception at Cat’s Eye Designs, 137 E. Main St., from 5–8 PM. Free. Features music, wine and cheese. Nature gets nurtured, in a way, during Women in Nature, a photo essay/exhibit which documents local women of all ages playin’, shreddin’ and just enjoying the outdoors with a reception from 5–8 PM at Betty’s Divine, 521 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Includes free flowing wine, cookies and a music performance by Lee McAfee. Expect something brilliant in the form of an installation piece when slick barista Nathan McTague presents a joint exhibit with his wife Natalie Christensen, at 5 PM on the walls of Butterfly Herbs, 232 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. This ain’t no Montucky landscape art: Cathryn Sugg exhibits a range of her large scale mixed media paintings and drawings, which often feature abstract representations of wapiti—aka elk—during an opening from 5:30–8:30 PM at the ZACC Gallery, 235 N. First St. W. Free. Call 549-7555. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Missoula Independent

Wave to a non-existent television audience so The Jimmy Snow Country Show can sweep you up into heights of countrified delirium when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. DJ Spidii spins all the newest polka hits, well, more likely the hottest trance tunes, when he plays the Palace at 9 PM. Free. Jump into a river of Kahlua so you can slide into the frothy sounds of Landslide, who play Sean Kelly’s at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327.

Page 21 January 7–January 14, 2010


Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Let Russ Nasset and the Revelators show you to the nearest bucket of pomade when they rock rockabilly and country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158. Let Luau Cinder singe your eyebrows to goth approved perfection when they push dub and funk on willing souls at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY January

09

Get those endorphins pumpin’ early when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for mid to long group runs during Saturday Group Runs, every Sat. at 8 AM starting with a stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA/Free to Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com. Bust Tonya Harding-esque smooth moves without busting any kneecaps during “It’s Great to Skate–Bring a Friend Day,” a free ice skating event sponsored by the Missoula Figure Skating Club which runs from 10–11:30 AM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Free, includes prizes and skating tips. Skate rental available for a nominal fee. Visit missoulafsc.org.

The focus of the retreat is to unburden ourselves from mental habits that cause unnecessary suffering and to realize our natural state which is the inner dimension of peace, joy and love. Anam Thubten invites everyone to experience this spiritual transformation through meditation practice and the timeless teachings of the Buddha.

Friday Night Public Talk • 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Retreat 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee Suggested Donation: Friday Night $15 or Full Retreat $125 To register, or with questions about scholarships, email: info@tibetanlanguage.org

Missoula Independent

Page 22 January 7–January 14, 2010

I bet he’s got a wicked handshake: local world record bench press holder Terry Baldwin hosts a free clinic on proper weight lifting techniques, pillar strength and how to make the most out of your muscles at 10 AM at Stafford Downtown, 218 E. Front St. Ste. 100. Call 549-2832 and visit staffordfitness.net. Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Rorschach Words” with Beth Jaffe. Free, but donations appreciated and accepted. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Make your thumbs green in order to grow something heady—for your eyes and taste buds, that is—during a Bigfork/Ferndale Community Garden Workshop, which specifically aims for you to become an expert at square foot gardening, at 10:30 AM at St. Patricks Episcopal Church in Ferndale, at the

corner of Montana Highway 209 and S. Ferndale Drive near Bigfork. Free. Call Michelle at 837-0982. Learn to mix and match your bellydance styles during Beginner/Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Sat. at 10:30 AM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for as many classes as you can make it to/ $8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com. Kick it to the core for a Core-Kicking Pilates Class with Alison Laundrie every Sat. at 646 Sixth St. W., at 11 AM. $10, includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Racists need not apply: Let diversity rush from your fingers and onto the canvas during a Saturday family art workshop titled Honoring Diversity with Ria DeNeeve, which starts at 11 AM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $5 per participant. Features mixed media/collage projects based on the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr. Call 728-0447. Renée Fleming rocks her singing socks off as an aristocrat in an opera about love and intrigue during the latest installment of The Met Live at the Roxy series, which features a HD screening of Der Rosenkavalier at 11 AM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $18/$16 students and seniors at any GrizTix outlet or www.griztix.com. Visit www.morrisproductions.org. Make the jam in your jar turn blue during an open acoustic bluegrass jam session hosted by the Montana Rockies Bluegrass Association, which starts with pickin’ at 1 PM at the Ruby’s Inn Convention Center, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free, open to all skill levels. Potluck dinner follows at 5:30 P M. Visit mtbluegrass.com. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Wake out of your slump and bond with your child during “Hibernation Celebration,” an activity that explores how animals adapt to cold weather, at 2 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $2/free MNHC members. Call 327-0405.

nightlife Andrea Harsell commands a ship of suds while Louie Bond backs her up with hot guitar licks, and his best Sean Connery impersonation, when they play the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. You can bet your sweet derrière there won’t be any obnoxious dudes vying to buy women drinks during Ladies’ Pottery Night, an artistic spin on ladies’ night, where women create bowls, dishware or sushi platters and enjoy complimentary wine and appetizers from 6–8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $20, with 10 percent off all pottery. Also includes a $10 non-refundable deposit. RSVP by calling 549-7555. When the going gets absurd, Blue Melon blends up pickle juice and city ordinances when they play rockabilly, jazz and blues at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.


Lusty tales of life as a teacher in Africa bring the condensation levels up a notch when Peter Orner reads and signs copies of The Second Coming of Mavala Shikongo: A Novel, at 7 PM at the Grizzly Claw Trading Company in Seeley Lake, 3187 Hwy. 83. Free. Call 677-0008. Sorry Missoula conservatives, local Dems won big this year, and now it’s time to partay. So join in on the festivities during the Missoula County Democrats’ Red, White and Blues Ball, which features music by the Mike Bader Blues Band and appearances by Mayor John Engen and City Councilman Roy Houseman at 7 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W. Suggested donation of $15, plus a dry or canned good for the Missoula Food Bank. Call Emily Brock at 546-6552. Jig yourself into a fury without selling armaments to Iran during a contra dance at the Kalispell Salvation Army Church Gym, 110 Bountiful Drive in Kalispell, which starts with dancing at 7:30 PM. Features music by Sassafras Stomp with calling by Roy Curet. $15 family/$7 adults and teens/free for nondancers. Call Joe at 752-7469. If you’ve been searching for some of that sweet, sweet nectar, look no further than Four Bee’s and A Honey, who command canes to tap and walkers to saunter when they play the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., at 8 PM. $5. Call 543-7154. An all out war on silence is declared with a local-yokel show at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., when experimental strands of rock, dance punk and more take form with sets by Hologram Pants, FagRag, At Home in the Cosmos, Julie and the Wolves and Petra Core. $5. (See Soundcheck in this issue.) He passes left so you can pop and lock to the right: Vic Stampley joins Lefty Lucy for a night of steamy vocals and instrumentals when they play the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 741-2361. Be the star in your own sitcom while others ignore your loss of marbles by shimmying to The Jimmy Snow Country Show, who play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at

least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. The men in Salt Lake City’s Gorgeous Hussies show you a thing or two about shedding timidity when they supply the pop and the rock at the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Opening support from Wolf Redboy and Elephant Gun. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

NEW YEAR? NEW 'DO!

Start 2010 with a steezy new look. Whether you're adding some funky color or just cleaning up that shag, we've got you covered!

Tom Catmull and the Clerics halt the worldwide ban on “flaming armpits,” which could be a drink—or a revolutionary act—when they play Americana and pull roots at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Idaho’s Stoney Holiday only asks for a lid of your love when they spread funk over bluegrass at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY January

10

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed before you head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996.

2302 B McDonald Ave (Next to Missoula Copy Center)

274-3017 outsideingarden.com

Let your body embrace rhythmic unity with breathing, chants, hand positions and body locks (but no popping and locking) during an Intro Kundalini yoga workshop taught by Sylvia Robert which meets from 10 AM–noon at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. Free, but donations accepted. Call 581-4093 and visit yogainmissoula.com. Quench your urge to watch football with others on several different televisions every Sun. at Lucky Strike Casino, 515 Dearborn Ave., and, if you’ve got the the gusto, belt out some bars during their karaoke contest which starts a 9:30 PM. Free. Call 549-4152.

Indoor Garden and G

"Servicing the

Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell, “Climate change, what climate change? I follow the megalomaniacal church of Glenn Beck!” Free. Call 543-7154. Leave the freedom toast at home so you can scarf down classical music from France during DalyClassic, an offshoot of DalyJazz that features performances by alto saxophonist Brooke Florence and pianist Jan Halmes at 2 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. Event is sold out. Visit dalyjazz.com. Renée Fleming rocks her singing socks off as an aristocrat in an opera about love and intrigue during the latest installment of The Met Live at the Roxy series, which features a HD screening of Der Rosenkavalier at 4 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $18/$16 students and seniors at any GrizTix outlet or www.griztix.com. Visit www.morrisproductions.org.

Missoula Independent

Page 23 January 7–January 14, 2010


see it

Seek connection, mutual life, or even death using the ancient Japanese strategy game Go when a group of enthusiasts meets to play the game this and every Sun. at 4:30 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Email goinmissoula@yahoo.com.

to believe it!

Celebrate at our New Resort with a discount of $ 50 per night!

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Have you seen this place?

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Missoula Independent

Page 24 January 7–January 14, 2010

January

11

If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool cue, consider joining a weekly pool tournament at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which runs this and every Sun. starting with a sign up at 4:30 PM and the game starting at 5. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight players, includes one free drink per player. Call 830-3277.

Quit that dead-end job and head down to the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center, 310 S. Curtis St., where you can brush up on your reading, writing and math skills in order to pass the GED or enroll in college during free adult education courses, every Mon.–Thu. from 8 AM–12 PM and 1–3 PM, as well as every Tue.–Thu. from 6–8 PM. Call 542-4015.

Sandy Lawler takes your hand for a dip through cayenne flavored dance moves during a beginning salsa class which meets this and every Sun. at 4:45 PM for six weeks at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. Call Sandy at 2396044 for pricing. A six-week beginning ballroom course taught by Lawler follows at 6 PM, as does a beginning swing class at 7:15 PM.

Sizzle off the flub you gained from overindulging and gain strength during springboard classes which occur this and every Mon. and Wed. at 9 AM, followed by Pilates mat classes at 12:30 PM and 5:45 PM, all at Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. D. $12 per class. Call Avril at 360-7421.

nightlife

Get slippery in a bucket of clay during a Beginning Pottery class, which runs this and every Sun. until Feb. 28, and every Wed. until March 3, from 6–9 PM both nights at The Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/$160 members. Includes a one-half of total cost, non-refundable down payment. Call 543-0509 to register or visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org.

You have to see it to believe it! The Inland Northwest’s newest destination resort with striking architecture, 250 oversized guest rooms and suites, more than 22,000 sq. ft. of meeting space, 14,000 sq. ft. of a luxury spa, 14 incredible restaurants and lounges, an exciting casino with over 2,000 slot machines, 37 Table Games and 9 Poker Tables, and starstudded entertainment. There’s something here for everyone!

MONDAY

Improvisational movement with others takes on an extemporaneous vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. You too can practice guided, affirmative and visual meditation with others when Rev. Jennifer Hackenbruch leads a session every second and fourth Sunday of the month from 7–8 PM at Unity Church, 546 South Ave. W. Love offering appreciated. Call 370-9631.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Donna Smith, The Front Street Jazz Group and DJs Gary Stein and Ryan Wendel. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798.

Sorry bud, cap and trade is not something you do when your favorite Kettlehouse growler breaks. But you can find out more about the other cap and trade—a system to reduce greenhouse gases—during the City Club Missoula forum “Cap and Trade: Is this the Answer to Decreasing Carbon Emissions?”, which features comments from local experts like Keegan Eisenstadt from 11:30 AM–1 PM at the Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $16/$11 members/$5 for no-lunch option. RSVP by noon on Jan. 8. Visit cityclubmissoula.org and call 541-CITY. (See Agenda in this issue.) Fire up your senses while you watch others install an exhibit filled with objects, interactive components and photos from the raging western fires of 1910 which will comprise When the Mountains Roared: The Fire of 1910, an exhibit that officially opens on March 28 at the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, located at building 322. You’re free to watch staff install the exhibit Tue.–Sun. from noon–5 PM through March 28. Call 728-3476 and visit fortmissoulamuseum.org. Slap, pinch and fondle some clay in order to sculpt a masterpiece during an eight week handbuilding class which meets this and every Mon. from 1–4 PM until March 1 at The Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/$160 members. Includes a onehalf of total cost, non-refundable down payment. Call 543-0509 to register or visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Two sessions of World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class hits Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon. At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month, drum rental available. RSVP 3963352 or visit tangledtones.com.

nightlife

Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations during Ladies’ Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Sun. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277.

If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. W. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot.

Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

Those looking to control their eating habits can get support from others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.


What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Let instructor Danny Crump breathe down your neck in the most benevolent of ways during an eight week intermediate throwing class, which meets this and every Mon. until March 1 from 6–9 PM at The Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/$160 members. Includes a one-half of total cost, non-refundable down payment. Call 543-0509 to register or visit theclaystudioofmissoula.org. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. Let the rumba and cha-cha rumble throughout your extremities when Sandy Lawler leads a beginning Latin dance class this and every Mon. at 6:30 PM for six weeks at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. Call Sandy at 239-6044 for pricing. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. If you’re 18 or under and your life has been affected by someone else’s drinking, get support with others by joining the Alateen 12Step Support Group, which meets this and every Monday at 7 PM at First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St. Free, use alley entrance. Call 728-5818 or visit www.alanon.alateen.org. Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Russ Nasset lets sweet guitar tones breathe down the nape of your neck when he plays a solo set at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free. Every Yogi had to start somewhere: get an intro into an ancient discipline during an Intro to Yoga class with Erin Gael Chambers, which meets this and every Mon. and Wed. until Feb. 17 from 7:15–8:30 PM at the Yoga Fitness Center, 123 W. Alder St. $75 for the six-week session. Call 370-0829 to register. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Rawk ‘N Roll Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Also includes a free nacho bar. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at

the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. This week: hip-hop from locals Tonsofun, Linkletter, Lui, Traffic and Tahjbo. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM. Free. Men drink on the cheap and can enjoy a game of pigskin, as well as karaoke, during Men’s Night at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Mon. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277.

handy during the ZACC’s Paint Your Own Pottery Studio, which runs from 12–8 PM Mon.–Fri. and every Sat. from noon–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Price ranges from $5–$20, depending on the cost of pottery. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Shaving cream and cornstarch no longer fit into your repertoire of “adult” fun during Preschool Art Start with Allie DePuy, where kids ages 3-and-a-half to 5 create art with a variety of mediums, like shaving cream, from 1–2:30 PM this and every Tue. until Feb. 16 at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $55/$49.50 members for six

SPOTLIGHT Don’t avert your gaze and act like you don’t know who I am. You live in Montana. Some of you see me all the time. I wander around your forests and near your mountainside homes, chomping on grasses and leaves. Many of you like to hunt and subsequently kill my ilk with a high-powered rifle, only to then take our heads to taxidermists so we can sit in your living room as ornaments. Sometimes you make us into sausages.

WHEN: Fri., Jan. 8, 5:30–8:30 PM WHERE: ZACC Gallery, 235 N. First St. W. HOW MUCH: Free I especially take a liking to her piece “Agony/Ecstasy,” which features an image of me howling in the wind with my dagger-like horns jutting in the air, colored in deep washes

TUESDAY

12

It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. If you suffer from fibromyalgia, consider easing your pain with a free, non-invasive test to be conducted by the Foundation for Wellness Professionals at 5:30 PM at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. Space is limited to the first 10 callers, so RSVP quickly by calling 541-2281.

When the drumbeat changes, your booty needs to pick up the beat. So shake your rump to some African flava during Tarn Ream’s Afrikan dance class, which meets at 6:30 PM in Room 005 of UM’s PARTV Center. $10 per class. Call 549-7933 or e-mail tarn.ream@umontana.edu. You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. of blood red, black and brown. I’ve also found my eyes entangled in “After Expectations,” pictured here, a work which appears to show an expansive cobweb-like mass of thread vying for dominance with a piece of cloth.

Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Brown Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com.

Sugg recently informed me that these works attempt to define the space that exists between opposites, such as hunter and gatherer or urban and rural. You should explore this concept of “in-between-ness” with me during her opening on Friday, so that we can perhaps bridge the awkward gap between us while soaking in her radiant works of art.

Let your body embrace rhythmic unity with breathing, meditation, mantras and more during a Kundalini yoga class, where instructor Sylvia Robert leads you to a state of oneness this and every Tue. from 7–8:15 PM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students. Call 581-4093 and visit yogainmissoula.com.

—Ira Sather-Olson weeks/$10 drop-in. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Your child’s fascination with shiny digital gadgets takes the backseat to silhouettes, styrofoam prints and ceramic heads during Afterschool Art Adventure with Lauren Sandler, where kids work on projects based on current exhibits at the Missoula Art Museum from 4–5:30 PM this and every Tue. until Feb. 16 at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $55/$49.50 members. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

Your skill at creating something functionally wicked, like a beer stein or a vase, comes in

Burn off even more of that bulk you gained from holiday overindulgence during spring-

January

Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200.

Beginners can try their hand with more experienced folks during a Beginner/Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance class, which takes place every Tue. at 6:30 PM at The Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Ste. B. $30 month for every class you can make it to/$8 drop-in. Call Wendy at 541-0667 or e-mail thebellytent@hotmail.com.

I’m wapiti, also known as an elk, and I’m often featured in many of the mixed media paintings and drawings by Cathryn Sugg, a current MFA candidate in UM’s College of Visual and Performing Arts. She hails from an area I’m familiar with, a small farm in the far reaches of Saskatchewan, Canada. And, I have to say, she really has a distinct aesthetic when it comes to rendering me and my horned peers on what appear to be patches of tablecloths.

WHO: Cathryn Sugg

nightlife

Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

elk, et al.

WHAT: Second Friday opening reception

board classes which occur this and every Tue. and Thu. at 4:30 PM, followed by Pilates mat classes at 5:30 PM, all at Studio D, 420 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. D. $12 per class. Call Avril at 360-7421.

Missoula Independent

Deciders win out over the inconclusive lot during the Missoula Public Library’s teen advisory board, which meets once a month at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St., to plan teen events, suggest materials and recommend teen-centric services. Free. Call 721-BOOK. He probably didn’t love their disdain for human rights: Join others in a discussion of Simon Winchester’s The Man Who Loved China during the Missoula Public Library’s book club meeting at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free, with copies of the book available at the accounts desk. Call 721-BOOK.

Page 25 January 7–January 14, 2010


Do the robot or whatever kind of dance suits you in order to laugh and express yourself during Turning the Wheel presents: Adult Tapestry Series, a class of movement exercises facilitated by Lizzi Juda with musical accompaniment by Nathan Zavalney that meets this and every Tue. from 7–8:30 PM until Feb. 2 at 1042 Monroe St. $24/$20 preregistered. Open to those ages 16 and over. RSVP by calling 853-0361 or e-mailing ann.stevenson@gmail.com.

Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every Tue. at 7:20 PM, when Horton Hip Hop puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? Grenache is a member what what fruit family? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.)

Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics

Let your bow-legged legs step to the rhythm of “slow, slow, quick, quick” during a beginning country 2-step class that meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM for six weeks at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. Call Sandy at 2396044 for pricing.

Call for new Patient Preferred Pricing Multiple Grade "A" Medical Strains

830-3335

The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers. Get fresh with three chords and a raucous ‘tude when Train Song hops a ride to the Badlander to slay you with punk at 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY

13

Morning Melodies, a free, fun-filled, familyfriendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free.

NO

Wander with wonder while looking at ceramics, glassware, paintings and even a miraculously modified gum ball machine during the Missoula Art Museum’s Benefit Art Auction Exhibition, which features over 50 artworks and opens at 10 AM at Carnegie Gallery in the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Exhibit runs through Feb. on: Wed.–Fri. from 10 AM–5 PM and Sat.–Sun. from 10 AM–3 PM. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org.

Do you suffer from any of these conditions?

Missoula Independent

Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463.

January

E LABL I A V A W

chronic pain multiple sclerosis glaucoma chronic muscle spasms

You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot.

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Crohn's disease chronic nausea seizure disorders Parkinson’s disease

aids/hiv cachexia hepatitis C IBS

Page 26 January 7–January 14, 2010

Consider getting your next tat from an intaglio print when you check out portraits of printmakers, by a printmaker, during the exhibition James Todd: Portraits of Printmakers, which opens at 10 AM in the Lela Autio Education Gallery at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Exhibit runs through Feb. 27. Hours are: Wed.–Fri. from 10 AM–5 PM and Sat.–Sun. from 10 AM–3 PM. Call 7280447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. (See Scope in this issue.) Imaginations leap during preschool story time, where Allison Jessop leads green minds into narrative appreciation mode with the story “Feelin’ Froggy” from 10:30–11:15 AM in the

children’s corner of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. As my main man Bob Dobbs always says, “Give me slack!” So heed his word and slack from duty to catch some swagger on the screen during a screening of The Flame and the Arrow at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 2 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Wed. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. Call 721-2665.

nightlife Sop up some suds to help gramps get support for his independence, dignity and health during a Kettlehouse “Community Unite” pint night, which runs from 5–8 PM at the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from every pint sold benefits Missoula Aging Services. Call 728-1660. Just don’t expect any beatboxing when the Black Mountain Boys play “fantastic bluegrass” at the Blacksmith Brewing Co., 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Perhaps the kids at Columbine wouldn’t have gone crazy if they’d heard the good word on peace from Dr. Mark Umbreit, a mediator who leads the discussion “Restorative Justice and Peacemaking in the Global Community,” at 6 PM in Room AT 203 of Flathead Valley Community College, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. Free. Visit restorativeyouthjustice.org. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts from a live model into a work of genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s non-instructed figure drawing classes, from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. If you fancy yourself a crackerjack with a pool cue, consider joining a weekly pool tournament at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which runs this and every Wed. starting with a sign up at 6:30 PM and the game start-


ing at 7. $5 buy-in with a minimum of eight players, includes one free drink per player. Call 830-3277. Get ballsy by having a ball with others on the dance floor during an intermediate ballroom dance class that meets this and every Wed. at 6:30 PM for six weeks at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St. Instructor consent required. Call Sandy at 239-6044 for pricing. An intermediate swing class by Lawler follows at 7:45 PM. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. B YO y a r n a n d n e e d l e s , a n d c h e c k o u t missoulaknits.blogspot.com. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. The subject is TBA, but you can bet your sensual side will be titillated during a sexual finesse workshop by Dr. Lindsey Doe from 7–8:30 PM at Birds & Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St. Cost TBA. Call 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org. Be the peacemaker between bears and wolves, or at least act like one, during a screening of Bob Landis’ film Clash: Encounters Between Bears and Wolves, at 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. Suggested donation: $4/free MNHC members. A Q&A session with Landis follows the movie. Call 327-0405. Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:20 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 541-7240 for pricing and visit ddcmontana.com. Release that mid and late week stress during Tai Chi Chuan classes every Wed. at 7:30 PM and every Sat. at 10 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $10/class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Excavate your carnal desire for song, dance and hilarity with a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—during another rendition of the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s Cabaret, which starts at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $7. Visit mtactors.com. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Grenache is a variety of grape that is often used for wine, and has been planted in places like California’s San Joaquin Valley. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Bette Davis Eyes” by Kim Carnes, (believe me, the

beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors—after a few pitchers—and muster up the courage to belt out some prize-winning classics during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Sun.–Sat. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Be sure you’ve grabbed yourself a designated driver so you can imbibe during Wasted Wednesdays at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which offers drink specials and starts at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Dab swabs of cotton on those emo arms so Cottonwood Draw can draw out your precious bodily fluids with bluegrass at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY January

14

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352.

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If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240 and visit ddcmontana.com. If the quickest way to your heart is a beer, then perhaps skip an all you can eat pancake supper. For others, grab your bib and head down to the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., where you can chow down with others at 4 PM. $5 per person. Bingo follows at 6:30 PM. Call 543-7154.

All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, noise pop—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Connect your mind and soul to whatever deity you deem divine during a taize chanting circle with Rev. Jennifer Hackenbruch and Erin Barnes the second and fourth Thu. of the month at 6 PM at 2237 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 370-9631. After the revolution we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383.

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If you’ve got a climbing itch to scratch, and want to help out a good cause, join the American Lung Association of the Mountain Pacific during its 2010 Reach the Summit Informational Meeting at 6:30 PM at The Trailhead, 221 E. Front. St. Free. Call Alison at 406-442-6556 x11 and visit www.reachthesummit.us

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Missoula 3623 Brooks (406) 728-5151 Buy online, schedule delivery, or pick-up in store: www.vanns.com/montana Vann’s accepts: Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express and Vann’s credit cards. Not all items on display at all locations. Limited to stock on hand. Delivery available for an additional charge. † Finance amounts are approximate, actual payments may vary. On approved credit, on your Vann’s credit card. See Vann’s for details.

Missoula Independent

Page 27 January 7–January 14, 2010


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Worship at the temple of philosophical poetry when The Fellowship Club meets to discuss Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet during a club meeting at 6 PM in the west meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670.

Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969.

Teens tickle their creative sides with a new spin on an old school art form when Larry Phan leads the Teen Open Studio Night program “Sgraffiti on Clay” from 6–8 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Open to ages 13–18. Call Linden at 728-0447 Ext. 230.

Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free.

Just remember that a touch of excess nose grease can tame the foam of your barley soda when Donna Smith brings jazz and blues to the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. Excavate your carnal desire for song, dance and hilarity with a dark twist—and likely a scantily clad cast—during another rendition of the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s Cabaret, which starts at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $7. Visit mtactors.com. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The

Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

Feel free to flail around like a rockstar whilst busting out your best version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” during karaoke at Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Thu. at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that

music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Even if you don’t consider yourself a fan of opera, the once-a-month series known as “The Met Live at the Roxy” might change your mind. While I’ve yet to see a screening, it looks pretty tempting. Where else can you find professionally produced opera from the Big Apple, transmitted to you live in high definition, and in the comfort of a seat at the theater? Probably nowhere else in Montucky. This week, you’ve a chance to take a peek during two screenings at the Roxy Theater of Richard Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier, the first on Sat., Jan. 9, at 11 AM and the second on Sun., Jan. 10, at 4 PM. It costs $18 per screening, or $16 if you’re a senior or student. Tempted? Then check it out, and let me know of any operas, punk shows or other happenings you’ve got going on by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 8, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

SPOTLIGHT

pas de deux

Les étangs d’eau chaude jaillit du soufre comme une bouteille de champagne fraîchement éclaté. Pardon? Vous ne comprenez pas ce que je veux dire? Laissez-moi vous expliquer...

Thank you from the Salvation Army Thank you to everyone who supported our 2009 Red Kettle Bell-Ringing program. Your support will help us provide vital services to people in Missoula and Ravalli County.

Special appreciation to the Management and Patrons of the following Missoula and Ravalli County businesses for their support. Albertsons Food Center (Eastgate) Albertsons Food Center (Hamilton) Albertsons Food Center (Oxford) Albertsons Food Center (Reserve) Albertsons Food Center (Trempers) Bitterroot Drug Store IGA (Hamilton) K-Mart (Hamilton) K-Mart (Missoula) Lolo Harvest Foods Macy's People's Market (Darby) Rosauers Supermarket

Safeway Food & Drug Store (Broadway) Safeway Food & Drug Store (Hamilton) Safeway Food & Drug Store (Reserve) Shopko Southgate Mall Super 1 Foods (Hamilton) Super 1 Foods (Stevensville) Walgreen Drug Stores (Brooks) Walgreen Drug Stores (Hamilton) Walgreen Drug Stores (Reserve) Wal-Mart (Hwy 93) Wal-Mart Supercenter Wholesale Sports 1st Interstate Bank

The Salvation Army 339 W. Broadway St., Missoula, MT 59802 Serving Missoula and Ravalli County since 1883 Missoula Independent

Page 28 October 29–November 5, 2009

If you’re perplexed by what I just wrote, perhaps you need to take a trip to Google Translate. Too much hassle? Well, just imagine translating over 100 pages of poems from English to French, without the luxury of the interwebs to help you out. It’s a project that’d likely make most people want to claw their eyes out, but UM alum Sean Gibbons tackled the challenge head on. Sean spent almost two years, under the guidance of UM French prof Michel Valentin, translating his father Mark Gibbons’ poetry book Connemara Moonshine into French. Noted French author/linguist Claude Held then kneaded the results, working out any linguistic kinks. The finished product was recently published under the title Mauvaises Herbes. Your chance to immerse yourself in these translated stanzas comes on Friday. Mark Gibbons, who received his MFA in creative writing from UM in WHAT: Reading and signing of Mark Gibbons’ Mauvaises Herbes WHO: Poet Mark Gibbons with translators Sean Gibbons and Michel Valentin WHERE: Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. WHEN: Fri., Jan. 8 at 7 PM HOW MUCH: Free

1998, holds a round robin reading of sorts on Friday for Mauvaises Herbes. Expect Mark to showcase a handful of his poems in English, while Sean and UM prof Valentin offer up their Francophonic rendering of his words, ensuring this won’t be a reading that’s lost in translation. —Ira Sather-Olson


I’ll admit that I’ve always kind of sucked at downhill skiing. I had a few good runs back in the day, when I was a little sixth grader shooting down Missoula’s now defunct Marshall Mountain ski area. But I was never good enough to successfully navigate bumpy moguls at Discovery, or deft enough with my poles to bust some slick turns down that vertical slice of downhill insanity known as Montana Snowbowl. I commend all of you out there who can shred that mountain without biffing it. Really, I do. If you’re in my boat, and you’re a woman who’d like to hone your skills in order to become the shredder that everybody envies, start this week by signing up for Montana Snowbowl’s For Women Only ski lessons, which run from 1–4 PM Fri., Jan. 8, and continue each Friday afternoon for six weeks. $185 if you’d like lessons with a half-day lift ticket, or $119 if you’re a pass holder. Click over to montanasnowbowl.com for a detailed description, and ring 549-9777 to sign up. Later on Fri., Jan. 8, you can see powder porn on the screen whilst enjoying a Cold Smoke or two during the Cold Smoke People’s Choice Awards, which starts at 8 PM at the Badlander and offers a chance to peep hair-raising ski movies like Swift Silent Deep and Magic Moments. $2, with hot DJ action from Monty Carlo following the films. Visit coldsmokeawards.com. On Sat., Jan. 9, those of you who find excitement shooting through your body at the sight of avians ought to feed the need like the birding junkie you are with a free half-day field trip to Maclay Flat with the Five Valley’s Audubon Society. Meet at the Maclay Flat parking lot at 10 AM, where experts with the society will guide you towards nirvana with raptors, or something like that. Visit fvamissoula.org. While birds might not sizzle the cockles of your heart, running probably does the trick in more ways than one. If so, take a short trip up to the Flathead on Sat., Jan. 9 for the Jingle Bell Jog, a 5k run/walk sponsored by Polson Running which starts at 10 AM at Century 21 Big Sky Real Estate in Polson, 119 Anchor Way. $15 per

person, with a Polson Running polar fleece ear warmer included. Not enticed? Here’s another kicker: It’s a fundraiser for Layne Lozeau, a local 6-year-old who suffers from adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare genetic disorder. Visit polsonrunning.com to download a registration form. Our next event on Sat., Jan. 9 offers you the opportunity to bust out vintage Tonya Harding-esque axel jumps—sans embroiling yourself in a national scandal—during It’s Great to Skate–Bring a Friend Day, a free ice skating event sponsored by the Missoula Figure Skating Club which runs from 10–11:30 AM at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. Besides free time on the ice, you can snag prizes as well as skating tips from experts. Find out more by visiting missoulafsc.org or by e-mailing missoulafsc@yahoo.com.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

If you’ve been in hibernation mode lately, perhaps due to some overindulgence of “adult soda” and food during the holidays, I’d recommend bonding with your child Sat., Jan. 9 by taking them to find out why other animals hibernate for months on end during Hibernation Celebration, an activity for children ages 5 and older that starts at 2 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $2/free for MNHC members. Expect to be bombarded, in a good way, with facts about how animals of all types adapt to frigid winter temps. Visit montananaturalist.org. Mon., Jan. 11 offers yet another opp for you to activate your bird appreciation glands when the Five Valleys Audubon Society

hosts presentations/discussions by wildlife photog Tad Lubinski and UM ecology/biology student Patrick Rhea during its chapter meeting at 7:30 PM, in Room L14 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Grab more details by downloading the club’s newsletter at fvamissoula.org. If heartbeats, damp feet and heavy breathing excite you, then skip the birding lectures to score running tips from an expert when Anders Brooker presents the talk “Can You Start from Zero and Still Run the Missoula Marathon or Half Marathon?” from 7–8 PM at the Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St. W. Free. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Perhaps pedaling titillates you even more. In that case, you should bike over to the Adventure Cycling Association, 150 E. Pine St., at 7 PM on Tue., Jan. 12 to snag a warm seat for the January edition of the Missoulians on Bicycles monthly meeting. Upcoming spring rides is the chief topic of this discussion, which is free to attend. Visit missoulabike.org. The longstanding rift between ursines and canids wash over your eyes on Wed., Jan. 13 at 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., during a screening of Clash: Encounters Between Bears and Wolves, a film by Emmy award winning cinematographer Bob Landis. A Q&A session with Landis follows, so don’t sleep on this one. $4 suggested donation/free for MNHC members. Yet another event competes for your attention Wed., Jan. 13: those boulder scramblers known as the Rocky Mountaineers host their January meeting at 7 PM at Pipestone Mountaineering, 129 W. Front St. Expect a presentation by Smoke Elser on the Bob Marshall Wilderness, as well as talk about upcoming trips. Free. Visit rockymountaineers.com. Finally, at 7:30 PM on Thu., Jan. 14, you can round out your week by listening to biologist Kristi Dubois and her husband Bert Lindler discuss our neighbor to the far east during the talk “Natural History of the Gambia of West Africa” in Room L09 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Visit mtnativeplants.org. For now, I’m now down and out like sauerkraut ‘til next time, y’all.

Missoula Independent

calendar@missoulanews.com

Page 29 January 7–January 14, 2010


scope

Lasting impression

Missoula Independent

Jim Todd’s woodprint portraits cut to the core by Erika Fredrickson “I was concerned with various people I’d studied In the mid-1960s, James Todd experienced an Etching tools, half-finished paintings and inked epiphany. He was living and working in Germany, still wood engravings fill Todd’s Missoula studio. He over the years who had discovered things that you can’t mourning the death of his brother from a few years ear- pulls out paintings from one of his most recent proj- see,” says Todd. “In the past, if people would give me lier, and invited a friend to his studio so he could paint ects, The War on Terror, which he started a few years ideas that I couldn’t envision I tended to doubt them. a portrait of him. after 9/11. One painting shows a solider ready for And I realized later that this was just a disposition of “I was about halfway through the portrait and I battle in which the gear and guns illuminate the sci- being a visual artist…We see the effects of gravity but suddenly got very upset,” Todd recalls. “I couldn’t fig- fi quality of the newest technology. Another shows gravity itself isn’t something that we really see.” With portraits of historical figures, Todd says he ure out why. I mean, I just had to stop painting. I real- the smirking crew of George W. Bush, Donald ized then that I had unconsciously begun to paint my Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney and Condoleeza Rice, and studies multiple photos or drawings of the person’s brother’s portrait.” Todd captures the character of the politicians with- face to find the features that stand out and to get a Todd put the portrait aside and never finished it, out resorting to caricature. He says he didn’t want to sense from several different perspectives what that perbut the incident stuck with him as an example of just create images that were satirical, preaching-to-the- son’s personality might be. It’s similar to what he does how powerful it can be for an artist to try and capture someone else in a work of art. Now 72, Todd has focused on portraiture through woodprints and painting for over five decades. He studied at the Chicago Art Institute and University of Chicago before earning his master’s from the University of Montana in 1969. Before he retired in 1999, Todd served as an influential teacher at UM for 30 years, chairing the Humanities Program before moving to the Art Department. Todd’s thoughtful when he talks about portraiture. He’s clear to differentiate between drawing technically accurate replicas of a person and going beyond that to capture the essence of someone’s personality. In the case of his friend transforming into his brother, Todd says that the artist’s perspective can transform a portrait’s entire feeling. “I don’t even know if my family members would recognize my brother in that painting,” he says. “But I could see the beginning of his image taking over this other portrait. So portraiture can be kind of complicated.” Jim Todd’s Portraits of Printmakers exhibit, which opens at MAM this week, includes wood engravings of influIn late January, the Missoula ential printmakers like Rembrandt Von Rijin. “I was selecting examples of printmakers who advanced the techArt Museum (MAM) will display sev- nology of printmaking,” says Todd. eral portrait exhibits, and Todd’s Portraits of Printmakers, already part of MAM’s collec- choir portraits, but ones that realistically hinted at when he draws a portrait of someone sitting in his stution, serves as an introduction to the portrait theme. the dark truth of politics and war. Only a few times dio—he studies his subject almost like a psychologist Todd’s work not only shows 10 famous printmakers, does he outwardly editorialize the portraits—for would. but also pays homage to each one’s style of printmak- instance, he paints a glowing cross above the head “It’s an important question: What it is that makes a ing; the background of each portrait replicates one of of Bush—but even those don’t overshadow the sub- good portrait? When I used to have people sit for me,” the individual artist’s signature pieces. The result is tlety of the portraits. he says, “they would sit up straight and expect a dupliincredibly intricate. Todd illustrates Rembrandt Von “I’m just telling you my politics. I don’t know cation of their likeness immediately. Well, that really Rijn’s innovative etchings, Jacques Callot’s metal whether you agree,” he says carefully. “When it became isn’t a very important stage. It’s as they get tired and as engravings, Pablo Picasso’s thin-lined lithography and clear to me that we were setting up concentration they start dreaming of things and wishing they didn’t Hannah Hoch’s political photomontage. The approach camps and torturing people and all this kind of stuff, it have to sit anymore that their personality starts coming allowed Todd to study the techniques of the influential got me upset enough that I started this series. It’s been through. That’s when you start getting into the porprintmakers, to honor them as artists and to challenge unpleasant for me to do because I’ve been very upset trait. It isn’t any particular technique. It’s a kind of himself. empathy.” with the policies of the government.” “It was a kind of private study of how they work,” James Todd’s Portraits of Printmakers opens Todd always has multiple projects going at once. he says, “and so I did take it upon myself to copy their Another portrait project called Pioneers of the Unseen at the Missoula Art Museum Wednesday, Jan. 13. techniques exactly but then I was further challenging features famous figures like Isaac Newton and Free. myself by putting it into a wood engraving, which I spe- Sigmund Freud, whose concepts of gravity and ego, cialize in.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com respectively, aren’t always easily illustrated.

Page 30 January 7–January 14, 2010


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Term of endearment Local rockers Fagrag go on the offensive by Ali Gadbow

Singer Mikki (pronounced “Mikey”) Lunda cuts sexual. If you are, in fact, a homosexual, then at a certain straight to the chase. “If you’re gonna name your band point …,” he shrugs. Fagrag—in which “more than half the members are Fagrag,” she says, “you have to have balls.” The members of Fagrag—Lunda, her boyfriend gay,” according to Lunda, and one is female—may have Gerrod Silva, keyboardist Isaiah Lara and drummer Mat encountered more resistance in another place, at anothCote—are funny, articulate and by no means shy. They’re er time, but luckily they’re safe to be brash, frank, funny not worried about offending people. In fact, they might and musically bold within a strong community like be disappointed if they offend no one, but that’s not like- Missoula. Community support partially explains the ease with ly to happen. According to the band, Missoula’s college radio sta- which Fagrag came into being, but only combined with tion, KBGA, adopted the well-intentioned policy in sum- the innate talent and sensibilities of this group, not to mer 2009 of referring to it as either “Homosexual Rag” or mention their affinity for one another. Cote, who sells vintage clothes, moved to Missoula “F-rag” in response to concerns about using the word “fag” on air. It’s a slippery slope for the radio station, eight months ago, met Lunda and soon found himself in a band, planning a West which might have to answer Coast tour. to the Federal Communica“I knew we were tions Commission (FCC)—in going to be instant best the form of fines—if even friends,” says Lunda. one listener complains. And Lunda and Silva such unwanted FCC attenalready had plans for a tion can derail an entire band, and the three of station. them found musical comStill, bands are fiercely mon ground, including protective of their names, San Francisco noise band and if anything the nonsense photo courtesy of Allison Goodnight terms “homosexual rag” and From left, Mat Cote, Isaiah Lara, Mikki Coachwhips and New York No Wave acts like “F-rag” sound more offen- Lunda and Gerrod Silva comprise Fagrag. Teenage Jesus and the sive than the original slang. Jerks. Even if the station had come “We totally clicked on music—that kind of frantic, loup with a better synonym for the name, they would be forced to choose a definition. Options run from fi, just fun, fun band was what we met on,” says Cote. Lunda’s feminine but fearless vocals define Fagrag’s “Alternative Lifestyle Publication” to “Socially Significant Handkerchief ” to “Manpon.” These are all fine band sound. Lydia Lunch is clearly a touchstone, but, while Fagrag is not especially melodic, it is no surprise that names, but they are not Fagrag. Lunda remains a fan of the station, but she was Lunda and Cote also site the B-52s as an influence. Even in the experimental strangeness of guitar wails, galloping offended by the arbitrary renaming of the band. “They can bleep shit, you know?” says Lunda, who drums and Lunda’s punctuated screams, you can hear works as a barista at Butterfly Herbs. “I would be less the undertones of a party band. Lara, usually a drummer, was recruited to play keyoffended if they were bleeping it.” Eventually the KBGA controversy blew over, but it boards, and the band took off, mounting a tour with a begs the question: Why stick with a problematic name? newly purchased van, borrowed equipment and a handWell, because this is rock and roll. Shaking people up is ful of finished songs. So far the band has thrived on minimal planning and part of the fun. “Fag” is a term in transition, proudly usurped by the fewer expectations. For now the future holds a new gay community but still taboo in mainstream culture. album, which, like the band’s debut CD, will probably be Whether a person can wield the term “fag” without recorded in Lunda’s 1971 Buddy-Style Mobile Home, offending depends on that individual’s level of comfort which houses Lunda, Silva, dachshunds Willy and Vienna, a third roommate and a cat. with, and sense of acceptance by, the LGBTQI crowd. “We do the recording ourselves, we do the mixing At a recent show in a very small town, bar staff and patrons achieved a kind of self-hypnosis against discom- ourselves, we do the packaging ourselves, and when you do it yourselves, you get what you want,” says Lunda. fort by pronouncing the band’s name “fah-grahg.” “You don’t have to worry about stepping on some sound “It was like don’t ask, don’t tell,” says Cote. A name like Fagrag forces people (if they acknowl- engineer’s toes.” Adds Cote about the band’s DIY engineering sound edge it at all) to examine their assumptions. On the other levels, “If we want it in the red it goes in the red. Just let hand, it’s just a band name. “It’s so hard to name a band that once you do it you it go in the red. Don’t be such a pussy.” Fagrag plays the Zootown Arts Community want to stop thinking about it,” says Lara, a University of Montana student in the media arts program. “We did it Center (ZAAC) Saturday, Jan. 9, at 8 PM with without really knowing if it was a good idea or not, but Hologram Pants, At Home in the Cosmos, Julie and there’s that level of detaching the signifier from the signi- the Wolves and Petra Core. $5. fied. When someone calls you a fag, the reason it’s insultarts@missoulanews.com ing—in their mind—is that it implies that you are a homo-

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NOTICE OF HEARING FIRE REVIEW SERVICE FEES The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing to clarify the application of fees adopted on August 3, 2009 for subdivision related Fire Review Services with Resolution #2009-093. A copy of Resolution #2009-093 and the fee schedule is available on-line on the OPG website @ http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb. There are no changes proposed to the resolution or fee schedule. The hearing will be limited to discussion on the application of the fees. It is proposed that the fees should apply to all future Final plat reviews, required Inspections, Plat Adjustments, Phasing Plan Amendments, Condition Amendments, Covenant Amendments, and Extension Requests, regardless of the date of subdivision preliminary plat application or subdivision preliminary plat approval. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at their regularly scheduled Public Meeting on January 27, 2010 at 1:30 p.m., in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse Annex. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted anytime prior to the hearing by phone, mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 7214043. Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from Denise Alexander, Principal Planner, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 or by calling (406) 258-4657.

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Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Off the reservation Alexie mines new territory in War Dances by Azita Osanloo â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah.â&#x20AC;? In works like The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fucking ridiculous.â&#x20AC;? in Heaven and Reservation Blues, National Book â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know.â&#x20AC;? Award-winning author Sherman Alexie wrote stories â&#x20AC;&#x153;And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s racist.â&#x20AC;? from the point-of-view of characters who had never â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know.â&#x20AC;? left an American Indian reservation. The results were â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re stereotyping your own damn people.â&#x20AC;? unforgettably vivid, evoking tense, alienated yearnings â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know.â&#x20AC;? from individuals who were simultaneously tangential â&#x20AC;&#x153;But damn if we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a room full of to life on the reservation, as well as inextricably and tragically tied to it. In his latest collection, War Dances, Pendleton blankets. New ones...â&#x20AC;? Alexie has made a subtle, yet undeniable shift in his In another story, a film editor work: Rather than setting his stoworking away in his home office ries squarely in the middle of the fatally injures a young black reservation, Alexieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characters teenager who has broken into his have moved away, leaving behind home. The editor isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t charged life on the rez, at least in theory. with any crimeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it was selfThe legacy of living as an American defense. When the teenagerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indian has always figured in mother pronounces that her son Alexieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, but here it only figwas â&#x20AC;&#x153;just another black boy killed ures obliquely. by a white man,â&#x20AC;? the narrator Though many of the characters points out, via live coverage, that in these stories are American Indian he is no white man. Indeed, he is (and some are not, or at least not â&#x20AC;&#x153;an enrolled member of the identified as such), they are, more Spokane Tribe of Indians.â&#x20AC;? After to the point, staunchly urbane making the comment, the film ediAmericans. They live and work in tor reflects that â&#x20AC;&#x153;it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take mainstream, middle class neighborclever editing to make me look hoods where their complexions are evil; I had accomplished this in no more of note than that of the War Dances Sherman Alexie one take, live and uncut.â&#x20AC;? In both Asian, African or Middle Eastern hardcover, Grove Press cases, the narrators struggle to live Americans who might live on the 256 pages, $23.00 unburdened by race, but they are same street, in the same city, miles continually compelled to reconcile with it. and miles away from the rez. There is much one could say about this brief but In a New York Times interview several months ago, Alexie said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt so conflicted about having fled oddly expansive collection of short stories, about the the rez as a kid that I created a whole literary career range of concerns Alexie has seamlessly woven that left me there.â&#x20AC;? With this collection Alexie has throughout. There is a sense, as there has been in his done an about face, paving a literary path away from earlier works, that Alexie gives memoir the freedom of the reservation. The result is stunning, and haunting. fiction. In addition to being a member of the Spokane Alexie and his characters may have fled the reserva- Tribe of Indians, Alexie is, like his narrators, a Seattle tion, but it still looms largely, forcing them to father of two, a film editor and a former childhood sufferer of hydrocephalus. There is also a profound mediacknowledge its imprint upon their lives. In the title story, a Seattle father of two suddenly tation on the life of the nomad in this collection, which finds he is unable to hear out of his right ear. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a is not unfitting for a collection that meanders away symptom, he fears, that is somehow related to hydro- from the central location of Alexieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous works. In cephalus (water on the brain), a disease he suffered the story â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ballad of Paul Nonetheless,â&#x20AC;? Paul wanfrom as a child. The experience compels him to reflect ders the Chicago Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare airport, following a woman in on his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last days. In alternating sections, the red Pumas, all the while musing on the collective connarrator waits nervously for impending news about sciousness of pop music. Throughout, Alexieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prose his brain and recounts an experience of walking has an accessible ease that belies the slippery nature of through a hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corridors, after one of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his work; as a reader, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re never quite sure if you surgeries, on the lookout for a fellow American Indian ought to laugh or cry. Of course, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all perfect: The poems interwho might lend him a blanket. The narratorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father had just had both his feet amputated and was cold in spersed between the stories alternately hit a single, perhis recovery room bed. An interaction with a harried fect and poignant note, as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ode to Pay Phones,â&#x20AC;? and nurse results in nothing more than a glorified sheet, then sometimes feel like superfluous fillers, as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;On after which the narrator roams the hallways. He spots Airplanes.â&#x20AC;? Nevertheless, Alexie, one of the most prolific writers an American Indian, exchanges a few pleasantries, working right now, has undertaken new, yet not wholly then sheepishly asks if he might have a blanket: disconnected themes, in this new collection. Even those who miss the intensity of the narration from the rez will â&#x20AC;&#x153;So you want to borrow a blanket from us?â&#x20AC;? find themselves turning pages as fast as they can. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because you thought some Indians would just arts@missoulanews.com happen to have some extra blankets lying around?â&#x20AC;?


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts

Harsh reality Precious pushes against convention by Katie Kane Sapphire’s controversial 1996 novel Push and ugly white stereotypes of blackness (there is a records vicious, shattering brutality and the possibil- scene involving Precious and a bucket of fried chickity of human redemption. It does so in the vividly en that is, indeed, hard to watch). But Precious is a shifting voice of a 16-year-old girl who moves movie and not a social policy or a prescriptive curebeyond overwhelming physical, sexual and social all for the racial and historical politics that continue abuse by learning to write her own story. Push is to bedevil American life. Yes, the film makes missimple in that way. Literacy is everything for takes. It stumbles. In the main, however, it is a beauPrecious Jones, the novel’s central character. tiful, moving narrative that is superlatively acted and Learning to tell her own story means having some strongly filmed. Not enough can be said about the strength, control over the plot of her life. And, yet, as its readers know, Push is also immensely complex in its exploration of the power of self-narration. The novel is a deep meditation on the experiences of an underclass, African American female pinned down by American racial politics and equally pinioned inside a set of interlocking institutions—juvenile justice, education and the welfare office of the 1980s. A child becom- Mariah Carey pays for the vanity of Glitter. ing a woman, Precious has also been subject to the torturing and dehumaniz- intensity and precision of the acting. There is no sining actions of a “mother” and a “father” who see her gle instance of miscasting or of mistaken characterias chattel to be used to gratify their own desires and zation in the film. Every cast member from Lenny Kravitz (Nurse John) to Gabourey Sidibe (Precious) needs. Resolutely focused on the narrative of Precious delivers deeply engaged and sometimes ferocious herself, Push manages to tell multiple stories while performances. Playing Mary Jones, Precious’ mothproviding varied depictions of African American life er, Mo’Nique’s final screen appearance in which she in the 1980s. A middle-class African American les- struggles in front of a social worker to tell her own bian who teaches at an alternative school claims the story of loss while exculpating herself of any comreader’s attention, as does a compassionate light- plicity in the abuse of Precious is nothing short of skinned African American nurse whom Precious stunning. The film itself is an interesting mix of realism calls “Miss Butter,” recognizing that there’s something about being black that isn’t only defined by and cinematic surrealism. Precious opens with a color. It is this complicating perspective that Push scene in which a red scarf dangles from a streetlamp has on Precious’ story that renders charges of its underneath a Harlem subway bridge. The intensity trafficking in negative representations and stereo- of the red gives the grey of Precious’ world a more vivid quality: The contrast is both pleasing and types of African American life moot. Just as Precious is “pushed” by her life, by both unsettling. The film uses color in this thematically her enemies and allies, and by her own dawning contrastive way throughout, particularly in distinsense of her value, the novel pushes its reader out guishing between the dark of Precious’ apartment, into deep water where no easy resolution is possi- where much of the physical and sexual violence of ble, no shoreline comes into clear view. In this con- the film takes place, and a set of brilliantly lit and text, Precious articulates the double bind of her life colored fantasy sequences—the catwalks, photo and her future in her still developing language: “I shoots and gospel choirs that Precious imagines as think how alive I am, every part of me that is cells, escape routes. It is worth noting that the controversy over the proteens, nutrons, hairs, pussy, eyeballs, nervus system, brain. I got poems, a son, friends. I want to live representational politics of Precious is connected so bad. Mama remind me that I might not. I got this to the material world: No film made by a black virus in my body like cloud over sun. Don’t know director has ever been nominated for an Oscar for when, don’t know how, maybe it hold back a long best picture, only one African American has ever been nominated as best director, and in the long time, but one day it’s gonna rain.” In bringing Push to the screen, director Lee category of writing for film, just five out of 800 Daniels’ Precious has doubled down on the history nominees have been African American. Precious is of controversy surrounding the representation of pushing into some important aesthetic and social American black experience. Critics and viewers territory. Precious continues at the Wilma Theatre. either love or hate the film, which has been dubbed “poverty porn,” a “sociological horror,” and charged arts@missoulanews.com with replicating some of the most deeply ingrained

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 January 7–January 14, 2010


Scope Soundcheck Books Film Movie Shorts OPENING THIS WEEK DAYBREAKERS Ethan Hawke plays a vampire and blood researcher in a world where bloodsuckers outnumber humans, but an encounter with one of the few remaining Homo sapiens just might turn Hawke against his parasitic kind in order to save humanity. Village 6: 7:15 and 9:40 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 2:45, 5:05 and 7:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 9:50 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:05, 7:20 and 9:40.

with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Entertainer in Ronan: 4 and 7:20.

Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30.

THE BLIND SIDE Sandra Bullock plays an upper-crust mom who takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 7:10 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:25 and 4:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:45, 6:50 and 9:35 with

PRECIOUS An African American teen in Harlem gets dealt many blows: she’s impregnated by her father, her mom is an abusive she-devil, and she’s illiterate. But can a vigorous alternative school teacher help her find hope? Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9 with Sun. shows at 1 and 3.

Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 6:50 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15. UP IN THE AIR George Clooney likes to fly, a lot. But when his employer skimps out on frequently flying him places, he worries that he might lose out on a romantic interlude with fellow traveler Vera

LEAP YEAR Amy Adams has a heart on for Adam Scott, and wants to tie the knot by taking matters into her own hands. Along the way, Matthew Goode steps in and screws up her plans in the best way possible. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:05 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:25. THE YOUNG VICTORIA British aristocracy hits the screen in this movie about the early reign of Britian’s 19th century empress Queen Victoria, and her quest to wed and bed Prince Albert. Wilma: 7 and 9 with Sun. shows at 1 and 3. YOUTH IN REVOLT Michael Cera is a teen horndog who can’t get any love or action. But will his hunkier alter ego help him score, or will his bad boy side get him busted by the fuzz? Village 6: 7:35 and 9:45 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:05, 3:15 and 5:25. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:35, 2:40, 4:50, 7:15 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:10, 7:15 and 9:40.

NOW PLAYING

This guy literally screams the need for universal health care. Daybreakers opens Friday at the Village 6.

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS THE SQUEAKQUEL In case you didn’t get your fill the last time around, your favorite animated rodents are back—high-pitched voices and all—in order help bail out a sinking school music program by shredding in a battle of the bands competition. Carmike 10: 4:50, 7 and 9:10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 12:30 and 2:40. Village 6: 7:25 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 1:15, 2:25, 3:45, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 2:25, 3:30, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. AVATAR Sam Worthington gets a 3-D makeover as he plays an ex-Marine whose alien body and human mind is sent to pillage a new planet for its resources, but does a chance encounter with a female humanoid help keep his eyes on the bounty? Carmike 10: 4:30, 7 and 8 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at noon, 1 and 3:30. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at noon and 3:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 only with Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1:30, 3:30, 5, 7 and 8:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:30 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 4:30, 7 and 8:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:30 and 7:30

Missoula Independent

additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at. 1:05, 3:45, 6:50 and 9:35. DID YOU HEAR ABOUT THE MORGANS? Sarah Jessica Parker and Hugh Grant are Manhattanites with a marriage on the rocks. But witnessing a murder transplants them to Dick Cheney’s stomping grounds of Wyoming— and their new digs in the boondocks just might salvage their love. Carmike 10: 7 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:25 and 6:40. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:15. INVICTUS Morgan Freeman plays Nelson Mandela and uses Matt Damon’s deft rugby skills as a means to quell the remnants of segregation in South Africa. Carmike 10: 4 and 10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 6:30 and 9:20 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. IT’S COMPLICATED Alec Baldwin hooks up with his ex-wife Meryl Streep, even though he’s remarried, only to then have Steve Martin barge in and rain on his love parade. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Village 6: 7 and 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:10, 3:55, 6:35 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

Page 34 January 7–January 14, 2010

THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG New Orleans finally gets positive, post-Katrina exposure in this animated tale about a prince turned frog who hopes to leap back to manhood with the help of a naïve girl, voodoo practitioner and other bayou dwellers. Carmike 10: 5:05, 7:20 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 12:35 and 2:50. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:45, 6:45 and 9. THE ROAD Viggo Mortensen plays a dad trying to navigate his son through a post-apocalyptic world full of frenzied cannibals, decimated landscapes and scarce resources in this adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 3:50 and 9:10 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. SHERLOCK HOLMES Robert Downey Jr. plays Sherlock Holmes and busts kneecaps with the help of his cain-wielding sidekick Jude Law (aka Dr. Watson) in order to save England from annihilation. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Village 6: 7 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 1, 3, 4, 6, 6:55 and 9 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3, 4, 6, 6:55 and 9. Mountain

Farmiga. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:50, 6:45 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. WINTER DAYDREAMS Take an animated trip into NoWhereLand and other astonishing lands with your kids’ favorite piglet Olivia, as well as sidekicks Franny and Maggie, as they embark on a number of fanciful expeditions to do things like save reindeer and play in enchanted tufts of snow. Village 6: noon only Sat.–Sun. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan 8. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/ Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


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Free- Build A Recycled Recumbent or 4 Wheel Bike SUNDAYS: Please CALL to RSVP & for Meeting Times. 2 hours volunteering required. Contact “Bob Ruby” @ 800-809-0112 See Details & Pics “Build a Bike Group” @ http://missoulaareaevents.ning.com GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by

AGE: 36 HEIGHT: 6 FT HAIR COLOR: BALD EYE COLOR: BROWN

advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484

Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-583-2101. www.continentalacademy.com

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484

I’m looking for a cleaning job that would pay $150-$400 a month for starters. March 1st would be the best time to start. Ole 327-7859

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE

MIND BODY SPIRIT ENERGIES 101 Free Class. Simple and effective energy techniques for self balancing, soul searching, healing

Tuesday at Post Office Hey sexy man who I just saw in the downtown post office. You: tall with beard talking to elder lady outside, then inside in line. Looks were exchanged. Whew. You are good looking! Woman to Man December 22nd I’m Dirt Poor Too You: at the Break on Saturday, using a Mac with a brown sticker. Me: sitting across from you at the big table with beard and headphones. We shared a couple of glances but you left before I could say anything. Man saw Woman December 19th

Missed Connections Dear Guy. I used to see you all the time when school was in session. Now I don’t see you anymore. I miss randomly seeing you everywhere (campus, downtown, walking) and I miss thinking, “I should just say something.” Woman to Man December 21st Red, White and Beer. Saturday at OSFF. Me: taking forever to choose a wine. You: taking forever to choose a beer. I commented on how it’s a tough decision, you laughed uncomfortably. I think you're handsome, you think I'm crazy. I'm not. I promise. Woman to Man December 19th

Post your own I Saw U or Shout Out online at

themix.bigskypress.com and manifesting. Plus free reading + Reiki. Space is limited so you must RSVP but we will schedule so you can attend. To gain access to our page join our network @ http://missoulaareaevents.ning.co m , click groups & join MIND BODY SPIRIT ENERGIES. PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or

from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

Advice Goddess . . . Freewill Astrology . Holiday . . . . . . . . . . Crossword . . . . . . . Home Page . . . . . . This Modern World

. . . . . .

. .C2 . .C4 . .C5 . .C7 . .C8 .C11

P L A C E YOU R AD: Deadline: Monday at Noon

Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it.



Send it. Post it.

543-6609 x121 or x115

classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Local Artists Art Classes 709 Ronan St. Missoula 541-7100 montanaart.com Tangles Hairstyling will be accepting donations of nonperishable food and personal care items for the Missoula Food Bank during October, November and December. Your donations will be greatly appreciated and will benefit our local community. THE BOAT SHOW: Boat buying event of the year. January 29th31st. Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds,

Helena, Mont. For info call: 2665700 or 443-6400 or visit online: www.mtboatshow.com

LOST & FOUND FOUND Friendly male husky mix, brown collar, at Russell & Broadway on 12/22. 804-8529130 to ID and claim


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS

LOST CAT NEAR HIGGINS AREA! Completely black with yellow-ish green-ish eyes, & extra toes. No collar. His name is Jack. Call 396-2444 if you find him!

By Amy Alkon

WANT LIES WITH THAT My boyfriend of six months revealed that he’s never been faithful to anyone, not even his wife of 10 years, whom he cheated on constantly because he married too young and made himself stay for the kids. Once he divorced, about a year ago, he decided never to lie or cheat again. He said he wants a future with me, wants to be honest about everything, and if there’s anything I want to know, I should just ask. I believe in loving someone unconditionally and without judgment, and I have a lot of respect for him for telling me the truth. I’m just not sure if the chance is worth taking: whether he’d be unfaithful and break my heart into a thousand pieces. —Loving Cautiously In a new relationship, any guy can put his best foot forward, but maybe it takes a guy who really loves you to put his worst foot forward: warning you that you could be waiting for the other shoe to drop—off the side of some other girl’s bed. Of course, he could also be warning you so that if he does cheat, well, you were warned. Commendable as it is that he’s resolved never to lie or cheat again, he’s been divorced a year and seeing you for half that time. That’s a seriously short stretch of never—especially for a guy who’s never been faithful to anyone (presumably, even running around on some pigtailed 14-year-old with the junior high school hussy). And while he talks a remorseful game, he still explains his marital infidelity with the howler “I did it for the children.” Paternal sacrifice is admirable, but more so when working three jobs to keep a roof over the kiddies’ heads is what a father’s been doing—and not a string of bar floozies. While many are quick to blame their cheating on a bum relationship, there seems to be a cheater personality. As I wrote in my column “Charlotte’s (Tangled) Web,” researchers Todd Shackelford and David Buss found three personality traits common to people prone to getting some on the side. There’s narcissism—being selfabsorbed, self-important, lacking in empathy, and predisposed to exploiting others. The other two are low conscientiousness and high “psychoticism,” clinical terms for a personality marked by impulsivity, unreliability, and an inability to delay gratification. So…any of this seem familiar? Clearly, the last thing you should be engaging in is “unconditional love.” Sounds beautiful, but that’s love minus discernment, which isn’t love at all, but projectile sentimentality. Seeing whether he’s turned

over a new leaf takes ongoing discernment—even beyond the two-year point. On average, that’s how long the happiness high people get from marrying seems to last, according to social psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky. For you two, the hot new thing phase might end sooner or later, but this at least gives you some sort of marker to go by. You know, seasons change, leaves fall…panties drop? It’s a good thing and a bad thing, having your relationship front-loaded with news of his zipper management issues. For day-today peace of mind, you want “I wonder if he’ll ever cheat” to maybe be a footnote on page 33 of your relationship story, not in bold type at the top of page one. On a positive note, you should be less likely to let monogamy slip into monotony. And, while most couples take for granted that both partners will be on their faithful best behavior, having this out in the open might help him focus on what really matters to him, and how he’ll deal, should temptation slide its hotel room key down the bar.

MAKING LEAVE LAST Why do exes always make return appearances? My exwife showed up at my door one night after a crisis with her husband, and two ex-girlfriends came back for a fling. Most bafflingly, a girl I really fell for (who’s now married) just texted me out of the blue. —Mystified People always want to make something out of patterns, which sometimes have meaning but often don’t. If, whenever you eat a peanut, you blow up so big somebody tries to stencil Goodyear across your side, then attach a passenger cabin, it’s wise to get checked out for a peanut allergy. But, just because four of your exes reappeared, you can’t make pronouncements about exes in general. If this isn’t a coincidence, you’re either a pushover or a guy who doesn’t end things ugly. (Or, maybe you have a peanut allergy.) These women probably feel they can count on you to mess around without messing things up with the man in their life. If you don’t want late-night therapy calls, get caller ID. Beyond that, what’s the downside? Sure, home invasions are alarming, but maybe complain when the perp’s shoving a gun in your face, not pushed-up, halfnaked cleavage.

TO GIVE AWAY FREE CYCLES MISSOULA. Kids bikes are always free. Monday & Thursday: 3:00-7:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00-3:00. 732 South 1st West LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889 Pass It On Missoula.com offers FREE infant, toddler, and maternity clothing to local families in serious need. FREE delivery! www.passitonmissoula.com

VOLUNTEERS Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area. WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K-8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550 x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

INSTRUCTION

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool .com 310-364-0665 Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Wildflower Montessori School

Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals Ages 2-6 • 830-3268 1703 S. 5th West

Positive. Practical. Casual. Comfortable. And, it's a church. 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

POTTERY CLASSES All levels Classes begin SOON! theCLAYSTUDIOofMISSOULA

406.543.0509

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

T'ai Chi 728-0918 missoulataichi.com

Can you handle it?

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Mas sage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Escape With Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Go to CarlaGreenMassage.com. 15 minutes free when you intake, pay and schedule online @ CarlaGreenMassage.com 406360-8746 LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 5524477 http-://astrologymontana.webs.com

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220

Shear

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Paradigm Reiki Balancing and Healing Session- $40 5490289 Professional massage therapy. 18 years experience. Deep Swedish Massage, Sports Massage, and Therapeutic Aromatherapy Massage. Danielle Packard, CMT 2743221. Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 5428090 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $35/hour. Anna 4930025

Specializing in Chronic Illness & IV Micronutirent Therapy

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 December 31–January 7, 2010

Art Salon 1804 North Ave EXP. 1/07/10 Call 214-3112 w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Hypnosis & Imager y

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Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

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317 SW Higgins


EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

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ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE Escort Referral Service

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EROTIC Entertainment

406-543-1851

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, P/T, Msla. Missoula CPA Firm seeking a reliable part-time ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. This position is part-time, approximately 21 hours per week to start, but will become four days per week during the tax season. Must have good organizational skills, experience with multiline phone system, typing & data entry. Will be doing work for small business clients to include: Taxes, payroll, write-offs, filing & all manner of general office work. Great customer service skills a must. Employer requires a Job Service Typing test, Data Entry 10Key with decimals, & Data Entry Alpha-Numeric test. Work days start as M-W 7 hours per day, then will become M-T during the tax season. Wage is $8.00/hour or more depending on experience. # 2976742 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ASSISTANT MANAGER, F/T, Msla. A local retail store is seeking a permanent, full-time ASSISTANT MANAGER. MUST have a minimum of 6 months retail sales experience. Cashier skills are a must as well as money handling and putting together bank deposits. Will assist manager in supervising staff. Applicants should have excellent customer service skills, be friendly and complete assigned tasks. Schedule will be full-time and pay is depending on experience. Store hours are Monday thru Saturday from 9-5 and Sunday from 10-5 and schedule will be within those hours for a 40 hour week. #2976735 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 COSMETOLOGIST, P & F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a Licensed Cosmetologist to work in their Salon. Duties would include: Cutting and styling hair, coloring, hi-lights and a variety of other chemical processes, facial waxing, and product sales. Days and hours will vary during Salon business hours: Mondays through Saturdays, 10am-9pm, and Sundays 11am-6pm. Position could be full-time or part-time. Wages or commission, whichever comes in higher. Benefits are available. Pay scale and benefits can be discussed at interview. Applicants MUST have their Cosmetology License. Computer skills are a plus, but employer is willing to train on Salon computers. # 2976725 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE, F/T, Employer is seeking full-time Customer Service Representatives for in bound calls only for Missoula company. Duties include navigating multiple database systems and other relevant applications, tools, & resources while speaking with customers, answer customer questions and resolve issues in a professional and courteous manner. Previous customer service experience is required. Pay range is from $10/hr to $12.50/hr with shift and previous experience considered. Also have opportunity to make additional pay for bonuses and incentives. Must be willing to work all shifts, weekends, holidays, and overtime as needed. #2976739 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

FRONT DESK CLERK, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking Front Desk Clerk with computer experience. Must be able to handle cash and credit card transactions. Will register and check out guests. Will also do some faxing. May help set up breakfast bar and do laundry duties when not busy. Employer prefers prior front desk clerk experience. Need strong customer service skills. Must be able to work all shifts, including weekends. Will work 3 to 4 shifts per week, 24 to 30 hours per week. Pay is $7.50 to $7.75 per hour. #2976732 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 RECEPTIONIST/TAX ASSISTANT, F/T, Msla. Experienced full time professional Receptionist/Tax Assistant needed for accounting firm. This is a fast-paced work environment. Successful candidate will have a polished phone presence and understand how to work effectively with business customers. Will work Monday-Friday days, 40 or more hours per week during tax time. Competitive pay is depending on experience. Excellent benefits offered. #2976721 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY AFFAIRS DIRECTOR, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a COMMUNITY AFFAIRS DIRECTOR who will develop and maintain effective lines of communication with local and state public officials regarding issues that impact the industry and association. Work is 40 hours per week, Monday through Friday; Evening meetings average once or twice a week. Pay is $15.00/hr. CLOSE DATE: 01/11/10 #2976717 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 COMMUNITY MUSIC PROGRAMS DIRECTOR, F/T, Msla. Missoula family oriented membership supported organization seeking a full-time COMMUNITY MUSIC PROGRAMS DIRECTOR. This is an innovative department and the director is responsible for the organization, delivery and quality of music programs to the membership and community. The director works independently under general direction & is expected to determine how to accomplish tasks. Program development is critical and processes that include volunteer and staff input will be required. Applicant should have a Bachelor’s degree (B. A.) from four-year College or university; or one to two years related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. All staff are required to complete CPR, New Staff Orientation, and annual In-Service within the first year of employment. Salary is $26,000 to $38,000 per year Depending on Experience. #2976746 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, F/T, Msla. The Development Manager plans activities to raise money and

awareness, manage the department to ensure adequate resource to meet the needs of the organization. Must have good written and verbal communication skills, be highly organized, computer literate with Microsoft Access experience a plus. Must have problem solving skills and be able to multitask. Will be developing and coordinating special events. Works with communication consultants to develop TV ads, billboards, and other communication opportunities. Must have valid driver’s license. Rate of pay is dependent on experience. Full job description available at Missoula Job Service front desk. #2976734. 728-7060 DIRECTOR OF HEALTH AND WELLNESS, F/T, DIRECTOR OF HEALTH AND WELLNESS for a Missoula family oriented membership based fitness facility. Requires a Bachelors Degree or one to two years experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. The director supervises a large, mission critical, department to engage health seekers in healthy lifestyles and is responsible for the organization, delivery and quality of program(s) to the membership and community. CPR Certification ACE, AFAA or ACSM Fitness Instructor or YMCA Fitness Specialist. Child Abuse Prevention for Supervisory Staff, Working with program volunteers program, Blood borne Pathogens, Child Abuse Prevention and Reporting Awareness. Must be completed in the first year of employment. Salary is from: $26,000 to $38,000 Depending on Experience. #2976744 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 LEAD CASE MANAGER, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a fulltime Lead Case ManagerCommunity Living Program & Veterans Directed Home & Community Based Services. Duties include implementing the project’s targeting criteria, creating the assessment and intake systems and providing ongoing case management services to clients participating in the program. Activities include educating clients, organizations, and the community at large on the intentions of the grant; training and monitoring staff and assisting the Case Management Program Manager. The position is a full-time position. The successful applicant will need to be openminded, flexible, able to operate under pressure, have a great deal of self-motivation and self-direction. Salary range is from $14.30$15.56/hour and includes a comprehensive benefit plan. The position requires a bachelor’s degree in social work or other relevant behavioral science and five (5) years of relevant experience or a suitable combination of education and experience. Full job description at the Missoula Job Service front desk. The employer does not wish to have applicants contact them directly. Closing date is Monday, January 11, 2010. #2976728 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

window installation, finish carpentry, shower door installation for both residential and commercial projects. Must be well organized to maintain customer schedules, able to interact well with customers, and perform quality work. Assist with loading, unloading and installation. Employer is willing to train the right person in the glass repair venue if they have the carpentry qualifications. # 2976727 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION TEACH ENGLISH ABROAD! Become TEFL certified. 4-week course offered monthly in Prague. Jobs available worldwide. Lifetime job assistance. Tu i t i o n : 1 3 0 0 E u r o s . http://www.teflworldwideprague.com info@teflworldwideprague.com

HEALTH CAREERS CNA - CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT, P/T, Msla. Employer is seeking On-Call CNAs for assisted living facility. Must have current CNA certification. Will provide outstanding ADL care to residents. Must be able to work well with residents, coworkers and family members. Requires heavy lifting and moving residents. This is an OnCall position and the hours will vary based on facility needs. Starting pay is $8.75 or higher depending on experience. IMMEDIATE NEED. #2976719 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SALES

SKILLED LABOR

ADVERTISING SALES ACCT REPRESENTATIVE, F/T, Msla. One of the Northwest’s largest independently owned direct mail advertising company’s is a seeking a full-time ADVERTISING SALES ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE. These “Shared Mail” programs are well established in 31 markets across the Pacific Northwest and currently we are looking to add a new team member to the sales force for our Missoula/Butte markets. The ideal applicant for this position will be a top sales performer who likes to work independently, but with the support of a solid company behind them. This is a business to business sale, so you will need to show strong presentation skills and an ability to make good business sense to our clients. Comprehensive paid training at our Portland OR, headquarters. $30,000 base salary, plus commission and bonus. Paid expenses, 401K plan & health insurance included. #2976738 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

OUTSIDE INSTALLER/TECH., F/T Seasonal, Msla. Local fast-growing company is seeking an experienced OUTSIDE INSTALLER. INSTALLER DUTIES INCLUDE: Outof-shop glass repairs, vinyl & wood

New Bio-Tech Natural Co. New Bio-Tech Natural Wellness Company Seeks Marketing Reps Nationwide. Unlimited Weekly Pay. Work from home, set own hours. Co. launched May, 2009. Call to qualify at 406-253-4582

OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE, F/T Lolo, Employer is seeking a full-time, Experienced OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE. Job duties will be to maintain relationships, take orders from existing customers, and secure new customers by calling or visiting potential clients. This position must keep pace with market demand and the needs of the Montana Food Products Manufacturing Plant. The outside sales person will devise and implement processes that will both minimize costs and waste and maximize sales. Additionally, will be responsible to sell and deliver consistent results, canvas, prospect and network, follow-up with prospects and clients, complete administrative tasks accurately and on time and plan the day, week and month and manage time efficiently. Will work 40 hours per week, Monday through Friday, days with possible swing shifts. Wage is $1700.00 to $2600.00 per month, depending on experience, plus commission available. Benefits available. Closes Friday January 08, 2010. #2976726 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com

Wilderness Instructors: Our InnerRoads Wilderness Program is looking to hire staff to start in March. Exp. w/ at-risk youth in wilderness required for most positions. Please complete Youth Homes application. For more info go to www.innerroads.org or contact Amy at 406-721-2704 ext. 240

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 December 31–January 7, 2010


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): One of my favorite landscape painters makes a livable wage from selling her art. She has had many gallery showings and has garnered much critical acclaim. That’s the good news. The bad news is that she feels obligated to keep churning out more landscape paintings—even when her muse nudges her to take a detour into, say, abstract expressionism or surrealistic portraits. Galleries don’t want anything from her except the stuff that has made her semifamous. “Sometimes I fantasize about creating a series of ‘Sock Puppet Monkeys Playing Poker,’” she told me. If she were an Aries, I’d advise her to do what I think you should do in 2010: Listen to what your version of the sock puppet monkeys are urging you to do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): My Taurus friend Jill had a dream in which she stopped by a blackberry bush on a summer afternoon. All the ripe blackberries were too high on the bush, just out of reach. She stood there gazing longingly up at them for a long time. Finally three people in medieval garb came by, as if having stepped out of a deck of Tarot cards—a warrior, magician, and priestess. “I really want those blackberries,” she said to them. “Could you give me a boost?” They stooped down to make their backs available. She climbed up, but still couldn’t reach the berries. “Oh well, we tried,” she said. “Follow us,” said the priestess, and she did. After a while they came to another bush whose blackberries were lower and easy to pluck. Then the four shared the feast. After analyzing the omens for 2010, Taurus, I’ve come to the conclusion that Jill’s dream is an apt metaphor for your best possible destiny in 2010. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We should not think of our past as definitely settled, for we are not a stone or a tree,” wrote poet Czeslaw Milosz. “My past changes every minute according to the meaning given it now, in this moment.” I suggest you make abundant use of this wisdom in 2010. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have unprecedented power to re-vision and reinterpret your past. Keep the following question in mind as you go about your work: “How can I recreate my history so as to make my willpower stronger, my love of life more intense, and my future more interesting?”



CANCER (June 21-July 22): I think everyone should always have an improbable quest playing at the edges of their imagination—you know, some heroic task that provokes deep thoughts and rouses noble passions even if it also incites smoldering torment. I’m talking about an extravagant dream that’s perhaps a bit farfetched but not entirely insane; a goal that constantly rouses you to stretch your possibilities and open your mind further; a wild hope whose pursuit makes you smarter and stronger even if you never fully accomplish it. The coming year would be an excellent time to keep such an adventure at the forefront of your awareness.

SERVICES BUSINESS Holiday Catering Need a holiday party catered? It’s not too late. Contact Austin at cateredaway@gmail.com or 543-1262. With 10 years of experience cooking in some of Missoula’s finest restaurants, I can offer cuisine to suit your taste and budget. Professional and accommodating.

STORAGE SHEDS MontanaShedBuilders.com Affordable, Durable, Delivered

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Northwest Homes

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Zach Long 544-6264

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FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-475-0876

MISC. GOODS

ELECTRONICS Get Dish -FREE Installation– $19.99/month. HBO & Showtime FREE-Over 50 HD Channels FREE Lowest Prices–No Equipment to Buy! Call Now for full Details- 1877-887-6143 Get Dish -FREE Installation– $19.99/month. HBO & Showtime FREE-Over 50 HD Channels FREE Lowest Prices–No Equipment to Buy! Call Now for full Details- 877887-6144

COMPUTERS

STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533

WANTED TO BUY

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214

CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794



RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

Do you have vintage watches like Rolex, Omega, or Hamilton that you’re looking to sell? I buy watches! Mr. Kearns 406-207-0687.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Who and what do you hold most dear, Aquarius? I encourage you to get clear about that. Once you do, I hope you’ll make a vow to bestow extra care and attention on them in 2010—I mean literally write out a one-page oath in which you describe the inner states you will cultivate in yourself while you’re in their presence and the specific actions you’re going to take to help them thrive. Nothing else you do will be more important to your success in 2010.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The philosopher Nietzsche said there was no middle ground: You either said “yes” to life or you said “no.” You either celebrated your vitality, enjoyed your power, and thrived on challenges, or else you practiced constant self-denial, hemmed yourself in with deluded rationalizations, and tormented yourself with indecision. I’m not so sure it’s always as clear-cut as that. While I’m usually in the “yes to life” camp,” I’ve gone through “no to life” phases, as well as some extended “maybe to life” times. What about you, Pisces? Whatever you’ve done in the past, I hope that in 2010 you will take maximum advantage of the cosmic rhythms, which will be encouraging you to give life a big, resounding, ongoing YES.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your limitations will be among your greatest assets in 2010. Yes, you heard me right, Libra; I’m not speaking ironically or sarcastically. During the coming months, you will be able to benefit from circumstances that you might otherwise imagine would prevent you from operating with maximum freedom. It might require you to look at the world upside-down, or work in reverse to your habitual thought patterns, but you could actually generate interesting opportunities, vital teachings, and maybe even financial gain by capitalizing on your so-called liabilities.



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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Scientific studies have proved what we all knew already: A person who’s only mildly interesting to you will probably become more attractive if you drink a couple of pints of beer. What if I told you, Virgo, that in 2010 you could regularly create the same effect without drinking the beer? I have it on good astrological authority that this will be the case. Due to fundamental shifts in your relationship with the life force, and having nothing to do with how much alcohol you consume, the entire world will often be at least 25 percent more attractive to you than it ever was before.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I am a man of fixed and unbending principles,” said American politician Everett Dirksen, “the first of which is to be flexible at all times.” That’s the kind of playful and resilient spirit I urge you to aspire to in 2010, Capricorn. I think you’re most likely to have a successful year if you regularly explore the joys of improvisation. The more empirical and less theory-bound you’re willing to be, the better you’ll feel. Practicing the art of compromise doesn’t have to be galling, I promise you; it may even turn out to be more fun and educational than you imagined possible.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You Sagittarians may wander farther and wider than the other signs of the zodiac, and you may get itchier when required to stay in one place too long, but you still need a sense of belonging. Whether that comes from having a certain building where you feel comfortable or a wilderness that evokes your beloved adventurousness or a tribe that gives you a sense of community, you thrive when you’re in regular touch with a homing signal that keeps you grounded. According to my analysis, 2010 will be prime time for you to find or create or renew your connection to a source that serves this purpose well.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A guy who goes by the name of “Winter” has made it his goal to visit every Starbucks in the world. According to his website, he has thus far ordered drinks in 9,874 stores. His project contrasts dramatically with an acquaintance of mine who calls herself “Indian Summer.” She is in the midst of a global pilgrimage to the hundreds of sites listed in Colin Wilson’s book The Atlas of Holy Places and Sacred Sites, including cave paintings, dolmens, medicine wheels, and temples. Guess which of these two explorers I’m nominating to be one of your inspirational heroes in 2010.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob: I sure don’t like so much God stuff mixed into my horoscopes. Can you cut it out, please? I understand it’s common for the masses to believe in an Ultra Being, but you? Pul-lease. You’re smarter than that. I just can’t abide all the ‘Divine Wow’ this and ‘Cackling Goddess’ nonsense that you dispense; it doesn’t jibe with the practical, sensible, unsuperstitious, non-mushy world I hold dear. -Sally Scorpio.” Dear Sally: I predict that many Scorpios will have sensational, ongoing, up-close and personal communion with the Divine Wow in 2010. You’re free, of course, to call it something else, like an unprecedented eruption of creative energy or a breakthrough in your ability to access your own higher powers.

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PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MISSOULA COUNTY REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS PARKS AND TRAILS PLANNING CONSULTANT SERVICES The Missoula Board of County Commissioners and the Parks & Trails Program of the Missoula County Rural Initiatives Office is requesting professional planners and/or consulting firms to submit their proposals for providing services to assist Missoula County in updating the 1997 Missoula County Parks and Conservation Lands Plan. The final product will be an integrated countywide parks and trails plan with a minimum life span of 20 years. It will include a parks plan update for the unincorporated areas of Missoula County not covered by the 2004 Master Parks and Recreation Plan for the Greater Missoula Area and a trails plan for the entire unincorporated area. To view the full RFP, including project overview; scope of services; and organization and submittal requirements; please visit our website at www.co.missoula.mt.us/rural. Please contact Lisa Moisey, County Parks Coordinator, with any questions at the mailing address below, by emailing lmoisey@co.missoula.mt.us, or by calling 406/2584716. Five complete copies of the proposals shall be received by Missoula County Rural Initiatives at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 by 5:00 PM MST on January 19, 2010. For hand delivery, please bring to the Rural Initiatives Office: 317 Woody St. Late submittals will NOT be accepted. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-09-1276 Dept. No. 3 SUMMONS. HEATHER NELSON, Plaintiff, v. SARAH EVANS, Defendant. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 21st day of October, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-09-90 Dept. No. 4 SUMMONS. HARRY STEPHEN DARTY, Plaintiff, v. ALFRED BARONE, Defendant. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 2nd day of September, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Diane Overholtzer, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Case No. DP-09-205 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of JOHN D. ARIAS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Eugenie Arias, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 1176 Ridgefield, Pint Pleasant, NJ 08742, or the above-entitled Court. DATED this 18th day of Dec., 2009. /s/ Eugenie Arias, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-1529 Honorable Ed McLean Presiding. NOTICE OF HEARING ON CHANGE OF NAME In the Matter of the name Change of Taylor Gibbs Noland, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has

asked the District Court for a change of name from Taylor Gibbs Noland to Taylor Britton Gibbs. The hearing will be on 2/10/2010 at 1:30 p.m.. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated 12/21/09 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court, By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-1530 Honorable Ed McLean Presiding. NOTICE OF HEARING ON CHANGE OF NAME In the Matter of the name Change of Lisa Christina Bruce, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Lisa Christina Bruce to Lisa Christina Gibbs. The hearing will be on 2/10/2010 at 1:30 p.m.. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated 12/21/09 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court, By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-09-181 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ASTRID W. WANG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative to the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to David M. Wang, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of October, 2009. /s/ David M. Wang, Personal Representative. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-206 Honorable John W. Larson Presiding. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF DONALD G. ARMSTRONG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Michaelene R. Armstrong, the Personal Representative, Return Receipt Requested, c/o Skjelset & Geer, P.L.L.P., PO Box 4102, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 22nd day of Dec., 2009. /s/ Michaelene R. Armstrong, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/22/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200604311, Book 769, Page 773, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Thomas J. McMahon, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 of Kona Rapids, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of October 28, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $425,046.41. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $385,527.11, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 9, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale

is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19787) 1002.111646-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/10/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200620387, Book 780, Page 1279, mortgage records of Missoula County, MT in which Trina Macdonald was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary & Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot A24 of Windsor Park, Phase II, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200827926, Book 831, page 115, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $175,309.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $154,159.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred & trustee’s & attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19517) 1002.106700-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/30/97, recorded as Instrument No. 9721844 Book 518, Page 926, and modified by Agreement recorded 5/14/2007 as Instrument No. 200711704 Book 797, Page 300, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Barbara A. Larsen, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 5: A parcel of land located in and a

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 December 31–January 7, 2010


PUBLIC NOTICES portion of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25, Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, a fence corner; thence S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along the East line of said Section 25, a distance of 1119.00 feet to a set rebar on the West right-of-way of a road, said point being the true point of beginning; thence continuing S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along said Section line and along said right-ofway, a distance of 200.00 feet to a set rebar; thence S. 64 degrees 39’01” W., 1471.43 feet to a set rebar on the West line of the Southeast one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25; thence N. 00 degrees 06’52” E., along said West line of the Southeast one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter, a distance of 455.84 feet to a set rebar; thence N. 74 degrees 17’06” E., 1381.34 feet to the true point of beginning, as shown on deed. Exhibit No. 2798, filed December 7, 1971, records of Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 2, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $102,507.36. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $88,377.90, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 15, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction

may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19334) 1002.108693-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/30/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200707965 Bk. 794 Pg. 1262, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Charles Dennis Ecret Jr., a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 5 of Certificate of Survey No. 1914, a tract of land located in the Northwest One-Quarter of Section 35, Township 14 North, Range 23 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 13, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $362,177.55. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $353,609.81, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on March 23, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the

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foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.08334) 1002.138612-FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale T S No 08 0107635 Title Order No 080039058MTGSI THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on 04/28/2010 at the hour of 11 00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place On the front steps to the County Courthouse 200 West Broadway Missoula MT RECONTRUST COMPANY N A successor in interest by merger to RECONTRUST COMPANY A NEVADA CORPORATION is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which JERRY LELAND KINNEY AN UNMARRIED MAN AND JAMES W KINNEY AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantors conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/17/2006 and recorded 08/25/2006 in document No 200621758 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 781 at Page Number 1172 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County Montana being more particularly described as follows LOT 5 OF SPRING VALLEY ACRES A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Property Address 22450 WALLACE CREEK RD CLINTON MT 59825 96S1 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed or by their successor in interest with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantors failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 06/01/2008 and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust advances assessments and attorney fees if any TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following The unpaid principal balance of $157,092.48 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.75% per annum from 05/01/2008 until paid plus all accrued late charges escrow advances attorney fees and costs and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture T S NO 08 0107635 Order NO 080Q39058MTGSI The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee s fees and attorney s fees costs and expenses of the sale and late charges if any Beneficiary has elected and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation RECONTRUST COMPANY NA successor in interest by merger to RECONTRUST COMPANY A NEVADA CORPORATION Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr TX2 985 07 03 Richardson TX 75082 ASAP# 3376020 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009, 01/07/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 13 IN BLOCK 1 OF KLAPWYK ADDITION NO 2, AS PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Mary Ann Sutton, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property

to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to All Pacific Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 3, 1994 and Recorded on January 10, 1994 at 4:10 o’clock P.M., in Book 403 of Micro Records, page 287. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank NA successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Home Loans, Inc f/k/a Homeside Lending, f/k/a BancBoston Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $672.92, beginning November 1, 2007, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 21, 2009 is $27603.71 principal, interest at the rate of 7.75% now totaling $1,349.50, late charges in the amount of $72.16, escrow advances of $1,012.46, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,698.96, plus accruing interest at the rate of $4.54 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 10/05/09 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 10/05/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3369490 12/17/2009, 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 12, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 1 OF WEBBER ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N. : 0497003 Eugene Karl Schafer and Janet Lindquist Schafer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Equity Direct Mortgage Corp, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 8, 1998 and recorded May 13, 1998 at 3:58 o’clock P.M. in Book 541, Page 0296, as Document No. 9812132. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Loan Services LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 December 31–January 7, 2010

monthly payments due in the amount of $1,109.47, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 14, 2009 is $97,402.78 principal, interest at the rate of 10.00% now totaling $10,113.88, late charges in the amount of $141.75, escrow advances of $1,814.96, suspense balance of $-961.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,241.04, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.38 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 5, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On October 5, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission Expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3369543 12/17/2009, 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 16, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 19 in Tract 15 of 5 Acre Tracts in the North one-half of School addition, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Shy A. Obrigewitch and Maria A. Obrigewitch, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 6, 2005 in Book 761, Page 1499, under Document Number 200526729. The beneficial interest is currently held by US Bank National Association as Trustee for RASC 2005KS12. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1132.70, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 30, 2009 is $112,491.81 principal, interest at the rate of 5.00% now totaling $4,813.53, late charges in the amount of $225.40, escrow advances of $939.28 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,522.75, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.41 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that

may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On October 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark Missoula County Government

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by River of Life Ministries for a special exception permitting River of Life Ministries to be located at 4007 Highway 200 East, legally described as, Lot 1B First Citizens Addition #2 Section 24 Township 13N Range 19W. The subject property is zoned C-C3, Community Commercial. Section 8.10 of Resolution #76-113

County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3369593 12/17/2009, 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 16, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 44 OF SHELBY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Bradley C Griswold and Amber K Griswold, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 3, 2005 and recorded June 7, 2005 in Book 753, Page 1537, under Document No. 200513593. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,530.33, beginning April 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 30, 2009 is $164,733.17 principal, interest at the rate of 5.875% now totaling $9,640.55, late charges in the amount of $51.30, escrow advances of $2,603.62 and other fees and expenses advanced of $-756.34, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.82 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale Missoula County Government

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, January 19, 2009, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Subdivision & Planned Variation Request – Blue Heron Estates A request from the Earl Pruyn Estate (c/o) Jack Meyer, represented by Eli & Associates, Inc., to subdivide a 75.01-acre parcel into 16 residential lots. The property is located on Lavoie Lane, south of Mullan Road in the Council Grove area, in the SW 1/4 of Section 31 in T14N, R20W, and in the NW 1/4 of Section 6 in T13N, R20W (see Map E).

The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this subdivision at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 3, 2009, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula.

requires that all special exceptions go before the County Board of Adjustment for approval. See map F. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the Office of Planning and Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request, you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and exact legal description is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. Legal ads for any City projects that will be heard at this meeting may be found in the Legal Ads section of the Missoulian.


PUBLIC NOTICES include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 10/13/09 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 10/13/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JOAN MEIER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/2013 ASAP# 3374545 12/17/2009, 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 23, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4953, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TOGETHER WITH A 60-FOOT EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3021 AND 3652. Dennis W Doran, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Horizon Home Loans, a Division of First Tennesse Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 12, 2007 and Recorded on September 17, 2007 under Document #200724122, in Bk-805, Pg-1128. The beneficial interest is currently held by First Horizon Home Loans, a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $978.77, beginning March 22, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2009 is $307,905.76 principal, interest at the rate of 3.625% now totaling $6,468.43, late charges in the amount of $389.85 plus accruing interest at the rate of $30.58 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the prop-

erty on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 16, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On October 16, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same.Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3384750 12/31/2009, 01/07/2010, 01/14/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 2, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: UNIT 8 IN BUILDING # 1 LOCATED IN THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS A RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM SITUATED ON THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL PROPERTY IN MISSOULA MONTANA, TO WIT: A PORTION OF THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 19 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF ELK HILLS-PHASE 1, A RECORDED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA, COUNTY, THENCE S.88&#186;15’00”W ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ELK HILLS-PHASE 1, 232.18 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING S.88&#186;15’00”W, 90.82 FEET, THENCE S.84&#186;20’45”W, 169.73 FEET; THENCE S.05&#186;31’30”E, 152.30 FEET; THENCE S.84&#186;00’00”W, 100.00 FEET; THENCE S.40&#186;00’00”W, 50.00 FEET; THENCE S.15&#186;00’00”E, 125.00 FEET; THENCE S.67&#186;04’30”E, 123.64 FEET, THENCE S.61&#186;51’24”E, 204.56 FEET; THENCE S. 48&#186;05’43”E, 189.96 FEET, THENCE N.22&#186;47’57”E, 187.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY 175.24 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGENT CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 924.93 FEET; THENCE N.76&#186;35’13”W, 50.07 FEET, THENCE N.62&#186;59’29”W, 170.81 FEET, THENCE N.04&#186;46’56”W, 183.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO THOSE RIGHTS, RESERVATIONS, EXCEPTIONS AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD INCLUDING THE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY PURPOSES FOR LOT 7 AS SHOWN ON THE APPROVED PLAT FOR THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS. TOGETHER WITH A 1/45TH INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS AND AN EXCLUSIVE RIGHT TO USE THE LIMITED COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT TO THIS UNIT, AS SAID COMMON ELEMENTS AND LIMITED COMMON ELEMENTS ARE DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP FOR THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS. AND SUBJECT TO THE DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP FOR THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS AND BYLAWS RECORDED NOVEMBER 7, 1996 IN BOOK 490 AT PAGE 20 MICRO RECORDS, AND AMENDED APRIL 16, 1999 IN BOOK 579 AT PAGE 924 MICRO RECORDS AND THE DECLARATION OF RESTRICTIONS FOR THE VILLAGE AT ELK HILLS RECORDED NOVEMBER 7, 1996 IN BOOK 490 AT PAGE 95 MICRO RECORDS. Curt McGinness, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 05, 2006 and Recorded on December 11, 2006 under Document No. 200631634, in Bk788, Pg-903. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1181.93, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2009 is $152,362.04 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $3,370.74, late charges in the amount of $269.02 and other fees and expenses advanced of $22.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.61 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents {valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 23, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 10/23/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 9/22/2012 ASAP# 3389609 12/31/2009, 01/07/2010, 01/14/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on February 19, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 5 OF MOUNTAIN SHADOWS WEST PHASE 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Michelle M. Wamsley-Lawston, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 10, 2007 and Recorded on May 15, 2007 under Document # 200711819, in Bk-797, Pg-415. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,316.59, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2009 is $303,784.91 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $11,788.99, late charges in the amount of $587.82, escrow advances of $415.62 and other fees and expenses advanced of $366.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $54.10 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the

Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 13, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On October 13, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3378544 12/24/2009, 12/31/2009, 01/07/2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on April 19, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the Front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2 in Block 1 of Kerr Addition No. 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. John Schilling Jr. and Tracy Schilling, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Panhandle State Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 7, 2008, and recorded August 14, 2008, in Book 824 of Micro, Page 1107, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded December 7, 2009, in Book 851, Page 1226, Document No. 200928776, records of Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Deed of Trust, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Deed of Trust, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Deed of Trust immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $281,212.01, plus interest at a rate of 7% totaling $6,199.61 late fees of $569.76, and escrow shortage balance of $599.711, for a total amount due of $288,581.09, as of November 25, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance wit the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 8th day of Dec., 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula) On this 8th day of Dec., 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana, Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 10, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the Front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the

following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 1 of Dorothy Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Arlyss Bolich, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to First Security Bank of Missoula, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated September 12, 2006, and recorded Sept. 20, 2006, in Book 783 of Micro Records, Page 694, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded Dec. 18, 2009, in Book 852, Page 848, Document No. 200929797, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $24,957.85, plus interest at a rate of 8.25% totaling $829.17 and late charges and other charges of $63.82, for a total amount due of $25,850.84, as of Dec. 21, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 21st day of Dec., 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 21st day of December, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 3, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the Front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 17 and 18 in Block 6 of South Missoula, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Melody L. Barnes, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated May 11, 2004 and recorded May 11, 2004 in Book 732, Page 433, Doc. No. 200413140, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded Dec. 10, 2009, in Book 852, Page 172, Document No. 200929121, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $144,756.09, plus interest at a rate of 6.875% totaling $5,555.64, taxes and insurance payments of $1,249.36 and late fees and other fees of $603.38, for a total amount due of $152,164.47, as of Dec. 9, 2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 15th day of Dec., 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 15th day of December, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013

d s

"Best of the Decade, Part 4" –this week: 2006-2007.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS 1 San Francisco's Fisherman's ___ 6 Shore bird 11 Oktoberfest mo. 14 Boston-based New York Times correspondent Sara 15 "...___ man with seven wives..." 16 Pubescent start? 17 Heroic way to introduce oneself 18 His "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" was on Publishers Weekly's Best Fiction of 2007 list 20 British "domestic goddess" Lawson 22 Torah repositories 23 Group whose album "St. Elsewhere" was #2 on Spin Magazine's 40 Best Albums of 2006 27 Kid-___ (G-rated Blockbuster rentals) 28 Broadway actress Salonga 29 "Call me Ishmael" speaker 32 Tiny titter 35 Diplomat's skill 36 NASCAR driver Earnhardt 37 Mentalist Geller 38 Rolling Stone's pick for #1 song of 2007, by Jay-Z 41 Suffix for Wisconsin 42 Near 44 Big man on campus? 45 Deck full of cups and wands 47 Dull pain 48 "Slippery" tree 49 Infantrymen, for short 50 One of The Forbidden Planet's "Best of the Year" movies of 2006 56 DVR brand introduced in 2000 57 "That's freakin' amazing!" 58 Buzznet's #1 choice of "Top 10 Bearded Musicians of 2007" 62 ___ pedis (athlete's foot) 63 Lawn dart path

64 Line to the audience 65 Open a toothpaste tube 66 "Go team!" cheer 67 Beermaking need 68 Cheats before Christmas?

DOWN 1 Clear (out), as a sponge 2 Guys getting ___ the groin (usual funny YouTube fare) 3 Onetime Commodore computer 4 Put on ice 5 More like lace 6 Part of some Muslim women's attire 7 Ostrich relative 8 "What EEZ IT, man?" yeller 9 Prefix meaning "ear" 10 Present at birth 11 Typical do for young male anime characters 12 Notable times 13 Heady candy? 19 Quaking-in-one's-boots feeling 21 Leary's drug 24 "The Heart of Dixie" 25 Enemy territory study 26 "I Kissed a Girl" singer Perry 30 Low choral part 31 Schrute Farms vegetable 32 Base for some casseroles 33 Actor Bana 34 Sound of some whistles or whines 35 Certain lymphocyte 39 Lofty poems 40 Bob Marley classic 43 Chuck overboard 46 Just plain stupid 49 Cardio locale 51 "That's too hard to believe..." 52 "Habanera" composer 53 FDR veep John ___ Garner 54 Tinker with 55 Laundry piles 56 Giga- times 1000 58 Course figure 59 End of many languages 60 "My Life in Ruins" actress Vardalos 61 Manning scores: abbr.

Last week’s solution

©2009 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0448

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 December 31–January 7, 2010


HOME PAGE

First-Time and Current Home Buyer Tax Credits: What You Need to Know By Bryan Flaherty, President, MOR For some, the real estate market of the last few months may have felt like the enactment of the Dr. Seuss tale, ‘How the Grinch Stole Christmas.’ But Christmas has passed, the new year is upon us, and it is a time for looking ahead with just a cursory glance backward. And with the first-time and current homeowner tax credits, the view offers some positive opportunities for those who are aware of the requirements. Consumers may be more familiar with the first-time homebuyer credit since it is an extension of the original offer that expired at the end of November, 2009. The amount is still $8,000. There are a few major differences: • Income limits have been raised to $125,000 single and $225,000 married • There is an $800,000 limitation on the cost of the home purchased • Purchases by dependents are not eligible • Purchaser must attach documentation of pu chase to the tax return

The same provisions apply to the current homeowner tax credit as well. Those intending to take advantage of this offer must have used the home as a principal residence consecutively for five of the previous eight years. With these very specific dates, consumers who are contemplating the possibility of taking advantage of these offers shouldn’t wait too long to start the process. Those who will be selling a residence in order to use the current homeowner credit to purchase a different property also should consider that the average time on the market in the Missoula urban area is 121 days. In order to meet the April 30 deadline, the property may need to be on the market soon after the first of the year.

NEW LISTING

• 5BD/2BA/2 Car Garage • Central Location, Fenced Yard • Hardwood Floors, Fireplace • Sauna & Surround Sound MLS# 907872

2111 Trail St Missoula

Shannon Hilliard

• • • •

$230,000 MLS# 908438

612 Carter Court

MLS# 908062

$211,000 MLS # 908233

NEW LISTING

Turn Key 3 bd, 2.5 bth Condo with garage Oak & Walnut furniture Central location

• • • •

$237,900 MLS# 905928

406-207-2326

drhalsell@gmail.com

Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

Ken Allen 406-239-6906

pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

allenmsw@bresnan.net

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 December 31–January 7, 2010

OPEN HOUSE • Th-M 11:30-5pm or by app. only T & W

• • • • •

3BD/ 2BA/ 2 Car Garage New home just completed UG spinklers, seeded lawn New development off Grove St.

2540 Red Osier Ct., Missoula

355 Strawberry Lane

Patrick Halsell

judy.gudgel@prumt.com

FEATURED LISTING

1816 #D Wyoming Missoula

• Unique A-frame cabin • Located on 10 acres • 360 views of the Jocko Valley • Studio over separate garage

2BD/2BA/2 Car Garage Located in cul de sac One level home Covered porch, UG sprinklers

Judy Gudgel 406-370-4580

shannon@prudentialmissoula.com www.ShannonHilliard.com

$156,000

FEATURED LISTING

Kerrigan Masters 406-329-2066

406-239-8350

• • • •

With quickly fluctuating lending requirements and very specific guidelines about using the first-time and current homeowner tax credits, January is a perfect time to explore the options and decide whether homeownership is the right decision. One thing is sure: now is the right time to turn to Missoula real estate professionals for assistance in evaluating current market information, and all homeownership options, so that you can make informed decisions.

Consumers may be tempted to hedge their bets that since there was one extension of the tax credit, there could be more. None of the information currently available indicates that this is a possibility; in fact, quite the

FEATURED LISTING

$249,000

opposite is true with the emphasis being that there definitely will not be another extension.

Starting at $166,900

Enjoy Downtown Living Fitness Room Secured Parking Owners Lounge Community Deck

801 N. Orange St. Missoula

Jeff Ellis 406-203-4143 office 406-529-5087 cell Re/Max Realty Consultants www.theuptownflatsmissoula.com


RENTALS PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

1&2

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HOUSES 3 bedroom Northside house 3 Bedroom 1 1/2 bath Northside home. Large fenced yard,washer/dryer hookups, two car garage, established garden, and fruit trees. Pets Ok! $1200/month + deposit. Garbage/Sewer paid. 529-2500 or 529-2503 for more infomation. Availible January 2010 Rural living!: 20-miles from Missoula, beautiful Ninemile valley, $450-$775, ONE-MONTH FREE RENT!, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com

RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Wolf Glen Apts. 1-2 bdrms, W/D included, dishwasher, covered parking, cats ok, $595-$695, Missoula Property Management251-8500

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

RENTAL WANTED

ROOMMATE NEEDED. New 1-2 bedroom condo with full bath. Minutes to UM. No smoking/pets. $400/month includes utilities, cable, Internet, W/D. 509-3986133

Private RV Trailer Lot For self-contained 33’ Airstream in

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 10250 Valley Grove Dr., Lolo MLS#902264 $299,000 Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath log home 5 minutes from Msla Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 5465816 131 S. Higgins 6-4 & 6-5 MLS#907544 - $389,000 Luxury 6th floor condo in historic Wilma Building. Upscale living in the heart of Msla. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 2 bdrm, 2 bath one level home with garage, central air, fenced yard, u/ground sprinkling patio. $169,500 MLS# 908650 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 www.missoulahomesonline.com Text: 44133 Msg:12889 for pics 2663 Stratford, Target Range MLS#907889 - $216,000 Well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath ranch. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3322 B Connery Way - MLS# 908163 - $191,000 Unique 3 level condo. 2 bed, plus loft & 3 bath. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Specializing in single family homes & horse properties in Missoula, Lolo, Florence & Stevensville.

4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 721-8990

Missoula. Call 406-546-2502.

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin &

Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com 4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 4 Bed, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text: 44133 Message:12886 for pics 4322 Capy Ln. - MLS#904419 $435,000 Wonderful executive style home on 1 acre lot. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 5 bed/2 bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Lrg kitchen w/ island. Fenced yard in front w/ private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS #906641. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Msg:12591 for pics 5999 Cunningham Ct., Florence MLS#905057 - $390,000 Beautiful 3 bedroom, 4 bath home on 3 acres. Just minutes from Missoula. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 928 Elm St. - MLS#904910 $229,000 Great property in lower Rattlesnake. Turn key & low maintenance. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 AMAZING HOME OVERLOOK-

ING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Beautifully remodeled and updated home with build-outs S O L Dand sky lights. 3 bed 2 bathroom. $229,900. Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Can’t get your house sold? Call Beverly Kiker @ Prudential Missoula. (406) 544-0708 Featured listing Unique Aframe cabin located on 10-acres with 360˚ views of the Jocko Valley. Studio over separate garage/shop. $211,000 MLS # 908233, 355 Strawberry Lane. Contact DR Halsell at Mullan Trail Realty for more info. (406)207-2326 Featured Listing 5BD/2BA with a 2 car garage in a central location. Fenced yard, hardwood floors, fireplace, sauna & surround sound. $249,000, MLS# 907872. Call Shannon Hilliard at Prudential Missoula Properties at 239-8350 for more info. 2111 Trail St. Featured Listing! Turn Key 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath condo w/garage. Central location. $156,000. MLS#908062. 1816 #D Wyoming, Missoula. Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653)

pat@properties2000.com GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS LOLO HOME WITH PRIVATE LAKE FRONTAGE. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage. New roof, new interior & exterior paint, new baths, wrap-around covered porch, tons of storage. $339,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy10 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Lot 1 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905530 - $109,000 2.87 acres in Georgetown Lake w/easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 5465816 Lot 2 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905531 - $129,000 2.25 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 NEW LISTING! 3BD/ 2BA/ 2 Car Garage. New home just completed in new development off Grove St. 2540 Red Osier Ct., Missoula. $237,900. MLS# 905928. Ken Allen Real Estate (406) 239-6906

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 December 31–January 7, 2010


REAL ESTATE NHN Applegate & Prarie Rd., Helena - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Great investment to get in the start of a cemetery development. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Montana for more information: 329-2066 or 370-4580.

Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Lrg Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 /year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@wind e r m e r e . c o m Te x t : 4 4 1 3 3 Message:12589 for pics

3 Quizno’s Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! $650,000Missoula, MT. Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753.

Price Reduction! 3bd/2bth, Double Garage, Patio, Fenced, UG Sprinklers, Quite, Hellgate Elem. School. $219,900 MLS# 906692. 4012 Lancaster Rd, Missoula. Pat McCormick 240-SOLD (7653) pat@properties2000.com SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master w/ walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com Price Reduction 20 lot subdivision on 4.67 acres. Each lot is 8,000 square feet, and it is all in a great location! $1,100,000, MLS# 807578. Call Kerrigan Masters or Judy Gudgel at Prudential

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

LAND FOR SALE 19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $89,900 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503. Text: 44133 Message:12890 for pics 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

COMMERCIAL

DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

10 years same location- an EXCELLENT VALUE! Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 5434412. www.missoulahomes.com

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful

Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatious with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road

Joy Earls Looking forward to working with you in 2010! Call me for more good values on Missoula homes & investments.

Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are Still You may be able to: Historically Low! • Lower your monthly You may be able to: payment • Lower your monthly

paymentfrom an ARM • Switch from an ARM to• aSwitch predictable to a predictable fixed-rate loan

call Hooker.

fixed-rate loan

• Get a shorter term to • Get a shorter term pay off your to pay off your mortgage faster

Over 10 years of Real Estate Experience

mortgage faster

• Finance your • Finance yourclosing closing costs ofyour your costs as as part part of new new loan. loan

Jodie L Hooker • 406.239.7588 Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com Quality Service Certified Realtor® www.MissoulaValleyHomes.com

REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-

1500 W. Broadway • Missoula • MT, 59808

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 406-239-7588 • www.MissoulaMultifamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com

RICE TEAM

When you are ready to work with a professional,

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL

Bankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Happy New Year!

PRICE REDUCED! Tanning salon, $55,000- top of the line equipment, excellent client base.

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 370-7689, Prudential Missoula.

misschance, your chance, Don't Don’t miss your contact me today. contact me today.

Jerry Hogan REALTOR®, QSC® 406-546-7270 • jerryhogan.point2agent.com Specializing in: Investment Properties

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, WHS, QSC®, PSC® 406-544-8570 • www.MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers Kevin Plumage REALTOR®, ABR®, E-Pro 406-240-2009 • kevin@greatermontanare.com Specializing in: Affordable Housing

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900

Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. This home has been well cared for and has many updates such as paint, appliances, lighting, A/C and underground sprinklers. It is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large insulated/sheet rocked garage plus a huge storage shed for over flow. There is a master bedroom, plus 2 additional bedrooms and a full bath. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. Call today for your private showing. MLS# 907496

It was great to work with everyone in 2009.

Thank You Let's welcome in an even better year with 2010

Happy new Year

Finalist

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com

Astrid Oliver Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Home Mortgage Consultant Cell: 406-550-3587 1800 S. Russell St. Ste. 200 Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Missoula, MT 59801 http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ Phone: 406-329-4061 astrid-oliver Cell: 406-550-3587 astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Credit is subject to approval. http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver

Astrid Oliver

Some restrictions apply. This information accurate as ofapply. Credit is subject to approval. is Some restrictions date of printing This information is accurate as ofand date is of subject printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Wells Home to change without notice. Mortgage is a Fargo divisionHome of Wells Fargo Bank, Mortgage is N.A. a 2009 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. of Wells Fargo Bank, division All rights reserved. N.A. © 2009 Wells Fargo #63731 11/09-01/10 Bank, N.A. All rights reserved #63731

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 December 31–January 7, 2010

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

Mary Mar ry R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com


REAL ESTATE

358 Mari Court, Msla $305,900 • MLS# 908482 Beautiful Home

Executive home on 10 acres

Granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, stone fireplace. Built-in lockers off garage entrance, lots of storage, 2 hot water heaters, RV pad, RV dump and a hot & cold water spicket, backyard adjourns a park.

MLS# 905791 • $688,000

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $269,900 • MLS# 908640 Large 5 BD Home 5BD/2BA home in a great neighborhood with a 2 car garage. Lots of storage, finished basement, kitchen updates.

3 BD, 3 BA 3400 sqft with 4 car garage, cathedral ceilings, master suite with views of the Bitterroots. Priced well under appraised value.

1720 Brooks • Suite 5 • Missoula

544-7507

370.7689

glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 822.7653 Anna Nooney

Rochelle Glasgow

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

www.YourMT.com

priscillabrockmeyer.com Missoula Proper ties

BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

Community Based Client Driven Uniquely Missoula

406-327-8787

445 W Alder - PORTICOREALESTATE.COM

$99,500/up, ATTENTION FIRST TIME HOMEBUYERS Get Your First Year's Principle & Interest Paid For You!

Classic Home in Great Local $315,000 Spacious, Like New $249,900 Immaculate Charmer

$128,500 Condo on river $174,500 Nice, Newer Starter $229,900 $219,900 Darling Home UC Hardwood Floors, Central Msla $349,900 Stellar University Area Home w/rental 1 acre with cabin $880,000 MLS#803924 • $695,000 River Front Custom Home $599,000 Lake-front Condo 605 College, Stevi $179K Sweet starter or retirement pad, radiant heat

4.35 acres, river access SHOP - No Covenants Nice 3 Bed, 2 Bath Completely Remodeled

Amazing Arts & Crafts style home built by meticulous artisan

OWNER FINANCING

$139,900 Under Contract

Making a difference in real estate

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 December 31–January 7, 2010


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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


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