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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 12 • March 19–March 26, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Seventy percent of the nation’s farm-raised trout come from just south of Missoula. Do these fish solve a sustainability problem, or create one? by Tara Morgan

Scope: Marie Watt takes a trip down memory lane with Heirlooms Briefs: City saves precious dough on cheaper dog poop bags Up Front: Missed opportunities mar mixed-use development


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Missoula Independent

Page 2 March 19–March 26, 2009

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nside Cover Story Aquaculture, or the commercial cultivation of ocean and freshwater fish, is a slippery issue. On one side, it can be seen as a sustainable solution to curtail destruction caused by commercial fishing. On the other, concerns have been raised about water polluCover photo by Chad Harder tion, wild-caught fish used to feed farm-raised fish and health risks posed by use of antibiotics and chemical dyes. The answer may lie about six hours south of Missoula, in Magic Valley, Idaho, where millions of rainbow trout splash around in human-made concrete raceways . . . . . . . .14

Friday 3/20 • 9pm

WELCOME SPRINGS ANNUAL WITH

TOM CATMULL AND THE CLERICS Saturday 3/21 • 9pm

News

Letters Sacred land, methane and home schooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Unemployment rises again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Dog poop bags, used bikes and Internet ambushes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. Let’s talk about sex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Pared down Garden District finally breaks ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Up Front Cell phone ban for drivers faces possible bumpy road . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski Change and hope were fun while they lasted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range Dire times may require a return to our roots. . . . . . . . . 11 Agenda Attend a Victory Gardens class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Warming up to winter salads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 8 Days a Week Mmmmmm, trout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mountain High Snowbowl’s “Best of the Bowl” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Scope Marie Watt sparks nostalgia with Heirlooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Noise March of the Black Queen, Joan Baez, Mason Jennings and Zoroaster . 29 Books Parzybok delivers an epic journey of this world . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Film Not much to like in I Love You, Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

THE GROWERS FUNKY FRESH MUSIC FROM BELLINGHAM, WA. Thursday 3/26 • 9pm

JOHN FLORIDIS FREE SHOW

FREE Euchre Tournament

Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Free Will Astrolog y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 This Modern World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

MONDAY 10PM

SUNDAY 8PM

THURSDAY 3/19

TUESDAY 7:30PM



Fat Tire Pub Trivia

Open Mic Night with Mike Avery!

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $10 at the door, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

TO NIG HT

Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen PHOTO INTERN Ashley Sears COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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DJ's Spinnin' Latin Rhythms All Night Long!! • Free Salsa Lessons Start at 8:30pm SUNDAY 3/22 Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $5, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

Dr. Manhattan with March of the Black Queen, Fiancee, & The Evergreen THURSDAY 3/26 Doors @ 9pm, Cover $10 advance, $12 day of show, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

Trampled By Turtles with Lucy Michelle & The Velvet Lapelles myspace.com/trampledbyturtles, myspace.com/lucymichelle Tickets Available @ Ear Candy Music, Rockin' Rudy's & Online @ WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MARIGNYPRODUCTIONS

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Page 3 March 19–March 26, 2009


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Ashley Sears

Asked Monday afternoon at Southgate Mall.

Q:

This week the Indy reports on the Missoula City Council’s possible proposal to ban drivers from using cell phones. How would such a law impact your daily routine? Follow-up: How many things can you safely do at once?

Rikki Elliott: Not at all. I get around on my own two feet and when I am in a car my cell phone is off. But I know that my friends who drive would be a lot happier if it passed. Bring it on: It depends. In a hazardous workspace, I can do about five different things at once, and I think talking on the phone while driving counts as a hazardous workspace. In a casual situation I don’t have a limit on what I can do at once.

Chris Mayeur: I don’t think I’d be driving any more, because I can’t live without my phone. Trifecta: I can talk, text and work all at the same time. All the things you need to do to be successful in life.

Mad about methane The Montana Legislature is once again considering a bill to change Montana water rights law to benefit the coal bed methane industry. Senate Bill 505, sponsored by Sen. Keith Bales out of Otter, makes the industry last in time, but first in right for water rights. They claim they only want to change the law to benefit thirsty ranchers. Give me a break! Less than one percent of this water will ever go to thirsty ranchers, and the methane companies get the water right. Ever since the methane industry started dewatering precious aquifers to access the methane, groups like Northern Plains Resource Council have tried to get them to re-inject or treat that water. But the methane industry doesn’t want to deal with the real problem—they are stealing groundwater from senior water rights holders. And that’s the whole reason behind their attempt to change Montana’s water rights law. By changing the law, the methane companies can absolve themselves of the responsibility for drying up an aquifer. SB 505 will affect everyone who has a water right throughout Montana, not just in eastern Montana. Legislators shouldn’t go along with this. They shouldn’t be bamboozled into upending 140 years of water rights law—a system that protects landowners across the state—just to benefit one short-term industry. Call your legislator and tell them to vote “no” on SB 505. Janet McMillan Greenough

Sacred land Kenai Greywolf: I think they should pass it. They’ve proven that it’s the equivalent to drinking and driving and it makes people idiots on the road. It’s even worse when it comes to truck drivers on the highway. They’ve got an 18,000-pound killing machine under them and they don’t pay attention. If you’re not going to pay attention then get off the road! Chat it up: I can talk on the phone while reading, and I can keep up with my kid. And I can have multiple conversations with several people all at one time.

Delores Birdsong: It probably wouldn’t affect me much, because I’m a pull-over-and-usethe-cell-phone person. Shut up and drive: A lot. I can chew gum and change the radio at the same time. But I think that if you are going to be driving, then you should just drive.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 March 19–March 26, 2009

Looking southward from Red Crow Mountain in today’s Glacier National Park, one is blessed with a view of the pristine landscape of the Badger-Two Medicine, which is nestled between the Continental Divide and the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. All Montanans can agree that the wild character of this area is inviting. But the eye does not capture the depth of its cultural significance. I am Ma-tak´-soo-woo, a grandson of Chief Red Crow. I feel a solemn duty to share with Montanans the traditional cultural regard that unifies our Blackfeet people with this landscape. This regard stems from the ancient parables that articulate that this area is Blackfeet Holy Ground. This regard is also reaffirmed in the reference and practice of today’s traditional Blackfeet. We refer to the Rockies as the “Backbone of the World,” and embrace this backbone as both a source and a channel for the varied expressions of the “Great Mystery,” including the characters Thunder, Coldmaker, Windmaker and Medicine Elk. The land between the Badger and Two Medicine Rivers is also where Old Man

Napi, in the long ago time, organized the first men to go northward to look for wives. The quintessential religious ceremony for our Blackfeet is the O´-kan, (Medicine Lodge or Sun Dance). The Badger-Two Medicine cradles four peaks honoring the central figures in the O´-kan’s origin story. Those mountains are Morning Star, Feather Woman, Scarface, and Poia. In the traditional naming of something, a name imparts the essence of its meaning upon that which is named. This is Holy Ground. The Badger-Two Medicine is also

The land “between the Badger and Two Medicine rivers is also where Old Man Napi, in the long ago time, organized the first men to go northward to look for

wives.

home to both Wolf and Grizzly who, in the long ago time, aided both a Blackfeet man and a woman in their respective odysseys to escape misfortune and return home. The epilogues of both parables have our morally considerate brothers traveling westward into the sunset of the Badger-Two Medicine watershed. Finally this landscape, in an undesecrated state, insures an accessible sanctuary for the continued practice of the vision quest, which is at the heart of traditional American Indian spirituality. My late father mentored and impressed upon me that, while the vision quest is rooted in identity, it ultimately becomes a path for establishing conscious contact with a power greater than self. This Power is that which both weaves and binds the universe. Recently, over 90 percent of commenting Montanans supported a nonmotorized conservation-based management alternative for the Rocky Mountain Front, the majestic northern third of which is the Badger-Two Medicine. Formerly “alternative 5,” the newly released Badger-Two Medicine Travel Plan is the option most respectful of and harmonious with the reverence developed and held by my

Blackfeet People. Two tribal councils and the Blackfeet Tribal Historic Preservation Office have concurred. The Forest Travel Plan also strengthens the environment for local and statebased outfitters by its emphasis on horse and foot travel. From Judeo-Christian tradition, I was raised with an important story involving the Sinai wilderness, a vision quest, and the revelation of Commandments. In that story, Moses is instructed by God to remove his sandals because he is standing upon sacred ground. The principle here is timeless: Respect sanctity by minimizing impact. Please join our Blackfeet People in support of the Forest Service travel plan restricting motorized travel inside the Badger-Two Medicine. This too is sacred ground. Jack Gladstone East Glacier

Three stories, one letter If people won’t police themselves, then the Missoula City Council will do it for them. I’m writing to thank the members who voted for telling dog owners to use a leash (see “Council collars dogs,” Feb. 26, 2009). And I guess I could say thanks for the laugh at the other council members who thought voice commands could control pets where their owners are hiking in the great beyond outside of town. I wrote before on this subject when one of your reporters complained about not being able to walk the streets with Fido off the leash (see “Etc., May 29, 2008). I related going to a picnic where other attendees brought both potato salad and their dogs—unleashed. It took about seven minutes before a fight ensued and the van doors opened to end the melee. Am I guessing that this same reporter wrote this time about what he views as parental ignorance in home schooling? (See “Etc., Feb. 26, 2009.) He could have checked the records of what some home schooled students have achieved. Yes, there are gaps in home schooling, but you could drive a truck through what some parents have seen in public education. I’m sure some of your readers could give him some examples of the latter question in a much less rude essay. I did only a two-year stint home schooling our three kids with superior instructions, lesson plans and materials from the state of Alaska. Every teacher at home was given day-by-day plans on every subject. The students’ work was graded by teachers in Juneau. Those two years benefited both my children and myself. There’s always another side to every question and that’s what reading your newspaper and my reply amounts to. Clare Hafferman Kalispell


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Page 5 March 19–March 26, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, March 11

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

The Montana Department of Labor announces 6.6 percent unemployment for January, an increase from 5.5 percent in December. Labor Commissioner Keith Kelly assures out of work Montanans that “things will begin turning around once the money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act hits the ground.”

• Thursday, March 12 Plum Creek Timber Co. cuts its final log at its Fortine sawmill, located in northwestern Montana about 20 miles from the British Columbia border. The mill will be disassembled in April after 53 years of operation, leaving 72 employees out of work.

• Friday, March 13 Days before he was scheduled to stand trial for the murder of a homeless Missoula man, Dustin Strahan pleads guilty to accountability for deliberate homicide. He’s sentenced to 30 years in Montana State Prison, with 25 years suspended. Last week co-defendant Anthony St. Dennis received a 100-year prison sentence for the murder.

• Saturday, March 14 Stanford-bound senior center Joslyn Tinkle scores 18 points to lead Big Sky past Butte, 56-46, for the state’s AA girls’ basketball championship. Tinkle receives the tournament’s most valuable player award for helping the Eagles win their secondstraight state championship.

• Sunday, March 15 The International Culture and Food Festival brings the sweet smells of fresh eats to the University of Montana’s University Center. More than 30 countries are represented during the five-hour event, with everything from traditional Middle Eastern dishes to Australian didgeridoo music.

• Monday, March 16 The U.S. Forest Service announces a ban on motorized travel on 186 miles of interior access trails in the Badger-Two Medicine area of the Lewis and Clark National Forest. The announcement is followed by a 45-day appeals period. Dave Cunningham with the Forest Service says he expects motor vehicle enthusiasts to protest the decision.

• Tuesday, March 17 A 53-year-old woman is killed on U.S. Highway 93 near Arlee when she loses control of her car during bad weather. According to highway patrol dispatch, the vehicle rolled twice in the ditch and ejected the driver. She is pronounced dead at St. Patrick Hospital.

Remnants of a forest dot the floodplain known for the past century as Milltown Reservoir. Crews have removed more than 2 million tons of contaminated sediment from the valley bottom, and hope to return the Clark Fork River to its natural channel the week of March 23. Crews will then move upstream in hopes of removing an additional 100,000 tons of contaminated muck before spring runoff.

Dog poop

City skimps on Mutt Mitts The state of the economy isn’t just thinning budgets—it’s now causing a significant change in Missoula’s ubiquitous dog poop picker-upper bags, otherwise known as Mutt Mitts. “Due to budget cuts, I’ve gone to a singleply bag versus a double-ply bag,” says Scott Van Ommeran, Missoula’s park maintenance manager. Van Ommeran recently replaced the signature white plastic Mutt Mitts—equivalent to the thickness of about five plastic grocery bags— with thinner green bags. He believes the switch will save the city thousands of dollars. In fiscal year 2008, dog owners pulled about 192,000 bags from the 103 Mutt Mitt dispensers dotting Missoula parks, according to Van Ommeran. If the poop output of Missoula’s roughly 7,000 registered dogs remains steady, the green bags—which cost the city 2.9 cents each compared to 7 cents for the white—will save the city nearly $8,000. “I haven’t had a chance to have them out there long enough to weigh the financial benefit

of it all. I could use twice as many bags, but I have no idea at this point,” Van Ommeran says. “I’m heavily monitoring the use.” The bag thinning represents just one example of how the city is reevaluating its budgets to cope with dwindling revenue. Last year Mayor John Engen asked all departments to cut costs by 3.7 percent. The $8,000 is a good chunk of the $125,000 Parks and Rec is straining to pinch in 2009. Missoula isn’t the only city struggling to find cuts, according to Rod Lukey, operations manager at Mutt Mitt. “We’ve had a lot of people who are finding, with budget constraints and whatnot, they need some clever ideas for how they can maintain their program,” says Lukey. The Kentucky-based company, which sells tens of millions of bags around the country each year, has one of its five employees devoted solely to working with customers cutting back, Lukey says. To keep those customers, Mutt Mitt encourages them to do what only Sacramento, Calif., has done: Imprint poop bags with advertisements. “People need to understand, what does a

budget cut look like?” says city communications officer Ginny Merriam. “It looks like a flimsier Mutt Mitt. And we may end up with something that is actually better for the environment, and works just as well, and is cheaper, and we could have been doing it all along.” Matthew Frank

Legislature

Dropping the cover charge Before Rep. George Groesbeck Jr. died in December, the Butte legislator had made a point of standing up for Montana’s artists. Now a bill he inspired is set to carry on that part of his legacy. Currently, musicians are required to obtain a Workers’ Compensation Act exemption by paying $125 and applying at the Montana Department of Labor. If they don’t sign up for the exemption, they—as well as the venue that books them— could be fined $1,000. Groesbeck wanted to eliminate the requirement by enacting a permanent exemption for entertainers who garner less than 50 percent of their income from performances. He never had a chance to introduce the bill, but his friend, Rep.

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 March 19–March 26, 2009

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

Pat Noonan, D-Ramsay, sponsored HB 598 with Groesbeck in mind. On March 11, the House Business and Labor Committee heard testimony about Noonan’s bill. Not surprisingly, the hearing drew support from artists and venue owners, but the business and labor community fought back. “The DJs that work for me are extremely poor,” says Whitney Fisher, owner of Missoula’s L.I.V Entertainment, noting that most of her DJ’s are college students. “And for them, coming up with the $125 exemption certificate, they’re like, ‘Well, I don’t have the money so I just won’t do it.’” The committee also heard from labor lobbyists who argued that if artists receive an exemption, it’s unclear who’s liable if they get injured during a performance. The lobbyists also wondered how the state would verify a performer’s income, an easily exploited loophole. But Gary Kelly, a club owner in Florence, told the committee that if the exemption doesn’t pass, many of the live musicians who play in Florence—and currently slip under the Department of Labor’s radar—will simply stop playing. “Most of the [performers at my venue] are working guys,” he said. “They work during the day and they play music for the love of it. I’ve talked to them and most of them have said that if they have to do something like that, they’ll just quit playing music. That might be something you want to think about.” The committee has not yet voted on the bill. Jesse Froehling

Business

Recycled bicycles Wrench monkeys Dave Hartman and Kevin Downey left managerial positions at Missoula Bicycle Works to secure a quasi-monopoly in the local bicycle market. Not a month in, business at Hellgate Cyclery, Missoula’s only used bike shop, is booming. The two haven’t even had time to plan a grand opening. Hartman says Hellgate Cyclery is filling a void in the community. An 11-year veteran of Missoula bike shops, he’s noted a steady increase in the biking population. A used bike shop seemed the logical response.

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

“Just always something I’ve seen the need for,” Hartman says. “I’m just surprised no one’s done it already.” When a back-alley storefront opened up behind Moose Creek Merchantile, Hartman and Downey put months of lofty talk into action. Now the cramped brick space houses a workbench and a wall of bikes and used parts. Hartman’s poodle, Grover, lounges near stacks of new fenders. For Jim Sayer, executive director of the

Adventure Cycling Association, Hellgate Cyclery serves as a terrific example of how the cycling community continues to grow. He says along with the new Big Sky Cyclery shop near the University of Montana campus, a used bike and repair shop downtown will offer more options for people looking to get out of their cars and onto bikes. “You’re in the middle of a down economy and you’re seeing a flourishing of the bike community,” Sayer says. Hartman wasn’t the only one to notice a void in the local bike market that needed filling. Reed Sonsalla, shop manager at Missoula Bicycle Works, has fielded many requests for used bikes over the years. “A lot of times we’d tell people to go to Craigslist, but there you’re not always guaranteed on quality,” Sonsalla says. Sonsalla says losing Hartman and Downey was a bit disappointing. Combined, they boast over 25 years of mechanic experience. Still, Sonsalla sees a need for a place like Hellgate Cyclery.

Agenda

“It’s better than just getting something off the Internet,” he says. Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

40

Snowmobiles U.S. Forest Service officials issued citations to seven snowmobilers riding through a nonmotorized area near the Montana-Idaho border on March 4. According to multiple sources familiar with the incident, the bust was made possible by monitoring a regional snowmobile discussion forum on the Internet. “Our law enforcement folks had information [that two snowmobilers] would be going in there to retrieve two broken down sleds on a specific day,” says Lolo National Forest public affairs officer Boyd Hartwig, who did not specify where the information originated. “They had a date and a location of when they expected these guys to be back in there.” Two snowmobilers rode up the Fish Creek drainage through a motorized-use corridor that passes through the proposed Great Burn wilderness area to Idaho, says Hartwig. But they left the corridor and entered the non-motorized-use Irish Basin to find the broken down snowmobiles. Law enforcement officers issued the men citations, which bring a $150 fine plus a $25 administration fee. Meanwhile, an assisting Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) helicopter spotted another five snowmobilers in the area and watched them ride into Idaho and stop at Kid Lake, Hartwig says. The helicopter landed and FWP officials issued three citations to riders who did not possess Montana registrations. Hartwig says the helicopter then recorded GPS data of the five snowmobilers’ route, found they also passed through a non-motorized area, and sent them citations through the mail. Law enforcement officer Clint McGuffey, one of the two officers who issued the citations, says the Lolo National Forest typically writes no more than 15 snowmobile-related tickets a year. “These seven tickets have been more contentious than any I’ve written lately,” McGuffey says. “[The cited snowmobilers] called me some pretty ugly names, but I guess wearing a green shirt makes you have a pretty thick skin, huh?” Matthew Frank

etc. Let’s talk about sex. Or, more precisely, let’s talk about why certain members of the University of Montana faculty would prefer to talk about anything but sex. Last week, UM’s student newspaper, the Kaimin, reported that assistant law professor Kristen Juras was going to the mattress over the paper’s “Bess Sex Column,” a weekly opinion piece penned by senior J-school student turned amateur sexologist Bess Davis. Under the guise of free speech not really being free or absolute, Juras argues that Davis’ columns “portray a hook-up culture that has unhealthy physical, psychological and emotional effects on students.” She also thinks, as the student paper of a state-funded institution, editor Bill Oram and his staff should be held to a certain journalistic standard—one that doesn’t include, say, advice about oral sex, as Davis’ most recent column did. In an interview with the Indy, Juras further articulated her concerns. She respects a student publication’s right to free speech, but feels written guidelines should be put into place to uphold the publication’s educational mandate. She proudly limits her own students’ free speech by prohibiting profanity in her classroom. She says she’s open to the Kaimin printing a sex column, but that it must be “appropriate.” She questions Davis’ expertise on the issue. With all due respect, Juras comes across badly on this issue. Who defines the appropriateness of the column? How exactly does the whole “I support free speech, but…” argument end? How much experience is expected at a student newspaper? In fact, we have yet to hear any lawyer convincingly defend Juras’ reasoning. (Sorry, Juras’ colleague, controversial UM law professor Rob Natelson, doesn’t count.) That’s because Juras doesn’t have a legal beef— she has an ideological one. She serves as the faculty advisor to the Christian Legal Society (CLS). The organization, among other things, requires its members and officers to adhere to a “Statement of Faith.” The CLS website includes a resolution outlining the specific sins of premarital sex, adultery and “homosexual conduct.” The resolution goes on to encourage CLS members to engage those involved in “sexual immorality” and lead them to repentance. Assuming Juras gets off on the CLS code of conduct, it’s easy to see her seductive First Amendment tease as a flimsy cover for asking everyone to repent. We respect Juras’ religious views as much as we respect Davis’ commentary on college sex. Both have their place—in a newspaper, on the opinion and lifestyle pages.

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Vicki Kober Page 7 March 19–March 26, 2009


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Late bloomer Pared down Garden District finally breaks ground by Matthew Frank

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A half-dozen excavators and bulldozers started to dig up dirt and asphalt at the former Intermountain Lumber site on Russell Street March 6, marking the long-awaited start of the Missoula Housing Authority’s (MHA) latest affordable housing project. But the current project pales in comparison to what MHA envisioned years ago. Developers balked, affordable housing funding came late and reconstruction of Russell Street remains in limbo. Local officials now believe the struggles to get the so-called Garden

A number of other Missoula developments face similar delays and downsizing. Ambitious plans conceived during Missoula’s economic heyday remain unbuilt, from the Old Sawmill District on the former Champion mill site to the Riverfront Triangle on the southwest corner of Orange and Front streets. Regardless of the myriad reasons for each project’s specific delays, they’re now mired in a market where prudence reigns and progress slows. The MHA searched for private developers to build the market-rate por-

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 March 19–March 26, 2009

District off the ground cast doubt on the viability of urban, mixed-use development in Missoula. “It was the kind of development everybody wishes we would do in Missoula, but nobody is able to do,” says Geoff Badenoch, formerly of the MHA. MHA bought the property in 2003 and planned to partner with a private developer to transform the 12-acre industrial blight into a community hub. The proposal included 270 residential units (72 considered affordable housing) mixed with commercial and retail space, a one-acre park and underground parking. MHA imagined the project as an anchor for the redevelopment of Russell Street, a key northsouth artery through town. Six years later, MHA has subdivided the site and scaled back to 37 affordable housing units in three buildings. Two empty lots fronting Russell Street await commercial buyers. MHA holds an option on a third lot and may build additional affordable housing in the future. “It’s too bad, in a way, that such an opportunity to do something that comprehensively has slipped past us, because there are no other sites like that around,” says Chris Behan of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency.

tion of the Intermountain Lumber site but never found a partner. Three expressed interest, including a Minnesota-based firm with vast experience building mixed-use developments. “And then this thing called the housing market started to tank in 2007, and the handwriting was on the wall,” says Badenoch. The developer pulled out by the end of the year. “It became clear we weren’t going to be able to create the original vision,” says Lori Davidson, MHA’s interim director. Russell Street itself complicated negotiations. Planners thought reconstruction of the notoriously congested street could occur in conjunction with the Intermountain Lumber site redevelopment. But the environmental review process drags on and reconstruction of Russell Street won’t begin until summer 2012 at the earliest, says Missoula Public Works Director Steve King. The work will cost upwards of $40 million and continue into the 2020s. “The uncertainty about the Russell Street development certainly, we think, has affected our ability to sell those street-front properties,” Davidson says, “because it’s difficult for a retail buyer not knowing if they’re going to have to put in sidewalks and everything.” On top of the Russell Street issues, MHA and homeWORD competed for

the same Montana Board of Housing tax credits in 2007. HomeWORD won out, which is why its affordable housing project on the corner of Broadway and Russell is near completion. MHA was awarded credits in 2008 and broke ground just two weeks ago. They expect to begin leasing units in November. “While it was a perfect storm in terms of delaying things, it came together in the end,” Davidson says, “and we couldn’t be happier with the way it turned out.” Missoula architects MacArthur, M e a n s & We l l s d r e w u p b o t h the 2003 and current plans for the Intermountain Lumber site. Don MacArthur says the development “harkens back to neighborhoods where we really understood what it was like to have a street that you’d want to both drive down and walk down.” But by the MHA putting the two adjacent commercial lots up for sale— listing for about $1.3 million and $850,000 by Properties 2000—it potentially jeopardizes that concept. “We have lost that ability to do it in a consistent manner if we sell it to other folks who have a different vision of what to do,” MacArthur says. “That’s where the loss has been.” That loss points to how Missoula has failed to build the type of mixeduse, transportation-oriented development architects and planners advocate. Missoula’s barriers, MacArthur says, include relatively low wages and high construction costs, high urban land costs, and the necessity of owning a car and having a place to park it. It adds up to a “fairly high risk proposition for the developer,” he says. “Since relatively few mixed-use projects are available in Missoula, the comps aren’t there to use in evaluating the risk and most of the projects are fairly large so the dollars involved are big.” What pencils out for developers, then, may not be what architects are drawing. “We are tending to do a lot of ‘prescribing’ for potential developers in how we plan for sites, before they even look at a site,” says Larry Swanson, an economist with the Center for the Rocky Mountain West. “Some of this is good, but too much and we may simply drive them away…I think that Missoula will learn sometime in the near future that we need to let private developers look at property and, based upon their experience, figure out what kind of development might work well.” mfrank@missoulanews.com


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Strong signals Cell phone ban for drivers faces possible bumpy road by Jesse Froehling

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A delivery truck almost killed Ward 1 have happened if I were not distracted ment would have no way to distinguish Councilmember Dave Strohmaier as he by the phone. So I imagine I will come between someone singing to their car stereo and calling home. A representawas walking home following the coun- around.” Not enough legislators came around tive from the local amateur radio club cil’s March 11 committee meetings. “I won’t name the company,” says to save the bill introduced by Rep. Bob attended the committee meeting to ask Strohmaier, “but the driver blows right Lake, R-Hamilton, earlier this session. that his constituents receive an exempon through the intersection while talking Lake, like Strohmaier, pointed to an tion from any ban. Similar exemptions abundance of data from the National were discussed for emergency personon his phone.” The near miss couldn’t have been Safety Council (NSC) to support his bill. nel and police officers. Other committee members wonmore prescient. Earlier that morning, Statistics show cell phone use conStrohmaier introduced a ban on tributes to an estimated 6 percent of dered how the city would educate the Missoula drivers using cell phones. It’s crashes yearly, which equates to 636,000 public about the law. Missoula Police something he hoped wouldn’t be necessary, but after three different cell phone bills died in Helena this legislative session, Strohmaier decided to take matters into his own hands. The city’s Public Safety and Health Committee discussed the topic at length, but took no action. A public hearing has not been set. The fate of the recent legislative bills and the committee’s debate over the proposed ban speak to the hangups of restricting personal cell phone use. While national statistics overwhelmingly show the dangers of talking Photo by Chad Harder and driving, only six states and Washington, D.C., have While national statistics overwhelmingly show the dangers of talking and driving, passed cell phone bans for only six states and Washington, D.C., have restricted the use of cell phones. drivers. Critics argue any law would infringe on personal freedoms— crashes, 330,000 injuries, 12,000 serious Chief Mark Muir noted the ban could an argument that strikes a chord in injuries and 2,600 deaths per year. NSC potentially surpass speeding as the city’s also estimates the chance of crashing top traffic offense. He said police already Montana. Ward 5 Councilmember Dick Haines increases by a factor of four when a dri- have plenty of opportunities to stop told the committee that although he ver’s talking on the phone. Despite the motorists and don’t necessarily need would support such legislation, he numbers, Lake’s bill died in the House another one. Another detail that caught the comunderstands why a law restricting cell Transportation Committee under the phone use has never passed in weight of legislators waving the civil lib- mittee’s attention was the ban’s inclusion of bicyclists. While some members Montana—or, for that matter, nation- erties’ flag. “There’s a group that is saying that joked that it was physically impossible wide. People in eastern Montana will fight “tooth and nail” to keep personal personal freedoms would be hindered if to hold a phone to your ear, grip a hanfreedoms, he said. Ward 3 we start telling people what they can do dlebar and maintain balance, Councilmember Bob Jaffe agreed, won- when they’re driving,” says Lake. “It fell Strohmaier argued that was exactly why dering where City Council should draw into the same group as the primary seat- it was important to add bicyclists to the belt group. They felt like mandating ordinance. the line. “There’s a lot of things you can do in these things steps a little too far into per“I think operating a bike while talking a car that will distract your driving,” Jaffe sonal freedoms.” on a cell phone is every bit as dangerous It was that camp, Lake says, that as operating a motor vehicle,” Strohmaier said. “But talking to friends, eating—it all caused his bill to be tabled indefinitely. regulates how we drive.” says. “Bikes are considered vehicles. “There was not a lot of opposition,” Therefore the ordinance ought to apply Jaffe also touched on the proposal’s other major hurdle—a majority of he says. “It was just the committee itself to both bikes and motor vehicles.” Americans have made a habit of talking that got tangled up in it.” The Public Safety and Health Strohmaier’s proposal has the Committee plans to hammer out the on their cell phone while driving, and chance to get similarly tied up in details before opening the debate to will be reluctant to change. “As a frequent user of my cell phone Missoula. Although most committee public comment. Until then, Strohmaier, while driving, I am hesitant to get behind members voiced support for the gener- who walks to and from city council meetthis one,” he wrote on his listserv fol- al idea, the details proved tricky. ings, will keep to the sidewalk and watch lowing the committee meeting. “But on Strohmaier suggested extending the out for drivers on cell phones. the other hand, I know I have made ban to hands-free devices like bonehead driving moves that would not Bluetooth headsets, but law enforcejfroehling@missoulanews.com

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Page 10 March 19–March 26, 2009

How little time it took to go from the Age of Hope to the Age of Outrage. The same people who swarmed to the inauguration of a new president promising “change and hope� now find themselves frustrated and angry at what is widely perceived to be a continuation of the fleecing of America that began under George W. Bush. And you know what, the people of this nation have every right to be mad as hell. It’s old news that Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney tossed open the doors to the U.S. Treasury during their disastrous eight-year reign of error. But the way they did it was through no-bid contracts to their cronies. Hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars flowed like water into the coffers of Halliburton, the company Cheney once led, Kellogg Brown & Root (the military supply arm of Halliburton) and the notorious contract security forces such as Blackwater and Triple Canopy. Meanwhile, billions more of taxpayer’s money was being funneled into hundreds of contract firms to take over jobs once performed by government agencies. Lots of people knew what was going on under Bush’s administration and lots of people complained about it. But a complicit Congress, including those sessions in which Democrats held majorities, willingly allowed the perfidy to continue. There’s not a single good reason why Congress didn’t fulfill its role as an independent branch of government by exercising its duty to provide checks and balances on the president. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., could have killed any of the bills in the House, but she didn’t. Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., could have killed any of the bills in the Senate, but he didn’t. Instead, the corrupt feeding frenzy went on unabated, culminating in Bush’s final, desperate “bailout� bill in which nearly a trillion dollars were given to the same Wall Street financial institutions and businesses that were wholly responsible for the economic shell games and over-the-top greed that led to the nation’s financial collapse. But then came Obama, who rode to office on a wave of hope and the promise—promise, mind you— of “change.� No longer would these corporate pirates loot our Treasury and steal our future once the new hand took control of the nation’s tiller. The old ways were out, the new ways were in, and with Democrats in control of both houses of Congress as well as the White House, average

Americans appeared to have some chance to have their voice, their needs and their concerns heard at the highest levels. Were that naĂŻve hope not so tragic, it might be funny. But there is nothing funny about what happened next. Instead of stopping the Bush giveaways, Obama merely relegated them to “the past.â€? When faced with a bloated, pork-laden spending bill rife with earmarks, Obama did not send it back

peasants “areThestorming the castle with torches and pitchforks, threatening not only any future bailouts, but also the future of Obama’s

�

presidency.

to Congress and demand that his campaign promise to end earmarks be honored. No, instead he signed it, sending nearly another half-trillion off to fill the pockets of the well connected and piling on additional billions to the incredible mountain of national debt Bush bequeathed the future. As luck would have it, the new president’s popularity ratings remained high as his stunning oratory worked its magic and, at least for a month or so, a frightened and confused public gave him another chance at change. Now, however, with the advent of the latest scandals, the public appears to have run out of patience and Obama’s approval ratings have plunged from the mid-60s to the mid50s—a huge drop in just a month. What outrages the populace more than anything is the on-going abuse of the billions of dollars Congress and the president continue to throw away. In the latest episode, it was revealed late last week that American International Group (AIG), the insurance giant that

was dubbed “too big to fail,� handed out $165 million in bonuses to its executives. That money comes from the $170 billion Congress and Bush gave them last year. Even worse, AIG says there are hundreds of millions more in bonuses that they will be contractually obligated to pay—many to the executives of the mega-corporation that were directly responsible for activities that brought the company to the brink of bankruptcy. New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo released data just this week that shows 73 AIG executives received $1 million or more in bonuses, including 11 who no longer work for the company. When faced with this situation— and the incredible political backlash it has ignited—Obama’s legal and financial advisers told him there was nothing they could do under the law. For about a day, that worked. But now the peasants are storming the castle with torches and pitchforks, threatening not only any future bailouts, but also the future of Obama’s presidency. In the meantime, the American public is once again treated to re-runs of representatives and senators issuing “stern reprimands� to the corporate pirates—a puppet show we have seen so often it has lost its ability to impress. One Republican, Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, suggested that the AIG executives should follow the example of their Japanese counterparts and kill themselves for their failures. Considering his role in all this, one might wonder why Grassley is immune from his own advice. A panicked Congress is now considering taxing the bonuses to get them back. First Congress and the president give the money away, then they get angry that it is being used without any sideboards—which they themselves neglected to put in the legislation authorizing the giveaways— and now they threaten to tax the execs to get the money back. Americans have every reason to be angry over how this country is being governed right now. The Republicans blew it, but we already knew that. We had every reason to expect more from the new administration and the Democratic Congress. Unfortunately, we’re not getting it, which brings us to the Age of Outrage. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Survive and thrive Dire times may require a return to our roots by Marcia Hensley

These are good days for survivalists, those dour predictors of dire times who’ve said all along that we’d better prepare for the worst. With people losing jobs, homes and life savings through no fault of their own, and with natural disasters, oil shortages and terrorists in the news, those long-predicted grim times may have arrived. Kurt Wilson, who hosts a website called “Armchair Survivalist,” predicts that the nation is falling into such chaos that survival skills will be crucial. But what are those skills? I think I have a good idea, based on what pioneers endured as they worked to settle the West. I believe they have a lot to teach us about what it takes to make it through hard times. Here’s a hint: A gun isn’t the most necessary thing. Where I live in Wyoming’s inhospitable high desert, settlers in 1908 knew that if they were ever going to grow anything, they needed to build a reservoir and ditches to direct water down from the Wind River Mountains. They did that by working together, and the ditches they dug a century ago still run water today. Some families lived in tents their first winter, burning sagebrush until they could bring logs from the mountains to build cabins and provide better fuel. They cleared the sagebrush, planted hay and grain, hunted rabbits, antelope and sage chickens. Gardens provided vegetables—fresh in summer, canned for the rest of the year. Each family had a cow, a pig and chickens. Surviving meant working dawn to dark. Because it took two days to ride in a wagon to Rock Springs, Wyo., the nearest town, they stocked up on staples once, maybe twice, a year. As recently as the 1930s, folks here were about as close to self-sufficient as you could get. Asked about life during the Great Depression, one old-timer said, “We didn’t notice much difference. No one had any money, but we had a roof over our heads and enough to eat.”

That kind of self-sufficiency may again become necessary, says Barton Biggs, a New York-based strategist who advised investors at Morgan Stanley. His recent book, Wealth, War and Wisdom, echoes survivalists by warning that the breakdown of civilized society is coming. Biggs advises creating safe havens stocked with necessities such as canned

Kurt Wilson, “ who hosts a website called ‘Armchair Survivalist,’ predicts that the nation is falling into such chaos that survival skills will be

crucial.

food, liquids, medicine, seeds and fertilizer. For the long term, he says, these “survival retreats” will also need a supply of water and a way of growing food. That makes them sound a lot like the early homesteads that were established in my community 100 years ago. Since my husband and I live on some of the same ground that supported settlers and their descendents—even in the same log house (although since remodeled) that they built—I’ve been wondering if we could survive under the same conditions they endured. We had a dress rehearsal during last year’s severe winter. We were snowed in for days and had to dip into our stores of canned and frozen goods. Fortunately, neither the electricity

nor the propane failed so that our television, stove, refrigerator and heaters kept us cozy. But what if the power grid were completely wiped out by weather or, as alarmists warn, by sabotage? Could we make do by heating with only our woodburning stove and cooking on the camp stove? How long would batteries sustain our transistor radio? No e-mail? No telephone? No indoor plumbing? What if there were no gas to drive the 50 miles to town for supplies, and what if the shelves were bare even if we managed to get there? It puts our gardening hobby in a whole new light. Forget the petunias. Put that precious water on the potatoes and beans. Hunting local wildlife would no longer be recreational. It would be a necessity. Could we raise chickens or barter with friends who do? We could try to get a calf or pig to fatten, and we’d want to replace our horse with a milk cow. On second thought, we might need that horse to get to the post office, assuming we still had mail delivery. If what armchair survivalist Kurt Wilson calls a “grid-down societal collapse” really did thrust us back to a frontier culture, he thinks we who live in the rural West would have an advantage over urban and coastal dwellers. The 19 states rated as best “retreat areas” on survivalblog.com are all inland Western states. The top five are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and my home state, Wyoming. The prospect of having to survive for long under truly primitive conditions is daunting, even frightening. But I like to think that if we absolutely had to, we could go back to living off the land. After all, I tell myself, we’re only a few generations away from the pioneers who did exactly that. Marcia Hensley is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She lives in Wyoming and is the author of Staking her Claim: Women Homesteading the West.

Sheena

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Beet the system. Squash the state. Overgrow the government. A slogan’s just a slogan until words become action. And as the ground’s decidedly thawing, so opens your window of opportunity to strike fear into the hearts of agribusiness and economic downturn. Unlike the 1940s, we’ve no fascist dictator against which to grow beans and corn. So for now, our enemy remains hunger and poverty. If you’re interested in enlisting in a multiyear ground campaign to free the world of the stranglehold of high prices, poor food quality and too many oil-based chemicals, get those hammers ready, as the iron’s heating up. When the Green Light hosts a Victory

Garden Class, you’ll learn to grow a massive amount of scrumptious produce in a small amount of space. Additional topics include companion planting, defensive strategies, soil amendments, in-the-bed composting, critters both “good” and “bad,” and mulch, mulch more. In the days after WWII, victory gardens supplied up to 40 percent of the United States’ food surplus. Forget the green berets, it’s time to call out the green thumbs. —Jonas Ehudin

Thu. 19 March

Sun. 22 March

The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Soldiers of Conscience—eight U.S. soldiers stand at a moral crossroads—are followed by discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peace andjusticefilms.org.

Stuff your craw with crab for the good of humanity when the second annual Special Olympics All-You-Can-Eat Crab Feed brings bushels of Bitterroot Stock Farm Chef Toby McCracken’s armored love to the Hamilton Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St. $45/$30 advance. Call 363-1111.

Help Missoula’s Community Forum members fund our infrastructure when you attend their meeting for the Capt. John Mullan neighborhood at 7 PM at Hellgate Elementary School, 2385 Flynn Lane. Free. Call 552-6081 for info on other neighborhood meetings.

Keep eating for another good cause when Pearl Cafe, 231 E. Front St., hosts their inaugural Powder Puff Night—featuring a four-course price-fixed meal prepared by the servers and served by the cooks—at 5 PM to benefit the women and kids of Mountain Home Missoula. Price TBA. RSVP ASAP 541-0231.

Help rebuild a shattered homeland when you attend a Benefit for the Children of Gaza, featuring Middle East Children’s Alliance’s Barbara Lubin and musical storyteller Jack Gladstone, at 7 PM at the Bigfork United Methodist Church, 750 Electric Ave. Donation based. Call 755-3704.

Fri. 20 March In honor of the third annual National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, the Missoula AIDS Council, 500 N. Higgins Ave., Suite 100, offers free and anonymous HIV testing from 9 AM–4 PM, plus free condoms and lube. Call 543-4770. Now that we’ve spent six years officially attacking Iraq, you can mark this ugly anniversary with a positive act when you attend the all-day—10 AM–6 PM—War Resisters Letter Writing Support Party at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave., where you can write to imprisoned soldiers and obstinate governments. You can also attend on Sat. Free. Call 728-8835.

The Green Light, 128 W. Alder St., hosts a Victory Garden Class at 1 PM on Sun., March 22. $10. RSVP 541-8623. Class is limited to 20 students.

Mon. 23 March The River front Neighborhood Council Meeting includes a presentation on zoning changes proposed for the ‘hood at 6:30 PM at Currents Aquatic Center’s meeting room. Free. Call 728-1880.

Tue. 24 March Partnership Health Center, 323 W. Alder St., provides Missoula area families with inexpensive Well Child exams from 9 AM-noon, with story reading, refreshments, and giveaways for all participants as well. $10. RSVP 258-4194. Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955.

Wed. 25 March

Montana native singer-songwriter Chris Cunningham plays to benefit Habitat for Humanity at 7:30 PM at Hamilton’s Roxy Twin Theater. $15/$12 advance at Chapter One Book Store/$20 couples advance. Call 375-1926.

Put your partying skills to good use when the Badlander hosts a Poverello Rock Raiser at 9 PM, where Andrea Harsell, Streetlight People and Pluto’s a Planet jam for the good of our less affluent neighbors. $5/$7 under 21.

Sat. 21 March

Thu. 26 March

On the Daly School Community Garden’s first volunteer day of the year, come get your hands dirty from 10 AM–2 PM, and chow on the lunch provided for volunteers. Free. Call 381-2564.

Join the mayhem at the MUD Mingle, a familyfriendly community potluck to kick off their upcoming workshop series at 6 PM at 629 Phillips St. Free. Call 721-7513.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 March 19–March 26, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When an 18-year-old man entered a bank in Camden, Ark., and opened a bag containing $88 in nickels that he wanted to change into paper money, the teller spotted a gun in the bag and alerted a supervisor, who called police. Capt. Scott Rosson told the Camden News the man didn’t try to rob the bank but explained he was carrying the gun because he planned to pawn it. Officers who questioned the man decided to search his home anyway and found $16,000 worth of property they believed was stolen. Rosson said many of the 1,760 nickels also were stolen. New York City police followed a robbery suspect from the scene to a nearby apartment building but arrested a different man who answered the door. The New York Post reported that when Raymond Gramby, 37, saw officers leading the man away, he yelled out his seventhfloor window, “It was me, you idiots. You have the wrong guy.” Officers released the first man and arrested Gramby. DOUBLE SECRET PROBATION - Some Atlanta residents complained the city shut off their water because of delinquent payments, even though they didn’t know they owed money. WGCL-TV reported that when the Department of Watershed Management hiked water rates 27.5 percent last June, it held off billing for the increase until December, then billed retroactively. Some customers said their water was shut off even though they’ve paid their bills, and they’re being charged a $100 reconnection fee to resume service. Department official Janet Ward insisted the retroactive billing, water shutoffs and reconnection fees are valid. THANKS FOR NOTHING - Witnesses said Jim Moffett, 58, and another man were helping two elderly women cross a busy Denver street during a snowstorm to get to a bus stop, when a pickup truck headed straight for them. Moffett pushed the other three out of the way, only to be struck and injured. After the Colorado State Patrol cited the driver of the pickup for careless driving, it ticketed Moffett, who was hospitalized in serious but stable condition, for jaywalking. BELIEVABLE—UP TO A POINT - Firefighters responding to a call from a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in Manchester, N.H., found three employees outside of the building wearing no clothes. WMUR News reported the employees had received a call from someone claiming to be from corporate headquarters who asked them to test their fire-suppression system. They did but told the caller chemicals from the extinguisher had gotten on their clothes. The caller told them to disrobe. The workers said they finally suspected the call was a hoax when the caller then told them to urinate on each other. PARENTING SKILLS - Authorities in Evangeline Parish, La., accused Donna Greenwell, 53, of trading two young children in her care for a pet cockatoo. The incident occurred after Greenwell spotted a flier offering to sell the bird for $1,500 and called the owners, Paul and Brandy Lynn Romero. When the Romeros happened to mention that they had tried for years to have a child together, sheriff’s Detective Keith Dupre said Greenwell offered them the 5year-old boy and 4-year-old girl for $2,000. When they couldn’t meet that price, Dupre said, “Ms. Greenwell agreed to make an even trade: the bird for the kids.” She asked for an additional $175 in cash to pay for adoption paperwork, even though she had no authority to put the children up for adoption. The mother and aunt of 4-year-old Deshawna Tyson found at a Chuck E. Cheese restaurant in Bel Air, Md., told authorities they didn’t realize the girl was missing until they saw her picture on a television newscast the next day. Harford County sheriff’s official David Betz told WBAL-TV the aunt and her boyfriend took Deshawna and eight other children to the restaurant in separate cars. When they drove home, each thought the other had the girl. Deshawna’s mother came home later that night and went straight to bed. EVANGELICAL FOLLIES - Shykea Boykin, 22, told police that she went home with Troy Brisport, 34, of West Toledo, Ohio, because she didn’t have a place to stay, but wound up being held captive. While she was asleep, according to court documents, Brisport handcuffed her wrists and ankles, put a gag in her mouth, undressed her, put an adult diaper on her and spent the next three days reading to her from the Bible. “It’s unusual to hold somebody for that long and not commit a sexual assault,” police Capt. Ray Carroll told the Toledo Blade, “and read Bible verses to them.” TRYING IS THE FIRST STEP TOWARD FAILURE - A South Korean woman failed the written exam for a driver’s license on her 771st try. The 68-year-old woman, whom the Korea Times identified only by her family name, Cha, began taking the test in April 2005, according to North Jeolla Province licensing official Choi Young-chui, who noted that Cha has spent $3,000 on fees for the test and scored as high as 50. A score of at least 60 is required on the written exam to advance to the driving test. The woman said she intends to try again but wouldn’t say when. A British woman who has tried but failed to kill herself at least 50 times was arrested after being spotted on cliffs near the village of Aberystwyth hours after magistrates rejected her request to lift her anti-social behavior order. BBC News reported that authorities imposed the ASBO in January 2006 after Amy Beth Dallamura, 45, made repeated suicide attempts by wading out to sea and leaping off piers, jetties, rocks and cliffs. Rescue attempts have cost emergency services $1.4 million. IDENTITY CRISIS - When two customers complained that a pizzeria in Palm Coast, Fla., got their order wrong, owner Joseph Milano was caught on tape pistol-whipping the men. After his arrest on aggravated assault charges, law enforcement officials confirmed a report by the Daytona Beach News-Journal that Milano was really Joey “Crazy Joe” Calco, 40, a mob hit man in the federal witness protection program. “Now that’s in the back of my mind,” said Richard Capie, 35, whose complaint provoked Calco’s attack. “The guy’s a killer.” ARMY STRONG - The Army disclosed that 24 soldiers committed suicide in January 2009— eight more than died in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

2009 Thurs March 19 5:30 pm

Missoula Greenhorns – Networking Event Staybridge Suites, 120 Expressway No RSVP

Thurs March 19 12:00 pm

City Club – Monthly Luncheon (Congressional Stimulus Talk) Holiday Inn Downtown at the Park RSVP: ccm@cityclubmissoula.org

Tues March 31 5:00 pm

Missoula Downtown Association (MDA) Downtown on Tap @ MkLaren, 124 N. Higgins No RSVP

Tues April 7 5:00 pm

Missoula Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours (BAH) Member Networking Social, W Chiropractic @ 2801 Great Nothern Loop No RSVP

Thurs April 9 5:15 pm

Missoula Building Industry Association (MBIA) Open the Door Kitchen & Bath Design Center/Natural Stone No RSVP

MDA > Missoula Downtown Association > www.missouladowntown.com Chamber > Missoula Chamber of Commerce > www.missoulachamber.com MBIA > Missoula Builders Industry Association > www.buildmissoula.com CityClub > CityClub Missoula New Ideas > www.cityclubmissoula.org Greenhorns > Missoula Greenhorns Young Network > www.missoulagreenhorns.com Want to spread the word about a business networking event? Submit info to cmelton@missoulanews.com. Events must be sponsored by a Missoula leadership and/or trade org with 25+ members, and open to the public for professional networking purposes. Events are subject to approval before being published. Please submit requests at least two weeks in advance.

Missoula Independent

Page 13 March 19–March 26, 2009


S

troll by a supermarket fresh fish counter and you’ll see varying shades of pink and gray flesh—salmon, trout, catfish, raw shrimp—piled on mounds of crushed ice. But look closer through the smudged display case and you’ll find a United Nations assembly of marine ambassadors, name tags proclaiming: “Arrowtooth Flounder, U.S.A., wild” or “Fresh farmed salmon steak, color added, Canada, farmraised” or “Raw shrimp, Thailand, farm-raised.” Though the debate over food miles—the amount of carbon used transporting food from its source

to your plate—has been widely discussed of late, there’s another issue playing out in this seafood case that’s less prominent but equally important: aquaculture. Aquaculture, or the commercial cultivation of ocean and fresh-water fish and shellfish, is a slippery issue. On one side, it can be seen as a sustainable solution to curtail destruction caused by commercial fishing. On the other, concerns have been raised about water pollution, wild-caught fish used to feed farm-raised fish, and health risks posed by use of antibiotics and chemical dyes. Though approximately 90 percent of the world’s farm-raised fish are produced in China and the rest of Asia and the Pacific region, the United States does have its own sizeable aquaculture industry. In fact, just six hours south of Missoula, in Magic Valley, Idaho, millions of trout splash about in human-

According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program, a popular source for information on sustainable seafood consumption, freshwater rainbow trout farmed in ponds, raceways and recirculating systems are considered a “best choice” option. “You’ve got a much more controlled and contained system in ponds or tanks or raceways inland,” explains Peter Bridson, aquaculture research manager at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “So that’s the advantage you have with things like trout and catfish is that you can contain them much more carefully, you can have screens on your outlets and…you don’t have the storm risks, you don’t have the risk of backing a boat propeller into your nets, or a seal chewing a hole in your net.” So what is it about farm-raised rainbow trout that makes it widely consid-

1960s, the aquaculture industry was booming. In 1966, Clear Springs Trout Company—now the single largest company raising rainbow trout in the world—was founded by Jess O. “Ted” Eastman in Buhl, Idaho. “We’re here because of the spring water,” says Cally Parrott, director of corporate relations for Clear Springs Foods. “It’s just perfect for raising rainbow trout, the 58-degree water—winter, spring, summer and fall.” Sitting at her desk in the Clear Springs corporate headquarters in Buhl, all smooth bleached wood and breathtaking panoramic views, Parrot explained the Clear Springs concept: “We’re totally vertically integrated. By that I mean we control every aspect—from the egg to the market. We have a broodstock station over in Soda Springs, Idaho, where we grow our eggs. We even have our own feed mill. We make our own feed, then we

Seventy percent of the nation’s farm-raised trout come from just south of Missoula. Do these fish solve a sustainability problem, or create one? story and photos by Tara Morgan made concrete raceways. Idaho is the nation’s No. 1 producer of farmraised rainbow trout—about 70 percent of the country’s total. And though aquaculture is the state’s third-largest food-animal industry—reeling in $37.5 million in 2005—you probably won’t see Idaho offering farm-raised trout novelty license plates any time soon.

Break it down According to the U.N.-led World Summit on Sustainable Development, around 75 percent of major marine fish stocks are either depleted, overexploited or being fished at their biological limit. Aquaculture has been offered as a way to meet the world’s demand for fish without depleting wild stocks and damaging the marine environment. But not all fish farms are created equal. A variety of methods exist for housing fish as they develop—open net pens, ponds, raceways and recirculating systems—and some are better for the environment than others. For example, there has been contention over the use of marine open-net pens and ponds, specifically in the international shrimp farming industry and the salmon industry, because of the destruction it wreaks on coastlines, the concentrated pollutants the farms release into ocean waters and the possibility for escapees to genetically pollute wild populations.

Missoula Independent

Page 14 March 19–March 26, 2009

ered a sustainable fish choice? The answer lies in Magic Valley.

The land of 1,000 springs Parked on the side of a backcountry road overlooking the Snake River, aquaculture farmer Leo Ray makes a sweeping hand gesture to the halffrozen natural springs bubbling out of a looming canyon. “This is the reason the trout industry is here in Idaho, these springs,” he says. Ray, owner of Fish Breeders of Idaho, settled in Hagerman in 1971 to raise warm-water fish—catfish and tilapia—in the area’s geothermal springs. Over time, he’s moved on to farm cold-water fish like trout and sturgeon, and even brought in alligators. Originally from Oklahoma, Ray speaks with passion and a measured drawl about his profession. “Trout was raised in Idaho before Idaho ever became a state,” explains Ray. “Sun Valley had a bunch of mines, but there really wasn’t an agricultural industry up there to supply food for all the miners. The Snake River Valley became the food bread basket.” Though it’s been a common industry in China for thousands of years, the first commercial aquaculture enterprise wasn’t developed in Idaho until 1928, when Jack and Selma Tingey started the Snake River Trout Company. The Tingeys soon discovered that the constant 58-degree temperature in the Thousand Springs area was ideal for cultivating trout. By the

process [the fish]. We have our own marketing department. We have our own trucks. We control everything, which is really nice because we know that it is the very best quality.” And that is exactly how Clear Springs came to produce 20 million pounds of trout per year (60 percent of all the trout that come out of Idaho)—absolute efficiency. Out at one of Clear Springs’ aquaculture facilities, a few short miles away from corporate headquarters, creviced canyons jut up behind a giant inclined and netted area full of hundreds of terraced concrete rectangles—or raceways. At the top of the incline, water from an area spring flows into the first line of raceways containing the youngest trout—the ones that are only around 2 months old and need the freshest, most nutrient rich water. The water then flows down in mini-waterfalls to the next terraced level containing slightly older fish, then the next, constantly re-oxygenating itself. In the end, solid waste is channeled into a settling pond, or quiescent zone, and the filtered water is then dispersed into the Snake River. “The water just comes right out of the canyon wall. And we have a canal system that just takes the water to the ponds. The water is only actually on facility for like 15 minutes and then goes out into the river,” explains Parrott. Each raceway contains hundreds of fish that are roughly the same age and


size. In order to ensure a uniformity, a man in rubber galoshes combs some of the raceways with a bar grader, removing the larger fish and transferring them to a row with similarly sized fish. This process is done infrequently due to the high amount of stress it puts on the fish. At the bottom of the terrace, 9to 10-month-old trout wait to be taken to one of Clear Springs’ processing facilities.

In hot water Things are done slightly differently over at Fish Breeders of Idaho in Hagerman. First, in addition to raising cold-water trout, Ray also uses eight geothermal wells with temperatures ranging from 90 to 95 degrees to rear warm-water species like catfish and tilapia. “The most underutilized resource in Idaho is geothermal water,” says Ray. “It’s a tremendous energy resource.” In a steamy wooden warehouse, geothermal waters nurse the fry in long tanks that separate fish of different ages. After three to four months, the fry are taken to the outdoor terraced raceways. Because Ray raises more than one type of fish at his geothermal facility, he is able to create a more symbiotic, or polycultural system. At the top, Ray stocks channel catfish, followed by lower-oxygen-tolerant blue catfish at the next level and then the most tolerant tilapia near the bottom. The water cycles through the system and then runs through a rocky brook where it is cooled and filtered before being discharged into the river. Some is also diverted into a pond where alligators lurk in the murky warm water, waiting to recycle dead fish. Down the road, Fish Breeders’ rainbow trout raceways are similar to the ones used for tilapia and catfish, but much colder. Unlike the automated system that drops feed periodically into the Clear Springs raceways, the trout at Fish Breeders control the amount of feed they receive by bumping a chain that disperses it from a tank into the water. They are also fed a specialty diet to meet demands of one of Ray’s most selective customers— Whole Foods. “First of all, you can never use any antibiotics on the fish, no chemicals, no antibiotics,” says Ray. “And the next is feed. You cannot feed them any landbased animal protein. Their reason for that is the danger of mad cow disease was spread by feeding cows that had died of mad cow disease back to cows or other animals. This runs the price of feed up considerably.” Though Ray explains that this diet worked out well for his trout, he ultimately had to take his catfish off the Whole Foods program. It turns out some sustainability requirements, though well intentioned, aren’t always tailored to meet the needs of all fish. “We found that the feed we had been feeding them all the time, our

A fish feeder hangs above one of Fish Breeders’ steamy geothermal raceways.

catfish never got sick. They didn’t have any need for antibiotics. Once we went to the diet [Whole Foods] wanted us to use, we’ve had a lot of disease. You either take tremendous losses or you have to feed them antibiotics.” While in this particular case, Whole Foods’ feed regulations proved not to be beneficial for Ray’s catfish, many

regulations put in place over the last few decades are greatly improving both the efficiency and the eco-friendliness of the aquaculture industry.

Monitoring marine life One of the facets of the industry being highly monitored is water quality. Now that there are approximately 115 aquaculture facilities in Idaho—70

percent of which are in the Magic Valley—the state is heavily regulating spring water use. According to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), before a facility can begin diverting spring water for aquaculture, they first have to obtain a water right from the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR). Next, they have to apply for a National Pollutant

“We’re totally vertically integrated. By that I mean we control every aspect—from the egg to the market.” —Cally Parrott, Clear Springs Foods

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Page 15 March 19–March 26, 2009


Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit from the Environmental Protection Agency. The NPDES permit regulates, among other things, the amount of phosphorus that each farm can discharge into the Snake River. “The EPA checks phosphor us because it’s the most difficult of all of the pollution elements to control. If they know how much phosphorus is going in, they can tell you how much nitrogen, nitrate and all the others,” explains Ray. “In order for us to raise more trout, we have to find methods to reduce the amount of phosphorus that we discharge.” But lowering phosphorus levels is a tricky task. As a key element in the production of living cells, too little phosphorus can lead to brittle bone

That, combined with the fact that fertilizers and chemicals from agricultural farms in the area can seep into the soil and also affect local groundwater, is why a total maximum daily load (TMDL) was instituted in the midSnake River. The TMDL and new, more stringent general NPDES permits adopted by aquaculture facilities have both helped to lower pollution levels in the Snake River over the last few years. “That area is still considered ‘water quality limited,’ which is code word for polluted,” explains Justin Hayes at the Idaho Conservation League. “The fish farms getting their new permits was a big part of trying to limit nutrients flowing into that part of the Snake River. The new permits

Both Fish Breeders of Idaho and Clear Springs Farms are working on ways to increase productivity while still staying within set EPA discharge limits. One vital area being researched is fish feed composition.

have resulted in a big reduction in pollutants from the fish farms, and that’s a good thing.” With their livelihood so dependent on clean, renewable water sources, it seems to be in the aquaculture farmers’ best interests to comply with permit limits. “I would say, in general, the aquaculture industry has a pretty good track record of meeting their permit limits,” says Sonny Buhidar, regional water quality manager for the DEQ. “One of the reasons is because they want to make sure that they are in compliance, and the other reason is because if they’re not in compliance, they could potentially affect their own production. They don’t want to have, for example, excess ammonia because if they did, they would be killing their own fish, and they don’t want to do that.”

around phosphorus,” says Hardy. “The trout industry in particular was just frantic about the newly imposed restrictions that were being considered by DEQ.” Though Hardy explains that so much progress has been made in the way of lowering phosphorus levels that it’s “not a big deal” anymore, he calls these achievements “environmentally benign,” as opposed to being truly sustainable. “In terms of sustainable,” Hardy explains further, “that’s a whole other deal. That’s looking for ingredients and inputs in the fish feed industry that are not depleting the planet of scarce resources, like fishmeal and fish oil.” Currently, one of the biggest debates among conser vationists regarding the aquaculture industry revolves around using wild fish in farm raised fish feed—which the U.N.’s 2006

The need for feed In 1988, the University of Idaho opened the Aquaculture Research Institute in Hagerman as a resource for the aquaculture industry in Idaho. For the past 12 years, Director of Aquaculture Research Ronald Hardy has been experimenting with various fish feeds that minimize the amount of pollutants discharged in fish excrement. “When I came here, the biggest problem with sustainability revolved

“Trout was raised in Idaho before Idaho ever became a state. Sun Valley had a bunch of mines, but there really wasn’t an agricultural industry up there to supply food for all the miners. The Snake River Valley became the food bread basket.” —Leo Ray, Fish Breeders of Idaho

development in fish, while too much discharged into a river system can lead to plant growth, like algae blooms, that obstruct water flow. And with so much water being constantly pumped through the raceways—2.75 million acre-feet according to Bob McLaughlin, public information officer for the IDWR—controlling effluent discharge becomes vital to maintaining the health of the river system. Though it seems like a lot of water is used by the aquaculture industry, it is classified as non-consumptive use. Unlike land-farmed plants that consume irrigation water through transpiration, aquaculture farming only uses water for a brief period of time before discharging it back into the river. But even in that short time, the high volume of fish being farmed can still cause contamination in the water.

Missoula Independent

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State of World Aquaculture Report estimated accounts for 35 percent of the world’s fishmeal consumption. “In the industry, particularly last year, the price of fishmeal and fish oil went through the roof,” explains Bridson of the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “So there’s a financial reason for doing that, and also there’s a sustainability issue in terms of moving away from wild-caught marine resources and converting one type of fish into another type of fish.” To ameliorate this inefficient practice, researchers at both the Aquaculture Research Institute and the Clear Springs private research and development lab have been experimenting with plant-based protein sources that can healthily sustain carnivorous species like trout. Hardy has looked at various combinations of soybeans, wheat, corn and barley, among other things. But removing fish protein completely can be problematic when trying to meet the complex amino acid needs of a growing fish. “We can easily remove half the fishmeal, and everything comes out okay. But taking it all out is hard. We’ve done that; we can get fish to grow, but they don’t grow quite as fast as they do with a fishmeal diet, and they don’t grow efficiently. They’re off by somewhere between 8 to 10 percent, which is not bad,” says Hardy. “That means we’re 90 percent there.” According to Ray, finding a nutritious feed is essential to keeping fish from getting sick. “My philosophy has always been, healthy fish don’t get sick,” explains Ray. “What makes them healthy is water quality and feed quality. But if you get nutritional problems in your feed, then that’s when they get sick.” While some facilities, like Fish Breeders of Idaho, don’t use antibiotics, opting instead to isolate sick fish in clean, oxygenated water to build their immune systems, others, like Clear Springs, find it necessary to use vaccines and, rarely, antibiotics to keep from losing large numbers of their stock.

Vaccines and ill pills Down a sterile tiled corridor at the Clear Springs research lab, a few scientists mill about in rooms full of graduated cylinders and circular fish tanks, jotting notes on clipboards. This team of scientists research water quality and feed ingredient issues, along with new vaccines and antibiotics to help improve the health of their fish. Some bacterial pathogens that affect trout like cold water disease and enteric red mouth—which both can have extremely high mortality rates—have been virtually eliminated through selective breeding and vaccine development done at the Clear Springs labs. “We can induce 100 percent immunity in rainbow trout to enteric red mouth,” explains Randy MacMillan, vice president of research and environmental affairs at Clear Springs. “It’s


a very effective method for us, and from a sustainability standpoint, that works out quite well. That way you don’t have to use antibiotics to try to take care of it.” Though MacMillan says Clear Springs’ fish health technicians occasionally have to isolate raceways and treat the fish with antibiotics, he explains it is a process that they prefer not to mess with because treated fish have to go through sometimes prolonged withdraw periods before they can be consumed by humans. “We can only use FDA-approved antibiotics, and there are very few of them that are available in the United States. Many other countries have a much more liberal approach to the use of antibiotics in fish farming. The [United States] has a very restrictive program that way,” says MacMillan. But if Whole Foods doesn’t allow antibiotics in the fish it buys from Fish Breeders of Idaho, then there must be some potential health risks involved. According to the Food and Agricultural Organization’s “Responsible use of Antibiotics in Aquaculture” report, the use of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance in fish, which can then be transferred to humans when consumed. The report cautions, “Even when treatment is suspended before the fish is sold for consumption, the resistance can still be transmitted.” While the report notes that “wider ranges of antibiotics are approved in

Asian countries” than in most of the Western world, antibiotic use remains a divisive practice. Interestingly, though, one of the most widely debated issues in fish consumption—mercury contamination—is less of a concern in farm-raised fish than wild-caught fish. The Whole Foods website explains that because farm-raised fish generally live for a shorter time than most wild-caught

while much still needs to be done as far as imposing regulations on international (particularly marine) aquaculture facilities, the more sustainable fresh-water industries like those found in Idaho might just be the solution to meet the world’s increasing demand. While many of the state’s aquaculture facilities are working to become more sustainable—researching plantbased feed composition and alterna-

explains Hayes at Idaho Conservation League. “They are very dependent on clean water coming into their facilities, and I think that the purity and quantity of that water remains under threat in Idaho. Their industry might be very in peril by things that are happening to them, not things that they’re causing.” Though this pending peril remains to be seen, Idaho’s aquaculture industry continues to thrive in

“I think that they are a sustainable industry, but I don’t know whether they will be able to continue to be here—not because of something that they’re doing, but because of things that are happening around them.” —Justin Hayes, Idaho Conservation League.

fish, they often do not accumulate as much mercury. And even smaller wild fish fed to carnivorous farm-raised fish are often species low in mercury.

Fishy future By 2030, the Food and Agricultural Organization of the U.N. estimates that an additional 40 million tons of fish and seafood will be needed just to sustain today’s levels of consumption. And

tives to antibiotics—two issues at the heart of most ecological arguments in Idaho might threaten the sustainability of the industry: water quality and quantity. “I think that they are a sustainable industry, but I don’t know whether they will be able to continue to be here—not because of something that they’re doing, but because of things that are happening around them,”

what—by many estimates—is a sustainable manner. And while this is only a brief glimpse at a small section of a very complex industry, the research and practices taking place in Magic Valley are helping to pioneer the future of an industry that might just hold one of the keys to sustainably feeding a growing world. editor@missoulanews.com

the $$–$$$...$15 and over The Keep Restaurant 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 728-5132 Steak - Seafood - Fine Wines and Spirits. Serving dinner 5pm-10pm seven days a week. Cocktail hour Mon-Thur 5pm-6pm in our fireside lounge. The ideal setting for weddings, receptions, and rehearsal dinners. Dates still available in 2009, call today. For dinner reservations call 728-5132. www.thekeeprestaurant.com $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Enjoy the warm ambience of our cozy neighborhood bistro with an urban feel. Our chefs transport flavors from Europe and the

Mediterranean offering a creative New American twist on classic fare. Featuring the freshest ingredients from local growers. Serving lunch Tuesday through Sat. 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tuesday through Sun. 5:00close. Beer and wine available. $$–$$$. Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Now featuring our winter menu. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone-deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, "Pizza by the Slice." Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups,

salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, losalt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

dish

Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. MF 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

Missoula Independent

Page 17 March 19–March 26, 2009


MARCH

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the

dish

Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$ The Press Box 835 E Broadway 721-1212 Enjoy our breakfast special, Monday through Friday, 7 AM to noon. We have great pizza, burgers & appetizers, and more! 21 beers on tap. Continually voted best sports bar in Missoula. Enjoy any game, any time at The Press Box. pressboxsportsbar.com. $-$$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Open for Lunch and Dinner! Check out our new menu: Sesame House Salad, Soba Vegetable Pasta, Warm Brie Salad, the Dubliner, Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich, and Great Italian Pastas. Irish favorites, too: Pasties, Fish and Chips & Shepherd’s Pie. “where the Gaelic and the Garlic mix!!” $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made

Missoula Independent

from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Vietnam Noodle 2100 Stephens 542-8299 A true Vietnamese dining experience! Enjoy our authentic beef noodle soup, spring rolls, pad thai, Vietnamese style hot & sour soup, noodle soup bowls & daily lunch/soup combo specials. We suggest that you also try our new stuffed hot peppers. For your cooking pleasure at home, we have an Asian grocery next to our restaurant! Get a free meal on your birthday when you bring 5 or more friends. $-$$

Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 36 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and

Page 18 March 19–March 26, 2009

Bucks Club

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. As of January 13, introducing Le Petits Plats menu (small plates) to enjoy with premium wines & European beers. Also featuring a tapas menu (small bites) and a cheese and dessert menu is also available. Serving dinners only Tues.-Sat. 5-9pm. Reservations.


by Ari LeVaux

Warming up to winter salads One afternoon last November, long after the autumn frosts began their nightly visits to Missoula, I faced a decision: Head for a certain deer stash and wait for the fading light of dusk to coax a yummy animal in my general direction or glean from a patch of collard greens and kale. The owner of the patch of greens was ready to be done farming for the year, and with the season’s final farmers’ market already long gone, she had no way to sell her greens. The best part is that after a few autumn frosts, the greens are sweeter than they were all summer. She had invited me to come take all the greens I wanted, and warned me that I better do it quick before she plowed the patch into the ground. I decided that while I really wanted to go post up for a chance at some meat, this sunny afternoon might be my last, and most pleasant, opportunity to put away massive amounts of greens. And unlike the deer, for which I’d already been hunting unsuccessfully for weeks, these greens were a sure thing. Guaranteed. In 20 minutes I had about 50 pounds of greens—more edible weight than I could hope to get from an average-sized deer. And the harvest was so quick that I still had time to go hunting, albeit unsuccessfully. Given the steady stream of data suggesting leafy vegetables are about the best thing you could possibly eat, it makes sense to invest in some good, local greens in autumn, and stash them away for use until the new leaves of spring emerge. I brought home my greens last November, boiled a big kettle of water, and blanched them in small enough batches that the water kept boiling. After about two minutes per batch, I fished them out with a slotted spoon and then plunged them

Ask Ari:

these same salads can be made with raw greens from the store, if you have to purchase them. To make a winter salad from kale, collards or chard, cut the thick stem out of the leaf ’s center, and then slice the leaves thinly before tossing in the dressing of your choice. You’ll notice an immediate difference from typical salads. Mainstream American cooking could stand to incorporate winter salads, because right now our usage of veggies in winter is in a rut. The standard American salad follows a tired formula—some bland variety of lettuce (think iceberg), maybe some onions (but not too much lest they affect our sterile breath) and, of course, red things that look like tomatoes.

In case you haven’t noticed, I’m sick of fresh tomatoes in winter. The widespread sense of entitlement to these cardboard imposters is a microcosm for everything that’s wrong with our food system. Winter tomatoes embody the exploitation of human laborers, the toll that vast monocultures take on the environment, and the emissions associated with production and shipment of food around the country. The one thing they don’t embody is flavor. In a well-balanced salad made with fresh ingredients, tomatoes add a burst of sweetness and acid, some contrast and diversity to the other components. But winter’s flavorless tomatoes don’t do that. Currants and raisins soaked overnight in white balsamic vinegar can fulfill the function of tomatoes. They hold their own in a salad of frozen greens dressed in soy sauce and rice vinegar, and tossed with pine nuts or sunflower seeds. Fresh onions also add a fresh zing to your winter salad, and they’re just as easy to store deep into winter. For an Asian-style option, toss your thawed leaves in two parts soy sauce, one part rice or cider vinegar, one part olive oil, and then sprinkle liberally with gomasio, a Japanese seasoning made from sesame seeds and salt. For a Mediterranean twist, toss your thawed leaves with balsamic vinegar, salt, feta, toasted pine nuts and sundried tomatoes that have been marinated in olive oil. If you serve any of these salads alongside meat, or any other rich food, the fiber in the greens will help push the heavy stuff through, and clean your pipes like an intestinal Brillo pad. And these salads are a reminder that the fresh greens of summer are getting closer each day. Next summer, just remember to put more away.

Saturday, March 21st at the Palace Lounge, 1-5pm. Advance tickets $3 at Blackbird Kid Shop or $5 at the door! Monday - Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 12-4 on the Hip Strip at 525 S. Higgins 543-2899

Get Together, Whatever The Weather... Sun thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com Across from the U of M campus.

Community supported answers

Q

Last week I put out a call for information on local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) options. For those unclear on the CSA concept, it allows the public to purchase shares in a local farm in exchange for regular—usually weekly—boxes of fresh produce from the farm. The contents of the box change as new items come into season. In response to my request for information, I received these two letters:

A

in a cold waterbath to stop the cooking and fix a bright green color in the leaves. Four months after those leaves were drained and frozen in freezer bags, they were still bright green. My default method of cooking greens is to use olive oil with garlic and soy sauce. But lately I’ve been on a winter salads kick. Although they’ve been blanched, thawed leaves can be treated as if they were raw. And

Hi Ari, Sandy Gates offers CSA memberships on her Clearwater Farm just out-

side of Stevensville. She can be reached at 406370-0808. Thanks for keeping the food, Laura Hey Ari, I read with interest your response to “Desperately Seeking CSA” and I wanted to tell you about a CSA I am coordinating at the Western Montana Growers Co-Op. A group of 12 farmers in the region will contribute to a weekly box of food that will be delivered to several drop points throughout western Montana, from Missoula to Polson. The cost of the weekly box will vary as the season pro-

gresses, and the members will have the option of purchasing eggs, milk, cheese and meat with their weekly orders as well. Deliveries will run from the first week in June to December with members getting a good share of winter storage crops. We have only 100 memberships available and I expect they will go quickly. Anyone interested can reach me at 406-544-6135 or montanacsa@hotmail.com. Sincerely, Paul Lowrey WMG Co-Op Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Page 19 March 19–March 26, 2009


8

days a week

THURSDAY

19

March

The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Soldiers of Conscience— eight U.S. soldiers stand at a moral crossroads—are followed by discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Three former and one current Montana mayor—yes, Engen will be in the house— take part in the Sustainable Business Council Lecture Perspectives on Sustainable Community: A Mayoral Forum, which begins with a 5:30 PM social time at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Free. Call 824-7336.

nightlife Exhibiting Native American artist Marie Watt discusses her exhibit, Heirloom, during the Missoula Art Museum’s 5:30 PM Artini: Heirloom, Ritual, Story, which also features DJ Mermaid scratching tiny bubbles into your cerebellum while you swill beverages and indulge in the Red Bird’s fine edible wares. Free. Call 728-0447. Ta r n R e a m o f f e r s f o u r w e e k l y Introduction to African Dance classes, which begin with stretching at 5:30 PM and continue until 7 every Thu. through March 26, in the Sussex School Gym, 1800 S. Second St. W. $10 per class/$35 for all four. Call 549-7933. Join Garden City Harvest’s Josh Slotnick for a Local Foods Potluck at 5:30 PM at the Holy Spirit Episcopal Church, 130 S. Sixth St. E., where feeding leads to a discussion about strengthening local food systems. Bring a potluck item/free for students. Call 243-5531.

Arts & Entertainment listings March 19–March 26, 2009

Hey, you look like you could use an Urban Dance Ritual for Dreaming and Awakening, which is why you should be at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., at 6 PM. $5–10 sliding scale. Call 543-4414. Ding! It’s round three of our own local amateur fashion design competition, Project Selvedge, wherein seven fierce competitors face judgment of their latest works at 6 PM at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Help provide proof to funders when you attend the training How To Take Great Habitat Pictures 101 at 6:30 PM at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Call 549-8210. Tell Missoula Parks & Recreation how you’d like your land managed when they host a Public Open House for just that purpose at 6:30 PM at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6263 or 552-6265. Families First presents the class Positive Discipline: Tips and Techniques for Toddlers and Preschoolers at 6:30 PM at Paxson Elementary School. Free. RSVP 549-8765. The Montana Community Autism and Aspergers Network invites you to their monthly meeting at 6:30 PM in the large meeting room at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Attend a Digital Recording Workshop and learn to use Apple’s GarageBand at 6:30 PM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., which is followed by an hour of music lab time. $35. RSVP 529-2601 or lcleminshaw@bresnan.net. Help Missoula’s Community Forum members figure out how to fund our infrastructure when you attend their meeting for the Capt. John Mullan neighborhood at 7 PM at Hellgate Elementary School, 2385 Flynn Lane. Free. Call 552-6081.

“What do you mean by, ‘Maybe you should tone it down a bit?’” Ariel Pink, right, and Crypticize unleash a torrential downpour of style paired perfectly with sound at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge on Sun., March 22. $7. Rebuild a shattered homeland when you attend a Benefit for the Children of Gaza, featuring Barbara Lubin, executive director of the Middle East Children’s Alliance, and musical storyteller Jack Gladstone, at 7 PM at the Bigfork United Methodist Church, 750 Electric Ave. Donation based. Call 755-3704.

at 7 PM. Free, and drop-ins are welcome. Call 541-8643.

Night at the High Spirits in Florence starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-9992.

Author Christopher J. Preston signs and reads from his book Saving Creation: Nature and Faith in the Life of Holmes Rolston III at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a preview show of Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $7/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 945-2904 or visit mtactors.com.

Internationally acclaimed artist, teacher and healer—and honoree of the Dalai Lama—Mansankho Banda presents a multicultural, movement-based community workshop to benefit NCBI Missoula at 7 PM at the YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway. $20 suggested donation. Call 543-6691 or 541-6891.

Come to The Cottage Inn in Kila for a 7 PM Irish jam session and stay for the weekly cribbage tournament at the world famous home of “Turbo Crib.” Free. Call 755-4572.

It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 8 PM. $18/$15 under 19. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org.

Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase featuring Kristen, Kris Koch, Mike Bengala and someone else or other

The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581. Let it all hang out—well, maybe not all of it—during L.I.V. Karaoke’s Ladies’

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 20, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

WHERE’S THE CO-OP? 1500 Burns Street

N. Russell St.

Turner St.

Times Run 3/20 - 3/26 Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Slumdog Millionaire



(R) Nightly at 7 & 9:10 Sun. Matinee at 1:00 & 3:10

Che, Part One 1500 Burns St.

Cooley St.

 www.missoulacommunitycoop.com 728-2369 • Tue-Fri 12-7 • Sat 10-3

Missoula Independent

Page 20 March 19–March 26, 2009

(R) Nightly at 7 Sun. Matinee at 1:00

Che, Part Two (R) Nightly at 9:15 Sun. Matinee at 3:15

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave.

Che, Parts 1 & 2 will not show Thurs. 3/26

Downtown Missoula

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521


Bowling and karaoke go together like gutting fish and tap dancing during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Mulletia, led by Universal Choke Sign, Beefcurtain and Doomfock at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. If you’ve ever strayed from your faith, or if you just like honest-to-goodness rock ballads and mood music, try Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons on for size at 9 PM at The Other Side. $10. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Here’s a better reason than stray ping pong balls for you to get on stage: The Union Club and Teri Llovet host Jammin’ at the Union, an open mic/jam night, every Thu. at 9 PM, so bring that axe and get to work. Free. Hip hoppy rock from iNHUMANS spices up the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865

FRIDAY

20

March

In honor of the third annual National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, the Missoula AIDS Council, 500 N. Higgins Ave., Suite 100, offers free and anonymous HIV testing from 9 AM-4 PM, plus free condoms and lube. Call 543-4770. Now that we’ve spent six years officially attacking Iraq, you can mark this ugly anniversary with a positive act when you attend the all-day—10 AM–6 PM— Wa r R e s i s t e r s L e t t e r Wr i t i n g Support Party at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave., where you can write to imprisoned soldiers, obstinate governments or both, and you can attend on Sat. as well. Free. Call 728-8835.

Be the lizard king when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents a meeting of the Animal Art Collective: Discover the Chameleon at 3:30 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-7529.

Montana native singer-songwriter Chris Cunningham plays to benefit Habitat for Humanity at 7:30 PM at Hamilton’s Roxy Twin Theater. $15/$12 advance at Chapter One Book Store/$20 couples advance. Call 375-1926.

Boys aged 7–13 can express that excess energy in an aesthetic way every Fri. at 3:30 PM, when the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., presents their Boys’ Art Group and encourages artsy exploration of the gross and the weird in a variety of media. $65/four classes. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com.

Start the weekend off on the early side as the fluid jazz of the Discount Quartet blends perfectly with fish, pasta and shaking your money maker at 7:30 PM at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier. $5.

Salt Lake City’s Repertory Dance Theatre presents the century-spanning dance retrospective Time Capsule at 7:30 PM at the Ronan Performing Arts Center in the Ronan Middle School Complex, with a 6:45 rap session with artistic director Linda C. Smith. $14/$12 advance. Call 6762427 or (800) 823-4386. Stay—or, for some of you, get—classy when the UM Symphony Orchestra kicks in the afterburners at 7:30 PM in

UM’s University Theatre. $10/$5 student and seniors. Call 243-6880. The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 945-2904 or visit mtactors.com.

nightlife Witness the inspiring relief manifested via Emotional Freedom Techniques as 10 people’s fears are dissolved during the film Try It on Everything, which screens at 6:30 PM at 2500 Great Northern Ave., behind Target. Free. Call 726-3564. The Celloman Lee Zimmerman performs a set or two for the diners at 7 PM at Arlee’s Hangin Art Gallery and Coffee House. Free. Call 726-5005. A tradition continues as the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts another Third Friday Social Dance Night, which this month means Brad Dickson offers Shim Sham lessons at 7 PM, with the free-form party beginning at 8:30. $10/$8 members/$5 dance only. Call 541-7240. A family concert for all ages goes down at 7 PM at the Florence Carlton School gym, where Dallas Brass promises nothing if not a great volume of surprises, intricacy and laughs. $10/$5 students. Visit moclub.com. If the Carmike’s not so impressed with the moths flying out of your wallet, make your next stop the Missoula Public Library, where their 7 PM Cheap Date Night offers easy financing on a recently new cinematic experience. Free. Call 721-2665. Jeannette Rankin Peace Center Coordinating Council Chair Srini Mondava leads the discussion “Searching for Peace in the Middle East,” at 7 PM in the JRPC Library, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Diverse cultural, religious, and political perspectives are welcome. Free. Contact 543-3955 or peace@jrpc.org.

SPOTLIGHT no man’s land There doesn’t appear to be much common ground between people who believe in creation and those who align themselves with evolution. Yet that thin sliver of territory has sustained Holmes Rolston III through his impressive career. Rolston’s journey began in the hills and hollers of Appalachia, where his surroundings infused a love of the natural world that would guide his path for decades. Later, as a Presbyterian minister, he found the edges of the divide that would dominate his career. The difficulties in reconciling two seemingly opposing camps— Christianity vs. science—led the struggling researcher to emerge as “the father of environmental ethics.” With various advanced degrees under his belt, Rolston continues to delineate the field for those who would come up after him, serving as a founder of the influential journal Environmental Ethics and essentially blazing a trail into the realm of environmental philosophy.

WHO: Christopher J. Preston WHAT: Reading and Signing Saving Creation: Nature and Faith in the Life of Holmes Rolston III WHEN: Thu., March 19, 7 PM WHERE: Fact & Fiction, 2 20 N. Higgins Ave. HOW MUCH: Free

Now, Christopher J. Preston, of UM’s Department of Philosophy, presents his homage to this man of both the cloth and the hand lens. When Preston reads from and signs his biography of Rolston, that common ground between faith and science gains depth and illumination. —Jonas Ehudin

Missoula Independent

Page 21 March 19–March 26, 2009


"Do Something This Spring Break" for a week of horses, horses & more horses!

Join us at

Riders 7th to 12th grade are invited to 4 days of horsemanship, riding, and equine leadership at Dunrovin Ranch in Lolo, Montana March 31– April 3, 2009 Noon to 6:00 PM • $300 Per Rider For more information & to register Call: 1- 406 - 273 - 7745 Email: info@dunrovinranchmontana.com www.DunrovinRanchMontana.com

It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 8 PM. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org. Revel in a musical tantrum as the Badlander/Palace complex enters the terrible twos by throwing a massive Two-Year Anniversary Party at 9 PM, which features Volumen, Secret Powers and DJ Hickey upstairs and Awesome Nice/The Jiggywatts, Tonsofun and Brand One in the basement. Free. Bob Wire and the Magnificent Bastards play under the watchful eyes of their bail bondsman as they inspire a great profusion of swinging at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Even if you don’t know Jake from Jack, you and your booty are invited to Jake’s Hip Hop Party at 9 PM at The Other Side. $6. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free.

Do the math. Between March 16 and the end of the season, come up and buy a lift ticket. Come up again and buy another lift ticket. Come a third day, and the lift’s on us. Just show us the other two at the ticket window and you’ll get the third day FREE.* Now how’s that for giving you a Spring Break? For more info, call 549-9777 or visit montanasnowbowl.com. *Offer begins March 16, 2009. First two tickets must be left intact and attached to your jacket. Old, mutilated or detached tickets will not be accepted. Offer expires at the end of the 2008/2009 season.

Release your inner Kool Moe Dee when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn

It’s 3/20, got a month? Tom Catmull and the Clerics perpetrate a set or two starting at 9:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Bozeman’s interpretation of spacey ‘n’ trippy rock and funk arrives at 10 PM at the Top Hat, where Archers Mob does what they do best. Free. The Workers work out your workout when they play the Old Post Pub at 10 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY

21

March

Ensure some peace of mind this summer—for yourself, that is—when you head to the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St., for “Super Saturday” summer camp registration, which begins at 8 AM. Call 721-9622. Hello slackers who made less than $42K in 2008: Get some help with your taxes from 9 AM–2 PM when Super Saturday comes to the Missoula IRS Office, 2681 Palmer St., so bring all those weird circumstances, baffling questions and homebaked goodies to ensure speedy service. Free. Visit irs.gov. Ye shall fear the gruesome paper cut inflicted by mine foam sword: Join the Warlord Combat Group for a wee bit o’ melee sometime today at some place or another. Visit soulofthewarrior.web.com or call 214-6466. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 541-7240.

Founded by the Hamilton Public Schools. Sponsored & Produced by HIPinc Productions

Box Office 164 South 3rd Street, Ste A

south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200.

S ERIES

presents

HamiltonPAS.org

On the Daly School Community Garden’s first volunteer day of the year, come get your hands dirty from 10 AM–2 PM, and chow on the lunch provided for volunteers. Free. Call 381-2564.

Donate your used yet functional mountain/outdoor gear to Mountain Shepherds, a community-owned ecotourism group in the Himalayas, during the month-long drive Gear for the Garhwal: A Mountain to Mountain Community Service, which has dropoff points at Pipestone Mountaineering, the Trailhead, Bob Wards and the UM Outdoor Program. Call 370-2294. Things are bound to get a little odd when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents Seuss Saturday for kids aged 3–6 at 11 AM. $4.25/ members free. Call 541-7529. The Missoula Art Museum presents the Saturday Family Art Workshop: Personal Flags with exhibiting artist Marie Watt at 11 AM, in which your clan explores the magic and history of your favorite items. $5 per participant. RSVP 728-0447. Renew your child’s commitment to feeling the rhythm when Tangled Tones hosts Kids Vibrations at 11 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $4/two for $6/three or more for $10. Call 541-7240. Join the Montana Backcountry Alliance for their inaugural Lolo Luau Barbecue and Backcountry Party, which takes place at the tricky-to-find “G-Spot,”—2.6 miles before Lolo Pass on Highway 12—and includes a skinski race, food, awards and fun for all human-powered recreationists. Free. Visit montanabackcountry.org. It’s a festival of hands-on learning when Kurt Von Kliest leads a two-day Basic Cabinet Making Workshop that begins at 1 PM at 839 Turner St. $20/$10 members. RSVP 721-7513. Montana author Donna Love keeps pimping—no offense, it’s a literary term—her children’s book Henry the Impatient Heron with a reading at 1 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. Clubbing takes practice, so launch your wee ones on the right foot when Blackbird Kid Shop presents a Kids Dance Party from 1–5 PM at the Palace Lounge, where great food and great tunes are supplemented by a disco costume contest and parent/child dance contest. $5/$3 advance at Blackbird, 525 S. Higgins Ave. Non-walkers free. Call 543-2899.

406.363.7946 Performances at the Hamilton PAC, 327 Fairgrounds Road Winnepeg's Vocal Supergroup

Chic Gamine Saturday, March 28 8 pm Tickets: $17.50 / 20 / 22.5

ON SALE NOW Coming up ...

AN EVENING WITH GROUCHO MARX Thursday, April 16 7:30 pm

Missoula Independent

Tickets ON SALE NOW

Page 22 March 19–March 26, 2009

Just outside Southgate Mall, Paxson St. Entrance, Off Brooks • 542-SEED


Young naturalists can learn about grizzlies, ferrets, eagles and more when the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., presents the Saturday Kids’ Activity: Endangered Species Treasure Hunt at 2 PM. $2/members free. Call 327-0405.

CALLING ALL : S T S I T R A LOCAL

It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 2 PM. $15. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org.

Give us your

The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 2 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581.

BEST!

Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

Every year our readers painstakingly complete their ballots, we diligently count 'em and then we dev ote an entire issue to showcasing what's been voted BEST OF MISSOULA. And this year we invite you to showcase your own self by getting your artistic take on Best of Missoula included in that issue. In other words, show us what “Best of Missoula”means to you...it could be a painting, a photograph, a dra wing, etc., but it must somehow incorporate the Mis soula Independent and it must somehow be totally awe some.

Bitterroot Gymnastics presents Acrotainment, a performing arts showcase featuring actors, jugglers, breakdancers, acrobatics and more from locals as well as traveling professionals, at 3 PM in UM’s University Theatre. $11–15. Call 243-4051 or visit griztix.com. Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, presents a few live sets by Tom Catmull at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

nightlife Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323. If you’ve got cable, you’ve got public access: Peek into the cattle/wildlife controversy when Gene Bernofsky’s documentary Hear the Buffalo airs at 5:30 PM on MCAT, channel 7 on your cable dial. Free-ish. Call 542-6228. Bitterroot Gymnastics presents Acrotainment, a performing arts showcase featuring actors, jugglers, breakdancers, acrobatics and more from locals as well as traveling professionals, at 6:30 PM in UM’s University Theatre. $11–15. Call 243-4051 or visit griztix.com. Find the all-ages crowd you’ve been meaning to become a part of when you head to the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., where Man Without Wax, Places and Fiancée play at 7 PM. $5. Renowned jazz saxophonist Grace Kelly plays with locals David Morgenroth, Craig Hall and Sam McKenzie at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly St. $25. RSVP 370-4564. The lessons begin at 7:30 PM when the Missoula Folklore Society throws their Heritage Contra Dance in UM’s Dell Brown Room in Turner Hall, where the honest-to-goodness party starts at 8 with music from Skippin’ A Groove and calling by Morna Leonard. $8/$6 members. Call 543-6508. The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581. The cover’s so damn reasonable, it’s hard to find a single reason not to shake a hip at the Hot Salsa Nights, which begins at 8 PM with lessons and keeps on keepin’ on until everyone in

Photo courtesy of Montana Actors’ Theatre

From left, Teralyn Tanner and Sariana Hart get their gloss on. The Montana Actors’ Theatre’s production of Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone continues at 8 PM on Thu., March 19, and runs through March 28, at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10–15/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 945-2904. the 18+ crowd’s matched up at The Other Side. $5. Keep the fun between your legs when you attend a fundraiser for the 2009 Pedal Festival, which features live sets by I Apologize and Dead Me Downs at 8 PM at the Bike Doctor, 1101 Toole Ave. $5. Call 721-5357. L.I.V. Karaoke night, which starts at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., is proof that it’s hard to soar with, oh, well... nevermind. Free. Call 531-7800. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 9452904 or visit mtactors.com. It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop

when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 8 PM. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. The man in black’s back, and he’s being channeled by Cold Hard Cash, who request that you “lay off that whiskey and let that cocaine be” at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5. Smuggle in an extra sandwich for their roadie when The Coloffs and Vera play the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $5. Don’t ask them to explain their name, just do your best to wrap your mind around the dynamic complexities inherent in their mix when Ball ‘N Jack plays the Union Club at 9 PM. Free.

GET

Published!

Our panel of esteemed judges (OK, some of the Indy staff) will evaluate the entries and select the best to be published in our

July 9th Best of Missoula issue Submission FORMATS: AL ART EPS • ORIGIN • JPEG • F IF T • F • PD

ENTRY DEADLINE: April 30, 2009

Entries may be submitted via email to m LFoland@missoulanews.co or delivered to MT 59801 317 S. Orange, Missoula

CONTEST

RULES

original work, it has not been copied from Entrants represent and warrant that their submission is their or entry. person other any others, and it does not violate the rights of dent and will not be acknowledged or Indepen a Missoul the of y propert the become ls materia All entry y of the entrant, but entry in this propert the remain shall ion submiss returned. The copyright in any , without further compensaconsent and ion contest constitutes entrant's irrevocable, perpetual permiss and state for editorial, advercity and name 's entrant the and ion submiss the use to tion or attribution, and/or others authorized by the sponsor, in tising, commercial and publicity purposes by the sponsor throughout the world, for the duration of the any and all media now in existence or hereinafter created, zed by the sponsor shall have the right to authori others and/or r Sponso copyright in the submission. and discharges the sponsor, the judges, releases edit, adapt, and modify the submission. Each entrant the contest, their employees, agents or of tration adminis or ment develop the with ed any party associat ies, or affiliates from any and all liacompan sister ries, representatives or any of their parents, subsidia on, limitati legal claims, costs, injuries, losses bility in connection with the contest, including without 09 or lfoland@missoulanews.com 543-66 info: More kind. any of or damages, demand or actions

Missoula Independent

Page 23 March 19–March 26, 2009


Scream with pleasure as Toby Keith is sacrificed to the gods of outlaw country music when The Whiskey Rebellion plays the Jack Saloon in Lolo—well, up Highway 12, and then up Graves Creek Road—at 9 PM. Free.

It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 6:30 PM. $18/$15 under 19. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org.

Feel free to perform during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW. Free.

Celebrate National Women’s History Month when the documentary on pesticide-hatin’ environmental scientist Rachel Carson, A Sense of Wonder, screens at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free.

If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. They’d better pay somebody to keep an eye on their van: The Growers come all they way from Seattle to play Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. If you loved the music in the old Ritz, you’ll be thrilled to know that DJ Concave brings that same flava to Boomer’s Pub every Sat. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 531-1510. It wobbles, but it won’t fall down: J.D. Smith and the Three Legged Dog raises a limb at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865 DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 7 PM, live jazz by Donna Smith at 7:30 and a rotating cast of bands thereafter. Free. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards

Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free.

MONDAY March

23

UM’s Center for Ethics presents Native American Studies professor Kathryn Shanley, whose lecture “Indigenous ‘Mapping’ of North American Indian Rights in the 21st Century” begins at 12:10 PM in the University Center Alumni Board Room. Free. Call 243-6632.

March

SPOTLIGHT hot horns

Peripatetic squeeze-boxers find harmony when the Five Valley Accordion Jam—which also welcomes guitars and banjos—presents three hours of great music for dancing and listening at 1 PM at the Poor Henry’s in Clinton. $4/$3 members. Stuff your craw with crab for the good of humanity when the second annual Special Olympics All-You-Can-Eat Crab Feed brings bushels of Bitterroot Stock Farm Chef Toby McCracken’s armored love to the Hamilton Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St. $45/$30 advance. Call 363-1111. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 2 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 945-2904 or visit mtactors.com. Playing bingo at 2 PM at the Missoula Senior Citizens Center is your chance to yell “Forward my mail to Utah, suckas!” Free. Call 543-7154. It’s a family-friendly trip back to the days of poodle skirts and serious hair goop when the MCT Community Theatre presents Bye Bye Birdie at 2 PM. $15. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org. The UM Department of Music presents a student recital by clarinetists Sofia Tanberg and Bridget Davis at 3 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. Keep eating for another good cause when Pearl Cafe, 231 E. Front St., hosts their inaugural Powder Puff Night—featuring a four-course price-fixed meal prepared by the servers and served by the cooks—at 5 PM to benefit the women and kids of Mountain Home Missoula. Price TBA. RSVP ASAP 541-0231.

nightlife The Second Wind Reading Series delivers the sweet sounds of prose by Kevin Canty, with a side of poetry from Ed McFadden, at 5:30 PM in the Palace Lounge. Free.

Missoula Independent

What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Beginning Pottery at The Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., is your shot to make something big and beautiful every Mon. at 6 PM through April 27. $168/eight-week class. Call 543-0509. The River front Neighborhood Council Meeting includes a presentation on zoning changes proposed for the ‘hood at 6:30 PM at Currents Aquatic Center’s meeting room. Free. Call 728-1880.

Washington University professor emeritus of philosophy Ananda Devi presents the lecture “Writing and Psychoanalysis” at 7 PM in Room L14 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2301. You’ll know you’re in the right place when your ears are soothed by the vintage love songs of Lori Conner and Eric Keeling, who play the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-2906.

22

Declare victory over high prices, poor quality, a lack of taste and an abundance of chemicals when you attend a Victory Garden Class at 1 PM at The Green Light, 128 W. Alder St. $10. RSVP 541-8623 fast, as the class maxes out at 20. (See Agenda in this issue.)

Get back on the right track when Dr. Shelby Smith presents Healthy Living: Eat Well, Move Well, Think Well at 6 PM at the Vitality Chiropractic Clinic, 410 W. Spruce St. Free. Call 549-0119.

As the backlash against HMOs is fully in effect, consider “The Ethics of Consumer-Driven Healthcare” with healthcare law and bioethics scholar Mark Hall’s 7 PM lecture in Room 169 of UM’s Skaggs Building. Free. Call 243-6605.

If you’re 18, you’re cleared for take-off when Club Q presents the Famous Divas Show at 10:30 PM, so use the Front Street entrance and get on down. $5.

SUNDAY

nightlife

Author Benjamin Parzybok presents a reading of his book The Couch at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Books in this issue.)

After 27 years spent in the public school band room trenches, John Schuberg is understandably excited about conducting a group of dedicated adults. The Missoula Community Concert Band, now in its 18th year, is a menagerie of music enthusiasts. They attend to their instruments like doting parents, enjoy talking shop and each year they recruit a guest conductor or two to keep things fresh. Schuberg has conducted the group once before, two years ago, along with longtime musical compadre Cliff Goodman. This Monday, the two lead the horde again, and Schuberg’s arranged two of the pieces in the show.

WHO: Missoula Community Concert Band WHAT: 18th Annual Spring Concert WHEN: Mon., March 23, 7:30 PM WHERE: MCT Center for the Performing Arts HOW MUCH: Free

One of them, “Fanfare for the New” by Hugo Montenegro—who wrote, among other things, the whistle-inclusive theme for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly—is a challenging piece by all accounts. With multiple horn sections—according to one source, four French horns are essential—the concert’s opening will get the audience into the spirit. According to Schuberg, the band’s up to the challenge. “We’ve got the hottest horn section in the state,” he says. This annual ritual of love for music, with its packed program and post-show meetand-greet reception in the MCT foyer, will do wonders to mitigate the toots and squeaks of your middle school band experience. —Jonas Ehudin

look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free.

At 5 PM, Forward Montana’s Progressive Happy Hour features Matt Kuntz and Mary Jane Nealon, who discuss matters concerning mental health in Montana at the Badlander. Call 542-VOTE.

Once all that reading’s done with, treat your ears to something a bit louder when Ariel Pink and Oakland’s Crypticize play the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $7.

Young people with an eye for the stage can pick up a few tricks of the trade every Mon. at 5 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Musical Theater Dance for 11–15 Years. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

The Other Side takes on an eerie blue glow when Dr. Manhattan plays with March of the Black Queen, Fiancée and the Evergreen at 9 PM. $5. (See Noise in this issue.) Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.”

Page 24 March 19–March 26, 2009

No dance experience is necessary when Interfaith Minister Jennifer Hackenbruch leads bodily seekers in the workshop Dance as a Spiritual Practice at 5:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. First class free. Call 370-9631.

Try some acrobatics on for size when Cathy Clark presents six weeks of Lindy Hop Workshop every Mon. at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. The public’s invited to observe America’s future nano-physicists when the 54th annual Montana Science Fair opens at 7 PM in UM’s Adams Center. Free. After a grueling rehearsal schedule this winter, the Missoula Community Concert Band— conducted by John Schuberg and Cliff Goodman—pulls the cover off their 18th annual Spring Concert at 7:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, with a reception to follow. Free. Call 542-7664. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Kalispell’s Silver Moon Kayak Company presents a stand-along Indoor Pool Kayak Class, where you can choose to specialize in rolling or rescue, at 7:30 PM at The Summit, 205 Sunnyview Lane. A second class is offered March 31. $115/$90 with your own paddle, kayak, PFD and skirt. RSVP 752-3794. The UM Department of Music presents a student recital by pianist Emily Trapp at 7:30 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. Experience momentum, balance, and timing tuned with a strong drummer-dancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, who presents Tribal Fusion Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. and Wed. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Dr. Linsdey Doe shares the evolutionary biology of sex—sexy science—and explains nature’s enormous role in how we operate socially in and out of the bedroom at 8:30 PM in Room 330 of UM’s University Center. $6. Visit doctordoe.com.


For once in your life, leave the bar with a slightly thicker wallet with DJ Hickey’s Rawk and Roll Bingo Night every Mon. from 8:30 PM until midnight at the Badlander. $1 per card, and the opening round’s always free. The Milkcrate Mechanic keeps the groove fine tuned when he presents random music for random people, featuring rotating DJs and acts, free pool and mad krunk every Mon. at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge. Free. Bring a temporary Calendar Editor to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can allow me to take my leave for the next two weeks. Free.

TUESDAY March

24

The public’s invited to observe the work of America’s future nano-roboticists when the 54th annual Montana Science Fair opens at 8 AM in UM’s Adams Center. Free. Partnership Health Center, 323 W. Alder St., provides Missoula area families with inexpensive Well Child exams from 9 AM–noon, with story reading, refreshments, and give-aways for all participants as well. $10. RSVP 258-4194. Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. If they’re under 24 months old, bring the kiddos to the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., where Families First’s Family Motion offers a Corona yoga regimen for you and yours at 11 AM. $4.25/Free for members. RSVP 541-PLAY. You can almost taste the nurturing environment when La Leche League meets at 11:30 AM in the Missoula Public Library’s large meeting room to discuss “Knitting for Baby.” Free. Call 549-1779 or 721-6111. In just one short week, the Dunrovin Ranch Spring Break Program offers beginner to advanced riders a four-day set of six-hour sessions. $300 per rider. Call 273-7745 or visit dunrovinranchmontana.com. Find strength and the will to fight at the Breast Cancer Support Group, which meets at noon each Tue. at St. Francis Xavier Church, 420 W. Pine St. Free. Get gooey during Open Instructed Studio at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., every Thu. at 6 PM through May 5, with no class April 7. $168/eight-week session. Call 543-0509.

nightlife It’s Tuesday, and you ate your last cucumber for breakfast, so why not Dine With the Elks from 5:30–7 PM? This week, barbecued pork ribs, creamy potatoes au gratin, a chef’s choice veggie, salad bar and a chocolate brownie sundae accompany the flashy pianizing of Adrienne Dussault. $9 per plate. RSVP 549-0542. Jody Mosher offers another weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise— aka Nia—every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. First class free/$6 each thereafter. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents

beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/class or $35/four classes. Call 549-7933. Help Missoula’s Community Forum members figure out how to fund our infrastructure when you attend their meeting for the Franklin to Fort neighborhood at 7:30 PM at the Quaker Meeting Hall, 1861 S. 12th St. W. Free. Call 552-6081. The UM Community Lecture Series presents UM history professor David Emmons, whose lecture “The Writer’s Mystical/Mythical Guide: Finding the Lost Journals of Sacajawea” begins at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Series: $20/$15 UM alumni/$10 students. Call 243-5211 or visit grizalum.com. UM’s Wilderness Institute sponsors their annual Wilderness Lecture Series, which continues with Chris Filardi’s 7 PM lecture “Exploring Islands in Time: Accidental Encounters with Wilderness in the Solomon Islands” in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6956 or visit www.cfc.umt.edu/wi. You’re invited by Turning the Wheel to take part in some Body-Centered Creative Expression to live music every Tue. at 7 PM. $5–10 donation. Call 543-4414 for location and more details. The UM Department of Music presents a guest artist recital by Wichita State University clarinetist Suzanne Tirk at 7:30 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall. $10/$5 student and seniors. Call 243-6880. The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581. Get the folk outta your house, and head to UM’s University Theatre, where an evening with the legendary Joan Baez awaits at 8 PM. $41/$39 advance, but alas, it’s sold out. (See Noise in this issue.) Olympia, Wash. loans us another smashing band when LAKE plays the ZACC, 235 N. Front St. W., along with local volleys of support from Travis Sehorn, Tyson Ballew and the Wartime Blues. $5. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What are the names of at least two of the three actors who’ve played the role of diminutive Mr. Conductor on the children’s TV show “Shining Time Station” and the related movie? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot. Whitefish musicians trade their skills for free drinks as the Great Northern Bar hosts Open Mic Night, which begins at 8 PM with an acoustic jam circle, heads into an electric set at 9:30 and features fine hosting by members of the Canyon Creek Ramblers. Free. Call 862-2816. It’s been a week since you drank that green beer—shouldn’t the symptoms be fading? Unravel the mystery at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge with a show from Sugar Sugar Sugar, Dr. Agony and the Mystery Date and Pluto’s a Planet. $5.

Missoula Independent

Page 25 March 19–March 26, 2009


The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM—with Happy Hour until 10—at the AmVets Club. Free. DJs Karl K, Dillon and Cosmic Diva play music for the irie-hearted every Tue. at 9 PM when Reggae Night overstands all your troubles at the Badlander. Free. The moon’s always full and the pack’s always howlin’ at the Wolf Den’s Open Mic Night in Polson. Free. 9 PM. Call 883-2054. Your weekly supply of DJ Concave jumps 50 percent as he holds down the tables at Boomer’s Pub every Tue. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 531-1510.

WEDNESDAY

25

March

If you can toddle, you can play: The Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents Toddler Playgroup at 11 AM, so bring the wee beasties for a chance to network and socialize. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. It’s healthier than heroin: Lunchtime Junkies Jogging and Walking Club offers a one-hour community run and training session every Wed. through April 22, so meet at noon at Currents Aquatic Center in McCormick Park. $10. RSVP 721-PARK or 552-6266. Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, presents a few live sets by John Floridis at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680. While selling out to Barnes and Noble is probably off the table, feel free to offer other suggestions when you help Decide the Future of the Library during a Board of Trustees meeting at 5 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-2665. Learn how to set financial goals, create budgets and savings plans, understand credit reports and much more when you attend Financial Fitness Classes at homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 303, every Wed. through Mar. 25, at 6 PM. $10. RSVP quickly 532-4663, ext. 14, or visit www.homeword.org/hoc/ff_ registration.htm.

nightlife The UM Women’s and Gender Studies Program celebrates Women’s History Month with a 7 PM screening of the documentary Sisters of ‘77 beginning with a 6 PM social hour in Room 332 of UM’s University Center, where a discussion follows the film. Free. RSVP 243-2584 or stacy.rye@umontana.edu. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her Afro-Brazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly

Missoula Independent

favor of the mysterious during Teen Open Studio Night at the Missoula Art Museum at 6 PM. Free. Call 7280447 ext. 230.

Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. A revolving cast of local singers and musicians makes up the band Katy and Friends, who do the rocking every Wed. at 6:30 PM at the Cottage Inn in Kila. Free. Call 755-8711.

Take your first crack at wheel throwing when Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave. in Whitefish, presents the class Mud in Motion at 6 PM. $75. Call 862-5929 or visit stumptownartstudio.org.

The fifth annual Citywide Poetry Slam gives people of any age a chance to get lyrically fierce for some cash prizes. Show up early to compete and be prepared for The Chalfonts who open the event at the Elks upstairs at 7 PM. $5.

Simple chants and melodies from the world’s spiritual steams inhabit your body and mind when the Common Ground Center, 258 Roosevelt Lane in Hamilton, hosts an evening of Devotional Singing at 7 PM. $3 donation. Call 546-5344.

Help Missoula’s Community Forum members figure out how to fund our infrastructure when you attend their meeting for the Moose Can Gully neighborhood at 7 PM at Chief Charlo School, 5600 Longview Drive. Free. Call 552-6081.

As Jerry once sang, “Dust off those rusty strings just one more time.” George Weisel’s Y Music class Care & Maintenance of Fretted Instruments gets your grimy axe back in shape at 7 PM at the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $15/$12 members. Call 721-YMCA or visit ymcamissoula.org.

UM’s Multicultural Film Series presents No End in Sight, the tale of the spring 2003 decisions surrounding the American invasion of Iraq, at 7 PM in UM’s University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-5776.

The Bitterroot Public Library’s Adult Foreign Film Series—no, not “that” kind of adult film—presents a peek into the gaming brain of the modern adolescent as they screen the Belgian film Ben X at 7 PM. Free. Call 363-1670.

A live reading by Dierdre McNamer, from her novel Red Rover, comprises the Adult Story Time program at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-2665.

The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581.

The fourth clinic to prep you for April’s GrizzlyMan Adventure Race—dubbed “On-the-Fly Bicycle Maintenance”— begins at 7 PM at Missoula Bicycle Works, 708 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Learn to mystify and entrance by wiggling those hips every Wed. during a Hula/Tahitian Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where you can learn beautiful and energetic rhythms at 7 PM. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Bring your loftiest expressions of humanity—or just your heartfelt odes to lost love—to Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, where a Poetry Slam’s your chance to vent a bit at 7:30 PM. Free. Contact Alysha at (480) 296-3361 to sign up. The UM Department of Drama/Dance presents Guys and Dolls at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Montana Theatre. $18/$14 student and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 243-4581. The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 9452904 or visit mtactors.com. Wednesdays are for the tango, and nobody know this like the Downtown Dance Collective, where Abby and Diego offer three tango options beginning at 8:30 PM every week. Call 5417240 for pricing. Put your partying skills to good use when the Badlander hosts a Poverello Rock Raiser at 9 PM, where Andrea Harsell, Streetlight People and Pluto’s a Planet jam for the good of our less affluent neighbors. $5/$7 under 21. Prepare a welcome resting spot of the Palace Lounge for traveling minstrels LKN and Le Force, who play at 9 PM with local support by The Electric Dandelion and Knot Knocked Up! $5. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free.

Page 26 March 19–March 26, 2009

Photo courtesy of Jason Messick

Fresh from their gig aboard the International Space Station, the members of Dr. Manhattan team up with March of the Black Queen, Fiancée and the Evergreen at 9 PM on Sun., March 22, at The Other Side. $5. The answer to this week’s thecommon-link-appears-to-bemagic-dust-abuse trivia question: The three actors who’ve portrayed Thomas the Tank Engine’s mysterious little friend Mr. Conductor are, in order of portrayal, Ringo Starr, George Carlin and Alec Baldwin. Spit the gorf out Bassackwards Wed. at 9 PM at North Reserve 531-8327.

of your taorht with Karaoke every Deano’s Casino on Street. Free. Call

L.I.V. Karaoke puts the crowd in high spirits at the High Spirits in Florence starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. This Missoula legend has nothing to do with g round beef: Wasted Wednesday at the Top Hat offers unlimited tap beer and M-Group at 10 PM and the wisdom you’ll gain is worth the $7 cover many times over. Call 728-9865. Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

THURSDAY

26

March

Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662. Birth Mama of Missoula presents an intensive Childbirth Class every

Thu. at 9 AM. Call 546-6452 for info, and to register for an upcoming doula training in April. School’s out early, which means it’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 239-7718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. Give your kids something to strive for when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., offers up some time with singer-songwriter Larry Hirshberg during Afterschool Adventures: Playdate with an Artist at 3 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater with Shorts Night, where screenings of El Otro Lado and Between Bulls and Mosquitoes are followed by discussions with the filmmakers. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

nightlife Join the mayhem at the MUD Mingle, a family-friendly community potluck to kick off their upcoming workshop series with course info, special offers and maybe some sweet new MUD shirts at 6 PM at 629 Phillips St. Free. Call 721-7513. Budding artists between the ages of 13 and 18 can experiment with supplies, tour the galleries for inspiration and craft something magnificent when Patricia Thornton’s Explorative Drawing pushes aside the known in

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents Sarah Ruhl’s new comedy Dead Man’s Cell Phone at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 student rush at 7:30. Call 9452904 or visit mtactors.com. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Mulletia, led by Bridgebuilder, Mageddon and Helliana at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. Get your dancing feet ready, as these folks don’t intend on letting up once they start: Lucy Michelle and the Velvet Lapelles open for stompgrass saviors Trampled By Turtles when The Other Side’s doors open at 9 PM. $12/$10 advance. Musicology won’t know what hit it: John Floridis plays a solo show at Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. And it’s with only the teeniest tinge of remorse—and with plenty of T.G.I. Spring Break—that I, your humble Comrade Calendar, do thus take my leave, effective immediately. In fact, as you read this, I’m already several states away, having shredded all my files, deleted any saved passwords and sent that pesky fax machine to the bottom of the Frenchtown Pond. All jokes and threats aside—recession=bad time to mistreat the office equipment—I leave you and your weekly events in the capable, if somewhat smaller, hands of my temporary replacement, Queenie Calendar. Do her right in my absence, good people, and I swear I’ll return with wild tales of the world outside the boundaries of our readership. And until next we meet, send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 20, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.


As it stands, I’ve got too many events this week to spend much time with an elaborate set-up, so here we go: The bird-loving set proceeds to wake up and smell the coming migration. In deep anticipation, the Five Valleys Audubon Society continues their six-part Advanced Birding Workshop when Jim Brown presents a class on shorebirds at 7 PM on Thu., March 19, at the Fish, Wildlife & Parks office on Spurgin Road. The class costs $15, or $60 covers you for all six classes, of which only one remains. RSVP 549-5632. In more mammalian news, a large herd of bipeds plans to stampede through town next month, and they’d like you to join them. Yes, folks, the YMCA Riverbank Run takes place this year on April 25, and registration begins on Fri., March 20. Choose from the one-mile fun run, the 5K, 10K, the trifecta or the school challenge. And get more info at ymcamissoula.org, or by calling 721-9622. Oh, and speaking of preparing to run around in groups, it is my distinct honor to announce that the third annual Missoula Marathon takes place on July 12. While winter’s sloth might not have gotten you in prime marathon shape, Run Wild Missoula comes to the rescue, with a 16-week Missoula Marathon Walking Training Class beginning at 8 AM on Sat., March 21, in Community Medical Center Conference Rooms I and J. You’ll be getting right to the training part, so dress accordingly. And bring some dough, as the class costs $25, or $20 for Run Wild members. Call 544-2150. Of course, you’ll need to stash the kids somewhere so’s you can begin your training. What better way than with the help of the Missoula Family YMCA, 3000 S. Russell Ave., which hosts its annual “Super Saturday” summer camp registration event at 8 AM on Sat., March 21. If past years are any indication, there will be food, drink, fun and games for everybody. But you’ll probably want to call ahead, just in case: 721-YMCA. Missoula’s had a patchy history with biker gangs, and one local group is hell-bent on rectifying errors of the past. Actually, the pedallers of Missoulians on Bikes (MOB) have never incited any street

riots, but that doesn’t mean they wouldn’t if they had the chance. In any case, they invite you and your bike to meet up at 10 AM at the Perkins on Reserve Street on Sat., March 21, for the 30-mile Frenchtown Frenzy for Fries and Frolic. Call Tom or Sue at 728-8319. Instead of that ride, take a trip up Grant Creek to Montana Snowbowl, where on Sat., March 21, the all-day, year-end blowout “Best of the Bowl” aims to determine exactly who the mountain monarch might be this year. Call 549-4777 or visit montana snowbowl.com. Here’s one the motor-heads might best avoid: The Montana Backcountry Alliance’s inaugural Lolo Luau Barbecue and Backcountry Party begins on Sat., March 21, at noon at the “G-Spot,” a little, hard-to-find nook about 2.6 miles before Lolo Pass on Highway 12. A skin-ski race takes place at 12:30, with the barbecue and awards raising everybody’s sap at 2. For more info, browse on over to montanabackcountry.org. It wouldn’t be Mountain High without a little nug of activity from the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., which hosts the Saturday Kids’ Activity “Endangered Species Treasure Hunt” at 2 PM on Sat., March 21. Your little exterminators—think about it—can learn all kinds of useful factoids about disappearing species like grizzly bears, black-footed ferrets and bald eagles, and the $2 fee is waived for members, so what’s your excuse? Call 327-0405. To wrap up the day’s listings, I’ll urge you to head north for the upper-crusty wilds of Whitefish, where the Whitefish Mountain Resort

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has something very special planned. On Sat., March 21, the Dummy Derby begins at 3:30 PM, and soon mannequins of all makes and sizes will be flying down the slopes toward a massive jump and their ultimate demise. Some rules: Nothing that was—or is—alive, no glass, explosives, motors or sharp metal objects. Teams of four are encouraged to call 862-2910 with any questions. That unruly MOB returns for more of the same on Sun., March 22, as they meet up at 10 AM at the old 4B’s Restaurant on Reserve Street for the 35-mile Fo r t F i z z l e Fo l l y . C a l l Ke n a t 239-9754. Moving right along, we’re reminded that boating season is just around the corner from our next snowstorm. Kalispell’s Silver Moon Kayak Company aims to boost the number of trained boater/consumers in the marketplace with the first of two stand-alone Indoor K a y a k Po o l C l a s s e s , w h i c h begins at 7:30 PM at the Summit, 205 Sunnyview Lane, on Mon., March 23. Two separate sections deal with rolls and rescues, and another class will be held on March 31, so you can take both sections. $115/$90 if you supply your own equipment. Call 752-3794. And tying it all back together, another chance to prepare for future races comes on Wed., March 25, as Photo by Chad Harder Missoula Bicycle Works, 708 S. Higgins Ave., hosts the fourth Grizzlyman Adventure Race clinic “On-The-Fly Bicycle Maintenance” at 7 PM. It’s free, and race organizers will be in hand to answer more general questions after the clinic. Now, let’s be careful out there. calendar@missoulanews.com

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Open 7AM-11PM Mon-Sat • Sun 9AM-10PM 543-3188 • 701 South Orange Street Missoula Independent

Page 27 March 19–March 26, 2009


scope

Never-ending story

Missoula Independent

Marie Watt sparks nostalgia with Heirlooms by Erika Fredrickson

Marie Watt’s sewing circles began as a means to The Heirlooms installation fills a full room at meet a deadline. The Portland, Ore.-based artist called MAM. Watt has built a cedar wall blocking off a small up a group of friends, some of them also artists, and back section of the room in a way that she hopes will asked if they’d help her sew an art piece together so she give the illusion of a giant old trunk or hope chest. could get it done in time for a show. She offered them From that wall the wool blanket billows out and lunch and planted the idea that it was one way they across the rest of the room, suspended by cables could all get together during their busy schedules. wrapped in wool braids—also made collectively in These days, Watt often asks people to join her Watt’s studio. sewing circles—friends and strangers, alike. In fact, she uses a massive Marie Watt’s unveils her new installation, Heirlooms, at MAM e-mail list to call for for Thursday’s Artini. help, and the list continues to grow. It’s still about efficiency—she’s gone to making all of her art by hand, and without other people she’d only get one piece done per year. But those sewing circles also produced a meaningful experience in which people told stories in an environment where fast-paced lives had a moment to slow down. “I would compare the sewing circle process to—because I don’t want it to only be understood in the context of women’s work or the history of sewing bees—the idea of a barn raising,” Watt says. “It takes a community to come together and make something like that, otherwise it couldn’t happen in a short amount of time.” With barn raising, she says, there’s also a food element, and since food “I want to create this feeling of being enveloped in often evokes comfort, Watt takes it seriously. At her a blanket,” Watt says, “and also create this sense of the sewing parties she serves bagels with lox, cream cheese blanket flowing out of the chest.” and capers, and in the summer months she serves Behind the wall—essentially “in” the chest—museCaprese salads, cheese from the local farmers’ market, um-goers can have their own sewing circle. Visitors can cookies and focaccia bread with cured meats. She also cut wool outlines of their hands and then sew them offers various beverages, including wine, beer, coffee onto the blanket behind the wall, which will be laid and tea. across a table. Recently, Watt invited her sewing comrades to help “That side of the wall,” Watt says about the sewing her stitch together a giant blanket made out of smaller circle space, “will be where heirlooms are still in the wool blankets of various plaids and sizes. The 50 foot making.” wide and 130 foot long patchwork makes up one part Besides tracing their hands, visitors have the opporof Watt’s new installation at the Missoula Art Museum tunity to answer questions about their favorite heirloom, (MAM). The installation, titled Heirlooms, is meant to which they write down on sale tags that say “Heirloom.” evoke that sense of nostalgia people feel with items that Those tags will continue to be pinned on the blanket for are either passed down a family line or have a strong others to see for the duration of the exhibit. story attached to them. Watt’s idea about heirlooms stemmed from a num“I was thinking wool blankets are heirloom-like ber of personal references. Her mom worked in objects,” Watt says, “and I also think my interest in heir- American Indian education for 27 years and when she looms grew out of the fact that I have a 4 year old and retired the kids, parents and grandparents gave her a I’ve been thinking more about what is it that we pass on. blanket on which they’d traced their hands. Watt’s also [It’s] less of an object based discussion and more based attuned to indigenous groups as she’s a member of the in values and stories and that sort of thing. And objects Seneca tribe herself, and so knowing that cedar has are the touchstone for those stories. They’re the marker been an important cultural resource for other native of a memory that leads you to that story.” groups makes the material more poignant for her.

Page 28 March 19–March 26, 2009

She also has a fond memory about heirlooms from the last time she visited Missoula. Two years ago she gave a brown bag lunch talk at MAM on heirlooms. It strikes her even now that she remembers MAM staff and community members telling stories about their memory items, such as canning jars, glass cutting tools and antiquated farm equipment.

Photo by Ashley Sears

Watt says that she chose wool as the main heirloomlike texture for her piece because so many people can relate to it. “Certain textures and colors remind people of blankets they had when they were kids,” says Watt, “or blankets they had at their grandparents or blankets from camping and so I hope that will be one of the experiences of this installation.” Heirlooms begins in Missoula but Watt plans to move it to other sites. She’ll soon be in residency at The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia where she’ll continue to embellish the wool installation, and she’ll move it back to Portland where she hopes it will continue to evolve as people add to it. “I think when artists make work there’s sometimes an assumption that it’s a completed thought,” Watt says, “but one of my goals is to have something that the community helps continue. So it’s not about completion in that regard. Like heirlooms, the stories grow with each generation.” Marie Watt’s Heirlooms opens Thursday, March 19, at 5:30 PM for Artini at the Missoula Art Museum, with a gallery talk at 7 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

March of the Black Queen States

self-released

Local band March of the Black Queen (the new incarnation of The Good Neighbor Policy) comes out of the gates strong in States. With a sound that is part ’70s ballad-rock, part country and a touch indie rock, the band cranks through a travelogue of eight anthemic, mostly state-named tunes. Each a lover’s lament, trouble follows them from “Oregon,” where they “never meant to cause you any pain,” to “Virginia,” where “there’s a ghost in my bed.” Rich, dynamic, Eddie Vedder-esque vocals from frontman Thomas Pendarvis soar over

Joan Baez

Day After Tomorrow Razor & Tie

Whether by choice or by dint of age, Joan Baez is losing her warble. And that’s a good thing. The classic Baez vocal style frankly makes me cringe. It just ain’t me, babe. That earnest vibrato sold the cult of the ’60s for a long time, whether Baez liked it or not. But many of us aren’t buying, and the rest are getting older and deafer. Hence the market logic of Day After Tomorrow, produced by alt-country legend Steve Earle. Maybe it’s not Baez’s fault, but cults of personality and those over-enunciated consonants breed resistance in my heart. That said, I like this album— mainly for what it lacks. It eschews the swooping

Mason Jennings In the Ever Brushfire Records

In the Ever won’t wham you over the head with greatness. Instead, getting a real sense of Mason Jennings’ new release requires several listens. Diverging from the trajectory of his career, this album shows Jennings getting back to basics. Recorded largely in a rural cabin, the quick-and-dirty feel is a boon to some songs, like the poignant, traininspired “Going Back to New Orleans”—and a detraction from others. “Never Knew Your Name” sounds like a rough melodic sketch and gets the

Zoroaster

Voice of Saturn Terminal Doom Records

As a band known for its pummeling live shows, Atlanta-based sludge and doom metal trio Zoroaster proves that pitting sheer aggression against psychedelic backdrops creates interesting results, even in digital form. Ambient opener “Seeing the Dark” sets the stage for “Spirit Molecule,” a swaggering blues-tinged metal behemoth that features the guttural bass and grizzled vocals of bassist Brent Anderson. “White Dwarf ” shows the band in full force, with chugging riffs courtesy of guitarists Will Fiore and guest shredder Brent Hinds (of fellow Atlanta band Mastodon) accompanied by Anderson belting out heavy bass

a plethora of backings, from violins and cello to slide guitar and piano. The sound bounces comfortably between lighter-raising ballads and lonely laments, like when “Kansas” conjures visions of stadium lightshows, and “Texas” evokes tumbleweed towns. This split personality works incredibly well, the two combining to create a compelling, everyman ethos. Musically, March of the Black Queen proves to be tight and versatile. States’ production is solid, although when the band hits full stride, the mix can get a little muddy; some songs crave a tweak or two to be stellar. And with such a solid foundation to work with, this band deserves that extra attention to help turn good songs into great ones. (Melissa Mylchreest) March of the Black Queen plays The Other Side Sunday, March 22, at 9 PM. Dr. Manhattan, Fiancée and The Evergreen open. $5. melodies and quaky soprano of yore in favor of a plainer sound and a lower vocal register, and the songs are evocative rather than confessional. Baez’ tendency to rush and refuse the rhythm—as if for a moment she has forgotten to sing—is used to good effect in songs like “Henry Russell’s Last Words.” Baez always recognized songwriting greatness. Bob Dylan and John Prine served her well back in the day. Now Earle, Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and others save her from the mire of ’60s nostalgia. (Ali Gadbow) Joan Baez plays the University Theatre Tuesday, March 24, at 8 PM. $41/$39 advance. album off to a rocky start. In its quest to be pantheological, “I Love You and Buddha Too” renders itself an abomination. It sounds like something straight out of Sunday school class, and even back-up vocals from Jack Johnson can’t save it. However, the religious theme plays well in tunes like the beautiful, old-time gospel inspired “How Deep Is That River.” Jennings’ humor surfaces in “Your New Man,” a lighthearted romp through jealousy and revenge, while his politics color songs like “Soldier Boy.” While In the Ever won’t wow you on the first goaround, and some songs shouldn’t have made the cut, a few gems do glimmer. Consider it a sidestep album worth that second and third listen. (Melissa Mylchreest) Mason Jennings plays the Wilma Theatre Thursday, March 26, at 8 PM. $25/$20 advance. rumblings and drummer Dan Scanlan providing a snappy backbone. But instead of an hour-long metallic assault, these southern boys also use Voice of Saturn to explore the outer regions of psychedelia. It’s best exemplified by the droning ambience of the album’s title track. There are also musical nods throughout to fellow sludge and doom bands like Eyehategod, Neurosis, Sleep and Black Sabbath. But instead of sounding like a carbon copy of those artists, Voice of Saturn stands on its own with its unique and peppered use of Moog synthesizers, sound effects, low-frequency feedback and wailing guitar. (Ira Sather-Olson)

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Parzybok pens an epic quest of this world

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Tales of epic journeys have always been popu- because it’s not a brand-name couch. They’re lar. However, they’re never quite of our own world. refused by another secondhand store. At this point, While the quest for the Holy Grail is still pretty cool, the gentlemen realize their couch has magical powits heroes are from yesteryear. Hobbits are mighty ers—its weight fluctuates, growing heavier or lovable, but the fellowship of the ring exists com- lighter depending on the boys’ direction, as though pletely off our map. Perhaps there’s something to registering its protest or assent with the journey. this separation. Just as our collective imagination When a local journalist stops them to ask why they’re carrying a couch all seems to crave quest stoover town, they spontaries, we also seem to expect neously hatch a plan: that the mythical nature of They’re carrying the couch these stories lend themacross America to, uh, fight selves, most reasonably, to world hunger or maybe to an other-worldliness. take the symbol of sedenThis is what makes tary life and put it into Benjamin Parzybok’s debut action? novel, Couch, so remarkDespite the half-baked able. Unlike most quest stoidea, the trio does begin ries, Parzybok’s combines carrying the couch, not the mythical with the ultraquite understanding why contemporary. His quest they’re compelled to do so begins—and is anchored—in and becoming more and our own world—Portland, more aware of its strange, Ore., to be specific (which is insidious powers. It lures nowhere near either them into deep slumbers, Mordor or Camelot, in case making them awake in teranyone was wondering). ror. It floats in water. Within Thom is an out-of-work just a few days, the lightcomputer programmer hearted quest becomes a who, at one time, enjoyed serious one. In a blogpost, some minor fame as a hackThom asks if anyone can er par excellence. In the last find a reasonable explanathree months, Thom’s been Couch tion for the couch’s mysterilaid off, dumped by his girl- Benjamin Parzybok ous powers and the friend and has been forced paperback, Small Beer Press responses are startling: It to move into a new apart- 256 pages, $16 could have been injected ment with two other guys he barely knows: Erik, a con-man who never quite with strange additives by the Pentagon, it might seems to pull off a con, and Tree, a quiet, pie-bak- contain Pandora’s box, it could have been ing hippie who keeps telling Thom not to worry bewitched by a wizard king who made love on the about the whole job thing because “I dreamed you couch, only to watch his victims die after orgasm. wouldn’t have to worry about getting a job, so I’d As Thom, Erik and Tree continue on their quest to hate for you to have to waste a lot more time look- return the couch to wherever it might belong, the impending results of their journey become more ing for one, you know?” Just a few nights after moving in, the boys are and more magnified. That the magic ring of this forced to move out, due to the collapse of a novel is a couch—perhaps the most potent symbol waterbed in the apartment above (a gymnast and a of American apathy—is all the more significant, as horse jockey got a bit too wild in bed, it turns out) the reader finds out. In truth, Couch is a quest like any other quest: and the ensuing water damage. With nowhere to go and almost nothing to keep them in Portland, the “Chosen” ones embark on some kind of long and boys decide to pack up what little they need, dump dangerous journey, bad guys try to hurt them, the rest, and go on a trip to wherever-ville for how- good guys help them along the way, the journey ends and, well, I’ll let you read what happens there. ever-long. Strangely enough, there’s one thing holding Parzybok understands the necessary components them back: a large, bright orange couch with hap- of an epic journey and has paid due homage to its hazard stitching that can’t be pried loose, even with predecessors. a knife. Thom, Erik and Tree are not the first roomYet, in remarkably sharp prose, he weaves the mates to find themselves with a large piece of nuances of our very recognizable realities—like eunwanted furniture but, still, there’s something mail addiction—with the mythical wonderment that funny about this couch: “There was a nagging in is part of the classic quest story, making the journey [Tree’s] mind, a leftover fleck of dream or a mis- in Couch a particularly memorable re-imagining. handled scrap of intuition, nothing more than a Benjamin Parzybok reads from Couch reminder that the couch was an item that required Monday, March 23, at Fact & Fiction Downtown some kind of attention.” at 7 PM. Free. So, they carry it a few blocks through Portland’s city streets to the Goodwill. Goodwill won’t take it arts@missoulanews.com


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Bro-found insights A Musical Fable of Broadway

Not much to like in I Love You, Man

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Decades from now, when sociologists and film historians are sifting through evidence from the cinematic male-bonding comedies of the early 21st century, I wonder what they will conclude about dudus Americanus. Had we become so metrosexualized, so divided from our inner chest-beating he-beast that we needed an entire movie genre to reassure us? Were we all that desperate for a pop-culture reminder that, yes, there were people around with whom we men could fart and projectile-vomit without fear of recrimination, and those people had not one ovary between them?

even at seemingly inappropriate moments. Segel’s not the most obvious choice for this kind of a role, having mostly played the sensitive schlub himself. But he finds an interesting middle ground between casual confidence and, ultimately, insecurity that his freewheeling ways are leaving him without any peers with whom he can hang. The easy, funky rapport between these two characters should have allowed I Love You, Man to sail on waves of comedy gold. But nearly everything that’s inventive about this idea seems to have ended with the idea itself. The supporting characters—par-

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Staring contests are so sophomoric. I Love You, Man opens Friday.

I Love You, Man is only the latest in the trend— popularized by the Judd Apatow oeuvre, but expanded to stuff like Superbad, Pineapple Express and Role Models featuring Apatow alumni—that has come to be called the “bro-mantic comedy,” or perhaps the “dick flick.” And it may have much to teach us about ourselves, my brothers—as we are, as we wish we could be and as we want to make it excruciatingly clear to everyone that we’re not. At least it seems to want to be that insightful. Director/co-writer John Hamburg (Along Came Polly) and co-writer Larry Levin begin with a pretty solid premise, and a character with which to explore it. Peter Klaven (Paul Rudd) is the kind of guy that girls adore. A successful real estate agent and wouldbe developer, he’s also a considerate lover who proposes romantically to his girlfriend Zooey (Rashida Jones of “The Office”). He even makes root beer floats for her and all her friends while they’re celebrating the engagement. In a peculiarly contemporary way, he truly is a ladies’ man. But there’s a dark side to this personality: He has no idea how to be a man’s man. He doesn’t have drinking buddies or poker buddies; he’s not even butch enough to usurp his gay brother (Andy Samberg) as his own father’s number-one pal. Rudd’s terrific at playing this kind of domesticated guy, and he gets a lot of comic mileage out of his painful inability to articulate any sort of casual dude-speak. So he begins a quest for someone to fill out his wedding party—and after failed, forced attempts, he meets Sydney Fife (Jason Segel) at an open house. Sydney is Peter’s polar opposite—a man who has no problem letting loose his “ocean of testosterone”

ticularly Jones’ Zooey and her two best gal-pals, played by Sarah Burns and Jamie Pressly—are generally so thinly sketched that you have to squint to see them at all. Hamburg and Levin manage few real laugh-out-loud gags, preferring to cruise along on the light amusement of Peter’s bumbling attempts at machismo. Only Jon Favreau—a veteran of the real pioneering modern bro-mantic comedy, Swingers—as Pressly’s ill-tempered husband manages to bring the film to occasional life. It’s hard for the stunt-casting of Lou Ferrigno not to feel more than slightly flop-sweaty. It’s also kind of depressing watching I Love You, Man look so insecure when attempting to prove its protagonists’ heterosexuality. On the surface, it seems very gay-friendly to have Peter’s out-andproud brother serving as one of his mentors in wooing male companionship. But one of the big early guffaw moments involves a misunderstanding on one of Peter’s “man-dates,” ending with a vigorous tongue-kissing. Neither Hamburg nor Rudd overplays the panic of the moment, but it becomes clear that the gay characters here exist primarily to prove by contrast what Peter and Sydney so are not. It’s a shame, really, that I Love You, Man isn’t funnier, and that it feels as uncomfortable in its own skin as its hero. We’re getting closer to learning something interesting about what guys need from other guys, but the sociologists won’t be gleaning more from this effort than a few chuckles. There’s more bro-vado here than bro-mance. I Love You, Man opens at the Village 6 Friday, March 20. arts@missoulanews.com


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OPENING THIS WEEK Altered Courses This week’s Carmike 10 independent film is set in 2042, when society has rebounded from near collapse and the story of a small decision that had massive effects is told by way of flashbacks. Not Rated. Showing Mon.–Thu. at the Carmike 10 at 4 and 9:50, displacing He’s Just Not That Into You. Che, Part Two In the second installment of this biography of Che Guevara, Benicio Del Toro portrays the revolutionary leader as he travels to incite revolution in Bolivia, where government agents begin to track him down. Not Rated. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 9:15 with a Sun. matinee at 3:15 and no Thu. show. Duplicity Undercover lovers Clive Owen and Julia Roberts are ex-spooks turned corporate spies, who find themselves in competition to steal a massive company secret. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. I Love You, Man Paul Rudd scrambles to find an acceptable first man to serve in his upcoming nuptials in this overblown statement on male intimacy in our culture. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4 and no Sun. shows after 7. Knowing Get this: Nicolas Cage tries to save the world. Really. From a huge disaster. And he may have to make “the ultimate sacrifice.” Ooooh! Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:30, 5, 7:30, 8 and 10 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and 2 and no shows Sun. after 9. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun.

NOW PLAYING Che, Part One Benicio Del Toro delivers a revolutionary performance in the first half of a biography of Argentine doctor, Marxist and soldier Ernesto “Che” Guevara. This episode, dubbed “The Argentine” takes us through the defeat of Cuban dictator Batista and includes a recreation of Che’s 1964 appearance at the UN. Not Rated. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 with a Sun. matinee at 1 and no Thu. show. Coraline 3D The first stop motion animated feature to be originally filmed in 3D, this film is based upon Neil Gaiman’s book and follows a little girl whose discovery of an alternate universe behind a door in her house leads eventually to dark realizations. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and no shows Sun. after 9. Gran Torino Clint Eastwood’s a racist and curmudgeonly Korean War vet who warms to his Hmong neighbors once he accepts humanity’s four universal connections: beer, guns, cars and payback. Actually, this is reportedly another touching and mature move away from Dirty Harry. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:35 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. He’s Just Not That Into You Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston, Drew Barrymore and Jennifer Connelly struggle to figure out why he/she says they’ll call, and then doesn’t. Rated

He’s Just Not That Into You Showing at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 6:50 and 9:15. Hotel for Dogs Based upon the Lois Duncan book of the same name, this star-flecked film—Lisa Kudrow, Kevin Dillon, and Don Cheadle, to name a few—follows two orphans who force their dog—and any other strays they can round up—to squat an abandoned hotel. Shortly thereafter, the dogs organize a chapter of Food Not Bombs. Rated PG. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:55 and 3:35 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:50 and 4:05. I Love You, Man Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:20, 4:15, 7:20 and 9:40. Knowing Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 4, 7 and 9:45. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 6:50 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. The Last House on the Left Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:15, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:45. Miss March Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 9:15. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:25, 2:35, 4:40 and 6:55 and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 4:20 and 6:55. The Pink Panther 2 Steve Martin returns as bumbling Inspector Clouseau, who faces consternation from John Cleese’s Inspector Dreyfus in this sequel to Bro-mance means sharing sweat without the interference of the 2006 installment of this cross-generational crowd-pleasing deodorant. I Love You, Man opens Friday at the Village 6. franchise. Rated PG. Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Miss March success on a TV game show, a performance that Kalispell at 1:30 and 7:15. A boy falls into a coma and awakes four years raises suspicions leading to revelations of poverty, Race to Witch Mountain later to find that his lily-white girlfriend has brutality and a yearning for love. Rated R. Showing Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at become a Playboy centerfold. Bring the kids. nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9:10 with 1, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6, 7:30, 8:30 and 9:45 with Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 5:20, 7:35 Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon. Also playing at the and 9:45 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:10 and Taken Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with no Sun. shows after 7. Liam Neeson is a retired CIA agent who turns Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and at the Showboat New in Town into a “crime-fighting machine” when his in Polson at 4:15, 7 and 9. Renée Zellweger is a powerful Miami business- daughter is kidnapped in Paris by Albanian sex The Reader woman who’s transferred to some podunk town, slave traders. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at where an unexpected romance with none other Village 6 at 4:20, 7:05 and 9:20 with Sat.–Sun. 6:45 and 9:25. than Harry Connick Jr. proves quite distracting. shows at 1:30 and no Sun. shows after 7. Slumdog Millionaire Rated PG-13. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 12:50, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:20 and Mon.–Thu. at and no 9 show on Sun. 1:20, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:20. Also playing at the show on Sun. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7 and 9:15 with Watchmen In lieu of brute force, unarmed New Jersey secu- In this highly anticipated adaptation of the cele- Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. rity guard Kevin James must use all his wit and brated mid-’80s graphic novel, a group of retired Taken brainpower to save his beloved workplace from a superheroes reunites after the murder of one of Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at gang of terrorist/thieves à la Die Hard. Rated PG. their own to investigate a nefarious plot that holds 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:25 and 9:35 and Mon.–Thu. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7:15 and the future of humanity at stake. Rated R. Showing at 1:45, 4:10, 7:25 and 9:35. Also playing at the 9:25 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and no at the Carmike 10 at 7 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at Entertainer in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:10. shows Sun. after 9. noon and 3:30 and at the Village 6 at 7 with Watchmen Push Sat.–Sun. shows at noon and 3:30. Showing at Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at Telekinetic Chris Evans and seer Dakota Fanning the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Sat.–Sun. 1:30, 3:30, 5, 7:30 and 8:30 with Fri.–Sun. matibattle a government agency bent upon mutating matinees at 3. nees at noon. humans into a psychic army. This film is totally not an X-Men rip-off. Rated PG-13. Showing at the FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin. Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Coraline 3D Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as Race to Witch Mountain 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:20 and 9:50 and Mon.–Thu. of Fri., March 20. Show times and locations are Cabbie Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson picks up two at 1:40, 4:25, 7:20 and 9:50. subject to change or errors, despite our best teens who happen to be aliens on the lam in this Duplicity efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or reboot of the family-pleasing Disney franchise. Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:10, 1:10, 4:05, 7:05 and 9:50. Also playing at the Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6— 5:40, 7:30, 8 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 6:50 and 9:30 with 541-7469; Wilma—728-2521; Pharaohplex in 12:30, 1, 2:50 and 3:20 and no shows Sun. after Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Hamilton—961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton— 9. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 Gran Torino 363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell-—752-7804. and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and show on Sun. 4:20 and 9:35. Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.

PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. The Last House on the Left When the gang of killers who left their daughter for dead unknowingly seeks refuge in her home, the young woman’s parents open up a serious can of whoop ass in this remake of a 1972 horror flick. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:20, 7:15 and 9:45 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and no Sun. shows after 7.

The Reader Kate Winslet and Ralph Fiennes star in this screen adaptation of Bernhard Schlink’s best-selling novel of the same name, a man in post-WWII Germany learns that his former lover stands accused of Nazi war crimes. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4 and no Sun. shows after 7. Slumdog Millionaire Danny Boyle (Trainspotting) directs a cast of Bollywood stars, who carry the weight of this welledited tale of a Mumbai street urchin’s surprising

Missoula Independent

Page 33 March 19–March 26, 2009


Amy Alkon

Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Great Walls Of China I think my wife of 20 years is trying to kill me. She’s insisting we need her late mother’s dishes. We have a perfectly good set of everyday dishes, plus plates with ugly hand-painted fruit, other expensive dishes, boxed-up Fiestaware, and fancy china that’s been packed away since our wedding. So, we already possess over four dozen plates, and we’re just two people, and never have people over. Her mother’s dishes are only the latest addition. Our house is exploding with stuff: hundreds of books that will never be read, shelf upon shelf of glassware that’s never used, a basement of children’s toys that haven’t seen the light of day for years, and never will. Is there something imbedded in female DNA compelling women to hoard things? As we acquire more and more stuff, I’m afraid a tipping point will be reached, and my brain will explode. —Terrified It must be tempting to give her an ultimatum: “Bring one more teacup into this house, and I’m renting a bull.” Unfortunately, she’s unlikely to respond by chucking plates at you. And, as you’ve surely observed, plying her with reason only makes her cling to all that crockery that much more tenaciously. That isn’t because she’s a woman. Hoarding seems to be a human instinct—one we share with squirrels. To the squirrels’ credit, they appear to have little interest in collecting a plate with what’s either a badly painted raspberry or a decorative take on a diseased pancreas. Hoarders tend to be “perfectionistic and indecisive,” says hoarding expert Dr. Randy O. Frost. Because they’re afraid of making mistakes, they have difficulty assessing whether they’ll have future need for, say, those Richard Nixon-head salt and pepper shakers. Frost explains that saving allows them to avoid making a decision, and to avoid the chance that any decision will be the wrong one. For Frost and his colleagues, mere “hoarding behavior” like your wife’s crosses the line into a “clinical” hoarding problem when living spaces can no longer be used as intended, and when there’s “significant distress or impairment in functioning.” One hoarder’s home was so jam-packed that her children had to eat with their plates on their laps on the few uncluttered chairs, and both entrances to the house were blocked. Frost’s study didn’t say how the woman recognized she had a problem, but I’m guessing it was hard to deny once her kids had to climb out the window to catch the

school bus. Because you and your wife aren’t likely to end up like a 43-year-old Bronx man—trapped for two days under an avalanche of a decade’s worth of newspapers, magazines, and junk mail—she isn’t likely to go for the cognitive behavioral therapy that’s helped some clinical hoarders. Probably your best appeal comes out of the work of 18th century economist Adam Smith, who noted that sympathy compels people to put others’ interests first. Tell her you understand these things are meaningful to her, but you’re unhappy and feeling smothered, and ask how can you work together to change that. Don’t expect miracles — like a sudden desire to hold a garage sale. Suggest storage. And, even if storage costs $2,400 a year, maybe that’s a bargain price for sanity, marital harmony, and avoiding the need to pay somebody to rob you of pallets of gravy boats and boxes of amputated Barbies while you’re at the Olive Garden.

Will You Query Me? I keep hearing that when people get engaged they should get premarital counseling. I think that’s ludicrous—if you need couples counseling before getting married, don’t get married. —Have Brain For people in relationships, there are questions—”Isn’t it romantic?”— and there are questions: “What if I decide I don’t want kids?” and “When the children need private school, who will drop them off at the adoption agency?” People hate to muck up the fantasy with treks into grim reality, and premarital counseling gets them to address common issues that cause breakups and strife. Couples don’t go because they necessarily have problems, but because they’re looking to avoid them. If you’re averse to having a stranger ask you a lot of prying questions, you can use books: “Don’t You Dare Get Married Until You Read This!” by Corey Donaldson and “1001 Questions to Ask Before You Get Married,” by Monica Mendez Leahy. Don’t ask your partner every one; use the questions (and sections like money, daily routine, kids, and traveling style) as jumping-off points about stuff to consider; for example “Would it bother you if I got artificial breasts?” Answer: Well, it’s especially worrisome if you’re a man. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice A m y @ a o l . c o m ( w w w. a d v i c e goddess.com)

Missoula Independent Page 34 March 19–March 26, 2009

PERSONALS Ready to meet great new people?

WOMEN SEEKING EASYGOING, SILLY, SINCERE Sarcastic, cynical SWF, 30, 5’6’’, hard-working, into gardening, movies, dining, travel, road trips, poetry, arts and crafts. Seeking SM, 30-50, similar interests. 274193



SWEET CHEEKS! SWF, 25, 5’7’’, brown/green, affectionate, outgoing, loves music, movies. Searching for Prince Charming, 27-35. Must be familyoriented, dedicated, honest, willing to show me true love is possible. 274172



SEEKING SOMEONE NEW Active, hard-working SWF, 33, open-minded, honest, enjoys watching horror movies, doting on my cats. Will share my great sense of humor with the right SWM, 25-37. Friendship first, possible relationship. 291395 @ nachomomma50



SOUND LIKE YOU? SWF, 46, 5’5’’, working mother of two, looking for a man, 37-53, who enjoys golfing, swimming, boating, rafting, skiing, movies, time at home, etc. 277049



BEAUTIFUL GREEN EYES SWF, 32, N/S, light drinker, has cats, likes horror movies, music, more. Would like to meet secure WM for friendship first. Let’s have fun together. 277876



I THINK LOVE STILL EXISTS Honest, caring, loving SWF, young-looking 56, seeks strong, confidnet gentleman, 5375, to be my best friend, lover, playmate, and partner in the dance of life. The next step is yours. 291187 @ ladybluwater



MUST LIKE DOGS WF, 27, looking for a professional male, 26-35, who enjoys animals, outdoors activities and enjoying what the city has to offer. 278828



SO MUCH TO KNOW... about me. Liberal WF, 5’6”, red/hazel, very active, loves horses, likes biking, hiking, reading, watching sports. Seeking very active, secure WM, 45-58, with a good sense of humor. 286734



LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE SWF, 50, N/S, enjoys the wide open spaces, road trips, contemplating nature’s beauty, taking long walks, biking, swimming, socializing with friends. Seeking friendly man, 45-55, for friendship, maybe more. 282465 @ Geri



INDUSTRIOUS MAN WANTED Attractive, fit, health-conscious SWF, 62, 5’4’’, 120lbs, loves reading books, camping, exploring. Looking for SW/BM, 57-72, for possible relationship. 292410



NEW TO MONTANA Attractive SWF, 45, 5’8’’, long auburn hair, green eyes, seeks wonderful guy, 30-50, who is honest, sincere, enjoys nature, the arts, music, animals. 295494



SWEET KIND WOMAN SF, 32, 5’5”, brown hair, blue eyes, N/S, N/ kids, likes to go out and see movies, read books, watch tv. Seeking a nice gentleman, 37-40, to share fun times, romance and maybe more. 305444



OVERLY LOVING Kind, fun-loving SWF, 46, 5’4’’, buxom blonde/brown, N/S, enjoys horseback riding, dancing. Looking for SM, 21-67, who has a career, is romantic, believes in chivalry. 309347



SEEKING THAT COWBOY Attractive, young-at-heart, sensitive, openminded, adventurous, honest SWF, 43, N/S, enjoys shopping, the outdoors, world travel, fine dining, red wine. Seeking great guy, 40-55, to share life together. 271910 @ padminiji



CALL ME Native American SF, 36, brown/brown, looking for a SM, 30-50, for friendship, companionship and possibly more. 257440



WELL-EDUCATED WF, 40s, hard-working, would like to find someone who enjoys camping, swimming, walks, movies, watching some sports, flea markets and more. Must have a great sense of humor. 258823

NEW TO THE AREA SWF, 22, very easygoing, likes traveling, music, the outdoors and more. Seeking a nice guy, 21-28, for possible LTR. 294161 @ NDgirl86



ARE YOU THE ONE? SWF, 32, mother of three, passionate, honest, sincere, believes the key to any good time is good company and conversation. Seeking similar SWM, 37-45. 301196



LOVES HORSES SF, 29, 5’8”, 130lbs, never married, no children, seeks athletic, animal-loving, outdoorsy, witty, comical, handsome prince to sweep this princess off her feet. Is that too much to ask? 261002



ARE YOU THE ONE FOR ME? Very open, honest and easygoing SWCF, 32, strawberry blonde/hazel, 5’7”. Looking for a SM, 31-38, fir friendship and possibly more. 275764 @ denbdon



LOOKING FOR YOU? SWF, 46, enjoys golf, skiing, travel, movies and a good micro-brew. Looking for nice, fun-loving man, 37-53, who’ll share his interests, humor, thoughts and then... who knows? 277047



I’M SHY AT FIRST... but I warm up quickly. Honest, caring, affectionate, hard-working gal, 34, N/S, kids at home, enjoys outdoors, Nascar, animals, movies, camping, pool, darts. Seeking honest, employed SM, 34-46. No games. 279293 @ MickyB



WIDOW NEEDS COMPANIONSHIP SF, 62, independent, enjoys computers, television, camping, traveling, friends and family. Seeking SM, 55-72, with similar interests, for possible LTR. 287419 @ PatsyMontana



HAPPY BUT LONELY DWF, 49, business-owner w/2 children and 2 dogs. Enjoys the outdoors, barbecues, gardening, cooking. Seeking SM who’s a natural leader in a relationship yet understands his woman’s intellect and capability. 297238 @ delightful1



SEEKING A NICE GUY SWF, 50, seeks friendly, secure man, 64-75, who is ready for a sweet change. Let’s build a friendship and enjoy the simple pleasures in life. 297307



WHERE THE BROTHERS AT? BBW, 36, green-eyed sweetie, seeks faithful, kind, intelligent BM, 35-48, for friendship, possible LTR. Enjoy movies, long walks, dancing and much more! 296424



ACTIVE LIFESTYLE SWF, 52, N/S, enjoys travel, antiques. Seeking SWF, 48-58, N/S, for sincere friendship, possibly more. 305226



GET TO KNOW ME! SWM, 37, 5’9’’, 175lbs, light brown/blue, likes movies, sports, music, beach walks. Seeking SW/HF, 25-40, same interests. 263635



SOMEONE TO TALK TO SWM, 38, 6’, brownish-blond/blue, smoker, likes golf, hiking, rafting, seeks WF, 25-45, to share my life. 263932



ARE YOU READY? SWM, 46, 5’9”, slim build, N/S, likes country and rock-n-roll, fishing, animals, camping, taking walks. Seeking SWF, 35-50, N/S, for friendship, possible romance. 270593



ARE WE A MATCH? SWM, 43, 5’5’’, 187lbs, brown/green, enjoys music, walks, camping, fishing. Seeking similar SW/BF, 20-40. 274411



COOL GUY WM, 5’11”, 185lbs, medium build, likes working out, playing sports, having fun, more. Looking for WF, 18-35, who enjoys the same. 275442



GIVE ME A CHANCE SM, 39, 6’2’’, 225lbs, light smoker, no children, medium build, likes fly-fishing, hunting, camping. Seeking SF, 18-45. 277072



GOOD-LOOKING FELLA Active SWM, 25, 5’7’’, 190lbs, nice blue eyes, athletic build, seeks compassionate, active SF, 18-34, who enjoys the outdoors, exercise and more. 308460



TIRED OLD DREAMER SWM, 62, 5’8’’, 145lbs, would love to meet the woman of my dreams, 39-60. Call me, let’s connect! 308421

TALK TO ME SF, 36, looking for an open-minded male who like to enjoy life and try new things. 258915



ATTRACTIVE & FIT SWF, 68, enjoys hiking, camping, skiing, snow-shoeing, gardening, travel, dining, quiet evenings at home. Seeking kind, conscious man to share life’s simple pleasures. 263816



ARCHETYPAL WILD WOMAN SWF, 27, seeks fellow mindful outdoor enthusiast to get out of town with and explore springtime wilderness! Hike, bike, boat, climb, hand glide, etc. 285159 @ montuckywoman



Answer an ad: 1. Note the ad

☎ number listed in the

2. Call 1-900-226-1232 It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,

or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a major credit or debit card 3. Follow the instructions to listen to the advertiser’s voicemail greeting 4. Leave a personal message for the advertiser

Place your own ad: 1. Call 1-800-710-8737 2. Answer some simple questions to create your ad 3. Record a voicemail greeting 4. Learn how to pick up your messages – we’ll let you know when new ones have arrived!

MEN SEEKING



FARM WOMAN SWF, 53, love the rural life, honest, kind personality, seeks SM, 52-66, to share activities, skiing, outdoor activities, traveling, cooking and more. 273964 @ winterphylli

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:





SEEKING NICE PERSON SWM, 20, 6’3”, 200lbs, blond/green, in shape, looking for a WF, 18-30, to hang out and have fun with, maybe leading to more. 288398



MUSICIAN WM, one daughter, plays the fiddle, has a dog, enjoys watching movies, art, outdoors, coffee shops, more. Seeking SF, 18-40, who shares these and other interests. 260375



LET’S HOOK UP! Male, 22, 5’5’’, 138lbs, smoker, seeks woman, 18-30, who enjoys bowling, snowboarding, video games, tv and movies. 263228



Get more: ❖ Check out www.missoulapersonals. com to find more great new people ❖ See the @ symbol in an ad? That means the advertiser has a profile (and maybe even a picture!) at www.missoulapersonals.com ❖ Meet more new people using text messaging on your cell phone. Text “mistxt” to 23578 to learn more. ❖ Need help? Some tips? Call 1-800-252-0920 Free Ads: Free ads placed in this section are not guaranteed- to run every week. Be sure to renew your ad frequently to keep it fresh. Guidelines: Personals are for adults 18 or over seeking monogamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carefully screen all responses and have first meetings occur in a public place. This publication reserves the right to edit, revise, or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content of or replies to any ad. Not all ads have corresponding voice messages. To review our complete guidelines, call (617) 425-2636

0317

MISSOULA AREA?


Scope Nose Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

PERSONALS

Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY

Ready to meet great new people?

IMPORTANT NUMBERS: Call 1-900-226-1232

SHOW ME THE ROPES Clean, discreet, fun-loving, laid-back curious male, 30, 5’8’’, enjoys dining, relaxing at home, partying. Seeking openminded, fun Bi/GM to show me the ropes! 310170

or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a majorcredit or debit card



LET’S GET TOGETHER SM, very oral and loves to receive, would love to meet singles and couples, males and females. ALso into toys and whatever else you would like. 307658

Place your own ad:



Call 1-800-710-8737 Answer some simple questions to create your ad



LET’S HAVE SOME FUN Fit SWM, early 40s, looking for discreet encounters with ladies, 40-55. Please be slim. Married ladies are welcome. Will answer all replies. 291122



SENSE OF HUMOR SWM, 44, 6’2’’, looking for outgoing SWF, 30-50, light drinker ok, who enjoys sports, outdoors, animals, kids, camping, fishing. 291953

WAITING FOR YOUR CALL GWM, 25, 6’1’’, 235lbs, seeks outgoing, gregarious, stable GWM for dating and romance. I enjoy movies, dining, bowling. 305105





DO YOU CANOE? SWM, 50, athletic, N/S, N/D, seeks SWF, 3050, for canoeing, fly-fishing, camping. Let’s meet! 292008



LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, 47, 5’9’’, 175lbs, hard-working, nonsmoker, non-drinker, loves the outdoors. Looking for SF, 35-50, for friendship, dating and more. 294605



CATCH ME IF YOU CAN! SWM, 65, 6’, 215lbs, N/S, social drinker, active, semi-retired businessman, likes outdoors, country music, dancing, hunting, traveling. Seeking SW/HF, 45-70, who’s kind, caring, in shape, for dating, possible LTR. 295947



DON’T WANT TO BE ALONE... for the holidays. WM, 41, 5’11”, 220lbs, blond/blue, business owner, wants to meet WF, 30-45, who likes to have a good time. 300473



LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, new to the area, 31, 170lbs, brown/ green, nice build. Looking to meet a nice girl to spend some of my time with. Let’s enjoy the simple things in life. 297422

ADULT SWEET & DISCRETE

READY FOR YOU WM, 5’11”, 180lbs, dark/blue, likes partying and having a lot of sex. Give me a call if interested. 273361

Escort Referral Service

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WANT TO TRY WM, 6’1”, 145lbs, brown/brown, wants to get together with a smooth man for some no-strings fun. A plus if you go both ways. 283737

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LOOKING FOR LOVE SWM, 18, 6’, short black hair, wears glasses, looking for SM, 18-21, to hang out with and get to know. 294712

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SEEKING FRIENDS Female, 44, looking for friends, age open, who enjoys the outdoors, wildlife, the country scenery, hiking, fishing, camping. Friendship, companionship, and getting to know each other! 307262



LET’S TALK WM, 5’6”, 125lbs, reddish-brown/blue, nice tattoos, enjoys hiking, walks, bike rides, theater, dining out, time with friends and family, more. Seeking someone for friendship. 299138



JOIN US Bi couple, middle-aged, into pretty much anything, looking for the same, or select singles, who would like to share life’s pleasures with us. 291876



HI LADIES! Attractive male in search of no-strings, discreet afternoon fun. Are you up for it? 281777



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “One of the healthiest ways to gamble is with a spade and a package of garden seeds,” says comedian Dan Bennett. Your assignment, Leo, is to come up with three other smart risks you could profit from taking. You’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when you’ll be rewarded by leaving your comfort zone and heading toward the frontier—but only if you’re fully armed with crafty discernment and a realistic (not cynical) understanding of how the world really works. Please stay away from rash dares, unresearched shots in the dark, and crazy plunges rooted in blind faith.

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LOOKING FOR ROMANCE SWM, 33, 5’11”, slim and fit Christian, seeks mature, sincere SWF, ages 20-45, for dating and possible LTR. I love movies, cats, reading, staying up late, playing board games, doing dinner and a show, romance, and more. 306560

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Though the seas threaten, they are merciful,” says Ferdinand, a character in Shakespeare’s play The Tempest. “I have cursed them without cause.” Please consider the possibility that you could honestly make a similar declaration about some influence in your world. What’s wild but mostly beneficent? What’s primal in a way that draws you back to your deepest sources and reminds you what’s really important?



LET’S GIVE IT A SHOT SWM, 52, 5’8’’, N/S, athletic build, loves spicy food, boating, waterskiing, hunting, fishing, camping. Seeking SWF, 35-52, for friendship or more. 281682



*charges may apply



HARDWORKING Native American male, 48, 5’9”, 160lbs, brown/brown, medium build, works out, likes the park, biking, fishing, horseback riding, more. Seeking female, 25-48, for dating. 282438



CONSTRUCTION WORKER SWM, 44, 5’10’’, 200lbs, seeks fun-loving woman who enjoys interesting conversation, needs a little excitement in her life! 282735



NEWS FLASH! Attractive, single Native American guy, early 40s, seeks adventurous Native American beauty, 25-40, for love, harmony, honesty, balance and much more, if fate leads us that way. 282900



OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST SWM, 42, 5’10’’, 165lbs, fit, active professional, N/S, N/D, seeking SWF, 25-39, who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking, fly fishing and traveling, for friendship or more. 285175







AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): No one really knows when the Piscean Age ends and the Aquarian Age begins. Astrologers have been arguing about the issue for years. But here’s what to watch for: When the transition gets underway, fewer and fewer people will be invested in belief systems, and an ever-growing contingent will thrive on asking questions and keeping an open mind. For those of us in the latter category—the Aquarian Agers—we will prize the virtues of curiosity. We will avoid being addicted to dogmatic theories and rigid certainties, knowing that they tend to shut down our fluid intelligence. We will get a kick out of shedding our own emotional biases so that we can strive to be more objective in our understanding of the ever-evolving truth. I mention this, Aquarius, because it is an excellent time for you to charge headlong toward the Aquarian Age.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some of the best-selling Japanese novels in recent years have been composed by young authors entirely on their cell phones. The small screens encourage narratives that are animated by terse rhythms. Flowery descriptions are rare and character development happens fast. I believe that in the coming weeks you will have a capacity akin to the cell-phone storytellers, Pisces. You’ll be able to compress complex material into simpler forms; you’ll have a knack for being very creative as you cut away frills and strip things down to their basics.



LET’S TALK SWM, 48, 6’, clean-shaven, independent contractor, seeks SM, 25-60, to spend some time together. Let’s talk! 292718

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Study the following terms: refuge, sanctuary, bunker, asylum, fortress, haven, shelter, safety zone, storm cellar, hideaway, retreat, halfway house, cloister, cell, ashram, clubhouse, lair, foxhole, nest, pit, inner sanctum. Now use some of those words to formulate descriptions of actions you’ll take to enhance both your freedom and security. Example: “When I’m longing for privacy and renewal, I’ll retreat to a haven, not a bunker.” Another example: “If I need to seek refuge from the unnameable insanity around me, I’ll make a pilgrimage to a sanctuary, not to a foxhole.”



SEEKING DIVERSITY SWM, 43, intelligent, attractive, well-traveled, fit, clean-cut, blond/blue, successful, seeking slender, attractive A/B/BF, 30-45, for dining, travel, cooking, intelligent conversation. 281407





LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you find yourself driving on a major highway anytime soon, there’s a better-than-usual chance that you’ll come upon a place where a truck has accidentally spilled a few tons of french fries or thousands of bottles of beer or a huge load of sex toys. Why do I say this? Because according to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be exposed to an abundance of some resource that is too much to use all at once or is not really yours to take or is not exactly what you need. A highway spill is just one form this could take. What should you? Don’t get distracted by frustration or confusion. Instead, use it as a provocative motivation to go get the precise stuff you need in the right amount.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): After extensive analysis, I’ve concluded that you won’t serve any time in hell for the shock therapy you’ll unleash this week—with one caveat: The shock therapy must be motivated primarily by love, not a lust for power. My research also suggests that in dropping your bombshells you may even rack up some karmic credit, not karmic debt— if the things you destroy are truly beyond repair and certain to keep causing pain, and if you institute a plan for building a shiny new creation to replace what’s lost.

TALK SOMETIME? SWM, sub-contractor, 6’, 175lbs, brown/ green, likes flying, skiing, sailing and surfing, keeping active. Seeking fit, fun-loving SF, 50-55, to share friendship and new adventures. 229043

LET’S TALK American-Indian SM, 45, 5’3’’, 190lbs, likes long walks, wishing on stars. Looking for SF, 35-40, for friendship or more. 289174

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Years ago a Polish scientist toiling in Antarctica was consumed with longing for a woman he’d left behind in his home country. Spilling over with the desire to express his adoration, he gathered a mass of penguin dung and used it to spell out a large “M” on the frigid ground. It was the first letter of his girlfriend’s name, Magda. To this day, two species of flowering plants have thrived in that M-shaped area, fed by the fertilizing power of the dung. Your assignment in the coming week, Virgo, is to create something equally enduring and unique for someone you care for deeply.





LET’S TALK WM, N/S, N/D, looking for female, 35-42, for companionship that may possibly lead to a relationship. Someone who likes bowling, playing pool and more. 284641

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Entomologist Justin O. Schmidt drew up an index to categorize the discomfort caused by stinging insects. The attack of the bald-faced hornet is “rich, hearty, slightly crunchy. Similar to getting your hand mashed in a revolving door.” A paper wasp delivers pain that’s “caustic and burning,” with a “distinctly bitter aftertaste. Like spilling a beaker of hydrochloric acid on a paper cut.” The sweat bee, on the other hand, can hurt you in a way that’s “light, ephemeral, almost fruity. A tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.” In bringing this to your attention, Gemini, I hope to inspire the rebel in you. Your homework is to create an equally nuanced and precise index of experiences that feel good. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will be able to call on tremendous reserves of intelligence as you identify the numerous modes of pleasure that are available to you, and define them in exquisite detail. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A famous YouTube video shows a small crab perched on top of a giant jellyfish that’s swimming in the ocean. (It’s here: tinyurl.com/6ulpoe.) Apparently this is a common phenomenon. The species known as the graceful rock crab not only grabs free rides on jellyfish, but also steals food from them as it does. This creature is your role model, Cancerian. See if you can develop a safe and symbiotic relationship (perhaps temporarily) with a big stinging blob. At the very least, wangle some benefit out of a clueless behemoth.

DVD's from

OTHER

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Among medieval alchemists, there were some who tried to make a fortune by literally converting lead into gold. But the authentic practitioners of the art were interested in a subtler kind of experimentation: ripening and beautifying the shadowy aspects of their own psyches. That explains their motto: “For a tree’s branches to reach to heaven, its roots must reach to hell.” Among other things, that means you have to dig deep and work hard on redeeming your less flattering qualities in order to earn the right to exalted states of consciousness and spiritual powers. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to carry out this alchemy.



FRIENDS



LET’S GIVE IT A TRY! SM, 62, N/S, slim build, likes fishing, lounging around at home. Looking for SM, age open. 292992





It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,

WANTS COMPANIONSHIP Retired widower, 72, financially secure, enjoys golf, fishing, family, cruises, camping, gardening, my two poodles. Seeking relationship with similar lady, 50-67. 290376

WANT SOMETHING NEW WM want to try anything new and is game for something different. If interested, give me a call. 282388 OPEN-MINDED FUN SWM, 52, 5’9’’, 190lbs, brown/blue, cleancut, fit, D/D-free, easygoing, laid-back, not into games, seeks SM, 18-55, for adult fun. 296853

Answer an ad:

MEN SEEKING

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The 1906 earthquake that hit San Francisco also demolished downtown Santa Rosa, about 50 miles to the north. During the rebuilding process, Frank Doyle, a local businessman who referred to himself as a “champion of the future,” pushed a radical agenda. “When we construct our new downtown thoroughfare,” he said, “let’s make it wider than it has been in the past. That way it will accommodate the promising technological innovation called the automobile.” Draw inspiration from Doyle’s prescience, Aries. As you regenerate and rejuvenate your world, do the equivalent of creating wider roads. Be a champion of the future. [Thanks to Daniel Osmer’s piece in the Fall 2008 issue of Lilipoh magazine for the info.]

866.399.5979

18+

0317

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Page 35 March 19–March 26, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law • Accidents & Personal Injury • Worker's Compensation • Social Security Disability

Over 17 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

Looking for A TEAM of 10

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS in 111 alternative newspapers like this one. Over 6 million circulation every week for $1200. No adult ads. Call Stephanie at 202-2898484. FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-475-0876

Be a "Paycation" Specialist

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-5832 1 0 1 . w w w. c o n t i n e n t a l academy.com

Recession Proof Your Income RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW!

JOANNE @ 239-6245 LINDY @ 239-1410 A PROFESSIONAL, WINNING RESUME WILL BE YOURS...When Rainmaker Resumes writes it! Our powerful resumes will get you a job interview...guaranteed! Call today for a free consultation, 546.8244

LOMA FLEA MARKET, Saturday, March 28, 2009, 9am to 4pm. Antiques - Collectibles, Arts Crafts, Tools, Toys, Homemade: Doughnuts, Indian Tacos, Hot Roast Beef. 739-4305, 739-4231. Spaces available. Loma Memorial Hall MAKE MONEY NOW! LEARN TO BARTEND TODAY. Montana Bartending Academy Get the Job You want in the Service Industry Learn how to: Increase your tips, Attract more customers, Manage alcohol responsibly within the law, Effectively write a resume, Communicate successfully in a job interview, Be a faster & more effi-

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway

Learning by Giving Grant Opportunity

corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Easier than sorting your socks

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

Pet of the Week

Bulletin Board

The UM L eadership and Motivation Class announces a request for proposals for Missoula county nonprofit organizations! The RFP is at: http://www.dhc.umt.edu/oce/LearningbyGiving.htm Grants will be made for program services in Youth, Education , or Health Grants range from $500 to $2,500 Deadline is Wednesday, April 1!!! Contact us at: 406-243-5139

Anna ‘No fuss, no muss,’ that’s the kind of dog Anna promises to be, if you can actually call her a dog. Not only does she act more like a cat, but her breeds are a complete mystery to us! All we know is she’s little, cute, quiet and easy to please. She needs is a cozy home with someone willing to help her continue her weight loss plan. Her foster dad has gotten three pounds off of her, and her outlook and energy has taken a positive turn. Come to the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. or call us @ 549-HSWM for more information about Anna

cient mixologist BECOME AN EXCEPTIONAL BARTENDER!!! Guaranteed Job Placement Assistance upon Completion CLASSES FILLING FAST. CALL 880-1206 or E-MAIL mba@bresnan.net TODAY FOR SCHEDULING & DETAILS

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Help make our community a safer place. Mark Elkshoulder

Phillip Neese

Sponsored By:

THE BONDSMAN

OFFENSE: Contempt of Court for not following requirements after a conviction for Felony Theft.

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

24 Hours A Day • 7 Days A Week ALL COURTS • ALL AMOUNTS

728-0844 • 1-800-335-0844 When you find yourself in a tight spot, call us for help.

AGE: 23 HEIGHT: 5 FT 10” HAIR COLOR: Brown EYE COLOR: Brown

OFFENSE: t

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If a suspect is sighted, do not approach or attempt to apprehend them. If you have information regarding either of these two suspects, contact the United States Marshals Service at (406) 247-7030 or Local Law Enforcement.

Volunteers

Employment

AniMeals is looking for volunteers! AniMeals is a nonprofit animal food bank and no-kill adoption center. We are looking for volunteers to help with anything from socializing with the animals, office help, special events and delivery. If you are interested in helping AniMeals please call (406) 7214710 and ask for Kelli or email us with any questions at info@animeals.net You can always check us out on the web at www.animeals.com. Our hours are Monday-Wednesday from 8:00am-5:00pm, Thursday-Friday from 8:00am-7:00pm and Saturday from 11:00am-5:00pm. Help AniMeals feed hungry animals, make a difference in an animals life.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE, PT, Msla. Local employer needs a CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE! Wage will be $9$10/per hour, with a potential for bonuses. #2975117 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 17-34. Financial security, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vacation/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri (877)4756289

DATA ENTRY CLERK, FT, Lolo. Employer is looking for a reliable energetic, customer service oriented person to do data entry work. Work site is in LOLO. #2975112 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $$ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289

ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR, PT, Msla. Small skilled nursing and assisted living center is seeking an experienced ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR to work 25 to 32 hours per week. Pay is $12.50. Business is on bus line. #2975118 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

GREENHOUSE NURSERY LABORERS, FT/PT, Msla. Knowledgeable plant lover needed for this GENERAL LABORER/SALES position at local nursery/greenhouse in Missoula. Full and part-time positions, various shifts available, including weekends. Must have valid driver’s license for deliveries. Will be working in all types of weather conditions. #2975111 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

ARE YOU 55 OR OLDER with limited income, unemployed and need to get back into the workforce? Experience works can help. 1-800450-5627. EEO/AA. www.experienceworks.org

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 150 www.easyworkgreatpay.com

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278

LAWN MAINTENANCE/LANDSCAPER, FT/PT, Lolo. Employer is seeking full & part-time LAWN MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPERS. Duties will include all aspects of landscaping including mowing, trimming, some irrigation work. Must have drivers license. Looking for someone that interacts well with customers, self starter, punctual, well groomed. Work week varies. Starting wage is $7.50/hr. #2975116 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Employment

CASHIER, FT/PT, Msla. Employer is seeking full or part-time CASHIERS for on campus restaurant. Primary duty is collecting from customers for meals. Will be required to know the prices of all foods offered. Restaurant is open 7 days a week, so work days and hours can vary. Rate of pay is $7/hr to start. Looking for someone with 6 months or more previous cashiering experience. #2975114 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COOK - CHINESE FOOD, FT/PT, Msla. Employer is seeking full or part-time COOKS for on campus restaurant. Primary duty is cooking a variety of Chinese Foods. Looking for someone with 12 months or more previous cooking experience. #2975115 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COUNTER-CUSTOMER SERVICE, PT, Msla. Local cleaners seeking a part-time FRONT COUNTER/CUSTOMER SERVICE worker. Pay will start at $7.50 per hour, depending on experience with a strong potential for increase with demonstrated dependability, knowledge, and performance. #2975120 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 NIGHT STOCKER, PT, Msla. Missoula grocery store is seeking Night Stockers. Will work varying nights, 11pm to 8 am for 25-30 hours per week. Pay starts at $7.16/hour or more. #2975113 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 ORDER BUILDER (LOADER), FT, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time individuals to pull various beverage products from the warehouse to build specific orders onto pallets. Prior warehouse experience is a plus. Open until filled. #2975119 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

Place your classified ad. Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Missoula Independent Page 36 March 19–March 26, 2009



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Employment

Employment

OVERNIGHT THERAPEUTIC YOUTH WORKER, FT, Msla. Missoula youth program is seeking a full-time OVERNIGHT THERAPEUTIC YOUTH WORKER. #2975123 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

WORK FROM HOME! Make money representing large “Go Green” company. Call for details: 406-369-2245

CHEF APPRENTICE Get paid to learn. Medical/dental, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044

$600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling.

CONSTRUCTION CAREERS U.S. NAVY. Paid training, financial security, medical/dental, vacation, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952

Instruction

SECRETARY, FT, Msla. Missoula employer is seeking a full-time SECRETARY with 12 months of office experience. Must be familiar with Microsoft Office including Word & Excel. Duties include answering phones, greeting walk-in customers, typing, filing, some light bookkeeping and other duties as necessary. Must be neatly groomed as will be greeting public on behalf of employer. Work week is Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:00pm & will include some Saturdays. Pay is $8.00/hr depending on experience. Open until filled. #2975121 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060. Parks and Recreation Seasonal Staff: Aquatics, Recreation. www.missoulaparks.org 721-PARK STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at:

PROFESSIONAL PATROL OFFICER OPENINGS City of Lemmon is accepting applications for a Chief of Police and a Patrol Officer; must be certified. Salary: DOE. Excellent benefits. Open until filled. Send standard LET application & resume to: City of Lemmon, 303 First Avenue West, Lemmon, SD 57638 or call 605374-5681. The City of Lemmon is an EOE SOUTHEASTERN MONTANA DAILY seeks full-time general assignment reporter. Send resume, clips to: Marla Prell, Miles City Star, P.O. Box 1216, Miles City, MT 59301; mceditor@midrivers.com

SKILLED LABOR PICKUP TRUCK & COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RV trailers and commercial trucks and buses to all 48 states and Canada. Log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com

Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

Product launch makes history • The perfect opportunity • No overhead

• Become an affiliate or customer

406-218-9071 mygenewize.com/jfowler

728-0918

Piano Lessons All ages and levels. 721-8947

missoulataichi.com

EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.MediaMakeupArtists .com 310-364-0665

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Missoula Community School Inspiring children to explore, create & care

542-2833

OPPORTUNTIES 100% RECESSION PROOF! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068

LEARN TO TEACH AND TURN 10-15 hours/week to

$1000+ /month

working from home.

Flexible Hours.

T'ai Chi

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

• Customized supplement based on personal DNA • Unbelivable income potential

Instruction

Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 Carla Green Massage, NCTMB 13 years, 211 N.Higgins #403, 4 0 6 - 3 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com Healthy Hummingbird Massage & ARTS CENTER! Warehouse: 725 W. Alder, Suite 27. Rates: $55/hr, $75/1.5hr,

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

A Must Feel! CMT for 20 years $25/hour

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

Jill Morris

543-2542

A.M. Yoga for Stress T-Th 7:45-8:45 a.m. $10 per class

Body/Mind/ Spirit Students: $35/hr, $55/1.5hr. Call Erica: 396-6868, Mary: 596-5842, Souta: 207-6269. Stop in between 10am-6pm daily for walk-in massage, or to see our Art Gallery and Local Store! LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 Nia Classes Nia every Tuesday at Teranga Arts School, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, 2926 S 3rd W, across from Hawthorne Elementary School. Come experience the fun and joy of movement. First class free, $6/class thereafter. Nia every Saturday morning at the Downtown Dance Collective, 9 – 10 am, 121 W. Main St. Enjoy playful and fantastic cardiovascular exercise. $10/class. Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Swedish and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. Rosie Smith/Moondance Massage 240-9103

$15

HAIRCUT

SPECIAL

KRISTA • 542-2978 at Cutting Crew 220 Ryman St.

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

BUSH WAX IT! B o d y C a re By Michelle Waxing • Facials

Massage $35/hr Professional Services Only A F u l l B o d y A ff a i r

Lolo 406-270-3230

Congregations

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

The Goods Garden SEED in a Box Great Gift Idea! Not only be prepared for any emergency, have seed on the shelf for the spring planting! Give that gardener in your life an Unique gift. KIDS pack with MAGIC BEANS, watch in amazement when the leaves of the beans rea; ld “I LOVE YOU”. A wonderful gift, that helps feed a large family for months during the spring and summer! www.abceeds.com

Glassware New & Vintage The Multi Item Store • 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

A Touch of Class NEW TO YOU Antiques & Treasures 11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

The Goods

Free online training.

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Adoption PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Antiques

yourfreedomoffice.com TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

DATA ENTRY PROCESSORS Needed! Earn $3,500-$5,000 Weekly Working from Home! Guaranteed Paychecks! No Experience Necessary! Positions Available Today! Register Online Now! www.DataPositions.com

113 W. Main 728-4395

Local Artist's Paintings on Display

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing.

The Multi Item Store LLC

Reiki Integrative Medicine, LLC 2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

Learn Reiki Yourself! Reiki II Class April 4th 9am-6pm Cost: $170

1358 1/2 W. Broadway

I spy... Missoula! Where am I?

Auctions EAGLE SELF STORAGE

CALL FOR MORE INFO • 360-9153

Body/Mind/ Body/Mind/ Spirit Spirit

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine IV Micronutrient Therapy

Dr. Christine White, ND

542-2147 www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT

(corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN 1 FREE class for: Supporting A Healthy Pregnancy

736 S. 1st St. W. #A (406) 493-0819 Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 83, 406, 114, 163, 190, 247, 336, 370, 377, 464, 568 and 633. Units contain furniture, clothes, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday March 23, 2009, by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday March 26, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyer’s bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Missoula Independent Page 37 March 19–March 26, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Sporting Goods Little Canyon Shooting spring hunting specials - 10 hens $100, 10 roosters $150. Pheasant eggs, chicks and incubators for sale. Peck Idaho 208-486-6235

Clothing Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins on Brooks)

Custom

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

Fly Rods

Thrift Stores

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com

The Sports Exchange

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

Gear up for Spring Break! Buy/Sell/Trade

Music

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

Electronics DIRECTV Satellite TV Special Offer: Save $21/month for one year, Free HD-DVR, Plus 3 Free months of HBO/Starz/Showtime! Call Expert Satellite. 1-888-246-2215 (credit card required) DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 728-5014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com DIRECTOR - Men’s A cappella Chorus - Barber Shop Harmony Society. Tuesdays 7:30 - 9:30. 5312142

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Automotive

DOMESTICS 08 Chevy Aveo 4 door Now Only $8,495 Tina Baltz 406261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM 03 Ford Focus ZX3 Now Only $7,995 Toby Kundig 406-8711830 RONANDODGE.COM ‘08 Ford Focus 8K Miles #8550LA Was $15,995 Now $13,987 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

09 Hyundai Sonata Sedan Fuel Efficient Now Only $14,995 Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM 08 Hyundai Accent Sedan Now Only $8,485 Tina Baltz 406261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM ‘03 Pontiac Grand Prix SE #85136B Was $9,995 Now $7,978 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

‘05 PT Cruiser Convertible #8624 LA Was $14,995 Now $12,495 www.flanagan motors.com 406721-1381

Largest Selection of Guitars in Western Montana

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

Computers

1995 Chrysler Concorde- 3.5 V-6, 1 owner, clean $3590 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 549-5178 missoulanissan.com 2004 Ford Ranger 4x4- Super cab, XLT pkg, 4.0 V-6 $10,790 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 5495178 missoulanissan.com

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

Furniture

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for a 30 cal. M1 carbine 821-3038 or 370-8794 CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

Pets & Animals A non-shedding hypoallergenic puppy! TAMI 626-4677 www.giantschnoodlesandminiatureschnauzers.com

LDR Kennel

Used Furniture Sale

All Offers Considered (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Place a line ad in the classifieds

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your service needs and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

Construction Discounted Steel Buildings Big & Small Standard or Custom Design. Get the Deal of Deals! Mfg to site. www.scg-grp.com Source#12F Phone: 406-5454580 Vermiculite ores from some sources have been found to contain asbestos minerals. Abatement Contractors of Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

Missoula Independent Page 38 March 19–March 26, 2009

for only $5.95 a week.


CLASSIFIEDS Automotive

Automotive

Automotive

Automotive

Automotive

IMPORTS

‘05 Subaru Outback 3.0 LL Bean AWD #8332B Was $18,995 Now $17,992 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

04 Ford F150 XCab V8 4x4 Now Only $15,995 Toby Kundig 406871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM

‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD #8270zc Was $16,995 Now $14,777 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘04 Liberty Sport #8610LA Was $12,995 Now $12,444 www. flanaganmotors.com 406-7211381

2007 Honda Civic Hybrid- Local Trade, Clean 40-45 MPG $17,990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 549-5178 missoulanissan.com ‘07 Hyundai Elantra 7K Miles #8554LA Was $13,995 Now $12,898 www.flanaganmotors .com 406-721-1381

2006 Subaru Legacy SE-Clean, moonroof, low miles $15,990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 5495178 missoulanissan.com ‘97 Toyota Camry #8451B Was $6,995 Now $5,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

2008 Hyundai Santa Fe GLSAWD Like new #P2052 $16,990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai - 5495178 missoulanissan.com 2007 Hyundai Accent-Auto, A/C, low miles, clean $9990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 549-5178 missoulanissan.com

‘06 Toyota Corolla #8114B Was $13,999 Now $11,997 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

2005 Hyundai Accent 3doorlocal trade, #P2058A $4990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 5495178 missoulanissan.com

06 Volkswagon Jetta Now Only $11,995 Tina Baltz 406-2613660 RONANDODGE.COM

‘05 Mazda 6i #8479B Was $13,995 Now $12,999 www. flanaganmotors.com 406-7211381

2006 VW Beetle- TDI , leather ,1 owner $14,990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 549-5178 missoulanissan.com

‘08 Mazda 3 #8543LA Was $15,995 Now $14,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘06 Nissan Sentra #8611B Was $12,995 Now $10,779 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

2005 Nissan Altima 2.5- auto, local trade #P1900 $7990 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 5495178 missoulanissan.com 2007 Pontiac G6- low miles, sporty $9993 Missoula Nissan Hyundai 549-5178 missoulanissan.com

GoPed Standup Scooter G230RC. 30+ MPH. Paid $800 new. Asking $300/OBO. 381-3561

PICKUP TRUCKS 98 Chevrolet XCab Diesel 4x4 NICE Truck $6,895 Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM 08 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 Now Only $18,995 Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM

03 Ford F150 Lariat 4x4 Now Only $12,995 Tina Baltz 406261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM 07 Ford Ranger XCab 4x4 Now Only $14,695 Toby Kundig 406871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM 1997 Ford F150 Extended cab, topper, CD, great condition. 95,000 miles $5,995. FIRM 2418188 or 826-5715

4X4 06 Dodge Durango SLT 4X4 Now Only $12,995 Tina Baltz 406261-3660

06 Toyota Tacoma Quad Cab 4x4 Now Only $22,995 Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM

SPORT UTILITY 05 Chrysler Pacifica AWD Now Only $9,995 Toby Kundig 406871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM ‘04 Honda Pilot EX-L #8650LA Was $17,995 Now $15,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

08 Jeep Liberty Sport 4x4 Now Only $15,495 Tina Baltz 406261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM ‘07 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x4 #9035LA Was $17,995 Now $16,444 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

Automotive

VANS 98 Chevrolet Venture Van Priced Right Only $2,495 Toby Kundig 406-871-1830 RONANDODGE.COM 08 Chrysler Town & Country Now Only $14,995 Tina Baltz 406261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM 07 Dodge Caravan Now Only $10,995 Tina Baltz 406-2613660 RONANDODGE.COM 05 Sedona LX Van Now Only $8,495 Toby Kundig 406-8711830 RONANDODGE.COM

Women: Free Car Care Clinic PROTECT YOURSELF FROM AUTO REPAIR RIP-OFF ARTISTS

March 28th •9am to Noon At Transolution 4500 Transolution Lane M-F 8-5:30 • 406-721-6109 tranpro1@qwestoffice.net

Attendees receive an automotive repair guide & coupons for automotive related services. Refreshments provided.

Space is limited - early contact is recommended.

'03 Pontiac Grand Prix SE '06 Nissan Sentra

Was $12,995

Now $10,779

#8611B

'06 Scion XB

Was 12,995

Now $11,988

#9021LB

'06 Toyota Corolla

Was $13,999

Now $11,997

#8114B

'04 Liberty Sport

Was $12,995

Now $12,444

#8610LA

'05 PT Cruiser Convertible #8624LA

'07 Hyundai Elantra 7K Miles

PRE PURCHASE USED VEHICLE INSPECTIONS

'05 Mazda 6i

$4 9 Down Delive r s ! *10% cash or trade equity, 72 months, $4 9 down, OAC

$28 9.00/mo. Starting at $16,9 95*

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Only

$69

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On Brooks near Southgate Mall www.missoulanissan.com 549-5178

Was $13,995

Now $12,898 Was $13,995

'08 Ford Focus 8K Miles #8550LA

'04 VW Beetle GL TDI '08 Mazda 3

Was $15,995

Now $13,987 Was $14,999

Now $13,999 Was $15,995

Now $14,444

#8543LA

'06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD #8270zc

Was $16,995

Now $14,777

'05 Subaru Outback 3.0 LL Bean AWD

Was $18,995

Now $17,992

#8332B

'07 Honda Accord LX 18K Miles #8173B

'09 Mazda Tribute AWD 2K Miles #8445B

Missoula Nissan Hyundai

Was $14,995

Now $12,495

Now $12,999

#8479B

#9082LA

200 8 Nissan Maxima S E S u n roof, CD, Low Miles,

Was $9,995

Now $7,978

#85136B

#8554LA

Car of the Week!

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

327-0300

02 Jeep Wrangler 4X4 Hard Top Now Only $11,995 Tina Baltz 406-261-3660 RONANDODGE.COM

RONANDODGE.COM 2008 GMC Sierra Denali AWD Fully loaded, black with heated black leather seats, dvd/navigation system, 20,000 miles, MUST SELL $33,000 (406) 531-2354, leave message

‘06 Scion XB #9021LB Was 12,995 Now $11,988 w w w. f l a n a g a n m o t o r s . c o m 406721-1381

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

05 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Now Only $9,495 Toby Kundig 406-8711830 RONANDODGE.COM

Automotive

'07 Honda Civic SI 13K Miles #8396B

'05 Toyota Avalon 44K Miles #9056LB

'05 Mini Cooper 15K Miles #9072LA

Was $19,995

Now $17,993 Was $22,595

Now $19,993 Was $20,995

Now $19,994 Was $23,995

Now $21,993 Was $24,995

Now $23,995

Sale Price includes 2 year/ 100,000 mile drive-train warranty ($1,395 value)

Flanagan’s J e e p • M a z d a • L i n c o l n • M e rc u r y

Family owned & operated since 1974 4/30/09

www.flanaganmotors.com

332 S. Orange St. www.midas.com

1700 Stephens Missoula • 406.721.1381

Mon-Fri 7:30-6, Sat. 8-4 90 Days Same as Cash OAC

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 39 March 19–March 26, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT Missoula County, Montana Office of Planning and Grants Fire Review Services Request for Qualifications The County of Missoula, Montana is seeking proposals from professionals with the appropriate qualifications and staff resources to review subdivision projects for compliance with fire safety requirements per the Missoula County Subdivision Regulations and Uniform Fire Code. OPG is seeking statements of qualification from individuals or firms interested in providing this service. Those interested in applying may find the submittal requirements on the OPG website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb/ or by contacting OPG at 406258-4657 or opg@co.missoula.mt.us. The submittal deadline is 5:00 P.M., March 30, 2009.

show cause, if any you may have, why the Father’s parental rights should not be terminated; why the Petition should not be granted or why said Youth should not be otherwise cared for. Pender Block is represented by the Office of State Public Defender, 610 Woody, Missoula, Montana, 59802, (406) 523-5140. Amy Berry is represented by Courtappointed attorney Susan Boyer, 610 Woody, Missoula, Montana, 59802, (406) 523-5140. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the Youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Edward P. McLean, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 5th day of March, 2009. /s/Ed McLean District Court Judge

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVENMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on May 5, 2009 an election will be held at Swan Valley School for the election of two Board Members for the Swan Valley Community Council. The polls will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on election day. DATED this 11th day of March , 2009. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County

drawings are not available for bidding. Make checks payable to “WGM Group, Inc.” SCHEDULE: Each Bid shall be accompanied by the CONTRACTOR’s schedule of construction. The schedule shall include all major work items included in the bid and detail the CONTRACTOR’s activities to complete the Project in accordance with the Contract Documents. BID SECURITY: Each Bid shall be accompanied by Bid Security made payable to OWNER in an amount of ten percent (10%) of the Bidder’s maximum Bid price and in the form of cash, a cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of Montana; or a Bid Bond (on form attached if a form is prescribed) issued by a surety authorized to do business in Montana meeting the requirements of Paragraph 5.01 of the General Conditions. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. The bid bond shall act as a guarantee that the bidder, if his bid is accepted, will promptly execute the Contract, secure pay-ment of worker’s compensation insurance, and furnish a satis-factory faithful performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price and a payment bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price. CONTRACTOR’S REGISTRATION: CONTRACTOR’s and any of the CONTRACTOR’s subcontractors bidding or doing work on this project will be required to be registered with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). No Bid shall be considered that does not carry the bidder’s Montana Contractor’s Registration Number on the Bid Form. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Ave., Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406444-7734. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by Federal Law. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. BUY

AMERICAN: All of the iron, steel and manufactured goods to be incorporated into the Project shall be produced in the United States. BIDS TO REMAIN OPEN: The Bidder shall guarantee the Total Bid Price for a period of 90 calendar days from the date of bid opening. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Wye Area Sanitary Sewer, Phase 2 RSID 8489, opening April 9, 2009,” and marked “Sealed Bid” with the CONTRACTOR’s name, address, Montana Contractors Registration Number, and be addressed to: Missoula County Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. No facsimile bids will be accepted. Any objection to published specifications must be filed in written form with the Office of County Commissioners prior to the scheduled time of bid opening. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the County is exempt therefrom and can furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. WAGE RATES: This project is partially funded with Federal Funds; therefore, the Contractor shall not pay less than the latest Federal Davis Bacon minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rates are attached as part of the specifications in Section 00910. FUNDING AGENCY PROVISIONS: BIDDER’S attention is directed to the Funding Agency Special Provisions for Montana Public Facility Projects of the Contract Documents (section 00900). Successful BIDDER shall be required to comply with all applicable articles therein, including the Additional Special Provisions for SRF, Section 1.05. PRE-BID CONFERENCE: Prospective bidders are encouraged to attend a pre-bid conference, which will be conducted jointly by the OWNER and ENGINEER at the Missoula County Public Works Office, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 at 2:00 p.m. on March 26, 2009. PROJECT ADMINISTRATION: All questions relative to this project prior to the opening of bids shall be directed to the ENGINEER. It shall be understood, however, that no specification interpretation will be made by telephone, nor will any “or equal” products be considered for approval prior

to award of contract. The ENGINEER for this project is: WGM Group, Inc. 3021 Palmer, P.O. Box 16027, Missoula, MT 59808-6027 Attn: Cody Thorson (406) 728-4611. OWNER’S RIGHTS RESERVED: The OWNER reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in a bid, or to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid and bidder, and to make awards in the interest of the OWNER. The low bid shall be deter-mined on the basis of the lowest Basic Bid, or lowest combination of Basic Bid and accepted Alternative Bids if alternatives are included. The OWNER may accept in any order; any, all, or none of the Alternative Bids. AWARD CONTINGENT: Without limiting the foregoing, it is expressly stated that final award of the Contract is contingent upon securing appropriate financing. Owner: Missoula County By: Bill Carey, Chair

Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 39 acres; Southeast Quarter of the Southwest (SE 1/4 SW 1/4), except Southeast corner, an area of one acre, more or less, east of slough which is excluded; Approximately 39 acres; Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW 1/4 SE 1/4) area North of slough, Approximately 24 acres; Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 SE 1/4) South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 39 acres, more or less; Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW 1/4 NE 1/4) South of Grass Valley Canal, Approximately 9 acres; Recording reference in Book 462 at Page 882 Micro Records. AND Lands lying in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. The Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) South of the Grass Valley French Canal and West of the existing fence... Recording Reference in Book 726 of Micro Records at Page 676.. AND Lands lying in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. That parcel in the Southeast corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE 1/4 SW 1/4) East of, and surrounded by the forks of, the Slough. Recording Reference in Book 726 of Micro Records at Page 677.. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. Dated this 19th day of March A.D., 2009. /s/ MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN, Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By:/s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-06-19 Department No. 3 District Judge John W. Larson SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING H.S. A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE TO: STEVEN LEE SMITH RE: H.S., born October 14, 2005 to Jessica Stratton YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana 59808, has filed a Petition to Terminate the Father’s Parental Rights or for said youth to be otherwise cared for; Now, Therefore,YOU ARE HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on the 16th day of April, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why the father’s rights should not be terminated; why CFS should not be awarded permanent legal custody of the youth with the right to consent to the youth’s adoption; and why the Petition should not be granted or why said youth should not be otherwise cared for. Steven Lee Smith is represented by Patrick Sandefur, 210 North Higgins, Suite 234, Missoula, Montana, 59802, (406) 721-5337. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable John W. Larson, Judge of the aboveentitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 19th day of February, 2009. /s/John W. Larson District Court Judge MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-07-20 Department No. 1 Judge Edward P. McLean Related Cause Nos. DN-0721, DN-07-22 SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING F.B. A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: AMY BERRY; PENDER BLOCK AND ALL PUTATIVE FATHERS OF F.B. Re: F.B., born October 14, 1992, to Amy Berry YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer Street, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana, 59808, has filed a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights of Pender Block and All Putative Fathers of F.B. or for said Youth to be otherwise cared for; Now, Therefore, YOU ARE HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on the 15th day of April, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the School/Special District Election to be held on May 5, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on April 6, 2009. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election office up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election office on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the School/Special District are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the polling place in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 11th day of March, 2009. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on May 5, 2009 an election will be held at Bonner School for the election of two Board Members for the Bonner Community Council. The polls will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on election day. DATED this 11th day of March , 2009. Vickie M. Zeier, Election Administrator, Missoula County. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on May 5, 2009 an election will be held at Evaro Fire Station Frenchtown Fire Station Nine Mile Fire Station Petty Creek Fire Station Spring Meadows Fire Station for the election of two Trustees for the Frenchtown Rural Fire Station. The polls will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on election day. DATED this 11th day of March , 2009. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY GOVENMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on May 5, 2009 an election will be held at Seeley Lake Elementary School Sunset School for the election of two Trustees for the Seeley Lake Rural Fire District. The polls will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on election day. DATED this 11th day of March , 2009. Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL Dental Delivery Units Partnership Health Center, a 501(c)(3) Federally Qualified Health Center, is currently soliciting sealed bids for three complete dental chairs to include delivery systems, chair-side monitors, appropriate cabinetry and lighting and one x-ray unit. The proposal should include delivery and installation on the second floor at the Partnership Health Center Clinic located at 401 West Railroad Street, Missoula, Montana.. Each proposal shall specify each and every item as set forth in the attached specifications. Any and all exceptions must be clearly stated in the proposal. Failure to set forth any item in the specifications without taking exception may be grounds for rejection. Partnership Health Center reserves the right to reject all proposals and to waive any informality. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the amount bid and must be in a form specified in the Montana Code Annotated, Title 18 Chapter 1 Part 203. The security is subject to forfeiture if the successful bidder does not enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Bids will be accepted until 3:00 PM, Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at which time bids will be opened and read. If your firm is interested and qualified, please submit three copies of your proposal to: Barbara Berens, County Auditor, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Bids must be sealed and marked “Proposal for Partnership Health Center Dental Chairs.” Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID RECEIPT OF BIDS: Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Missoula County Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana, 59808, until 2:00 p.m. local time on April 9, 2009, for the construction of the “Wye Area Sanitary Sewer - Phase 2” Project. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work includes approximately 56,000 lineal feet of sanitary sewer gravity main (8” to 18”), approximately 7,000 lineal feet of sanitary force main (2” and 8”), one wastewater pumping station, and appurtenant work. PROJECT FINANCING – The Missoula County “Wye Area Sanitary Sewer - Phase 2” is a project funded in part by the Federal Government through the State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Program in conjunction with Special Improvement District No. 8489 and is subject to all applicable Federal/State regulations, as indicated within the specifications. SITE OF WORK: The site of the work is located in Missoula County immediately northwest of the City of Missoula. COMPLETION OF WORK: All work must be substantially completed within 220 calendar days after the commencement date stated in the Notice to Proceed. OPENING OF BIDS: The bids will be publicly opened and read starting at 2:00 p.m. on April 9, 2009 at Missoula County Public Works Department, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana (Phone (406) 258-4753). OBTAINING CONTRACT DOCUMENTS: The documents are entitled “Wye Area Sanitary Sewer – Phase 2”. Copies of the Contract Documents may be purchased by mailing check or money order to: WGM Group, Inc. 3021 Palmer, P.O. Box 16027, Missoula, MT 59808-6027 Attn: Cody Thorson (406) 728-4611. Documents will be shipped via UPS Second Day Service. If shipping by other means is required, Bidder shall include their UPS/Federal Express/Airborne account number with their request for documents. Copies of half-size set of Drawings and Contract Manual may be obtained upon paying a nonrefundable fee of $150.00. Full-size

Missoula Independent Page 40 March 19–March 26, 2009

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT SHERIFF’S SALE GES, INC., A MONTANA CORPORATION, Plaintiff Against GEORGE MASTEL and LAVERNE MASTEL, Defendants. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s d Sale: TERMS: CASH, ornitseequivapo On the 9th lent; NO personal checks. t s 2009, at 10:00 day of April A.D., Patothe front o’clock A.M., door of the e l Court House, a in the City of Missoula, S County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain real property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, towit:Township 13 North, Range 20 West Section Four (4), Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4 NW 1/4); Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), less Chicago, Milwaukee, St, Paul & Pacific Railroad right-of-way.. Township l4 North, Range 20 West Section ThirtyThree (33), Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4 SW 1/4), Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4), South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 35 acres; Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), South and West of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 7 acres; Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE 1/4 NW 1/4), South of Grass Valley French Canal, Approximately 9 acres; Northeast

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

SHERIFF'S SALE • ABANDONED VEHICLES TERMS: CASH ONLY; NO CHECKS; $85.00 MINIMUM BID TO BE SOLD AT SHERIFF'S SALE: On 3/30/2009, at 9:00 a.m. at Red's Towing, 321 N. Russell, Missoula, in the county of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situated in the said County of Missoula, and particularly described as follows, to wit: VEHICLE # VEHICLE 64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1994 CHEVROLET CORSICA 4D 67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1994 DODGE SHADOW 4D 68 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1979 DATSUN 280Z 69 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1974 AMERICAN JEEP CHEROKEE 70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1988 JEEP CHEROKEE 4WD 4D 71 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1998 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 4D 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1994 JEEP CHEROKEE 4WD 4D 73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1996 SATURNS L24D 74 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1988 CHEVROLET CORSICA 4D 75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1992 HONDA ACCORD 4D 76 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1980 GMC TK PK 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1992 TOYOTA PASEO CP 79 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT 3D 80 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1989 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER 4D 81 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1990 FORD BRONCO 4WD 2D 82 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1979 FORD FAIRMONT SW 4D 83 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1998 FORD WINDSTAR WAGON 84 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1984 DODGE TK PK 2D 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1989 FORD TEMPO 4D 87 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1987 FORD TK PK 89 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1977 SECURITY TL 90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1964 SHASTA TL TV 91 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1966 SHASTA TL TV 92 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1984 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 4D 93 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1989 NISSAN MAXIMA 4D 94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1985 BMW 318I 2D 95 . . . . . . . . . . .1995 NISSAN PATHFINDER 4WD 2D 96 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1997 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA 4D 97 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1991 CHEVROLET BERETTA 2D 98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1991 HYUNDAI EXCEL 2D 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1992 FORD TAURUS 4D 101 . . . . . . . . . . .1995 CHEVROLET BLAZER 4WD 4D 102 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1987 NISSAN SENTRA 2D 106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1995 TOYOTA TERCEL 2D 107 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1994 MAZDA PROTÉGÉ 4D 111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1995 FORD WINDSTAR VAN 113 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1995 DODGE NEON 4D 114 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1991 CHEVROLET CORSICA 4D 115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1987 CHRYSLER FIFTH AVE 4D 116 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1996 JEEP CHEROKEE 4WD 4D 117 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1989 DODGE TK PK 119 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2001 DODGE RAM VAN 120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1995 KIT COMPANION TL TV

VIN # . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G1LD554XRY206217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B3AP683XRN127289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2DHS130100466 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J4A167CN39056 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1JCMT7820JT073892 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G1JC5249W7235563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1J4GZ78Y9RC320382 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G8ZK5270TZ238238 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G1LT5110JE632132 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1HGCB754XNA061791 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TCL24AJ506926 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JT2EL45F7N0039038 . . . . . . . . . . . . .KMHCF35G0YU060458 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1C3BC6639KD409537 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FMEU15H6LLA20864 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9K94T215963 . . . . . . . . . . . . .2FMZA5145WBD47166 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JB7FP54E8EY402267 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2FAPP36X5KB211735 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FTEF14H8HKB00566 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7370056 or 7370866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FS22512 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P8780 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G3AY69YXEM791209 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JN1HJ01P2KT257788 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WBAAK7407F8789451 . . . . . . . . . . . . .JN8HD17Y1SW073195 . . . . . . . . . . . . .3VWVA81H3VM129602 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G1LZ13A8MY149429 . . . . . . . . . . . . .KMHVD12JXMU085994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1FACP5242NG116665 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1GNDT13WXS2238158 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JN1PB26S4HU004038 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JT2EL55D4S0082283 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JM1BG2242R0768415 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2FMDA5143SBB13287 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B3ES47C5SD580804 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1G1LT53T5MY181152 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1C3BF66P9HW120665 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1J4FJ28S0TL315080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B7FL66X3KS18477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2B6HB11X61K551679 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1KC27KT24SB180024

Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. No warranty is made as to the condition or title of these vehicles. Date: 3/19/2009 • MICHAEL R. McMEEKIN, SHERIFF • Patrick A. Turner Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, April 7, 2009, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Subdivision Request – Homestead Vista A request from Wheatgrass Holdings, LLC, represented by PCI, to subdivide a 25.05 --acre parcel into 12 residential lots. The property is located east of Sleeman Creek Road and north of Highway 12. The property is legally described as Tract 39 A-1 of COS 2382 with a portion of COS 2748 excepting there from the following: Tract 39 A-1A of COS 3582 and Portion A of COS 3783 and Portion B of COS 4006, located in Section 33 of T12N, R20W, P.M.M. (see Map D).

The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this subdivision at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15, 2009, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The requests and exact legal descriptions are available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.


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MISSOULA IRRIGATION DISTRICT ANNUAL REPORT 2008. Cash Receipts for fiscal year 2008: $131,015.08. Negative cash balance 12/31/2007: -19,022.56. Total: $111,992.52. Less cash disbursements/expenses: -109,320.01. Balance at end of 2008: $2,672.51. Note: Negative cash balance resulted from Missoula County Treasurer distributing monies belonging to the District, but has not replaced such monies as yet. The above represents the accounting made by MID from its internal records. MID receives some interest from monies invested by Missoula County of MID funds. All monies received by or for MID are deposited with Missoula County, MT and all disbursements are drawn from that fund. Dated this 11th day of March, 2009. MISSOULA IRRIGATION DISTRICT. /s/ Raymond P. Tipp, Secretary to MID Board

L. Deschamps III NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Christopher D. McAlexander, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Christopher Dale McAlexander to Christopher Dale Dennison. The hearing will be on April 14th, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED: 3/5/09. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Bobbi Hainline, Deputy Clerk of Court

receipt requested, at 160 Highmore Street, Lolo, MT 59847, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 6th day of March, 2009. /s/ Cara L. Lightfield, 160 Highmore Street, Lolo, MT 59847

The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19273) 1002.108964-FEI

due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28501) 1002.108700-FEI

erence. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19334) 1002.108693-FEI

records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 27, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $662,371.61. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 9, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-FEI

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-09-30 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY E. FOSHAG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either by mailed to Burt Foshag, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 6425 Linda Vista Blvd., Missoula, MT 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 1st day of March, 2009. /s/ Burt Foshag, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-08-1358 Dept. No. 4 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION. CITY OF MISSOULA, Plaintiff, v. BARBARA S. KOESSLER, as trustee of Barbara S. Koessler Revocable Trust, all known and unknown heirs and assigns of LEILA McDONALD, CORINNE M. TURMAN and CECIL THURSTON, and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to the Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA sends greetings to the above named Defendants and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the complaint adverse to the Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto, whether such claim or possible claim be present or contingent: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you in the County wherein you reside, and to file your answer to the Complaint and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within 20 days. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you, be default, for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title to land situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: A tract of land located in the Southeast Quarter of Section 1, Township 12 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana; more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northwesterly corner of Lot 48 of South Side Homes, A recorded subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, said corner being a point on the Northerly line of that parcel of land described in boo 788 Micro, Page 1258 on file and of record in Missoula County, Montana; thence N 86º34’28” W continuing along last said Northerly line 30.0 feet to the point of beginning; then N 86º34’28” W continuing along last said Northerly line 38.1 feet to a point on the Southeasterly right-of-way of Lower Miller Creek Road, last said point being on a nontangent curve concave Northwesterly and having a radius of 1341.06 feet, a radial line to the last said point bears S 68º58’52” E; thence along last said non-tangent curve through a central angle of 6º36’08”, an arc length of 154.5 feet to a point on the Westerly right-of-way line of Upper Miller Creek Road; thence S 03º25’42” W along last said Westerly right-of-way line, 149.7 feet to the point of beginning; containing 2,623 square feet, more or less. WITNESS my hand and Seal of said Court this 4th day of March, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-09-319 Dept. No. 2 Robert

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-31 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD P. GREIL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Elva M. Greil has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson, Jones & Chisholm, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 26th day of February, 2009. CHRISTIAN, SAMSON, JONES & CHISHOLM, PLLC. /s/ Kirby S. Christian, Attorney for Personal Representative, Elva M. Greil MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-09-38 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RALPH HENRY PRAZAK, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Karen Prazak has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karen Prazak, the Personal Representative, certified mail, return receipt requested, in care of Molly K. Howard, Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C., 201 West Main Street, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 6th day of March, 2009. /s/ Molly K. Howard, Attorney for Karen Prazak, Personal Representative of the Ralph Henry Prazak MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-23 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPHY ALFRED JOHNSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Barbara A. Johnson has been appointed Personal Representative of the the Estate of Joseph Alfred Johnson. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Barbara A. Johnson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Cunningham Law Office, 818 West Central, Suite 1, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of February, 2009. /s/ Kyle D. Cunningham, Attorney for Personal Representative, Barbara A. Johnson MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate Case No. DP-09-13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM M. JOHNSTON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Darin Johnston, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 3183, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 10th day of March, 2009. /s/ Darin Johnston, Personal Representative, PO Box 3183, Missoula, MT 59806 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-35 Dept. No. 2 Judge Robert L. Deschamps III. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF Alyce M. Dover, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to CARA L. LIGHTFIELD, the Personal Representative, return

NOTICE OF SALE UNDER MONTANA TRUST INDENTURE Trust Indenture: Dated February 21, 2006 Grantor: Clay A. Mathews, P.O. Box 1327, Victor,,, Montana 59875 Original Trustee: Stewart Title of Ravalli County, LLC, 1920 North First, Suite B Hamilton, Montana 59840. Beneficiary: First Security Bank of Missoula, P.O. Box 4506, Missoula, Montana 59806. Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley, Attorney at Law, Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC, P.O. Box 8957, Missoula, Montana 59807—8957. Date and Place of Recordation: February 23, 2006 as Instrument No. 567502, records of Ravalli County, Montana. The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 30th day of June, 2009, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. in front of the Ravalli County Clerk and Recorder’s Office, 215 South Fourth Street, Suite C, Hamilton, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: Lot B-3 of Bullseye situated in Ravalli County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. TOGETHER WITH the right to use with others a 60 foot road and utility easement from U.S. Highway 93 to Lot B-3, shown as Bullseye Lane, on subdivision plat of Bullseye Subdivision. Subject to a Deed of Trust dated February 1, 1999, in favor of Norwest Mortgage, recorded at Book 180 of Mortgages, Page 899. Subject to easements and encumbrances of record. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and to pay when due the monthly payments of interest, and principal due on maturity as provided for in the Deed of Trust and Modifications thereto. The Loan matured on January 30, 2008 and the entire balance of principal and interest became due and payable.. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Ninety-nine Thousand Nine Hundred Seventeen and 20/100ths Dollars ($99,917.20) principal, plus interest thereon at the rate of NY Prime plus 1.5% (currently 4.75%) from and after March 20, 2006 to January 23, 2009, in the amount of Seventeen Thousand Six Hundred Sixty and 77/100ths Dollars ($17,660.77), plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Thirteen Dollars ($13.00), plus all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law.. DATED this 28th day of January, 2009. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC, P.O. Box 8957, Missoula, Montana 59807-8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula. This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 28th day of January, 2009, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the State of Montana.. Printed name: Roxie Hausauer ((NOTARIAL SEAL) Residing at: Lolo, MT My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/06/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200805786 Book 815, Page 361, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Blake F. Bushman, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 of Ponda Rosa Acres, a platted subdivision in Missoula, Montana, according to the official recorded plat of record in Book 8 of Plats at Pages 25 and 26. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 14, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $365,049.77. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $355,417.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 26, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/07/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200507978 Book 750, Page 611, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Keith E. Kominek, married man was Grantor, Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis was Beneficiary and Chicago Title Insurance Co. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title Insurance Co. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8 and the East one-half of Lot 9, Lots 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 in Block 16 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Also, a strip, piece or parcel of land in the Northwest onequarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, Montana Principal Meridian, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the point where the West line of said Northwest one-quarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35 intersects the South line of Mullan Road; thence running Southeasterly along the said South line of Mullan Road 66 feet; thence Southwesterly 93 feet to the West line of said Section 35; thence North on the West line of Section 35, 107 feet to the Place of Beginning. Recording reference: Book 735 Micro Records, at Page 1518 less and except that portion conveyed in Bargain and Sale Deed recorded in Book 189 of Deeds at Page 268. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BSABS 2005-AC3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 12, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $136,656.74. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $131,999.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 22, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/30/97, recorded as Instrument No. 9721844 Book 518, Page 926, and modified by Agreement recorded 5/14/2007 as Instrument No. 200711704 Book 797, Page 300, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Barbara A. Larsen, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 5: A parcel of land located in and a portion of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25, Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, a fence corner; thence S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along the East line of said Section 25, a distance of 1119.00 feet to a set rebar on the West rightof-way of a road, said point being the true point of beginning; thence continuing S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along said Section line and along said right-of-way, a distance of 200.00 feet to a set rebar; thence S. 64 degrees 39’01” W., 1471.43 feet to a set rebar on the West line of the Southeast onequarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25; thence N. 00 degrees 06’52” E., along said West line of the Southeast onequarter of the Northeast one-quarter, a distance of 455.84 feet to a set rebar; thence N. 74 degrees 17’06” E., 1381.34 feet to the true point of beginning, as shown on deed. Exhibit No. 2798, filed December 7, 1971, records of Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to . Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 12, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $92,162.25. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $88,377.90, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 22, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the ref-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 12/23/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200600274, Book 767, Page 104, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Dale S. Martell, Susan L. Martell, as husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for American Brokers Conduit was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 17H of the Amended plat of Cobban and Disnmore’s Orchard Homes, Lot 17, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-4. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 17, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $173,286.02. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $168,056.95, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 29, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28803) 1002.109468-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/28/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200619250 Bk. 780, Pg. 142, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kevin S. Connell, a married man was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Brokers Conduit was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 6 in Block 13 of

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Missoula Independent Page 42 March 19–March 26, 2009

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Public Notices

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West View Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 29, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $148,160.47. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $142,508.42, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 10, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19352) 1002.110615-FEI

C29º00’21”W., 4074.20 feet, an arc length of 160.00 feet; thence N27º33’07” E., 574.09 feet; thence S. 62º26’40” E., 160.00 feet; thence along the East boundary of said Tract C2. S.27º33’12” W., 575.00 feet to the point of beginning. Debra Ann Finley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated August 7, 2001 and Recorded on August 13, 2001 in Book 666, Page 567, as Document No. 200119620 and Re-Recorded on September 5, 2001 in Book 667, Page 860, as Document No. 200121908. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation, A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,249.60, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 4, 2008 is $127,384.92 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $3,217.43, late charges in the amount of $1,971.06, escrow advances of $907.72, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.87 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any, Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the Trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 30, 2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On December 30, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose

name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Jessica Hopkins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3018123 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009, 03/26/2009

C r o s s w o r d s

Jonesin’

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 11, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the N 1 /2 of Section 22, township 12 North, Range 17 West, P.M.M. Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534. Less and excepting that portion of Tract C2 of Certificate of Survey no. 3534 more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Tract C2, Certificate of Survey No. 3534, thence northwesterly, along the Frontage Road right-of-way, along a non-tangent curve, whose center bears

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 18, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 25 and 26 in Block 3 of MCLEOD ADDITION, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Monique S. Lary, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Arthur F. Lamey, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 20, 2005 and Recorded July 25, 2005 in Book 756 on Page 1288 as Document No. 200518767. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust (SAIL) 2006-1. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 31, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,664.20, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 5, 2009 is $164,030.08 principal, interest at the rate of 10.0000% now totaling $7,059.30, late charges in the amount of $404.04, escrow advances of $641.28, and other fees and expenses advanced of $208.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $44.94 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than

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DOWN 1 Bellyacher's noise 2 "She Believes ___" (Kenny Rogers song) 3 Jackie O couturier Cassini 4 Long-winded rants 5 Company that eventually burned down in "Office Space" 6 Fielder and Rhodes, for two 7 Have a craving 8 Like an insult comic's material, often 9 Frustrated sigh before cleaning up 10 Island that's now called Sri Lanka 11 Contacts in the back of the paper

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Radiators - Auto Batteries - Milk Jugs - Pop & Water Plastic - Phone Books & Shredding Services We pay market rate for metal & cardboard!

20 Edible mushrooms 21 Muscles shown off by musclemen 22 Gets oneself focused 23 Go together like green and purple? 25 Entre ___ 27 Like some pickings 28 Capitol Hill figure, for short 29 Combatants in a long-standing battle

30 Title for Khan 31 "I'm 100% with you," in Internet shorthand 33 Pringles competitor 34 ___ Roses (band that returned with a 2008 album) 36 Drink with a bottle cap 38 Candlestick alternative 39 It helps govern disputes offshore

40 Early South African prime minister Jan 42 It's yellow and can get baked 47 Get to the top, maybe? 48 Computer time-waster for one 49 Be a snitch 50 "Jurassic Park" dinos

13 Acquiesce 14 Like many freeways, width-wise 16 Drilling structures 18 Susie of "Curb Your Enthusiasm" 21 Former host Petros of Spike TV's "Pros vs. Joes" 22 Items at some tables 23 Doll of the 1960s-70s 24 The heart, to Henri 25 Tide type 26 Cleanser brand 29 Ambling pace for a horse 32 Stink 34 Weathered through

35 Hog the spotlight, perhaps 37 Queso ___ (Mexican cheese molded in baskets) 38 Stewie's teddy bear, on "Family Guy" 40 "The Baroness Redecorates" singersongwriter Sarah 41 Roman numeral that translates to a 4digit palindrome 43 "I'm ___ you!" 44 Put ___ on (levy) 45 Phone book-sized novel, e.g. 46 Bonanza finds

For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0406.

Last week’s solution

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

Missoula Independent Page 43 March 19–March 26, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: January 6, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On January 6, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3026741 03/19/2009, 03/26/2009, 04/02/2009

SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 8, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO WIT: LOT 16 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 1220208; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 735, PAGE 961 (RECORDED 07/06/04) Gerald H Hoover and Witchuda N Hoover, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to National Settlement Services/Rocky Mount, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 19, 2006 and recorded on August 17, 2006 at 8:31 o’clock A.M., in Book 781, Page 246, under Document No 200620832. The beneficial interest is currently held by HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 8, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $4,224.25, beginning December 1, 2007, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 31, 2008 is $238,786.04 principal, interest at the rate of 10.45% now totaling $35,321.82, late charges in the amount of $3,073.69, and other fees and expenses advanced of $125.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $68.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 18, 2008 Charles J. Peterson MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On December 18, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3014239 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009

point of beginning being a found iron pin; thence N.89º51’E., along the South boundary of said Country Homes Addition No. 2, a distance of 180.50 feet to an iron pin; thence S.0º09’E., along the West boundary of the property described in Missoula County Book 21 of Deeds at page 1248, a distance of 75.70 feet to an iron pin; thence S.89º51’W., a distance of 180.50 feet to an iron pin on the East boundary of Lot 4, County Homes Addition, an official subdivision of Missoula County, Montana; thence N.0º09’ West along the East boundary of said Lot 4, a distance of 75.70 feet to the point of beginning. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 102 of Micro Records at page 1333. Elizabeth F. Marsh, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 13, 2005 and Recorded October 10, 2005 under Book 762 in Page 788 as Document No. 200527542. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 15, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,682.95, beginning June 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 18, 2008 is $301,304.29 principal, interest at the rate of 6.7500% now totaling $12,811.13, late charges in the amount of $703.71, escrow advances of $2,513.09, and other fees and expenses advanced of $67.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $55.72 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 19, 2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On December 19, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3014548 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009

13, 207 and Recorded August 13, 2007 in Book 803, Page 808, as Document No. 200720943. The beneficial interest is currently held by Flagstar Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 18, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $5,346.52, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 9, 2009 is $644,109.45 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125 % now totaling $20,127.84, late charges in the amount of $1,094.80, escrow advances of $3,887.66, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,305.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $125.73 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10`h day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: 12/22/2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 12/22/2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3015233 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009, 03/26/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 19, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock AM at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 1 OF WEBBER ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: 0497003 Eugene Karl Schafer and Janet Lindquist Schafer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Equity Direct Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 8, 1998, and Recorded May 13, 1998 at 3:58 o’clock PM, in Book 541, Page 0296, as Document No. 9812132. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Loan Services LLC. Charles J. Peterson , is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated June 28, 2005, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,109.47, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 7, 2009 is $97,534.99 principal, interest at the rate of 10.00% now totaling $3,411.49, late charges in the amount of $141.75, escrow advances of $156.89, , plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: Jan. 9, 2009, Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On Jan . 9, 20099, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/2013 ASAP# 3029781 03/19/2009, 03/26/2009, 04/02/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 8, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the SE1/4SW1/4 of Section 32, Township 13 North, Range 19 West P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of Lot 7, Block 2 Country Homes Addition No. 2, an official subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, said

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 8, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 3 of Wetland Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. APN #: To Be Determined Brian Corr, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August

Missoula Independent Page 44 March 19–March 26, 2009

RentalsApartments PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

RentalsHouses 1423 S. 4th St- 3bed/2bath fenced yard, garage near bike trail & Good Food Store. $1250 Call Devan @ Prudential Missoula 2411408 HOUSE IN LOWER RATTLESNAKE A MUST SEE!!!IT IS 0.6 MILES FROM THE CAMPUS AND NEAR GREENOUGH PARK. DEFINETELY WALKING DISTANCE FROM DOWNTOWN MISSOULA.

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707 1 BD Duplex - 3317 S 7th W, $595/mo. 1 BD Apt - 119 Johnson, $465/mo. 2 BD Apt - Uncle Robert Lane, $605/mo. 4 BD House - 2225 Mount, $995/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

LANDLORDS Who is representing your interests at the 2009 legislative session? The following bills were introduced and are in various stages of processing. HB175-include certain agreements involving roomers in landlord tenant act. HB188-double damages for wrongful withholding of security deposits. HB189-revise landlord-tenant laws HB236-require landlord to test private water source for fecal & E coli HB252-sexual orientation and gender identity in human rights and government practices. HB401-revise methamphetamine clean-up laws HB485-revise mobile home court laws regarding eminent domain SB171-criminal damage to rental property SB323-provide default lease extension period for residential leases.

Be part of the solution by joining the Montana Landlords Association, Inc. There is no free lunch and your active participation is needed and encouraged by the local chapter of MLA. Gene Thompson, president. Cell: 250-0729

www.mlaonline.org

RentalsHouses

Roommates

3 BEDROOMS & 2 BATH, NEWLY PAINTED FROM THE INSIDE WASHER AND DRIER: -DISHWASHER: -HARDWOOD FLOOR IN THE HOUSE NEWLY POLISHED; -GARBAGE ALSO INCLUDED IN THE PRICE; -AMAZING VIEW OF MOUNT JUMBO; CALL ME FOR ANY QUETSIONS AT 510.280.4488

Room for rent Share cute, clean and comfortable home with two young professionals. Has everything including cable, internet, wd etc. 400/month (406) 5462307

Looking for a rental? Visit www.prudentialmissoula.com for list of available rentals.

RentalsFurnished

RentalsCommercial Commercial Space for lease: 229 East Front Street, Between The Trail Head and Pearl Café. 1639 total Sq feet. Includes shared bathrooms w/ Trail Head. Newly renovated, original wood floors great high ceilings. Aggressive downtown lease rate. For info call Todd 544-9331

1&2

Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

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GardenCity Property Management 422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals:

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MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212


CLASSIFIEDS RentalsApartments

RentalsApartments

Homes for Sale Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

Join the Montana Landlord's Association

...www.mindypalmer.com

IMMACULATE LEWIS & CLARK AREA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, hardwood floors, new roof, large fenced back yard, lots of windows, $198,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

9 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms

...www.mindypalmer.com

Gene Thompson, president

(406) 250-0729 • www.mlaonline.org

JUST LISTED. BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CONDO. 2 Bdr/1.5 Bath, private deck, single garage, fireplace, vaulted ceilings, lots of windows, $155,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

...www.mindypalmer.com

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

1333 Toole #C-13 $132,500 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House MF 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 3 bdrm 1/12 bath on large fenced lot in Lolo. Newer flooring, family room and deck with hot tub. Single garage. $184,900 MLS# 809632 Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12590 for pics 3 Bed/2.5 Bath house in Stevensville with rental & 2 car garage. Separate 4 car garage with shop area. 1.3 landscaped acres. $299,900 MLS#900811. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics 4800 SQ FT MULLAN RD AREA HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, great floor plan, family room with wet bar, vaulted ceilings, and more, $448,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

...www.mindypalmer.com

832 Cherry St. $239,500 Lower Rattlesnake - 2bed/1bath, brand new kitchen & bath, garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

...www.mindypalmer.com

Buying or Selling? Call Priscilla Brockmeyer at Prudential Missoula Properties. 370-7689 www.priscillabrockmeyer.com Frenchtown Schools, 2 bdrm, 2bath, family room and bonus room. Pellet Stove, deck, patio, double attached garage. $229,900 MLS# 808738. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Text:44133 Message:12594 for pics GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at ......www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential

JUST LISTED. ROSE PARK CHARMER. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 + bonus rooms, single garage, hardwood floors, walk/bike to UM or Downtown. $249,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

Land for Sale

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

FORT BENTON REALTY, LLP (800)406-0946. UNSPOILED MARAIS RIVER BREAKS 1,000 farm/ranch acres South of Rudyard. Seller will lease back grazing rights. $850,000. POWDER RIVER BREAKS VIEWS 240 acres west of Ekalaka. Ranch home, barn, corrals, shop. End of road privacy. $425,000. www.fbrealty.com

...www.mindypalmer.com

5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $740,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

...www.mindypalmer.com

Homes for Sale

Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689 Priced Reduced! Large family home on 1.2 Acres. $285,000. Call Lara 406-531-5582 REDUCED PRICE! 3bdrm, 1 bath, single garage. Fenced yard and covered front porch. Newly remodeled. MLS# 808575 $89,900 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Windermere RE UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, single attached garage, new flooring, interior paint, updated kitchen, new furnace and more, $149,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Bridget Bowers REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 207-5387 • Bridget@GreaterMontanaRE.com BitterrootMontanaProperties.com Specializing in: Homes with Acreage

Homes for Sale

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com • 4 Bd/3 Bth Great Views • Large Deck & Fire Place • Double Attached Garage • 1/2 acre close to golf and fishing • $349,900 MLS# 805015 Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics

• Wishard View lots (20+acres) • Meadows & Trees near Potomac • One has a pole barn • Plenty of room for horses or cows • $179,000-$199,900 MLS# 900454 Text:44133 Message: 12888 for pics

• 3 Bd/2 Bth Manufactured Home • Nice lot w/ large covered porch • Home - 1072 SF / Lot - 3125 SF • New carpet and interior paint • $89,900 MLS# 900417 Text:44133 Message: 12597 for pics

• 40x82 insulated free span building • 1 acre with security fence • Three 14' overhead doors • 9292 Futurity Drive • $339,900 MLS#901478 Text:44133 Message: 12595 for pics

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

Commercial

Visit my website for more pictures and other listings…

For Lease • 1001 SW Higgins, Suite 104

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077

...www.mindypalmer.com

Are you looking for a new home built with accessibility & low maintenance?

Commercial

2300 Regent, Suites 205-206-207

...www.mindypalmer.com

KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Homes for Sale

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

RICE TEAM

...www.mindypalmer.com

Nice manufactured on foundation with attached single garage. Large covered deck in back of house. Vinyl siding. $103,900. MLS# 809491 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12598 for pics

Homes for Sale

Three Wonderful 2 year old commercial Condos, one with reception area, conference room, production space, and 6 work cubicals. There are 2 more additional condo units with added work areas, and separate entrances. All 3 condo’s comes with 10 deeded parking spaces. Suites 205 and 206 can be sold separately for $240,000. Suite 207 sold separately is $510,000. All 3 sold together, priced at $745,000. See LA for more details. MLS: 901538 & 901542 & 901535.

247 W. Front • Missoula

Joy Earls

921 S 4th St W. $249,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage

ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at

Land for Sale

Professional office space in the Panorama Park Building. 1,335+ sq. ft., 2 offices, large reception area, bathroom and kitchen. Could easily be converted into more office spaces. $1,650 a month. Broker Owned 544-2125

Fabulous downtown locale includes 11 parking spaces! Seats 36+, outside seating, basement with lots of storage. Long time established Missoula restaurant with cabaret license included. $150,000 MLS# 901625

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

$349,500 • MLS#808566

Mary Mar ry

Joy Earls • 531-9811

REALTOR®, Broker Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

joyearls.mywindermere.com

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

At this price, everyone’s happy!!

Marlies Borchers REALTOR, ABR, GRI

Place a line ad in the classifieds for only $5.95 a

week.

O: 327.8787 C: 370.5758

shesellsmontana.com

For all your home mortgage needs call

Julie Lapham julie@landlmortgage.com

240-0032 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

#228,229

Missoula Independent Page 45 March 19–March 26, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Lorin & Amy Peterson

a father daughter team

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223 www.LorinAndAmy.com

Mortgage & Financial CASH FOR GOLD! We buy Gold, Silver, Platinum. Get Cash NOW! Highest Payouts - Satisfaction Guaranteed 1-877-548-1550 In today’s economy most people have credit card debt. Credit Card Rescue has the solution. Get out of debt in months not years - save thousands. Call 866-910-5252 Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Price reduction! $185,900 2 story home with nice fenced yard located in cul-desac. 2 Bed/1.5 Bat. Central location. www.classiccourt.com 2387 Classic Ct.

The Realtor who speaks your language

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Missoula Independent Page 46 March 19–March 26, 2009

239.8350


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 Missoula Independent Page 47 March 19–March 26, 2009


How to define music has long been the subject of debate; philosophers, musicians, and, more recently, various social and natural scientists have argued about what constitutes music. The definition has varied through history, in different regions, and within societies. Definitions vary as music, like art, is a subjectively perceived phenomenon. Its definition has been tackled by philosophers of art, lexicographers, composers, music critics, musicians, linguists, sociologists, and neurologists. Music may be defined according to various criteria including organization, pleasantness, intent, social co n st ru ct i o n , p e rc e p t u a l processes and engagement, universal aspects or family resemblances, and t h ro u g h co n t r ast o r negative definition.

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Missoula Independent: 3/19 - 3/26/09