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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog $5

www.miracosta.edu

Success starts at MiraCosta College!


The MiraCosta Community College District includes Oceanside, Carlsbad, La Costa, Encinitas, Olivenhain, Rancho Santa Fe, Cardiff, Solana Beach, Del Mar and Carmel Valley. With its coastal location, beautiful campuses and strong academic programs, MiraCosta College attracts students from throughout San Diego County, the state, and the country as well as from abroad. The student population in the credit program is approximately 10,400, with about 7,000 attending classes at the Oceanside Campus and the remainder studying at the San Elijo Campus in Cardiff. The Community Learning Center in Oceanside serves about 4,000 students in noncredit programs. For detailed information on MiraCostaĂ­s programs and classes, call the Public Information Office at (760) 795-6612. You can request a credit or noncredit course schedule by calling (760) 795-6615. Call toll-free from outside the 760 area code: 888-201-8480, ext. 6612 or ext. 6615. Schedules may also be viewed on the college Web site at www.miracosta.edu


MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Published by the MiraCosta Community College District

www.miracosta.edu

Community Learning Center 1831 Mission Avenue Oceanside, CA 92058-7104 (760) 795-8710

DISTRICT OFFICE Oceanside Campus 1 Barnard Drive Oceanside, CA 92056-3899 (760) 757-2121

San Elijo Campus 3333 Manchester Avenue Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA 92007-1516 (760) 944-4449

Outside the 760 area code, call us toll-free: 1-888-201-8480 The hearing impaired may call us at the following TTY numbers: (760) 439-1060, (760) 436-9521

Table of Contents College Calendar . .........................................................................................................................2 Message from the President..........................................................................................................3 General Information . .....................................................................................................................4 MiraCosta College Campuses . .....................................................................................................4 Welcome to MiraCosta College......................................................................................................6 Admissions and Records Information . ..........................................................................................7 Expenses . ...................................................................................................................................10 Student Support Services . ......................................................................................................... 11 Programs of Instruction ...............................................................................................................22 The Associate Degree .................................................................................................................23 The Certificate Programs ............................................................................................................31 Transferring Course Work ...........................................................................................................33 Courses of Instruction .................................................................................................................43 Continuing Education (Noncredit Courses)................................................................................227 Academic Policies .....................................................................................................................245 Glossary of Terms .....................................................................................................................253 Rights and Responsibilities of Students and Staff Members . ...................................................255 Governing Board........................................................................................................................263 Faculty .......................................................................................................................................265 Index . ........................................................................................................................................269 Accuracy Statement: MiraCosta College has made every reasonable effort to assure that materials contained in this catalog are accurate. However, this catalog does not constitute a contract. Recognizing that the possibility of error does exist, we will maintain a corrected copy of the catalog in the Counseling Office.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog




MIRACOSTA COLLEGE CALENDAR

MiraCosta College A Public Two-Year Community College Accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Approved by California Board of Registered Nursing California State Colleges and Universities California State Department of Education Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training State Board of Vocational Nurse and Psychiatric Technician Examiners University of California Accreditation: MiraCosta College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, 10 Commercial Blvd., Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234, an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education and approved by the California State Department of Education Office of Private Post-Secondary Education for training veterans and other eligible persons under the provisions of the GI Bill. The University of California, California State Universities, and private universities of high rank give credit for transfer courses completed at MiraCosta College. Students or community members with verified disabilities are entitled to appropriate accommodations. A variety of alternative formats are readily available; others may require additional time. For specific details, contact the Disabled Student Programs and Services Office, (760) 795-6658. Effective dates of this catalog: Fall 2007 through Summer 2008.

College Calendar 2007-2008 Fall Semester 2007 August 20............................First Day of Fall Semester Classes September 3...................................Labor Day (College Closed) September 21....Deadline to File Petition for Degree/Certificate for Fall September 21...Deadline to Petition for Credit/No Credit Grade November 12.............................Veterans Day (College Closed) November 22-25........................ Thanksgiving (College Closed) December 8-14..............Final Examinations—Day and Evening December 14.............................................End of Fall Semester December 15-January 20................................. Semester Break December 24-January 1.....................................College Closed

Spring Semester 2008 January 21..................Martin Luther King Day (College Closed) January 22...................... First Day of Spring Semester Classes February 15-18...................... President’s Day (College Closed) February 22.......Deadline to File Petition for Degree/Certificate  for Spring February 22......Deadline to Petition for Credit/No Credit Grade March 17-22.......................................................... Spring Break March 21............................................................College Closed May 17-23.....................Final Examinations—Day and Evening May 23..................................................End of Spring Semester May 23..............................................................Commencement May 26...................................... Memorial Day (College Closed) Summer Intersession 2008 Dates not available at time of publication. See Summer 2008 Credit Course Schedule at www.miracosta.edu.

For application and enrollment dates and deadlines, consult the schedule of credit courses or the Community Education Bulletin for each semester. Current information is also available on the college web site: www.miracosta.edu



MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


GENERAL INFORMATION

Message from the President Bienvenidos • Kon-nichiwa • Bienvenue • Aloha Goede dag • Dobrý den • Ahalan • Zdravstvuyte • Ni hao Welcome, MiraCosta College students! A world of academic wonder awaits you here. MiraCosta offers a rich array of educational opportunities, in and out of the classroom. Perusing this catalog provides an excellent overview. Year after year, students tell us how much they enjoy the MiraCosta experience: the enthusiastic and knowledgeable instructors, the helpful staff, the diversity of the student population, the beautiful campuses . . . all the things that make up MiraCosta College. I know you’ll be glad you’ve chosen MiraCosta. Please tell us how we can make your experience here the best it can be. Our goal is your success! Dr. Victoria Muñoz Richart President

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog




GENERAL INFORMATION

General Information Vision Challenging the present and enriching the future, MiraCosta College is a learning community pledged to principle, committed to quality, and devoted to student success. Mission MiraCosta College, a comprehensive public two-year community college, provides transfer preparation, vocational education, general education, basic skills development, community education, and workforce development. Core Values Recognizing that education is a lifelong process, MiraCosta College demonstrates an ongoing commitment to the following core values: • the primary purpose of teaching and learning; • collegiality and shared governance; • technology leadership; • positive working and learning environment for staff and students; • highest quality through effectiveness, efficiency, and accountability; • decision making based on research, data, and evidence; • career preparation and economic development; • a climate which promotes diversity; • service to our community; • beautiful, welcoming campuses; and • innovation and ability to change.

Philosophy MiraCosta College is dedicated to providing excellent educational programs that develop individual abilities, strengthen human relationships, enhance community life, and heighten global consciousness. To be responsive to all learners, the college offers programs that reflect changing local, regional, national, and international needs. Dedicated professionals create an environment that stimulates intellectual curiosity, nurtures learning, and develops an understanding of society. Within such a setting, learners develop self-understanding, pursue educational objectives, and ultimately stand accountable for their own progress. MiraCosta embraces diversity and takes pride in affording equal educational and employment opportunities, in practicing principles of collegial governance, and in creating an environment of cooperation, mutual respect, and trust among all members of its learning community. MiraCosta College Foundation The MiraCosta College Foundation, a nonprofit corporation managed by a 30-member volunteer board of local community leaders, works to enhance MiraCosta’s educational opportunities by promoting public awareness of the college’s financial needs, establishing endowment funds, and raising funds for quality facilities, educational programs and scholarships. The foundation’s President Circle is an opportunity for individuals, small businesses and corporations to become involved with MiraCosta College in a meaningful way. Members donate between $1,000 and $10,000 annually. Their gifts are designated to the President’s Circle Fund and support a variety of needs at the college—including student scholarships, capital projects, program enhancement grants, and educational equipment. President’s Circle members are invited to meet with the MiraCosta College president to learn about the college and its role in the community and to share their ideas, creating a valuable link between the college and the communities it serves. For information about the MiraCosta College Foundation and the President’s Circle, contact the Fund Development Office at (760)795-6777.

MIRACOSTA COLLEGE CAMPUSES Oceanside Campus

MiraCosta College was founded in 1934 as OceansideCarlsbad Junior College. The second community college in San Diego County, it served the cities of Oceanside and Carlsbad in one wing of Oceanside High School. Then in 1964, the college moved to its present 121-acre hilltop location and became MiraCosta College. The name (derived from Spanish, “behold the coast”) refers to the panoramic ocean and coastal mountain views from the campus. The Oceanside Campus has grown and changed during the decades, and plans for growth continue. Projects to be completed in the next five years include completion of a creative arts center with classrooms, labs and studios for music and art; and a new student services building to house the Counseling, University Transfer and Career Centers. Locations of special interest at this campus: MiraCosta College Theatre, on the southwest corner of campus. This newly-remodeled 243-seat facility includes a large stage,



MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


CAMPUSES

a set-construction shop, make-up and costume labs, men’s and women’s dressing rooms, and a combination classroom and green room. It has been called one of the finest educational theaters in Southern California. Student Center, west side of the campus. Dining areas feature indoor and outdoor tables overlooking the coast. The center also houses the bookstore, an art gallery, club offices, conference rooms and student government offices. Kruglak Art Gallery, lower level of the Student Center. Named in memory of Amy Kruglak, one of the college’s benefactors, the gallery showcases works by visiting artists, faculty, and students. Wellness Center, northeast side of campus. The Wellness Center features a “fitness circuit,” free weights, and the latest ergonomically correct workout equipment. Biotech Manufacturing Classroom/Lab, north side of campus. Designed in collaboration with representatives from local biotech companies, this newly remodeled facility provides space for training pharmaceutical and biotech employees in the various processes of pharmaceutical manufacturing. Child Development Center, northwest corner of campus. The center serves a dual purpose: educating MiraCosta’s child development majors and providing affordable child care for students, faculty, staff and community members. Library and Information Hub, central campus area. In addition to traditional books and reference materials, the hub also houses a tutoring center, math lab, and more than 200 computers for academic use.

San Elijo Campus

The San Elijo Campus of MiraCosta College opened in 1988 and is situated on 42 acres facing the San Elijo Lagoon in Cardiff-by-the-Sea. The campus offers a general education credit program and a broad range of noncredit, fee-based Community Services classes and workshops. Student Services at the San Elijo Campus include admissions and records, counseling, health services, tutoring, testing and student activities. Students may schedule appointments for financial aid, disabled student assistance, job placement, University Transfer Center counseling, and Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS). The expanded and remodeled student center is set to open in 2008.

Community Learning Center

MiraCosta’s Community Learning Center hosts a wide variety of noncredit programs, including English as a second language, adult high school diploma, classes for older adults, parenting classes, and programs for those who are physically and mentally challenged. Also housed at the center is the Cisco Academy, which offers training in computer networking.

Small Business Development Center

The Small Business Development Center (SBDC), hosted by MiraCosta College, is a partnership program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. The SBDC provides services to meet the needs of entrepreneurs throughout North San Diego County. These services are free or inexpensive and include one-on-one counseling and workshops. The center also houses a resource library with an extensive collection of books and publications of interest to small business owners as well as computers with relevant software and internet connections. The SBDC is part of the Community Learning Center complex. MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog




WELCOME

Welcome to MiraCosta College No matter what your educational goal may be, you’ll enhance your student experience at MiraCosta by reviewing the following suggestions. 1. Get a MiraCosta College Credit Class Schedule You will need a class schedule for the semester you plan to attend. Class schedules are free and available on campus, in local public libraries, and at district high schools. Or we’ll mail a schedule at your request. Just call (760) 795-6615, or visit the web site at www.miracosta.edu and click on “Request Information” under the General Information category. 2. Apply for Admission Complete the Credit Application for Admission online at www. miracosta.edu. Or, you may submit the paper application found on page A-1 in the center of the class schedule to the Admissions and Records Office at either the Oceanside or San Elijo Campus. 3. Apply for Financial Aid If you need financial assistance to help with your educational expenses, stop by the Financial Aid Office in Building 3000 on the Oceanside Campus or visit our web site at www.miracosta. edu/financialaid. 4. Take the Placement Tests The English and math tests help place you in classes where you are most likely to succeed. No reservations are required for tests. Detailed information about placement tests are included in the class schedule. 5. Attend Orientation—In Person or Online Orientation gives you planning tools you’ll need to succeed at MiraCosta as well as important information about college programs, requirements and services. No reservations are required. See the class schedule for orientation dates and times or for information about accessing orientation online. 6. Attend Academic Advisement Counselors provide pre-enrollment advisement for all new students through group sessions. To attend a session, you must first complete English and math placement testing, and orientation. A reservation is required for an academic advisement session. 7. Clear Prerequisites MiraCosta College enforces prerequisites and corequisites during the enrollment process. Students who have not taken a mandatory prerequisite at MiraCosta College must provide a transcript or other evidence that they have taken the course elsewhere. Students currently enrolled in a requisite course will be allowed to enroll in courses pending proof of satisfactory completion. To clear prerequisites completed at another school, complete a Requisite Review Form. The completed form must be submitted to the Admissions and Records Office with a transcript or grade report for each prerequisite to be cleared. Prerequisites must be cleared by an Admissions and Records evaluator before enrolling in the class.

8. Enroll in Classes and Pay Fees All students may enroll in classes and pay fees using the SURF online enrollment system. To enroll online, go to the MiraCosta College web site at www.miracosta.edu and click on the SURF icon. Students may also enroll in person in the Admissions and Records Office. If you aren’t sure which classes to take, begin with the course recommendations from your placement tests. Since math, writing, and reading courses provide a foundation for all other classes, it’s a good idea to start with these basic skills. You can also choose classes that satisfy general education and major prep requirements for an A.A. degree and/or transfer. Make an appointment to see a counselor before or early in your first semester to develop an educational plan. Consider beginning with a lighter class load to get off to a good start. Remember that 12 units or more is considered full-time. A student with fewer than 12 units is considered part-time. (Your unit total will likely affect your financial aid, veterans benefits, and/or insurance coverage, if you are eligible.) 9. Buy Your Books You can purchase textbooks in the Spartan Bookstore at either campus or online at www.efollett.com. 10. Attend Class You must attend and be on time for the first class meeting. If you don’t attend the first class on time, you may be dropped from the class to make room for another student. Attend every class and arrive early. Come prepared with your text and other materials. Take notes on the lecture, concentrating on the main points. Listen actively and ask for clarification of points you don’t understand. Participate in class discussions. Make sure you understand what material has been assigned and when it is due. Be sure to find out how to contact your instructor if you need additional clarification of course material.

Allow Plenty of Time to Study and Do Homework On the average, students can expect two hours of homework for each hour they spend in class. At MiraCosta, many classes will require at least this time commitment, and some may require still more outside time. As a general rule, the more outside commitments you have (e.g., work, family, clubs, recreational activities), the fewer courses you should take. Set a regular time to study and allow enough time for each assignment, starting with your toughest or least favorite subject. Review your class notes; edit and rewrite them if necessary. Consider studying with classmates; group study can be very effective. If you have difficulty with course material consult your instructor. He/she may recommend tutoring. Free tutoring is available in most subjects.



MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS INFORMATION

Admissions and Records Information Admissions and Records Office Oceanside: (760) 795-6620 San Elijo: (760) 634-7870 Eligibility for Attendance To be eligible for attendance at MiraCosta College, a student must be 1.  Eighteen years of age or older and 2.  Able to benefit from instruction or 3.  The holder of a high school diploma or equivalent or 4. Currently attending high school as a sophomore, junior or senior with a Concurrent Enrollment Permit signed by the high school principal, and parent. This form is available at high school counseling offices, and the Admissions and Records offices at the Oceanside and San Elijo campuses. Students under 18 years of age who have not completed high school and are not pursuing the equivalent of a high school education must contact the Admissions and Records Office for more information. Admission of International Students Oceanside: (760) 795-6897 As part of its educational program, MiraCosta College believes it is important to attract capable international students who will share and learn with our own district students. MiraCosta is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant F-1 visa students. The Institute for International Perspectives (IIP) is the department responsible for issuing admissions documents and provides support services for F-1/M-1 students attending MiraCosta. Prospective international students must submit a completed international student application and required supporting documents, including: • Official high school (secondary school) transcripts and translation in English • All official transcripts for college work completed • TOEFL score/proof of English proficiency • Proof of financial support All F-1 or M-1 visa students must contact the IIP prior to enrolling at MiraCosta College. Applications for fall semester must be submitted by July 1 of the year of application. Applications for spring semester (beginning in January) must be submitted by November 1 of the previous year. International students who wish to improve their English skills to prepare for academic classes can apply as F-1 visa students to the English Language and College Skills Institute through Community Services. Applications for admission and details regarding MiraCosta’s international student programs are available at the Institute for International Perspective office located on the Oceanside Campus or on the MiraCosta College web site: www. miracosta.edu/iip Procedure for Early Military Discharge Military service personnel who plan to request an early discharge in order to attend MiraCosta College should complete an Application for Admission and an Application for Early Military Discharge. Licensed Vocational Nursing and Cosmetology Nursing and cosmetology students have special application and registration procedures. Contact the Admissions and Records Office for specific details. Residency Requirements The residency rules as established by Title V of the California Code of Regulations require one year of physical presence in the state of

California prior to the first day of the term combined with one year of evidence of intent and ability to establish residency in California. Students may be required to present evidence regarding their residency. Examples of appropriate intent include: a) paying California resident state income tax, b) possessing California resident license plates, c) holding a California driver’s license, and/or d) voting in California. Some exceptions and limitations to the residency requirement exist. Upon completion and submission of the Application for Admission, determination will be made as to residency status. See the nonresident tuition section of this catalog (page 10) for an explanation of non-resident fees. Contact the Admissions and Records Office for further information.

Enrollment Students may enroll online with certain exceptions (e.g., audition, prerequisite, time conflict, “in progress” class). Registration exceptions, priorities, dates and times are listed in the class schedule published for each semester. Special enrollment dates are provided for disabled and EOPS students. For further information contact the Disabled Student Services Program or EOPS staff.

Course Selection Policy, Prerequisites and Related Issues Course Selection

Although course selection is generally the student’s responsibility based on the student’s previous academic record, certain classes have prerequisites which must be met before enrollment in the class is permitted. Members of the counseling staff are available to assist students in evaluating their academic potential and in making proper class selections. Requisites

A prerequisite is a requirement which 1) is authorized by statute or regulation, 2) is necessary to protect the health and safety of students or others or 3) assures that the student will have skill or knowledge presupposed to receive at least a ‘C’ grade in a course. A corequisite is a companion course to a targeted MiraCosta course. It teaches skills and/or knowledge without which a student is highly unlikely to pass the targeted course. Course work that is determined to meet a higher-level prerequisite course may be used to clear a lower-level prerequisite (ex: If a student has cleared the prerequisite for calculus, he/she has also cleared the prerequisite for statistics). Information regarding specific prerequisites and corequisites, where applicable, is listed in the catalog as part of the course description. Meeting and Clearing Prerequisites

Students may meet prerequisites through satisfactory completion of designated MiraCosta courses or by completing course work from other regionally accredited post-secondary institutions. Additionally, students may meet prerequisites by qualifying through the appropriate MiraCosta competency exam or other approved exams. High school course work may not be used to clear prerequisites unless the prerequisite listed in the catalog specifically allows for it. Only grades of ‘C’ or higher (2.0 grade points based on a 4.0 scale, or the equivalent) may be used to clear a prerequisite unless stated otherwise in the course description. To clear prerequisites taken at another institution, students must provide a transcript or other evidence to the Admissions and Records Office along with a “Requisite Review” form. All such evidence shall be reviewed to determine applicabilty. Prerequisites must be cleared before enrolling online.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog




ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS INFORMATION

Challenge Process MiraCosta College will offer a timely challenge process to a student for any of the grounds listed below [Title 5—55201(f)]: 1. The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the course or program despite not meeting the prerequisite or corequisite; 2. The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining the goal of his/her student educational plan because the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made reasonably available; 3. The requisite or limitation on enrollment is in violation of Title 5 or was not established according to MiraCosta College Board Policy or is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an unlawfully discriminatory manner; 4. The enrollment limitation does not have a basis allowed in Title 5 or is not justified by the facts; 5. The course has a health and safety prerequisite, but the student can demonstrate that he/she does not pose a threat to himself/ herself or others. If the challenge is upheld, the student will be allowed to remain in the course or program. Specific information concerning the challenge procedure and the required forms are available in the Admissions and Records Office at each campus location.

Adding and Dropping Classes Adding Classes Full-semester length and 15-week classes may be added through the first week of the semester or, at the instructor’s discretion, through the second week. If a student wishes to add a class that is closed (full), the student may attend the first class meeting and request the instructor to sign an Add Card if room becomes available. A student has not successfully added a class until he/she has submitted the Add Card to the Admissions and Records Office and paid the appropriate fees. The instructor will ask the student to verify enrollment with the receipt obtained from the Admissions and Records Office/Student Accounts. A student may not add a class after the deadline listed in the schedule of classes. Students who believe they have extenuating circumstances for adding late may petition to the instructor and the appropriate dean. Deadlines for short-term, late-start, and open-entry classes are available in the Admissions and Records Office. Dropping Classes It is the student’s reponsibility to drop an unwanted class, although instructors may drop students who are absent for the first class meeting or for excessive absences thereafter. To avoid receiving a failing grade, a student must officially drop a class, either by using the online SURF system, or by submitting a Drop Card at the Admissions and Records Office by the appropriate deadline. The instructor’s signature is not required on the Drop Card. Three deadlines pertain to dropping a class: the first entitles the student to a refund and no record on his/her transcript; the second deadline results in a “W” (withdrawal) rather than an evaluative grade, and no refund; and the third deadline is the 60% withdrawal date for calculating return of Title IV funds for financial aid purposes. The schedule of classes lists the deadlines for full-semester and short-term classes. Transcripts from Other Colleges and Universities Official transcripts are required for certain students: 1.  Those enrolled in special programs such as athletics 2.  Those receiving financial aid 3.  Those receiving veterans’ educational benefits 4.  Those seeking an associate degree or a certificate of competence. Consult the specific program for information regarding deadlines for submitting transcripts. MiraCosta College reserves the right to evaluate work completed at other colleges.



MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Notification of Rights under FERPA The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the registrar, the registrar shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the college to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the college official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the college decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the college will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his/her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as the National Student Loan Clearinghouse, an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his/her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibility. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by MiraCosta College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605 Matriculation MiraCosta College offers a series of guidance services to all students. New students (first-time freshmen) are expected to complete a matriculation process of orientation, assessment, and advisement upon applying to the college or as soon as possible after enrolling in classes. Students who matriculate their first semester may enroll earlier than non-matriculated students. Students other than first-time freshmen are also invited to participate in the matriculation process. Any applicant to the college may expressly refuse to participate in any matriculation service. However, those who refuse are not entitled to early enrollment privileges. To matriculate, complete the process of application, orientation, assessment, and advisement described below. Application. Complete and submit the online application form or complete the application printed in the schedule of classes and submit it to the Admissions and Records Office. You will receive confirmation that all forms are in order and directions on how to proceed.


ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS INFORMATION

Orientation. Complete the online orientation or attend a group orientation session. Online orientation consists of information about college programs and services. At the end of the online orientation you will be asked ten questions to determine your understanding of the material. If you successfully pass the assessment, your records will reflect the fact within 24 hours after completing orientation. You may repeat the assessment as often as needed. At a group orientation session, we will welcome you to the college, give you a free course catalog, introduce you to terminology and planning tools used in college, outline your rights and responsibilities as a student, and orient you to the college’s academic programs and student services. We will also give you important information about assessment and advisement opportunities and requirements. Assessment. At a minimum, this process includes measuring your current skills in math and English to help you select appropriate MiraCosta College classes. You may choose one of these paths for assessment: 1. Test at MiraCosta College: Take the English Assessment (EA) or ESL Assessment (ESLA), and the Math Competency Examination (MCE). or 2. Use your placement recommendation from another California community college. Bring a copy of your placement recommendation to the Admissions and Records Office. or 3. If you have achieved one of the following minimum scores, take the documentation to the Dean of Admissions, Assessment and Student Aid, who will review it and other factors to determine placement: English Tests • an Advanced Placement Program English Test with a score of three or higher. • the International Baccalaureate Higher Level English Examination with a score of four or higher. • the California State University English Placement Test with a score of 151 or higher. • passing score on the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination (previously the Subject A Examination.) Math Tests • an Advanced Placement Program Calculus Test with a score of three or higher. • a College Level Examination Program general or subject examination in mathematics with a score at or above the 50th percentile. • An Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) test with a qualifying score: Tests prior to March 2002: 550 or higher Tests dated March 2002 and after: 50 or higher Staff will note in your MiraCosta College matriculation records that your English and/or math skills have been assessed. or 4. Challenge the prerequisite. (See page 7.) Academic Advisement. After orientation and assessment, you will receive a report of the best results from any MiraCosta College tests that you have taken and assistance in using scores to select appropriate courses. In a group setting, you will learn how to combine MiraCosta courses to meet various vocational or academic goals, including transfer to a California university. Expert assistance is offered in selecting classes for the coming term. If you are uncertain of your plans, advisers will help you select courses that will keep your options open and aid you in selecting your goal. Orientation and Advisement. This combined version of orientation and advisement is offered on campus during enrollment periods and at participating high schools each spring. To participate in this program, students must first have their English and math skills assessed by MiraCosta College and make a reservation to attend advisement by calling the Testing Office.

Eligibility for Early Enrollment. Completion of the matriculation process will entitle you to an earlier enrollment date. Whether you intend to complete a degree or take only a course or two, you will find that matriculation offers you the information you most need for planning a successful college experience. Exemption from the Matriculation Process. To be exempt from the matriculation process at MiraCosta College, a student must meet one of the following conditions: 1. The student was exempt during a previous semester or 2. The student has earned an associate or higher degree from an accredited institution; or 3. The student has previously attended another college and the student has indicated one of the following as an educational goal: • discover/formulate career interest, plans, goals • prepare for a new career (acquire job skills) • advance further in current job/career (update job skills) • maintain certificate or license (e.g. nursing, real estate) • personal interest; no intention to use credit for certificate, degree or transfer • complete credits for high school diploma or GED Exemption From Assessment (Testing) Only. To be exempt from the assessment component of matriculation a student must meet one of the following conditions: 1. The student has completed the prerequisite course with a grade of C or higher at another college for any math or English course(s) in which he/she wishes to enroll (transcript or grade report required); or 2. The student has taken an approved assessment test at another California community college which can be used to meet the prerequisite for the math or English course(s) in which he/she wishes to enroll. Student Rights and Responsibilities. You have the right to challenge or appeal any step in the matriculation process by contacting the Dean of Counseling and Special Services at (760) 795-6892. To challenge a course requisite, contact the Admissions and Records Office on either campus. Furthermore, you may refuse to participate in any matriculation service. Refusal, however, will not entitle you to early registration privileges or waive course requisites. You are responsible for expressing broad educational intent upon admission and for declaring a specific educational goal by the time you have completed 15 semester units. You are also responsible for attending class, completing assignments, receiving counseling, and maintaining progress toward your educational goal.

Math and English Placement Tests MiraCosta College offers placement tests in English and math to assist students in selecting appropriate courses. Students may choose the English Assessment or the ESL Assessment to determine course eligibility in English or ESL courses. For math courses, the Mathematics Competency Exam offers a selection of four test levels (algebra readiness, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and pre-calculus) in order to assess students’ current skills.   Adaptive math testing is available to students who are referred by Disabled Students Programs & Services, and extended time on the math test is offered through Testing Services to students who are non-native speakers of English. English and math testing is computerized, and may be done on a drop-in basis in the Testing Computer Lab located in Building 3000 on the Oceanside Campus, or in the Library and Information Hub (Building 100) on the San Elijo Campus. The schedule of classes lists specific times and locations for testing. Contact Testing Services for related information at (760) 795-6685.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog




EXPENSES

Expenses Attendance Fees All fees are subject to change. The enrollment fee is subject to revision by the California Legislature. Other fees are subject to revision by the governing board in accordance with the Education Code. Check the current class schedule or the web site www.miracosta.edu for detailed information on fees. For information about financial aid and/or scholarships available, consult the class schedule or visit the Financial Aid Office in Building 3000 on the Oceanside Campus. Enrollment Fee The college is required by state law to charge each student a per unit enrollment fee for credit classes. Check the current class schedule or the web site www.miracosta.edu for detailed information on fees. Non-Resident Tuition International students pay a per-unit Non-Resident Capital Outlay fee. A student classified as a non-resident shall be required, except as otherwise provided, to pay a non-resident fee per unit in addition to the regular enrollment fee. Check the current class schedule or the web site www.miracosta.edu for detailed information on fees. Health Services Fee All students enrolled in credit courses and taking any number of units at the Oceanside Campus, San Elijo Campus, Community Learning Center or Oceanside College of Beauty will pay a health services fee as prescribed by the governing board. Students enrolled in credit courses conducted at locations other than the Oceanside Campus, San Elijo Campus, Community Learning Center or the Oceanside College of Beauty must also pay the health fee. Companies or school districts which arrange for MiraCosta College to conduct classes at off-site locations may request a waiver of the health fee by providing proof of accident insurance. Arrangements for a fee waiver must be made with the Office of Instruction at the time negotiations are conducted for off-site classes. Students taking only online courses or studying abroad are not required to pay the health services fee. They must notify Student Accounts. Students who are enrolled in noncredit courses are not required to pay the health services fee. However, they may elect to do so if they want to avail themselves of the services. Students who depend exclusively upon prayer for healing in accordance with the teachings of a bona fide religious sect, denomination, or organization may be granted an exemption. Instructional Materials Fees Students must purchase those materials which are of continuing value outside the classroom setting, including, but not limited to, textbooks, tools, equipment, clothing, and materials which are necessary for their vocational training and employment. Textbooks and supplies may be purchased in the Spartan Bookstore. Total costs for books and supplies per semester will vary with the student’s program. Parking Fees All student vehicles parked on campus must be registered with the Parking/Campus Police Office. Offices are located in Parking Lot 1A on the Oceanside Campus and on the east side of the entrance to the San Elijo Campus. A copy of all rules and regulations regarding parking on campus is available at the Parking/Campus Police Office. A parking fee is charged for registration of each vehicle each semester with some exceptions, which are listed in the class schedule. The fee varies with the type of vehicle. Parking decals will be issued upon registration and must be properly affixed to the vehicle registered. Violators are subject to citation and fine. Student Center Fee A Student Center fee of $1 per credit unit with a maximum of $10 per academic year (summer-spring) will be charged to students enrolled

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in on-campus credit classes at the San Elijo or Oceanside campus. This fee will be waived for students who provide documentation of their participation in AFDC/TANF, SSI or General Relief. Documentation must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office. Student ID Card (optional) The student ID card supports a variety of college services such as using computer and language labs, and writing checks in the college bookstore. A valid student ID card serves as the MCC library card, expediting access to the library circulating collection and academic reserve collections. Students without a valid MCC student ID card will be asked to provide proof of current semester registration along with a government-issued photo ID and proof of current address. MiraCosta College student ID cardholders also receive discounts at various North County businesses such as movie theatres. ID cards and replacements are issued at the Student Activities offices on both campuses. One dollar of this fee supports the Chariot student newspaper. Students need to bring their receipt of purchase and a picture ID. Acceptable forms of ID are listed on the Student Activities web page. Student Eligibility for Refund A refund of enrollment, non-resident, student center and health fees will be given to eligible students: (1) Those whose classes have been canceled by the district; (2) Those who have officially dropped from classes (turned in a Drop Card to the Admissions and Records Office) during the first two weeks of a full-semester class (or by 10 percent of a short-term class); (3) Those who are members of an active or reserve military service who receive orders compelling a withdrawal from courses at any time during the semester are eligible for a full refund of fees. Processing of Refunds Processing of refunds will begin after the end of late registration. Refunds will be automatically mailed or credited to your credit card throughout the semester. If you have not received your refund by the sixth week of classes, please call the Student Accounts Office at (760) 795-6835. Fees subject to a refund: (1) Student enrollment fee (4) Student Center fee (2) Health services fee (5) Materials fee (3) Non-resident fee Students who receive federal financial aid funds and who totally withdraw before the 60 percent date of the term will require a refund and repayment calculation to determine funds owed back to the various federal aid programs by both the school and the student. Unofficial withdrawals (grades of all F’s and/or W’s) will also require a refund and repayment calculation. Refunds of the federal aid programs will be made according to a formula established by the U.S. Department of Education. Additional information is available in the Financial Aid Office. Auditing Fees Auditors will pay a non-refundable audit fee per unit and will also be charged for all instructional materials. Students enrolled in 10 or more units may audit an additional three or fewer units without paying a fee. Penalty for Dishonored Checks A penalty of $10 will be levied for every check dishonored by the bank and returned to the college. This penalty is in addition to any and all other fees, fines and charges. Processing Fees A $10 processing fee is charged for a clearance of a HOLD that has been put on a student’s record. Transcript Fees Two transcripts are provided to each student without cost. Five dollars will be charged for each additional copy.


STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Student Support Services MiraCosta College has a comprehensive program of student services. All services are provided to full- and part-time students on the Oceanside Campus. Some services are available on a regular basis at the San Elijo Campus and the Community Learning Center, and any services offered may be made available to students upon request. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to receive assistance and services throughout their educational experiences at the college.

Admissions and Oceanside, (760) 795-6620 Records Office Building 3300 San Elijo, (760) 634-7870 Administration Building The Admissions and Records Office is responsible for processing applications, enrolling students in credit and noncredit community education classes, processing grades, maintaining academic records, sending transcripts to other schools, evaluating records for graduation, and enforcing academic regulations. The function of Admissions and Records is handled in three locations: the Oceanside Campus, the San Elijo Campus, and the Community Learning Center (Adult High School Diploma Program, noncredit classes). Campus Police

Oceanside, (760) 795-6640 Building 1100 San Elijo, (760) 634-7899 Parking/Police Kiosk Community Learning Center, (760) 757-2121, ext. 8899 On Campus Emergency, ext. 6911

Campus Police is responsible for the general safety/security of students, faculty, and staff, and for maintaining the registration and orderly parking of motor vehicles. Students are required to purchase parking permits each semester and may park at the Oceanside Campus in marked stalls in student lots 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4C, 5A or 5B as well as marked spaces along Barnard Drive. At the San Elijo Campus and Community Learning Center, students may park in marked spaces in student lots. Daily parking permits may be purchased at the Community Learning Center and San Elijo Campus only. Campus guests and visitors not driving a college-registered vehicle must obtain a visitor’s permit at the Parking/Campus Police Office. The District accepts no responsibility for damage to vehicles or their contents parked on District property. (See Operation of Vehicles/Parking, MCC Gov. Board Policy VIII G 2.) Disabled students who require special parking must have a Department of Motor Vehicles (D.M.V.) placard or plate, which can be obtained at the local D.M.V. office. Students who have a valid disabled placard or plate may obtain a free parking permit at Campus Police. Temporary parking arrangements can be made for students who sustain a temporary injury; these permits are available at the Disabled Student Services Office. MiraCosta College Parking Guidelines are available at Campus Police Offices and online at: www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/campuspolice/ parkingregulations.htm

Students, staff, faculty and campus guests may request an escort from Campus Police. The service is provided during regular office hours at each campus location. Campus Police also assist with vehicle lock outs, jump starts, and traffic control, and hosts community policing events, a victim assistance program, and women’s self defense program. For more information on these services or for questions or comments about safety and security on campus, contact Campus Police at (760) 795-6640. Hours of the Parking/Campus Police office at each campus are as follows: Oceanside Campus — (760) 795-6640 7 a.m. - 11 p.m., Monday-Thursday 7 a.m. - 11 p.m., Friday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m., Saturday San Elijo Campus — (760) 634-7899 7 a.m. - 10 p.m., Monday-Friday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m., Saturday Community Learning Center — (760) 757-2121, ext. 8899 7 a.m. - 10:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m., Friday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m., Saturday

Crime and Safety Statistics Reported in accordance with the Uniform Crime Reporting Procedures and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and the Campus Crime Statistics Act. REPORTED CRIMES, 2003-2005 Oceanside (OC) & San Elijo (SAN) campuses and the Community Learning Center (CLC) OC SAN CLC ’03 ’04 ’05 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’03 ’04 ’05 Murder.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Manslaughter.................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Forcible sex offenses........................ 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Non-forcible sex offenses................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Robbery............................................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aggravated assault........................... 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 Burglary............................................ 2 12 16 0 5 0 0 0 1 Arson................................................ 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Stolen vehicles................................. 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Theft...............................................18 22 15 2 3 2 5 3 3 Crimes listed above or other crimes of bodily injury classified as hate crimes, listed by category of prejudice.

Race.................................................0 Gender............................................. 0 Religion............................................ 0 Sexual Orientation............................ 0 Ethnicity............................................ 0 Disability........................................... 0

Liquor Law Violations Referral............................................. 0 Arrest................................................ 4 Drug Law Violations Referral............................................. 0 Arrest................................................ 7 Weapons Violations Referral............................................. 0 Arrest................................................ 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 2 1 0

0 0 5 0

0 1 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 3 0 1

1 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 2 2

MiraCosta College campuses include buildings and property owned or controlled by the college within the same contiguous geographic area and used in direct support of the college’s educational or institutional purposes. Non-campus building or property includes those owned or controlled by the college and are used in direct support of educational purposes, used frequently by students, and are not within the same contiguous geographic area as the campus. Public property includes city thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks and parking facilities that are within or immediately adjacent to the any of the college campuses.

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Career Center Oceanside, (760) 795-6772 Building 3700 Services include career assessment, exploration, counseling, workshops, and on- and off-campus employment and assistance with job placement, Cooperative Work Experience Education, and Internship Studies. The Career Resource Lab is equipped with upto-date career planning software and access to all relevant Internet sites. Print resources include a collection of reference books on careers, labor market forecasts, resume writing, interview techniques and more. Services are offered through individual sessions and group workshops on a walk-in and by-appointment basis. For more information, go to www.miracosta.edu/Careers. Child Development Center Oceanside, (760) 795-6656 Building 8000 The Child Development Center at MiraCosta College provides developmentally appropriate, play based, inclusive early care and education for children between the ages of 18 months and 5 ½ years. MiraCosta College students receive priority enrollment, a reduction of fees and extended hours of care. The center also accepts enrollment applications for faculty, staff and community families. The morning program is from 8:45 am until noon and the afternoon program is from 12:45-4 pm. Extended care is available from 7:15-8:45 am and from 4-4:45 pm, extended care is only available to students who are enrolled in a class at that time. The lunch program is from 12-12:45 pm. All programs follow the school’s semester schedule throughout the academic year. Please visit the center and pick up an application for enrollment. You may also take a tour and download an application via MiraCosta College’s web site. For specific information and program requirements, call the center at 795-6656, stop by the center, building 8000, or visit us online at www.miracosta.edu/childdev.

Counseling Services (760) 795-6670 Oceanside, Building 3700 San Elijo, Administration Building Counselors help students make effective academic, personal, and career decisions. Counseling services are generally offered through individual sessions. Online advising, workshops, group sessions, and classes are also available. Academic advising is available to students seeking assistance with choosing and developing their programs, and with graduation, major, certificate and transfer requirements. Career counseling is also provided through The Center for Career Studies and Services, (760) 795-6772. Personal counseling is available to assist students in decision making, problem solving, and developing an awareness of themselves and their relationships with others. Referrals are provided by the counselors to various on-campus and community agencies when special expertise is needed. Disabled Student Programs Oceanside, (760) 795-6658 and Services (DSP&S) or TTY (760) 439-1060 Building 3000 MiraCosta College is committed to ensuring that students with disabilities receive appropriate accommodations in their instructional activities as mandated by federal and state law and by college/district policy. A student seeking an academic accommodation due to a documented disability may request assistance from Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSP&S). The student must present verifying documentation of his/her disability from a qualified professional as determined by DSP&S. DSP&S will assess and document the extent of the student’s educational functional limitations. Depending on the educational functional limitations and severity of the disability, DSP&S will recommend appropriate accommodations while maintaining academic integrity. Accommodations may include test accommodation, interpreters or real-time captioning for the deaf; alternate media, i.e., Braille, large print, e-text; and priority enrollment. In addition, the department offers High Tech Center assessment, liaison with the Physical Education Department, special noncredit classes for the developmentally delayed learner, and learning strategies classes designed for students with learning disabilities. All services are designed to help students participate fully in the regular college program.

CalWORKs and Employer Liaison Laura Ponterotto was honored as the Classified Staff Member of the Year at the 2007 graduation ceremony. Among her many responsibilities, Laura coordinates First Impressions, a program designed to provide MiraCosta College students with career clothing free of charge for job interviews and job retention.

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Extended Opportunity Oceanside, (760) 795-6680 Programs and Services (EOPS) Building 3000 Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) is a state-wide outreach and special assistance program which provides a unique educational support system for individuals from educationally and financially disadvantaged backgrounds. EOPS participants receive advising, special financial aid information and assistance, plus a wide variety of other services. Apply by completing: 1. Board of Governors Fee Waiver application (available in the class schedule and at the Financial Aid Office). 2. MiraCosta College enrollment application (available at the Admissions and Records Office). 3. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and all necessary documents (available in the Financial Aid Office). To qualify you must: 1. be a disadvantaged student according to criteria established by state regulations. 2. enroll in a minimum of 12 units. EOPS works to foster pride and dignity in students, thereby increasing self-esteem and motivation to make education accessible. Financial Aid Office Oceanside, (760) 795-6711 Building 3000 Financial aid includes a variety of federal and state programs designed to provide students access to an education. Financial aid is not designed to provide total support but to bridge the gap between educational costs and available resources. Total processing time can take 6 to 12 weeks, so early application is recommended. Students need to be prepared to pay initial school expenses. Programs available at MiraCosta College include the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Stafford Loans. State programs include the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services, the Board of Governors Fee Waiver which assists with enrollment fees, Cal Grant B or C, and the Chafee Grant, designed specifically for Foster Youth. Students should use the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), so that the output from the application reaches the Financial Aid Office while the student is still enrolled in school. To be considered for a Cal Grant, the FAFSA must be filed by March 2 of each year, preceding the school year. Students who wish to borrow under the Federal Stafford Loan (subsidized and/or unsubsidized) must complete their file, including all necessary documentation, no later than mid-April of the appropriate school year. A separate application for the Board of Governors Fee Waiver is in each semester’s class schedule. Verification of income will be required. Applicants for federal aid must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States; possess a high school diploma or its equivalent, or be at least 18 years of age and be able to demonstrate an ability to benefit from college-level instruction; be enrolled in an eligible program leading to a certificate, degree, or transfer; maintain financial aid satisfactory academic progress; and not be in default on a federal student loan or owe a repayment of federal grant funds. Students enrolled less than half-time are not eligible for student loan programs, FSEOG, ACG, or Federal Work Study.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress In order to remain eligible for financial aid, students must successfully complete 75% of the units in which they enrolled, (as determined by enrollment status), and maintain a cumulative “C” average (2.0 grade point average). Upon completion of 67.5 attempted units, financial aid eligibility at MiraCosta College will be determined based on each student’s Maximum Time Frame appeal. The full Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress and Appeals policy is available at www.miracosta.edu/financialaid/ Refunds Students who receive federal financial aid funds and who totally withdraw before the 60 percent date of the semester will require a refund and repayment calculation to determine funds owed back to the various federal aid programs by both the school and the student. Unofficial withdrawals (grades of all F’s and/or W’s) will also require a refund and repayment calculation. Refunds of the federal aid programs will be made according to the formula established by the U.S. Department of Education. Additional information is available in the Financial Aid Office. Ineligible Programs/Courses for Federal Financial Aid Eligible programs must be a minimum of 15 weeks in length and require at least 16 semester units. When used as the major for an associate degree, a program which is not eligible as a certificate program may be eligible as a degree program. Certificate programs are described in another section of this catalog. Any pre-collegiate courses taken to meet high school requirements are ineligible, even if they can also be used toward a degree program. AUDITED CLASSES AND CREDIT BY EXAM—courses taken in this manner cannot be considered in determining financial aid eligibility. REPEATED COURSES—repeated course work for which a grade of A, B, C, D, or CR has already been earned cannot be considered in determining financial aid eligibility unless the course has been designated as repeatable; repeatable courses are identified in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalog. REMEDIAL COURSE WORK—once a student has attempted 30 units of remedial course work (whether successfully completed or not), no additional remedial courses can be included when determining enrollment status for federal financial aid programs.

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Scholarships Oceanside, (760) 795-6751 Building 3000 Continuing MiraCosta students, graduating high school seniors planning to attend MiraCosta, and students transferring to a fouryear college may apply for scholarships. Scholarships are funded by the MiraCosta College Foundation, local service organizations, businesses, and individuals. General scholarships are available as well as scholarships for students pursuing specific academic fields. Food Pantry The Food Pantry provides emergency food assistance to students in need. Any student who is currently enrolled at MiraCosta College qualifies for support. The program provides short term relief and offers referrals for additional community resources. All services are confidential. Food distribution is handled by the following Student Services Offices: • Service Learning Oceanside Campus- Room 3445 (760) 795-6616 • EOPS Oceanside Campus -Building 3000 (760) 795-6680 • Health Services Oceanside Campus-Building 3300 (760) 795-6675 Food Services

Oceanside, (760) 795-6886 Building 3400 San Elijo, Student Center The Oceanside Campus food service, located on the upper level of the Student Center, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner during the school year and for morning breaks and lunch during the summer. Daily lunch specials, homemade soups, sandwiches, hamburgers, fries, salads, fruits, vegetarian foods, desserts, and hot and cold drinks are available from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., MondayThursday, and 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Friday. Students can enjoy their meals in the dining room with an ocean view or in one of the patio areas. In the Student Lounge at the San Elijo Campus vending machines sell sandwiches, salads, snacks and beverages.

Health Services

Oceanside, (760) 795-6675 Building 3300 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7747 Administration Building MiraCosta College’s Student Health Services Program is available at both the Oceanside and San Elijo campuses. Our goal is to help students achieve their desired educational objectives by maintaining optimal physical, mental and emotional health. The mandated fee covers the cost of secondary student accident insurance and helps to fund the operational expenses of the Student Health Services centers. Most health and medical services are provided without additional charges to students. Required lab tests are offered at a reduced rate. The Student Health Services centers are staffed by registered nurses who are trained to assist students who have medical and health problems. Health Services focuses its services and programs in the following areas: 1. Nursing services provided by registered nurses 2. Health education and promotional events 3. Health assessment 4. Sexually transmitted disease testing information, and referral 5. Medical services by physician and nurse practitioner 6. Personal counseling through the MFT intern program 7. Community resources listing and referral 8. Wellness classes 9. Service Learning opportunities

Honor Society Oceanside, (760) 795-6760 Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society was established more than 80 years ago to acknowledge and promote the academic achievements of two-year college students. In 1929, Phi Theta Kappa became the official honor society for two-year colleges. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunities for each student to nurture his or her own personal growth in leadership and service. With a membership of more than one million students throughout 1,100 worldwide chapters, Phi Theta Kappa is the largest honor society in American higher education. Membership benefits include the Phi Theta Kappa diploma seal; the privilege of wearing the honors stole and tassel at graduation; a myriad of scholarships (over $30 million); the chance to travel to

MiraCosta College’s food pantry provides emergency assistance to MiraCosta students in the form of canned foods, grocery store gift cards and cafeteria vouchers. MiraCosta accepts donations to support the food pantry. Cash donations, checks and grocery store gift cards can be mailed to the MiraCosta College Foundation. If donating canned food items, please bring them directly to the Service Learning Office located in the Student Center (Building 3400).

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

various conferences throughout the year; and the honor of becoming an alumni member after graduation. These are just a few of the benefits of becoming a member. For transfer students, transcripts sent to senior institutions will have the Phi Theta Kappa stamp. Requirements for Membership: • Student must be enrolled at MiraCosta College at time of application • Student must have successfully completed 12 or more units at MiraCosta College • Student must have a GPA (at MiraCosta College) of at least 3.5 Gold, Gods, and Glory: The Global Dynamics of Power

Each year Phi Theta Kappa selects a theme intended to unite faculty and students across disciplines. The theme provides an academic focal point, prompting discussions and activities both in class and out. Phi Theta Kappa’s 2007-08 Honors Study Topic, Gold, Gods, and Glory: The Global Dynamics of Power, takes its name from historical references to Christopher Columbus’ bygone era. But the three G’s are just as relevant to understanding the dynamics of power today as in Columbus’ day. Wealth or resources (gold), religion or spirituality (gods), and honor or pride (glory) continue to be sources through which power is attained, and forces that motivate individuals and nations to seek power. Over the next two years, we will explore the dynamics of power on personal, interpersonal, societal and global levels. We will seek to understand how gold, gods, and glory are rationales for acquiring power, address how gold, gods, and glory provide access to power, explore the effects of power, recognize the power of symbols, and look at how power is sustained or lost. In addition, we will examine the dynamics of power from an historical perspective, so that we may learn lessons to apply to our understanding of the dynamics of power in our own lives, our nation, and the world today. There is no denying that power is shifting and changing the current global landscape. Many questions can be asked to explore Gold, Gods, and Glory: The Global Dynamics of Power. Who has power? How was their power attained? How and why has power shifted over time? How is power used and misused? Why is power sought? How has the use and misuse of power changed the world? These questions and others will determine our course as we look at power from an historical perspective, examining powerful people and civilizations of the past. We will ask these questions to learn about the power at play in our personal lives, in our relationships with others, and in our societies. And hopefully, we will apply what we learn about ourselves and what we learn from history toward a better understanding of the current dynamics of power in our global environment.

Honors Scholar Program Oceanside, (760) 795-6878 Students interested in Phi Theta Kappa may also want to consider the Honors Scholar Program, an academic program offering the possibility of graduating with honors. Graduates of the Honors Scholar Program (see page 41) will be eligible for priority or guaranteed admission to certain competitive four-year colleges and universities. Housing Referral Oceanside, (760) 795-6890 Building 3400 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7782 Student Center The Student Activities Office maintains a book for students who need housing or a roommate. Arrangements may include rooms, apartments, houses to rent/share, or room and board in exchange for work. Housing Referral is located on the upper level of the Student Center in the Student Activities Office, Oceanside Campus and in the Student Lounge at the San Elijo Campus. ID Cards Oceanside, (760) 795-6890 Building 3400 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7782 Student Center The MiraCosta College Student ID Card is helpful when checking out library materials including reserved materials, using the computer labs, writing checks in the college bookstores, identification for test-taking, using certain college facilities and more. Additionally, the card may be used for off-campus discounts at participating copy centers, theatres, restaurants, clubs, museums and sports events just to name a few. With the discount on just two movie tickets, a cardholder will save more than the cost of the ID card. Funded activities include: Student government and campus clubs, community events, cultural celebrations such as AfricanAmerican History Month, Asian Pacific events, Cinco de Mayo, ASG elections, and the Chariot student newspaper. How to get your ID card: 1. Pay your fees at enrollment; 2. Bring your receipt to the Student Activities Office, upper level, Student Center, Oceanside Campus or Student Lounge, San Elijo Campus along with one of the following valid forms of identification: • A valid driver’s license containing a photograph. • A temporary California driver’s license containing a photograph.

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• A valid state-issued identification card containing a photograph. • A valid United States Military I.D. card (active duty, reserve, dependent). • A valid driver’s license issued by a Canadian government authority. • A valid driver’s license issued by the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico or Virgin Islands. • A valid U.S. passport. • A valid foreign passport. • A valid alien registration card (“Green Card”). • California Department of Corrections Privilege card [CDC 130-A(7-88)]. • Matrícula Consular; 3. Have your picture taken and the card made while you wait; 4. Be sure to have a current sticker on the card.

Information Center Oceanside, (760) 795-6890 Building 3400 If you have any news or information you want to give out for free, bring a copy to the Student Activities Office and it will be displayed at the Information Center. Posting/Publicity Regulations: All items posted on campus must be approved by the Student Activities Office. Posting is allowed only on designated bulletin boards. Items may be posted for two weeks. All flyers, posters, and banners will be date-stamped by the Student Activities Office. More specific information on posting regulations is available at the Student Activities Office in the Student Center, Oceanside Campus or Student Lounge, San Elijo Campus.

International Students Oceanside, (760) 795-6897 and Study Abroad Building 3400 Institute for International Perspectives The Institute for International Perspectives (IIP) endeavors to internationalize the MiraCosta College campus by supporting international students, administering study abroad programs, as well as promoting international cultural activities. The IIP supports international students enrolled on an F-1 visa in our academic programs and the full-time intensive English language program offered through Community Services (English Language and College Skills Institute). International students with an F-1 or M-1 visa must contact the IIP and review the admission requirements found under Admissions and Records. The IIP also offers a variety of international study programs to various countries around the world. Programs range from short-term courses on single academic subjects to semester-long programs requiring full-time enrollment. Study-abroad programs offer only courses approved in accordance with the Education Code and Title 5 regulations by faculty meeting the minimum qualifications for providing instruction. Further information may be obtained by calling the Institute for International Perspectives, (760) 795-6897, or by looking on the MiraCosta College web site: www.miracosta.edu/iip Library and Information Hubs Oceanside, (760) 795-6715 Building 1200 San Elijo, (760) 634-7850 Building 100 The MiraCosta College Libraries provide extensive resources and services for students, faculty and staff. Information resources include: • More than 73,000 books, 5,100 DVDs/videos, and 2,200 CDs. • Online reference databases covering a variety of disciplines such as science, literature, health, social sciences and the humanities.

Congratulations to MiraCosta College’s 2007 Medal of Honor Winners Medals of Honor for Academic Excellence are awarded each year to those students nominated by the teaching faculty and having a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 in degree-applicable courses. Sponsored by the MiraCosta College Foundation, it is the college’s highest academic honor. Back row, left to right: Racquel Dudzinski, Zach Young, Angelito dela Cruz, Aaron Gonzales, Jenelle Raynowska Front row: Roberta Laub Rode, Azin Alavi, Yang Shirley Song, Winnifred Gakuya, Joie Peringer

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

• Access to over 8,000 periodicals titles through full-text online databases such as ProQuest Direct and JSTOR. • E-book collection of almost 20,000 titles. • Remote access for students, staff & faculty to all library databases (requires SURF ID and password.) • A current collection of bestsellers and leisure reading. • CD, DVD, video and cassette players, as well as adaptive technology devices. • Web accessible computers equipped with productivity software. • Printing, photocopying and scanning equipment. Information and instructional services include: • Reference services available in-person, by e-mail and by phone. • Library instruction geared to the needs of specific classes upon request. • Self-paced and online Library Science credit courses. • Reciprocal borrowing privileges with the Palomar College and Cal State San Marcos libraries. • Group study facilities. • Interlibrary loan for books and periodical articles. Library and Information Hubs at both Oceanside and San Elijo campuses are open: Monday – Thursday, 8:00 am – 9:30 pm Friday , 8:00 am – 3:00 pm Saturday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. On legal or administrative holidays and during semester breaks, the libraries may be closed or on a special schedule. Changes in hours are posted on the library web page and in each library as necessary, and are also recorded at (760) 795-6717. For more information, consult the MiraCosta College Library web page at www.miracosta.edu/Instruction/Library/.

Lost & Found Oceanside, (760) 795-6640 Building 1100 San Elijo, (760) 634-7899 Administration Building Lost & Found is located at the Parking/Campus Police Office at the Oceanside Campus, and in the Administration Building at the San Elijo Campus. Puente Project Oceanside, (760) 757-2121, ext 6296 Building 3700 Founded in 1981 at Chabot College, the Puente Project was originally created to increase the number of Mexican-American/ Latino students transferring to four year colleges and universities. Since then, Puente has expanded to colleges and high schools throughout the state. It is now open to all students who want to succeed academically, gain recognition as leaders, and graduate from four-year universities. Puente is a year-long program that includes intensive writing instruction, one-on-one work with a counselor to develop an educational plan, work with community-based mentors, and cultural activities. Complete information is available at www.miracosta.edu/studentservices/puente

Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) MiraCosta College does not have an ROTC program. However, through an agreement with the Air Force and Army ROTC and San Diego State University, qualified students at MiraCosta College may participate in these programs at San Diego State University’s Extended Studies Department. The two- to four-year programs are conducted on the campus of San Diego State University. Further information can be obtained by calling San Diego State University at (619) 594-5545. School Relations/ Oceanside, (760) 795-6894 Outreach Building 3400 This program is designed to serve as a resource for students, parents, faculty, and staff from schools in the college service area, and is responsible for implementing student outreach services to encourage diversity in the student body. General goals are: • Encourage all students to prepare for and pursue a college education by providing college workshops and pre-enrollment advising services • Provide target outreach services for under-represented and educationally disadvantaged students in order to encourage their enrollment in college • Assist students with their transition into college by providing them with matriculation and admissions-related services • Establish partnerships and maintain positive relations with the administration, faculty, and staff of district K-12 schools • Represent MiraCosta and promote the college in the community. Student Accounts Office

Oceanside, (760) 795-6835 Building 3200 San Elijo, (760) 634-7762 Administration Building Students may pay all fees (including parking citations, child care and transcripts), pick up scholarship checks, process Military Tuition Assistance forms, deferment forms, In-Progress waivers, and audit forms. Students eligible for EOPS/FA emergency loans may pick up their checks. Staff at the Student Accounts Office are not permitted to cash personal or payroll checks. Forms of payment accepted at the Student Accounts Office include cash, checks, money orders, and VISA/MC. Enrollment and related fees may also be paid online at surf.miracosta.edu

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Student Activities Office

Oceanside, (760) 795-6890 Building 3400 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7782 Student Center The Student Activities Office is rich with activities, events, information, and resources, and acts as a focal point for service and leadership development programs. Programs and Services • Support for the Associated Student Government of MiraCosta College • Support for campus clubs • Support for The Chariot student newspaper • Campus Information Center including posting approval and literature distribution • Campus social, recreational, cultural, and educational programming • Community service and volunteer activities • Emerging Leaders Institute • Housing referrals • On-campus events These services enhance the educational experience of students and foster social, intellectual, and physical growth. The staff is firmly committed to actively promoting student involvement and development. The Student Activities Office is located on the upper level of the Student Center, Room 3435, Oceanside Campus and in the Student Lounge at the San Elijo Campus. Office hours for Oceanside are Monday-Thursday, 8:00 a.m.7:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; and San Elijo: MondayThursday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Associated Student Oceanside, (760) 795-6891 Government of Building 3400 MiraCosta College San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7782 As a student of MiraCosta College, you are a member of the Associated Students of MiraCosta College. Managing the affairs of the associated students is the Associated Student Government (ASG). The goal of the ASG is to give a voice to all MiraCosta

MiraCosta College Service Learning Coordinator Carol Wilkinson is the 2007 Richard E. Cone Award recipient. The award recognizes one individual who has made significant contributions to the development of partnerships between institutions of higher education and communities surrounding the campus.

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students, enabling them to become part of the college community. ASG’s major responsibilities are: appointing students to campuswide committees, sharing governance in the development of college policies and annual budget, adopting and overseeing use of an annual ASG budget, allocating funds for new programs/ projects, granting club charters, and providing and administering a program of activities and services for students. Any interested student with a 2.5 GPA or above and enrolled in at least five units each semester is eligible to seek an ASG office. The weekly meetings of ASG are called the Student Senate and are open to all MiraCostans. Come by the Student Activities Office to find out the meeting times and see what it’s all about.

Student Senate Positions Students who manage the business of the Student Senate represent a variety of ages, interests, and academic majors. They sometimes have prior experience in student government, or often they are simply interested in discovering their leadership potential through participation. Each member gains valuable experience through exposure to the variety of requests and programs addressed by the Student Senate. The following officers compose the Student Senate: Elected positions are president/student trustee, executive vice president, vice president of the San Elijo Campus. Appointed positions are vice president of programming, Oceanside Campus; vice president of the Community Learning Center; vice president of programming, San Elijo Campus; vice president of public relations; chair of the Inter-Organizations Council; and 22 senators. Campus Clubs Joining a campus club is a great way to  enrich your academic experience at MiraCosta. There are clubs of all types on campus and they change periodically with the changing interests of the student body. All club members have a voice through the Inter-Club Council (ICC), to which each club sends a representative. ICC develops effective, organized, and fair policies so all clubs will thrive. ICC also sponsors a “Club Recruitment Day” each semester, which gives interested students an opportunity to learn about the various clubs on campus and allows clubs to increase their membership. To start a club, file a petition for a charter (forms available at the Student Activities Office), which must include a list of 10 credit students and a full-time staff/faculty adviser. Attach a proposed constitution and submit the petition to the Student Activities Office. For more information, contact the Chair, Inter-Club Council, in the Associated Student Government offices, 795-6891, or the Student Activities Office at 795-6890. Following are the chartered clubs at MiraCosta. Not all clubs listed here are currently active. Check with the Student Activities Office for more information.


STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Athletics Fencing Club Soccer Club Career Allied Health Club Bio-Med Club Future Educators Club Departmental Anthropology Backstage Players Club Natural Science Club Honors/Service Phi Theta Kappa Religious Catholic Club Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship Club Muslim Student Association Multicultural/Ethnic Black Student Union International Club Japanese Club Latina Leadership Network MEChA Puente/Cultural Diversity Club Spanish Club Special Interest Anime Club Art Club Barrio Arte Club Dance Club Friends of the EOPS Pride Alliance (LGBTSA) Producers Club

Athletics MiraCosta College participates in the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference, which also includes Grossmont, Palomar, Southwestern, San Diego City, San Diego Mesa, and Imperial Valley colleges. Intercollegiate teams compete in men’s and women’s basketball and soccer. MiraCosta College also has a surf team which competes in the collegiate division of the National Scholastic Surfing Association (NSSA). MiraCosta also offers an intramural sports program open to all students. To participate in intercollegiate athletics, a student must be admitted to the college and must meet eligibility requirements of the conference and the State Athletic Code. College students with first-year standing are immediately eligible in their first sport. Special rules apply to transfer students, out-of-state, and out-of-district students. Students wishing to determine eligibility status should consult with the athletic director, Martin Spring, (760) 795-6892. The Chariot— Oceanside, (760) 757-2121, ext. 6254 Student Newspaper Building 3400 The Chariot, MiraCosta College’s official student newspaper, serves the college by covering campus news and features as well as offering opinion pieces, community information, and student activity announcements. In the process, Chariot staffers have the opportunity to gain practical experience in all aspects of newspaper production. Published every week during the regular school year, The Chariot is distributed free of charge to students, faculty, and staff.

College Hour College Hour is a program of student events and activities during the noon hour on Thursdays during fall and spring semesters. Since some classes are scheduled during this time, students who wish to be involved should arrange their schedules to keep the time slot free. College Hour events include concerts, meetings, performances, games, interactive workshops, club activities, and lectures. Service Learning Oceanside, (760) 795-6616 Program Building 3400 The Service Learning Program partners academic instruction with community service. Students work with their instructors and the Service Learning Center to find meaningful service opportunities in the community related to classroom learning. Students participate in youth programs, environmental efforts, homeless and hunger programs, senior services, literacy programs, and many more. Through these community placements, students gain practical experience which can be linked to classroom theory. Students can explore career possibilities and add work experience to their resumes. There is an increased awareness of community needs and active effort to address these needs. The Service Learning Office is located in the Student Center, Room 3445. Spartan Bookstores Oceanside, (760) 795-6630, Building 3400 San Elijo, (760) 634-7830, Room 307 Community Learning Center, (760) 795-8708 The Spartan Bookstores are operated by Follett, Inc. The Oceanside bookstore is located in the Student Center; the San Elijo bookstore is located in Building 300. All textbooks may also be ordered through www.efollet.com Textbooks and school supplies needed for MiraCosta College classes are available, as well as computer software, art supplies, calculators, tape recorders, batteries, backpacks, clothing, snacks, greeting cards, gifts and sundries.

Student Ambassador Oceanside, (760) 795-6894 Program Building 3400 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7768 Student Ambassadors are MiraCosta students hired by the School Relations/Outreach Department. Ambassadors serve as peer advisers to high school students in district schools, develop workshops for elementary and junior high school students, provide information at community events, provide on-campus tours and perform a variety of other high-profile assignments. Ambassadors must be enrolled in at least six units, maintain a 2.0 grade point average and be available to work between 5 and 15 hours per week. The School Relations/Outreach Office is located on the upper level of the Student Center, Room 3435, Oceanside Campus.

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Student Employment Services See Career Center description, page 12.

Oceanside Campus Building 3700

Tech Prep Oceanside, (760) 757-2121, ext. 6578 College credit for high school classes Building 3700 The Tech Prep program awards college credit to high school students who earn an A or B in career-related “articulated” high school courses. An articulated course is one in which the high school teacher and MiraCosta College faculty have formally agreed that the high school course’s outline, syllabus, textbook and final exam are comparable to those in a course of the same major at MiraCosta College. Over 40 different high school courses have been articulated in the following majors: Accounting, Automotive Technology, Business Administration, Business Office Technology, Child Development, Computer and Information Science, Design Drafting Technology, Horticulture and Nursing. Students who are taking courses in these majors at Carlsbad, El Camino, Fallbrook, Ocean Shores, Oceanside, Rancho Buena Vista, San Dieguito Academy, Torrey Pines, Valley Center and Vista high schools may be eligible for Tech Prep credit. To find out more about the Tech Prep program call the Tech Prep Office or visit the website: www.miracosta.edu/techprep. Testing Services Oceanside, (760) 795-6685 Building 3000 Testing Services administers tests for course placement and serves as a test center for the Ability to Benefit (ATB) test, the American College Testing Program (ACT), and the General Education Development (GED) test. By individual arrangement, Testing Services also administers external examinations and an examination on the U.S. Constitution used for California teacher certification. MiraCosta’s initial course placement tests (the English Assessment, ESL Assessment, and the Math Competency Exam) and the Ability to Benefit test are offered free of charge. All other tests require payment of fees at the time of application. Fees vary, and in most cases, they are nonrefundable. MiraCosta’s course placement tests are open to students who have submitted their application for admission or who are currently enrolled. Adaptive testing is available to students referred by Dis-

abled Student Programs and Services, and extended time on the math test is offered to students who are non-native speakers of English. Scores may be used to meet various academic requirements. Questions concerning the accuracy of scores must be addressed to Testing Services within six weeks of test completion. Computerized English and math testing is done at the Testing Services lab in Oceanside, the Tutoring Center at the San Elijo Campus, and at the Community Learning Center. You are allowed to take the English or ESL Assessment, any of the four mathematics tests, or the Ability to Benefit test twice. Tests given through our high school outreach testing program will not be counted toward this maximum. Students must wait at least 24 hours after their initial test before retesting. Individuals who do not intend to enroll at MiraCosta College, but who wish to take the English or ESL Assessment, any of the four mathematics tests, and/or the Ability to Benefit test will be charged $30 per test. General Education Development Test (GED) The GED is offered several times during the year. Examinees must be 18 years of age and provide acceptable photo ID to register and to test. GED registration is available at Testing Services, Oceanside Campus; Admissions & Records, San Elijo Campus; and the Community Learning Center, 1831 Mission Ave., Oceanside. Scores are mailed to examinees approximately two weeks after test completion. Those who need to meet a deadline should take the test at least two months before the deadline.

Tutoring and Academic Oceanside, (760) 795-6682 Support Center Building 1200 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7748 Room 105 Community Learning Center, (760) 795-8724 Room 130 The Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) is committed to enhancing student retention and success by providing assistance to students through innovative academic support services. Full- and part-time students enrolled at MiraCosta College are eligible to use these services free of charge. TASC helps students by providing individual and group tutoring, mentoring, learning communities, supplemental instruction, selfhelp materials, and student success workshops on a variety of subjects. Services are available during day and evening hours at the Community Learning Center, San Elijo and Oceanside campuses.

“The program at MiraCosta College allows guys like me, who may have not done so well in school early on, to get a second chance.” -Brendan Duffy, Marine Corps veteran, received a $500 math scholarship from the MiraCosta Math Department and transferred into UCLA’s Math and Economics Program, where he was one of only 65 students in the nation chosen to receive the UCLA Transfer Alliance Program (TAP) Scholarship, which is worth at least $5,000 a year.

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University Transfer Center Oceanside, (760) 795-6880 Building 3700 The University Transfer Center is committed to providing services which directly assist potential transfer students preparing for upper-division work at a four-year college or university. The University Transfer Center attempts to identify and encourage students who choose transfer as their educational goal. Advising sessions with university representatives, transfer workshops, and trips to college and university Transfer Days are some of the services provided. The staff in the University Transfer Center coordinate all transfer admission guarantee programs. University Transfer Center counselors are available for all students who wish to have an individual student educational plan tailored to their personal goals. In addition, advising is provided for special programs such as UniversityLink and the Honors Scholar Program. The University Transfer Center makes many resource materials available for students such as college/university catalogs, articulation agreements, reference books, videos, computers to access information and applications for university admissions, and brochures. The University Transfer Center works closely with other student support services at MiraCosta and four-year universities in order to enhance the transfer function at MiraCosta College.

Veterans Services Oceanside, (760) 757-2121, ext. 6285 Building 3300 The college assists eligible veterans and dependents in obtaining their VA education benefits and achieving their educational goals. These services are provided at no cost to the student. Students receiving GI Bill Educational Benefits are subject to the following general policies: 1. Students must declare a major and enroll in classes required for their major. 2. Students must have ALL prior college and military credit evaluated. Transcripts must be received by the college before the end of the first semester. 3. Students must meet with a MiraCosta academic counselor to obtain an educational plan during their first semester. 4. Students must be making satisfactory progress toward their educational goals. 5. Students must report all changes in their educational status, including adds and drops in class schedule, education plans or TAG agreements to the MiraCosta College Veterans Services Office. Continuing students should notify the appropriate staff member of their intention to continue the GI Bill prior to the end of each term to prevent interruption. Because not all classes are VA approved, students should have their classes reviewed by a counselor. Students changing their major must file the necessary paperwork and make a counseling appointment to update their education plan. It takes approximately six to eight weeks to process a VA Education Claim.

California Veteran Dependent Exemption The basic benefit is the waiver of tuition and required incidental fees at a California community college, California State University or University of California. Dependents who may be eligible for this benefit include: a child or surviving spouse of a veteran who died in the line of duty or as a result of a service-connected disability, the child or spouse of a totally disabled service-connected veteran, or a child of a veteran who has applied for a service-connected disability and has received a rating of zero or more percent and falls within the income guidelines. Writing Center Oceanside, (760) 795-6682 Building 1200 San Elijo, (760) 944-4449, ext. 7748 Room 105 Community Learning Center, (760) 757-2121, ext. 8724 Room 130 The Writing Center (WC) provides assistance with writing for any MiraCosta College course through a variety of services. Full- and part-time students enrolled at MiraCosta are eligible to use these services free of charge. The WC offers appointments, learning communities, lab assistance, and student success workshops, as well as a drop-in service at the Oceanside and San Elijo campuses. Specific services are available at the Community Learning Center as well. The WC also makes selected resources available to students, including grammar guides, style manuals, tip sheets, and constructive toys which students may use within the center at any campus.

The MiraCosta Writing Center offers a variety of workshops that encourage students to “build” papers and think “outside the box” about their writing.

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PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION

Programs of Instruction Students wishing more information about courses than can be contained in the brief catalog description may access Courses of Study online at www.miracosta.edu/instruction/WebCMS by selecting Public Access and searching on discipline/number. These “outlines of record” include the minimum standards for each course regarding objectives, skills to be imparted, subject matter covered, level of difficulty involved, kinds and frequency of assignments/tests, plus the amount of work required for each unit of credit.

Credit Courses Most MiraCosta College courses are offered for credit. That means they are taught by credentialed faculty who meet with students at regularly scheduled times or in self-paced or online formats, and offer graded instructional experiences which require preparation averaging two hours of additional study for every hour of instruction. Credit courses are offered to meet requirements for two-year and four-year degrees, for job preparation or advancement, and for basic skills. 100 to 199—numbered courses are associate-degree appropriate representing freshman-level material and expectations for vocational or academic programs. 200 to 299—numbered courses are intended for college sophomores. They often assume skills and knowledge acquired in freshman-level courses. Like the 100-level courses, they are taught at the college level and are appropriate for an associate degree. NOTE: 100- and 200-level courses may or may not be appropriate for transfer to a four-year college/university. See section in catalog regarding transferability of courses. 800 to 899—numbers identify courses which are college preparatory or basic skills. These courses may not be applied toward an associate degree. In addition, students are limited to 30 units of such courses except for students who need English as a second language or who are learning disabled as identified by the college. 900 to 999—numbers signify courses which do not fall in any of the above categories but are, for the most part, specialized or advanced. These courses are non-degree appropriate. Enrichment Seminar Program Students are invited to put their interests and talents to work in an atmosphere rich in stimulation and challenge through the Enrichment Seminar Program. This program is offered across the disciplines as a one-hour enhancement to a course for students who want to pursue a subject in greater depth than is possible in a conventional section. This option includes opportunities for students to interact in small groups and forums so they can come together as a community of learners. Honors Scholar Program (HSP) Honors courses are specifically designed to develop exceptional talent and ability in highly motivated students. They provide greater flexibility in format and instructional methodologies through close interaction with HSP faculty and mentors. See page 41 for additional information and admission requirements. Internship Studies Program The internship program is designed to provide students with workplace skills and experience by linking classroom learning to the work world. See page 248 or go to www.miracosta.edu/careers for program details.

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Cooperative Work Experience Education (Co-op) Cooperative Work Experience Education units earned from courses can be included as electives in the 60 units required for an associate degree and in certain certificate programs. This program is organized to provide students with new, expanded, and practical learning opportunities on the job so they may achieve the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for career success. The course will assist students in gaining insight into the structure of the world of work, understanding business and organizational procedures, and developing the personal commitments necessary for successful careers. Co-op courses are available in many fields of study; see course 299. For more information, go to www.miracosta.edu/careerstudies. Students studying under the GI Bill receive benefits only for enrollment in occupational work experience courses. Continuing Education (Tuition-Free Noncredit) The goal of adult education in California is to provide citizens of every age and every educational level the opportunity to develop civic responsibility, a realization of the human potential, effective human relationships, and economic self-sufficiency. This broad goal forms the basis for the noncredit courses and programs offered in each of the authorized categories of noncredit instruction. The categories include elementary and secondary basic skills, English as a Second Language (ESL) and citizenship, consumer economics, health and safety, older adults, parenting, special education for adults, and short-term vocational. Community Services and Business Development Community Services functions as an integral part of MiraCosta College providing educational, cultural and recreational programs and activities. Community Services offers flexible, timely responses to community interests and needs beyond the traditional college curriculum through not-for-credit classes, workshops, excursions and special events supported through participants’ fees. The English Language and College Skills Institute (EL&CSI), a full-time intensive English language program designed for international students, is one program administered by Community Services. The Community Education Bulletin outlines these programs. Business Development is designed to link business, industry, and government agencies with the educational resources of MiraCosta College. As part of the college’s commitment to address the needs of the community, the college offers flexible, comprehensive on-site education to meet the requirements of both growing and established employee-training and management-development programs. Classes and workshops are created to comply with a company’s specific goals and can be custom designed or selected from the more than 1,000 courses taught at MiraCosta College. Courses can begin anytime there is a need and may be offered not-for-credit, noncredit, or for credit. Programs are not limited to big businesses. “Pooling” students with common interests from several small companies to form a quality training program is also possible.


ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

The Associate Degree A college degree assures that graduates have been introduced to disciplines within four areas of general education: 1) natural/physical sciences, 2) social/behavioral sciences, 3) humanities, and 4) language and rationality. This exposure is intended to produce integrated human beings: curious, adaptable, and self-sufficient individuals who are a credit to our college and our community. To ensure that students spend their time at the college productively, the faculty urges that students devote their first semester to courses in the learning skills area before attempting courses required by the major. The faculty has agreed on the following criteria that apply to courses designed to fulfill general education breadth requirements: Rigor: All courses are expected to involve students in preparation outside the classroom equaling twice the hours of lecture. Scope: All courses must introduce students to a broad spectrum of concepts. Integration of Knowledge: All courses should strive to integrate the course material with pertinent knowledge from other subject areas. Heritage: All courses should critically examine civilization and its heritage (historical background, technological advancements, artistic expression, or intellectual endeavors). Courses should also address implications for the future. Critical Thinking: All courses require students to make critical comparisons of the principles covered in the subject matter. They will develop the ability to examine, evaluate, and express individual values. Communication: All courses demand that students demonstrate literacy (i.e., reading and expression) in the dominant language of the course.

MiraCosta College offers four paths to an Associate Degree: 1) Associate in Arts, University Studies with a specified prep-for-major, for students planning to transfer to a four-year institution to complete a bachelor’s degree; 2) Associate in Arts earned in combination with completion of a Certificate of Competence in a vocational major; and 3) Associate in Arts, a terminal or non-transfer degree (available in Dance, Fire Technology and General Studies.) 4) Associate in Science, Registered Nursing

1. Associate in Arts degree in University Studies The Associate in Arts degree in University Studies is a degree program designed for students who plan to transfer to an accredited four-year university. It is granted in those disciplines for which a bachelor’s degree is considered the traditional degree. Students who are unsure of their immediate transfer plans are also advised to obtain the University Studies degree, as it will provide more options should the student decide to transfer in the future. Students bound for University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) will find this degree program particularly attractive because lower division course requirements completed at MiraCosta College are guaranteed to transfer through articulation agreements with those institutions. MiraCosta also has articulation agreements with many private universities, and students may pursue the A.A. degree in University Studies in majors offered by these institutions. The goal of this degree program is to prepare students, as completely as possible, to meet the lower division requirements of their transfer institution. To accomplish this goal, students must meet with a MiraCosta College counselor and complete a written educational plan. Students are expected to complete, at minimum, the lower division preparation for their major and lower division general education requirements selected from one of the following: • California State University system-wide General Education Requirements • IGETC (Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum) • UCSD’s TAG (Transfer Admission Guarantee) Core General Education • General education requirements specified by an individual transfer institution. Note: Although the awarding of this degree recognizes the completion of lower division course requirements, it does not necessarily guarantee admission to a four-year institution. Students will need a higher grade point average (GPA) for admission to a University of California campus or to UC/CSU impacted programs/ majors than is required for the Associate in Arts degree in University Studies. (A 2.0 GPA is required to earn the MiraCosta associate degree.) For Transfer Admission Guarantee (TAG) programs, see pages 35-37.

Students completing an Associate in Arts degree in University Studies will have their major or pre-major listed on their MiraCosta College diploma upon completing the degree. For example: AA in University Studies: Psychology or AA in University Studies: Pre-Engineering

Requirements for the Associate in Arts in University Studies A. Choose an accredited transfer institution. 1. Declare a major offered by the transfer institution and complete all lower division preparation for the major offered at MiraCosta College. (The Director of Transfer and Articulation Programs at MiraCosta College may make exceptions.) 2. Complete the transfer general education requirements for CSU, IGETC, or TAG (UCSD) or complete the general education requirements specified by an individual transfer institution, which must include, at minimum:

• Language and Rationality (6 units) • English Composition (3 units) • Communication and Analytical Thinking (3 units) • Natural Science (3 units) • Social & Behavioral Science (3 units) • One additional GE course (3 units) 3. Complete additional lower division requirements (e.g., American Institutions, foreign language, computer competency, etc.) if required for admission. 4. Meet MiraCosta College’s competency requirements in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics (see page 25). 5. Meet MiraCosta College’s residency requirements 6. Complete a minimum of 60 transferable units with a 2.0 GPA. B. File a petition for graduation during the first 30 percent of the last semester in attendance at MiraCosta College. (Check the class schedule for deadline date.) IMPORTANT: You must complete an education plan with a MiraCosta counselor in the Counseling Office or University Transfer Center. Students who are eligible for these programs may complete an education plan with a counselor in Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS), Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS) and Institute for International Perspectives (IIP—for international students). An original copy of your education

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

plan must be on file in one of the offices listed above and all official transcripts from prior colleges/universities must also be included in your file at the time you petition for graduation. Proper academic preparation for transfer requires careful planning. Students are advised to meet with a MiraCosta counselor early in their educational program for assistance. The University Transfer Center provides advising guides and articulation agreements which indicate lower division major and general education requirements for many colleges and universities. Students may also access articulation agreements online at www.assist.org.

2. Associate in Arts, Vocational Majors Students may choose to earn an Associate in Arts degree by completing a Certificate of Competence (18 units minimum) in addition to general education courses and other requirements. Course work for the Certificates of Competence is developed by MiraCosta faculty in partnership with employers to ensure that students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in all aspects of a trade or occupation. This degree is a good choice for students seeking both a degree and specific job training. The Associate in Arts with vocational majors is offered on completion of one of the following Certificates of Competence in addition to general education courses and other requirements. ACCT ACCT ADM ARCH AUTO BTEC BTEC BUS BUS BUS BUS BOT BOT CHLD CHLD CHLD CHLD

Accounting Bookkeeping Law Enforcement Architectural Technology Automotive Technology Bioprocessing Technician Biotechnology Research and Development Technician Entrepreneurship Management Marketing Retail Management Office Manager Secretary/Administrative Assistant Child Development Associate Teacher Child Development Entrepreneurship Child Development Master Teacher Child Development Site Supervisor

CHLD CHLD CIS CIS COSM CS DRAF DRAF DRAF DRAM HORT HORT HORT HORT HORT HOSP IMT IMT MA MUS MUS MUS NURS NURS REAL REAL REST SURG TOUR

Child Development Teacher Early Intervention and Inclusion Computer Applications Computer Network Administration Cosmetology Fundamentals of Computer Programming Computer-Aided Design and Drafting Computer-Aided Drafting Mechanical Drafting Design and Technology Agri-Business Management Floriculture Landscape Architecture Landscape Management Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production Hospitality Management Graphic Design Web Development and Design Medical Office Professional Digital Audio Production Recording Arts/Record Production Sound Reinforcement Licensed Vocational Nursing LVN to Registered Nursing Career Ladder (step-up) Program Real Estate Real Estate Entrepreneurship Restaurant Management Surgical Technology Travel and Tourism Management

The requirements for the above-listed Certificates of Competence are described following the course descriptions in each of the disciplines.

3. Associate in Arts in an Academic Major (terminal, or non-transfer degree) The terminal Associate in Arts degree requires completion of 18 units in the major in addition to general education courses and other requirements. This type of Associate in Arts degree will not meet all transfer requirements in a student’s chosen major, nor will it meet all general education transfer requirements. Students interested in transferring to earn a bachelor’s degree should major in University Studies with a designated major and meet with a MiraCosta counselor early in their studies to develop an educational plan. The terminal Associate in Arts degree is offered in the following majors: Dance Fire Technology General Studies Note: Students may earn an A.A. degree in other academic majors by completing the A.A. in University Studies; for example, A.A. in University Studies: English.

4. Associate in Science, Registered Nursing The Associate in Science degree is currently offered in one major: Registered Nursing. This degree option is available only to those students completing the LVN-RN Career Ladder (Step Up) Program. For degree requirements, please see page 185 in the Nursing course listings.

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

Requirements for Associate in Arts, Terminal or Vocational Degree REQUIREMENT

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

Units

60 degree-applicable units minimum.

Major

Complete a minimum of 18 units in a chosen major. A maximum of one course counted for the major also may be used to satisfy general education requirements with the exception of the Child Development Master Teacher and Biotechnology programs. Multiple degrees will not be allowed. However, multiple majors are allowed as long as there is a minimum of 18 unduplicated credits in the major. A student may not earn a multiple-major combination of University Studies and General Studies.

Residency

1. Must complete minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta College, at least 6 in the major. 2. Of the last 12 units completed prior to graduation, at least 6 must be completed in residence at MiraCosta College. A student who lacks 6 or fewer units in order to satisfy all degree requirements may be evaluated under the original catalog that applied. Or 3. A total of 45-units of degree applicable courses with at least six in the major if not in attendance during the last semester prior to graduation.

College Preparatory Courses

No degree credit for courses numbered 800-900.

GPA (Grade Point Average)

A grade point average of 2.0 (“C”) in all units attempted is required for graduation. In addition, a grade point average of 2.0 is required for courses taken as a part of a major. A grade of “C” or better is required in each and every course used to complete a certificate. This is true even if the certificate program is used as a major for the A.A. Courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis are not considered in computing the grade point average.

Minimum Competencies

All students seeking an associate in arts degree must demonstrate competence in reading, written expression, and mathematics. Achievement of minimum competency does NOT mean students have met course work requirements for the associate degree. 1. Reading: Reading competency must be demonstrated by completing one of the following options: a. Achieve a qualifying score on the reading component of the MiraCosta College English Assessment. b. Complete with a grade of “C” or better Reading 100 or higher-level reading course; or English 100, 201, or 202; or an equivalent course from an accredited college. c. Present proof of one of the following: 1) A “pass for credit” on the CSU English Equivalency Examination. 2) A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced Placement English Examination. 3) A score of 4 or better on the International Baccalaureate Higher Level English Test. 2. Writing: Writing competency must be demonstrated by completing one of the following options: a. Achieve a qualifying score on the MiraCosta College English Assessment. b. Complete with a grade of “C” or better English 100, 201 or 202 at MiraCosta College or an equivalent course at another accredited college. c. Present proof of one of the following: 1) A “pass for credit” on the CSU English Equivalency Examination. 2) A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced Placement Program English Examination. 3) A score of 4 or better on the International Baccalaureate English 1A Higher Level Examination. 3. Mathematics: One of the following options may be used to satisfy the minimum competency requirements in mathematics: a. Pass with a grade of “C” or better, a mathematics course numbered 101-270 at MiraCosta; OR complete at another accredited college a course equivalent to a MiraCosta mathematics course numbered 101-270; OR complete a college mathematics course at another accredited college which has a stated prerequisite of a course equivalent to a MiraCosta mathematics course numbered 101-270. b. Achieve a score on the MiraCosta College Mathematics Competency Examination that qualifies a student for a math course numbered 103-150. Results from other examinations may not be used to satisfy minimum competency. Qualifying scores and related information are available in Testing Services. c. Present proof of one of the following: A College Board Mathematics Achievement Test Level I 500 Level II 600

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

REQUIREMENT

American Institutions and History

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS TEST A College Board Advanced Placement Math Examination Calculus AB Calculus BC Statistics A College-Level Examination Program Subject Exam College Algebra College Algebra—Trigonometry Trigonometry Calculus with Elementary Functions An International Baccalaureate Examination Higher Level Mathematics Subsidiary Level Mathematics Subsidiary Level Mathematical Studies

MINIMUM SCORE 3 3 3 50 50 50 50 4 4 4

The American Institutions and History requirement is intended to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for intelligent citizenship. Courses and examinations given to satisfy this requirement deal with relevant information of the major events and issues in U.S. history, the principles of the U.S. and California constitutions, and the political processes used in the United States and California. Students may satisfy this requirement in one of the following ways: 1.

One course of History 110 & 111 or History 116 & 117 may be applied to Area D and American Institutions. Choose one group: Group I—History 110 & 111 Group II—History 116 & 117 Group III—History 141 & 142 Group IV—History 145 & 146 Group V—Political Science 102

OR

2. By requesting at the Admissions and Records Office an official evaluation of their transcripts from other accredited colleges offering comparable course work. Students who have completed the U.S. portion of the American Institutions and History requirement but have not completed the requirements of the California state and local government component (this would normally apply to out-of-state courses) may satisfy the requirement by taking one of the courses listed below. History 161—Contemporary California History History 165—California History Political Science 102—American Institutions and History For CSU American Institutions requirement see page 39.

Health and Physical Fitness

Since MiraCosta strongly believes in the value of health education for all despite age, sex, or physical condition, a class is available and appropriate to the physical performance level of each student. Careful attention is given to the student who presents evidence of medical opinion regarding expected level of performance. Upon petitioning for graduation, a student must show a minimum proficiency in the following: 1. techniques and understanding of physical fitness 2. techniques and understanding of healthful living, e.g., hygiene, substance abuse, etc. 3. techniques and importance of nutrition To satisfy the requirement a student must successfully 1. complete Health Education 101 (3 units) or present evidence of successful completion of an accredited registered or vocational nursing program. AND Health Education 101L-Physical Fitness (1 unit) or Physical Education 101L- Physical Fitness (1 unit). It is recommended for maximum benefit that this class be taken concurrently with Health Education 101. Note: U.S. Veterans and active duty U.S. military personnel may clear the physical fitness requirement through completion of Basic Training or Recruiter Training. Submit an original copy of your DD-295 or military transcript from the appropriate service (AART, SMART, CGIT or CCAF) to the Counseling Office. OR 2. demonstrate minimum proficiency through examination by a written test plus a physical performance test provided through the Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department. A physical examination by a medical doctor is required prior to the physical performance test.

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

REQUIREMENT

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

General Education

The general education requirements for the Associate in Arts degree involve the completion of 3 units each in Areas A and B and 6 units in each of Areas C, D, and E, for a total of at least 24 units. It is the purpose of general education to encourage the student to select a broad spectrum of classes. A maximum of one course counted for general education may also be used toward the major. Area A. English Composition: (3 unit minimum). English 100—Composition and Reading (4) Area B. Communication and Analytical Thinking (3 unit minimum). Biology 180—Biostatistics (4) Biotechnology 180—Biostatistics (4) Communication 101—Principles of Oral Communication (3) Communication 106—Group Discussion (3) Communication 207—Interpersonal Communication (3) Communication 212—Argumentation (3) English 201—Critical Thinking, Literature and Composition (4) English 202—Critical Thinking and Composition (4) Mathematics 101—Intermediate Algebra (4) Mathematics 103—Statistics (3) Mathematics 105-106—Concepts and Structures of Elementary Mathematics I, II (3-3) Mathematics 115—Calculus with Applications (4) Mathematics 125—College Algebra (3) Mathematics 130—Trigonometry (3) Mathematics 135—Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5) Mathematics 150-155-260—Calculus and Analytic Geometry I, II, III (5-4-4) Philosophy 100—Informal Logic and Critical Thinking (3) Philosophy 130—Critical Thinking and Writing (4) Psychology 104—Statistics for Behavioral Science (3) Reading 100—Critical Reading and Thinking (3) Reading 120—Power Reading—Speed and Comprehension (3) Reading 130—College Reading: Critical Analysis (3) Sociology 104—Statistics for Behavioral Science (3) Area C. Natural Sciences (6-unit minimum). One course must be selected from each of the segments within this area. A lab (L) course must be taken. Life Sciences: Anthropology 101—Biological Anthropology (3) (L) Anthropology 101L—Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1) Anthropology 190—Primate Behavior and Ecology (3) Biology 101—General Biology (3) (L) Biology 101L—General Biology Laboratory (1) (L) Biology 102—Ecology and Environmental Biology (4) Biology 103—Animal Diversity (3) Biology 105—Genes and Technology in Society (3) (L) Biology 150—General Botany (4) (L) Biology 170—Marine Biology (4) Biology 172—Marine Ecology (3) (L) Biology 172L—Marine Ecology Laboratory (1) (L) Biology 202—Foundations of Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology (4) (L) Biology 204—Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics and Molecular Biology (4) (L) Biology 220—Human Physiology (4) (L) Horticulture 116—Plant Science (4) Psychology 260—Physiological Psychology (3) Physical Sciences: Astronomy 101—Descriptive Astronomy (3) (L) Astronomy 101L—Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory (1) Astronomy 120—Life in the Universe (3) Astronomy 201—Introductory Astronomy (3) (L) Chemistry 100—Introductory Chemistry (4) (L) Chemistry 102—Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (4) Chemistry 103—Chemistry and Society (3) (L) Chemistry 103L—Chemistry and Society Laboratory (1) (L) Chemistry 104—Chemistry of Living Things (5)

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

REQUIREMENT

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Chemistry 108—Preparatory Chemistry (3) (L) Chemistry 110-111—General Chemistry (5-5) Earth Sciences 106—Earth and Space Science (3) Geography 101—Physical Geography (3) (L) Geography 101L—Physical Geography Laboratory (1) Geography 110—Weather and Climate (3) Geology 101—General Geology (3) (L) Geology 101L—General Geology Laboratory (1) Geology 120—Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards & Humanity (3) Oceanography 101—Introduction to Oceanography (3) (L) Oceanography 101L—Introductory Oceanography Laboratory (1) Physical Science 101—Fundamentals of Physical Science (3) Physical Science 106­—Energy, Motion and Matter (3) (L) Physics 111-112—Introductory Physics I, II (4-4) (L) Physics 151-152-253—Principles of Physics I, II, III (4-4-4) (L) = Laboratory course

Area D. Social and Behavioral Sciences (6-unit minimum). No more than one course may be selected from a single discipline within this area. Administration of Justice 100—Introduction to the Administration of Justice (3) Administration of Justice 105—Introduction to Justice Studies (3) Anthropology 101L—Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1) Anthropology 102—Cultural Anthropology (3) Anthropology 103—Introduction to Archaeology (3) Asian Studies 107—East Asian Societies (3) Child Development 121—Human Development (3) Communication 120—Principles of Human Communication (3) Communication 135—Gender Studies in Communiation (3) Communication 220—Introduction to Mass Communication (3) Economics 100—Survey of Economics (3) Economics 101—Principles of Economics: MACRO (3) Economics 102—Principles of Economics: MICRO (3) Geography 102—Cultural Geography (3) Geography 104—World Geography (3) Gerontology 101—Introduction to Aging (3) History 100—World History to 1500 (3) History 101—World History Since 1500 (3) History 105—History of England (3) History 107—East Asian Societies (3) History 108—History of Africa (3) History 109—History of the Middle East (3) * History 110—United States History (3) * History 111—United States History (3) * History 116-117—History of the Americas (3-3) History 150—History of Mexico (3) History 160—Early California History (3) * History 161—Contemporary California History (3) History 165—California History (3) Political Science 101—Introduction to Political Science (3) Political Science 103—Comparative Government (3) Political Science 150—Introduction to International Relations (3) Psychology 100—Introduction to Psychology (3) Psychology 101—General Psychology (3) Psychology 103—Social Psychology (3) Psychology 121—Human Development (3) Sociology 101—Introduction to Sociology (3) Sociology 102—Contemporary Social Problems (3) Sociology 103—Social Psychology (3) Sociology 105—Introduction to Justice Studies (3) Sociology 110—Comparative Cultures (3) Sociology 120—Introduction to Women’s Studies (3) * These courses may be applied to either the general education or American Institutions requirement but not both.

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

REQUIREMENT

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Area E. Humanities (6-unit minimum). No more than one course may be selected from a single discipline within this area. In addition, no more than one performance (P) course may be counted for this requirement. Art 100—Drawing and Composition (3) Art 101—Design and Color (3) Art 103—Beginning Sculpture (3) Art 157—Art Orientation (3) Art 158—Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3) Art 177—Art in the Elementary Schools (3) Art 201—Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art (3) Art 254—Understanding and Appreciating the Photographic Image (3) Art 258—Ancient to Gothic Art (3) Art 259—History of Renaissance to Modern Art (3) Art 260—History of Modern Art (3) Art 290—Landmarks of Art (3) Asian Studies 105—Asian Philosophy and Religion (3) Chinese 101—Elementary Chinese I (First Semester) (4) Chinese 102—Elementary Chinese II (Second Semester) (4) (P) Communication 111—Oral Interpretation (3) Communication 215—Intercultural Communication (3) Dance 101—History and Appreciation of Dance (3) Dance 105—Dance Cultures of the World (3) (P) Dramatic Arts 105—Introduction to Theatre (3) Dramatic Arts 106—Study of Filmed Plays (3) (P) Dramatic Arts 111—Oral Interpretation (3) Dramatic Arts 120-121—Dramatic Literature (3-3) (P) Dramatic Arts 130—Elementary Acting (3) Film 101—Introduction to Film (3) Film 106—Study of Filmed Plays (3) Film 110—Film History (3) French 101—Elementary French I (First Semester) (4) French 102—Elementary French II (Second Semester) (4) French 201—Intermediate French I (Third Semester) (4) French 202—Intermediate French II (Fourth Semester) (4) German 101—Elementary German (First Semester) (4) German 102—Elementary German (Second Semester) (4) German 201—Intermediate German (Third Semester) (4) German 202—Intermediate German (Fourth Semester) (4) History 103—Western Civilization (3) History 104—Western Civilization (3) Humanities 101—Introduction to the Arts (3) Humanities 201—Humanities of the Western World: Pre-History through the Middle Ages (3) Humanities 202—Humanities of the Western World: The Renaissance to the Twentieth Century (3) Humanities 205—Women in Western Art and Literature (3) Humanities 250-251—American Studies (3-3) Italian 101—Elementary Italian (First Semester) (4) Italian 102—Elementary Italian (Second Semester) (4) Italian 201—Intermediate Italian I (Third Semester) (4) Japanese 101—Elementary Japanese (First Semester) (5) Japanese 102—Elementary Japanese (Second Semester) (5) Japanese 201—Intermediate Japanese (First Semester) (5) Japanese 202—Intermediate Japanese (Second Semester) (5) Literature 120—Introduction to Literature (3) Literature 122—Introduction to African-American Literature (3) Literature 123—Introduction to Latina/o Literature (3) Literature 200—Poetry (3) Literature 250-251—American Literature (3-3) Literature 260-261—English Literature (3-3) Literature 270-271—World Literature (3-3) Music 105—Music Fundamentals (3) Music 108—Music for Elementary Teachers (3) Music 109—Beginning Music Theory Through Guitar (3) (P) = Performance course

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS

REQUIREMENT

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Music 113—Music in Multicultural America (3) Music 114—History of Rock and Roll (3) Music 115—Introduction to Music (3) Music 116—A Survey of World Music (3) Music 117-118—Music Appreciation (3-3) Music 119—History of Jazz (3) Philosophy 101—Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality (3) Philosophy 102—Contemporary Moral Problems (3) Philosophy 105—Asian Philosophy and Religion (3) Philosophy 122—World Religions (3) Philosophy 221—Philosophy of Religion (3) Spanish 101—Elementary Spanish (First Semester) (4) Spanish 102—Elementary Spanish (Second Semester) (4) Spanish 201—Intermediate Spanish (Third Semester) (4) Spanish 202—Intermediate Spanish (Fourth Semester) (4) Spanish 203—Spanish for Native Speakers I (3)

Catalog Rights

In general, students are expected to follow the academic regulations leading to completion of a degree or certificate according to the catalog effective when they first enrolled at MiraCosta College. However, the community college hosts a wide range of students; therefore, some flexibility seems appropriate. Unless otherwise requested by the student on his/her petition for graduation, the catalog used to determine eligibility will be the catalog operating at the time the student began continual enrollment at MiraCosta College. Continual enrollment is defined as attending MiraCosta College for more than 30 percent (approximately six weeks) of each semester. A one-semester leave will not negate a student’s continuous status, but a continuous two-semester leave will negate such continuity. This provision does not include the summer intersession. For purposes of this section, the catalog in effect for students entering during the summer intersession is the catalog in effect for the subsequent fall and spring semesters. If a student wishes to use a later catalog than the one with which he/she began continual enrollment, he/she should so specify on the graduation petition. (Consult with a counselor regarding catalog rights for transfer students.)

Petition for Degree or Certificate

Students must submit graduation and or certificate petitions by the 30 percent deadline of the final semester leading to their graduation. (If a student intends to graduate during the summer intersession, he/she may petition during the spring semester.) Petitions submitted after this deadline will automatically be handled in the subsequent semester. Students are responsible for having transcripts of other colleges attended (or concurrently attending) on file in the Counseling Office for purposes of calculating overall GPA. As stated above, students petitioning for an A.A. in University Studies must have a current educational plan on file in the Counseling Office. Transcripts, approved substitutions and waivers, educational plans and any other necessary documents should be on file before the student submits a petition to graduate.

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CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCE

The Certificate Programs CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCE Certificates of Competence are designed to prepare graduates for immediate employment in specific career areas. The total units required for a certificate varies with each discipline; the minimum, however, is 18 units of instruction. In developing the certificates, MiraCosta faculty collaborate with employers who describe the knowledge, skills, and competencies needed for success in all aspects of a trade or occupation. Although college academic courses are not usually required for a certificate, students must have basic knowledge in such subjects as reading, writing, and math to master the work and advance in the occupation they select. Certificates of Competence may be used to satisfy the requirements for an associate in arts major in the area of specialization. Interested students should review the degree requirements and supplement certificate courses with appropriate general education courses. In some areas, students earning degrees can transfer to upper-division at four-year institutions. Further information about transfer possibilities can be obtained at the University Transfer Center. Eligibility for Certificates of Competence includes attaining a minimum grade of “C” in every course and satisfying the residency requirements. Of the last 12 units completed toward satisfaction of the Certificate of Competence, at least 6 units must be completed in residence at MiraCosta College; each candidate must have completed a minimum of 12 units in residence at MiraCosta College. Students are eligible to receive Certificates of Competence with honors if they earn a grade point average of 3.00-3.45. Certificates of Competence with highest honors are awarded to students with grade point averages of 3.50-4.00. Course requirements for certificates of competence follow the course descriptions in each discipline. ACCOUNTING

Accounting Bookkeeping ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

Law Enforcement ARCHITECTURE

Architectural Technology AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Automotive Technology (Day Only) Automotive Technology (Evening Only) BIOTECHNOLOGY

Bioprocessing Technician Biotechnology Research and Development Technician BUSINESS

Entrepreneurship Management Marketing Retail Management BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

Office Manager Secretary/Administrative Assistant

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Child Development Associate Teacher Child Development Entrepreneurship   Child Development Master Teacher Child Development Site Supervisor Child Development Teacher Early Intervention and Inclusion COMPUTER SCIENCE

Fundamentals of Computer Programming COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Computer Applications Computer Network Administration COSMETOLOGY

Cosmetology DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

Computer-Aided Design and Drafting Computer-Aided Drafting Mechanical Drafting DRAMATIC ARTS

Design and Technology HORTICULTURE

Agri-Business Management Floriculture Landscape Architecture Landscape Management Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production HOSPITALITY

Hospitality Management INTERNET AND MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Graphic Design Web Development and Design MEDICAL ASSISTANT

Medical Office Professional MUSIC

Digital Audio Production Recording Arts/Record Production Sound Reinforcement NURSING

Licensed Vocational Nursing (LVN) LVN to Registered Nursing Career Ladder (Step Up) Program REAL ESTATE

Real Estate Real Estate Entrepreneurship RESTAURANT

Restaurant Management SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY

Surgical Technology TOURISM

Travel and Tourism Management

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CERTIFICATES OF ACHIEVEMENT

CERTIFICATES OF ACHIEVEMENT Certificates of Achievement are short-term certificates, typically requiring fewer than 18 units of course work, which introduce students to one aspect of a trade or occupation. A Certificate of Achievement is a good choice for those students who wish to test a potential career area, who want to be competitive for entrylevel jobs in one part of an industry, or who prefer to enter the industry and pursue further education in that field after they start working. Certificates of Achievement are designed to be the first step in a career ladder. In most cases, the courses completed for these certificates can also be applied toward the next step in a career ladder, a Certificate of Competence (18 or more units). The final step at the community college is the A.A. degree (typically 60 units). Eligibility for Certificates of Achievement includes earning a minimum grade of “C” in every course. At least six units or the maximum number of units required for the certificate, whichever is less, must be completed in residence at MiraCosta College. ACCOUNTING

Billing, Cost and Accounting Assistant Income Tax Preparer ART

Digital Photography AUTOMOTIVE

Automotive Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension Automotive Electronics Automotive Quick Service Assistant Automotive Repair: Drive Train Specialist Basic Engine Performance BIOTECHNOLOGY

Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant BUSINESS

Business Fundamentals Retail Assistant BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

Data Entry General Office Medical Transcription Office Assistant Virtual Assistant CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Assistant Teacher COMMUNICATION STUDIES

Organizational Communication COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Advanced Routing and Switching Computer Internetworking Fundamentals E-Commerce Microsoft Certified Office User (Proficient Level) Microsoft Certified Office User (Expert Level) UNIX Administration DANCE

Pilates Certification DRAFTING

Applied Design Drafting Fundamentals HEALTH EDUCATION

Massage Therapy Technician

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HORTICULTURE

Arboriculture Floral Design Assistant Irrigation Technology Landscape Assistant Nursery Assistant Wine Technology HOSPITALITY

Front Office Operations Rooms Division Management INTERNET AND MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Arts and Technology Multimedia Production Print Publishing Video and Animation Visual Communication Web Design KINESIOLOGY

Personal Fitness Trainer MEDICAL ASSISTANT

Medical Insurance and Coding Specialist MUSIC

Digital Audio Guitar Music Technology Performance Technician Songwriting NURSING

Certified Nursing Assistant Health Care Fundamentals Home Health Aide PHLEBOTOMY

Phlebotomy Technician (pending Dept. of Health approval) PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

Research Fundamentals Volunteer Services REAL ESTATE

Property Management Real Estate Appraisal Real Estate Assistant Real Estate Finance Real Estate Sales RESTAURANT

Catering Operations Dining Room Operations Food Service Operations SPANISH

Career Spanish for Medical Personnel TOURISM

Travel Reservations Certificate programs that are taken as part of and prior to the associate degree are approved for veterans’ benefits. Limited English speaking students who are otherwise eligible will not be excluded from any vocational education program. Los estudiantes que están calificados para entrar en el programa de educación vocacional no pueden ser excluidos debido a su inglés limitado. Course requirements for certificates of achievement follow the course descriptions in each discipline.


TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

Transferring Course Work for the Bachelor’s Degree General Information MiraCosta College students have the opportunity of transferring to a variety of public and independent colleges and universities. In California, students may transfer to a college or university in the University of California (UC) system, California State University (CSU) system, or various independent universities and colleges. Transfer students should be aware of both the entrance requirements and graduation requirements of the university or college they wish to attend. Part of the MiraCosta College curriculum is designed to prepare students to transfer to four-year colleges or universities by providing instruction in general education course work and preparatory courses for specific majors. Students should choose the particular college or university they wish to attend after MiraCosta as soon as possible, and the specific major area they wish to pursue. The counseling staff is available to assist students in making these important decisions. MiraCosta’s University Transfer Center provides articulation agreements for courses which meet both lower-division major requirements and general education requirements for colleges and universities frequently attended by transfer students from MiraCosta College. Many of these agreements are on the Internet at www.assist. org. Students should consult with a counselor or the University Transfer Center advisers regarding use of these agreements.

Approved CAN courses are noted at the end of course descriptions in the MiraCosta College Catalog. Some CSU’s use CAN numbers in the development of articulation agreements which are listed on ASSIST at www.assist.org.

Preparing to Transfer Preparation for the Major and ASSIST Transfer students should complete both the general education requirements and the preparation for their major before transferring from a community college. Each transfer institution has its own requirements for major prep. Students should meet with a counselor before or early in their first semester to prepare an educational plan which will include both general education and preparation for the major courses. Articulation agreements between two institutions (i.e. MiraCosta and any CSU or UC) can be found at www.assist.org. This web site not only contains information on courses that will meet the requirements for preparation for the major, it is also where you can view the CSU GE, IGETC, and all transferable courses for MiraCosta and for all other community colleges in the state.

Steps to follow: 1. Determine your educational and/or career goal. 2. Review college and university catalogs available online and in the University Transfer Center. 3.  Choose a school which offers your chosen program. 4.  Select courses at MiraCosta from the general education list and others that are required for your major as indicated by your chosen school. California Articulation Number System (CAN) CAN provides a cross-reference number for courses which have been evaluated by CSU and California community college faculty and determined to be  acceptable “in lieu of” each other. The California Articulation Number System is not a common numbering system. Each campus retains its own course numbers, prefixes, and titles. The CAN number (e.g. CAN ENGL 2) is listed parenthetically in catalog descriptions and other publications as appropriate. Participating campuses cross-reference their courses with a CAN number as illustrated below: Example: Intro., British Literature, 1st semester of year sequence CAMPUS A: ENGL 40 (CAN ENGL 8) CAMPUS B: ENGL 110 (CAN ENGL 8) CAMPUS C: LIT 21A (CAN ENGL 8) As in the above example, the names of the departments offering the courses may vary from campus to campus. However, since the courses are identified with an identical California Articulation Number, the courses are accepted in lieu of each other at CSU’s and California community colleges. Student will need to check the transfer institution catalog to confirm that institution’s participation in CAN. This program will be phased out beginning fall 2007.

“I really feel that more students need to know that the University Transfer Center is so helpful. The University Transfer Center was a huge help for me and the counselors guided me to the path with the most options.” - Aaron Strunk, transferred to UCSD’s Bioengineering Program

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) Transfer students have the option of completing the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC). Completion of IGETC permits a student to transfer from a community college to a campus in either the California State University or University of California system without the need to take additional lower-division, general education courses to satisfy campus G.E. requirements after transfer. Students undecided about which system, UC or CSU, or which UC campus to transfer to will find IGETC an advantageous way to meet general education requirements. It should be noted that completion of the IGETC is not a requirement for transfer to CSU or UC, nor is it the only way to fulfill the lowerdivision general education requirements of CSU or UC prior to transfer. Additional information and guidance on the appropriateness of IGETC to student transfer plans may be obtained from the University Transfer Center and counseling staff at MiraCosta College. All IGETC requirements must be completed prior to transfer and each course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. It is very important for students to remember to get IGETC certified by MiraCosta’s Admissions and Records Office before transferring in order not to be held to any additional lower-division general education requirements after transfer. For exceptions to this policy, consult the director of the MiraCosta University Transfer Center. Area 1 English Communication: CSU—three courses required, one from each group below; UC—two courses required, one each from A and B. A. English Composition, one course (3 semester units) English 100 (4) B. Critical Thinking-English Composition, one course (3 semester units) English 201 (4) English 202 (4) Philosophy 130 (4) C. Oral Communication, (CSU only—3 semester units) Communication 101 (3) Communication 106 (3) Area 2 Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning: one course (3 semester units) Mathematics 103 (3) Mathematics 115 (4) Mathematics 125 (3) Mathematics 135** (5) Mathematics 150 (5) Mathematics 155 (4) Mathematics 260 (4) Psychology 104 (3) Sociology 104 (3) **Transfer credit may be limited by either UC or CSU Area 3 Arts and Humanities: three courses, with at least one from the Arts and one from the Humanities (9 semester units) A. Arts: Art 157 (3) Art 158 (3) Art 201 (3) Art 254 (3) Art 258 (3) Art 259 (3) Art 260 (3) Dance 101 (3) Dance 105 (3) Dramatic Arts 105 (3)

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Area 3 (cont.) Dramatic Arts 106 (3) Dramatic Arts 120 (3) Dramatic Arts 121 (3) Film 106 (3) Music 105 (3) Music 113 (3) Music 115 (3) Music 116 (3) Music 117 (3) Music 118 (3) Music 119 (3) B. Humanities: Asian Studies 105 (3) Communication 215 (3) Film 101 (3) Film 110 (3) French 201 (4) French 202 (4) German 201 (4) German 202 (4) History 103 (3) History 104 (3) Humanities 101 (3) Humanities 201 (3) Humanities 202 (3) Humanities 205 (3) Humanities 250 (3) Humanities 251 (3) Italian 201 (4) Japanese 201 (5) Japanese 202 (5) Literature 120 (3) Literature 122 (3) Literature 123 (3) Literature 200 (3) Literature 250 (3) Literature 251 (3) Literature 260 (3) Literature 261 (3) Literature 270 (3) Literature 271 (3) Philosophy 101 (3) Philosophy 102 (3) Philosophy 105 (3) Philosophy 122 (3) Philosophy 221 (3) Spanish 201 (4) Spanish 202 (4)

Area 4 Social and Behavioral Sciences: At least three courses from at least two disciplines (A-J) or an interdisciplinary sequence (9 semester units.) A. Anthropology and Archaeology Anthropology 102 (3) Anthropology 190 (3) Anthropology 201 (3) B. Economics Economics 100** (3) Economics 101** (3) Economics 102** (3) Economics 105** (3) D. Gender Studies Communications 135 (3) E. Geography Geography 102 (3) Geography 104 (3) F. History Asian Studies 107/History 107 (3) History 100 (3) History 101 (3) History 105 (3) History 108 (3) History 109 (3) History 110** (3) History 111** (3) History 116 (3) History 117 (3) History 150 (3) History 160 (3) History 161 (3) History 165 (3) G. Interdisciplinary, Social & Behavioral Sciences Admin. of Justice/Sociology 105 (3) Communications 120 (3) Communications 220 (3) Gerontology 101 (3) H. Political Science, Government & Legal Institutions Political Science 101 (3) Political Science 103 (3) Political Science 117 (3) Political Science 150 (3) I. Psychology Child Development 121**/Psychology 121** (3)


TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

Psychology 100** (3) Psychology 101 (3) Psychology 103 (3) J. Sociology & Criminology Admin. of Justice 100 (3) Sociology 101 (3) Sociology 102 (3) Sociology 103 (3) Sociology 110 (3) ** Transfer credit may be limited by either UC or CSU or both. Please consult with a counselor.

Area 5 Physical and Biological Sciences: Two courses; one Physical Science course and one Biological Science (one course to include a laboratory) A. Physical Sciences: Astronomy 101 (3) * Astronomy 101L (1) Astronomy 201**(3) * Chemistry 100 (4) * Chemistry 102 (4) Chemistry 103 (3) * Chemistry 103L (1) * Chemistry 104 (5) Chemistry 108 (3) * Chemistry 110 (5) * Chemistry 111 (5)

Earth Science 106 (3) Geography 101 (3) * Geography 101L (1) Geography 110 (3) Geology 101 (3) * Geology 101L (1) Geology 120 (3) Oceanography 101 (3) * Oceanography 101L (1) Physical Science 101 (3) Physical Science 106 (3) * Physics 111 (4) * Physics 112 (4) * Physics 151 (4) * Physics 152 (4) * Physics 253 (4) B. Biological Sciences: Anthropology 101 (3) * Anthropology 101L (1) Biological Sciences 101 (3) * Biological Sciences 101L (1) * Biological Sciences 102 (4) Biological Sciences 103 (3) Biological Sciences 105 (3) * Biological Sciences 150 (4) * Biological Sciences 170 (4) Biological Sciences 172 (3) * Biological Sciences 172L (1) * Biological Sciences 202 (4)

University of California System The University of California system includes ten campuses extending from Davis in the north to San Diego in the south. Each campus has its own distinctive characteristics. In selecting a campus, the student must thoroughly explore all the options available to determine which campus seems the best choice. The ten campuses are located in the following areas: Berkeley Merced San Francisco Davis Riverside Santa Barbara Irvine San Diego Santa Cruz Los Angeles All campuses, except the San Francisco Medical School, follow similar entrance requirements and use a common application form. However, individual campuses may impose additional entrance requirements for specific majors and programs. Consult the university catalog or a member of the MiraCosta counseling staff for specific information.

Admission Requirements The University of California gives priority consideration for admission to all California community college students over other transfer students. The definition of a California community college student for admission purposes is: 1. Student was enrolled at one or more of the California community colleges for at least two terms (excluding summer sessions). 2. Student attended a California community college for the last semester prior to admission to the University of California (excluding summer session); and 3. Student completed at least 30 semester (45 quarter) UCtransferable units at one or more of the California community colleges.

* Biological Sciences 204 (4) * Biological Sciences 220 (4) Psychology 260 (3) * Designates lab courses ** Transfer credit may be limited by either UC or CSU

Area 6 Language Other Than English (UC Requirement Only): Proficiency equivalent to two years of high school study in the same language. Chinese 101 (4) French 101 (4) German 101 (4) Italian 101 (4) Japanese 101 (5) Spanish 101 (4) Interested students may obtain a copy of the approved course list and IGETC requirements from the MiraCosta College University Transfer Center, Counseling Office or www.miracosta.edu/transfer. For CSU American Institution Certification requirement, see p. 39.

Transfer options for the UC System: 1. IGETC Certification: 60 units, a competitive GPA, and any requirements to prepare for the major. (IGETC is used for most of the guaranteed admission programs, other than UCSD TAG, see listing under option 3.) 2. UC admission course pattern requirements: 60 units, a competitive GPA, and any requirements to prepare for the major. Core subjects include: a. Two transferable college courses (3 semester or 4-5 quarter units each) in English composition; AND b. One transferable college course (3 semester or 4-5 quarter units) in Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning; AND c. Four transferable college courses (3 semester or 4-5 quarter units each) chosen from at least two of the following: arts and humanities; social and behavioral sciences; or physical and biological sciences. 3. Transfer Admission Guarantee Programs: a. UC San Diego: TAG (Transfer Admission Guarantee) contract. i. TAG contract. ii. UniversityLink contract. b. UC Davis: TAA (Transfer Admission Agreement). c. UC Riverside: TAG (Transfer Admission Guarantee) contract (not available for Business Majors). d. UC Santa Barbara: TAA (Transfer Admission Agreement) contract (College of Letters & Sciences only). e. UC Santa Cruz: G.A.T.E. (Guaranteed Admission for Transfer Entry) contract. Note: MiraCosta College also participates in the following “Priority Admission” programs: a. UC Los Angeles: TAP (Transfer Alliance Program) into MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

College of Letters and Sciences with the exception of Communications Studies. b. UC Irvine: P.A.I.F. (Preferred Admission Into the Field) students meet with a P.A.I.F. counselor at UC Irvine. A full description of TAG to UCSD and more information on each of the other guarantee programs follows this section. A comprehensive overview of all of the University of California transfer programs can be researched at: http://www.ucop.edu/pathways/infoctr/at/atprogs.html

Transfer Admission Guarantee for UCSD (TAG) (Based on information provided by UCSD May 2006, is valid through Spring 2009)

The Transfer Admission Guarantee Program (TAG) guarantees qualified MiraCosta College students admission to UCSD and the college of their choice within the university-Muir, Marshall, Warren, Revelle, Roosevelt, or Sixth. Under the program, students must sign a contract with a MiraCosta counselor. Criteria for TAG include: 1. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.8 in all UC-transferable units and be in good academic standing (minimum 2.0 GPA) in last regular term attended. 2. Pass with “C” grade or better the following subjects for minimum eligibility: Two UC-transferable English composition courses, one UC-transferable mathematics course and four UC-transferable college courses chosen from at least two of the following subject areas: arts and humanities, social and behavioral science, physical and biological science. 3. Clear each TAG core course for general education with a minimum “C” grade. 4. Earn sixty (60) UC-transferable semester units. 5. Establish California residency for admissions purposes by completing 30 UC-transferable units at a California community college and the last regular term attended must be at a California community college. (Resident status for fee purposes at a community college does not guarantee resident status for tuition purposes at UCSD). 6. Submit an official UC Admission Application within the published deadlines for the quarter applicable on the TAG contract (see UC Admission Application for filing dates) and comply with all UC requirements and deadlines. 7. Once the TAG contract is signed, all remaining core course work must be completed at a participating TAG community college. 8. Complete all of the TAG requirements one quarter prior to transfer. • Fall Quarter Transfer: End of spring term (May). • Winter Quarter Transfer: End of summer term (August). • Spring Quarter Transfer: End of fall term (December). Restricted Students: 1. Students with fewer than 12 UC-transferable units or lower than a 2.8 GPA. 2. Foreign students with a visa (NOTE: Students with permanent resident status are not considered to be foreign students). 3. Students who are not in good standing at a UC campus (Below 2.0 GPA).

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4. Students who have registered at UCSD other than in summer school, cross enrollment or UCSD Extension. 5. Students currently holding a BA or BS or higher degree, including degrees earned outside the United States. 6. Students who are not classified as California residents for their community college’s fee purposes (UC residency criteria may differ for fee purposes). 7. Students whose total combined 2-year and 4-year (including University Extensions) transferable work exceeds 90 semester units. 8. High school students who are concurrently enrolled at a community college and have not yet earned a diploma.

TAG Core General Education Requirements: Select a two-course sequence from one department in each of the following areas: (based on 2005-06 approvals) A. Writing: English 100 and 201 or 202 B. Humanities: Choose a two-course sequence from one subject. 1. Art 260 and 158 2. Art 258 and 259 3. Dance 101 and 105 4. Dramatic Arts 120 and 121 5. History 100 and 101 6. History 103 and 104 7. History 116 and 117 8. Humanities 201 and 202 9. Literature 250 and 251 10. Literature 260 and 261 11. Literature 270 and 271 12. Music 117 and 118 13. Music 115 and 114 or 116 or 119 14. Philosophy 101 and 102 C. Foreign Language: Complete two semesters in the same language. 1.  Chinese 101 and 102   2. French 101, 102, 201, 202 3.  German 101, 102, 201, 202 4. Italian 101, 102, 201 5. Japanese 101, 102, 201, 202 6.  Spanish 101, 102, 201, 202, 203 D. Social Science: Choose a two-course sequence from one subject. 1. Anthropology 101 and 102 or 101 and 103 2. Anthropology 102 and 103 3. Economics 101 and 102 4. History 110 and 111 5. History 141 and 142 6. History 145 and 146 7. Political Science 101 and 102 or 103 or 150 8. Psychology 101 and 103 9. Psychology 100 and 101 (Note: No credit for 100 if taken after 101) 10. Psychology 101 and 114 or 211 11. Sociology 101 and 102 or 110 E. Calculus or Natural Science: Complete a two-course sequence from one subject 1. Biological Science 101 and 202 (Recommended biology sequence for non-science majors) 2. Biological Science 101 and 150 (Recommended biology sequence for non-science majors)


TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

3. Biological Science 101 and 204 or 210 4. Biological Science 202 and 204 5. Biological Science 204 and 220 or 210 or 150 6. Biological Science 202 and 220 or 210 or 150 7. Chemistry 110 and 111; 210 and 211 8. Math 150 and 155 or 260 or 265 9. Physics 111 and 112 10. Physics 151 and 152 or 253 Note: Students choosing a science sequence rather than calculus are required to meet the math admission requirements. Additional lower-division general education requirements for Muir, Marshall, Revelle and Roosevelt colleges may be completed either at MiraCosta or after transfer to UCSD. Specific courses are listed in the TAG Advising Guide available at the University Transfer Center, from a counselor, or by clicking on “Tag Advising Guide” at www.miracosta.edu/transfer on the Internet.

Additional UCSD TAG Information 1. Prior college credit may be applicable to the TAG core general education requirement. However, for credits taken under the quarter system, students must have two-quarter courses to clear a one-semester course for TAG. In a sequence where two courses are quarter and one course is semester, some units will be taken away because of content duplication. The number of units for a sequence would normally be six semester units granted. 2. AP and IB exams may be used to clear some courses in the TAG Core General Education. Students must send for official transcripts. No typed scores or high school transcripts are accepted. A chart explaining how these exams can be used to satisfy TAG contract requirements is available to students in the MCC University Transfer Center. 3. Courses taken for Pass/No Pass or Credit/No Credit may be used to meet TAG core requirements as long as the passing grade is equivalent to a “C” or better. You may use up to 14 transferable Pass/No Pass or Credit/No Credit semester units. 4. All applicants must follow regular application procedures. Transfer Admission Agreement with UC Davis (TAA) MiraCosta College has a Transfer Admission Agreement (TAA) with UC Davis which guarantees admission to the university and to the major. Contracts may be signed after completing 30 UC-transferable units. However, students should consult with a counselor in May a year prior to fall transfer in order to become familiar with the criteria and contract-filing deadlines. This is a space-limited program. Transfer Alliance Program with UC Los Angeles (TAP) The Transfer Alliance Program gives students at MiraCosta College an opportunity to transfer to UCLA as juniors. Students must be accepted into MiraCosta’s Honors Scholar Program (see page 41) in order to participate in TAP. Faculty and the Honors Scholar Program counselor will help students plan an academic program at MiraCosta College that meets major and general education requirements. Students who complete the program are given priority consideration for admission to the UCLA College (formerly College of Letters and Sciences), except for the Communication Studies major.

Transfer Admission Guarantee with UC Riverside (TAG) The UCR TAG program ensures admission to one of the topranked universities in the country. The program allows eligible students to study at MiraCosta College and have a guarantee of admission to UCR as a junior-level transfer. TAG Criteria: Students must meet the following criteria to sign a TAG contract: 1. Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. 2. Completed all course work at a California community college. 3. Completed 30 semester (45 quarter) UC-transferable units with a minimum 2.8 grade point average. Majors in the College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences require a minimum GPA of 3.0. 4. Completed or have in progress the mathematics and English courses necessary to satisfy regular UC admissions requirements. Students interested in this program may complete a UCR TAG evaluation request form, which is available in the MiraCosta College University Transfer Center. The TAG program is available for majors in all colleges. However, students are not guaranteed admission to impacted majors and may need to meet additional screening criteria. Biochemistry and chemistry majors are admitted for fall quarter only, while biological sciences and biology majors are admitted for fall and winter quarters. Transfer Admission Agreement with UC Santa Barbara (TAA) The UC Santa Barbara Transfer Admission Agreement program ensures admission to the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UCSB. Students must complete 60 units at MiraCosta College and maintain a 2.8 grade point average. Contracts must be signed by November 30 of the year prior to transfer. Agreements are for fall quarter admission only. UC Santa Cruz Guaranteed Admission for Transfer Entry (GATE) Program A transfer admission guarantee program is available to MiraCosta College students who are interested in transferring to UC Santa Cruz. The Transfer Admission Agreements are for fall quarter only. To apply for the GATE program, students must have completed a minimum of 30 UC-transferable semester units with a 3.0 grade point average. At the time of transferring to UCSC, students must have completed a minimum of 30 UC-transferable units at a California community college and must be transferring with a minimum of 60 UC-transferable semester units. Students must complete all transfer admission requirements by the end of the spring semester prior to transfer and must be in “good standing.” Consult the MiraCosta College University Transfer Center for details. UC Irvine Preliminary Admission-in-the-Field (P.A.I.F) Students are required to meet with a UCI P.A.I.F counselor to sign a contract. In addition, MiraCosta Honor Scholars Program students receive preferred admission into UCI’s honors program. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required. See www.admissions. uci.edu/paif for more information.

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TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

California State University System The California State University System includes 23 campuses, more than 1,400 bachelor’s degree programs, 500 master’s degree programs, and over 200 subject areas. Campuses are located throughout the state: from Arcata, near the Oregon border, to San Diego, near the Mexican border. See map on page 42.

Transfer Admission Requirements All campuses follow similar admission requirements and use a common application form. To be admitted to upper-division status, a transfer student must complete at least 60 transferable semester units with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. Several specific majors, such as business, computer science, engineering, and nursing may have additional entrance requirements. For specific eligibility information, consult the target university or the University Transfer Center.

Area A Communication in the English Language and Critical Thinking: 9 units may apply from this area, one course from each segment. 1. Oral Communication Communication 101 (3) Communication 106 (3) Communication 207 (3) 2. Written Communication English 100 (4) 3. Critical Thinking Communication 212 (3) English 201 (4) English 202 (4) Philosophy 120 (3) Philosophy 130 (4) Reading 100 (3) Area B Physical Universe and its Life Forms: 9 units may apply from this area, one course from each segment. A laboratory course must be taken in either segment 1 or segment 2 below. 1. Physical Science Astronomy 101 (3) * Astronomy 101L (1) Astronomy 120 (3) Astronomy 201 (3) * Chemistry 100 (4) * Chemistry 102 (4) Chemistry 103 (3) * Chemistry 103L (1) * Chemistry 104 (5) Chemistry 108 (3) * Chemistry 110 (5) * Chemistry 111 (5) Earth Science 106 (3) Geography 101 (3) * Geography 101L (1)

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General Education Certification All California State Universities require for graduation a basic program of general education breadth requirements totaling 48 units, regardless of the type of bachelor’s degree or major field selected by the student. These general education requirements vary greatly from school to school. Certification of lower-division general education breadth requirement may be accomplished by completing 39 units of course work from the list below. The remaining 9 units of upper-division general education must be taken no sooner than the term in which the candidate achieves upper-division status. These units must be taken at the institution granting the bachelor’s degree. Students are advised to check with a counselor regarding general education requirements. A student may apply for partial certification at the Admissions and Records Office at the time he/she requests a transcript be sent to a CSU campus. Any of the areas or all of the 39 units may be taken at MiraCosta and certified at the time of transfer. Students must request certification at the Admissions and Records Office. The number of units for each course is listed in parentheses.

Geography 110 (3) Geology 101 (3) * Geology 101L (1) Geology 120 (3) Oceanography 101 (3) * Oceanography 101L (1) Physical Science 101 (3) Physical Science 106 (3) * Physics 111 (4) * Physics 112 (4) * Physics 151 (4) * Physics 152 (4) * Physics 253 (4) 2. Life Science Anthropology 101 (3) * Anthropology 101L (1) # Anthropology 190 (3) Biological Sciences 101 (3) * Biological Sciences 101L (1) * Biological Sciences 102 (4) Biological Sciences 103 (3) Biological Sciences 105 (3) * Biological Sciences 150 (4) * Biological Sciences 170 (4) Biological Sciences 172 (3) * Biological Sciences 172L (1) * Biological Sciences 202 (4) * Biological Sciences 204 (4) * Biological Sciences 220 (4) * Horticulture 116 (4) Psychology 260 (3) 3. Laboratory Activity This requirement may be met by the completion of any lab course above in B-1 or B-2. * Designates lab courses # May be used in either B-2 or D-1, but not in both.

4. Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Biological Sciences 180 (4) Biotechnology 180 (4) Math 103 (3) Math 105 (3) Math 106 (3) Math 115 (4) Math 125 (3) Math 130 (3) Math 135 (5) Math 150 (5) Math 155 (4) Math 260 (4) Psychology 104 (3) Sociology 104 (3)

Area C Arts, Literature, Philosophy and Foreign Language: 9 semester units with at least one course in the Arts and one in Humanities. 1. Arts Art 100 (3) Art 101 (3) Art 103 (3) Art 157 (3) Art 158 (3) Art 201 (3) Art 254 (3) Art 258 (3) Art 259 (3) Art 260 (3) Art 290 (3) Communication 111 (3) Dance 101 (3) Dance 105 (3) Dramatic Arts 105 (3) Dramatic Arts 106 (3) Dramatic Arts 111 (3) Dramatic Arts 120 (3) Dramatic Arts 121 (3) Dramatic Arts 130 (3)


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Film 106 (3) Music 105 (3) Music 108 (3) Music 109 (3) Music 113 (3) Music 114 (3) Music 115 (3) Music 116 (3) Music 117 (3) Music 118 (3) Music 119 (3) 2. Humanities Asian Studies 105 (3) Chinese 101 (4) Chinese 102 (4) Communication 215 (3) Film 101 (3) Film 110 (3) French 101 (4) French 102 (4) French 201 (4) French 202 (4) German 101 (4) German 102 (4) German 201 (4) German 202 (4) History 103 (3) History 104 (3) Humanities 101 (3) Humanities 201 (3) Humanities 202 (3) Humanities 205 (3) Humanities 250 (3) Humanities 251 (3) Italian 101 (4) Italian 102 (4) Italian 201 (4) Japanese 101 (5) Japanese 102 (5) Japanese 201 (5) Japanese 202 (5) Literature 120 (3) Literature 122 (3) Literature 123 (3) Literature 200 (3) Literature 250 (3) Literature 251 (3) Literature 260 (3) Literature 261 (3) Literature 270 (3) Literature 271 (3) Philosophy 101 (3) Philosophy 102 (3) Philosophy 105 (3) Philosophy 122 (3) Philosophy 221 (3) Spanish 101 (4) Spanish 102 (4) Spanish 201 (4) Spanish 202 (4) Spanish 203 (3) Spanish 204 (3)

Area D Social, Political, and Economic Institutions and Behavior; Historical Background: 9 semester units with courses taken in at least two categories. 1. Anthropology and Archaeology Anthropology 102 (3) Anthropology 103 (3) # Anthropology 190 (3) 2. Economics Economics 100 (3) Economics 101 (3) Economics 102 (3) Economics 105 (3) 3. Ethnic Studies Asian Studies 107 **(3) History 107 **(3) Sociology 110 (3) 4. Gender Studies Communication 135 (3) Sociology 120 (3) 5. Geography Geography 102 (3) Geography 104 (3) 6. History Asian Studies 107 **(3) History 100 (3) History 101 (3) History 105 (3) History 107 **(3) History 108 (3) History 109 (3) + History 110 (3) + History 111 (3) + History 116 (3) + History 117 (3) History 150 (3) History 160 (3) History 161 (3) + History 165 (3) 7. Interdisciplinary, Social or Behavioral Science Administration of Justice 105 (3) Communication 120 (3) Communication 220 (3) Gerontology 101 (3) Sociology 105 (3) 8. Political Science, Government, and Legal Institutions Political Science 101 (3) Political Science 103 (3) Political Science 150 (3) 9. Psychology Child Development 121 (3) Psychology 100 (3) Psychology 101 (3) Psychology 103 (3) Psychology 121 (3) 10. Sociology and Criminology Administration of Justice 100 (3) Sociology 101 (3)

Sociology 102 (3) Sociology 103 (3)

# May be used in either B-2 or D-1, but not in both. + Note: Three of the 6 units used to meet the American Institutions requirement may be used in Area D for CSU general education. ** Courses listed in two different areas may be used in one or the other, but not in both. Area E Lifelong Understanding and Self-Development: 3 units may apply from this area. Career and Life Planning 100 (3) Counseling 100 (3) Counseling 110 (3) Health Education 100 (3) Health Education 101 (3) Psychology 115 (3) Psychology 145 (3) Sociology 145 (3) American Institutions Certification All campuses require for graduation a basic American Institutions requirement regardless of the type of bachelor’s degree or major field selected by the student. Students may receive certification of completion of the American Institutions requirement through MiraCosta by completing one of the designated groups of courses and applying for certification in the Admissions and Records Office. Group I—History 110+ and 111+ Group II—History 116+ and 117+ (117 not approved f04 only) Group III—History 141 and 142 Group IV—History 145 and 146 (146 not approved f04 only) Group V—PLSC 102 + Note: Three of the 6 units used to meet the American Institutions requirement may be used in Area D for CSU general education.

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39


TRANSFERRING COURSE WORK

MiraCosta College Honors Scholar Progam Students who participate in the Honors Scholar Program will be eligible for a transfer admission guarantee or priority consideration for admission to many colleges and universities that are participating in the Transfer Honors Council of California. These institutions include, but are not limited to: UCLA, UCI, Pitzer and Pomona colleges, Pepperdine University, and Chapman University. UCB agreement is pending. Consult the Honors Scholar Program counselor in the MiraCosta College University Transfer Center for details. More information is available at www.miracosta. edu/honors Impacted Programs An undergraduate major, program, or campus is designated as impacted or oversubscribed when the number of applications received in the first month of the filing period is greater than available spaces. Such majors, programs, or campuses are authorized to use supplementary admissions criteria to screen applicants. This criteria may include: 1. completing specific courses 2. accumulating a specific number of college units 3. earning a specific grade point average 4.  meeting advance application deadlines 5.  participating in interviews or special evaluations 6.  other The list of impacted programs may vary from year to year as majors are added and deleted frequently. Also, a major impacted at one campus may be open at another; therefore, students should consult a MiraCosta counselor or their intended campus representative to receive updated information about impacted majors. Independent Universities and Colleges Requirements of independent universities and colleges vary greatly. Students should determine the independent institution of their choice, obtain appropriate catalogs, and confer with a counselor to plan an appropriate, effective transfer program. Recommendations for Transfer Students 1. Take math and English courses as soon as possible, especially if skill development is needed prior to eligibility for transfer-level courses. You are encouraged not to leave the required transfer-level math course for your last semester at MiraCosta as doing so could jeopardize admission eligibility. 2. See a counselor, preferably within the first semester at MiraCosta, to make sure you are meeting the preparation for major, general education, and admission requirements necessary for transfer. Request a written educational plan. If you need help in selecting a major and/or transfer university, the Counseling Office and University Transfer Center staff are available to assist you. 3. Choose a preparation course for your major over a general education course when there is a conflict in scheduling. Many courses for the major are part of a sequence and may not be offered often. General education courses are more plentiful each semester and during the summer. 4. Visit the MiraCosta College University Transfer Center web site at www.miracosta.edu/transfer where transfer information is abundant. 5. Purchase the college/university catalog and read it. 6. Attend a campus tour and orientation session at your target

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

university, a great way to meet admissions staff and department advisers. 7. Submit applications to more than one college or university unless you are part of a transfer admission guarantee program. Be aware of admission application filing dates. Visit the application web sites for information.

UC online application web site: www.ucop.edu/pathways/ CSU online application web site: www.csumentor.edu

8. Check the status of your application at your target school’s web site. 9. Apply for an associate degree within the first six weeks of your last semester at MiraCosta. Remember, if you have been following your transfer educational plan you may be eligible for an A.A. in University Studies. Check with your counselor.

University Transfer Center Calendar Phone: (760) 795-6880 July 1–31........................ Admission Application Filing Period for UC Winter Quarter August 1–31................... Admission Application Filing Period for CSU Spring Semester August 31....................... Deadline to sign contract for TAG to UCSD for Spring Quarter * August 1......................... Deadline to apply to MiraCosta’s Honors Scholar Program . For students interested in UCLA TAP Program (priority admission), this is a requirement. September 5................... Initial deadline to submit UCD TAA contracts. Contracts may be accepted until September 28, based on space availability September 30................. Deadline to sign contract for TAG to UCSD for Fall Quarter * October 1–31.................. Admission Application Filing Period for UC Spring Semester October 15...................... Deadline to sign contract for G.A.T.E. to UC Santa Cruz for Fall Quarter October 1–November 30 CSU and UC Application workshops; contact the University Transfer Center for dates and times October 1–November 30 Admission Application Filing Period for CSU Fall Semester/Quarter November 1–30.............. Admission Application Filing Period for UC Fall Semester/Quarter May 31............................ Deadline to sign contract for TAG to UCSD for Winter Quarter * All of the dates above are subject to change. Information is based on data at the time of printing (July 2007). *NOTE: Students wishing to participate in the UCSD TAG program must meet wth a counselor well ahead of the deadline.


HONORS SCHOLAR PROGRAM

Honors Scholar Program Philosophy, Rationale and Characteristics The Honors Scholar Program (HSP) consists of advanced courses specifically designed to develop exceptional talent and ability in highly motivated students. Honors courses provide greater flexibility in format and instructional methodologies through close interaction with Honors Scholar Program faculty and mentors. The Honors Scholar Program Curriculum The Honors Scholar Program offers a variety of courses. The courses are fully transferable, and many are written at the survey/introductory level so that students in virtually every major can participate in HSP while making continuous good progress toward graduation and transfer. Honors scholars are individually guided by a designated honors counselor to establish a program of courses that best suits their particular educational goals and satisfies the requirements of the Honors Board. Honors scholars are required to submit a written educational plan and complete a minimum of 20 units in 6 honors courses, including the following components. Not all courses will be available each semester. Honors Components I. English 100 (4 units) Completion with a grade B or better II. English 201 (4 units) Plus an HSP addendum III. Complete four from the following along with an HSP addendum: • Administration of Justice 100 • Anthropology 101 • Anthropology 102 • Art 260 • Film 101 • Geology 101 • History 100 • History 101 • Humanities 101 • Music 115 • Psychology 101 • Psychology 104 • Sociology 101 • Sociology 104 Parent courses and addendums must be taken concurrently. Honors Scholar Program (HSP) Addendum The addendum (no units) contains a writing component and student-directed studies in small seminars with an honors instructor. The topic/theme of the addendum changes yearly, addressing issues of culture, science and society. The focus of the addendum is to foster a more analytical and creative approach to course content. Additional Activities The honors scholar participates in a variety of activities, which include special cultural events, field experiences, independent study projects, colloquia, and invitations to four-year colleges and universities. Students are encouraged to participate in an Honor’s conference every year at the University of California, Irvine. Consult the HSP faculty or HSP office for more information. Transfer Opportunities Honors scholars who complete the Honors Scholar Program in good standing are eligible for priority or guaranteed admission to certain prestigious four-year colleges and universities. These institutions include, but are not limited to: UCLA, UCI, Pitzer and Pomona colleges. Agreements vary by schools and some may include scholarships.

Requirements for Admission to the Program 1. For entering freshman, an overall minimum GPA of 3.0 in all high school work. For continuing students who have completed at least 12 units of college-level courses, a GPA of 3.0 in all transferable coursework, including courses taken at other institutions. 2. Completed Honors Scholar Program application with essay. 3. Two letters of recommendation on letterhead. 4. Copies of transcripts all of previous academic work. Unofficial copies will be accepted. Entering freshmen submit high school transcripts. Continuing college students may obtain unofficial MCC transcripts online through SURF. ALL transcripts from other postsecondary institutions attended must be submitted with application. 5. Copies of AP or IB transcripts must be submitted with application. 6. All applicants must be English 100 eligible. Students who have completed ENGL 100 must have received a B or better. Students who have completed ENGL 201 prior to admission to HSP are NOT eligible for the program. All application materials must be returned to before the deadline: Honors Office MiraCosta College/MS 5B 1 Barnard Dr. Oceanside, CA 92056 Application materials are available on the Oceanside Campus in the Honors Office, Room T305, or the University Transfer Center, Bldg. 3700. On the San Elijo Campus, application materials are available in the Administration Building. Downloadable applications are available online at: www.miracosta.edu/honors

Requirements for Program Completion 1. Complete a minimum of 6 Honors Program courses, minimum of 20 units. 2. Enroll in at least one HSP seminar each semester and receive a letter grade. 3. Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Honors courses and a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. 4. Complete all pre-major and admissions requirements set by the transfer university. 5. Satisfy the Honors residency: final 30 transferable units must be completed at MCC. 6. Meet with Honors counselor once per semester. 7. Students must apply for an associate degree, such as the AA in University Studies in their last semester prior to transfer. 8. To “Graduate with Honors” a student must have 3.0 cumulative GPA and a 3.0 cumulative GPA in HSP courses at the beginning of the graduating semester. Students must maintain the GPA requirements to complete the program. Students who complete the Honors Scholar Program requirements are eligible for benefits of program completion and will receive the “Certified Honors Scholar” designation on their transcript. For further information, please call the MiraCosta College Honors Office, (760) 795­-6878.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

41


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA / CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSTIY SYSTEMS

University of California / California State University Systems

University of California University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Merced University of California, Riverside University of California, San Diego University of California, San Francisco University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Cruz

California State University California Maritime Academy, Vallejo California State Polytechnic University, Pomona California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo California State University, Bakersfield California State University, Channel Islands California State University, Chico California State University, Dominguez Hills California State University, East Bay California State University, Fresno California State University, Fullerton California State University, Long Beach California State University, Los Angeles California State University, Monterey Bay California State University, Northridge California State University, Sacramento California State University, San Bernardino California State University, San Marcos California State University, Sonoma California State University, Stanislaus Humboldt State University San Diego State University San Francisco State University San Jose State University

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION


ACCOUNTING

Accounting (ACCT) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Business Tom Severance, tseverance@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Christina Hata www.miracosta.edu/ACCT

The accounting discipline offers theoretical and practical courses for students planning to transfer as accounting majors, career and technical courses leading to certificates of competence and achievement, as well as courses to improve workplace skills. Career options in accounting include positions in the private and public sectors; tax preparation; finance and banking; business ownership; and managerial positions. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Business Administration; A.A. in Accounting; A.A. in Bookkeeping Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Accounting; Bookkeeping Certificates of Achievement: Billing, Cost and Accounting Assistant; Income Tax Preparer See certificate requirements following Accounting course descriptions.

101 Practical Accounting

Prerequisites: None Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00) Directed toward students preparing for ACCT 201 and the bookkeeping and accounting certificates, this course covers record keeping for sole proprietorships in service and trade businesses, including worksheets, adjusting and closing journal entries, payroll, cash reconciliation, and preparation of financial statements. Practical problems are stressed, and students are required to complete an accounting practice set for a company. Formerly BUS 101.

145

Individual Income Tax

Computer Accounting

3 Units

Prerequisite: ACCT 101 or ACCT 201. Advisory: ACCT 101, ACCT 201, or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00) The course is designed to instruct the student in the execution of accounting computer programs used by commercial business enterprises. A popular small business accounting software will be the basis of instruction on a personal computer. The full accounting cycle and

44

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

158

Business Mathematics

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00) Designed to meet the needs of business students who wish to gain proficiency in mathematical applications in the business world. Preparation for the study of accounting. Preparation for pre-employment mathematics tests common to office employment. Applications include trade and cash discounts, markup, depreciation, property tax, interest, and payrolls. Focuses on solving word problems in an accounting and business context. Includes many accounting terms. Formerly BUS 158.

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 4 hours. (0502.10) Tax planning and preparation topics include filing status, exemptions, income and exclusions, business expenses, itemized deductions, credits, capital gains, depreciation, tax payments, California tax, IRS and FTB, and audits. ACCT 145 is a CTEC-approved course which fulfills the 60-hour “qualifying education� requirement for tax preparers. Formerly BUS 145.

148

payroll will be covered. The objective is to provide the student with a complete guide to creating and maintaining a proper accounting system on a computer. No prior computer knowledge or experience is required. Formerly BUS 148.

4 Units

201

Financial Accounting

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: ACCT 101 recommended. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00) This transfer-level course for four-year Business Administration or Accounting majors will focus on the theory and practice of accounting. The meaning, construction and interpretation of financial statement will be applied to management and personal investment decisions. The role of accounting in society and current topics are discussed. Formerly BUS 201. (CAN BUS2) (ACCT 201 + ACCT 202 = CAN BUS SEQ A)


ACCOUNTING

202

299

Managerial Accounting

4 Units

Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours. (0502.00) Theory and practice of accounting as applied to cost accumulation and product costing; managerial decisionmaking; planning and control. This course addresses costvolume-profit analysis, relevant costs, budgeting, capital budgeting, and standard costing. Formerly BUS 202. (CAN BUS4) (ACCT 201 + ACCT 202 = CAN BUS SEQ A)

Cooperative Work Experience--Occupational

A bookkeeper generally works under supervision. He/she makes entries in special journals, posts to subsidiary ledgers, verifies and files source documents. Appropriate training includes accounting, business mathematics, and computer office skills. A strong demand by the community for bookkeepers assures opportunities within this field. The following courses may be taken in any sequence as long as all prerequisites are met.

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0502.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directed related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 76 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester. A combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Accounting Certificates Certificate of Competence Accounting An accountant generally works without continuous supervision. He/she has full responsibility for entries to general journals, posting to general ledgers, year-end adjustments, and financial statements. An accountant often supervises one or more bookkeepers and is the primary accounting specialist in a small business. In addition to the training needed by a bookkeeper, an accountant needs extra accounting, business communication, law, income tax, and management training. A strong demand by the community for accounting specialists assures opportunities within this field. The following courses may be taken in any sequence as long as all prerequisites are met. ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT BUS

101 145 148 158 201 202 120

Practical Accounting Individual Income Tax Computer Accounting Business Mathematics Financial Accounting Managerial Accounting Introduction to Business

Units 4 4 3 3 4 4 3

130 136

or Small Business Management (3) Human Relations in Business or Legal Environment of Business (3) Business Communication Computer Applications Introduction to Microsoft Excel Total Units

BUS BUS

BUS 140 BUS 290 CIS 100 CIS 152

3

3 3 1.5 35.5

Certificate of Competence Bookkeeping

ACCT 101 ACCT 148 ACCT 158 ACCT 201 CIS 100 CIS 152

Practical Accounting Computer Accounting Business Mathematics Financial Accounting Computer Applications Introduction to Microsoft Excel Total Units

Units 4 3 3 4 3 1.5 18.5

Certificate of Achievement Billing, Cost and Accounting Assistant This certificate will introduce students to the basic components of the billing, cost and accounting functions. Most of the courses in this certificate can be applied to the Accounting and Bookkeeping Certificates of Competence. Units ACCT 101 Practical Accounting 4 ACCT 158 Business Mathematics 3 CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 or CIS 102 Computer Literacy (1.5) and CIS 152 Introduction to Microsoft Excel (1.5) Total Units 10

Certificate of Achievement Income Tax Preparer The Income Tax Preparer certificate will train students to work in an entry-level assistant position with an experienced tax preparer or a commercial tax preparation service. Units ACCT 101 Practical Accounting 4 ACCT 145 Individual Income Tax 4 ACCT 148 Computer Accounting 3 or CIS 100 Computer Applications (3) Total Units 11

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45


Administration of Justice

Administration of Justice (ADM) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Behavioral Science Karen Baum, kbaum@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Patrick Connolly www.miracosta.edu/ADM

Administration of Justice is the study of the structure, functions, laws/procedures, and decision-making processes of those agencies that deal with the management of crime—the police, prosecutors, courts and correctional facilities. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in criminal justice, criminology or law enforcement or to fulfill general education requirements. Courses are also of interest to professionals working in law enforcement, corrections or other related fields. Career options include work in federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; correctional agencies and institutions, and private security agencies. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Criminal Justice; A.A. in Law Enforcement (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in one of these majors: Criminology; Justice Studies.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificate of Competence: Law Enforcement See certificate requirements following Administration of Justice course descriptions.

100

105

Introduction to the Administration of Justice

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) This course explores the roots of our current justice system and the interaction of its various sub-systems (law enforcement/prosecution, judicial, and corrections). Emphasized is the organizational structure and legal consideration relevant to each. Topics include the origin of law, theories of crime causation, an overview of criminal procedure and a discussion of sentencing philosophies and alternatives. The student is also introduced to the research methodology and sources of information/statistics relevant to the discipline. (CAN AJ2)

Introduction to Justice Studies

Concepts of Criminal Law Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

210

3 Units

Criminal Procedures

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) The course explores the basic concepts of criminal procedure with special emphasis on constitutional principles that apply to investigative techniques involving search and seizure, electronic surveillance, temporary detention, arrest, identification procedures, and interrogation. In addition, legal issues will be covered that relate to initial entry into the judicial system, pre-trial, sentencing, punishment, appeal, and post conviction relief.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of justice studies. Explores social, economic, and criminal justice issues by means of sociological, philosophical, and legal perspectives and methodologies. Students will critically assess the obstacles and opportunities central to the pursuit of justice in the United States and abroad. Topics of analysis may include formal legal systems, institutionalization of injustice, environmental justice, and genocide. Not open to students with credit in ADM 105/SOC 105.

200

Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) The course explores the basic concepts of criminal law to include its philosophy and development, elements of a crime, inchoate offenses, and capacities and defenses. The course will cover specific violations and legal issues related to crimes against persons, property crimes, organized crime, white collar crime, environmental crime, public safety and terrorism offenses, alcohol and drug offenses, and offenses against justice and public administration. (CAN AJ4)

220

Criminal Evidence

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Study of the types and forms of evidence and the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in criminal proceedings with emphasis on the California Evidence Code


ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

and the Federal Rules of Evidence. (CAN AJ6)

230

Community and Human Relations

evidence; scientific aids; modus operandi; sources of information; interviews; and case preparation and follow-up. (CAN AJ8)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Study of the role of administration of justice practitioners relative to the public which they serve. Emphasis on the unique aspects of law enforcement as a profession. Analysis of interaction between the police and the community in terms of the general principles of the dynamics of human interaction. Exploration of ways of improving rapport between the police and the community through expertise with communication skills. Evaluation of police methods used in potentially hypersensitive situations. Study of the history and future of police community relation programs.

240

Written and Oral Communication in Administration of Justice

Police Field Operations

292

Organized Crime, Vice, and Narcotics

293

3 Units

270

Crime and Delinquency

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Introduction to the major types of criminal behavior, characteristics of offenders, factors which contribute to crime and delinquency; the criminal justice process; the function of law enforcement, courts, probation, parole and institutions; changes in crime control and treatment processes; the role of society.

280

Criminal Investigation

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Fundamentals of investigation including crime scene search; recording, collecting, and preserving physical

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Topics in Administration of Justice

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of ADM 293, ADM 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2105.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) This course traces the origins and evolution of domestic and transnational organized criminal enterprises including gang activity. Emphasis will be placed upon the illicit business of organized crime concentrating primarily on drug trafficking and other vice activities. The course will explore organized crime’s influence on society, law enforcement, and world politics.

3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2105.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Study of the responsibilities, objectives, techniques, and methods of police patrol.

260

Juvenile Law and Procedures

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Study of the history and philosophy of juvenile justice with emphasis on the functions of the various components of the overall justice system relative to the special problems of juvenile victims and juvenile offenders.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (2105.00) Practice in the writing skills necessary to professionals in the criminal justice field. Enhancement of skills in oral communication to increase proficiency in obtaining and disseminating information and communicating with private citizens and with other professionals in the field.

250

290

296

Topics in Administration of Justice

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of ADM 293, ADM 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2105.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in Administration of Justice

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (2105.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience - Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

47


ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (2105.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

910

Specialized Topics in Administration of Justice

Administration of Justice Certificate Certificate of Competence Law Enforcement

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: P.O.S.T. Basic Certificate. Current employment with accredited law enforcement agency. Laboratory 40 hours. (2 weeks) (2105.00) This course deals with identification, collection, protection, and presentation of physical evidence in practical “hands-on” exercises. This course meets P.O.S.T. standards established for Field Evidence Technician. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated.)

Select nine elective units from the following: 9 ADM 250 Police Field Operations (3) ADM 260 Organized Crime, Vice, and Narcotics (3) ADM 270 Crime and Delinquency (3) ADM 280 Criminal Investigation (3) ADM 290 Juvenile Law and Procedures (3) Total Units 27

Chemical Agents for Trainers

1 Unit

Field Evidence Technician

“The information I learned from the administration of justice classes I took at MiraCosta College is just amazing. In fact, once I transferred to USD, a professor there told me how impressed he was with the amount of knowledge I already had about the field!” -Kathy Braun, transferred to USD

48

.5-3 Units

Prerequisite: P.O.S.T. Basic Certificate. Current employment with accredited law enforcement agency. Lecture .5 - 3 hours. (2105.00) Study of specialized topics relevant to sworn law enforcement personnel. Course content and number of hours approved on an annual basis by Peace Officers Standards and Training. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated three times with different content.)

As the criminal justice system responds to the increasing complexities of our society, education becomes even more essential for those seeking careers as peace officers as well as for law enforcement personnel seeking advancement within the field. Units ADM 100 Introduction to the 3 Administration of Justice ADM 200 Concepts of Criminal Law 3 ADM 210 Criminal Procedures 3 ADM 220 Criminal Evidence 3 ADM 230 Community and Human Relations 3 ADM 240 Written and Oral Communication 3 in the Administration of Justice

Prerequisite: P.O.S.T. Basic Certificate. Current employment with accredited law enforcement agency. Laboratory 40 hours. (1 week) (2105.00) This course is for police officers who are assigned the duties of training officer in the use of non-lethal chemical agents. It is also for members of tactical teams who utilize non-lethal chemical agents in tactical situations. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated.)

915

996

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


ANTHROPOLOGY

Anthropology (ANTH) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Social Science Louisa Moon, lmoon@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Lynne Miller www.miracosta.edu/ANTH

Anthropology is the study of human behavior from a biological, historical, cultural, and social perspective. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in anthropology or to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include work in data analysis, social services, education, journalism, advertising, international relations, government service, field research, contract archaeology, museums, zoological parks, and nonprofit organizations. Degree: A. A. in University Studies: Anthropology Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101

Biological Anthropology

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00) The course examines (a) the biological basis for animal forms and behaviors, including basic genetics and evolution theory; (b) primate classification, ecology and social behavior; (c) the fossil and archaeological evidence for early human life; and (d) the evolutionary basis for modern human variation in appearance and behavior. (CAN ANTH2)

101L Biological Anthropology Laboratory

1 Unit

Prerequisite: ANTH 101. Corequisite: ANTH 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (2202.00) Designed to accompany Anthropology 101, this laboratory section allows students to garner practical, hands-on experience with the scientific method, genetic models, simulations of evolutionary processes, primate skeletal anatomy, primate behavior and ecology, human osteology, and casts and tools representing selected stages in human development.

102 Cultural Anthropology

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00) The course explores (a) the fundamental characteristics of culture, including its structure, function, and means of change; (b) the science of studying human culture; and (c) human cultural variation in major topics such as mode of subsistence, gender roles, language, kinship structures, political organizations, art, ritual, and celebrations of the human life cycle. (CAN ANTH4)

103 Introduction to Archaeology

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2202.20) This course presents archaeological theory and method, including field excavations and laboratory research, and our current understanding of past cultures based upon their material remains. The course will explore stone age lifeways, early farming cultures, and emergent civilizations around the world. (CAN ANTH6)

190 Primate Behavior and Ecology

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2202.00) This course explores principles of animal behavior and ecology from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include predator avoidance, foraging behavior, mating strategies, mother-infant bonding, and the development of social groups. Focusing on nonhuman primates, the principles are applicable to all animal species; therefore, the course offers value to all students interested in animal behavior. It also includes research methodology and requires an observational project of primates at the San Diego Zoo and/or Wild Animal Park.

292 Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2202.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

49


ANTHROPOLOGY

296

Topics in Anthropology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2202.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. (May be repeated three times with different content.)

298

Directed Studies in Anthropology

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (2202.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

Anthropology students in Lynne Miller’s Primate Behavior and Ecology class present their final project posters on primate behavior to classmates.

50

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


ARCHITECTURE

Architecture (ARCH) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Horticulture, Architecture, & Applied Technologies Paul Clarke, pclarke@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Paul Clarke www.miracosta.edu/ARCH

The Architectural Technology Program is designed to give students a working knowledge of the practices and technical aspects of architectural design and drawing. Careers in architecture include architect (requires graduate degree); federal, state, and local land use planning, building and transportation agencies; architectural, contract, and construction companies. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Pre-Architecture; A.A. in Architectural Technology Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete the Certificate of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificate of Competence: Architectural Technology See certificate requirements following Architecture course descriptions.

101

Architectural Drawing

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (0201.00) This course provides the methods and techniques required for architectural drawing. The major components covered are freehand sketching; line work; lettering; geometric constructions; orthographic and isometric projections; and construction documents which include floor and foundation plans, elevations, sections, and details.

102

Architectural Design I

Architectural Communications

Building Codes and Specifications

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (0201.00) This course provides an introduction to the Building Code, with emphasis on locating, describing, and applying ap-

Construction Materials

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0201.00) This course provides an overview of the processes and materials used in construction. Course topics include elements of planning, designing, and contracting of the work. Emphasis will be placed on site preparation and the materials used in residential and commercial projects, including wood, concrete, steel, glazing, and plastics as applied to the interiors and exteriors of buildings.

207

AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0201.00) Introduction to modeling the built environment using Revit software. Students will create and modify building models, produce presentations including renderings and animated walk-throughs, manipulate parametric objects, create schedules/ legends from the inclusive data base, and generate construction documents from the model. Not open to students with credit in ARCH 207/DRAF 207.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: ARCH 101. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (0201.00) This course provides students the fundamentals of architectural presentation, rendering, and model making. It introduces standards and applications of design language, color theory, pen and ink, freehand drawing, 2-point perspective and model making technique.

104

105

3 Units

Prerequisite: ARCH 101. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (0201.00) This course introduces the basics of architectural design. Students will learn and apply fundamental form and space concepts to a design project using visual communication, spatial communications, and creative problem solving.

103

propriate code sections in the design and development of residential and commercial structures. The course is recommended for architectural students and building contractors.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0201.00) MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

51


ARCHITECTURE

Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0201.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Architecture

Architecture Certificate Certificate of Competence Architectural Technology The Architectural Technology Certificate Program is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the practices and the technical aspects of architectural design and architectural drawing. This course of study will enable the student to qualify for entry-level positions in detailing, revisions, design update, and general office practice. The student will have a basis in architectural drawing and design, building codes, building materials, and training in computer-aided drawing. Units ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing 3 ARCH 102 Architectural Design I 3 ARCH 103 Architectural Communications 3 ARCH 104 Building Codes and Specifications 2 ARCH 105 Construction Materials 3 DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 201 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AUTOCAD DRAF 207/ARCH 207 AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD 2 Total Units 24

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0201.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

�The teachers at MiraCosta are passionate about the subjects they teach and truly want the students to succeed. Most of my classes were relatively small and the teachers were always available.� -Zachary Young, 2007 Medal of Honor recipient, accepted to California State University, Fullerton

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


ART

Art (ART) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-time Faculty: Web Site:

Art Yoshimi Hayashi, yhayashi@miracosta.edu Building 2000, (760) 795-6816 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu Susan Delaney, Yoshimi Hayashi, Peggy Jones, Leslie Nemour, Gilbert Neri, Anna O’Cain, Dean Ramos www.miracosta.edu/ART

The Art Department offers theoretical and practical courses in the traditional disciplines of art and art history as well as digital and photographic arts. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in art or art history, to meet general education requirements, or for personal growth. Career directions include working artist, teacher, graphic designer, photographer, sculptor, curator in a museum or gallery, conservator, appraiser, or work in various related fields such as marketing and advertising. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Art; A.A. in University Studies: Art History (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: Visual Arts; Graphic Design.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Certificate of Achievement: Digital Photography See certificate requirements following Art course descriptions.

100

Drawing and Composition

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) Beginning course in drawing which develops basic drawing skills, perception, and personal expression. Problems of value, structure, and composition, using a variety of themes are addressed. Ordering of two-dimensional space through drawing. Integration of history, theory, and criticism. Interrelationship of the creative arts, humanities, and the self in western and non-western cultures. Experiences with a variety of drawing media and approaches. Notebooks and journal required. (CAN ART8)

101

Design and Color

102

3 Units

Prerequisite: ART 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) Continuation of Art 100 emphasizing a creative approach using both black and white and color media. Students will be exposed to a variety of contemporary approaches toward space, scale, and content, and will be encouraged to develop personal expression through the combined manipulations of subject matter and materials. (May be repeated two times.)

103

Beginning Sculpture

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.20) In this sculpture course, students explore the language of three-dimensional form, structure, and space. It develops personal expression, using a variety of themes and subject matter by ordering three-dimensional space through basic materials such as clay, plaster, metal, and wood. It offers experiences with differing approaches within cultural contexts and integrates history, theory, and criticism showing interrelationship of the creative arts, humanities, and the self in western and non-western cultures. This course will satisfy the Art 103, three-dimensional design course requirement for art majors transferring to SDSU. (CAN ART12)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) In this course, students learn the language of design principles and color theory as they relate to formal composition and the construction of meaning in an artwork. Students will create art and design projects using paint, drawing materials, and other media to demonstrate and evaluate design principles and color theory. Students will research and analyze elements of design in examples of fine art, graphic design, and other forms of popular media. History, theory, and critical analysis of art will be integrated into the study of design and color. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN ART14)

Drawing and Composition

157

Art Orientation

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00) Basic course in art appreciation, including a study of

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

53


ART

world art forms, techniques, traditions, and aesthetics. Emphasis will be placed on surveying both western and world art. Lectures are illustrated with slides.

158

Traditional Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

(May be repeated three times.) (CAN ART24)

204

Art in the Elementary Schools

3 Units

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (1002.00) Philosophy and development of art programs in the elementary schools are studied. Major components of the curriculum are included: line, color, shape, space, pattern, self-expression, historical context, and cultural diversity. Emphasis is placed on global perspectives and the use of practical methods of teaching art including field experience with elementary school-age students.

201

Objects and Ideas in Contemporary Art

203

Life Drawing

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Waterbase Media

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) This course covers composition, techniques, and theory of painting, using watercolor and/or waterbase media. Students will master basic painting principles and explore a broad range of painting issues. Students will investigate various painting media, art historical traditions, and theoretical positions. Course work includes lecture, lab, critique, and independent projects. Instructor may emphasize watercolor and waterbased media as well as mixed media and contemporary approaches. Advanced students will prepare a documented presentation and exhibition of work. (May be repeated three times.)

206

Figure Painting

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: ART 100 or ART 204. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) Working from a posed model, students explore various approaches to the representation of the human figure. Form and structure of the figure are studied, inspired by the rich world traditions of art history and individual creativity. A variety of media will be used as directed by the instructor. This may include oils, acrylics, ink, watercolor, or pastels. (May be repeated three times.)

207

Beginning Photography

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1011.00) An in-depth study of the camera, black-and-white film processing and printing, lighting techniques, presentation, and exhibition. Emphasis is placed on controlling fundamental materials and processes and choosing appropriate subject matter. (CAN ART18)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) The human figure is the subject of this drawing course. Students work from a nude model using materials such as charcoal, pencil, ink, and pastels. Students learn how to depict action in quick gesture drawings as well as produce more complex tonal drawings with emphasis on composition and personal expression. Topics include basic anatomy, structure, and proportion with equal emphasis placed on line quality, value, and media control.

54

205

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.00) Ideas and current issues in contemporary art will be investigated through visual presentations of artistic activity including vanguard work of the 20th and 21st centuries. Lectures will address historical and cultural contexts of contemporary art, as well as influences, intentions, and strategies that contemporary artists invent and employ. It explores art across the globe, including Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Student art projects may include found and constructed objects, low cost, recyclable, unconventional materials in tandem with traditional materials and methods. Environment, sound, installation, and time-based elements may be integrated into the projects. Technical and conceptual explorations in student art projects and research presentations will link to contemporary art. Experimentation and creative problem solving will be emphasized in individual and collaborative art projects. While focused on hybrid and multifaceted forms of new art, vocabulary development will be beneficial for description and analysis of art from many ages.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: ART 100 or ART 101. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.10) Students will study past and present practices in painting working from various subjects which may include still life, landscape, figures, or portraits, either from life or two-dimensional references. Learning to be creative and analytical in painting images and forms, students will develop skills in painting techniques, color mixing, composition, design, and drawing using oils or acrylic as determined by instructor. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN ART10)

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00) An introduction to non-Western arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. This course explores methodology and materials in diverse media as they reflect various cultures from ancient to contemporary periods.

177

Painting

208

Advanced Photography Prerequisite: ART 207. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1011.00)

3 Units


ART

Creative black and white photography explores the use of visual language in relation to thought processes. Advanced techniques of camera use, film handling, and printing will be included, but the emphasis will be placed on the personal expression of ideas. Instruction is offered at intermediate and advanced levels. (May be repeated two times.)

210

Printmaking

potter’s wheel. Creative use of clay, glaze, technique, and kiln firing is encouraged. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN ART6)

245

Advanced Sculpture

3 Units

3 Units

247

Prerequisite: ART 103. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.20) This course concentrates on the exploration and refinement of a wide range of sculptural techniques and strategies. Students will work with traditional mediums such as clay, wood, and metal. Students will be introduced to installation and public works, as well as time-based and kinetic art. Course will include 3-D art theory. (May be repeated two times.)

217

Figure Sculpture

223

Woodworking and Furniture Design

248

Ceramics

3 Units

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.30) This introductory course explores techniques and materials and gives a broad understanding of the traditions of pottery. It emphasizes hand building and/or use of the

3 Units

Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1030.00) In this course students utilize the computer as a tool to create and organize text and vector graphic images into personal and commercial output. Students will produce and manipulate vector graphic images through the use of the software program Adobe Illustrator. Students will generate effective typography, utilize a variety of color palettes and libraries, develop unique brushes and patterns, apply transparency and other special effects, transform objects and manipulate perspective, utilize blends and gradients to produce airbrush effects, make use of pathfinder tools, understand the differences and similarities of CMYK and RGB, and import and export different graphic file formats. Involves considerable hands-on instruction and multiple projects. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 248/CIS 248. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1001.00) This course is designed to teach the skills of working with wood to develop an understanding of the nature of hardwoods and softwoods, the mechanics of shaping/joining, and the proper and safe use of hand and power tools. Special emphasis is placed on creating individual, unique designs. Traditional and contemporary work is studied. (May be repeated three times.)

225

Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1030.00) In this course students utilize the computer as a tool to create and manipulate photographic and other raster graphic images. Students will explore digital imaging techniques through the use of the photo manipulation software Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn to use photo editing and color correction tools, activate selection tools and extraction functions, utilize quick masks and alpha channels, manipulate work paths, incorporate adjustment layers and layer masks. They will also apply filters and blending modes to create special effects, incorporate clipping groups, understand the differences and similarities of CMYK and RGB, and work with a variety of file formats. This course involves considerable hands-on instruction and multiple projects. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 247/CIS 246. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.20) The students are introduced to sculpture, using the human figure as subject matter. Working from the nude model, class members develop the skills of observation and modeling. Clay is the primary material; plaster, metal, and wood are alternate materials at an advanced level. Emphasis is placed on accurate representation of the human anatomy. (May be repeated three times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1030.00) This course provides hands-on computer experience as it applies to the visual arts. Students work with painting systems, study design elements, and print on a color printer. A number of other areas such as animation, music, video, games, and publishing are introduced. Lectures involve hardware configurations, printers, monitors, operating systems, computer programming, art and sound applications, the role of computers in the arts, combining art and sound through the computer, and the role of an artist-programmer. (May be repeated one time.)

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1002.00) Introduction to woodcut, etching, lithography, and contemporary printmaking techniques. Craftsmanship and individual expression is emphasized. Experimentation in the use of materials is encouraged. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN ART20)

216

Introduction to Digital Arts

250

Adobe Photoshop for the World Wide Web

3 Units

Prerequisites: None

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

55


ART

Advisory: CIS 246 and/or ART 247. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1030.00) This course provides introductory instruction in the use of Adobe Photoshop and ImageReady to create graphics for the World Wide Web. Students will gain detailed knowledge of software for digital graphic and photo manipulation, optimize photographs, and create buttons and simple animations for Web pages. Scanning techniques, image compression, file formats, controlling color through the use of appropriate palettes, and cross-platform concerns will be covered. A variety of Internet sites will serve as case studies for analyzing successful interface design. This course does not include actual Web page construction, but addresses the creation and preparation of visual components used in creating Web pages.

251

Digital Photography

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: ART 207, and ART 247 or CIS 246. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (1030.00) This course uses the computer as a tool to create and manipulate photographic imagery. Students will explore photographic theory and technique while learning to use state-of-the-art hardware and programs to enhance and alter images. Ethical considerations will be addressed regarding image manipulation and appropriation. Students will create images from digital cameras and/or scanned negatives, slides, and prints to produce a portfolio of digitally-enhanced photographs. (May be repeated one time with different software version.)

252

Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop

3 Units

Prerequisite: ART 247 or CIS 246. Lecture 3 hours. (0614.50) This course is designed to build upon knowledge and skills gained in CIS 246 or ART 247. Students will acquire advanced digital imaging techniques for desktop image design and production including color correction and management, photomontage, retouching, and creating special effects. Through specific projects, students will utilize higher level compositing techniques such as making selections with alpha channels and paths, creating complex layer masks, and the control of color through adjustment layers and color profiles. Students will learn time-saving keyboard short-cuts to gain speed in work production. Multiple projects reinforce acquired knowledge through preparation of digital files for printing at service bureaus and screen delivery such as the World Wide Web. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 252/CIS 253. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

254

Understanding and Appreciating the Photographic Image

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

258

Ancient to Gothic Art

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00) This course surveys Western art from prehistoric through the Gothic period, emphasizing the content and stylistic aspects of major art works in painting, sculpture, architecture, and craft media. (CAN ART2) (ART 258 + ART 259 = CAN ART SEQ A)

259

History of Renaissance to Modern Art

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00) This course surveys Western art history from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century. Major movements are described and evaluated. (CAN ART4) (ART 258 + ART 259 = CAN ART SEQ A)

260

History of Modern Art

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00) This course traces art forms from the 19th Century through modern art.

290

Landmarks of Art

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1001.00) Art and architecture will be studied on-site within cultural and historical contexts. This course surveys selected periods of western and non-western traditions. Students will investigate major works of art on-site on location. Emphasis will be on understanding the visual arts representing the tradition and evolution of a culture, from ancient to contemporary periods. Course includes preparatory lectures and on-site discussions. Students will keep journals of observations and conclusions.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1002.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1002.00) A survey course of the history of still photography from the discipline’s inception to the present digital age, this course explores photographs as a form of visual communication

56

in historical, socio-political, and cultural contexts. Areas of focus will center on the evolution of photographic images, process, delivery and meaning. Students will develop visual literacy through verbal and written analyses.

293

Topics in Art

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of


ART

ART 293, ART 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1002.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

295

Professional Practices and Portfolio Development in Visual Art

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (1002.00) This course is designed for the student artist interested in researching professional practices in the visual arts, exploring the business of the art world, or planning to transfer to an art program to obtain a bachelor’s degree in art. Students will study contemporary artists, designers, and art-related career choices. Professional responsibilities and relationships in the art world will be compared and contrasted. The ongoing development of the portfolio is a major emphasis as students work in teams to light and photograph their artwork, prepare slides and digital prints, scan and optimize images, and color-correct images for the portfolio and publicity. Students will read and write art criticism and artists’ statements, and critique each other’s writing samples in writing groups. Proposal development for grants, exhibitions, and design presentations will be evaluated and used as models for student projects. An exhibition of class artworks will be the culminating event in this course. Curatorial competence, organizational abilities, good listening and communication skills, and resourceful installation practices are required for a successful exhibition. Visiting artists will speak in the class and the class will visit local museums, art galleries, college art programs, and design businesses.

296

Topics in Art

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of ART 293, ART 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1002.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content will be determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in Art

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1002.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

Art Certificate Certificate of Achievement Digital Photography Learn the essentials of the new technology emerging from the digital imaging industry. Fundamental skills in traditional photography provide the base of knowledge for learning about digital cameras, editing digital image files, lighting, exposure, composition and digital printing. Image editing software will be used to improve photographic images and create special effects. Units ART 207 Beginning Photography 3 ART 245 Introduction to Digital Arts 3 ART 247/CIS 246 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop 3 ART 251 Digital Photography 3 ART 252/CIS 253 Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop 3 Total Units 15

Anna O’Cain 2007 Faculty Member of the Year Art instructor Anna O’Cain was selected as the 2007 Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year. The students who nominated her for the award recognized her generosity, knowledge, motivation, and inspiration. O’Cain was also one of only three Southern California community college instructors selected to teach classes during the fall 2007 semester in the Southern California Foothills Consortium’s Semester in London Program. Yoshimi Hayashi 2006 Faculty Member of the Year Yoshimi joined the Art Department at MiraCosta College in 2001 to teach ceramics and sculpture. He is currently the department chair. Yoshimi is well liked by his students, who nominated him for the 2006 Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year Award. “I tell my students, it’s not always easy to do whatever you want to do. Sometimes you have to follow a road that you may not have expected. But, you have to do what you truly believe in.”

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

57


ASIAN STUDIES

Asian Studies (ASIA) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

Social Science Louisa Moon, lmoon@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/ASIA

Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the cultures of Asia. In preparation for transfer, students often complete courses in Asian studies, history, anthropology, Japanese or Chinese, geography, art, music, and philosophy. Career options include teaching, museum curator and archivist positions, consultancies in art fields, government posts in Asian and AsianAmerican policy, and media production (film, television and music). Degree: A. A. in University Studies: Asian Studies Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

105

Asian Philosophy and Religion

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2201.00) An interdisciplinary survey of the philosophical and religious thought of South and East Asia and its application in theory and practice in traditional Asian societies. Not open to students with credit in ASIA 105/PHIL 105.

107

East Asian Societies

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2201.00) An examination of the social and political foundations of East Asia through historical, religious, and literary documents. Not open to students with credit in ASIA 107/HIST 107.

292

Internship Studies

“I enjoyed the active participation and hands-on learning at MiraCosta College. It kept my attention focused and helped me achieve my goals in class. The friendly instructors put complicated subjects in perspective and made learning fun.� -Aaron Gonzales, 2007 Medal of Honor recipient, accepted to Cal State University, San Marcos

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2201.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)


ASTRONOMY

Astronomy (ASTR) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Physical Science Don Robertson, donrobertson@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Rica S. French www.miracosta.edu/ASTR

Astronomy, the oldest of all scientific studies, has played a vital role in the development of modern science. Astronomers study the formation, composition, and evolution of objects such as planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, black holes, and the Universe itself. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in astronomy or to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include teaching, museum or planetarium director, astronomer/astrophysicist, space scientist, mission data analyst, space craft and instrument designer, observatory technician, telescope operator, optics or electronics technician, computer programmer, and mathematician. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Astronomy Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101 Descriptive Astronomy

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00) This is an introductory course surveying a broad range of topics in astronomy while emphasizing the nature and process of physical science. Studies include the nature of electromagnetic radiation, spectroscopy, optics and telescopes, historical perspectives on modeling the solar system and universe, motions of the night sky and the earth-moon-sun system, terrestrial and Jovian planets, stars, nebulae, galaxies, and cosmology, including formation scenarios, evolutionary processes, and life cycles. Not open to students with credit in ASTR 201.

101L Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory

Life in the Universe

201

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00) Introductory course surveying the study of life in the Uni-

Introductory Astronomy

3 Units

Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C� or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Advisory: MATH 135 Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1911.00) Directed towards students with strong interest and preparation in science and mathematics, this course surveys a broad range of astronomical concepts. Topics of study include physics of atoms, electromagnetic radiation, and spectra; optics and telescopes; laws of mechanics and gravity; motions in the night sky; formation and evolution of the solar system; stars and stellar evolution; galaxies and cosmology. Emphasizes analytical skills and problemsolving in the physical sciences.

1 Unit

Prerequisite: ASTR 101 or ASTR 201. Corequisite: ASTR 101 or ASTR 201 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1911.00) This course provides a hands-on introduction to the methods and techniques of observational astronomy and data/error analysis. Emphasis is placed on the collection, presentation, and interpretation of basic astronomical observations. Students learn to use a planisphere, read star charts, and operate small telescopes. Through indoor activities and by making naked-eye, binocular, and telescopic observations, students explore such topics as motions of the night sky; seasons; rotation of the earth, sun, and moon; light and optics, spectroscopy, and characteristics of planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies.

120

verse. Considers the current state of and future prospects for further development of the search for extraterrestrial life, including methods of communication. Origin and evolution of our Universe and the development of life on Earth are addressed. Basic principles of cosmochemistry and astrobiology are introduced where appropriate. Also treats pseudoscience and considers the philosophical, political, societal, religious, and cultural implications of contact with an extraterrestrial civilization.

3 Units

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1911.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

59


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Automotive Technology (AUTO) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-time Faculty: Web Site:

Horticulture, Architecture and Applied Technologies Paul Clarke, pclarke@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Paul Katson, Steve Vail, Arnoldo Williams www.miracosta.edu/AUTO

The Automotive Technology Program prepares students for entry-level automotive mechanic positions and provides training for persons already employed in the industry. Courses also prepare students for various state licenses and national certifications, including tests administered by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Career options include auto mechanic/repair technician, service manager, and parts specialist. Potential employers include automotive dealerships and independent repair facilities. Degree: A. A. in Automotive Technology Students interested in earning an A.A. degree must complete the Certificate of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificate of Competence: Automotive Technology Certificates of Achievement: Automotive Alignment, Brakes and Suspension; Automotive Electronics; Automotive Quick Service Assistant; Automotive Repair: Drive-Train Specialist; Basic Engine Performance See certificate requirements following Automotive Technology course descriptions.

102

Preventive Maintenance and Engine Performance

suspension service on both domestic and foreign cars. The theory of suspension and alignment is presented along with the rebuilding of front suspension systems, including McPherson Strut and dual-control arm types. Four-wheel alignment systems are studied using the latest computerized equipment. The theory and operation of drive train components are introduced including manual and automatic transmissions, transaxles, clutch systems, drivelines, and differentials. This course is designed to prepare students for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification tests.

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00) Designed to develop an understanding of the operation, care, and preventive maintenance of the automobile. This course covers the overall theory of the automobile including maintenance of tires, wheels, brakes, suspensions; characteristics of fuels, oil and lubricants; maintenance of smog devices; basic engine performance and automotive electronics procedures; and safety factors.

120

Automotive Brakes

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00) This course covers a broad range of brake system theory, diagnosis, and repair. Students will learn the evolution and application of hydraulic brake technology and the theory, operation, and service procedures for drum and disc brake systems found on most domestic and foreign automobiles. Brake drum and disc rotor machining, as well as anti lock brake and traction control systems theory and service, will be presented. Front and rear suspension systems and their relation to brake technology will be introduced. This course is designed to prepare students for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification tests on brakes (A5).

122

Auto Suspension and Wheel Alignment

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0948.00) Complete automotive suspension and steering systems will be covered, with an emphasis on wheel alignment and

60

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

130

Basic Automotive Tune-Up

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours. (0948.00) This course is designed to give students a full understanding of the theory and operation of the internal combustion engine. Cooling, lubrication, ignition, carburetion, fuel injection, and emission control systems are covered as well as maintenance and servicing procedures. Testing equipment and automotive manuals are utilized. This course also offers an introduction to hybrid technology and computerized systems, and it designed to prepare students for the study of Automotive Tune-Up and Diagnosis.

135

Auto Electronic Fundamentals

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00) This course is designed to prepare students for the study of automotive electrical and electronic computer control systems, covering the fundamentals of electricity, electromagnetism, electromagnetic induction, electronics, and D/C and A/C current theory. Voltage, amperage, resistance,


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

and Ohm’s Law are studied in depth. Emphasis will be placed on electronic principles and digital logic. Topics include the overall theory, service, and testing of the battery, charging system, starter, and ignition. Analysis or wiring diagrams and diagnostic charts will be covered. This class will also prepare students to understand advanced electrical systems.

151

Automotive Technology: Engine Performance

153

155

Engine Repair I: Cylinder Head (Top-End)

156

Manual Transmissions and Transaxles

3 Units

Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0948.00) Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles is an introductory course in the theory, service, and repair of automatic transmissions (RWD) and automatic transaxles (FWD). Students will learn to identify, evaluate, service, remove, and replace transmissions and transaxles. Students will learn theory, service, and repair of electronic assist automatic transmission components and related driveline components. Students will prepare for the ASE Automatic Transmission examination.

230

Automotive Tune-Up and Diagnosis

2 Units

Prerequisite: AUTO 130. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours. (0948.00) This course covers operation, diagnosis, and repair of electronic ignition, fuel injection, and emission control systems. Emphasis is placed on engine performance diagnostic utilizing the latest computer analyzers. Topics include testing and diagnosis of computer controlled sensors and actuators. Supercharging, turbo charging, and introduction to variable valve timing are also covered. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A8 certification test in engine performance.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0948.00) This course will cover the theory, operation, and repair of four-cycle automotive engines. It will provide students with experience in the diagnosis and service of major mechanical engine components. Topics covered provide an in-depth study of engine cylinder heads, their constituent components, failure analysis, and related engine systems. Symptom analysis and sequential procedures for repair and reconditioning will be emphasized. Students will prepare for the A1 ASE examination on Engine Repair through lecture, text, and lab assignments. In addition, students may have the opportunity to practice their skills on designated shop and actual in-service vehicles.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0948.00) Manual Transmissions and Transaxles is an introductory course in the theory, service, and repair of manual transmissions (RWD), and manual transaxles (FWD). Students will learn to identify, evaluate, service, remove, and replace transmissions and transaxles. Students will learn theory, service, and repair of manual and hydraulic clutch systems and drivelines components. Students will prepare for the ASE A3 Manual Transmission examination.

Automotive Technology: Suspension and Brakes 10 Units Prerequisites: None Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 16 hours. (0948.00) This course covers the theory, operation, and service procedures relative to automotive front end brake systems found on most domestic and foreign automobiles. Transmission, driveline, and differential fundamentals are introduced. Hydraulic brake systems theory and operation are covered in depth, including ABS and traction control technology, coverage of automotive suspension and steering systems, four wheel alignment using the latest computerized alignment equipment, tire and wheel theory, and computerized wheel balancing. It will also provide a brief overview of manual transmission and clutch operation, automatic transmission theory, and differential/driveline function. This course is designed to prepare students for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification tests in suspension and steering (A4) and brakes (A5).

Engine Repair II: Engine Block

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0948.00) This course will cover the theory, operation, and repair of four-cycle automotive engines. It will provide students with experience in the diagnosis and service of major mechanical engine components. Topics covered provide an in-depth study of engine blocks, their internal components, failure analysis, and related engine systems. Symptom analysis and sequential procedures for repair and reconditioning will be emphasized. Students will prepare for the A1 ASE examination on Engine Repair through lecture, text, and lab assignments. In addition, students may have the opportunity to practice their skills on designated shop and actual in-service vehicles.

10 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 16 hours. (0948.00) This course is designed to prepare students for employment as tune-up technicians. Areas covered in detail are the theory and operation of the internal combustion engine and its related systems including cooling, lubrication and emission control systems and fuel systems including electronic fuel injection and basic carburetion principles and repair. Introduction and principles of electricity and automotive electronics, battery, alternator, standard and electronic ignition system, and OBD I, OBD II. Emphasis will be given to the proper use of the latest diagnostic tune-up equipment including lab scopes, oscilloscopes, diagnostic computers (scan tool), infra-red analyzers, dynamometers including dyno-tuning and multimeter, reading, and understanding wiring diagrams. This course prepares students to pass state and national examinations for automotive technicians.

152

154

235

Electronic Engine Control Systems

4 Units

Prerequisite: AUTO 135 or proof of equivalent trade experience. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0948.00) This course covers automotive computers as they relate to the fuel/air management, ignition, and emission control. Engine management sensors and actuators are covered

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AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

in depth. Idle speed controls, ignition scope patterns, and transaxle electronic controls are also covered in this class. Course also includes the use of automotive scanners to retrieve trouble codes and analyze computer data stream. Emphasis is placed on OBD II systems and computerized CAN BUS communications. This course is also designed to help prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A6 certification test in electricity and electronics.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (0948.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Automotive Technology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of AUTO 293, AUTO 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0948.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Automotive Technology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of AUTO 293, AUTO 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0948.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0948.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students

62

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Automotive Technology

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0948.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Automotive Technology Certificates Certificate of Competence Automotive Technology (Day Only) This certificate is designed to prepare students for entry-level auto mechanic positions at local dealerships and independent repair facilities. Courses are designed to prepare students for various state licenses and national certification. After completion of these courses, students are qualified to take the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) tests for engine performance, brakes, and steering and suspension. Students interested in the ASE Certificate as a Master Automobile Technician need to complete other specific courses listed in the catalog to prepare for the additional test areas. Students may earn the Automotive Technology certificate by completing the following courses: Units AUTO 151 Automotive Technology: Engine 10 Performance AUTO 152 Automotive Technology: Suspension 10 and Brakes Total Units 20

Certificate of Competence Automotive Technology (Evening Only) Students employed during the daytime who are seeking national certification (ASE) should complete the following evening courses to earn the MiraCosta certificate: Units AUTO 120 Automotive Brakes 2 AUTO 122 Auto Suspension and Wheel Alignment 3 AUTO 130 Basic Automotive Tune-Up 2 AUTO 135 Auto Electronic Fundamentals 4 AUTO 230 Automotive Tune-Up and Diagnosis 2 AUTO 235 Electronic Engine Control Systems 4 AUTO 292 Internship Studies 1-3 or AUTO 299 Cooperative Work Experience 4 —Occupational Total Units 18-21

Certificate of Achievement Automotive Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Suspension and Steering (A4) and Brakes (A5) examinations and for entry-level employment in the suspension and brake areas of the automotive service industry.


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

AUTO 120 AUTO 122

Units Automotive Brakes 2 Auto Suspension and Wheel Alignment 3 Total Units 5

Certificate of Achievement Automotive Electronics This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Electrical/Electronic Systems (A6) examination as well as for entry-level employment in electrical and electronic areas of the automotive service industry. Units AUTO 135 Auto Electronic Fundamentals 4 AUTO 235 Electronic Engine Control Systems 4 Total Units 8

Certificate of Achievement Automotive Quick Service Assistant The Automotive Quick Service certificate offers training in basic automotive service and maintenance along with the sales training needed for employment as a quick service technician. AUTO 102 Preventive Maintenance and Engine Performance BUS 135 Personal Selling or BUS 137 Customer Service (3) Total Units

Units 4 3

Certificate of Achievement Automotive Repair: Drive-Train Specialist This certificate is designed to prepare students for entry-level auto mechanic positions at local dealerships and independent repair facilities. Content focuses on diagnosis and repair of internal engine components for domestic and import vehicles. Students will take apart engines and transmissions, putting them back together from the ground up. This certificate will prepare students for the ASE examinations for engine repair, automatic, and manual transmissions. Units AUTO 130 Basic Automotive Tune-Up 2 Engine Repair I: Cylinder Head (Top-End) 3 AUTO 153 AUTO 154 Engine Repair II: Engine Block 3 AUTO 155 Manual Transmissions and Transaxles 3 AUTO 156 Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles 3 Total Units 14

Certificate of Achievement Basic Engine Performance This certificate prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Engine Performance (A8) examination and for entry-level employment in the engine performance area of the automotive service industry. Units AUTO 130 Basic Automotive Tune-Up 2 AUTO 230 Automotive Tune-Up and Diagnosis 2 Total Units 4

7

“The automotive equipment at MiraCosta is fantastic. I can get all the knowledge I need. You can do it all at MiraCosta!� - Ronald Aperocho, MiraCosta automotive student

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

63


BIOLOGY

Biological Sciences (BIO) Department: Biological Sciences Department Chair: John Thomford, jthomford@miracosta.edu Office: Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Dean: Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Full-Time Faculty: Gail Baughman, Keith Cunningham, Jeanine Donley, Julie Haugsness-White, Jeff Ihara, Himgauri Kulkarni, John Thomford Web Site: www.miracosta.edu/BIO Biology is the science of life and living organisms including their structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, and distribution. Students may take courses to prepare for a biology major, to fulfill general education requirements, and to meet prerequisites for related courses. Career options include health-care professions, biotechnology industry, medical research, wildlife conservation, marine sciences, and education. Degree: A. A. in University Studies: Biology/ Biological Sciences (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: Animal Physiology and Neuroscience; Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Biotechnology; Ecology, Behavior and Evolution; Genetics; Marine Biology; Microbiology; Molecular Biology; Zoology.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101 General Biology

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in BIO 101L strongly recommended. Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) General Biology is an entry-level general education course for the non-biology major; it provides a broad perspective of biological concepts and principles. While often the human will be the chief organism of focus, the course emphasizes fundamental themes and understanding of basic principles drawing from a diverse range of unicellular, multicellular, plant and animal species. The course is designed to create an understanding of topics such as the structure and function of life, metabolism and manipulation of energy by plants and animals, cell division, classical and molecular genetics, development, and the evolution and adaptation of living organisms in order to provide the student with the ability to make effective decisions regarding contemporary issues in life science.

101L General Biology Laboratory

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

102

Ecology and Environmental Biology

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0301.00) A general education course for non-biology majors, ecology represents an interdisciplinary introduction to environmental science. The course examines the science of ecology focusing on contemporary problems of population growth, resource use, and pollution. Lab portion meets G.E. science lab requirement and will include field trips to acquaint students with local environmental resources. Formerly BIO 120.

103

Animal Diversity

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) This life sciences, general education course challenges students to think critically and demonstrate hypotheticodeductive reasoning within basic biological concepts (e.g., evolution, ecology, behavior, physiology, and development) focusing on diversity within the animal kingdom. This course targets the non-science major.

1 Unit

Prerequisite: BIO 101. Corequisite: BIO 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) Laboratory accompanies General Biology 101. It is a general education course for non-biology majors providing direct participation in experiments, demonstrations and discussions related to fundamental concepts in biology. Topics address the process of scientific inquiry, the biochemistry of biomolecules, plant and animal cell form and function, energetics and photosynthesis, plant and animal reproduction, molecular and classical genetics, patterns of inheritance, developmental biology, structure and function at the systems level, homeostatic mechanisms, and evolutionary ecology of living plants and animals. This in-

64

troduction to the biology of the human species will develop student understanding of body functions, the human’s place in nature, and the mechanics of heredity.

3 Units

105

Genes and Technology in Society

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) This introductory course is intended as a general education elective for non-science majors, and for any student interested in learning basic biology as it relates to the


BIOLOGY

emerging field of biotechnology. Topics to be emphasized include fundamental chemical processes common to all cells, an understanding of the chemistry of bio-molecules, cellular and molecular biology, classical and molecular genetics, and the molecular basis of immunology and cancer. Current advances in biotechnology, such as cloning, recombinant DNA technology, and gene therapy will be highlighted along with the applications, social consequences and ethical implications of biology and biotechnology in medicine and agriculture.

130

Natural History of California: The Sierra Nevada

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) A lecture course covering the biology and geology of the Sierra Nevada and associated regions; the course will introduce students to ecological relationships within montane environments detailing characteristics of those environments and the adaptation of organisms to them. Geological features such as mountain building and erosional processes are discussed. Local ranges, recognition of key animals, plants, and geological features are stressed. Utilization theory of both renewable and non-renewable resources are presented and modeled. Fields trips may involve overnight camping and a moderate amount of hiking.

130L Natural History of California: The Sierra Nevada (Lab)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: BIO 130. Corequisite: BIO 130 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 16 hours. (3 weeks) (0408.00) An extended field investigation located in the Sierra Nevada designed to accompany the summer offering of BIO 130. Over a three-week period, students will learn field observation and recording techniques, analyze and interpret data, learn to identify the dominant Sierran plant and animal species, and maintain a pressed-plant collection. Field work will be located throughout the Sierra Nevada, Great Basin, and Inyo White Range. Participants need to be in good physical condition and willing to “rough” it. Offered summers only.

150

General Botany

diversity of marine organisms and introduces basic biological and ecological concepts. The course is designed to create an understanding of the diversity of life in the ocean from bacteria to mammals, the flow of energy through trophic systems, the evolution and adaptation of marine organisms in terms of their functional role in a given habitat, and how physical factors such as tides influence the structure of marine communities. The laboratory portion of the course combines classroom investigation with field exploration introducing local marine institutions and coastal habitats and emphasizing both experimental design and current field sampling.

172

Marine Biology

172L Marine Ecology Laboratory

4 Units

3 Units

Prerequisite: BIO 172 Corequisite: BIO 172 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) This course takes a hands-on approach to studying ecology principles using marine intertidal and subtidal communities. The structure and dynamics of marine habitats will be explored using field observation and experimental techniques. Field explorations may involve overnight camping and water activities.

180

Biostatistics

4 Units

Prerequisites: BIO 101 with a grade of “C” or better or approved equivalent and MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) Principles and practice of statistical design and analysis for experimentation in the biological and health sciences, including hypothesis formation, experimental design and execution, data analysis and communication. Laboratory application and extensive use of computer software for statistical analysis and simulation. Not open to students with credit in BIO 180/BTEC 180 or PSYC 104/SOC 104.

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) This general education Life Science course explores the

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in BIO 172L is strongly recommended. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0401.00) A lecture course investigating the structure and dynamics of local marine intertidal and subtidal ecosystems. This course takes an in-depth look at the ecology principles using some of the most species-rich habitats in the marine realm with specific emphasis on examining the flow of energy from primary producers to top consumers, the short- and long-term dynamics, and the physical and biological characteristics of each habitat. Field trips may involve overnight camping and water activities.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) An introductory biology course focusing on plant anatomy, physiology, energetics, classification, and ecology. The unifying topics of biochemistry, cell biology, evolution, molecular and Mendelian genetics are also covered. Provides a solid scientific understanding of plants and related organisms for both major and non-major students. (CAN BIOL6)

170

Marine Ecology

190

Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (8 weeks) (0401.00) This course examines the anatomy and physiology of the human musculoskeletal system emphasizing interaction

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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BIOLOGY

between skeletal muscles and bones for stability and movement. It addresses gross and microscopic study of major bones, muscle groups, and joints in the human body, along with their actions. It uses human skeletons, cadavers, models, and the computer-based A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy program. This course is designed for students in selected Occupational Health programs.

202

Foundations of Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, and Organismal Biology

66

220

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

4 Units

Human Physiology

4 Units

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 204 or BIO 210. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0410.00) Introduction to the physiology of the human organism. Emphasis will be on integration of the body systems and the inter-relationships for maintaining homeostasis. Basic concepts are detailed, and the practical applications of these concepts--in health, disease, and in exercise physiology--are presented in sufficient detail to stimulate interest and improve the transfer of knowledge from the classroom to the professional arena. Designed for students majoring in pre-medicine, pre- nursing, allied health fields, and physical education. (CAN BIOL12) (BIO 210 + BIO 220 = CAN BIOL SEQ B)

230

Fundamentals of Microbiology

5 Units

Prerequisite: BIO 220 or CHEM 100 or CHEM 108 or CHEM 110. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0403.00) Fundamental concepts of life examined to provide a working knowledge of microbiology and its special techniques. Bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, and viruses are examined with emphasis on the bacteria. Includes history of microbiology, morphology and physiology of microbes, techniques of isolation, culturing, identification, and control of bacteria. Pathogenicity and immunology of important medical organisms are considered. Designed for students majoring in the medical/biotech fields. (CAN BIOL14)

Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular Biology 4 Units Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) BIO 204 and BIO 202 make up a comprehensive lowerdivision biological “foundation” for science majors, which is strongly recommended for all students transferring to four-year institutions as biology/biochemistry majors, or in a different major but following a pre-medical/pre-veterinary track. The two courses need not be taken in sequence. BIO 204 surveys the “molecular half” of biological disciplines and covers topics including biological molecules, metabolic biochemistry, cell biology, and a wide range of genetic fields (transmission, population, quantitative, and molecular.) The laboratory emphasizes classical and modern methods in molecular biology and experimental design. (CAN BIOL2) (BIO 202 + 204 = CAN BIOL SEQ A)

Human Anatomy

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or NURS 151 or a minimum 3-unit course in biology that includes curriculum which presents principles of cellular life. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0410.00) Study of the fundamental gross anatomy of the human body through systemic approach. Includes dissection of the cat, study of the cadaver/human skeleton, and introduction to histology. Topics include the skeletal system, muscular system, visceral organs, cardiovascular system, and nervous system. Recommended primarily for students majoring in pre-medicine, pre-nursing, allied health fields, and physical education. (CAN BIOL10) (BIO 210 + BIO 220 = CAN BIOL SEQ B)

4 Units

Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Advisory: Completion of college-level course work in biology with focus at oranismal or populational level, e.g., BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 150, BIO 170, or BIO 220. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) BIO 202 and 204 make up a comprehensive lower-division biological “foundation” for science majors, which is strongly recommended for all students transferring to four-year institutions as biology/biochemistry majors, or in a different major but following a pre-medical/pre-veterinary track. The two courses need not be taken in sequence. BIO 202 surveys the “organismal/meta-organismal half” of biological disciplines and covers topics including the taxonomy and physiology of protists, fungi, and plants; the taxonomy, developmental biology, and physiology of animals; single-species population dynamics of interspecies interactions in communities. The laboratory emphasizes comparative anatomy/physiology of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates, phylogeny reconstruction, life history evolution, and surveys of ecological habitats through field studies. Prospective biology majors should note that this course is offered every semester and may be taken concurrently with CHEM 110 (the prerequisite for BIO 204). (CAN BIOL4) (BIO 202 + 204 = CAN BIOL SEQ A)

204

210

290

Human Dissection Laboratory

1 Unit

Prerequisite: BIO 210 and meeting with instructor prior to registration. Corequisite: BIO 210 if prerequisite not met. Laboratory 3 hours. (0401.00) A course of supervised study of the techniques of human dissection with the use of films, readings, seminar, and actual experience in human dissection. The organization of the course will follow a systemic approach to human anatomy.


BIOLOGY

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0401.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Biology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of BIO 293, BIO 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0401.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Biology

298

Directed Studies in Biology

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0401.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Biological Sciences 1-2 Units Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0401.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of BIO 293, BIO 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0401.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

“I am really thankful for the help from teachers and others throughout my stay at MiraCosta; they have created a positive environment and have definitely fostered my learning.� - Racquel Dudzinski, 2007 Medal of Honor recipient and biology student

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BIOTECHNOLOGY

Biotechnology (BTEC) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Biological Sciences John Thomford, jthomford@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Gail Baughman, Michael Fino www.miracosta.edu/BTEC

Biotechnology is an expanding field devoted to improving human health through the research, development, testing, manufacturing, and marketing of products related to the biomedical and agricultural industries. Courses provide both the theoretical background and practical experience necessary to gain employment in the biotechnology industry. Career options include research, development, quality control and assurance, manufacturing, analytical testing, and work as a lab technician. Degrees: A. A. in University Studies: see Biology; A. A. in Bioprocessing Technician; A.A. in Biotechnology Research and Development Technician Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Bioprocessing Technician; Biotechnology Research and Development Technician Certificate of Achievement: Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant See certificate requirements following Biotechnology course descriptions.

110

Basic Techniques in Biotechnology

4 Units

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0430.00) This course focuses on the basic laboratory skills needed for employment in the bioscience/biotechnology industry. Students will learn laboratory safety and documentation while acquiring skills in the maintenance and calibration of basic lab equipment, calculation, and preparation of lab solutions and media, and routine handling of both bacterial and mammalian cell cultures (tissue culture). Fundamental skills in spectroscopy, centrifugation, performance of assays, gel electrophoresis, and the purification and handling of biological molecules such as proteins and DNA, will be developed.

120

Business and Regulatory Practices in Biotechnology

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0430.00) This course examines basic business principles and manufacturing procedures designed to assure the quality and safety of the product as the manufacturing team moves that product down the biotechnology production pipeline. It explores the role of governmental oversight and regulation during the discovery, development, and manufacture of new products produced by biotechnology.

68

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

180

Biostatistics

4 Units

Prerequisites: BIO 101 with a grade of “C” or better or approved equivalent and MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0430.00) Principles and practice of statistical design and analysis for experimentation in the biological and health sciences, including hypothesis formation, experimental design and execution, data analysis and communication. Laboratory application and extensive use of computer software for statistical analysis and simulation. Not open to students with credit in BIO 180/BTEC 180 or PSYC 104/SOC 104.

201

Principles and Practice of Tissue Culture

1 Unit

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.2 hours, laboratory 2.2 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced course teaches skills in the proper handling of cells from higher organisms, such as those from plants, mammals or insects, routinely maintained in culture in the biotechnology laboratory. Instruction will focus on growing techniques and long-term maintaining of various laboratory cell cultures, including both attached and suspension


BIOTECHNOLOGY

ter or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.6 hours, laboratory 1.8 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced module provides skills in the separation of biomolecules from complex mixtures using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HLPC). Instruction will focus on understanding the principles of separation, acquiring skills in the separation of various biomolecules, and analyzing the outcome for the purpose of determining system performance and biomolecular purification. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation, assays, and spectroscopy.

cell lines. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation and sterile technique.

202

Isolation and Purification of DNA

1 Unit

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.2 hours, laboratory 2.2 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced module provides skills in the routine isolation of genomic and plasmid DNA from cells. Students will gain a greater understanding of the physical properties of DNA and direct experience in techniques related to DNA isolation, separation, and purification commonly used in the biotechnology laboratory. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation, sterile technique, and gel electrophoresis.

203

Techniques in DNA Amplification

Recombinant DNA

206

Principles of Separation and HPLC

215

1 Unit

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or bet-

1 Unit

Qualification and Validation in Biotechnology

3 Units

Prerequisites: BTEC 110 and BTEC 120. Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0430.00) This course will provide a comprehensive understanding and practical execution of how to meet FDA and quality system expectations regarding qualification and validation in biotechnology. The course covers the validation lifecycle and equipment, assay, cleaning, computer, and process validation methodologies. Documentation will be developed to support the validation activities, including change control and handling deviations, within the scope of a cGMP bioprocess pilot plant.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.2 hours, laboratory 2.2 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced course provides skills in recombinant DNA technology used to analyze and manipulate DNA in the biotechnology laboratory. Students will understand the process of cloning DNA and acquire the skills necessary to cut, piece together, and introduce new DNA molecules into prepared host bacterial cells. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation, basic bacteriology, gel electrophoresis, and the isolation and purification of DNA.

Techniques in Immunochemistry and ELISA

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.2 hours, laboratory 2.2 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced course provides skills in the use of antibody reagents as a tool in the biotechnology laboratory. Instruction will focus on student understanding of the nature and specificity of antibody reagents and acquiring skills in the performance of techniques utilizing antibodies, such as Westerns and ELISAs. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation and assay procedures.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent, and CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and BIO 101 or BIO 105 or BIO 204. Advisory: BTEC 110 and eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2.2 hours, laboratory 2.2 hours. (5 weeks) (0430.00) This advanced course is designed to provide skills in the performance of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique commonly used to amplify DNA in forensics and the biotechnology laboratory. Instruction will focus on understanding the process; potential applications of DNA amplification; and the skills related to the set up, performance, and evaluation of the outcome of the technique. The course assumes prior knowledge of solution preparation and gel electrophoresis.

204

207

220

Bioprocessing

4 Units

Prerequisites: BTEC 110 and BTEC 120. Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 as evidenced by successful completion of ENGL 803 or qualification through the English Assessment Examination. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (0430.00) This laboratory course teaches the skills needed to serve as a technician in biotechnology production. Students will grow and monitor a variety of cells (bacterial, yeast, and/or mammalian) on a laboratory scale that emulates the largescale production used in industry. Students will become

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BIOTECHNOLOGY

familiar with the cleaning, sterilization, aseptic inoculation, operation, and monitoring of fermenters and bioreactors. Students will recover and purify proteins produced by those cell cultures using centrifugation, ultrafiltration, and chromatography techniques. The course emphasizes the use of current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP), and students gain experience following Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0430.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by the instructor and the department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Biotechnology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of BTEC 293, BTEC 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0430.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Biotechnology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0430.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Certificate of Competence Bioprocessing Technician The Bioprocessing Technician certificate provides a foundation in, and practical application of, the technologies employed by biotechnology companies engaged in the production of cell-derived products from small to large scales. Through a combination of basic science courses and laboratory instruction, students will acquire the confidence, the competence, and the compliance for technical work in a regulated environment. Bioprocessing technologies encompass the operation and maintenance of equipment and instrumentation used to manufacture protein pharmaceutical products or reagents utilized by pharmaceutical and academic research labs. Students will learn to grow a variety of cells and recover the proteins that they produce. They will learn to follow good manufacturing practices by maintaining records in order to comply with quality system requirements and government regulations. Graduates of this certificate program can expect to be employed in a range of positions including production, process development, validation, quality control, calibration, and maintenance. Units BTEC 110 Basic Techniques in Biotechnology 4 BTEC 120 Business and Regulatory Practices in 3 Biotechnology BTEC 220 Bioprocessing 4 BIO 101 General Biology 3 BIO

105

BIO 204 CHEM 108 CIS 100 ENGL 100 MATH 101

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0430.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

70

Biotechnology Certificates

or Genes and Technology in Society (3) or Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry, (4) Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular Biology Preparatory Chemistry 3 Computer Applications 3 or Equivalent knowledge Composition and Reading 4 Intermediate Algebra 4 or Qualification through Math competency exam or approved equivalent

Select one course from the following electives: BIO 180/BTEC 180 Biostatistics (4) BTEC 215 Qualification and Validation in (3) Biotechnology Total Units

3-4

24-33

Certificate of Competence Biotechnology Research and Development Technician The Biotechnology Research and Development Technician certificate is designed to meet the increasing need for entry-level laboratory technicians, especially in the field of research and development. Technicians in this field must be proficient in the application of scientific methodology to solve problems. They must learn/implement laboratory procedures and use specialized laboratory equipment. Competency in organizational,


BIOTECHNOLOGY

computational and communication skills is required. This two-year program is designed to give students the theoretical background as well as the practical experience necessary to be effective laboratory technicians. Graduates of this biotechnology program can expect to be employed in various capacities including quality control and quality assurance, manufacturing, research and product development, analytical testing and academic research. Students interested in an Associate in Arts degree in Biotechnology must complete the requirements for this certificate and the other degree requirements listed in the college catalog for the A.A. degree. Units BTEC 110 Basic Techniques in Biotechnology 4 BIO 101 General Biology 3 BIO

105

or Genes and Technology in Society (3)

or BIO 204 Foundations of Biology: Biochemistry, (4) Cell Biology, Genetics, and Molecular Biology BIO 180/BTEC 180 Biostatistics 4 BIO 220 Human Physiology 4 CHEM 110 General Chemistry 5 CHEM 111 General Chemistry 5 CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 ENGL 100 Composition and Reading 4 MATH 101 Intermediate Algebra 4 Select two courses from the following electives: 2-7 BTEC 120 Business and Regulatory Practices (3) in Biotechnology BTEC 202 Isolation and Purification of DNA (1) BTEC 203 Techniques in DNA Amplification (1) BTEC 204 Recombinant DNA (1) BTEC 206 Principles of Separation and HPLC (1) BTEC 207 Techniques in Immunochemistry and (1) ELISA

BTEC 215 BTEC 220 BTEC 292 BTEC 299

Qualification and Validation in (3) Biotechnology Bioprocessing (4) Internship Studies (1) Cooperative Work Experience (1) —Occupational Total Units

38-44

Certificate of Achievement Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant This certificate is designed to meet the increasing need for entrylevel production (or manufacturing) assistants in biotechnology. The required courses are designed to provide students with a basic foundation in biology, chemistry and mathematics to allow them to successfully enter the biotechnology workplace as support personnel. Graduates of the program can expect employment performing general tasks such as solution and media preparation, inventory and ordering of supplies and reagents, and providing general assistance in the performance of tests and routine tasks related to the manufacturing and laboratory environments. Units BIO 101 General Biology 3 or BIO 105 Genes and Technology in Society (3) BTEC 110 Basic Techniques in Biotechnology 4 CHEM 108 Preparatory Chemistry 3 or CHEM 110 General Chemistry (5) MATH 101 Intermediate Algebra 4 or Qualification through Math competency exam or approved equivalent Total Units 10-16

“MiraCosta College has been so supportive. The EOPS program has helped me immensely. I also have been blessed to receive scholarships with the help of the Scholarship Office. Also, many of the faculty members were great mentors and really believed in me. People ask how I can be a mom, a full-time student, and work. I tell them, I don’t think about how I do it, I just do it.” -Déva Plumlee, MiraCosta graduate and one of only three San Diego County students to receive a summer internship and scholarship from Genentech, a biotechnology company in Oceanside.

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71


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business Administration (BUS) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Business Tom Severance, tseverance@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Christina Hata, Tom Severance, Rita Soza www.miracosta.edu/BUS

Business Administration offers theoretical and practical courses for students planning to transfer as business majors, career and technical courses leading to certificates of competence and achievement, as well as courses to improve workplace skills. Career opportunities in business include accounting, marketing, finance, small business development, and management positions in retail, service, manufacturing, government, and nonprofit organizations. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Business Administration; A.A. in University Studies: International Business; A.A. in Entrepreneurship; A.A. in Management; A.A. in Marketing; A.A. in Retail Management Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Entrepreneurship; Management; Marketing; Retail Management Certificates of Achievement: Business Fundamentals; Retail Assistant See certificate requirements following Business Administration course descriptions.

117

Human Resources Management

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) Introduction to the management of the human resource function in business and hospitality settings. Topics covered include: motivation and management; organizing people relations; job analysis; employee selection, appraisal, and training; theory and techniques of supervision; management by objectives; wage and salary administration; and union relations. Not open to students with credit in BUS117/HOSP 117.

120

Introduction to Business

Small Business Management

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0506.40) Business start-up and management topics include conducting preliminary research, analyzing trends and competition, buying and starting a business or franchise,

72

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

131

Management Principles

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) This course explores contemporary management application issues. Topics include management theories, finding and developing leaders, measuring and improving customer and employee satisfaction, strategic planning, hiring and training employees, developing workplace teams, choosing and evaluating suppliers, and labor and legal issues.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) The trends and opportunities in today’s dynamic business environment are introduced through economics, global markets, social responsibility, ownership forms, entrepreneurship, management organization, employee relations, marketing, decision-making, accounting, and financial management. Students will develop key business success skills and discover many business career and educational opportunities available.

130

developing a business plan, considering legal issues, target marketing, accounting, and managing personnel.

3 Units

132

Marketing

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0509.00) Topics will include market research, buyer behavior, segmenting and targeting, determining market mix, product decisions, pricing, distribution, retailing, wholesaling, promotion, advertising, publicity, selling, service and nonprofit marketing, and international issues.

134

Retail Management

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) Principles and practices used in management of retail businesses. Includes site selection, layout, organization, staffing, positioning, customer service, promotional techniques, and all aspects of the critical buying function.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

135

Personal Selling

3 Units

160

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0509.40) Professional selling techniques include finding career opportunities, motivating, persuading, prospecting, interviewing, handling buyer concerns, negotiating, closing the transaction, obtaining referrals, telemarketing, and addressing legal and ethical concerns.

136

Human Relations in Business

137

Customer Service

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) This course presents a practical approach to understanding and implementing the principles of customer service within an organization. The benchmarking process will be studied within the context of continuous quality service improvement.

138

Advertising and Promotion

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0509.00) Marketing communication topics include strategic planning; research; budgeting; choosing message and media; creating print, radio, TV, and direct mail ads; public relations; global and business-to-business advertising; social, ethical, economic, and legal issues.

140

Legal Environment of Business

147

Personal Finance

170

171

1.5 Units

Entrepreneur II

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0506.40) More practical business start-up topics including determining financing needs and sources, choosing a business entity and location, legal issues, organization and personnel, bookkeeping and financial management, risk analysis and insurance.

290

Business Communication

3 Units

Prerequisite: Pass with a grade of “CR� ENGL 803 or ESL 803 or approved equivalent, or qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Advisory: ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) Principles of effective written, oral, and electronic communication are stressed. Emphasis is on solving problems and eliciting positive response through carefully organized and designed memos, letters, reports, and presentations. A formal business report will be prepared that meets the SDSU Business Administration major requirement. The skills taught are crucial to business success. This course is required in many of the business certificate programs.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0506.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0502.00) Financial planning and budgeting topics include bank accounts and certificates of deposit; credit; credit cards; economics; college funding; taxes; personal residence; property, life, and health insurance; stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; real estate; marriage and divorce; and estate and retirement planning.

Entrepreneur I

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0506.40) Topics include practical business start-up issues for prospective entrepreneurs, successful traits and skills, finding and evaluating business ideas, starting or buying a business or franchise, market research, sales forecasting, distribution, pricing, promotion, advertising, and selling.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0505.00) Business law and government regulations. Topics include the court system, torts, crimes, contracts, sales, consumer protection, commercial paper, agency, employment, business entities, secured transactions, bankruptcy, insurance, real and personal property, landlord-tenant, and wills and trusts. (CAN BUS12)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0508.00) An overview of international business, trade, and globalization, this course focuses on the role of political systems, economics, the legal environment, and culture in the conduct of international business. Additional topics include monetary and financial systems, foreign direct investment, regional trade agreements, key management issues, marketing, and international operations management.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0506.00) Topics include motivation; values; attitudes; group behavior; teamwork; communication; productivity; total quality; job redesign and enrichment; leadership; developing, appraising, and rewarding employees; and managing conflict and change.

International Business

293

Topics in Business

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUS 293, BUS 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0506.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Business Administration

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of BUS 293, BUS 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0501.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in Business

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0506.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0506.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Business

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0501.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

74

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Business Certificates Certificate of Competence Entrepreneurship Starting and running a business gives a student the freedom and enjoyment of being his/her own boss with unlimited earning potential. This certificate program is for both current and prospective entrepreneurs. It assists students in learning and applying the traits and skills necessary to start, operate, and maintain a successful business. Students may take courses in any sequence. Units BUS 132 Marketing 3 BUS 136 Human Relations in Business 3 BUS 130 Small Business Management 3 or BUS 170 Entrepreneur I (1.5) and BUS 171 Entrepreneur II (1.5) ACCT 101 Practical Accounting 4 or ACCT 201 Financial Accounting (4) Select at least nine elective units from the following: BUS/HOSP 117 Human Resources Management (3) BUS 131 Management Principles (3) BUS 134 Retail Management (3) BUS 135 Personal Selling (3) BUS 137 Customer Service (3) BUS 138 Advertising and Promotion (3) BUS 140 Legal Environment of Business (3) BUS 147 Personal Finance (3) BUS 160 International Business (3) BUS 290 Business Communication (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (.5 - 3) Total Units

9

22

Certificate of Competence Management This Management certificate is for students trying to keep pace with an increasingly turbulent working environment. It is particularly appropriate for manufacturing firms facing strong international competition and for all service industries. Completion of the certificate gives students a solid introduction to various management philosophies and skills, and is a valuable addition to their resume. Students are encouraged to choose a variety of electives, emphasizing skills in communication, teamwork, problem solving, accounting and statistics that best increase their skill sets. Units BUS/HOSP 117 Human Resources Management 3 BUS 131 Management Principles 3 BUS 136 Human Relations in Business 3 BUS 290 Business Communication 3 Select at least nine elective units from the following: BUS 130 Small Business Management (3) BUS 134 Retail Management (3) BUS 135 Personal Selling (3) BUS 137 Customer Service (3)

9


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUS 140 Legal Environment of Business (3) BUS 160 International Business (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (.5 - 3) ACCT 201 Financial Accounting (4) ACCT 202 Managerial Accounting (4) COMM 101 Principles of Oral Communication (3) COMM 106 Group Discussion (3) PSYC 104/SOC 104 Statistics for Behavioral Science (3) Total Units  21

Certificate of Competence Marketing Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. It is critical to all business success. This certificate program is for the student currently in or hoping to enter the marketing field. Students learn how products and services are developed, priced, promoted, and distributed; they also learn and practice marketing skills needed in the job market. Students may take courses in any sequence. Students are encouraged to choose a variety of electives that best increase their skill sets. Units BUS 132 Marketing 3 BUS 135 Personal Selling 3 BUS 138 Advertising and Promotion 3 BUS 290 Business Communication 3 Select at least nine elective units from the following: 9 BUS 134 Retail Management (3) BUS 136 Human Relations in Business (3) BUS 137 Customer Service (3) BUS 160 International Business (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (.5 - 3) CIS 246/ART 247 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop (3) CIS 248/ART 248 Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator (3) IMT 120 Interactive Media Production (3) MATH 103 Statistics (3) Total Units 21

Certificate of Competence

Retail Management Retail Management is an expanding career path supported by many industry sectors. Strong retail managers are essential to business success in electronics, clothing, food, entertainment, home furnishings, cosmetics, gifts, athletic equipment, pet supplies, and just about every other imaginable consumer product and service. This program, designed in collaboration with industry leaders, provides the student with many of the competencies required for success at the management level within the vast retail industry. This program encompasses the business essentials such as accounting and marketing, and also emphasizes the “soft skills” of management and communication required for career success. This certificate has been endorsed by the Western Association of Food Chains and its member companies. Units BUS 117/HOSP 117 Human Resources Management BUS 131 Management Principles BUS 132 Marketing BUS 134 Retail Management BUS 136 Human Relations in Business BUS 290 Business Communication ACCT 101 Practical Accounting or ACCT 201 Financial Accounting (4) ACCT 158 Business Mathematics CIS 100 Computer Applications COMM 101 Principles of Oral Communication Total Units

3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 31

Certificate of Achievement Business Fundamentals This certificate will introduce and provide an overview of the issues and skills involved in business education or a career in business. An introductory business course covering marketing, management, and finance is combined with a communications course and a computer skills course. These courses provide a foundation for work or study related to business. Units BUS 120 Introduction to Business 3 BUS 290 Business Communication 3 CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 Total Units 9

Certificate of Achievement Retail Assistant This certificate covers topics essential to the retail workplace and addresses basic skills required for success in that setting. Units BUS 132 Marketing 3 BUS 137 Customer Service 3 ACCT 158 Business Mathematics 3 Total Units 9

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BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

Business Office Technology (BOT) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Computer and Information Science Martin Parks, mparks@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Joseph Moreau, jmoreau@miracosta.edu Kathy Striebel www.miracosta.edu/BOT

The Business Office Technology Program offers career and technical education courses for students and working professionals who seek to learn or update specific job skills or obtain specialized certificates in the office/ administrative assistant skill area. Courses are offered in a self-paced, open-entry format, allowing students to design a flexible schedule. Business Office Technology courses are designed for all who seek to stay current and learn new technology and/or equipment. Careers in Business Office Technology include administrative assistant, secretarial, clerical, data entry, medical office, office management, customer service, and virtual assistant. Degrees: A.A. Office Manager; A.A. Secretary/Administrative Assistant Students interested in earning an A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Officer Manager; Secretary/Administrative Assistant Certificates of Achievement: Data Entry; General Office; Medical Transcription; Office Assistant; Virtual Assistant See certificate requirements following Business Office Technology course descriptions.

100

Keyboarding, Self-Paced

109

Becoming a Virtual Assistant

Word Processing Prerequisites: None

76

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

111

3 Units

Machine Transcription

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 110. Laboratory 3 hours. (0514.00) This is an open-entry, self-paced introduction to transcription course. Students transcribe dictated text into business documents. This course combines the skills of keyboarding, listening, document formatting, and proofreading to produce mailable business documents. Assignments also include a review of grammar, punctuation, word usage, and proofreading. Formerly BUS 111.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS100 Computer Applications or knowledge of basic software applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation media. Laboratory 9 hours. (0514.00) This is an open-entry, self-paced course providing students the opportunity to explore offering their administrative services in a virtual environment. This course provides information and guidance in creating the virtual office. Topics include marketing your abilities, setting up an in-home office, using technology to support your business, coping with working alone, electronic communication, and professional networking.

110

Advisory: BOT 100 or at least 25 wpm keyboarding speed. Laboratory 9 hours. (0514.00) This is an open-entry, self-paced document production course using word processing software. Students will practice the basic operations of a word processing application while creating business documents. Assignments include letters, memos, reports, tables, announcements, newsletters, mail merge, graphics, electronic messaging, Internet research, and projects designed to provide workplace simulation experiences. Formerly BUS 110. This course may be dual-listed with NCVOC 71.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 3 hours. (0514.00) An open-entry, self-paced online keyboarding course for beginners or those who want to learn correct keyboarding technique, or intermediate keyboarding skills, or advanced keyboarding accuracy and speed, or 10 key proficiency. Students use a guided online software program to learn and practice the alphabetic keyboard or 10 keypad. Beginning and 10 keypad courses emphasize keyboarding technique and accuracy; intermediate and advanced courses emphasize speed building. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated three times.) Formerly BUS 100. This course may be dual-listed with NCVOC 70.

112

Machine Calculation

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 3 hours. (0514.00) This is an open-entry, self-paced 10 key calculation course using the 10 keypad on the computer keyboard. Students will learn to operate the 10 keypad by practicing accuracy and speed drills. Skill will be applied to basic business calculations such as retail, payroll, inventory,


BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

employment tests, checkbook balances, and petty cash registers. Formerly BUS 112.

113

Basic Office Skills

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 100. Laboratory 3 hours. (0514.00) This open-entry, self-paced course offers students six (6) choices of basic skills needed for on-the-job success in business and/or to provide a foundation for success in computer classes. Students make selections based on their career goals and/or certificate requirements. Choices include leadership and professional development, communication for the workplace, technology of communication, workplace technologies, advanced word processing, and advanced transcription. (May be repeated three times for a total of 4 units.) Formerly BUS 113. This course may be dual-listed with NCVOC 72.

114

Legal Office Procedures

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 110. Laboratory 4.5 hours. (0514.00) This open-entry, self-paced course will introduce students to a career as a legal office assistant. Students will become familiar with legal office procedures and the necessary background information to perform basic administrative tasks in a law office. Assignments include legal terminology, legal documents, legal transcription, legal jurisdictions, and legal research. This course provides an excellent review of listening, editing, transcription, and word processing skills while learning about the administrative operations of a legal office. Formerly BUS 114.

115

Medical Transcription

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 110 and BOT 111. Laboratory 4.5 hours. (0514.00) This is an open-entry, self-paced course. Students will transcribe medical documents from dictated copy using the software and materials provided by the publisher. Before transcribing, students will complete practice exercises to review terminology, procedures, terms, abbreviations, body systems, pharmacology, and other medical information needed to understand the dictated text. This course provides an excellent review of listening, editing, transcription, and word processing skills while learning about different medical specialities. Workshops and activities with the American Association for Medical Transcription are included in the course materials. Formerly BUS 115.

116

Office Systems and Procedures

to make appropriate business decisions by using realistic events and situations. Students enrolled in this course are encouraged to join the International Association of Administrative Professionals. The instructor and students attend monthly meetings and special events sponsored by this organization.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 100, BOT 110, CIS 100. Laboratory 9 hours. (0514.00) BOT 116 is an open entry, self-paced course. Students use a simulation package and other supplemental materials to perform the job tasks of an administrative assistant in a simulated work environment. Students complete assignments using Microsoft application software. Students practice common office tasks that require knowledge of basic office procedures. Assignments will guide students

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0514.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester. A combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Business Office Technology Certificates Certificate of Competence Office Manager The Office Manager certificate is designed for individuals who want to assume management functions in a business office. Supervisors perform administrative tasks to ensure that their staff can work efficiently. Planning the work and supervising the staff are the key elements of this job. To do these effectively, the supervisor must know the strengths and weaknesses of each member of the staff, as well as the results required from and time allotted to each job. Persons interested in this certificate would include those who have completed the Secretary/Administrative Assistant certificate or comparable program, those who have at least a year’s full-time work experience in an office position, or those who intend to pursue an Associate in Arts and/or Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. Students interested in a bachelor’s degree should consult the articulation agreement between MiraCosta College and their transfer university regarding preparation-for-the-major requirements, general education requirements, etc. Courses in this certificate program are offered on campus, online, and open-entry, self-paced. Units BOT 116 Office Systems and Procedures 3 ACCT 101 Practical Accounting 4 or ACCT 201 Financial Accounting (4) BUS 136 Human Relations in Business 3 BUS 140 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 290 Business Communication 3

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BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

Select at least seven elective units from the following: 7 BOT 100 Keyboarding, Self-Paced (1) BOT 109 Becoming a Virtual Assistant (3) BOT 110 Word Processing (3) BOT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (3) - Occupational ACCT 148 Computer Accounting (3) BUS 130 Small Business Management (3) BUS 137 Customer Service (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (1-3) CIS 100 Computer Applications (3) CIS 150 Introduction to Microsoft Word (1.5) CIS 166 Microsoft Outlook and (1.5) Office Integration CIS 184 Introduction to Microsoft (1.5) PowerPoint CIS 191 E-Commerce (3) ENGL 100 Composition and Reading (4) Total Units 23

Certificate of Competence Secretary/Administrative Assistant The Secretary/Administrative Assistant certificate provides students with skills to obtain an entry-level administrative support position in today’s high-technology office. Office automation and organizational restructuring have led secretaries and administrative assistants to assume a wider range of new responsibilities once reserved for managerial and professional staff. Tasks such as training and orientation of new staff, Internet research, operating and troubleshooting new office technologies, as well as coordinating an office’s administrative activities, and storing, retrieving, and integrating information for dissemination to staff and clients are all part of a secretary/administrative assistant’s job duties. Some administrative assistants telecommute, working from their homes, or provide services to many clients as virtual assistants. This certificate program provides students with foundation skills in basic office procedures, quality document production, communication technology in software and equipment, Internet research, and basic computer skills. All of the required courses and most of the elective courses within this certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. Units BOT 100 Keyboarding, Self-Paced (1) BOT BOT BOT BOT BOT CIS

110 111 113* 114 116 100

or Typing test @ 40 wpm Word Processing 3 Introduction to Machine Transcription 1 Basic Office Skills - two sections 1 Legal Office Procedures 1.5 Office Systems and Procedures 3 Computer Applications 3

Select at least seven elective units from the following: 7 BOT 109 Becoming a Virtual Assistant (3) BOT 112 Machine Calculation (1) BOT 113* Basic Office Skills - two sections (1) BOT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (1-4) - Occupational BUS 137 Customer Service (3) BUS 290 Business Communication (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (1) CIS 105 Intermediate Computer Applications (3)

78

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

CIS 150 Introduction to Microsoft Word (1.5) CIS 166 Microsoft Outlook and Office (1.5) Integration CIS 184 Introduction to Microsoft (1.5) PowerPoint CIS 191 E-Commerce (3) Total Units 19.5-20.5 * More than one section offered each semester. Student can enroll in two different sections, choose two different topics, and earn two units.

Certificate of Achievement Data Entry The Data Entry certificate provides students with immediate employment skills. Data entry keyers usually input lists of items, numbers, or other data into computers or complete forms that appear on a computer screen. They also may manipulate existing data, edit current information, or proofread new entries to a database for accuracy. Some data entry workers telecommute, working from their homes on personal computers linked by telephone lines to those in the main office. Most data entry jobs are offered through temporary employment agencies. This sequence of courses emphasizes keyboarding skills, 10-key-bytouch, machine calculation, basic word processing and computer applications, as well as working in a virtual environment.  All of the courses offered within this certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. With good study skills and commitment, a student can complete this certificate program in one semester. Units BOT 100 Keyboarding - 10-key 1 and BOT 100 Keyboarding - Beginning, 1 Intermediate or Advanced BOT 110 Word Processing  3 BOT 112 Machine Calculation   1 Select at least three elective units from the following: BOT 109 Becoming a Virtual Assistant (3) BOT 113 Basic Office Skills (1) BOT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (1-4) - Occupational BUS 292 Internship Studies (1) CIS   100 Computer Applications (3) Total Units

3

9

Certificate of Achievement General Office The General Office certificate provides students with immediate entry-level employment skills for office positions such as receptionist, typist, file clerk or general clerk.  General Office clerks often have daily responsibilities that change with the needs of the specific job and employer. Most positions require good keyboarding skills, basic computer skills, and other general office skills. Employees in these jobs perform and coordinate office activities and ensure that information gets disseminated to staff and clients. The certificate emphasizes these skills. The courses within the certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. With good study skills and commitment, a student can complete this certificate program in one semester.


BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

BOT

100

BOT 100 BOT 110 BOT 113

Keyboarding - 10-key and Keyboarding - Beginning, Intermediate or Advanced Word Processing Basic Office Skills

Units 1

BOT

100*

Units Keyboarding, Self-Paced two sections (1)

1

BOT BOT

110 113*

or Typing test @ 40 wpm Word Processing Basic Office Skills

Select at least three elective units from the following: BOT 111 Introduction to Machine (1) Transcription BOT 112 Machine Calculation (1) BOT 114 Legal Office Procedures (1.5) BOT 116 Office Systems and Procedures (3) BOT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (1) —Occupational BUS  292 Internship Studies (1) CIS 100 Computer Applications (3) Total Units

3 1 3

9

Certificate of Achievement Medical Transcription The Medical Transcription certificate program provides students with skills to obtain an entry-level job. Knowledge of medical terminology, good grammar and punctuation skills, competent typing speed, computer proficiency and excellent listening skills are necessary for employment. Many medical transcriptionists telecommute from home-based offices as employees or subcontractors for hospitals and transcription services or as self-employed, independent contractors. All of the courses offered within this certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. With good study skills and commitment, a student can complete this certificate program in one semester. Units BOT 113* Basic Office Skills - two sections 1 BOT 115 Medical Transcription 1.5 NURS 155 Basic Medical Terminology 3 Select two elective units from the following: 2 BOT 100 Keyboarding, Self-Paced (1)     BOT 113* Basic Office Skills - two sections (1) BUS 292 Internship Studies (1) Total Units 7.5 * More than one section offered each semester. Student can enroll in two different sections, choose two different topics, and earn two units.

Certificate of Achievement Office Assistant

The Office Assistant certificate is designed for those who wish to obtain an entry-level support position in an office environment. Office assistants are usually under the supervision of a secretary/administrative assistant or office manager. Job tasks are delegated to an office assistant in specific areas such as data entry, filing, typing, payroll, mail processing, and copying. This position requires accurate keyboarding speed, computer proficiency, customer service skills, and basic business procedures. Students who complete this certificate may be interested in taking additional courses to earn the Secretary/Administrative Assistant Certificate of Competence. All of the required courses and most of the elective courses within the certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. With good study skills and commitment, a student can complete this program in one semester.

Select at least four elective units from the following: BOT 100* Keyboarding - two sections (1) BOT 111 Introduction to Machine (1) Transcription BOT 112 Machine Calculation (1) BOT 113* Basic Office Skills (1) BOT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (1) - Occupational BUS 137 Customer Service (3) BUS 292 Internship Studies (1) Total Units

3 1 4

8-9

* More than one section offered each semester for both BOT 100 and BOT 113. Student can enroll in two different sections, choose two different topics, and earn two units.

Certificate of Achievement Virtual Assistant The Virtual Assistant certificate is designed for individuals who want to explore working in a “virtual” environment as a telecommuter or independent contractor. Administrative assistants working in remote locations from their employers or clients comprise the newest career category called Virtual Assistants, or VAs. These workers provide many different types of services to clients using a variety of media. In some cases, they never step into the client’s office or meet them face to face. Through the use of the computer and Internet access, VAs are able to communicate with employers and clients in any domestic or international location. This profession requires excellent computer skills, organizational skills, Internet and electronic messaging skills, and knowledge of business operations. All of the required courses and most of the elective courses within the certificate are offered open-entry, self-paced or online. With good study skills and commitment, a student can complete this program in one semester. Units BOT 109 Becoming a Virtual Assistant 3 BOT 113* Basic Office Skills - two sections 1 BOT 116 Office Systems and Procedures 3 Select at least five elective units from the following: 5 BOT 100 Keyboarding (1)     BOT 110 Word Processing (3) BOT 113* Basic Office Skills - two sections (1) BOT 114 Legal Office Procedures (1.5) BOT 115 Medical Transcription (1.5) BUS 292 Internship Studies (1) CIS 105 Intermediate Computer Applications (3) CIS 167 Microsoft FrontPage (1.5) CIS 191 E-Commerce (3) Total Units 12 * More than one section offered each semester. Student can enroll in two different sections, choose two different topics, and earn two units.

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79


CAREER & LIFE PLANNING

Career & Life Planning (CRLP) Department: Career Studies Department Chair: Donna Davis, ddavis@miracosta.edu Office: Building 3700, (760) 795-6772 Dean: Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Full-Time Faculty: Robbi Rosen Website: www.miracosta.edu/CAREERS Career and Life Planning courses are designed to help students make effective decisions regarding their career and life choices and to provide the tools and techniques for developing a balanced, integrated lifestyle. Students gain self-understanding and develop techniques for successful career development and employment searches. Emphasis is placed on increasing selfknowledge, exploring potential majors and career paths, organizing successful job searches, and developing effective workplace behaviors and attitudes.

100

Career and Life Planning

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (4930.12) This comprehensive course explores the issues and tasks related to personal and career development over the lifespan. Applying psychological, sociological, and physiological principles, students will utilize the career planning process to begin to prepare effectively for work in the 21st century global economy. Topics include assessment of interests, personality characteristics, transferable skills, work values, career exploration, and decision-making strategies. Job search preparation includes development of a resume, cover letter, and interviewing skills. Prepares new and re-entry students to explore, identify, and integrate career and life planning goals. Emphasis is placed on the importance of actively managing one’s career to achieve success in all life roles. Not open to students with credit in COUN 100/ CRLP 100.

101

Introduction to Career Planning

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 hour. (4930.12) This course is designed to provide an introduction to the career planning process. Students’ interests, values, skills, and personality preferences will be explored as they relate to potential career options. Career research will be conducted, decision-making styles, and job search strategies will be introduced. Emphasis will be placed on career development theory, life stages, and the importance of taking responsibility for actively managing one’s own career. Offered credit/no credit only.

102

Job Search Strategies

.5 Unit

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour. (8 weeks) (4930.12) This course will provide an introduction to the job search process including the skills and strategies required to develop and implement a comprehensive and successful job search plan. Students will identify and describe their transferable skills, explore traditional and non-traditional job search strategies, analyze labor market information, create a persuasive resume and cover letter, and evaluate and demonstrate effective interviewing skills. Offered credit/no credit only.

103

Job Success Skills

.5 Unit

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour. (8 weeks) (4930.12) This course will provide an introduction to the development of job success skills. Students will gain knowledge of the skills, attributes, and personal characteristics required for success in today’s workplace including effective interpersonal communications, positive attitude, professional work attire and grooming, time management, teamwork, customer service, and workplace ethics. Students will also develop an understanding of employer expectations and prepare to transition from student life to professional life.

“I took CRLP 101 (Career and Life Planning) and I think this course has been one of the best classes I have taken in college. The assessments, the class exercises, the handouts, and PowerPoint lecture presentations were all very good tools. They helped me to reinforce my re-entry college student goals, to broaden my interests, and to expand my education possibilities.” -Lucero Cardenas, MiraCosta student

80

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog


CHEMISTRY

Chemistry (CHEM) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Physical Science Don Robertson, donrobertson@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Pierre Goueth, Nancy Lee, Don Robertson, Mark Yeager www.miracosta.edu/CHEM

Chemistry is the science of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular systems. Students may take courses to prepare for a chemistry major, to fulfill general education requirements, and to meet prerequisites for related courses and programs. Career options include the medical, health, engineering, industrial, governmental, environmental, and teaching fields. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Chemistry (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in the following majors: Pharmacological Chemistry; Biochemistry.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

100

Introductory Chemistry

What do nutrition, clothing, medicine, household products, energy, and the environment all have in common? Chemistry is the one science which studies the ways they all work, the methods used to produce or protect them, and the research carried out to improve them. This course introduces the non-science major to the fundamental concepts of chemistry and the applications of these concepts to a number of the everyday necessities mentioned above. In doing so, it also teaches the student how to analyze and solve problems using critical thinking and the scientific method.

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1905.00) Introductory Chemistry is a beginning course that teaches the student the language, materials, mathematics, and principles of chemistry. This course will cover properties of matter, atomic theory, use of the periodic table of elements, naming of compounds, formulas and equations, metric measurement, physical states of matter, chemistry of solutions, acids and bases, organic and nuclear chemistry. It is designed for the non-chemistry major, and, along with CHEM 102, makes up the General-Organic-Biological (GOB) sequence required for many allied health fields. While this course has no prerequisites, high school-level math skills are assumed. (Not open to students with credit in CHEM 108 or 110.) Formerly CHEM 101. (CAN CHEM6)

102

Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry

Chemistry and Society Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1905.00)

3 Units

1 Unit

Prerequisite: CHEM 103. Corequisite: CHEM 103 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Laboratory 3 hours. (1905.00) Students taking this course will perform experiments that illustrate, apply, and explain the principles and concepts of chemistry as presented in CHEM 103, including examination of the application of these principles and concepts to issues important to our society. The concepts examined include properties of elements and compounds; energy and matter; atomic theory and structure; chemical reactions; chemical bonding; and selected topics from environmental chemistry, forensic chemistry, biotechnology and biochemistry, materials science, consumer and industrial chemistry, and/or other areas of chemistry.

4 Units

Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or CHEM 108 or CHEM 110 with a grade of “C� or better. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1905.00) This course introduces organic chemistry. It is designed for students pursuing health professions. Topics include nomenclature, bonding, isomerization, reaction mechanisms, and instrumental methods of interpretation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Topics will include structure and reactions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, enzymes, and metabolic functions. (No credit if taken after CHEM 210.) (CAN CHEM8)

103

103L Chemistry and Society Laboratory

104

Chemistry of Living Things (Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry)

5 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: High School level math skills. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00) The Chemistry of Living Things--Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry surveys the concepts of skills of the chemistry of living organisms, with emphasis on the human body. Topics include the structure of the atom,

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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CHEMISTRY

chemical bonding, chemical reactions, the structure and reactions of organic compounds, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids, and metabolism, with applications in the physiology, nutrition, and pharmacology of the human body. This course includes both lecture and laboratory components, and meets the needs of many students planning to transfer in nursing and other health-related fields (check with program advisor or transfer institution for specific information on transferability). Students cannot take CHEM 104 if CHEM 102 has been completed.

108

Preparatory Chemistry

110

111

General Chemistry

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

5 Units

Prerequisite: CHEM 110 with a grade of “C” or better. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00) Chemistry 111 is a continuation of Chemistry 110. This is a study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and

Biotechnology research company Genentech awarded five MiraCosta students $1,000 scholarships each at a special biotechnology event at MiraCosta’s Biotechnology Laboratory in spring 2007. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must have completed at least one MiraCosta biotechnology class and display overall academic excellence, success in their programs of study, and financial need. The five students selected (pictured left to right) are Rene Castillo, Sabrina Tayee, Damon Fadjo, Michael Miller, and George Dela Rosa.

82

5 Units

Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or one year of high school chemistry, and MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Advisory: CHEM 108 strongly recommended if it has been four or more years since chemistry course. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00) Chemistry 110 is the first semester of a one-year general chemistry sequence. A requirement for science majors, the course is a study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Students are taught the application of these principles with special significance placed on chemical computation. Modern theories are presented within the context of historical perspectives. Some of the topics include atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, and nomenclature. As with the lecture portion of the class, the laboratory component is both qualitative and quantitative in scope. A variety of experiments are performed that are designed to enhance and reinforce concepts covered in lecture. Critical thinking and writing, measurement, identification, and analysis skills are emphasized. The course meets requirements of science majors as well as pre-dental, pre-medical, and pre-engineering majors. (CAN CHEM2) (CHEM 110 + CHEM 111 = CAN CHEM SEQ A)

3 Units

Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 101B with a grade of “C” or better or qualification through the Math Competency Exam or approved equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 101B if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1905.00) This course is designed to prepare the science major with the skills and background necessary to succeed in CHEM 110, General Chemistry. The scientific method is used to teach students how theories evolve and how data that supports the theories are acquired and analyzed. It concentrates on developing both analytical and reasoning skills, via problem-solving and establishing cause and effect. Topics include historical development of chemistry, graphing and measurements, dimensional analysis, atomic theory, nomenclature, quantum theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, the Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases, bonding theory, Lewis structures, and the relationship between chemistry and society. (Not open to students with credit in CHEM 110.)

General Chemistry


CHEMISTRY

their applications. The course will cover such topics as kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear reactions, and organic chemistry. The laboratory will include a variety of experiments to supplement and reinforce the class work. The lab will also include a section on qualitative analysis. The course meets requirements of chemistry, biology, physics, pre-dental, pre-medical, and pre-engineering majors. (CAN CHEM4) (CHEM 110 + CHEM 111 = CAN CHEM SEQ A)

210

Organic Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry II

5 Units

Prerequisite: CHEM 210 with a grade of “C” or better. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00) Continuation of the one-year sequence begun by CHEM 210. Topics covered include the structure and reactivity of carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines and other nitrogen functions, aromatic compounds, sulfur-, phosphorus-and silicon-containing compounds, heterocyclic compounds, and di- and polyfunctional compounds; conjugation and aromaticity; multistep organic synthesis; and biological chemistry.

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1905.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

5 Units

Prerequisite: CHEM 110 with a grade of “C” or better. Advisory: CHEM 111. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 6 hours. (1905.00) Organic Chemistry I is the first course in a standard oneyear organic chemistry sequence for students majoring in chemistry and other sciences. Topics covered include the structure and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, nitrites, aldehydes and ketones; determination of structure by physical and chemical methods; and organic chemistry lab techniques. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of organic chemical reactions.

211

292

298

Directed Studies in Chemistry

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1905.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Chemistry

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1905.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

2007 salutatorian and Medal of Honor student Shirley Song is transferring to UC Berkeley where she will major in chemistry.

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Child Development (CHLD) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Behavioral Science Karen Baum, kbaum@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Penny Skemp, Mark Whitney www.miracosta.edu/CHLD

Child Development is the study of the social/emotional, cognitive/language, and physical/motor, growth and development of children, from conception through adolescence. Students may take courses to obtain child development certificates and permits, earn an associate in arts degree, and/or prepare to transfer to a four-year institution. Courses are also of interest to students already working in the field of child development. Career options include a variety of professions serving children and their families such as infant/toddler care, preschool teaching (including Head Start), elementary and secondary education, early childhood special education, program administration, school counseling, child psychology, child advocacy, social work, and community services. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Child Development; A.A. in Child Development Associate Teacher; A.A. in Child Development Entrepreneurship; A.A. in Child Development Master Teacher; A.A. in Child Development Site Supervisor; A.A. in Child Development Teacher; A.A. in Early Intervention and Inclusion Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. For information about the appropriate degree/ courses to meet Head Start teaching requirements, please consult with Penny Skemp or Mark Whitney. Certificates of Competence: Child Development Associate Teacher; Child Development Entrepreneurship; Child Development Master Teacher; Child Development Site Supervisor; Child Development Teacher; Early Intervention and Inclusion Certificate of Achievement: Assistant Teacher See certificate requirements following Child Development course descriptions.

105

Program Planning and Curriculum Methods

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80) Designed for teachers of young children, this course offers an in-depth study of program planning, organizing instruction, and writing of learning plans. Explores the theory and practice behind curriculum development in early childhood settings, including philosophy, goals, and objectives. Discusses activities and materials along with planning the appropriate environment and daily schedules. Consideration will be given to adaptations accounting for cultural and developmental diversity.

106

Educational Play: Materials

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Child Behavior and Guidance

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Designed to increase understanding of children’s behavior and appropriate teaching strategies and interventions. Explores effective techniques for dealing with children, including those with special needs, pertaining to such issues as separation from parents, new experiences, routines, rules, regulations, peer interaction, fears, frustrations, and aggression. Emphasis is placed upon how parents and teachers can give children guidance and discipline which promotes self-control, feelings of security, competency, and self-esteem in the child.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Course is designed for the development of play materials for young children. An overview of current theories and philosophies of play is given. Main focus of course is making appropriate play materials in the curricular areas of art, science, music/rhythm, language, motor, and concept learning. Not open to students with credit in CHLD 120.

84

109

111

Programs for Infants and Toddlers

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1305.90) This course is specifically designed for caregivers of infants and toddlers to enable them to meet state licensing requirements for child development hours. The class will focus on the growth and development of the child, birth through three years of age, and various home and center-based programs offered to this age group. Topics will include physical caregiving and early learning activities,


CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80) This course focuses on the practical aspects of running a successful family child care business including child guidance and development, children with special needs, environmental design, professional growth, and developing a supportive reciprocal relationship with families and their children. Students will be aided in expanding their personal philosophies, examining the National Association for Family Child Care accreditation process, and refining in-depth curriculum planning.

setting up environments, accommodating individual differences, and working with parents and families.

112

Child Growth and Development

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Psychological and physical development of the child during the first six years of life from conception through the pre-natal, infant, and pre-school periods. Major theories of intellectual, physical, emotional, and social development presented. Different cultural and racial methods of child rearing will be examined. Not open to students with credit in CHLD112/PSYC 112.

113

Child and Adolescent Growth and Development

Human Development

125

Family Child Care

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 803. Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80) This course focuses on the practical aspects of building a successful in-home family child care business including state licensing requirements, child development and children with special needs, environment and curriculum, sound business practices, and working in partnership with parents. Further, students will be aided in developing individual ideas about children and their care into a carefully formulated personal philosophy to help in matching the needs of children, parents, and caregivers.

126

Advanced Issues in Family Child Care

140

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 803, CHLD 125 or suitable experience running a family child care business.

3 Units

Children’s Literature and Language

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Development of language and communication skills in the first five years of life. Creating a language arts curriculum for toddlers and preschoolers with an emphasis on oral communication using story telling, puppets, films, conversations, and dramatic play. Analysis of stories and literature for their value to the young child.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) The psychological and physical development of the individual from conception through childhood, adolescence, and maturity. Major theories of intellectual, physical, emotional, and social development presented. Emphasis is on the interdependence of various periods of the individual’s life. Consideration of scientific methods, behavioral disorders, death, and spirituality. Understand the diversity that exists in our culture during one’s life span. Not open to students with credit in CHLD 121/PSYC 121.

Science and Math for Young Children

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Developing a preschool science curriculum aimed at introducing the young child to physical science, simple chemistry, and biological science concepts. Planning a science environment in the preschool classroom that is meaningful and exciting for the young child. Introducing number and math concepts to preschoolers and toddlers.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Study of the child from conception through adolescence. Principles of human development within cultural and family contexts, with emphasis on cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development, both typical and atypical. Consideration of scientific methods, theoretical perspectives, special needs, and the development of skills lending to optimal interaction in adult-child relationships. Not open to students with credit in CHLD 113/PSYC 113.

121

130

150

Art for Young Children

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 803. Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Developing aesthetic and perceptual awareness in the preschool child through exploration of various art media and teacher-programmed activities and experiences. Developmental stages in creative expression of young children will be examined.

160

Music and Movement for Young Children

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 803. Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Music, rhythm, and body movement experiences for young children. Development of teacher skills with simple musical instruments and familiarity with resource materials for program planning.

170

Food and Nutrition for Children

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Examines the nutrient needs through the life cycle with emphasis on prenatal and early childhood. Application of nutrition practices in various child care settings, including

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

menu planning, food purchasing, basic principles of food sanitation, and involvement of the children in nutritionrelated activities.

200

Early Childhood Observation

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1305.00) Observation and interpretation of the young child’s behavior and development is guided in a systematic and objective fashion to enhance the student’s knowledge of developmental norms and promote an understanding of the typical and atypical functioning of children from infancy through the early school years.

205

Health and Safety Issues in Childhood

Child, Family, and Community

Advanced Issues in Infant-Toddler Care

230

Parent / Teacher Partnerships

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

3 Units

Mentor Teacher

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (1305.80) This class teaches methods and principles of supervising student teachers in early childhood classrooms. It emphasizes characteristics of classroom teachers who must function not only as mentors to new teachers, but also address the needs of children, parents, and other staff.

250

Administration of Child Development Programs

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80) Planning and administering of early childhood programs; developing policies with consideration given to the various diverse cultures being served; equipping the environment; purchasing materials; licensing regulations; planning educational, nutritional, and health services; financing; and budgeting.

251

Supervision of Child Development Programs

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100; CHLD 250 is recommended. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.80) An advanced course in the methodology and coordination of early childhood programs to include organization, personnel management, staff development, in-service training, and community relations in diverse cultures. Also presents materials on working with parents, functions of aides, volunteers, and varied early childhood organizational patterns.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) Role of pre-school teacher/administrator in establishing

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245

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.90) This course is specifically designed for caregivers of infants and toddlers to enable them to meet licensing requirements for child development hours. It will focus on the growth and development of children birth through three years of age. Topics will include issues in group care; communication skills; adapting curriculum; and the design, implementation, and evaluation of developmentally appropriate, individually responsive, and culturally sensitive environments for infants and toddlers.

Children with Special Learning Needs

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1305.20) This course focuses on learning to work with children with disabilities and other special learning needs and their families in inclusive early childhood educational settings. It will include an exploration of the characteristics of young children with disabilities and other special learning needs, impacts on the family, types of educational and other programs/services that are available, modification of the educational environment, individualizing curriculum, approaches to assessment, inclusion, cultural competence, and future trends. Although the course will focus on young children, resources will be available regarding older children and youth with special learning needs.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) This course focuses on processes and results of the child’s integration into the social world of family and community. It includes child behavior and development as they are shaped by the family and social institutions along with understanding cultural and developmental diversity in society and their impact on teaching, parenting, and family relations. Not open to students with credit in CHLD 210/SOC 210.

212

240

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1305.00) This course is designed to give those who care for children an overview of health and safety issues. Students will be certified in CPR and First Aid training. Common childhood illnesses and diseases will be presented. This course also covers child abuse, its treatment and prevention, along with reporting procedures. Issues in cultural and developmental diversity as related to typical and atypical child development and child health and safety will be examined.

210

effective relationships with parents in the school setting. Developing skills and techniques in parent-teacher conferencing, home-school communication, parent education, group contacts with parents, and parent involvement in early childhood education. Cultural and developmental diversity will be examined in relation to parent and family contact. Also covers understanding parenting styles, family dynamics, and community resources and support systems.

270

Preschool Teacher Internship Prerequisites: None

3 Units


CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 6 hours. (1305.80) Student teaching under the guidance of the supervising teacher at the campus Child Development Center or with a designated mentor teacher in the community. Developmentally appropriate design of the environment, planning, implementing, and evaluating classroom activities, instructional methods, individual adaptations, and guidance techniques emphasized. Competence developed in teaching strategies, effective communication, and classroom practices.

271

Administration Internship

Laboratory 3 - 9 hours. (1305.00) Individualized study project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

299

Internship Studies

3 Units

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1305.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Child Development

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of CHLD 293, CHLD 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1305.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Child Development

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of CHLD 293, CHLD 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1305.00) Designed to expose students to a variety of curriculum topics not covered in our current course selection. Designed to meet special needs as they arise within the Child Development program.

298

Directed Studies in Child Development Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU

1-3 Units

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (1305.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CHLD 270. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Laboratory 10 hours. (1305.80) Administrative internship under guidance of an administrator at either the campus Children’s Center or a designated off-campus child care site. Experiences in program planning and administrative procedures in the early childhood setting. Students must complete at least one semester of internship at MiraCosta to meet certificate requirements.

292

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Child Development

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1305.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Child Development Certificates The Child Development certificates are designed to prepare students for employment as teachers, aides, directors, and entrepreneurs in preschools, child care centers (including infant/toddler facilities), and family child care programs. Courses are also appropriate for parents, nannies, camp counselors, recreation leaders, elementary school teaching assistants, social service and health care practitioners, administrators, and others working with children. Certificates meet the course requirements for teachers and directors of private child care programs licensed by the California State Department of Social Services (Title 22), Community Care Licensing. The program also meets the course work requirements for the Child Development Permit issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Child development programs that are state funded or federally funded (Title 5 programs such as Head Start, state preschools, etc.) follow the Child Development Permit matrix.   The Child Development Program offers seven certificates to meet the needs of the individual student. The certificates follow

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

the Child Development Permit matrix and are sequential, so it is easy for students to continue to earn additional certificates. Course work completed for the Assistant and Associate Teacher certificates provides the foundation for more specialized courses and a wider range of career options with the Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, Entrepreneurship, and Early Intervention and Inclusion certificates. Note: Not all child development courses are transferable. Students transferring to MiraCosta are required to complete at least one semester of internship here to meet certificate requirements.

Certificate of Competence Child Development Associate Teacher This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements for centers regulated by Title 22. It also meets the Associate Teacher Permit requirements for provision of instruction and supervision of assistant teacher-level staff in Title 5 schools. Units CHLD 105 Program Planning and 3 Curriculum Methods CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 Select six elective units from the following: 6 CHLD 106 Educational Play: Materials (3) CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance (3) CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers (3) CHLD 125 Family Child Care (3) CHLD 130 Science and Math for Young (3) Children CHLD 140 Children’s Literature and Language (3) CHLD 150 Art for Young Children (3) CHLD 160 Music and Movement for Young (3) Children CHLD 170 Food and Nutrition for Children (3) CHLD 200 Early Childhood Observation (3) CHLD 230 Parent/Teacher Partnerships (3) CHLD 240 Children with Special Learning (3) Needs Total Units 18 Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child Development Permit: Associate Teacher, students must also complete the following experience requirements: 50 days of three or more hours per day within two years.

Certificate of Competence Child Development Entrepreneurship   The Child Development Entrepreneurship certificate is designed specifically for students who want to own and operate a child care center or have an in-house child care business. This certificate exceeds the minimum state requirements and adds the necessary business courses to start and successfully run a small business. It should be noted that students must obtain four years of preschool teaching experience for eligibility to run and operate a child care center.

88

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Units CHLD 105 Program Planning and Curriculum 3 Methods CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance 3 CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers 3 CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 CHLD 250 Administration of Child 3 Development Programs CHLD 271 Administration Internship 3 BUS 130 Small Business Management 3 or BUS 170 Entrepreneur I (1.5) and BUS 171 Entrepreneur II (1.5) BUS 132 Marketing 3 or BUS 140 Legal Environment of Business (3) BUS 136 Human Relations in Business 3 or BUS 131 Management Principles (3) BUS 138 Advertising and Promotion 3 or BUS 135 Personal Selling (3) CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 Total Units 39 Experience: Students interested in owning/operating their own child care business need a minimum of four years’ teaching experience regulated by Title 22. Currently, there are no experience requirements for those students who want to own/operate a child care center in their homes.

Certificate of Competence Child Development Master Teacher This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements for Title 22 schools. It is designed to meet the Master Teacher requirements for Title 5 child development programs. This includes providing instruction; supervising assistants, associate teachers, and teacher-level staff; and serving as coordinator of curriculum and staff development. Units CHLD 105 Program Planning and 3 Curriculum Methods CHLD 106 Educational Play: Materials 3 CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance 3 CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 200 Early Childhood Observation 3 CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 CHLD 245 Mentor Teacher 2 CHLD 270 Preschool Teacher Internship 3


CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Select three units from the following: 3 CHLD 140 Children’s Literature and Language (3) CHLD 170 Food and Nutrition for Children (3) CHLD 230 Parent/Teacher Partnerships (3) CHLD 240 Children with Special Learning (3) Needs

Select three elective units from the following: 3 CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers (3) CHLD 230 Parent/Teacher Partnerships (3) CHLD 240 Children with Special Learning (3) Needs Total Units 38

Select six units in one area of specialization: Infant/Toddler CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers (3) CHLD 212 Advanced Issues in Infant (3) and Toddler Care

Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child Development Permit: Site Supervisor, students must also complete the following experience requirements: 350 days of three or more hours per day within four years, including at least 100 days of supervising adults.

Family Child Care CHLD 125 CHLD 126 Creative Arts CHLD 150 CHLD 160

6

Certificate of Competence Child Development Teacher

Family Child Care (3) Advanced Issues in Family (3) Child Care Art for Young Children (3) Music and Movement for Young (3) Children

Consult faculty for other specialization options. Select 16 units in general education.

16

Include at least one course in each of the following: Humanities, Social Sciences, Math and/or Science, English Total Units 51 Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child Development Permit: Master Teacher, students must also complete the following experience requirements: 350 days of three or more hours per day within four years.

Certificate of Competence Child Development Site Supervisor This certificate is designed for students who will be single-site supervisors under Title 5 or center directors under Title 22. It allows holders to supervise master teachers, teachers, associate teachers, and assistants as well as manage single-site programs, provide instruction, and serve as coordinators of curriculum and staff development. Units CHLD 105 Program Planning and Curriculum 3 Methods CHLD 106 Educational Play: Materials 3 CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance 3 CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 200 Early Childhood Observation 3 CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 CHLD 245 Mentor Teacher 2 CHLD 250 Administration of Child Development 3 Programs CHLD 251 Supervision of Child Development 3 Programs CHLD 270 Preschool Teacher Internship 3 CHLD 271 Administration Internship 3

This certificate exceeds the minimum teaching requirements for centers regulated by Title 22. It also meets the Teacher Permit requirements for provision of instruction and supervision of assistant or associate teacher-level staff in a Title 5 (state funded or federally funded) child development program. Units CHLD 105 Program Planning and Curriculum 3 Methods CHLD 106 Educational Play: Materials 3 CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance 3 CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 200 Early Childhood Observation 3 CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 CHLD 270 Preschool Teacher Internship    3 Select three elective units from the following: 3 CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers (3) CHLD 130 Science and Math for Young (3) Children CHLD 140 Children’s Literature and Language (3) CHLD 150 Art for Young Children (3) CHLD 160 Music and Movement for Young (3) Children CHLD 170 Food and Nutrition for Children (3) CHLD 230 Parent/Teacher Partnerships (3) CHLD 240 Children with Special Learning (3) Needs Select 16 units in general education. 16 Include at least one course in each of the following: Humanities, Social Sciences, Math and/or Science, English Total Units 43 Note: To be eligible for the State of California Child Development Permit: Teacher, students must also complete the following experience requirements: 175 days of three or more hours per day within four years.

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Certificate of Competence Early Intervention and Inclusion

Certificate of Achievement Assistant Teacher

This certificate is designed to train students to work with young children with special needs (birth to eight years of age), with those who may be at risk for developmental delays and disabilities, and with their families. This certificate would be appropriate for students working as an assistant or a paraprofessional in early intervention or early childhood special education, or as a teacher in an inclusive early childhood program.

This certificate meets the minimum teaching requirements for private child care centers regulated by Title 22. It also allows students to assist in the instruction of children under the supervision of an associate teacher-level or above in a Title 5 child development program. Units CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3

CHLD 105 CHLD 109 CHLD 205 CHLD 230 CHLD 240 CHLD 270 CHLD 111

Units Program Planning and 3 Curriculum Methods Child Behavior and Guidance 3 Health and Safety Issues in Childhood 3 Parent/Teacher Partnerships 3 Children with Special Learning Needs 3 Preschool Teacher Internship 3 Programs for Infants and Toddlers 3 or CHLD 212 Advanced Issues in Infant-Toddler (3) Care CHLD 112/PSYC 112 Child Growth and Development 3 or CHLD 113/PSYC 113 Child and Adolescent Growth (3) and Development CHLD 210/SOC 210 Child, Family and Community 3 Total Units 27

Select six elective units from the following: 6 CHLD 105 Program Planning and Curriculum (3) Methods CHLD 106 Educational Play: Materials (3) CHLD 109 Child Behavior and Guidance (3) CHLD 111 Programs for Infants and Toddlers (3) CHLD 125 Family Child Care (3) CHLD 130 Science and Math for Young (3) Children CHLD 140 Children’s Literature and Language (3) CHLD 150 Art for Young Children (3) CHLD 160 Music and Movement for Young (3) Children CHLD 170 Food and Nutrition for Children (3) CHLD 205 Health and Safety Issues in (3) Childhood Total Units 12

“Ultimately, I want to open a preschool somewhere near Camp Pendleton to help military families. But, until then, I intend to stay here as long as I can. I love MiraCosta!” -Eric Davis, Marine Corps veteran, MiraCosta graduate, Child Development Center employee and 2005 MiraCosta Student Employee of the Year

90

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CHINESE

Chinese (CHNS) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

International Languages Francisco Alvarez, falvarez@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/CHNS

The International Language program provides students the foundation for language study. Students may prepare for a major in Spanish, Japanese, German and French and take courses to meet general education requirements in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese or Spanish. Career options include advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, counseling, education, film, foreign service, fund raising, human resources, journalism, international relations, law, management, ministry, politics, public relations, sales, social work, and various other related fields. Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101

Elementary Chinese I (First Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1107.00) Beginning Chinese (Mandarin). Covers speaking, reading, and writing in Chinese. Study of Chinese writing system. Pronunciation, oral practice, readings on Chinese culture and civilization. Corresponds to the first two years of high school Chinese.

102

Elementary Chinese II (Second Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisite: CHNS 101 or two years of high school Chinese. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1107.00) A continuation of Chinese 101. Covers comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in Chinese. Strong emphasis on oral use of the language. More study and practice with Chinese writing system. Continuing study of Chinese peoples and cultures.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1107.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

MiraCosta College celebrated the Year of the Pig in February with special events on all three campuses. Events included a tai chi presentation, a Chinese art exhibit, a lecture, a “Chinese Idol� talent show, a qigong presentation and more.

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COMMUNICATION

Communication (COMM) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Communication Studies Dana Smith, dsmith@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Glenn DeLange gdelange@miracosta.edu Samuel Arenivar, Beatriz McWilliams, Neil Moura, Dana Smith www.miracosta.edu/COMM

The Communication Studies Department provides students a theoretical and methodological foundation of the nature of communication in its various forms and contexts, as well as the uses, effects and relevancy of communication in their own lives. Students may prepare to transfer with a major in communication or take courses to meet general education requirements. Career options include advertising, broadcasting, community relations, consulting, counseling, education, film, foreign service, fund raising, human resources, journalism, international relations, law, management, marketing, mediation, ministry, politics, public relations, sales, speech writing, social work. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Communication; A.A. in University Studies: Pre-Communication Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Certificate of Achievement: Organizational Communication See certificate requirements following Communication course descriptions.

101

Principles of Oral Communication

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) Training in the basic principles of oral expression: selection and research on subjects, organization and support of ideas, experience in the development and delivery of various forms of speeches. (CAN SPCH4)

106

Group Communication

Practicum of Voice and Diction

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1506.00) This lab course covers the basics of vocal training. Students learn to improve voice projection, articulation, and expression through acting-oriented exercises and activities. Not open to students with maximum credit in COMM 109/DRAM 109. (May be repeated two times.)

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Voice and Diction

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) Emphasizes training to improve the speaking voice in quality, flexibility, and effectiveness. Not open to students with credit in COMM110/DRAM 110. (CAN DRAM6)

111

Oral Interpretation of Literature

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) This course introduces the oral interpretation and analysis of literary works of art in their intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic forms. Class readings include prose, poetry, and drama. Students will develop vocal expressiveness, variety, and flexibility through oral presentations of literature. Not open to students with credit in COMM 111/DRAM 111.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) This course introduces students to group communication processes and principles, and the necessary role of discussion in society. While addressing current topics of controversy, students learn and apply theories of group problem-solving, roles, conflict resolution, leadership, ethics, and decision-making. Students develop group communication skills in verbal and nonverbal interaction, participation, organization, and cultural diversity. (CAN SPCH10)

109

110

120

Principles of Human Communication

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) An introductory course in human communication concepts and theories, with a focus on the role and significance of communication in and across different contexts. Covers the basic structures and processes of communication, and compares the communication abilities of humans to other species. Message production, message reception, and varying influences on human communication -- such as interpersonal, intercultural, and mediated contexts -- are also analyzed.


COMMUNICATION

135

Gender Studies in Communication

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) An examination of the communication patterns typically exhibited by men and women, this course studies differences and similarities in verbal and nonverbal behaviors, perception, conflict, leadership, and interpersonal relationships. Students develop an awareness and appreciation of gender as an important variable in human communication, in both public and private settings.

207

Interpersonal Communication

Argumentation

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) Includes the study of psychological and logical basis of argument and principles of effective organization. Designed to help the student become a more skilled and responsible advocate. (CAN SPCH6)

215

Intercultural Communication

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) This course analyzes the cultural factors and variables that influence human communication choices and actions. Study includes a focus on perception, language, reasoning, nonverbal messages, values, beliefs, attitudes, perceptions, and rules. Students will learn to identify the cultural principles and variables of communication so as to act effectively and responsibly when interacting with diverse persons in various contexts.

220

Introduction to Mass Communication

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) This course covers the role and impact of mass media in the United States. It demonstrates various media operations in the U.S. and their societal and cultural effects. The course enables students to be informed, critical consumers of mass media, and to understand how the media influence attitudes, values, beliefs, and perceptions. (CAN JOUR4)

292

Internship Studies

293

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required.

Topics in Communication

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of COMM 293, COMM 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1506.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1506.00) Provides for the study of communication within an interpersonal context. Includes the study of the communication process, perception, the symbolic nature of language, non-verbal codes, principles of effective communication, and the effects of communication on people in society.

212

Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1506.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

296

Topics in Communication

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of COMM 293, COMM 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1506.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

Communication Certificate Certificate of Achievement Organizational Communication This certificate provides students with a foundation in communication skills and theories that is applicable to business and organizational contexts. The certificate demonstrates knowledge and proficiency in group, gender, interpersonal, and intercultural communication that students may then apply to their unique workplace environments. The majority of jobs today require people to have awareness of and sensitivity toward the diverse nature of human communication in the workplace. As such, this certificate could help improve the student’s opportunity for personal and professional advancement. Units COMM 106 Group Communication 3 COMM 135 Gender Studies in Communication 3 COMM 207 Interpersonal Communication 3 COMM 215 Intercultural Communication 3 Total Units 12 Note: Most of the Communication courses in this certificate have an official “English 100 Advisory” meaning, in part, that students should be able to read, write, understand, and speak English with college-level fluency at the time of enrollment. Consult with a campus counselor if you need assistance in determining your level of English proficiency. Courses that are part of this certificate may apply toward the A.A. Degree, University Studies in Communication. Taking day, evening, and/or online sections, students can earn the “Certificate of Achievement in Organizational Communication” within two (2) semesters.

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COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

Computer & Information Science (CIS) (See also Computer Science and Internet & Multimedia Technology) Department: Computer and Information Science Department Chair: Martin Parks, mparks@miracosta.edu Office: Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Dean: Joseph Moreau, jmoreau@miracosta.edu Full-Time Faculty: Steve Isachsen, Kathie Laughlin, Jill Malone, Martin Parks, June Porto Web Site: www.miracosta.edu/CIS The Computer and Information Science Department offers a variety of courses designed to give students both theoretical and hands-on experience in the following specialty areas: computer applications, computer graphics, and networking. Students may take courses to prepare for a transfer major and to gain specific computer skills. Career options include desktop publisher, graphic production artist, computer help desk technician, and network administrator. Certain networking courses provide preparatory training for various industry certifications from Microsoft, CompTIA, CISCO and Red Hat. Additionally, the CIS Department offers the following professional level certifications: CCNA, CCNP, MOS Core and Expert Levels. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Computer Information Systems; A.A. in University Studies: Business Administration; A.A. in Computer Applications; A.A. in Computer Network Administration Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Computer Applications; Computer Network Administration Certificates of Achievement: Advanced Routing and Switching; Computer Internetworking Fundamentals; E-Commerce; Microsoft Certified Office User (Proficient Level); Microsoft Certified Office User (Expert Level); and Unix Administration See certificate requirements following Computer & Information Science course descriptions.

100

Computer Applications

101

Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0701.00) This course covers the concepts of information systems, information storage and processing, data communications and networking, information systems development and implementation, and career opportunities in the field of information systems. The course introduces students to financial analysis tools and database management tools, such as Microsoft Excel and Access. This course is

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intended for students majoring in Business and Information Systems. It does not satisfy the CSUSM computer literacy requirement. (CAN BUS6)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: BOT 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10) This course introduces students to personal computer applications through hands-on instruction. Topics covered include essential hardware concepts, operating system basics, word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), database management (Microsoft Access), presentation graphics (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic Internet functions. It includes one hour of individual laboratory time each week. (May be repeated one time.) (CAN CSCI2)

102

Computer Literacy

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1.5 hours. (0701.00) Hands-on introduction to using the microcomputer for personal and academic use. Course includes a preview of course hardware and software; personal/academic applications in word processing, spreadsheets, and database; basic operating system commands; and personal computer ethics. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

105

Intermediate Computer Applications

3 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10) This course covers intermediate computer applications featuring the use and integration of word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation graphics, and Internet functions. It is designed for those students who have completed CIS 100 and may also be used to prepare for CIS 151, CIS 154, and CIS 165.


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

120

Cisco Internetworking Fundamentals

3 Units

124

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1.5 hours. (0708.10) This course introduces students to Local Area Networks (LAN) using routers and switches. Topics include network topologies, the OSI model, cabling (pulling, terminating, punching down, testing, standards), IP addressing, subnetting, ARP/RARP, routing protocols, network media, LAN design, and electrical and safety considerations. First in a four-course sequence preparing students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate exam. This course may be dual-listed with NCVOC 11. (May be repeated every three years for required recertification up to a maximum of four times.)

121

Router and Routing Basics

3 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 120. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1.5 hours. (0708.10) This course builds upon knowledge gained in Cisco Internetworking Fundamentals (CIS120). Topics include network layer concepts, router user interface, displaying router configuration information, router start-up and setup configurations, configuring router interfaces with IP addresses, routing protocols, network management, RIP protocol, access lists (ACLs) for security and traffic control, and troubleshooting. Second in a four-course sequence preparing students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate exam. This course may be duallisted with NCVOC 12. (May be repeated one time for recertification.)

122

Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing

123

Cisco Wide Area Network Technologies

125

Building Cisco Remote Access Networks

4 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) This course teaches students how to build a remote access network to interconnect central sites to branch offices and home office/telecommuters. Once the network is built, the course teaches students how to control access to the central site, as well as maximize bandwidth utilization over the remote links. Prepares students for the Cisco CCNP Remote Access Exam.

126

Building Multilayer Switching Networks

4 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) This course teaches students how to build campus networks using multilayer switching technologies over high speed Ethernet. The course addresses how routing, switching concepts, and implementation technologies work together. Topics include managing traffic and controlling access for a campus network. Quality of Service, setting traffic priorities and supporting dedicated bandwidth. Prepares students for Cisco CCNP Switching exam.

127

Cisco Network Troubleshooting and Support

4 Units

Prerequisites: CIS 124, 125 and CIS 126, or passing score on Cisco exams 640-503, 640-504 and 640-505. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) This course teaches students how to baseline and troubleshoot an environment using routers and switches for multiprotocol client hosts and servers connected with the Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, and Token Ring LANs; Serial, Frame Relay, and ISDN BRI WANs; Switching and Quality of Service. Prepares students for Cisco CCNP Support exam.

3 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 122. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1.5 hours. (0708.10) This course builds on the knowledge gained in Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing (CIS 122) and covers the fundamentals of Wide Area Networking (WAN) technologies. Topics include advanced IP addressing techniques; WAN design including core, distribution and access layers; Frame Relay router configuration and monitoring; ISDN, Point to Point Protocol, Port Address Translation, and Network Address Translation. Last in a four-course sequence preparing students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate exam. This course may be dual-listed with NCVOC 14. (May be repeated one time for recertification.)

4 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) This course covers managing access and controlling overhead traffic in growing, routed networks after basic connectivity has been established. Router capabilities used to control traffic over LANs and WANs, as well as connecting corporate networks to an ISP are covered. Techniques for improving traffic flow, reliability, redundance, and performance are included. Advanced IP addressing topics, routing protocols including OSPF, EIGRP, IS-IS, BGP, and Route Optimization are discussed. Prepares students for Cisco CCNP Routing exam. This course may be duallisted with NCVOC 15. (May be repeated one time for recertification.)

3 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 121. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1.5 hours. (0708.10) This course builds on knowledge gained in Router and Routing Basics (CIS 121). Provides a foundation in switching basics and intermediate routing. Topics include virtual LANs, Spanning Tree Protocol, VLAN trunking protocol, and intermediate routing protocols such as RIP v2, single-area OSPF, and EIGRP. Third in a fourcourse series preparing students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate exam. This course may be duallisted with NCVOC 13. (May be repeated one time for recertification.)

Advanced Routing

128

Securing Cisco Routers

4 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) Introduction to Cisco Network Security. This course will cover types of security threats, security policy design and management; security technologies, products, and solutions. Students will implement secure router design, installation, and configuration. Topics included are VPN implementation using Cisco Routers, AAA implementation, TACACS+, IPSec, and access control lists. Prepares students for the Securing Cisco IOS Networks exam (SECUR).

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

129

Cisco PIX Firewall Configuration

4 Units

154

Prerequisite: CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0708.10) Students will develop the ability to describe, configure, verify, and manage the PIX firewall family of products. Topics include PIX firewall, PIX device manager, translations and connections including NAT and PAT, access lists, routing options, advanced protocols, security, failover, VPNs, IDS, AAA, and PIX systems management. Involves extensive hands-on instruction and multiple labs/projects. Prepares students for the Cisco Secure PIX Firewall Advanced (CSPFA) exam.

150

Introduction to Microsoft Word

1.5 Units

Advanced Microsoft Word

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 105 or CIS 150. Corequisite: CIS 150 if prerequisite not met. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Students will learn advanced features of Microsoft Word. Topics covered include annotations, bookmarks, multiplecolumn layouts, tabular calculations, mail merging, and sorting. Students will perform complex formatting procedures, such as creating and redefining styles, attaching templates, and inserting graphics, borders, and frames. Outlines, indexes, and tables of contents will be covered. This course is recommended for students who know the basics of Microsoft Word and who would like to learn its more sophisticated features. (May be repeated one time in preparation for the Microsoft Certification Expert Exam.)

152

Introduction to Microsoft Excel

164

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Introduction to Microsoft Access

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Database management on microcomputers is introduced emphasizing concepts and procedures for designing/creating database files, entering/updating data, retrieving database information, and producing data reports. It also includes sorting and indexing the file, modifying the database structure, designing custom screens for data entry, managing multiple data files, creating and using catalogs, and preparing mail merge documents with considerable hands-on instruction and numerous business applications. (May be repeated one time for MOS exam.)

165

Advanced Microsoft Access

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 105 or 164. Corequisite: CIS 164 if prerequisite not met. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Covers advanced features of Microsoft Access such as multi-table relations, advanced queries, macros, and modules. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

166

Microsoft Outlook & Office Integration

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 150, 152, 164. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) This course covers Microsoft Outlook’s functions and features including calendar, scheduling, e-mail, task lists, and contact manager. The course also covers Microsoft Office Integration techniques. Students will learn to incorporate spreadsheets, database tables, charts, and word processed documents. This course prepares students to pass the Microsoft Outlook expert exam and the Microsoft Office expert exam. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 185. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) This course introduces spreadsheets for microcomputers using Microsoft Excel. It emphasizes the concepts of planning and building spreadsheets; correctly utilizing values, text, formulas, and functions; formatting worksheet data and enhancing font styles; applying Excel’s toolbar; understanding relative and absolute cell references; creating and refining charts and graphs to enhance worksheet data; recording and debugging simple macros; and using database management commands such as sorting, searching, and record extraction. This course involves considerable hands-on instruction and simulated business applications. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: CIS 105 or CIS 152. Corequisite: CIS 152 if prerequisite not met. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Covers advanced features of Microsoft Excel such as spreadsheet modeling, “what if” analysis, input tables, spreadsheet consolidation, data tables and queries, object linking and imbedding, filters and pivot tables, macros, Visual Basic for Applications, and advanced charting features. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 185. Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Students will use Microsoft Word to create, edit, format, and print documents for personal and business use. Tables, outlines, reports, and document merges will be covered. Additional topics include block operations, text enhancements, use of multiple windows, and elementary graphic techniques using Microsoft’s WordArt. This course involves considerable hands-on instruction and simulated business applications. (May be repeated one time in preparation for the MOS Certification Exam.)

151

Advanced Microsoft Excel

167

Microsoft FrontPage

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0614.30) An introductory Internet course covering web page creation and web site management using Microsoft FrontPage. Students will create, save, and print web pages, learn how to use interactive forms on the Web, add graphics, images, links, and frames to their web site, as well as gain an understanding of HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). (May be repeated once with different software.)


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

169

Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0702.10) This class expands upon techniques previously learned in basic Microsoft Office Access, Excel, PowerPoint, and Word application classes. Students will learn to customize their work while developing more complex and sophisticated procedures appropriate to the workplace. This course will include working with the programming language Visual Basic for Applications and the concept of objects and their properties and methods. This course is recommended for students who have an intermediate to advanced level of knowledge in Excel and/or Access and who know the basics of the other Microsoft Office programs. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

179

Publishing I: Adobe InDesign

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0614.50) This course introduces students to the page layout software program used by professional graphic artists to create ads, business cards, brochures, data sheets, postcards, newsletters, magazines, books, posters, CD covers, and more. It involves considerable hands-on instruction, short exercises, and projects similar to everyday challenges faced by professional designers. Students learn the program’s user interface, how to create and edit documents, and how to arrange elements in multiple-page publications. Students learn how to format type, import images, use layers, save styles, create tables, utilize color palettes and libraries, and apply keyboard shortcuts. Students learn typographic and publishing terms, basic design principles, and how to manage process and spot color. Students will examine, troubleshoot, and package digital files for output to a service bureau, commercial printer, or destination publication.

184

Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint

the Windows environment. Data communications will be discussed, and students will explore the Internet’s World Wide Web using a Windows Web browser. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

3 Units

187

Introduction to Microsoft Windows

188

1.5 Units

Network Administration - User Management

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course covers the fundamentals of local area network administration. Topics include installing a network operating system, creating a network hierarchy, administering users, establishing and maintaining network security, and installing and maintaining networked applications. Students completing the course will be prepared to administer a local area network (LAN). (May be repeated once.)

191

E-Commerce

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0709.10) This course covers how to make a Web site specifically for e-commerce and provides students with a basic working knowledge of how to sell products and services on the Web. Topics include creating a successful Web presence; how to build an on-line store; electronic commerce security; electronic payment systems; international, legal, and ethics issues; and careers in electronic commerce. Students will get hands-on experience in creating a commercial Web site using a WYSISYG editor and HTML, and will discuss design issues related to making an effective e-commerce interface. They will also learn how to make an interactive Web site using JavaScript, CGI, Perl, and Java applets. They will create validating forms, shopping carts, and optimize their site for search engine placement. They will work with XML, multimedia, and animation. Also discussed will be database, server, and e-mail issues. By the final class the students should have a working e-commerce site they can use for their own Internet business or to help them get a job in the field. (May be repeated one time.)

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) This course introduces the student to the current Microsoft Windows operating system. Students will learn to switch between different application windows, view system components and properties, manage files and folders, create desktop shortcuts, link and embed objects, and customize

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course presents the basics of computer network design and network operation from the perspective of a network user. Topics covered include the architecture and protocols employed in the design of computer networks. Students will learn how to access and utilize networked resources such as file servers, printers, e-mail, the Internet, and networked applications.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0702.10) Students will use current presentation software to generate computerized presentations. Topics covered include planning a presentation, choosing a look for the presentation, drawing, and codifying simple graphic objects, inserting graphs and organizational charts, embedding tables and worksheets, applying templates, establishing slide transitions, and using the presentation viewer. Students will exhibit a computerized presentation on a topic of their choice as a final project. (May be repeated one time to prepare for the MOS Certification Exam.)

185

Fundamentals of Computer Networks

193

Network Client

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the implementation and support of network client operating systems in a network operating system environment. Installation, configuration, management, operation, optimization and troubleshooting of the network client will also be presented. Workstation integration in the network environment will

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

be emphasized. Client workstation software may include Windows 2000 Professional and XP Pro.

194

Network Mail Server

Network Security

196

Database Server Administration

Internet Information Server

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

200

Introduction to Linux/UNIX

3 Units

Network Administration - System Services

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the implementation and support of advanced features of network operating systems. These features include managing fault tolerance, configuring internetworking multiple protocols, network services, directory replication, and emergency repairs. (May be repeated once.)

201

Network Infrastructure

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the administration of network infrastructure. Installation, configuration, management, operation, optimization, and troubleshooting of network servers in an Enterprise environment will be covered. In conjunction with CIS 198, prepares students for the Microsoft Windows 2003 Network Infrastructure MCP/MCSE exam 70-291. May be taken concurrently with CIS 188 and CIS 200.

202

Network Directory Services

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 187, CIS 188, and CIS 201. Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the planning, implementation and support of network directory services. This includes planning and creation of the directory namespace, delegation and management of administrative authority, domain implementation, network directory replication, schema modification, and domain synchronization.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 188, CIS 191 and CIS 198. Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course introduces students to various information services on the Internet. Students will learn how to set up Internet servers for World Wide Web, FTP, and Telnet services based on client/server architecture. Students will also learn practical techniques to manage these services.

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 187. Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers the installation, configuration, management, operation, optimization, and troubleshooting of the Linux/UNIX operating systems, desktop configuration, networking, and network applications. (May be repeated three times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the administration of database servers. Planning which includes choosing server roles, security strategy, growth and capacity planning, file system design, and layout and communication requirements. Installation and configuration of the database server software, creating and managing the database, loading data and maintaining the database, implementing security, implementing data availability solutions, managing replication, and backup and restore strategy, monitoring and optimization of database server performance, and troubleshooting. (May be repeated two times.)

197

199

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to security in a network environment, including LAN, WAN, and the Internet. Topics include controlling and auditing access to resources, authentication and encryption, security requirements for users, networks and network infrastructures, evaluation of internal and external security risks, secure communications, strategies for administration, delegation of authority, security models and policies for sites, domains, organizational units and server certificates. Students who complete this course will be able to identify security risks, threats and vulnerabilities, and to respond and recover from security incidents. They will implement network services security, deploy patch and service packs, understand DNS security and SNMP security, IPSec, as well as provide secure access in LAN, WAN, and public networks.

TCP/IP Network Administration

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours. (0708.00) This course introduces students to the TCP/IP protocol upon which the global Internet is based. Students will learn the layered functions of the TCP/IP protocol stack and how they relate to the overall global Internet architecture. They will also learn the TCP/IP address scheme, host/domain name management, routing considerations, subnetting, and practical techniques to manage these TCP/IP components.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 188 and CIS 201. Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the implementation and support of network mail systems. Installation, configuration, management, operation, optimization, and troubleshooting of the mail server will be covered. Integration of the mail server in the Enterprise Network Environment will be emphasized. Mail server software may include Microsoft Exchange Server, Netscape Messaging Server Suite or other mail server software.

195

198

203

Linux/UNIX Administration

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0708.00) This course covers topics related to the administration of Linux and UNIX systems, scripting using various shells and Perl, system performance and system tuning, troubleshooting, system security, installing and removing


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

packages, and Linux/UNIX tools. The course topics also include Linux/UNIX based Web and mail servers and internetworking with other network operating systems. (May be repeated one time.)

204

System Integration - Small Business Server

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 188, CIS 194, CIS 195, CIS 196, CIS 197, CIS 200, CIS 200. Lecture 3 hours. (0708.10) This course covers server integration and troubleshooting based on Microsoft Small Business Server or an open source equivalent. This course challenges students to integrate Windows Server in an active directory environment with Exchange Server, SQL Server, Web Services, and Internet Security and Acceleration Server (web caching and firewall). Students will be required to install and configure the servers, create accounts, configure and maintain security and functionality on systems connected to the Internet. Students will troubleshoot installation, configuration, and integration problems; and update, manage, and protect their systems from Internet intrusions and other troubleshooting challenges. (May be repeated two times for certification requirement change.)

205

Wireless Networks

A+ Core Hardware

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0702.00) This course provides broad base knowledge and experience working with core hardware technologies including installation, configuration, diagnosing, preventative maintenance, and basic networking. This course prepares the student for the hardware half of the CompTIA A+ certification. This vendor-neutral certification is the industry standard for validating skills expected of an entry-level computer technician.

207

A+ OS Technologies

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0702.00) This course focuses on operating system technologies including configuration, installation, upgrade, troubleshooting, preventive maintenance, customer integration, security, and network and Internet management. This course prepares the student for the software half of the CompTIA A+ certification. This certification is a vendor-neutral certification that is the industry standard for validating skills expected of an entry-level computer technician.

208

Computer Support

246

Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0614.50) In this course students utilize the computer as a tool to create and manipulate photographic and other raster graphic images. Students will explore digital imaging techniques through the use of the photo manipulation software Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn to use photo editing and color correction tools, activate selection tools and extraction functions, utilize quick masks and alpha channels, manipulate work paths, incorporate adjustment layers and layer masks. They will also apply filters and blending modes to create special effects, incorporate clipping groups, understand the differences and similarities of CMYK and RGB, and work with a variety of file formats. This course involves considerable hands-on instruction and multiple projects. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 247/CIS 246. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0708.10) This course covers the planning, design, installation, configuration, security, and troubleshooting of wireless LANs and prepares students for the Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) certification.

206

Course includes installation and upgrades of operating systems and applications for users. Students will diagnose problems in connectivity, manage security settings, troubleshoot hardware issues and optimize system performance.

248

Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0614.60) In this course students utilize the computer as a tool to create and organize text and vector graphic images into personal and commercial output. Students will produce and manipulate vector graphic images through the use of the software program Adobe Illustrator. Students will generate effective typography, utilize a variety of color palettes and libraries, develop unique brushes and patterns, apply transparency and other special effects, transform objects and manipulate perspective, utilize blends and gradients to produce airbrush effects, make use of pathfinder tools, understand the differences and similarities of CMYK and

“All the teachers at MiraCosta are encouraging. Plus, they relate what we’re learning to today’s workforce, which is very helpful. In all, I’ve been really impressed with the college.” -Maile Soukup, MiraCosta CIS Flexible Learning Program student

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0702.00) The course prepares students to support desktop users.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

99


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

RGB, and import and export different graphic file formats. Involves considerable hands-on instruction and multiple projects. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 248/CIS 248. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

249

Publishing 2: Advanced Output for Print

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0614.50) Students in this class will become familiar with print publication in the digital age. Students will explore how work flows from one member of a graphic design team to another, and students will learn basic concepts and terms used by professionals in the industry. Students will learn how to accurately reproduce color using print media, how to plan and troubleshoot a project, how to construct digital art files for release to a print bureau, and how to proofread various kinds of prototypes. Students will practice prepress techniques using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign and will complete take-home projects similar to everyday challenges faced by professional designers. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

253

Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0701.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Computer and Information Science

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of CIS 293, CIS 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0701.00)

100

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

296

Topics in Computer and Information Science

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of CIS 293, CIS 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0701.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content will be determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

297

Individualized Projects

.5-1 Units

Prerequisite: Instructor Consent required. Independent study 1.5 - 3 hours. (0701.00) This course provides students with additional experience in specific software applications. The student’s understanding is enhanced through assisting instructors in delivering classroom instruction. Primary duties will involve working with students individually or in small groups to facilitate their learning experience. Contact course instructor prior to enrolling. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated three times.)

3 Units

Prerequisite: ART 247 or CIS 246. Lecture 3 hours. (0614.60) This course is designed to build upon knowledge and skills gained in CIS 246 or ART 247. Students will acquire advanced digital imaging techniques for desktop image design and production including color correction and management, photomontage, retouching, and creating special effects. Through specific projects, students will utilize higher level compositing techniques such as making selections with alpha channels and paths, creating complex layer masks, and the control of color through adjustment layers and color profiles. Students will learn time-saving keyboard short-cuts to gain speed in work production. Multiple projects reinforce acquired knowledge through preparation of digital files for printing at service bureaus and screen delivery such as the World Wide Web. Not open to students with maximum credit in ART 252/CIS 253. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

292

A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

298

Directed Studies in Computer Information Science 1-3 Units Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0701.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0701.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Computer Information Science 1-2 Units

Certificate of Competence Computer Network Administration

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0701.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

This certificate is designed to meet the demand in the business community for individuals trained in computer networking, network administration, Enterprise networking, and Internet or intranet administration. Units CIS 187 Fundamentals of Computer Networks 2 CIS 188 Network Administration- User Management 2 CIS 193 Network Client 2 CIS 198 TCP/IP Network Administration 2 CIS 200 Network Administration- System Services 2 CIS 201 Network Infrastructure 2

Computer and Information Science Certificates Certificate of Competence Computer Applications The Computer Applications certificate is designed to meet the demand in the industry for individuals who are trained in the use of computers. Specific areas of application include word processing, spreadsheets, database management, electronic presentations, desktop publishing, computer graphics, digital imaging and applications for the Internet. Learning to use these powerful tools effectively is essential for those preparing for jobs in today’s technological workplace. Units CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 and CIS 105 Intermediate Computer Applications 3 or CIS 150 Introduction to Microsoft Word (1.5) and CIS 152 Introduction to Microsoft Excel (1.5) and CIS 164 Introduction to Microsoft Access (1.5) and CIS 184 Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint (1.5 ) CIS 179 Publishing 1: Adobe InDesign 3 CIS 185 Introduction to Microsoft Windows 1.5 CIS 246/ART 247 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop 3 CIS 248/ART 248 Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator 3 Select at least three elective units from the following: 3 CIS 151 Advanced Microsoft Word (1.5) CIS 154 Advanced Microsoft Excel (1.5) CIS 165 Advanced Microsoft Access (1.5) CIS 169 Microsoft Visual Basic (3) for Applications CIS 191 E-Commerce (3) CIS 249/ART 249 Publishing 2: Advanced Output for Print (3) CIS 253/ART 252 Digital Imaging 3: Advanced Photoshop (3) CIS 297 Individualized Projects (.5-1) CS 107 Introduction to Object-Oriented (3) Programming BOT 100 Keyboarding, Self-Paced (1) IMT 120 Interactive Media Production (3) IMT 170 Motion Graphics (3) Total Units 19.5

Select at least six elective units from the following: CIS 194 Network Mail Server (3) CIS 195 Network Security (3) CIS 196 Database Server Administration (3) CIS 197 Internet Information Server (3) CIS 199 Introduction to Linux/UNIX (3) CIS 202 Network Directory Services (3) CIS 203 Linux/UNIX Administration (3) CIS 204 System Integration - Small (3) Business Server CIS 205 Wireless Networks (3) Total Units

6

18

Certificate of Achievement Advanced Routing and Switching Completion of this certificate indicates advanced expertise in managing access to computer networks and controlling traffic in growing networks. The course of study prepares students to interconnect multiple sites, utilize routing and switching technologies, connect corporate networks to an Internal Service Provider (ISP), use multiple routing protocols, and improve traffic flow, network performance and reliability. Prepares students for Cisco Certified Network Professional exams (4). Note: Satisfactory completion of CIS 120, CIS 121, CIS 122, and CIS 123 or Cisco CCNA certification is required prior to enrollment in CIS 124. Units CIS 124 Advanced Routing 4 CIS 125 Building Cisco Remote Access Networks 4 CIS 126 Building Multilayer Switching Networks 4 CIS 127 Cisco Network Troubleshooting and 4 Support Total Units 16

Certificate of Achievement Computer Internetworking Fundamentals The Computer Internetworking Fundamentals certificate provides a foundation for knowledge of computer networking. The training provides the skills necessary to install, configure, and operate LAN, WAN, and dial access service for small networks. Graduates of the program are able to configure, operate, and troubleshoot routers and switches in small and medium-sized networks. The certificate prepares students to take the Cisco Certified Networking Associate exam. Units CIS 120 Cisco Internetworking Fundamentals 3 CIS 121 Router and Routing Basics 3 CIS 122 Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing 3 CIS 123 Cisco Wide Area Network Technologies 3

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

101


COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE

BUS 137

Customer Service Total Units

3 15

Certificate of Achievement E-Commerce The E-Commerce certificate is designed for individuals interested in exploring the process of conducting business on the Internet and related design and technical considerations. Students are advised to enroll in CIS 191 prior to selecting electives. Units CIS 191 E-Commerce 3 IMT 125 Web Design 1: Fundamentals 3 6 Select at least six units from the following: CIS 195 Network Security (3) CIS 196 Database Server Administration (3) CIS 197 Internet Information Server (3) CIS 246/ART 247 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop (3) CIS 248/ART 248 Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator (3) IMT 180 Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques (3) IMT 190 Flash 2: ActionScript (3) IMT 220 Dynamic Web Development (3) IMT 230 Web Design 3: Site Design and (3) Architecture Total Units 12

Certificate of Achievement Microsoft Certified Office User (Proficient Level)

The Microsoft Certified Office User certificate will prepare students to pass a series of industry-recognized tests for certification in the use of Microsoft Office applications. All or most of the courses in this certificate also apply to the Data Entry, General Office, and Office Manager certificates. Units CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 and CIS 105 Intermediate Computer Applications 3 or CIS 150 Introduction to Microsoft Word (1.5) and

“The Networking Program and the support I got from the MiraCosta faculty were excellent. In all honesty, the Networking Program at MiraCosta changed my life for the better.� - Eric Pfeiffer, MiraCosta graduate and owner and founder of the Encinitasbased company, Silver Ace Consulting

102

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

CIS

152

CIS

164

CIS 184

Introduction to Microsoft Excel (1.5) and Introduction to Microsoft Access (1.5) and Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint (1.5 ) Total Units 6

Certificate of Achievement Microsoft Certified Office User (Expert Level) This certificate is designed for students who want to develop mastery of the Microsoft Office Suite of products. It is appropriate for students who will be working in clerical and administrative assistant positions. Students who complete this certificate will be prepared to take and pass the Microsoft certification exams at the expert level. Units CIS 151 Advanced Microsoft Word 1.5 CIS 154 Advanced Microsoft Excel 1.5 CIS 165 Advanced Microsoft Access 1.5 CIS 100 Computer Applications 3 and CIS 105 Intermediate Computer Applications 3 or CIS 150 Introduction to Microsoft Word (1.5) and CIS 152 Introduction to Microsoft Excel (1.5) and CIS 164 Introduction to Microsoft Access (1.5) and CIS 184 Introduction to Microsoft (1.5) PowerPoint Select at least 1.5 elective units from the following: 1.5 CIS 166 Microsoft Outlook and (1.5) Office Integration CIS 169 Mircrosoft Visual Basic (3) for Applications CIS 185 Introduction to Microsoft Windows (1.5) CIS 297 Individualized Projects (.5) Total Units 12

Certificate of Achievement UNIX Administration This certificate is designed to meet the demand of the business community for individuals trained in Linux/UNIX, Linux/UNIX networking and Linux/UNIX administration. The course of study provides an overview of computer networking fundamentals, TCP/IP, the fundamentals of Linux/UNIX configuration, networking, and systems administration in a Linux/UNIX environment. Units CIS 187 Fundamentals of Computer Networks 2 CIS 198 TCP/IP Network Administration 2 CIS 199 Introduction to Linux/UNIX 3 CIS 203 Linux/UNIX Administration 3 Total Units 10


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer Science (CS) (See also Computer & Information Science) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Computer and Information Science Martin Parks, mparks@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Joseph Moreau, jmoreau@miracosta.edu June Porto www.miracosta.edu/CS

Computer Science is the study of computers and their applications. It includes a variety of specialties such as systems programming, artificial intelligence, robotics, networking and graphics. In preparation for transfer into more advanced fundamental and specialized areas, students will learn basic programming, data structures and architecture. Computer Science majors will also need two or three semesters of calculus and discrete mathematics, depending on the choice of transfer institution.Career options in Computer Science include software engineer, computer engineer, systems analyst, database administrator, software project manager and various other computer-related fields. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Computer Science; A.A. in Fundamentals of Computer Science Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificate of Competence: Fundamentals of Computer Programming

107

Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) This introductory computer science course teaches students the concepts of an object-oriented programming. Students will use pre-built objects containing attributes and methods that can be combined to create animated storyboards in 3-D virtual worlds. Using an abstracted high-level language such as Alice, students will experiment with writing code but will focus on object-oriented programming skills and problem solving techniques. This course is highly recommended for a beginner programming student before taking a code writing class such as Java or C++. Formerly CIS 107.

110

111

3 Units

Prerequisite: High school algebra or MATH 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) Introduction to computer science and programming using an object-oriented language, this course is designed for students majoring in Computer Science and Engineering. Basics of the language will be covered including control structures, data types, input/output, operators, classes, methods and parameters, modularity and abstraction, basic inheritance, documentation techniques, and testing and verification techniques. Formerly CIS 111.

112

Introduction to Computer Science II: Java

3 Units

Prerequisite: CS 111. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) Continuation of programming using an object-oriented language. Further work with inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation; classes, methods, and parameters; modularity and abstraction; graphics; event-driven programming, graphical user interfaces and exception handling. Formerly CIS 112.

Introduction to Computer Science and Object-Oriented Programming: Java (Accelerated Pace) 4 Units Prerequisites: None Advisory: CS 107 or other programming experience, MATH 101. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) An accelerated introduction to computer science and programming using the Java language. Basic object-oriented programming including inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, testing and verification techniques and dynamic binding. (Not open to students with credit in CS 111 or CS 112.)

Introduction to Computer Science I: Java

113

Basic Data Structures and Algorithms

3 Units

Prerequisite: CS 112. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) This course introduces students to the process of soft-

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

ware development using efficient algorithms and properly designed data structures to develop effective software solutions to common programming problems. Topics include searching, sorting, hashing, algorithm analysis, object-oriented design, collections, lists, stacks, queues, trees, sets, dictionaries, and graphs. Formerly CIS 230.

140

Visual Basic Programming

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: High School Algebra or MATH 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) Students will use an object-oriented approach to design and develop programs using the Visual Basic.net programming language. This course will guide students through all aspects of Visual Basic programming to develop Windows applications. Students will use the tools provided by Visual Basic to create windows with familiar elements like menus, text boxes, command buttons, option buttons, check boxes, and scroll bars. Event handling and database integration will also be covered. Programming projects in Visual Basic are included. Formerly CIS 114.

150

C++ Programming

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: High School Algebra or MATH 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) Using a object-oriented approach to programming in the C++ language, the course covers data input/output, data types, control structures, operators, functions, and the operating environment. Upon successful completion of the course, the student is able to construct moderately complex programs in C++. Formerly CIS 251.

220

Computer Organization and Architecture

3 Units

Prerequisite: CS 111. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) Introduction to the fundamental physical and structural concepts of Assembly language programming. Topics

“When I first took a computer science course it was only to fulfill a transfer requirement. My feelings on the subject have now changed for the better. I now understand the materials and concepts much more clearly. If things don’t work out for me in the electrical engineering field, I know one subject that’s guaranteed to spark my interest: computer science!” -James Meaden, transferred to San Diego State University

104

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

include machine architecture, memory addressing, I/O, interrupts, control structures, compiling and linking. Formerly CIS 220. (CAN CSCI10)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0707.10) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Computer Science Certificate Certificate of Competence Fundamentals of Computer Programming The Fundamentals of Computer Programming certificate provides a strong foundation for knowledge of basic Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) techniques and data structures used in computer science. Students will gain experience in several OOP programming languages and be able to analyze and assess problems and formulate appropriate solutions. Completing this certificate program will help students prepare for real-world jobs in computer programming and provide a solid base upon which to build as they pursue a career in the Computer Science discipline. This certificate offers many of the basic courses for those wishing to complete a four-year degree in Computer Science. Units CS 107 Introduction to Object-Oriented 3 Programming CS 113 Basic Data Structures and Algorithims 3 CS 150 C++ Programming 3 and CS 110 Introduction to Computer Science and 4 Object-Oriented Programming: Java (Accelerated Pace) or CS 111 Introduction to Computer Science I: Java 3 CS 112 Introduction to Computer Science II: Java 3 Select at least six elective units from the following: 6 CS 140 Visual Basic Programming (3) CS 220 Computer Organization and Architecture (3) MATH 226 Discrete Mathematics (3) Total Units 19-21


COSMETOLOGY

Cosmetology (COSM) Office: Dean: Web Site:

Building 4700, (760) 795-6811 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/COSM

MiraCosta College has contracted with a local beauty college to provide cosmetology instruction to students who enroll and pay MiraCosta College fees. The college pays the student’s full tuition expense at the beauty college. The completion of Cosmetology 150, 151, and 152 provides 1600 hours of theory and practice required by the State of California Cosmetology Act and by the Board of Cosmetology for licensing as a cosmetologist. Classes are scheduled for eight hours a day Tuesday through Saturday. Students must complete two regular semesters plus a summer session to fulfill the 1600-hour requirement. Degree: A.A. in Cosmetology Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Certificate of Competence: Cosmetology See certificate requirements following Cosmetology course descriptions.

150

Cosmetology

18 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 6 hours, laboratory 34 hours. (3007.00) Students who enter the program in the fall semester will begin with COSM 150 and proceed to COSM 151 and COSM 152.

151

Cosmetology

18 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 6 hours, laboratory 34 hours. (3007.00) Students who enter the program in the spring will begin with COSM 151 and proceed to COSM 152 and then COSM 150.

152

Cosmetology

8 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 6 hours, laboratory 34 hours. (6 weeks) (3007.00) Students who enter the program in the summer will begin with 152 and proceed to 150 and then 151.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (3007.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (3007.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position

directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Cosmetology Certificate Certificate of Competence Cosmetology The Cosmetology Program develops skills, theoretical knowledge and professional attitudes in students. This three-course program will prepare students to take the California State Board of Cosmetology licensing exam and prepare students for entrylevel positions in the beauty field. Passing the State written and practical exam is a requisite to obtain a Cosmetology License in California and to operate as a cosmetologist in the state. The 1,600 clock-hour program takes approximately 10 months to complete. Careers in cosmetology include occupations such as hair stylist, makeup artist, nail technician, salon manager, beauty school instructor, product representative or manufacturer, or owner of your own salon. Qualified cosmetologists can find rewarding employment in almost any community because skilled beauty care is in universal demand. They also work in television, theatrical productions and for cosmetics manufacturers. Students who successfully complete the program will receive a Certificate of Competence in Cosmetology from MiraCosta College. Units COSM 150 Cosmetology 18 COSM 151 Cosmetology 18 COSM 152 Cosmetology 8 Total Units 44

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

105


COUNSELING

Counseling (COUN) Department: Department Chair: Office: Web Site:

Counseling Hilda Gomez, hgomez@miracosta.edu Building 3700, (760) 795-6670 www.miracosta.edu/COUN

The Counseling Department offers courses designed to develop skills to help students succeed in college and make effective career and life choices. Special topics courses related to various areas of academic career and personal development are also offered.

100

Career and Life Planning

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (4930.12) This comprehensive course explores the issues and tasks related to personal and career development over the lifespan. Applying psychological, sociological, and physiological principles, students will utilize the career planning process to begin to prepare effectively for work in the 21st century global economy. Topics include assessment of interests, personality characteristics, transferable skills, work values, career exploration, and decision-making strategies. Job search preparation includes development of a resume, cover letter, and interviewing skills. Prepares new and re-entry students to explore, identify, and integrate career and life planning goals. Emphasis is placed on the importance of actively managing one’s career to achieve success in all life roles. Not open to students with credit in COUN 100/ CRLP 100.

101

Orientation to College

Transfer Success

106

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

292

3 Units

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (4930.12) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Counseling

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of COUN 293, COUN 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (4930.13) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours. (8 weeks) (4930.13) The goal of this course is to help students understand higher education options and vocabulary; make extensive use of Internet resources to identify majors, curriculum and programs, and the colleges/universities that offer them; research and choose the best college/ university to meet their academic and personal needs; understand the admission process and timeline; budget for college; relate majors to future career goals, and develop a personalized educational planning portfolio.

College Success Skills

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (4930.13) College Success Skills is a course designed to provide students with a formula for personal and academic success. Students will develop their own plan through research and self-evaluation. Students will learn how to access and use print and electronic information resources. Students will assess their career and academic goals, select majors, and develop student education plans. Topics covered will include creative goal setting, academic and life management, college and community resources, health maintenance, stress management, library and information resources, diversity awareness, time management, memory techniques and learning styles. This course is recommended for new and re-entry students.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour. (4930.13) Orientation to College is designed to help students adapt to the college environment by acquainting them with the college, its facilities, and services. Students will analyze their basic skills, time management skills, and library use skills. Students will use a career inventory assessment, analyze the results, and begin to formulate career objectives. Students review the role and function of higher education, community college education, and MiraCosta’s curriculum. Students will understand the curriculum requirements for certificate, degree, and transfer programs that pertain to them and begin to formulate a detailed education plan. Offered credit/no credit only.

105

110

296

Topics in Counseling

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of COUN 293, COUN 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (4930.13) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.


DANCE

Dance (DNCE) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Performing & Media Arts Dave Megill, dwmegill@miracosta.edu Building 2000, (760) 795-6816 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu Trisha Hanada-Rogers, David Massey www.miracosta.edu/DNCE

The dance discipline teaches understanding of the choreography, performance and aesthetic of dance in a diversity of styles and techniques. Students may take courses to prepare for a dance major to transfer to a four-year institution, to earn an A.A. degree in dance, or to meet general education requirements. Performance opportunities are available to both majors and non-majors. Career options include professional performance or choreography, dance studio or company management, child development, dance therapy, movement analysis, dance ethnology, dance criticism, dance science, academic research, and teaching. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Dance; A.A. in Dance Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. The non-transfer A.A. in Dance degree is designed for students who may already be teaching, performing, or choreographing and desire a formal two-year academic degree program. To complete the A.A. in Dance degree, the following list of courses must be completed, in addition to dance electives, for a total of 22 units. Students must also complete additional required courses listed in the Requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree on page 23. DNCE 154, Ballet II 1.5 units DNCE 168, Jazz Dance II 1.5 units DNCE 178, Modern Dance II 1.5 units or DNCE 173, Lyrical Dance 1.5 units DNCE 162, Dance Arts Ensemble 2 units DNCE 160, Rehearsal & Performance 1.5 units or DNCE 163, Dance Improvisation I 1 unit or DNCE 179, Musical Theatre Dance 1 unit DNCE 101, History & Appreciation of Dance 3 units or DNCE 105, Dance Cultures of the World 3 units DNCE 185, Introduction to Choreography 3 units DNCE 146, Latin Dance 1 unit or 1 unit or DNCE 169, Introduction to World Dance Forms DNCE 171, Selected World Dance 1 unit DNCE 140, Ballroom Dance 1 unit or DNCE 183, Commercial Dance 1 unit or DNCE 191, Tap Dance I 1.5 units DNCE 159, Pilates Mat Work I 1 unit Choose courses from the following list of electives to complete the required 22 units: DNCE 152, Ballet I 1.5 units DNCE 157, Pilates Apparatus I 1 unit DNCE 158, Dance Stretch 1 unit DNCE 164, Improvisation II 1 unit DNCE 166, Jazz Dance I 1.5 units DNCE 176, Modern Dance I 1.5 units DNCE 186, Choreography II 3 units DNCE 193, Tap Dance II 1.5 units DNCE 252, Ballet III 1.5 units DNCE 255, Pointe 1 unit DNCE 259, Pilates Mat Work II 1.5 units DNCE 266, Jazz Dance III 1.5 units Certificate of Achievement: Pilates Certification See certificate requirements following Dance course descriptions.

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DANCE

101

History and Appreciation of Dance

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00) A survey of dance in western civilization. The study of the history of dance in chronological sequence emphasizing the cultural background and historical development of ballet and modern dance to include discussion of the influence of dance on other art forms.

105

Dance Cultures of the World

Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This continued study of ballet technique, principles, and terminology at the intermediate level in preparation for further dance studies and performance includes variations of ballet barre, center, petit allegro, adagio, and grande allegro work. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each semester.

3 Units

157

Ballroom Dance

3 Units

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course is designed to introduce students to ballroom dance through developing an understanding of its history, music, and fundamental performance practices. Students will learn the basics of ballroom dance including swing, lindy hop, tango, cha-cha, waltz, and fox trot. Development proceeds from more basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section. (May be repeated three times.)

146

Latin Dance

152

Ballet I

Ballet II

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 152, DNCE 154, DNCE 252. Advisory: DNCE 152. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC

108

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Dance Stretch

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) Instruction in sustained and specific stretch exercises designed to improve overall body flexibility and to increase range of motion, this course is an introduction to body modalities of yoga, ideokinesis, Alexander and Feldenkrais techniques, Laban movement analysis and authentic movement. Development proceeds from more basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section. (May be repeated three times.)

159

Pilates Mat Work I

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 159, DNCE 259 Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This Pilates conditioning course emphasizes basic Pilates mat work exercises and body awareness resulting in improved strength, flexibility, control, coordination, body alignment, and breathing. Included in the course are basic Pilates principles developing a kinesiological awareness for improved dance/sports technique and performance. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section.

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 152, DNCE 154, DNCE 252. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course offers ballet technique fundamentals including barre, center, adagio, and allegro work, focusing on correct body alignment, turnout, and placement to improve flexibility, balance, strength, and coordination.

154

158

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) Study of the Latin-American dances, focusing on technique and styling. Students will learn dance steps and variations of Latin dances to include samba, merengue, mambo, salsa, and rumba. (May be repeated three times.)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: DNCE 159 Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 157, DNCE 257 Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course is based on the exercises and concepts of the techniques developed by Joseph Pilates. It will include Pilates-based work on the Universal Reformer. The exercises will develop and improve body alignment, strength, flexibility, control, coordination, and breathing. It will also aid in correcting imbalances or dance/sports injuries. The course includes beginning and beginning/intermediate levels of instruction.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00) Dance around the world in its cultural/social context. Emphasis on different ways dance is used to express ideas about the relationship between a person and the body, the opposite sex, religion, cultural traditions, and ritual. Includes cultures from Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, North America, and Eastern Europe.

140

Pilates Apparatus I

160

Rehearsal and Performance

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: By audition only. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course develops dance performance skills from the studio environment to the stage. It includes the learning, rehearsal, and final completion of choreographed dance in live and taped performance, affording students the opportunity to work with student and faculty choreographers in both traditional and contemporary dance styles. (May be repeated three times.)


DANCE

161

Contemporary Dance Ensemble

Prerequisite: By audition only. Corequisite: MUS 162 and DNCE 161 must be taken concurrently. Enroll first in MUS 162, then DNCE 161. Acceptable for Credit: CSU; UC pending Activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) The MiraCosta Contemporary Dance Ensemble performs songs and dances in a variety of genres including country, pop, rock, show tunes, and other musical and dance styles. Choreographic sequences will be taught in conjunction with learning the music repertoire. Performances will be scheduled during the semester. Formerly DNCE 297-1. (May be repeated three times.)

162

Dance Arts Ensemble

ment vocabulary, teaches execution of appropriate dance techniques and applies them to choreographed dance combinations and routines. Topics include rhythmic theme and variation, understanding choreography, using video feedback in self-critique, and application of various dance styles to jazz dance itself. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each semester.

.5 Unit

169

Dance Improvisation I

2 Units

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course develops improvisational skills in dance. Creative movement is explored through various stimuli such as music, sound, text, art, etc., which leads to the acquisition of basic improvisational skills.

164

Dance Improvisation II

166

Jazz Dance I

Jazz Dance II

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 166, DNCE 168, DNCE 266. Advisory: DNCE 166. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course continues development of jazz dance move-

Selected World Dance

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 169, DNCE 171. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course offers concentrated study of dance movement and technique from a selected world dance culture, with emphasis on understanding its particular style, historical background, aesthetic, and cultural significance. Topics may vary to include dances from Africa, Asia, South America, the Middle East, and other parts of the world. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section.

173

Lyrical Dance

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course emphasizes the lyrical interpretive dance styles used in concert dance choreography, including contemporary and neo-classical dance forms in a blend of ballet, modern, and fluid jazz styles. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section. (May be repeated one time.)

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 166, DNCE 168, DNCE 266. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course is an introduction to jazz dance with emphasis on development of appropriate movement. Jazz dance techniques and vocabulary are applied to choreographed dance combinations and routines.

168

171

1 Unit

Prerequisite: DNCE 163. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course provides practice in complex arrangements of dance improvisation. Creative movement is explored through various stimuli, including music, sound, text, art, etc., which generate movement for choreography and solve choreographic problems through improvisation.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 169, DNCE 171. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) A survey and sampling of world dance forms through movement experiences and lecture/discussion, this course includes dances of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Students will gain an understanding of how dances differ from culture to culture and how each dance reflects the values, aesthetics, and general lifestyles of the culture in which it is found. Previous dance experience is not required for this class. Development proceeds from more basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section.

Prerequisite: By audition only. Advisory: DNCE 154, DNCE 178. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Activity 4 hours. (1008.00) Students will learn repertory from faculty and/or guest artists resulting in performances. (May be repeated three times.)

163

Introduction to World Dance Forms

176

Modern Dance I

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 176, DNCE 178. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) This course explores the performance principles and individual expressive choreography of the American modern dance pioneers Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, and Charles Weidman. Students will study variety in modern

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DANCE

dance techniques in response to feeling, sound, music, aesthetic dance skill, and control. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each semester.

178

Modern Dance II

Musical Theatre Dance

183

Commercial Dance

Introduction to Choreography

186

Choreography II

3 Units

Prerequisite: DNCE 185. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, activity 2 hours. (1008.00) Development of choreographic concepts and skills from DNCE 185 in creating and crafting dance problems and compositions. Introduction to methods of expanding initial movement concepts from a solo or small group work to larger group compositions.

110

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

194

Tap Dance II

1.5 Units

Dance / Sports Injury Prevention

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1008.00) Students will develop knowledge and skills in the theory and practical application of current techniques in the prevention, recognition, and treatment of dance/sports injuries. This course will look at body types prone to certain injuries; acute and chronic injuries; and the anatomy and common injuries of the foot, ankle, knee, hip, spine, shoulder, and neck.

232

Movement for the Stage

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1008.00) This course is designed to create an environment in which students can explore more dynamic movement. It emphasizes not only physical control, strength, flexibility, and creative imagination, but also the integration of mind, body, and emotion. Not open to students with maximum credit in DNCE 232/DRAM 232. (May be repeated two times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: DNCE 176. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, activity 2 hours. (1008.00) Basic skills with practical experience in the creating and crafting of dance problems and compositions. Studies and compositions emphasize solo and small group work.

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 191, DNCE 193. Advisory: DNCE 191. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) Students will learn a variety of tap dance styles based on a variety of roots from musical theatre, clogging, vaudeville, and contemporary dance theatre. They will continue to develop skills for intermediate tap dance technique.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.10) This course emphasizes movement for commercial dance work used in movies, concert dance, television, and industrial shows offering current trends in popular dance styles. It includes complex turns, floor work, leaps, and rhythm techniques. Development proceeds from basic to more difficult and demanding techniques with each section. (May be repeated three times.)

185

193

1 Unit

Prerequisite: By audition only. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) Musical theatre dance focuses on historical and contemporary Broadway musical shows. Students will learn and participate in choreography, dance terminology, stage presence, rehearsal, and performance techniques, in conjunction with the current semester’s theatrical musical performance. (May be repeated one time.)

Tap Dance I

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 191, DNCE 193. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) An introduction to beginning tap dance, this course develops basic skills in execution of traditional tap dance steps and sequences. Mastery of basic steps and rhythms is emphasized. The basics of choreography as it applies to tap dance is also introduced.

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 176, DNCE 178. Advisory: DNCE 176. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) Continued development in intermediate modern dance techniques, analyzing elements of time, space, design, and emotion plus contrasting elements of color, sound, text, and props. These elements are woven together with technical skills to promote a means of communication through a controlled body.

179

191

252

Ballet III

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 152, DNCE 154, DNCE 252. Advisory: DNCE 154. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) An advanced study of ballet technique, principles, terminology, and performance in preparation for further dance studies, performance, and possible career opportunities.


DANCE

255

Pointe

1 Unit

266

Prerequisite: DNCE 154 or DNCE 252. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 1.5 hours. (1008.00) This course introduces pointe technique, based on a strong foundation of dance technique, terminology, and performance. (May be repeated three times.)

257

Pilates Apparatus II

259

Pilates Mat Work II

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1008.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: DNCE 159. Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 159, DNCE 259. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) A course emphasizing alignment and correctives work based on exercises and concepts developed by Joseph H. Pilates, intermediate through advanced levels of instruction. The course focuses on mat work exercises for improved body alignment, strength, flexibility, control, centering, coordination, and breathing. This course employs a series of exercises designed to enhance dance performance and prevent injury. It will also aid in dance/ sports rehabilitation.

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 166, DNCE 168, DNCE 266. Advisory: DNCE 168. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 0.5 hour, activity 2.5 hours. (1008.00) Designed to further develop technical skills in specialized movements, with emphasis on precision and execution. Topics include in-depth study of rhythmic theme and variation, movement memorization techniques, extended dance routines, and development of choreographic skills.

1.5 Units

Prerequisite: DNCE 157. Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 157, DNCE 257. Acceptable for Credit: CSU; UC pending Lecture 1 hour, activity 2 hours. (1008.00) A course emphasizing alignment and correctives work based on exercises and concepts developed by Joseph H. Pilates at the intermediate through advanced levels of instruction. The course focuses on exercises using the Pilates Universal Reformer for improved body alignment, strength, flexibility, control, centering, coordination, and breathing. This course employs a series of exercises designed to enhance dance performance and prevent injury. It will also aid in dance/sports rehabilitation.

Jazz Dance III

293

Topics in Dance

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 293, DNCE 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1008.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

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DANCE

296

Topics in Dance

297

Topics in Dance

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Activity 1.5 - 9 hours. (1008.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. (May be repeated three times.)

298

Directed Studies in Dance

Dance Certificate

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DNCE 293, DNCE 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 0.5 - 3 hours. (1008.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1008.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

Certificate of Achievement Pilates Certification The Pilates Certificate of Achievement prepares the student to teach in a Pilates studio, health club, recreational facility, rehabilitation center, or develop his or her own small business. The student takes theory and technique courses in the Pilates Mat work and the Pilates Apparatus taught by certified Pilates professionals. The student learns methods to appraise and design suitable exercise programs for people of all ages and physical conditions. To prepare the student for employment, instruction uses both classroom work with a variety of instructional methods such as lecture, lab/demonstration, independent/group projects, and internship experiences in Pilates and fitness facilities. DNCE 157 DNCE 159 DNCE 257 DNCE 259 DNCE 292 BIO 190 BUS 140

Pilates Apparatus I Pilates Mat Work I Pilates Apparatus II Pilates Mat Work II Internship Studies Survey of Human Musculoskeletal System Legal Environment of Business

MiraCosta instructor and professional dancer Sadie Weinberg dances a duet with Bradley Lundberg. She was honored as the Outstanding Associate Faculty Member of the Year. Weinberg was recognized by students for her high standards, balance, thoughtfulness, and passion.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

3

3 Select at least three elective units from the following: BUS 130 Small Business Management (3 ) BUS 170 Entrepreneur I (1.5 ) BUS 171 Entrepreneur II (1.5 ) Total Units 14.5

Photo credit: Jeffrey Brown

112

Units 1 1 1.5 1.5 2.5 1


DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

Design Drafting Technology (DRAF) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Horticulture, Architecture, & Applied Technologies Paul Clarke, pclarke@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Paul Clarke www.miracosta.edu/DRAF

The Design Drafting Technology Program offers courses for students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution and/or have an interest in drafting related careers, as well as training for persons already employed in fields related to design and drafting. Courses are also offered for those who may not be pursuing a career in design and drafting, but who have an interest in, or need to understand graphic communication. Career options include federal, state, and local land use planning; building and transportation agencies; private architectural, contract, and construction companies; for profit industrial and manufacturing companies in life science, defense, sport/recreation equipment, and various other industries. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Industrial Design; A.A. in Computer-Aided Design and Drafting; A.A. in Computer-Aided Drafting; A.A. in Mechanical Drafting Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Computer-Aided Design and Drafting; Computer-Aided Drafting; Mechanical Drafting. Certificates of Achievement: Applied Design; Drafting Fundamentals See certificate requirements following Design Drafting Technology course descriptions.

101

Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting Using AutoCAD

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0953.00) This course is an introduction to computer-aided drafting. Students will use microcomputers with AutoCAD software and peripheral equipment to develop computer-generated drawings for various fields and industries including architecture, engineering, landscape, and design. Students will learn principles and techniques that enable them to create, edit, modify, scale, and plot two-dimensional technical drawings. Lab time is utilized for learning these applications. (May be repeated one time.)

110

Graphics Communication

be emphasized and developed through sketching and exercises. Other topics include dimensioning, drafting standards, technical calculations, manufacturing processes, design teams, and CAD systems as they relate to the preparation of engineering drawings and models will be studied. Not open to students with credit in ENGR 110/DRAF 110.

4 Units

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00) This course introduces graphics as a fundamental means of communicating technical information for product design, manufacturing, and construction. Students will develop an understanding of graphics communication in the design process, and will gain hands-on experience using orthographic, section, and auxiliary projection principles to create multi-view drawings. Pictorial sketches using isometric, perspective, and oblique principles will also be created. The importance of 3D spatial visualization will

111

Engineering Design Graphics

4 Units

Prerequisite: DRAF 110 or ENGR 110. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00) Introduction to the engineering design process and graphical communication tools used by engineers through hands-on design team projects. Design topics include problem identification, ideation, design teams, project management, risk reduction, and cost analysis. Engineering graphics and communication skills such as free-hand sketching, CAD, solid-modeling, animation, and technical communication are used and developed. Other engineering graphics topics include orthographic, section, auxiliary, and isometric projections; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T); detail and assembly drawings; advanced visualization; and descriptive geometry. Computer-assisted design tools are used for 2D and 3D model creation, analysis (geometric, thermal, stress, etc.) advanced calculations, data tables, rendering, animation, and rapid prototyping. Design teams and communication

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DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

skills are stressed throughout the course. Not open to students with credit in DRAF 111/ENGR 111.

120

Manufacturing Processes

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 4 hours. (0953.00) This course is a survey of the materials and processes used in industry as they apply to design. Students will be introduced to the various materials (plastics, metals, ceramics, composites), machine tools, processes, methods, and terminology used in modern industry including material removal (cutting, turning, drilling, boring, milling, shaping, planning sawing, broaching, grinding, sanding, punching, piercing), forming (rolling, bending, drawing, extruding, forging), joining (welding, brazing, soldering, adhesive bonding, mechanical fastening), casting (sand, injection, die, investment, shell, permanent, ceramic, plaster), heat treating, powder metallurgy, measurement, assembling, finishing and an introduction to the principles of production systems. In addition to these traditional elements, students will explore unconventional and emerging technology such as electrical discharge machining (EDM), lasers, water jets, rapid prototyping, 3D plotting, and nanotechnology as they relate to the design process. Special emphasis will be given to computer controlled methods.

123

Electronic Design

for a wide variety of applications and industries. Topics include tolerancing, blocks, libraries, attributes, bills of materials, isometric drawings, plotting, solid modeling, and rendering. Skills in visualizing, creating, and editing threedimensional shapes for modeling, testing, analysis, rapid prototyping, and marketing will be studied and applied. Emphasis will also be placed on improving productivity and presentation skills. (May be repeated one time.)

203

Fundamentals of Design

204

3 Units

201

Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting Using AutoCAD

4 Units

Prerequisite: DRAF 101. Corequisite: DRAF 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00) A continuation of DRAF 101, this course will focus on applying advanced AutoCAD skills in the design process to create models, drawings, and related documentation

114

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

SolidWorks Advanced 3D Solid Modeling

2 Units

Prerequisite: DRAF 203. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (0953.40) This course is an advanced exploration of the theory and application of 3D parametric solid modeling using SolidWorks. The topics covered include photorealistic rendering, surface modeling, molds, sheet metal design, and dynamic assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on improving productivity, enhancing presentation, and using finite element analysis tools to solve design problems. Detail documentation with geometric tolerancing per ASME standards will also be stressed. (May be repeated one time.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0953.40) This course will provide a basic understanding of the design process in the industrial and interior design fields. It will include a brief history of design, the fundamentals of the design process, color theory, drawing techniques, and problem solving, as well as professional presentation styles. Students will be able to produce design concepts and solutions for real-world applications.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0953.00) An introduction to solid modeling and three-dimensional representation techniques using current software and hardware. Students will create, analyze, store, and modify part models, assembly models, and working drawings produced from these models. Other topics introduced will include presentation techniques, finite element analysis, typical input/output hardware, and the advantages of solid modeling compared to other CAD systems in the design and manufacturing process. (May be repeated one time.)

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 4 hours. (0953.00) This course teaches the preparation of electrical and electronic drawings and models using up-to-date industry standard graphical annotations and symbols including block, schematics, connection, logic, cable, and wiring diagrams. Course also provides introduction to printed circuit board layout, artwork, documentation, and design using current IPC standards, computer design software, and surface mounting technology.

136

3D Parametric Solid Modeling

207

AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.40) Introduction to modeling the built environment using Revit software. Students will create and modify building models, produce presentations including renderings and animated walk-throughs, manipulate parametric objects, create schedules/ legends from the inclusive data base, and generate construction documents from the model. Not open to students with credit in ARCH 207/DRAF 207.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (0953.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)


DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

293

Topics in Drafting

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DRAF 293, DRAF 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0953.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Drafting

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: DRAF 101. Corequisite: DRAF 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0953.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered on the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in Drafting

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0953.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0953.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Drafting Technology

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0953.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and

resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access data bases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Design Drafting Technology Certificates The Design Drafting Technology Certificates are designed to prepare students for employment as drafters, CAD technicians, and designers in governmental planning agencies, private architectural and engineering design firms, and for profit industrial and manufacturing companies.  Students may choose from  six  different certificates to meet their individual career aspirations and interests.  With careful planning students can earn more than one certificate in as little as  two  semesters.  Courses in the certificate programs are also appropriate for contractors, inventors, designers, home owners, entrepreneurs, architects,  and engineers.  

Certificate of Competence Computer-Aided Design and Drafting This certificate provides a solid foundation in Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD). In addition to the common core of CADD related courses, students select and complete all the courses in an emphasis area of their choosing. The areas of emphasis are Architecture, Engineering, and Landscape. Upon completion of this program, students will be prepared to secure entry-level support positions in a variety of local industries or to continue their education. Typical job titles of students completing this certificate include Designer, CAD Technician, Design Drafter, AutoCAD Designer, and others. This certificate consists of 15 units of required courses and 11-13 units of electives. Student should select an emphasis area and take all 11-13 units in that emphasis. Program Requirements: Units DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 110/ENGR 110 Graphics Communication 4 DRAF 201 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 203 3D Parametric Solid Modeling  3 and Completion of one area of emphasis listed below 11-13 Total Units   26-28 Emphasis in Architecture: ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing (3) ARCH 102 Architectural Design (3) DRAF 207/ARCH 207AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD (2) Select 1 course from the following electives: ARCH 103 Architectural Communications (3) CIS 246/ART 247 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop (3) CIS 248/ART 248 Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator (3) DRAF 136 Fundamentals of Design (3)

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DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

Emphasis in Engineering: DRAF 111/ENGR 111 Engineering Design Graphics (4) DRAF 120 Manufacturing Processes (4) DRAF 204 SolidWorks Advanced 3D Solid Modeling (2) Select 1 course from the following electives: DRAF 123 Electronic Design (3) DRAF 136 Fundamentals of Design (3) DRAF207/ARCH 207 AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD (2) MATH 130 Trigonometry (3) Emphasis in Landscape: DRAF207/ARCH 207 AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD (2) CIS 246/ART 247 Digital Imaging 1: Adobe Photoshop (3) HORT 127 Landscape Design (3) Select 1 course from the following electives: CIS 248/ART 248 Digital Imaging 2: Adobe Illustrator (3) HORT 117 Plant Identification (3) HORT 126 Landscape Irrigation (3) HORT 129 Beginning Computer-Aided (3) Landscape Design

Certificate of Competence Computer-Aided Drafting This certificate provides a solid foundation in Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD). In addition to the common core of CAD related courses, students select and complete all the courses in an emphasis area of their choosing. The areas of emphasis are Architecture, Engineering, and Landscape. Upon completion of this program, students will be prepared to secure entry-level support positions in a variety of local industries or to continue their education. Typical job titles of students completing this certificate include Drafter, CAD Operator, AutoCAD Support Person, CAD Technician, and others. This certificate consists of 15 units of required courses and 5-6 units of electives. Student should select an emphasis area and take all 5-6 units in that emphasis. Program Requirements: Units DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 110/ENGR 110 Graphics Communication 4 DRAF 201 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 203 3D Parametric Solid Modeling 3 and Completion of one area of emphasis listed below 5-6 Total Units   20-21 Emphasis in Architecture: ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing (3) DRAF207/ARCH 207 AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD (2)

Emphasis in Engineering: DRAF 111/ENGR 111 Engineering Design Graphics (4) DRAF 204 SolidWorks Advanced 3D Solid (2) Modeling Emphasis in Landscape: DRAF207/ARCH 207 AutoDesk Revit Building 3D CADD (2) HORT 127 Landscape Design (3)

Certificate of Competence Mechanical Drafting This certificate prepares individuals for entry-level jobs with companies and agencies involved in the design and/or manufacture of mechanical objects.  Students develop skills in sketching, visualization, computer-aided drafting, solid modeling, materials, and manufacturing processes.  With careful planning, students may complete this certificate in  nine  months and acquire more than one certificate.  Job titles of students completing this certificate include Drafter, Mechanical Drafter, Mechanical Designer and others. Units DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 110/ENGR 110 Graphics Communication 4 DRAF 111/ENGR 111 Engineering Design Graphics 4 DRAF 120 Manufacturing Processes 4 DRAF 203 3D Parametric Solid Modeling  3     Total Units   19

Certificate of Achievement Applied Design The Applied Design certificate prepares individuals with skills that are fundamental to careers in professional interior and industrial design. The certificate is designed for students who desire to secure entry level positions or who plan to continue their education at a college of design. Job titles typical of students completing this certificate include Design Assistant or Interior Design Assistant. This certificate consists of 10 units of required courses and 6-7 units of electives. Student should select an emphasis area and take 6-7 units in that emphasis. Program Requirements: Units ART 100 Drawing and Composition 3 DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 136 Fundamentals of Design 3 and Completion of one area of emphasis listed below: 6-7 Total Units   16-17 Select two (2) courses for emphasis in Interior Design: ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing (3) ARCH 102 Architectural Design I (3) ART 260 History of Modern Art (3)

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DESIGN DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

Select two (2) courses for emphasis in Industrial Design: DRAF 110/ENGR 110 Graphics Communication (4) DRAF 203 3D Parametric Solid Modeling (3) ART 223 Woodworking and Furniture Design (3)

Certificate of Achievement Drafting Fundamentals This certificate will introduce and provide an overview of the issues and skills involved in drafting education or a career in drafting. A graphics communication course covering sketching, visualization, and projections is combined with a computer-aided drafting (CAD) and architectural drawing course to help students develop skills using the board and CAD. These courses provide a foundation for work or study related to drafting. Units DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting 4 using AutoCAD DRAF 110/ENGR 110 Graphics Communication 4 ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing 3 Total Units   11

“I have always enjoyed the friendly learning environment of MiraCosta College. From the first semester that I attended MiraCosta, I found the faculty very helpful and caring. MiraCosta College definitely helped me achieve my educational goals and prepared me for new challenges ahead.” - Azin Alavizadeh, 2007 Medal of Honor recipient, accepted to UCSD’S Mechanical Engineering Program

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DRAMATIC ARTS

Dramatic Arts (DRAM) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Performing & Media Arts Dave Megill, dwmegill@miracosta.edu Building 2000, (760) 795-6816 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu Eric Bishop, Tracy Williams www.miracosta.edu/DRAM

The Dramatic Arts Program includes theoretical and practical courses in all aspects of theatre. Students make take courses to prepare for a transfer major in dramatic arts, for professional training, or to fulfill general education requirements. Performance and technical theatre opportunities are available to both majors and non-majors. Career options include both creative and technical work in the performing arts/entertainment industry including live theatre, film, television, and broadcasting; academic research and teaching; and other communications-related fields such as advertising and public relations. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Dramatic Arts; A.A. in Dramatic Arts: Design and Technology (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: Theatre; Theatre Design.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificate of Competence: Design & Technology See certificate requirements following Dramatic Arts course descriptions.

105 Introduction to Theatre

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00) This survey course introduces the fundamental practices and creative processes of the theatre arts. Through experimentation and examination, students will gain greater insight and appreciation of the dramatic arts as an agent of change that is vital to the humanities. All aspects of theatre production and collaboration are covered through lecture, small-group discussion, in-class participation, guest speakers, and demonstration. (CAN DRAM18)

106

Study of Filmed Plays

dents learn to improve voice projection, articulation, and expression through acting-oriented exercises and activities. Not open to students with maximum credit in COMM 109/DRAM 109. (May be repeated two times.)

3 Units

3 Units

110

Practicum of Voice and Diction

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) This lab course covers the basics of vocal training. Stu-

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3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00) Emphasizes training to improve the speaking voice in quality, flexibility, and effectiveness. Not open to students with credit in COMM110/DRAM 110. (CAN DRAM6)

111

Oral Interpretation of Literature

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00) This course introduces the oral interpretation and analysis of literary works of art in their intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic forms. Class readings include prose, poetry, and drama. Students will develop vocal expressiveness, variety, and flexibility through oral presentations of literature. Not open to students with credit in COMM 111/DRAM 111.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00) This course studies cinematic adaptations of plays by comparing and contrasting the stage and screen versions in concept, writing, and production. Students will gain insight and appreciation for both art forms through structural analysis, class discussions, and written critiques. Not open to students with credit in DRAM 106/FILM 106.

109

Voice and Diction

120

Dramatic Literature (Sophocles to Moliere) Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00)

3 Units


DRAMATIC ARTS

Course extends from Sophocles to Moliere and centers on practice and theory. Play structure, textual analysis and historical backgrounds of dramatic literature are studied. Attendance may be required at several performances or rehearsals.

121

Dramatic Literature (Restoration to Present)

Beginning Acting Lab

192

Shakespearean Acting Lab

1 Unit

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) This lab course will focus on the basics of classical acting techniques, including comprehension and delivery of Shakespeare’s works. It will include ensemble work, exercises, games, and examining universal themes. (May be repeated two times.)

130

Acting I

139

Stage and Concert Management

200

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU; UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) This course offers an introduction to the skills and procedures involved in stage managing a theatrical, dance, or music production. Through hands-on experience, students will learn to develop the knowledge and skills involved in running a live performance. Students will learn how to prep and run rehearsals, create a production book and prompt script, run dimmer and sound checks, organize scenic shifts and call light, and sound cues in live performance. Formerly DRAM 296-5. (May be repeated two times.)

Audio Equipment Maintenance

2 Units

Creative Dramatics and Storytelling

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) This course introduces the fundamentals of theatre for young audiences in theory and performance. This kind of theatre is also known as children’s theatre. The class will research various forms of presentation, prepare for production, and rehearse and perform selected plays on campus in the local elementary schools.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) This course teaches the fundamentals of acting and techniques based on Stanislavski’s principles. Emphasis on ability to express thought, emotion, and character through the effective use of voice, movement, and script analysis. (CAN DRAM8)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours. (1007.00) This course introduces audio maintenance, calibration, and minor repair as well as some electronic building tips as they pertain to music and theatre. Lecture covers basic electronic principles involving Ohm’s law and how they properly relate to matching audio components in various system design applications for recording and sound reinforcement. Related topics include impedance matching, power rating, parallel, and series type wiring. Lab features hands-on work with basic electronic maintenance/repair kits; teaches soldering methods, continuity testing, and building audio and video cables. Safety issues with electricity are stressed. Not open to students with credit in DRAM192/MUS192.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) Students will learn the basics of acting: how to sustain a character in performance to function in an ensemble and to use techniques of acting. They will also learn about ensemble building and the art of theatre.

126

Stage Lighting

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00) This course teaches the basics of stage lighting for theatrical productions through instruction and practical experience. Students learn and implement proper lighting theory, lighting design, equipment use, and safety precautions. (May be repeated one time.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00) This course is a reading survey of plays which begins at the decline of the Restoration Period, continues through the 20th century and concludes in the present both in practice and theory. Play structure, textual analysis and historical backgrounds of dramatic literature are studied. Attendance may be required at several performances or rehearsals.

125

141

230

One Act Play Production

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1.5 hours, laboratory 4.5 hours. (1007.00) Students engage in production theory and practical application of producing a one act play for public performance. Student participation includes acting, stage managing, and technical aspects.

231

Acting II

3 Units

Prerequisite: DRAM 130 or equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00) In-depth application of the techniques explored in Acting I with an emphasis on characterization, scene study, methodology, and process. Acting studies focus on performance from varied acting philosophies, styles, and genres. (May be repeated one time.) (CAN DRAM22)

232

Movement for the Stage

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1007.00)

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DRAMATIC ARTS

This course is designed to create an environment in which students can explore more dynamic movement. It emphasizes not only physical control, strength, flexibility, and creative imagination, but also the integration of mind, body, and emotion. Not open to students with maximum credit in DNCE 232/DRAM 232. (May be repeated two times.)

233

Playwriting

Stage Makeup

Survey of Costume

293

Scene Design

296

297

Stagecraft

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00) Technical problems of organizing a stage production. Practical applications center on construction of stage scenery for dramatic productions. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN DRAM12)

270

Rehearsal and Performance

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298

Topics in Dramatic Arts

1-3 Units

Topics in Dramatic Arts

.5-3 Units

Directed Studies in Dramatic Arts

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1007.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: By audition only. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 - 9 hours. (1007.00) Composed of students who are cast and/or assigned crew positions in the mainstage productions. Emphasis is placed on the rehearsal process and culminates in public

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Activity 1.5 - 9 hours. (1007.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. (May be repeated three times.)

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1006.00) Instruction and practice in the elements of scene design. Practical experience in design from perspective drawing to finished scale models and sets.

256

Topics in Dramatic Arts

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DRAM 293, DRAM 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1007.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

3 Units

3 Units

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of DRAM 293, DRAM 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1007.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00) Emphasizes the philosophy of costume design, the creation of renderings, and costume history. Students participate in costume construction for the college’s mainstage productions.

255

Internship Studies

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1007.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1006.00) This course will instruct students in the practical application of theatre makeup in a lab setting. Under close supervision, students engage in all phases of theatrical makeup. Students also plan and execute the makeup for college productions. (May be repeated two times.) (CAN DRAM14)

254

292

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU; UC pending Lecture 3 hours. (1007.00) This course gives students an opportunity to develop the ability to write effective material for the theatre. Student written material can be workshopped with a possible opportunity for production.

253

performances. (May be repeated three times.)

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit.


DRAMATIC ARTS

Work experience. (1007.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Dramatic Arts

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1007.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Dramatic Arts Certificate Certificate of Competence Design and Technology This is an occupational certificate in Performing Arts Design and Technology in which the student will learn the skills necessary in scenery, lighting, sound and makeup in order to pursue a professional career in theatre, film, television, music, and/or dance.   Units DRAM 105 Introduction to Theatre  3 DRAM 141 Stage Lighting 3 DRAM 253 Stage Makeup  3 DRAM 139 Stage and Concert Management 3 or DRAM 254 Survey of Costume (3) or DRAM 255 Scene Design (3) DRAM 256 Stagecraft 3 DRAM 270* Rehearsal and Performance (1 - 3 units) 4 MUS 185 Sound Reinforcement I 2 Total Units   21 * To complete the DRAM 270 requirement, multiple sections must be taken in any unit combination to fulfill a total of 4 units.

“The two years I spent at MiraCosta were truly unforgettable. I left with lifetime friendships, powerful experiences both on and off the stage, and extensive training that has prepared me for the stage, along with film and television. With a professional program and talented faculty, I am entirely sincere when I say that I wouldn’t have been able to make it in Los Angeles without experiencing all aspects of the MiraCosta Theater Program.” – Emily O’Brien, played recurring lead character on CBS’s “The Young and the Restless” among other television and film appearances

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EARTH SCIENCES

Earth Sciences (EART) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

Physical Science Don Robertson, donrobertson@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/EART

Earth Sciences cover a range of disciplines such as astronomy and space science, climatology, geology, physical geography, and oceanography. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in one of these earth sciences or to fulfill general education requirements.

106

Earth and Space Science

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (1930.00) This course introduces astronomy, including planetary origin and motions; earth science, including origin and composition of earth, landforms, and plate tectonics; atmospheric processes, including climate and weather; and earth’s oceans and other bodies of water. It covers ocean currents and tides as well as the hydrologic cycle.

Each spring, the Service Learning Program hosts an annual Community Science Fair. “In spring 2007 we had approximately 500 community members visit our campus for a wonderful afternoon filled with hands-on math and science activities. The feedback from our guests was overwhelmingly positive with many commenting on how friendly MiraCostans were and how welcome they felt at our campus.” – Carol Wilkinson, Service Learning Coordinator

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ECONOMICS

Economics (ECON) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Social Science Louisa Moon, lmoon@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Shafin Ali www.miracosta.edu/ECON

Economics deals with the problem of scarcity as it applies to the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services and with the theory and management of economies or economic systems. Students may take courses to prepare for an economics major or to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include banking, business, management, finance, insurance, real estate, marketing, law, politics, government, journalism, health care, education, and the arts. Degrees: A. A. in University Studies: Economics; A.A. in University Studies: Business Economics Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

100

Survey of Economics

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00) A non-technical introduction to economics showing the application of basic economic principles to contemporary social issues and public policy. Designed for the non-major. No credit if taken after ECON 101 and ECON 102.

101

Principles of Economics: MACRO

Principles of Economics: MICRO

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00) This is an introductory course focusing on choices of individual economic units. Topics include scarcity, opportunity costs, comparative advantage, supply, demand, elasticity, cost theory, price and output determination under various market structures and factor markets. Related topics such as international trade, publish choice, income distribution, externalities and government regulation may be included. (CAN ECON4)

292

Internship Studies

298

Directed Studies in Economics

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (2204.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2204.00) Introduction to the science of economics applied to the aggregate economy emphasizing national income determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policies, international economic relationships, and issues associated with economic growth. (CAN ECON2)

102

Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2204.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Economics

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (2204.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit.

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EDUCATION

Education (EDUC) The Education program offers preparation for multiple-subject and single-subject teaching credentials, as well as introductory courses to assist students in making career choices. A Liberal Studies major is recommended for students planning to transfer to CSU to earn a multiple subject (grades K-6) credential. Requirements vary among transfer institutions so students planning to earn a bachelor’s degree and teaching credential should meet with a MiraCosta counselor early in their first semester to identify courses that will meet requirements for their intended major and transfer institution. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Liberal Studies

110

Introduction to Education

thinking and practices in public education in the U.S. Subjects from sociological, philosophical, and historical foundations of education are addressed. Readings from the lives of teachers and interactions with local educators will assist students to understand the richness and complexity of teaching as a career. Emphasizes the importance of education for all children in a diverse society. Intended for individuals interested in becoming teachers, to understand the nature of formal education in the United States, and to assess teaching as a career.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0801.00) A career in education is analyzed in depth. Selected topics from the following are studied: issues, philosophy, goals, and methods; discipline and learning problems; child development; the role of the teaching assistant. Students are assigned projects in local schools. See also Physical Education 200; Psychology 113.

115

Foundations of Teaching as a Profession

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0801.00) An orientation to careers in K-12 education. Participation in 45 hours of supervised fieldwork assignments in K-12 classroom settings. Focuses on teaching and schooling from multiple perspectives, with an emphasis on current

292

Internship Studies

Each spring, the Career Center hosts a Career Expo at the Student Center Pavilion on the Oceanside campus. In 2007, the expo featured a campus employer networking fair, student employee of the year award presentation, and a student fashion show hosted by MiraCosta’s First Impressions Program, which provides students with career clothing free of charge.

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.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0801.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by the instructor and the department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)


ENGINEERING

Engineering (ENGR) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Horticulture, Architecture, & Applied Technologies Paul Clarke, pclarke@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Paul Clarke www.miracosta.edu/ENGR

The Pre-Engineering Program provides basic course work for students planning to transfer in a variety of engineering majors. Preparation for an engineering major may differ slightly depending on the specialization, however, all engineering majors require three semesters of calculus, three semesters of calculus-based physics, and some chemistry. Additional math, such as linear algebra and/or differential equations, and computer programming may also be required. Career options may include aerospace, bioengineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering and mechanical engineering. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Pre-Engineering (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in Aeronautical Engineering, Bioengineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

110

Graphics Communication

111

Engineering Design Graphics

auxiliary, and isometric projections; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T); detail and assembly drawings; advanced visualization; and descriptive geometry. Computer-assisted design tools are used for 2D and 3D model creation, analysis (geometric, thermal, stress, etc.) advanced calculations, data tables, rendering, animation, and rapid prototyping. Design teams and communication skills are stressed throughout the course. Not open to students with credit in DRAF 111/ENGR 111.

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0901.00) This course introduces graphics as a fundamental means of communicating technical information for product design, manufacturing, and construction. Students will develop an understanding of graphics communication in the design process, and will gain hands-on experience using orthographic, section, and auxiliary projection principles to create multi-view drawings. Pictorial sketches using isometric, perspective, and oblique principles will also be created. The importance of 3D spatial visualization will be emphasized and developed through sketching and exercises. Other topics include dimensioning, drafting standards, technical calculations, manufacturing processes, design teams, and CAD systems as they relate to the preparation of engineering drawings and models will be studied. Not open to students with credit in ENGR 110/DRAF 110.

292

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0901.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

4 Units

Prerequisite: DRAF 110 or ENGR 110. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0901.00) Introduction to the engineering design process and graphical communication tools used by engineers through hands-on design team projects. Design topics include problem identification, ideation, design teams, project management, risk reduction, and cost analysis. Engineering graphics and communication skills such as free-hand sketching, CAD, solid-modeling, animation, and technical communication are used and developed. Other engineering graphics topics include orthographic, section,

Internship Studies

298

Directed Studies in Engineering

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0901.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

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ENGLISH

English (ENGL) (See also Literature) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Letters Susan Herrmann, sherrmann@miracosta.edu Building 3600, (760) 795-6874 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu Robert Archer, Donna Caudill, Gloria Floren, Mary Gross, Julie Hatoff, Susan Herrmann, José Jara, Jeff Keehn, John Kirwan, Jane Mushinsky, Holly Ordway, Dara Perales, Jim Sullivan, Nancy Schaefer, Robert Turner, Arlie Zolynas www.miracosta.edu/ENGL

The English discipline includes courses in expository and creative writing and American, British, and world literature. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in English or to fulfill general education requirements. Careers for English majors include a variety of options such as law, education, journalism, mass media, marketing, public relations, communications, business administration, and the humanities. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: English (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in one these majors: Literature; Literature and Writing.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

100

Composition and Reading

201

Critical Thinking, Composition, and Literature

Critical Thinking and Composition

4 Units

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 with a grade of “C” or better. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00) This course emphasizes critical thinking, particularly in the reading and writing of argument. Content includes methods of analysis; principles of logic, including the relationship between language and logic; techniques of

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280

Creative Writing

3 Units

Prerequisite: Pass with a grade of “CR” ENGL 803 or ESL 803 or approved equivalent, or qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1501.00) This course offers the opportunity to practice and develop creative writing skills, emphasizing poetry and narrative prose fiction through a study of creative form and content. It provides extensive training and practice in various genres (poetry, fiction, journal), depending on the student’s interest. Emphasizing individual creativity, self-direction, and initiative, this course explores not only the creative act as an end in itself but also composing, polishing, and evaluating for publication. The student may enroll in this course for four semesters for credit to continue development of creative writing abilities under the guidance of a writing expert. (May be repeated three times.) (CAN ENGL6)

4 Units

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 with a grade of “C” or better. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00) Designed to continue the critical thinking, reading, and writing practice begun in English 100, this course teaches critical thinking, reading, composition, research, and argument using literature (drama, essay, novel, poetry, and short story) as the basis for analysis. This course is designed for students who seek to satisfy both the full-year composition and the critical-thinking transfer requirements. (CAN ENGL4)

202

reasoning, including the use of evidence; techniques of style; and research skills.

4 Units

Prerequisite: Pass with a grade of “CR” ENGL 803 or ESL 803 or approved equivalent, or qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours. (1501.00) This course in critical reading and expository writing offers training in the writing process, the development and organization of expository prose, and research techniques. The course emphasizes quality in logic and diction. (CAN ENGL2)

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1501.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)


ENGLISH

293

Topics in English

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of ENGL 293, ENGL 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1501.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in English

Directed Studies in English

Introduction to College Writing I

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Lecture 4 hours. (4930.21) This course introduces students to the writing process and

Introduction to College Writing II

4 Units

Prerequisite: Pass with a grade of “CR” ENGL 802 or ESL 802 or approved equivalent or qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Lecture 4 hours. (4930.21) This course offers intensive practice in the writing process and in critical reading and thinking. It also provides practice in acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. Offered credit/no credit only.

850

English Grammar and Usage

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (4930.21) Grammatical terminology, including parts of speech, subject and predicate, complements, verbals, phrases, clauses, subject-verb agreement. A thorough review of traditional grammar; rules of syntax, punctuation, spelling, capitalization; standard vs. non-standard usage and appropriateness of each.

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1501.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

802

803

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of ENGL 293, ENGL 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1501.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

to critical reading and thinking. It offers practice in gathering, organizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. Offered credit/no credit only.

1-3 Units

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in English

.5-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 1.5 - 6 hours. (1501.00) Using software selected by Letters Department faculty and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop writing and editing skills, access databases, and increase knowledge of the writing process. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

“I love this school. The people at MiraCosta are so warm and supportive. Some of the happiest times of my life were when I was a student at MiraCosta College.” - Debbie Copeland, MiraCosta graduate and author of the book, “The Kids at Latimar High”

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ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

English as a Second Language (ESL) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Letters Susan Herrmann, sherrmann@miracosta.edu Building 3600, (760) 795-6874 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu Mary Gross www.miracosta.edu/ESL

The English as a Second Language program offers courses for non-native speakers needing to improve their skills in reading, writing and speaking college-level English. Courses are offered credit/no credit only (no letter grade given) and do not fulfill degree or transfer requirements.

292 Internship Studies

The development of aural and oral competence of standard American English through listening to and participating in a variety of communicative activities is emphasized in this course. Listening and speaking skills, including the ability to understand and participate in a variety of authentic exchanges in the home, workplace, or academic environments are advanced. Practical applications include participating in small group discussions, working on individual pronunciation and intonation variations, and developing academic notetaking competence. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated one time.)

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (4930.81) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be repeated three times.)

802

Introduction to College Writing I for Non-Native Speakers

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (4930.80) This course is designed for non-native speakers who are making a transition to the use of academic English and who require the development of writing skills. Writing, critical reading, and thinking are emphasized. Practice is offered in gathering, organizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated one time.)

803

Introduction to College Writing II for Non-Native Speakers

810

Listening and Speaking for Non-Native Speakers of English Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (4930.80)

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3 Units

Reading and Vocabulary Development for Non-Native Speakers of English

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (4930.80) This course is designed for non-native speakers who are making the transition to the use of academic English and who require the development of reading and vocabulary skills needed for academic and workplace success. Students will read a variety of texts and apply appropriate reading strategies as well as participate in activities to advance vocabulary and facilitate comprehension. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated one time.)

820

4 Units

Prerequisite: Pass with a grade of “CR� ENGL 802 or ESL 802 or approved equivalent or qualify through the English Assessment or approved equivalent. Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (4930.80) This course offers intensive practice in the writing process, critical reading, and critical thinking. It also provides practice in acquiring, synthesizing, and communicating information and in applying the principles and conventions of standard edited American English. This course is designed for non-native speakers who require the development of those writing skills taught in ENGL 803. Offered credit/no credit only. (Course may be repeated one time.)

815

Grammar for Non-Native Speakers of English

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (4930.80) This course reviews basic grammar for non-native speakers of American English including parts of speech, clauses, verb forms and tenses, pronoun case, and sentence types. Standard usage in written and spoken English is emphasized. This course is intended for students at or above the ESL 802 level. Offered credit/no-credit only. (May be repeated one time.)

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in English as a Second Language

.5-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 1.5 - 6 hours. (4930.80) Using software selected by ESL faculty and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop writing and editing skills, access data bases, and increase knowledge of the writing process and the English language. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.


FILM

Film (FILM) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Letters Susan Herrmann, sherrmann@miracosta.edu Building 3600, (760) 795-6874 Glenn DeLange, delange@miracosta.edu Gloria Floren www.miracosta.edu/FILM

For degree and transfer information, see a MiraCosta counselor.

101

Introduction to Film

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00) An introduction to film as an art form and as a cultural artifact, this course examines content and techniques found in film, historical and stylistic influences on film makers, their artistic values, and the social implications of film. Feature films as well as shorts and animated films are viewed during the course as a basis for critical analysis.

106

Study of Filmed Plays

Film History

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation

Topics in Film

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of FILM 293, FILM 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0612.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Film

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of FILM 293, FILM 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0612.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00) Film History traces the history of motion pictures, focusing on four areas (a) socio-political issues (how specific films and film genres reflect and shape the socio-political assumptions and biases of their audiences) (b) economics (how economic necessities and policies affect how movies are made (c) aesthetics (how the specific artistic elements of film have changed over the last 100 years) (d) technology (how what is technically possible drives the content and production of films). Films chosen for study will be examined in each of the preceding four areas to demonstrate how art (film, in this case) is created by diverse cultural and historical forces. Films will represent diversity of expression and achievement, varying by gender, culture or ethnicity, or nationality.

292

293

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0612.00) This course studies cinematic adaptations of plays by comparing and contrasting the stage and screen versions in concept, writing, and production. Students will gain insight and appreciation for both art forms through structural analysis, class discussions, and written critiques. Not open to students with credit in DRAM 106/FILM 106.

110

Independent study. (0612.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

298

Directed Studies in Film

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0612.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration.

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Film

.5-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 1.5 - 6 hours. (0612.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access data bases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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FIRE TECHNOLOGY APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Fire Technology Apprenticeship Program (FTAP) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean:

Career Studies Donna Davis, ddavis@miracosta.edu Building 3700, (760) 795-6617 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu

The Fire Technology Apprenticeship Program offers fire fighter apprentices indentured with the CFFJAC the opportunity to earn an Associate in Arts degree. For the A.A. degree in Fire Technology, students must complete FTAP 100, FTAP 101, FTAP 102, FTAP 103, FTAP 104, and 16 units of on-the-job training (FTAP 299) as well as general education requirements listed on page 23 (30 units). Career options include fire officer, engineer, apparatus engineer, equipment specialist, inspector, marshal, prevention officer, training officer; arson and bomb investigator; and fire fighter paramedic. Students who wish to become apprentices should contact the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee, 1780 Creekside Oaks, Suite 201, Sacramento, CA, 95833 or call (916) 648-1717 or email CFFJAC@cpf.org for more information. Degree: A.A. in Fire Technology

100

Fire Protection Organization

Prerequisite: Each student must be an indentured apprentice to the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Lecture 3 hours. (2133.50) This course provides an introduction to career opportunities in fire protection and related fields. Also covered is the philosophy and history of fire protection, fire loss analysis, organization and function of public and private fire protection services, fire departments as part of local government, and laws affecting the fire service. Introduced is fire service nomenclature, specific fire protection functions, basic fire chemistry and physics, fire protection systems, and fire fighting strategy and tactics.

101

Fire Prevention Technology

Fire Protection Equipment and Systems

3 Units

Prerequisite: Each student must be an indentured apprentice to the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Lecture 3 hours. (2133.50) This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire detection and alarm systems. Also included are heat and smoke control systems, special protection and sprinkler systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers.

103

Building Construction

3 Units

Prerequisite: Each student must be an indentured apprentice to the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Lecture 3 hours. (2133.50)

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MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

104

Fire Behavior and Combustion

3 Units

Prerequisite: Each student must be an indentured apprentice to the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Lecture 3 hours. (2133.50) This is a theory and fundamentals course that examines how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled. An in-depth study of fire chemistry and physics, fire characteristics of materials, extinguishing agents, and fire control techniques will be included.

3 Units

Prerequisite: Each student must be an indentured apprentice to the California Fire Fighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Lecture 3 hours. (2133.50) This course provides fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, and the use of fire codes. Also covered is the identification and correction of fire hazards, the relationship of fire prevention with fire safety education, and detection and suppression systems.

102

This course covers the study of the components of building construction that relate to fire safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at fires. The development and evolution of building and fire codes will be studied in relationship to past fires in residential, commercial, and industrial occupancies.

3 Units

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (2133.50) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester. A combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)


FRENCH

French (FREN) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

International Languages Francisco Alvarez, falvarez@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/FREN

The International Language program provides students the foundation for language study. Students may prepare for a major in Spanish, Japanese, German and French and take courses to meet general education requirements in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese or Spanish. Career options include advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, counseling, education, film, foreign service, fund raising, human resources, journalism, international relations, law, management, ministry, politics, public relations, sales, social work, and various other related fields. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: French Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101 Elementary French I (First Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1102.00) Introduction to modern French. Understanding of structure through study of grammar, readings, and writing. Pronunciation is emphasized. Introduction to French and francophone cultures and civilization through selected readings and discussions. Laboratory work is integrated with class work. Corresponds to the first two years of high school French. (CAN FREN2) (FREN 101 + FREN 102 = CAN FREN SEQ A)

102

Elementary French II (Second Semester)

Intermediate French I (Third Semester)

292

4 Units

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1102.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in French

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of FREN 293, FREN 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1102.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

4 Units

Prerequisite: FREN 102 or three years of high school French. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1102.00) A review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary covered in FREN 101 and FREN 102. Further development of reading skills (short literary and contemporary cultural selections are assigned) as well as listening and speaking proficiency. Study of customs, cultural production, and socio-political institutions from French-speaking societies. (CAN FREN8) (FREN 201 + FREN 202 = CAN FREN SEQ B)

Intermediate French II (Fourth Semester)

Prerequisite: FREN 201 or four years of high school French. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1102.00) Continuation of FREN 201. Continued development of all four primary skills, with an emphasis on reading, composition, and oral communication. Review of grammatical structures. Study of the culture of French-speaking societies through extensive readings and films. (CAN FREN10) (FREN 201 + FREN 202 = CAN FREN SEQ B)

4 Units

Prerequisite: FREN 101 or two years of high school French. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1102.00) Continuation of FREN 101. Emphasis on development of all four major skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Continues with study of French and francophone cultures through selected readings and discussions. Corresponds to the first three years of high school French. (CAN FREN4) (FREN 101 + FREN 102 = CAN FREN SEQ A)

201

202

296

Topics in French

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of

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FRENCH

GENERAL STUDIES

FREN 293, FREN 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1102.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in French

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1102.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in French

1-2 Units

GENERAL STUDIES To complete the instructional discipline requirements in General Studies for a terminal associate in arts degree, students must complete 18 units of transferable credit. In addition, 24 units of general education requirements must also be met (a 3-unit overlap is permitted between the general education requirements and the instructional discipline). Upon completion of this program, students should have at least 39-42 transferable units. In addition to the 39-42 units, students must complete all other graduation requirements and have a minimum of 60 total units for the associate degree. Students planning to transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree should complete an A.A. in University Studies, not a terminal A.A. degree.

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1102.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

“I developed close relationships with professors at MiraCosta and they pushed me to transfer to San Diego State. Now, the contacts I have made at State and my professors from MiraCosta are talking to me about graduate school.” - Melissa Stager, transferred to San Diego State

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GEOGRAPHY

Geography (GEOG) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Social Science Louisa Moon, lmoon@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Herschel Stern www.miracosta.edu/GEOG

Geography is the study of the earth, including the distribution and interconnectedness of all natural and cultural phenomena, and how places are particular expressions of nature and culture. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in geography or to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include teaching and research, natural resource management, meteorology (weather), cartography (map-making), urban/regional planning, location analysis, and work using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Degree: A. A. in University Studies: Geography Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101

Physical Geography

this course includes study of the natural environment and ecological relationships, demography, political and economic systems, and cultural patterns such as language, religion, and social structure.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00) An introduction to the natural environment from a spatial perspective. Examines processes, distributions, and interrelationships of climate, water, life forms, soil, and landforms, and their significance in environmental issues. (CAN GEOG2)

101L Physical Geography Laboratory

Cultural Geography

104

World Geography

160

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00) A global survey examining the distinguishing features of major culture regions and the interrelationships among regions set in the context of physical and human geography,

3 Units

Introduction to Geography and Geographic Information Systems

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Working knowledge of Windows. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (2206.10) An introduction to geographic concepts and tools with applications using computer-driven Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Principles of map and image reading, interpretation, spatial analysis, and their incorporation in GIS are presented. Introduces basic requirements, software operations, and uses of GIS.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00) A broad view of geographic patterns of human behavior, including the development, distribution, ecological relationships, and landscapes of cultural features, at scales ranging from local to global. Topics include population dynamics, economic activity, politics, language, religion, folk and popular culture, and urban settlement. (CAN GEOG4)

Weather and Climate

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2206.00) Considers composition, structure, energy, moisture, and circulation processes in the atmosphere and their distribution over the earth’s surface.

1 Unit

Prerequisite: GEOG 101. Corequisite: GEOG 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (2206.00) Designed to accompany GEOG 101. Emphasizes map reading and the collection, presentation, and interpretation of physical geographic data.

102

110

161

Geographic Information Systems Software Applications

3 Units

Prerequisite: GEOG 160. Corequisite: GEOG 160 if prerequisite not met. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (2206.10) This course exposes students to a variety of functions of a Geographic Information System (GIS) using ArcView’s vector-based software. Students learn the basic principles and functions of the software as well as spatial analysis and problem solving.

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GEOGRAPHY

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2206.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Geography

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of GEOG 293, GEOG 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2206.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Geography

298

Directed Studies in Geography

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Geography

1-3 Units

MiraCosta geology and oceanography instructor Keith Meldahl recently completed a book about geology and history along the Oregon-California Emigrant Trail called “Hard Road West - History & Geology along the Gold Rush Trail� (University of Chicago Press). The book will be out in September 2007.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (2206.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access data bases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of GEOG 293, GEOG 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2206.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

134

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (2206.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)


GEOLOGY

Geology (GEOL) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Physical Science Don Robertson, donrobertson@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Keith Meldahl, Christopher Metzler, John Turbeville www.miracosta.edu/GEOL

Geology is the scientific study of the origin, history and structure of the earth. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in geology and to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include teaching; employment by private corporations including mining, hydrology, and engineering companies; government agencies such as the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Conservation, and regional planning offices. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Geology Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101 Physical Geology 3 Units Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1914.00) Physical geology introduces the processes at work changing the earth today. Within the context of global tectonics, it explores the origins of rocks and minerals and the dynamics of processes such as igneous activity, seismicity, and crustal deformation driven by the release of earth’s internal heat. It also examines how air, water and ice move in response to gravity and energy from the sun, sculpting earth’s surface by eroding, transporting and depositing weathered rock materials. (GEOL 101 + GEOL 101L = CAN GEOL2)

101L Physical Geology Laboratory

120

Environmental Geology: Earth Hazards and Humanity

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1914.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: GEOL 101. Corequisite: GEOL 101 if prerequisite not met. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Laboratory 3 hours. (1914.00) Designed to accompany Geology 101, this lab provides hands-on experience in identification of mineral samples, rock samples, and fossils. It develops skills of mapmaking, and interpretation of geologic features on maps introducing students to analysis of geologic data on computers and San Diego County geology on local field trips. (GEOL 101 + GEOL 101L = CAN GEOL2)

water, groundwater, fossil fuels, and ore deposits); and human effects on the earth environment (global warming, ozone depletion, hazardous waste disposal, landfills, river dams, and land subsidence).

298

Directed Studies

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1914.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1914.00) This course explores the interaction of humans with the geologic environment. Topics include earth processes that produce geologic hazards (flooding, earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, coastal hazards); formation, distribution, and exploitation of geologic resources (soils, surface

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GERMAN

German (GRMN) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

International Languages Francisco Alvarez, falvarez@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/GRMN

The International Language program provides students the foundation for language study. Students may prepare for a major in Spanish or Japanese and take courses to meet general education requirements in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese or Spanish. Career options include advertising, broadcasting, consulting, translating, counseling, education, film, foreign service, fund raising, human resources, journalism, international relations, law, management, ministry, politics, public relations, sales, social work, and various other related fields. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: German Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101

Elementary German (First Semester)

4 Units

202

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1103.00) Designed to develop basic ability in pronunciation, listening comprehension, reading, and writing in German. Essentials of German grammar. Introduction to study of German culture through selected readings, film, and class discussion. Corresponds to the first two years of high school German. (CAN GERM2) (GERM 101 + GERM 102 = CAN GERM SEQ A)

102

Elementary German (Second Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisite: GRMN 101 or two years of high school German. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1103.00) Continuation of GRMN 101. Provides a more detailed study of grammar, review and practice of German pronunciation, and reading of selected materials. Emphasizes conversational use of German and writing of short compositions. Includes vocabulary building and study of idioms. Corresponds to the third year of high school German. (CAN GERM4) (GERM 101 + GERM 102 = CAN GERM SEQ A)

201

Intermediate German (Third Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisite: GRMN 102 or three years of high school German. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1103.00) Provides a review and expansion of first-year grammar. Emphasizes development of communicative proficiency at the intermediate level. Includes extensive readings, such as poetry, excerpts from works of important writers (Goethe, Schiller, Kafka, Rilke, Nietzsche, and others), humor, biographical sketches, short stories, fables; readings on economy, arts, geography, government, the German educational system. (CAN GERM8)

136

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Intermediate German (Fourth Semester)

4 Units

Prerequisite: GRMN 201 or four years of high school German. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 4 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (1103.00) Provides a review and expansion of material previously undertaken in GRMN 201. Emphasizes practice of all language skills at the intermediate level. Involves original compositions and oral reports in German. Continues with study of selected topics in German culture and literature. German newspaper articles, short stories, poetry, and other materials are read.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1103.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in German

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1103.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.


GERONTOLOGY

Gerontology (GERO) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

Behavioral Science Karen Baum, kbaum@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/GERO

101 Introduction to Aging

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1309.00) Overview of the human aging process. Physiological, psychological, sociological aspects of aging and their effects on individuals and populations cohorts. Society’s responses to the needs of this group are considered.

The Library and Information Hub is one of the newest and largest buildings on the Oceanside Campus. With over 48,000 square feet, this building encompasses the library, open computer labs, the Math Learning Center (MLC), the Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC), the Writing Center (WC), and the Academic Information Services (AIS) Department.

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HEALTH EDUCATION

Health Education (HEAL) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Kinesiology, Health and Nutrition Sue Simpson, ssimpson@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Linda Shaffer www.miracosta.edu/HEAL

The Health Education Program offers courses for students planning to transfer in a variety of health-related fields as well as for students needing to fulfill general education requirements (Health 101 and 101L meet the requirement for MiraCosta’s terminal and vocational A.A. degrees). Career opportunities include teaching; health care administration; federal, state and local health care agencies such as County Health Department, Cal OSHA, Environmental Protection Agency; and health care and education in the private sector. Degree: A.A. University Studies: Health Care Management (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: Environmental and Occupational Health, Health Sciences, Health & Rehabilitation Sciences. Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Certificate of Achievement: Massage Therapy Technician

100

Nutrition Today

101

Principles of Health

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Therapeutic Massage I

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00) This foundation course for therapeutic massage includes theory, practical experience, methods, procedures, and contraindications of massage. Topics covered include anatomy, applicable medical terminology, proper body mechanics, draping, sanitation and physiological changes associated with massage. Students will review the rich international history of massage, including massage techniques from different countries around the world as well as career opportunities in the field. Each class meeting will include time to practice massage techniques utilizing the therapeutic principles of massage.

150

HIV/AIDS Peer Educator

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3.2 hours. (10 weeks) (0837.00) A course designed to train students to become HIV/AIDS peer educators. Students will learn how to present topics related to the AIDS issue such as pathophysiology of HIV, risk reduction skills, legal issues, etc.

1 Unit

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HEAL 101L, PHSE 101L, PHSE 150. Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in HEAL 101. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Activity 2 hours. (0835.00) This physical fitness course introduces current research

138

110

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in HEAL 101L or PHSE 101L. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00) This survey course on the principles of health and wellness aims to enhance the student’s self-awareness through exposure to the principles of wellness. Topics covered include exercise, weight maintenance, and nutrition; human sexuality, sexual responses, and sexually-transmitted diseases; drug use, misuse and abuse; cancers; and cardiovascular diseases.

101L Physical Fitness

on fitness and wellness and involves each student in physical measurement, cardiovascular endurance, weight control, and the development of strength and flexibility. Offered credit/no credit only. (May be repeated three times.) Not open to students with maximum credit in HEAL 101L/PHSE 101L.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0837.00) This course focuses on the fundamentals of nutrition. Individual well-being will be discussed through the study of nutrients and their effects on the micro-environment of the living cell, correlation of these principles with diet and eating habits, influences on food choices, food safety, and world health problems. Special attention will be given to nutrition throughout the life cycle, special dietary needs, and food budgeting. (CAN FCS2)

210

Therapeutic Massage II

3 Units

Prerequisite: HEAL 110. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00) This is the advanced course for therapeutic massage. It includes advanced massage theory, methods and procedures of advanced soft tissue techniques,


HEALTH EDUCATION

contraindications, and practical experience. Students will identify anatomy while assessing common pathology.

215

Massage Clinical Practicum

2 Units

Prerequisite: HEAL 210. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (1262.00) This course is the clinical practice for massage therapy. Students will focus on massage methods, business practices, massage marketing, ethics, and clinic procedures of massage experience.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0837.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Health

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HEAL 293, HEAL 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0837.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Health

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HEAL 293, HEAL 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0837.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in

the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

Directed Studies in Health

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0837.00) Individualized study, project or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

Health Certificate Certificate of Achievement Massage Therapy Technician This certificate is designed to meet the increasing demand for massage therapists and body workers. The required courses meet the local licensure requirements for Massage Therapy Technicians (100 hours). The program is based upon the medical model which requires comprehensive knowledge of medical terminology, anatomy, pathology, and physiology. It is designed to give students the necessary theoretical background and practical experience to work in the industry. Graduates of the program can expect employment in physician offices, spas, and the salon industry. Units HEAL 110 Therapeutic Massage I 3 HEAL 210 Therapeutic Massage II 3 HEAL 215 Massage Clinical Practicum 2 BIO   190 Survey of Human Musculoskeletal 1 System NURS   151 Body Systems Survey for Health 3 Professions Total Units    12

MiraCosta College’s Health Services hosts a free health and safety fair and blood drive each March on the Oceanside Campus. A blood drive is also hosted on the San Elijo Campus. The fair is designed to educate students and the community about healthy and safe lifestyles. Topics covered at the fair include birth control, HIV, STDs, smoking cessation, mental health counseling, tattooing safety, ocean safety and more. Nearly two dozen local volunteer organizations and businesses are also on hand to distribute information and to answer questions.

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HISTORY

History (HIST) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Social Science Louisa Moon, lmoon@miracosta.edu Building 3100, (760) 795-6871 Ric Matthews, rmatthews@miracosta.edu Arturo Arevalos, Bradley Byrom, Lisa M. Lane www.miracosta.edu/HIST

The study of history is the endeavor to understand the present by becoming knowledgeable about the past. History is the context of all human activity, and gives students the depth needed to understand society and their place in it. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in history or to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include business administration, law, teaching, social services, journalism, finance, law enforcement, public relations, advertising, and government service. Degree: A. A. in University Studies: History (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: International Studies; Latin American Studies; Chicano Studies.) Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

100

World History to 1500

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Traces the historical development of the world to 1500. This course emphasizes the interaction between the environment and people, the development of religious and philosophical systems, and the internal evolution and interaction within and among cultures. Students will experience a variety of learning techniques designed to promote greater cross-cultural understanding. (CAN HIST14) (HIST 100 + HIST 101 = CAN HIST SEQ C)

101

World History Since 1500

Western Civilization

140

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

105

3 Units

History of England

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Examines the cultural, social, political, economic, intellectual, and diplomatic history of England from earliest times to the present. Topics will include the creation of Britain, Viking and Roman influence, feudalism, commercialism, empire, world wars, Soviet relations, and contemporary developments.

107

East Asian Societies

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2201.00) An examination of the social and political foundations of East Asia through historical, religious, and literary documents. Not open to students with credit in ASIA 107/HIST 107.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) History of western civilization from earliest times to 1648 is covered, with emphasis on western culture and humanities. Social, economic, political, and artistic trends will be explored, as well as the history of gender, sexuality, and ideas during the ancient and medieval eras. (CAN HIST2)

Western Civilization

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) History of western civilization from 1648 to contemporary times, with emphasis on western culture and humanities. Social, economic, political, and artistic trends will be explored, as well as the history of gender, sexuality, fashion, and ideas during the early modern, modern, and contemporary eras. (CAN HIST4)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Traces the historical development of the world since 1500. This course emphasizes the relationship between technology and society, the development of rationalism and imperialism, and the movement toward independent nationhood and global interdependence. Students will explore cross-cultural trends through a variety of learning methods. (CAN HIST16) (HIST 100 + HIST 101 = CAN HIST SEQ C)

103

104

108

History of Africa

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) History of African civilizations from ancient times to the present. The development of religion, social institutions,


HISTORY

and trade networks will be emphasized, as well as the impact of colonialism, independence, and modern nation-building.

109

History of the Middle East

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) History of the Middle East from origins to contemporary times. This course covers the political, social, and economic development of early Mesopotamia, the Persian Empire, the development of monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), the Abbasid Caliphate, the Crusades, the Ottoman and Safavid empires, European imperialism, and modern Middle Eastern states.

110

United States History

whole focusing on the roles played by the diverse peoples and cultures who shaped their development. Major political, economic, social, and cultural factors and issues are presented with emphasis given to emerging international relations within the Western Hemisphere during the 19th and 20th centuries. Final focus will be on the American nations and globalization. Taken with HIST 116, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements.

141

United States History

3 Units

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) This course covers the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Taken with HIST 110, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements. (CAN HIST10)

116

History of the Americas

117

History of the Americas

142

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) The histories of the United States, Canada, and the nations of Latin America from the completion of the independence movements to the present are studied as an integrated

History of the Mexican-American in the United States

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) A history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the Chicano/a, Latino/a experience. This course explores the economic, social, cultural, and political developments and impacts on the diverse peoples of the United States emphasizing the Mexican American experience. Taken with HIST 141, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) This course covers the histories of Latin America, Canada, and the United States as an integrated whole. Emphasis is given to the Pre-Colombian setting, Native American heritage, the European conquest and legacy, distinctive colonial institutions, and the growth of independence movements. Major political, social, economic, and cultural factors will be presented focusing on the roles played by the diverse people and cultures who shared in the development of the nations of the Western Hemisphere. Included is the study of the United States Constitution compared to other constitutions of the Western Hemisphere. Taken with HIST 117, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) A study of United States history with emphasis on Chicano/a Latino/a perspective through the Mexican American War and the late 19th century, this course focuses on major political, social, economic, and cultural factors. It explores the roles played by the diverse peoples and cultures who shared in the development of United States history. The contributions of ancient Indians and civilizations and the influences of Spanish institutions and cultures will be emphasized. Taken with HIST 142, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements.

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) History of the United States from the early cultures to Reconstruction, this course emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. Taken with History 111, satisfies both the MCC and CSU American Institutions and History requirements. (CAN HIST8)

111

History of the Mexican-American in the United States

145

History of African-Americans in the United States

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Historical development of the role of African-Americans in United States history from colonial origins through Reconstruction, with emphasis on the black experience within political, social, economic, and cultural frameworks. Taken with HIST 146, satisfies both the American Institutions and History requirements.

146

History of African-Americans in the United States

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) This course examines the role of African-Americans in United States history from Reconstruction to the present within political, social, economic, and cultural frameworks. Taken with History 145, satisfies the American Institutions and History requirement.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

141


HISTORY

150

History of Mexico

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Historical development of the economic, political, and social institutions of Mexico from the time of the Spanish conquest to the present, emphasizing the heritage, traditions, and ideals of its people. Basic body of knowledge regarding the history of Mexico and some perspectives of its cultural heritage.

160

Early California History

Contemporary California History

California History

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60

142

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

296

1-3 Units

Topics in History

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HIST 293, HIST 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2205.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content will be determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

298

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) This course addresses the social, economic, political, and cultural history of California. It begins with an overview of the indigenous Native American population, and continues through the Spanish, Mexican and American eras. The topics covered in this class include studies of the mission era, the pastoral era, the gold rush, the railroad era, the development and modification of California’s constitution, and the rise of the modern industries such as aerospace and information technologies.

Topics in History

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HIST 293, HIST 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (2205.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) From 1900 to the present. Special attention devoted to the social, economic, and political problems resulting from California’s pivotal role in the United States. Students should refer to the American Institutions and History Requirement and Examination sections of the catalog.

165

293

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (2205.00) Social, political, economic and cultural development beginning with exploration and early settlement and continuing through the Spanish, Mexican and American ascendancies to 1900. Emphasis given to Native American, Spanish, and Mexican heritage; the Gold Rush; the rise of the Southland.

161

hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (2205.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

Directed Studies in History

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (2205.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in History

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (2205.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.


HORTICULTURE

Horticulture (HORT) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Horticulture, Architecture, & Applied Technologies Paul Clarke, pclarke@miracosta.edu Building 4600, (760) 795-6873 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Claire Ehrlinger www.miracosta.edu/HORT

Horticulture is the study of the art and science of cultivating plants. MiraCosta’s Horticulture Program also includes design, installation, and maintenance of landscapes; agri-business; floriculture; and wine technology. Students may take courses to prepare for a major in horticulture, to complete certificates to enter the job market, and to fulfill general education requirements. Career options include floriculture and nursery industries, landscape and irrigation design, landscape installation and management, sports turf management, horticulture sales and services, enology and viticulture (vineyards/winemaking). Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Horticulture (Depending on the transfer institution, students may also earn an A.A. in University Studies in these majors: Environmental Horticulture; Viticulture and Enology.); A.A. in Agri-Business Management; A.A. in Floriculture; A.A. in Landscape Architecture; A.A. in Landscape Management; A.A. in Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production. Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Agri-Business Management; Floriculture; Landscape Architecture; Landscape Management; Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production Certificates of Achievement: Arboriculture; Floral Design Assistant; Irrigation Technology; Landscape Assistant; Nursery Assistant; Wine Technology See certificate requirements following Horticulture course descriptions.

110

Basic Horticulture

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00) A basic course for horticulture majors and others desiring to learn basic horticulture science and related skills. Career opportunities in the California agricultural and landscape industries are emphasized. Field labs are required.

111

Introduction to Agri-Business Management

Fair Exhibit Construction

115

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 5 hours, laboratory 16 hours. (3 weeks) (0109.00) Students will learn to construct an actual landscape exhibit from a plan. They will incorporate design and construction

Soil Science

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0103.00) This course includes the study of soil physical, chemical, and biological properties. Soil conditions that restrict plant growth are examined. Students learn to solve soil problems that may exist in the field, greenhouse, and landscape. Problem-solving techniques that apply to Southern California soils are emphasized, including fertility, salinity, pH, high calcium, specific toxicities, and physical problems. Field labs are required. (CAN AG14)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0112.00) The course includes the business management practices relating to California plant industries. Retail and wholesale nurseries, landscape contracting, landscape management, floral and allied horticultural businesses are discussed. Course emphasis is upon sales, business management, employer-employee relations, laws, and labor management as related to these business operations. Opportunities for business ownership are also covered.

112

skills normally used in the landscape industry and create an exhibit to attract or promote a business, private or commercial.

3 Units

116

Plant Science

4 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0103.00) This course offers an opportunity to learn the basic principles of plant science pertaining to food and ornamental plants. Topics receiving emphasis are plant taxonomy and nomenclature, plant structure and morphology, controlling plant growth and development, and plant-soil-climate interrelationships. Learning activities include plant

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

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HORTICULTURE

studies in the field, greenhouse, and landscape. Field lab is required. (CAN AG8)

117

Plant Identification

Arboriculture

119

Specialized Tree Pruning and Surgery

Urban Forestry

121

Landscape Management

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Landscape Design

3 Units

Landscape Construction

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Students will learn the basic skills required by the landscape construction trades in building architectural components, such as planter boxes, benches, walks, patio decks, fences, retaining walls, and enrichment features. Skills in specification writing and cost estimating practice will also be learned.

129

Beginning Computer-Aided Landscape Design

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Introduction to the application of computer-aided drafting (CAD) for the landscape student/professional using software for the development of landscape design, irrigation design, perspective and elevation drawing, and cost estimating on personal computers.

130

Advanced Irrigation Design

3 Units

Prerequisite: HORT 126. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) This irrigation course includes design and management of sprinkler systems on a larger or more complex level than a residential setting. Athletic fields, golf courses, parks, and other such commercial or public settings will be covered. Emphasis on the principles and practices of hydrostatic problems and methods of large-scale irrigation design will be applied to these elaborate systems, as well as single drip system design.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) This course includes studies in landscape ecosystems with emphasis on turfgrass, trees, and border plantings. Students will learn landscape management practices, including soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, cultivation, variety selection, mowing, pruning and growth control, and pest management. Basic skills needed for successful maintenance of landscaped areas are practiced in laboratory sessions.

144

128

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (8 weeks) (0109.10) Integrated practice to the approach of management of street, parks, residential open spaces, or commercial/public open space vegetation. Inventory, budget, risk, and tree waste management practices will be introduced. Appraising and site evaluation techniques will be discussed, along with beneficial utilization of volunteer organizations.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Students enrolled in this course will learn the basic landscape design principles, elements, considerations, and enrichment factors with an emphasis upon residential landscaping. Students will assemble a site analysis, draw a plot plan, create design concepts, and render a landscape design including written specifications and a cost estimate.

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (8 weeks) (0199.00) This course covers the methods, problems, and techniques specific to ornamentals, fruit trees, and palm trees. Habits of growth coupled with correct pruning, cabling, and bracing applications are taught. Treatment and practices in crown thinning, topping alternatives, injury and cavity repairs will provide hands-on learning topics. (May be repeated two times.)

120

127

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0199.00) This course covers the care and management of ornamental trees. Practice in the cultural requirements of seedlings to mature trees including fertilization, irrigation, and integrated pest management. Pruning techniques, safety equipment and practices, climbing, repairs, bracing, cabling, and tree removal will be stressed. (May be repeated one time.)

Landscape Irrigation

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Students taking this course will learn how to perform a site analysis for a landscape irrigation design, how to engineer an irrigation system using manual and automatic components, how to design a sprinkler and drip irrigation system in landscaped areas, and how to properly install and maintain irrigation systems using state-of-the-art components and procedures.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00) This course covers the identification, growth habits, culture, and ornamental use of plants used in Southern California landscapes. Botanical and common names, plant family relationships, and environmental adaptations will be studied. Plants emphasized will come from the current California Association of Nurserymen & Garden Centers (CANGC), Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) Certification Tests Plant Lists, and those recommended by local growers and plant specialists. Required field labs may be on or off campus.

118

126

131

Computer-Aided Irrigation Design Prerequisites: None Advisory: HORT 126. Acceptable for Credit: CSU

3 Units


HORTICULTURE

Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Introduction to the application of computer-aided drafting (CAD) for the landscape irrigation student or professional using software specifically developed for irrigation design, graphics, and cost estimation.

132

Turf Management

Plant Pest Control

140

Subtropical Fruit and Plant Production

Wines of the World

144

Nursery Management and Production

148

149

3 Units

Introduction to Wine Production

1.5 Units

Vineyard Production and Management

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0104.00) The production and management decisions for wine and table grapes will be presented. Topics will include climate zones, soil selection, financing, farm organization, irrigation systems, field layout, varietal selection, nutritional needs, harvesting, labor management, marketing, and budgeting. Students will be required to prepare a budget and calendar of operations.

151

Plant Identification: Shrubs

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0109.00) Students will learn to identify 75 shrubs, foliage plants, and herbaceous plants used in Southern California landscapes by botanical name, common name, and plant family. Students will also learn how each plant discussed may be properly used in landscaping.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.30) This course will teach all aspects of nursery management including cutting/seed propagation methods and systems, soil, water, fertilization, pest management, advertising, pricing, business planning and financial statement analysis, employee selection and management, pruning and staking, and production scheduling. A number of field trips to local nurseries will be made.

Wines of California

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0104.00) This course will provide beginning winemakers with basic “how to” instructions and advanced technical training on aspects of winemaking. This course will also provide the student with information and techniques necessary to start a successful grape wine fermentation. The importance of specialized backgrounds needed to solve the wide variety of problems encountered in commercial wine production will be emphasized.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (0104.00) The world’s wines, including their history, regional origins, viticultural practices, and wine-making styles are introduced. Students will participate in sensory evaluations of representative wines of Europe, Australia, Asia, and the Americas. Students must pay a lab fee and be 21 years of age to enroll.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0104.00) This course is designed for students to increase their knowledge of the technical, historical, social, and marketing aspects of wines and winemaking. Students will have their palates exposed to approximately 100 different wines, learn the skill of wine tasting, and develop an appreciation of wine. Students must be 21 years old to enroll and pay a lab fee. (Formerly HORT 141 and HORT 142.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00) Principles and practices involved in the production of subtropical fruits and plants such as citrus and avocados. Includes discussions of propagation, site selection, planting, fertilization, irrigation, and pest control. Also emphasized are harvest techniques, marketing, and industry economic trends. Field trips to local orchards and groves.

143

147

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.00) This course involves a study of the common pests that invade ornamental plantings in Southern California landscapes, including weeds, invertebrate pests, and plant diseases. Students will learn to diagnose pest problems and design solutions to these problems based upon an integration of approved pest management techniques and practices.

Introduction to Enology

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (0104.00) Students will be presented with an overview of the history and development of winemaking, detailing the grape varieties produced in the major wine-producing regions. Factors affecting the wine quality from the varying processes and the importance of these wines produced form these regions will be covered. Students must be 21 years old to enroll and pay a lab fee. (May be repeated two times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.40) This course covers the identification, culture, and management of turf grasses used in parks, residences, and landscapes. Topics include soil preparation, planting, fertilizing, irrigation methods, thatch control, aeration, and insect and disease problems and their controls.

134

145

152

Plant Identification: Trees

1.5 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (8 weeks) (0109.00) Students will learn to identify 75 trees, vines, and groundcovers used in Southern California landscapes by botanical name, common name, and plant family. Students will

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HORTICULTURE

Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0109.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

also learn how each plant discussed may be properly used in landscaping.

170

Plant Identification: Floral Crops

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (0109.20) This course covers the floral crops utilized in the floral design and retail floristic industry. Students will learn to identify 85 cut flowers, cut foliage, potted flowers, and potted foliage plants by their botanical and common names. Students will also learn to identify quality crops and their common market defects.

171

Floral Design I

Floral Design II

173

Wedding Design

296

299

Landscape Architecture

2 Units

3 Units

Prerequisite: HORT 127. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.10) Students will learn techniques for organizing and synthesizing the various elements in the shaping of landscape form. The course will stress applications of ideas through construction of full-scale experimental projects. Topics covered include identification of major design determinants and the role of landscape architects and other professionals in dealing with diverse aspects of design.

292

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit.

146

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Topics in Horticulture

1-3 Units

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0109.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

Prerequisites: None Advisory: HORT 171. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.20) Several traditional and contemporary styles of wedding bouquets, corsages, and boutonniere construction will be covered. Students will learn church and reception floral designs. The skills, mechanics, and speed required in the floral industry will be practiced.

230

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HORT 293, HORT 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0109.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: HORT 171 or prior floral design experience. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.20) Students in this course will learn the theory and practice of special occasion, contemporary, and large event floral designing. Floral shop management, employee relationships, and customer service will be emphasized.

Topics in Horticulture

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HORT 293, HORT 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0109.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

2 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours. (0109.20) This course will introduce students to the practical skills and theory of basic floral design. Selecting flowers and foliages used in arrangements, instruction in basic design principles, cut flower preparation and care, merchandising and packaging will be taught preparing students for employment in the floral industry.

172

293

900

Computer-Assisted Instruction in Horticulture

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (0109.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.


HORTICULTURE

Horticulture Certificates

Certificate of Competence Floriculture

Certificate programs prepare students for state, county, and city employment in most areas of landscape management such as park administration, state or county agriculture inspecting, and grounds supervising. In the private sector, graduates find jobs in agri-sales and services, retail and wholesale nurseries, greenhouses, landscape design and contracting, landscape management, and irrigation. Any of these majors may be completed in three semesters and one or two summer sessions by students who attend full-time. If you have questions, please visit the Horticulture Unit at MiraCosta College or call (760) 757-2121, ext. 6482.

Certificate of Competence Agri-Business Management This Agri-Business Management certificate involves the application of business concepts to the horticulture and agriculture industries. Because of the wide selection of courses, a broad range of occupational choices is available to graduates. These include positions in banking; sales and marketing; federal, state, and county government; brokering; packing houses; and supermarket produce management. The core is designed to provide students with the basic functions of business and the application of principles and practice to the agri-business industry. A selection of courses allows students to tailor course work to their particular interests. Units HORT 111 Introduction to Agri-Business 3 Management HORT 144 Nursery Management and Production 3

The Floriculture certificate is designed for those students seeking new careers or upgrading existing skills in this area. The course work provides hands-on practice coupled with theory. Students will receive a foundation in the related fields of ornamental horticulture, business, and art while gaining experience and training in the specific skills necessary for excellence in the floriculture industry. Units HORT 111 Introduction to Agri-Business 3 Management HORT 116 Plant Science 4 HORT 144 Nursery Management and Production 3 HORT 170 Plant Identification: Floral Crops 3 HORT 171 Floral Design I 2 HORT 172 Floral Design II 2 HORT 173 Wedding Design 2 Select two courses from the following electives: 6-7 HORT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (3-4) —Occupational ART 101 Design and Color (3) BUS 130 Small Business Management (3) Total Units 25-26

Certificate of Competence Landscape Architecture

or Fundamentals of Computer (3) Information Systems

The Landscape Architecture certificate is designed to train individuals to have employable technical skills in the field of professional residential landscape design development, or for those students who plan to enter a college of landscape architecture. Units HORT 117 Plant Identification 3 HORT 126 Landscape Irrigation 3 HORT 127 Landscape Design 3 HORT 129 Beginning Computer-Aided 3 Landscape Design HORT 230 Landscape Architecture 3 ARCH 101 Architectural Drawing 3 ARCH 102 Architectural Design I 3

Select two courses from the following electives: 6-8 HORT 116 Plant Science (4) HORT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (2-4) —Occupational BUS 131 Management Principles (3) BUS 135 Personal Selling (3) BUS 136 Human Relations in Business (3) BUS 138 Advertising and Promotion (3) BUS 290 Business Communication (3) Total Units    24-27

Select one course from the following electives: 2-4 HORT 112 Fair Exhibit Construction (2) HORT 128 Landscape Construction (3) HORT 131 Computer-Aided Irrigation Design (3) HORT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (2-4) —Occupational ARCH 103 Architectural Communications (3) DRAF 101 Beginning Computer-Aided Drafting (4) using AUTOCAD Total Units 23-25

HORT 121 ACCT 101

or Landscape Management (3) Practical Accounting

4

ECON 102 BUS 132 BUS   140 CIS    100

or Principles of Economics: MICRO (3) Marketing Legal Environment of Business Computer Applications

3 3 3

CIS  

101

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HORTICULTURE

Certificate of Competence Landscape Management This certificate gives students who want laboratory classes with practical hands-on experience the opportunity to learn skills needed for employment in the California horticulture and landscape industries. Units HORT 115 Soil Science 3 HORT 116 Plant Science 4 HORT 117 Plant Identification 3 HORT 121 Landscape Management 3 HORT 126 Landscape Irrigation 3 HORT 127 Landscape Design 3 HORT 128 Landscape Construction 3 HORT 134 Plant Pest Control 3 SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish (First Semester) 4 SPAN 152

or Beginning Conversation (3)

Select one course from the following electives: 2-4 HORT 110 Basic Horticulture (3) HORT 111 Introduction to Agri-Business (3) Management HORT 118 Arboriculture (3) HORT 130 Advanced Irrigation Design (3) HORT 132 Turf Management (3) HORT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (2-4) —Occupational Total Units 30-33

Certificate of Competence Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production This certificate provides students with practical hands-on experience in laboratory classes in order to attain skills needed for employment in the areas of plant production, maintenance, or sales of ornamental and/or food crops in California. Units HORT 111 Introduction to Agri-Business 3 Management HORT 115 Soil Science 3 HORT 116 Plant Science 4 HORT 117 Plant Identification 3 HORT 134 Plant Pest Control 3 HORT 140 Subtropical Fruit and Plant Production 3 HORT 144 Nursery Management and Production 3 SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish (First Semester) 4 SPAN 152

or Beginning Conversation (3)

Select one course from the following electives: 2-3 HORT 112 Fair Exhibit Construction (2) HORT 143 Wines of the World (3) HORT 145 Introduction to Enology (3) HORT 147 Wines of California (3) HORT 149 Vineyard Management and (3) Production HORT 170 Plant Identification: Floral Crops (3) HORT 299 Cooperative Work Experience (3) —Occupational Total Units 27-29

MiraCosta’s newly constructed state-of-the-art Horticulture facility was opened for classes in spring 2007. Students are now enjoying the use of new technology in every classroom.

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HORTICULTURE

Certificate of Achievement Arboriculture

Certificate of Achievement Landscape Assistant

The Arboriculture certificate provides students with the opportunity to obtain the practical skills and scientific background necessary in this specific area of horticulture. Career opportunities for students are available in the tree care and maintenance of businesses, parks departments, school districts, and the Department of Forestry. Units HORT 118 Arboriculture 3 HORT 119 Specialized Tree Pruning and Surgery 1.5 HORT 120 Urban Forestry 1.5 HORT 121 Landscape Management 3 HORT 152 Plant Identification: Trees 1.5 Total Units 10.5

The Landscape Assistant certificate will prepare students for entry-level work as an assistant in all phases of landscape construction and maintenance. All courses in this certificate also apply to the Landscape Management Certificate of Competence. Units HORT 121 Landscape Management 3 HORT 126 Landscape Irrigation 3 HORT 128 Landscape Construction 3 HORT 132 Turf Management 3 Total Units 12

Certificate of Achievement Nursery Assistant

Certificate of Achievement Floral Design Assistant The Floral Design Assistant certificate will prepare students for entry-level flower arranging with a florist. The courses in this certificate also apply to the Floriculture Certificate of Competence. Units HORT 171 Floral Design I 2 HORT 172 Floral Design II 2 HORT 173 Wedding Design 2 Total Units 6

The Nursery Assistant certificate will prepare students for entrylevel work as an assistant in a commercial nursery (wholesale or retail). Courses in this certificate also apply to the Nursery Production and/or Landscape Management Certificates of Competence. Units HORT 116 Plant Science 4 HORT 117 Plant Identification 3 HORT 144 Nursery Management and Production 3 Total Units 10

Certificate of Achievement Irrigation Technology

Certificate of Achievement Wine Technology

This certificate is designed to teach the theory, design, and installation of irrigation including the materials, installation practices, maintenance, crew management, and operations of an irrigation business. Both residential and large scale irrigation system installation and management skills are emphasized. Units HORT 121 Landscape Management 3 HORT 126 Landscape Irrigation 3 HORT 130 Advanced Irrigation Design 3 HORT 131 Computer-Aided Irrigation Design 3 SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish (First Semester) 4

The Wine Technology certificate prepares students for entrylevel work in the wine sales and service area, i.e., wineries, restaurants, and wine shops. All of the courses in this certificate apply to the Nursery Production Certificate of Competence. Units HORT 143 Wines of the World 3 HORT 145 Introduction to Enology 3 HORT 147 Wines of California 3 HORT 148 Introduction to Wine Production 1.5 HORT 149 Vineyard Production and Management 3 Total Units 13.5

SPAN 152

or Beginning Conversation (3) Total Units

15-16

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HOSPITALITY

Hospitality (HOSP) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Business Tom Severance, tseverance@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Al Taccone, ataccone@miracosta.edu Karen Smith www.miracosta.edu/HOSP

The Hospitality Management Program offers courses for students planning to transfer as hospitality majors to four-year institutions as well as career and technical courses, often leading to certificates of competence and achievement. Career options include front office, reservations, sales, marketing, customer service and management positions in hotels, restaurants, theme parks, attractions, clubs, and casinos. Degrees: A.A. in University Studies: Hospitality; A.A. in Hospitality Management Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. MiraCosta has an articulation agreement with Les Roches, a highly-touted hospitality school with campuses in the alpine village of Bluche, Switzerland and the seaside city of Marbella, Spain. MiraCosta students in the hospitality program who follow the agreement can transfer to one of these campuses to complete a bachelor’s degree. Certificate of Competence: Hospitality Management Certificates of Achievement: Front Office Operations; Rooms Division Management See certificate requirements following Hospitality course descriptions.

100

Introduction to Hospitality and Food Service

Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) Introduction to the management of the human resource function in business and hospitality settings. Topics covered include: motivation and management; organizing people relations; job analysis; employee selection, appraisal, and training; theory and techniques of supervision; management by objectives; wage and salary administration; and union relations. Not open to students with credit in BUS117/HOSP 117.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) This course covers the history, scope, and functions of the hospitality, food service, and tourism industries. In addition, the course will focus on basic management theories and principles as they apply to the industry. An overview of career opportunities, responsibilities, professionalism, and career ethics will be emphasized.

114

Hospitality Law

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) Principles of law that apply to the hospitality industry including possible legal issues for hotel and restaurant operators will be covered, as well as rights and responsibilities of hospitality establishments. Reviews the increase in U.S. laws and regulations affecting the lodging industry and tactics for avoiding lawsuits. Case studies are utilized to examine protecting guests, loss of property, wages and hours, labor relations, worker’s compensation, franchising, and the Internet. This course allows the student to gain Hospitality Law certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

117

Human Resources Management Prerequisites: None

150

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

3 Units

133

Front Office Management

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) Provides training for entry-level positions in the lodging industry. The curriculum includes instruction in hotel/motel front office procedures and other duties performed in establishments that provide lodging, meals, convention facilities and other hospitality services to the general public or to an organization’s membership. This course reviews guest relations; registration and reservation systems; cash, credit, and audit procedures; safety and security. Students consider how front office activities affect other departments and focus on managing the front office. This course allows the student to gain Hospitality Front Office certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association.


HOSPITALITY

134

Facilities Management

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) Students will explore areas within the purview of housekeeping and engineering departments that pertain to the accommodations and services found in a hotel, motel, or resort property. Emphasis will be placed on examining the procedures to maintain the comfort of guests as a priority. Non-engineers will learn terminology unique to vendors, suppliers, and maintenance/engineering staff and techniques to reduce expenses and increase efficiency. New technology will be considered as a means of streamlining operational procedures. United Nations’ environmental guidelines will be examined and the implications of these guidelines will be discussed while striving to balance the needs of guests with concern for the environment. This course allows the student to gain Hospitality Facilities Management certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

234

Hospitality Marketing

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1307.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Hospitality

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HOSP 293, HOSP 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1307.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

Topics in Hospitality

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HOSP 293, HOSP 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1307.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (1307.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. A maximum of four units of occupational work experience may be earned each semester and a combined maximum of 16 units of occupational and general work experience may be earned during community college attendance and applied as electives toward graduation. Students may receive G.I. Bill benefits for work experience only if required for their specific program. (May be repeated three times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Lecture 3 hours. (1307.00) This course takes a practical perspective in introducing students to the marketing of hotels, restaurants, and clubs. Topics covered include market segmentation, marketing research, sales, advertising, public relations, promotions, packaging, pricing strategies, revenue maximization, and travel purchasing systems. Practical application of these topics will be explored. Students will obtain tips, checklists, industry forms, do’s and don’ts, and useful ideas from industry practitioners for tools to implement on the job. This course allows the student to gain Hospitality Marketing certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

292

296

900

Computer-Aided Instruction in Hospitality

1-2 Units

Prerequisites: None Laboratory 2 - 4 hours. (1307.00) Using software selected by discipline specialists and resident on a college network, students do assignments at workstations in the lab to develop skills, access databases, and increase knowledge in the field as designated by subject-matter experts. (May be repeated three times.) Offered credit/no credit only.

Hospitality Certificates Certificate of Competence Hospitality Management The Hospitality Management certificate is designed to provide students with the broad technical background required in today’s increasingly diverse hospitality industry. This program was developed with the cooperation of local hospitality executives and The Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel Association. The institute will award a certificate of completion to students as they complete these courses. Courses in this program complement the skills learned on the job and are valuable to either the person who is seeking a certificate/degree or for the individual who is already in the field and desires to increase his/her overall effectiveness in a particular area.

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HOSPITALITY

HOSP 100 Introduction to Hospitality and Food Service HOSP 114 Hospitality Law HOSP 117/BUS 117 Human Resources Management HOSP 133 Front Office Management HOSP 134 Facilities Management HOSP 234 Hospitality Marketing HOSP 292 Internship Studies

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 .5-3

REST 153 ACCT 101

or Cooperative Work Experience (1-4) —Occupational Restaurant Management 3 Practical Accounting 4

ACCT 201 BUS 137 CIS 100

or Financial Accounting (4) Customer Service Computer Applications Total Units

HOSP 299

3 3  31.5-35

Certificate of Achievement Rooms Division Management The Rooms Division Management certificate is designed to prepare students with the specific technical and supervisory job skills employers demand for entry-level management positions. All courses are taught using curriculum developed by the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association. The courses in this certificate also apply to the Hospitality Management Certificate of Competence. Units HOSP 100 Introduction to Hospitality and Food 3 Service HOSP 114 Hospitality Law 3 HOSP 117/BUS117 Human Resources Management 3 HOSP 133 Front Office Management 3 HOSP 134 Facilities Management 3 Total Units 15

Certificate of Achievement Front Office Operations The Front Office Operations certificate is designed to prepare students for entry-level work in the hospitality industry with a focus on front-office procedures. The courses in this certificate also apply to the Hospitality Management Certificate of Competence. Units HOSP 100 Introduction to Hospitality and 3 Food Service HOSP 133 Front Office Management 3 BUS 137 Customer Service 3 Total Units  9

During one of the many field trips taken by MiraCosta’s Hospitality classes, students toured Legoland and were able to learn about the park’s catering operations.

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HUMANITIES

Humanities (HUMN) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Web Site:

Letters Susan Herrmann, sherrmann@miracosta.edu Building 3600, (760) 795-6874 Glenn DeLange, gdelange@miracosta.edu www.miracosta.edu/HUMN

Humanities is an interdisciplinary major focusing on those areas of study that involve human thought and culture such as philosophy, literature, and the arts. Career options include teaching; positions in museums, theatres or arts centers; literature or arts reviewer; writing; public relations; and other communications-related fields. Degree: A.A. in University Studies: Humanities Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan.

101

Introduction to the Arts

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00) A general introduction to interdisciplinary humanities, this course explores at least six humanities subjects, such as literature, music, architecture, theater, dance, film, art, philosophy, photography, and/or landscape design. An entree to cultural literacy, this course studies how the humanities reveal and sustain both the framework of society and culture and some essential elements of our individual humanness, including creativity and a sense of the aesthetic.

201

202

Humanities of the Western World: Pre-History Through the Middle Ages

This course surveys major works, figures, styles, and events in the liberal and fine arts from the Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras. Students will study a wide range of examples of creative genius from such fields as art, literature, music, philosophy, history, film, theater, and architecture to better understand the past and engage themselves more intelligently in the humanities of today.

3 Units

3 Units

205

250

Humanities of the Western World: The Renaissance to the Twentieth Century

251 3 Units

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00) A survey and examination of the art and literature of western civilization from a feminist theoretical viewpoint, with an emphasis on the construction of gender and the framework of historiography throughout the centuries.

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00) This course surveys major works, figures, styles, and events in the liberal and fine arts from the Early Mediterranean, Hellenic, Hellenistic, Roman, and Medieval eras. Students will study a wide range of examples of creative genius from such fields as art, literature, music, philosophy, history, theater, and architecture to better understand the past and widen their cultural horizons.

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00)

Women in Western Art and Literature

American Studies

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00) This course is an interdisciplinary study of American culture. It explores materials from American philosophy, religion, folklore, music, art, architecture, history, and literature. Special attention is given to ideas that have shaped the American experience in the past and that continue to do so in the present. Survey - roughly 1588 to 1877.

American Studies

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (1504.00) This course is an interdisciplinary study of American

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HUMANITIES

culture. It explores materials from American philosophy, religion, folklore, music, art, architecture, history, and literature. Special attention is given to ideas and problems that have characterized the American experience in the past and that continue to do so in the present. Survey - roughly 1877 to 1989.

292

Internship Studies

Topics in Humanities

1-3 Units

Topics in Humanities

298

Directed Studies in Humanities

MiraCosta Kruglak Art Gallery Director and instructor Diane Adams is one of only 13 individuals recently inducted into the Oceanside High School Hall of Fame. Diane, a 1964 Oceanside High School and 1966 MiraCosta College graduate, was selected from thousands of alumni. One of Diane’s many accomplishments was helping to establish the Oceanside Days of Art. Her artwork has been included in such prestigious shows as the San Diego Watercolor Society International, San Diego Art Institute Annuals and Cannon Gallery’s Premier Exhibit. She has won awards in the Southern California Fine Arts Exposition, the COAL and SDAI annual exhibits, the SDWS shows and various other juried shows. She was also awarded the Rhino Art Award in 1998 for her contributions to the arts community.

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (1504.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration.

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HUMN 293, HUMN 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1504.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

154

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of HUMN 293, HUMN 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (1504.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (1504.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

296


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Interdisciplinary Studies (INTR) 109

Practicum in Learning and Development

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Credit limitation Lecture 3 hours, field studies 2 hours. (0801.00) A course for students in psychology, sociology, child development, and teacher preparation. This course includes three hours of lecture on a variety of topics involving the cognitive development of children and two hours of supervised laboratory work in a school setting with children at designated community field sites. Additional time will be devoted to reading research articles, answering critical thinking questions for class participation, writing and electronically submitting clinical field notes, participating in web board discussions with classmates and the instructor, and writing an APA format final paper.

112

Freshman Seminar

Internship Studies

293

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60

Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of INTR 293, INTR 296. Lecture1 - 3 hours. (4999.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Lecture 3 hours. (4930.14) A seminar course designed to introduce students to the rewards of higher education, historical and cultural changes, methods of critical thinking, and learning strategies. Analysis of emerging education issues and contemporary student needs will also be discussed. This course is especially recommended for university-bound students.

292

hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Credit limitation Independent study. (0801.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by the instructor and the department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

3 Units

296

Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of INTR 293, INTR 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC Approval pending Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (4999.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

“I have made a number of attempts at a college education. Parenting and family responsibilities prevented my attending a college. But, I knew that this time it was really going to happen! My long-term goal is to come back to MiraCosta College as an instructor.� - Joie Peringer, 2007 Medal of Honor recipient, accepted to California State University, San Marcos

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

155


INTERNET & MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Internet & Multimedia Technology (IMT) Department: Department Chair: Office: Dean: Full-Time Faculty: Web Site:

Computer & Information Science Martin Parks, mparks@miracosta.edu Building 4800, (760) 795-6841 Joseph Moreau, jmoreau@miracosta.edu Karl Cleveland, Jeff Uhlik www.miracosta.edu/IMT

The Internet and Multimedia Technology program provides a focused sequence of courses for students who wish to transfer to a four-year institution or gain employment in the fields of web and interactive design, graphic design, video production, or print media creation and delivery. Career options include web page design; web/multimedia development; web/multimedia programming; information architecture; graphics production; content development; interface design; video editing; and layout design. Specific positions include webmaster; production assistant; video production assistant, background artist, product modeling, product animator; and storyboard artist. Degrees: A.A. in Graphic Design; A.A. in Web Development and Design Students planning to transfer and/or earn a University Studies degree should meet with a MiraCosta counselor to identify required courses and develop an educational plan. Students interested in earning a non-transfer A.A. degree must complete one of the Certificates of Competence listed below and additional courses listed on page 23. Certificates of Competence: Graphic Design; Web Development and Design Certificates of Achievement: Arts and Technology; Multimedia Production; Print Publishing; Video and Animation; Visual Communication; Web Design See certificate requirements following the Internet and Multimedia course descriptions.

120

Interactive Media Production

125

Web Design 1: Fundamentals

Graphic Design 1: Principles Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU

156

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

140

3 Units

3-D Modeling and Animation

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.40) Designed to give a working knowledge and experience of the concepts and execution of 3D modeling, animation, and rendering. Skills acquired during this class include storyboard development and visualization; 3D environment design including lighting and camera angles, efficient modeling and texturing techniques, object and camera animation, and rendering considerations. Proper formats for delivery through various presentation platforms are also covered.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 102 or equivalent. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.30) This course introduces the fundamentals of building Web pages including XHTML programming, effective images/ backgrounds, interface design, and FTP protocols for uploading Web sites. It also teaches students the management of personal Web pages, browsers, and platforms as well as the basics of network protocols.

135

Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) Students are introduced to the visual concepts of successful graphic design. Concepts include principles of 2D design; work/image relationship; color use and psychology; grid structures; layout design; and typography. The course will develop and refine each student’s personal design sensibility by emphasizing both appropriate and creative media presentations.

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) This course covers the basic skills needed for the design and development of multimedia presentations and interactive programs. Skills acquired during this class include the basics of acquisition and digitizing video, images, and audio; an introduction to 3D modeling and animation; and a fundamental understanding of interactive program design and development. Proper formats for playback through various presentation platforms and the basics of network protocol are also covered.

145

Flash 1

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.40) Students approach Web site design using the latest techniques: vector, raster, and step animation technologies


INTERNET & MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) This course builds on the skills developed in IMT 125 and introduces the student to the more advanced tools and techniques for designing Web sites using current web design and development tools. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

as well as visual and audio feedback to provide a rich, interactive Internet user experience. Repurposing content from print, video, and hard media delivery platforms is also covered. Successful interface integration and appropriateness of animation are stressed. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

150

155

Graphic Design 3: Design and Layout

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 135. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) Refining the concepts introduced in IMT 135, the emphasis of this course is on the process of creating effective, efficient, and dynamic solutions to visual communication problems. Each stage of the design process is explored, with emphasis on developing a creative problem-solving approach and refining a personal design sense.

190

Graphic Design 2: Typography

210

3 Units

Motion Graphics

175

Video Production 1

180

Web Design 2: Tools and Techniques Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 125.

220

3 Units

3 Units

Dynamic Web Development

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 180. Acceptable for Credit: CSU pending Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.00) Develop basic skills for building database driven, dynamically generated Web applications using current database technologies. Students will develop their own databasedriven Web applications as a basis for creating e-commerce and e-learning commercial applications. Projects will be tested using a Web server on a multi-browser, multiplatform environments. (May be repeated one time.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) This course offers detailed coverage of the digital video production environment. The process of creating and editing digital video will be covered from concept and storyboards through shooting and recording, culminating in acquiring, editing, and mastering a digital program. Proper formats for delivery through various presentation platforms are also covered.

Advanced Media Production

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 145, IMT 170, or IMT 175. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) This course builds on the skills learned in previous IMT courses by applying the concepts to more complex media production environments. Students focus on the advanced concepts of media production within a handson, large-scale project production environment. A team atmosphere is utilized to develop and combine skills and media into complex relationships to create media productions with an emphasis on concept, project development, and content organization. Advanced production techniques are incorporated into a finished, professional-level presentation for delivery over different formats. (May be repeated two times.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: CIS 246/ART 247. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.40) This course provides instruction in the concepts and execution of animating graphics and special effects using industry standard software. Techniques for creating sophisticated motion and imagery by combining and animating numerous moving layers of graphics, text, photographs, and live video for multimedia, Web, broadcast, cable and video programs are covered. This course provides instruction through lecture, demonstration, exercises, and project execution. (May be repeated one time.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 145. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0707.10) This course expands upon the basic concepts covered in IMT 145. Emphasis is placed on ActionScript, user interface functionality, and efficient program development as they relate to creating exciting, compelling, interactive user experiences. Development issues for multi-platform playback are stressed. (May be repeated two times.)

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 135 Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.10) Typographic design, whether considered a functional or creative activity, is an essential component of all visual communication. By understanding the principles of typography, a graphic designer should have the ability to improve the meaning and impact of a message. The focus of this course is on typographic composition as it applies to improving the syntactic and semantic quality of information and communication.

170

Flash 2: ActionScript

230

Web Design 3: Site Design and Architecture

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: IMT 180. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.30) Students use current Web development software tools to design a complex, professional level Web site. Site architecture, content rationale, interface design, and the implementation of proper software integration are of primary focus. Successful site design with an enriching user experience within a team development environment is stressed. (May be repeated one time with different software.)

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

157


INTERNET & MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

270

Advanced Design Studio

3 Units

Prerequisite: By audition only at first class meeting with portfolio and instructor consent. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.00) This capstone course is a working studio where advanced students gain firsthand experience in the function of a professional studio environment creating real-world projects for real-world clients. Client relations, project development and management, problem solving, team management, asset management, and project delivery considerations are all part of the experiences of this course. This course is ideally repeated in a two-semester sequence where the first semester is spent as a production artist working under an established art director. The student advances in the second semester to the position of art director, where significant project and team responsibilities are assumed.

290

Portfolio Development

Internship Studies

.5-3 Units

Prerequisites: Complete 6 units at MCC prior to internship; permission of instructor and department chair required. Corequisite: Must currently be enrolled in 3 units and complete 60 hours of non-paid or 75 hours of paid work per unit of credit. Independent study. (0614.00) Individualized study linking classroom learning to the workplace. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 12 units.)

293

Topics in Internet and Multimedia Technology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of IMT 293, IMT 296. Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0614.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community. Non-transfer topics only.

296

Topics in Internet and Multimedia Technology

1-3 Units

Prerequisites: None Repeatability Rule: Allow four completions in any combination of IMT 293, IMT 296. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Lecture 1 - 3 hours. (0614.00) A study of relevant topics in the discipline not covered in the current selection of courses. Designed to meet special needs; content determined by participating faculty members in consultation with students and the community.

158

MiraCosta College 2007-2008 Catalog

Individualized Projects

.5-1 Units

Prerequisite: IMT 110 or IMT 120 or IMT 125 or IMT 135 or IMT 145 or IMT 190 or IMT 210 or IMT 220 or IMT 230. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 1.5 - 3 hours. (0614.00) This course provides students with experience in additional specific software applications. The student’s understanding will be enhanced through assisting instructors in delivering classroom instruction. Primary duties will involve working with students individually or in small groups to facilitate their learning experience. The course instructor must be contacted by prospective students prior to their enrolling. (May be repeated three times)

298

Directed Studies in Internet and Multimedia Technology

1-3 Units

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair. Acceptable for Credit: CSU Independent study 3 - 9 hours. (0614.00) Individualized study, project, or research in area of particular interest to the student and not included in the regular courses of the college. Approval form must be signed by instructor and department chair before registration. (May be taken for a total of 3 units.)

3 Units

Prerequisites: None Advisory: It is recommended that students complete most courses within an IMT certificate program before enrolling in IMT 290. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. (0614.00) Students develop a personal digital portfolio showcasing their multimedia and design skills and completed projects. The format for the portfolio may take any viable form and will be determined by individual student goals and current available technology. The portfolio will be used to market the student as a prospective employee of a digital media company, or as a self-promotion piece.

292

297

299

Cooperative Work Experience -- Occupational

1-4 Units

Prerequisites: None Corequisites: Students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-paid work per unit of credit. Work experience. (0614.00) For students whose work is directly related to their major. To participate in occupational cooperative work experience education, students must be employed in a position directly related to their declared major and undertake new or expanded responsibilities at their work site. Students must develop one learning objective for each unit of credit in which they enroll and they must complete 75 hours of paid work or 60 hours of non-pa